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Sample records for radiographic heart volume

  1. Radiographic heart-volume estimation in normal cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlberg, N.E.; Hansson, K.; Svensson, L.; Iwarsson, K.

    1989-01-01

    Heart volume mensuration was evaluated on conventional radiographs from eight normal cats in different body positions using computed tomography (CT). Heart volumes were calculated from orthogonal thoracic radiographs in ventral and dorsal recumbency and from radiographs exposed with a vertical X-ray beam in dorsal and lateral recumbency using the formula for an ellipsoid body. Heart volumes were also estimated with CT in ventral, dorsal, right lateral and left lateral recumbency. No differences between heart volumes from CT in ventral recumbency and those from CT in right and left lateral recumbency were seen. In dorsal recumbency, however, significantly lower heart volumes were obtained. Heart volumes from CT in ventral recumbency were similar to those from radiographs in ventral and dorsal recumbency and dorsal/left lateral recumbency. Close correlation was also demonstrated between heart volumes from radiographs in dorsal/ left lateral recumbency and body weights of the eight cats

  2. Cardiothoracic ratio on chest radiograph in pediatric heart disease: How does it correlate with heart volumes at magnetic resonance imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotenhuis, Heynric B. [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Zhou, Cheng; Isaac, Kathryn V. [The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Tomlinson, George [University of Toronto, Department of Medicine, Toronto General Hospital and Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    The cardiothoracic ratio by chest radiograph is widely used as a marker of cardiac size. The purpose of this study is to correlate cardiothoracic ratio and cardiac volumes as measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) in common structural and myopathic heart disease with increased cardiac size due to volume overload or hypertrophy. A retrospective single center study was performed in all patients between 2007 and 2013 with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), aortic regurgitation, isolated left-to-right shunt and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who underwent cardiovascular MR and chest radiograph within 6 months of each other. Cardiothoracic ratios by chest radiograph (frontal and lateral) were compared to cardiac volumes (indexed for body surface area) by cardiovascular MR. One hundred twenty-seven patients (mean age: 11.2 ± 5.5 years) were included in this study (76 with TOF, 23 with isolated left-to-right shunt, 16 with aortic regurgitation and 12 with HCM). Frontal cardiothoracic ratio of all groups correlated with indexed right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume (EDVI) (r = 0.40, P < 0.01) and indexed total heart volume (THVI) (r = 0.27, P < 0.01). In TOF patients, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with RVEDVI (r = 0.34, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 27.6%), indexed RV end-systolic volume (ESVI) (r = 0.44, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 33.3%) and THVI (r = 0.35, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 19.6%), although RV volumes and THVI showed widespread variation given the high coefficients of variation. In patients with aortic regurgitation, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with left ventricular (LV) EDVI (r = 0.50, P = 0.047), but not with THVI and aortic regurgitant fraction, and widespread variation for LV EDVI (coefficient of variation = 19.2%), LV ESVI (coefficient of variation = 32.5%) and THVI (coefficient of variation = 13.6%) was also observed. Frontal cardiothoracic ratio was not correlated with cardiac volumes

  3. Normal radiographic heart volume in the neonate. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlstroem, A.; Ringertz, H.G.; Sachsska Pediatric Hospital, Stockholm

    1985-01-01

    The diagnostic power of the heart volume and the cardiothoracic ratio in congenital heart disease in neonates has been compared. A consecutive series of 130 children with suspection of heart disease examined radiologically at between 48 h and 15 days of age were followed for 14+-10 months. Of these, 16 (12%) were diagnosed as having congenital heart disease. The number of false positive and negative diagnoses was less for heart volume than for cardiothoracic ratio using +2 SD as limit for pathology. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity was 84, 75, and 85% respectively for heart volume and 73, 57, and 75% for cardiothoracic ratio. Cases that were false positive with both methods were significantly more often examined between 48 and 72 hours of age indicating that the explanation might be a somewhat late closure of the ductus arteriosus. (orig.)

  4. Radiographic Evaluation of Valvular Heart Disease With Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempel, Jason K; Bolen, Michael A; Renapurkar, Rahul D; Azok, Joseph T; White, Charles S

    2016-09-01

    Valvular heart disease is a group of complex entities with varying etiologies and clinical presentations. There are a number of imaging tools available to supplement clinical evaluation of suspected valvular heart disease, with echocardiography being the most common and clinically established, and more recent emergence of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as additional supportive techniques. Yet even with these newer and more sophisticated modalities, chest radiography remains one of the earliest and most common diagnostic examinations performed during the triage of patients with suspected cardiac dysfunction. Recognizing the anatomic and pathologic features of cardiac radiography including the heart's adaptation to varying hemodynamic changes can provide clues to the radiologist regarding the underlying etiology. In this article, we will elucidate several principles relating to chamber modifications in response to pressure and volume overload as well as radiographic appearances associated with pulmonary fluid status and cardiac dysfunction. We will also present a pattern approach to optimize analysis of the chest radiograph for valvular heart disease, which will help guide the radiologist down a differential diagnostic pathway and create a more meaningful clinical report.

  5. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in radiation treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Freedman, Gary; Fowble, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume. Retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer is presented with respect to CLD. Methods and Materials: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 108 consecutive cases (52 left and 56 right breast) referred for CT simulation. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the measurement of the CLD and analysis. Results: Using CT data the mean volume and standard deviation of left and right lungs were 1307.7 ± 297.7 cm 3 and 1529.6 ± 298.5 cm 3 , respectively. The magnitude of irradiated volume in left and right lung is nearly equal for the same CLD that produces different percent irradiated volumes (PIV). The left and right PIV lungs are 8.3 ± 4.7% and 6.6 ± 3.7%, respectively. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with second- and third-degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomials. The regression lines for the left and right breasts are very different based on

  6. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in tangential field irradiation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Fowble, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume based on empirically derived functions which accuracy depends on the actual measured volume in treatment position. A simple and accurate linear relationship with CLD and retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart is presented with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 45 consecutive (22 left and 23 right breast) patients referred for CT simulation of the cone down treatment. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head uniformly to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the CLD and analysis. Results: Table 1 shows the volume statistics of patients in this study. There is a large variation in the lung and heart volumes among patients. Due to differences in the shape of right and left lungs the percent irradiated volume (PIV) are different. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with 2nd and 3rd degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomial. The regression lines for the left and right

  7. Radiographic determination of urinary bladder volume and residual urine volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klumair, J.

    1977-01-01

    In the course of a long study the author has tested most of the methods for determination of urinary bladder volume. A radiographic method which can state bladder volume exactly in cc's is attainable only with great time and effort. In the author's experience, however, it is possible, by means of a pattern in connection with a IVP, to estimate residual urine volume from a post-void picture of the bladder with sufficient accuracy for practical purposes. An account is given of the production of this pattern and of two relatively simple calculations for residual volume based on AP and lateral views of circular- and ellipsoid-shaped bladders. Also discussed is the radiation exposure which varies with the radiographic methods used. In male patients, the radiation exposure appears to be negligible, especially when the testicles are protected by a radiation shield. In female patients - which make up only a small fraction of all patients -, radiation exposure is higher but must be accepted. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Estimation of lung volumes from chest radiographs using shape information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.J.; Brown, D.J.; Holmes, M.; Cumming, G.; Denison, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The cross-sectional shapes of the chest and its contained structures were assessed in post-mortem anatomical sections and from computerised tomographic scans in living subjects. These shapes are described by simple equations that can be used to increase the accuracy of measuring lung volumes from chest radiographs. Radiographic estimates of total lung capacity, using the equations, were compared with plethysmographic and single-breath helium dilution measurements in 35 normal subjects. After correction for posture effects the radiographic estimates of TLC, which measure the displacement volume of the lung, exceeded the plethysmographic estimates of contained gas volume by a mean of 720 ml, which was taken as the volume of tissue, blood, and water in the lungs. The single-breath dilution estimates of TLC fell short of the plethysmographic values by a mean of 480 ml, taken as the volume of contained gas that was inaccessible to helium in 10 seconds. The tomographic studies suggested that the radiographic technique of measuring lung displacement volumes has an accuracy of +- 210 ml. The method is rapid and simple to use and the intra- and inter-observer variabilities of <1% and <5% respectively. (author)

  9. Chest radiographic findings and complications of the temporary implantation of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart while patients await orthotopic heart transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, L.; Fuhrman, C.; Hardesty, R.; Griffith, B.

    1987-01-01

    At the University of Pittsburgh, the authors have had 15 patients in whom Jarvik-7 hearts were implanted as a temporary measure while the patients awaited suitable donors for cardiac transplantation. The paper presents a brief description of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, factors affecting patient selection, and the radiographic appearance of a normally functioning Jarvik-7 heart, and reviews the chest radiographic complications seen in this patient group, along with eventual patient outcome

  10. "Porcelain heart" cardiomyopathy secondary to hyperparathyroidism: radiographic, echocardiographic, and cardiac CT appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Freeman, James

    2012-02-01

    We report the radiographic, echocardiographic and cardiac CT appearances of \\'porcelain heart\\' in an 85-year-old woman who presented with progressive heart failure. The extensive myocardial calcification was secondary to hyperparathyroidism with renal failure.

  11. "Porcelain heart" cardiomyopathy secondary to hyperparathyroidism: radiographic, echocardiographic, and cardiac CT appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Freeman, James

    2010-11-01

    We report the radiographic, echocardiographic and cardiac CT appearances of \\'porcelain heart\\' in an 85-year-old woman who presented with progressive heart failure. The extensive myocardial calcification was secondary to hyperparathyroidism with renal failure.

  12. Vertebral scale system to measure canine heart size in radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, J.W.; Bucheler, J.

    1995-01-01

    A method for measuring canine heart size in radiographs was developed on the basis that there is a good correlation between heart size and body length regardless of the conformation of the thorax. The lengths of the long and short axes of the heart of 100 clinically normal dogs were determined with calipers, and the dimensions were scaled against the length of vertebrae dorsal to the heart beginning with T4. The sum of the long and short axes of the heart expressed as vertebral heart size was 9.7 +/- 0.5 vertebrae. The differences between dogs with a wide or deep thorax, males and females, and right or left lateral recumbency were not significant. The caudal vena cava was 0.75 vertebrae +/- 0.13 in comparison to the length of the vertebra over the tracheal bifurcation

  13. Physical correlates of radiologic heart volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, D.

    1978-01-01

    Radiologic heart volume was calculated on a 10 per cent random sample of subjects examined in the London Civil Service Health Survey. Data were available for 1 188 men over the age of 40, and the importance of correcting radiologic heart volume for body size, age and heart rate was demonstrated. After these variables were taken into account, the most important association found was with blood pressure. Radiologic heart volume has potential value in cardiovascular screening programmes. (Auth.)

  14. Accuracy of chest radiographs in the emergency diagnosis of heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studler, Ueli; Kretzschmar, Martin; Steinbrich, Wolfgang [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Christ, Michael; Breidthardt, Tobias; Noveanu, Markus; Perruchoud, Andre P.; Mueller, Christian [University Hospital Basel, Department of Internal Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Schoetzau, Andreas [Institute of Biostatistics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of chest radiographic findings of heart failure (HF) in current patients presenting with dyspnea in the emergency department. In a secondary analysis of the BASEL study, initial chest radiographs of 277 patients with acute dyspnea were evaluated by two radiologists blinded to the adjudicated diagnosis (56% had the final diagnosis of HF). Predefined radiographic criteria of HF were used. Statistical analysis included receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and calculation of a logistic regression model including B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. The reader's overall impression showed the highest area under the ROC curve for the diagnosis of HF in both supine and erect patient positions (0.855 and 0.857). Among individual radiographic findings, peribronchial cuffing in the supine position (0.829) showed the highest accuracies. The lowest accuracy was found for the vascular pedicle width in the supine position (0.461). Logistic regression analysis showed no significant differences between the reader's overall impression, the radiographic model, and BNP testing. In our study, the combination of radiographic features provided valuable information and was of comparable accuracy as BNP-testing for the diagnosis of HF. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of congestive heart failure in chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, L.; Sundin, A.; Smedby, Oe.; Albrektsson, P.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of observer variations and film-screen quality on the diagnosis of congestive heart failure based on chest radiographs was studied in 27 patients. For each patient, two films were exposed, one with the Kodak Lanex Medium system and one with the Agfa MR 400 system. The films were presented to three observers who assessed the presence of congestive heart failure on a three-graded scale. The results showed no significant difference between the two systems but large systematic differences between the observers. There were also differences between the two ratings by the same observer that could not be explained by the film-screen factor. It is concluded that the choice between these two systems is of little importance in view of the interobserver and intraobserver variability that can exist within the same department. (orig.)

  16. Chest radiographic findings and complications of the temporary implantation of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart while awaiting orthotopic heart transplantation: Experience with five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, L.R.; Fuhrman, C.R.; Hardesty, R.A.; Griffith, B.P.

    1986-01-01

    The Jarvik-7 artificial heart was originally introduced as a therapeutic alternative to cardiac transplantation in patients with endstage refractory cardiac disease. Its use has been expanded to those patients awaiting cardiac transplantation in whom death is impending and for whom a suitable donor match is unavailable. At Presbyterian-University Hospital of Pittsburgh five patients have had Jarvik-7 hearts implanted as a temporary measure while awaiting compatible donors for cardiac transplantation. The authors believe this is the largest patient group to undergo this procedure at a single institution. They present a brief description of the Jarvik-7 heart, the clinical factors affecting patient selection, and the radiographic appearance of a normally functioning Jarvik-7 heart, and review the chest radiographic complications seen in the patient group, along with eventual patient outcome

  17. Navigator channel adaptation to reconstruct three dimensional heart volumes from two dimensional radiotherapy planning data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Angela; Nguyen, Thao-Nguyen; Moseley, Joanne L; Hodgson, David C; Sharpe, Michael B; Brock, Kristy K

    2012-01-01

    Biologically-based models that utilize 3D radiation dosimetry data to estimate the risk of late cardiac effects could have significant utility for planning radiotherapy in young patients. A major challenge arises from having only 2D treatment planning data for patients with long-term follow-up. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of an advanced deformable image registration (DIR) and navigator channels (NC) adaptation technique to reconstruct 3D heart volumes from 2D radiotherapy planning images for Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL) patients. Planning CT images were obtained for 50 HL patients who underwent mediastinal radiotherapy. Twelve image sets (6 male, 6 female) were used to construct a male and a female population heart model, which was registered to 23 HL 'Reference' patients' CT images using a DIR algorithm, MORFEUS. This generated a series of population-to-Reference patient specific 3D deformation maps. The technique was independently tested on 15 additional 'Test' patients by reconstructing their 3D heart volumes using 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR). The technique involved: 1) identifying a matching Reference patient for each Test patient using thorax measurements, 2) placement of six NCs on matching Reference and Test patients' DRRs to capture differences in significant heart curvatures, 3) adapting the population-to-Reference patient-specific deformation maps to generate population-to-Test patient-specific deformation maps using linear and bilinear interpolation methods, 4) applying population-to-Test patient specific deformation to the population model to reconstruct Test-patient specific 3D heart models. The percentage volume overlap between the NC-adapted reconstruction and actual Test patient's true heart volume was calculated using the Dice coefficient. The average Dice coefficient expressed as a percentage between the NC-adapted and actual Test model was 89.4 ± 2.8%. The modified NC adaptation

  18. Influence of cardiac cycle on the radiographic appearance of the feline heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toal, R.L.; Losonsky, J.M.; Coulter, D.B.; DeNovellis, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of cardiac-cycle phase on the radiographic appearance of the feline heart was investigated. Results show that the size and shape changes in the cardiac silhouette due to the cardiac cycle were present in all three postural positions investigated. Cardiac size and shape changes were present more frequently and in more locations of the cardiac silhouette when patients were in ventral recumbency (DV) versus dorsal recumbency (VD). In most cases, the magnitude of differences was small and detection was facilitated by comparison viewing. It is suggested that these size and shape influences of the cardiac cycle on cardiac appearance should be kept in mind when interpreting feline radiographs for cardiac pathology

  19. The accuracy of chest radiographs in the detection of congenital heart disease and in the diagnosis of specific congenital cardiac lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laya, Bernard F.; Goske, Marilyn J.; Morrison, Stuart; Reid, Janet R.; Swischuck, Leonard; Ey, Elizabeth H.; Murphy, Daniel J.; Lieber, Michael; Obuchowski, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients. Traditional teaching holds that specific types of CHD can be diagnosed on the chest radiograph (CXR) through pattern recognition. To determine the accuracy of radiologists in detecting CHD on the CXR. This study was a blinded retrospective review of chest radiographs from 281 patients (<12 years) by five pediatric radiologists from three institutions. Thirteen groups were evaluated that included 12 categories of CHD and a control group of patients without heart disease. Radiographs were assessed for heart size, heart and mediastinal shape and vascularity. Clinical information, angiography, echocardiograms and surgery were used as the gold standard for definitive diagnosis. The average accuracy of the five readers in distinguishing normal from CHD patients was 78% (range of 72% to 82%). The overall measure of accuracy in distinguishing specific congenital cardiac lesions among 13 groups of patients was 71% (range of 63% to 79%). CXR alone is not diagnostic of specific cardiac lesions, with a low accuracy of only 71%. We believe that less emphasis should be placed on the use of radiographs alone in diagnosing specific congenital cardiac lesions. (orig.)

  20. Radiocardiographic determination of the stroke volume and of the heart minute volume in athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattler, R; Stoll, W [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik

    1981-11-01

    Radiocardiography, a novel radioisotope method for the problemless determination of many cardiodynamic parameters which can be applied also at given physical exercise is presented. On the basis of stroke volume and heart minute volume values from 35 athletes practising different sports and of a comparison with normal values reported in the literature, differences in the cardiac adaptation and the function of athletic hearts and so-called normal hearts are pointed out. The stroke volume of endurance-trained athletes exceeds that of untrained individuals by 30-40 ml. Under exercise the increase of the stroke volume is considerably greater in endurance athletes than in individuals practising other sports or in untrained subjects. At rest the values of the heart minute volume are almost the same in athletes and untrained individuals. Under exercise the heart minute volume of endurance athletes (40 l/min) is nearly twice that of untrained individuals (volume reserve of the athlete).

  1. Radiocardiographic determination of the stroke volume and of the heart minute volume in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, R.; Stoll, W.

    1981-01-01

    Radiocardiography, a novel radioisotope method for the problemless determination of many cardiodynamic parameters which can be applied also at given physical exercise is presented. On the basis of stroke volume and heart minute volume values from 35 athletes practising different sports and of a comparison with normal values reported in the literature, differences in the cardiac adaptation and the function of athletic hearts and so-called normal hearts are pointed out. The stroke volume of endurance-trained athetes exceed that of untrained individuals by 30-40 ml. Under exercise the increase of the stroke volume is considerably greater in endurance athletes than in individuals practising other sports or in untrained subjects. At rest the values of the heart minute volume are almost the same in athletes and untrained individuals. Under exercise the heart minute volume of endurance athletes (40 l/min) is nearly twice that of untrained individuals (volume reserve of the athlete). (author)

  2. Cardiothoracic ratio and vertebral heart size (VHS to standardize the heart size of the tufted capuchin (Cebus apella Linnaeus, 1758 in computerized radiographic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermínio J. Rocha-Neto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The VHS and CTR were assessed using computerized thoracic radiographs of ten clinically healthy tufted capuchin monkeys (five males and five females from the Wild Animal Screening Center in São Luís (Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres de São Luís-MA-CETAS. Radiographs were taken in laterolateral and dorsoventral projections to calculate the cardiothoracic ratio (VHS and vertebral heart size (CTR. The VHS showed mean values of 9.34±0.32v (males and 9.16±0.34v (females and there was no statistical difference between males and females (p>0.05. The CTR showed mean values of 0.55±0.04 (males and 0.52±0.03 (females and there was no statistical difference between the sexes (p>0.05. There was positive correlation between VHS and CTR (r=0.78. The thoracic and heart diameters showed mean values of 5.70±0.48cm and 2.16±0.40cm in the males, respectively. In the females they measured 5.32±0.39cm and 2.94±0.32cm. There was no statistical difference between the sexes. Our results show that the high correlation found between VHS and CTR permitted the verification with similar clinical precision between the two methods to estimate alterations in the heart silhouette by radiographic examination of tufted capuchin, making it an easy technique to apply that can be considered in the investigation of heart problems for this wild species.

  3. The clinical importance of radiological determination of the heart volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaedicke, W.; Ong, T.S.; Barmeyer, J.

    1982-01-01

    The size of the heart is an autonomous, important parameter of its functional state, i.e. in the radiologic heart diagnostics, the measurement of the heart volume is of equal value as the shape analysis. A size determination which must be exact enough for course controls and differentiation from the normal picture makes sense only if the measurement is carriet out in 3 dimensions and not in only one as is done when determining the heart-lung-quotient. The heart volume measurement carried out in lying or sitting position is considerably more reliable than in standing position as too many extracardiac factors influence the heart volume when the patient is standing. The echo cardiogram is a nearly ideal supplement but no competitor of radiological heart volume measurement and can be of the same value as or superior to heart volume measurement for functional diagnostics only in diseases limited to nearly exclusively to the left ventricle as in coronary diseases. (orig.) [de

  4. Estimation of the 3D positioning of anatomic structures from radiographic projection and volume knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bifulco, P; Cesarelli, M; Roccasalva Firenze, M; Verso, E; Sansone, M; Bracale, M [University of Naples, Federico II, Electronic Engineering Department, Bioengineering Unit, Via Claudio, 21 - 80125 Naples (Italy)

    1999-12-31

    The aim of this study is to develop a method to estimate the 3D positioning of an anatomic structure using the knowledge of its volume (provided by CT or MRI) combined with a single radiographic projection. This method could be applied in stereotactic surgery or in the study of 3D body joints kinematics. The knowledge of the 3D anatomical structure, available from CT (or in future MRI) is used to estimate the orientation of the projection that better match the actual 2D available projection. For this purpose it was necessary to develop an algorithm to simulate the radiographic projections. The radiographic image formation process has been simulated utilizing the geometrical characteristics of a real radiographic device and the volumetric anatomical data of the patient, obtained by 3D diagnostic CT images. The position of the patient volume respect to the radiological device is estimated comparing the actual radiographic projection with those simulated, maximising a similarity index. To assess the estimation, the 3D positioning of a segmented vertebra has been used as a test volume. The assessment has been carried out only by means of simulation. Estimation errors have been statistically evaluated. Conditions of mispositioning and noise have been also considered. The results relative to the simulation show the feasibility of the method. From the analysis of the errors emerges that the searching procedure results robust respect to the addition of white Gaussian noise. (authors) 13 fers., 4 figs., 1 tabs.

  5. Estimation of the 3D positioning of anatomic structures from radiographic projection and volume knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bifulco, P.; Cesarelli, M.; Roccasalva Firenze, M.; Verso, E.; Sansone, M.; Bracale, M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a method to estimate the 3D positioning of an anatomic structure using the knowledge of its volume (provided by CT or MRI) combined with a single radiographic projection. This method could be applied in stereotactic surgery or in the study of 3D body joints kinematics. The knowledge of the 3D anatomical structure, available from CT (or in future MRI) is used to estimate the orientation of the projection that better match the actual 2D available projection. For this purpose it was necessary to develop an algorithm to simulate the radiographic projections. The radiographic image formation process has been simulated utilizing the geometrical characteristics of a real radiographic device and the volumetric anatomical data of the patient, obtained by 3D diagnostic CT images. The position of the patient volume respect to the radiological device is estimated comparing the actual radiographic projection with those simulated, maximising a similarity index. To assess the estimation, the 3D positioning of a segmented vertebra has been used as a test volume. The assessment has been carried out only by means of simulation. Estimation errors have been statistically evaluated. Conditions of mispositioning and noise have been also considered. The results relative to the simulation show the feasibility of the method. From the analysis of the errors emerges that the searching procedure results robust respect to the addition of white Gaussian noise. (authors)

  6. Heart Performance Determination by Visualization in Larval Fishes: Influence of Alternative Models for Heart Shape and Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prescilla Perrichon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding cardiac function in developing larval fishes is crucial for assessing their physiological condition and overall health. Cardiac output measurements in transparent fish larvae and other vertebrates have long been made by analyzing videos of the beating heart, and modeling this structure using a conventional simple prolate spheroid shape model. However, the larval fish heart changes shape during early development and subsequent maturation, but no consideration has been made of the effect of different heart geometries on cardiac output estimation. The present study assessed the validity of three different heart models (the “standard” prolate spheroid model as well as a cylinder and cone tip + cylinder model applied to digital images of complete cardiac cycles in larval mahi-mahi and red drum. The inherent error of each model was determined to allow for more precise calculation of stroke volume and cardiac output. The conventional prolate spheroid and cone tip + cylinder models yielded significantly different stroke volume values at 56 hpf in red drum and from 56 to 104 hpf in mahi. End-diastolic and stroke volumes modeled by just a simple cylinder shape were 30–50% higher compared to the conventional prolate spheroid. However, when these values of stroke volume multiplied by heart rate to calculate cardiac output, no significant differences between models emerged because of considerable variability in heart rate. Essentially, the conventional prolate spheroid shape model provides the simplest measurement with lowest variability of stroke volume and cardiac output. However, assessment of heart function—especially if stroke volume is the focus of the study—should consider larval heart shape, with different models being applied on a species-by-species and developmental stage-by-stage basis for best estimation of cardiac output.

  7. Radionuclide determined pulmonary blood volume in ischaemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, W.J.; Vojacek, J.; Connell, H.M. Dewhurst N.G.; Muir, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Most measurements of pulmonary blood volume have been based on the Stewart-Hamilton dye dilution principle and have required direct catheterisation of the cardiac chambers. Alternatively a precordial counter may be used to detect the composite right and left heart curves after an intravenous injection of radionuclide. We investigated the use of a gamma camera/computer system to determine the radionuclide (sup(99m)Tc) dilution curves from individual cardiac chambers. Pulmonary transit time and pulmonary blood volume were measured in nine normal subjects, eight patients with angina pectoris but without heart failure, and 13 patients with ischaemic heart disease and left ventricular failure. Patients with heart failure had significantly greater (p 0 angle. A reduction in pulmonary blood volume in the tilted position was observed in each subject (p < 0.005). This simple non-invasive measurement should allow more detailed assessment of physiological or pharmacological changes of the pulmonary vascular bed. (author)

  8. Comparison of extravascular lung water volume with radiographic findings in dogs with experimentally increased permeability pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, A.; Okumura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Hagio, M.; Fujinaga, T.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between extravascular lung water volume (ELWV) and chest radiographical findings was studied in general-anesthetized beagles. The dogs were experimentally injected with oleic acid to increase pulmonary vascular permeability. When the ELWV value in the dogs increased more than approximately 37% from the control value, their chest radiographs began to show signs of pulmonary edema. At this time, the chest X-ray density increased to 10% above the control level. PaO2 decreased, and PaCO2 increased after the administration of oleic acid. This clearly showed that the pulmonary gas exchange function was reduced following increasing ELWV. This comparison showed that probably the thermal-sodium double indicator dilution measurement of ELWV can detect slight hyperpermeability pulmonary edema that does not show on chest radiographs. The chest radiograph was therefore not suitable for the detection of slight pulmonary edema, because it did not show any changes in the early stages in hyperpermeability pulmonary edema

  9. Reduction of heart volume during neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haj Mohammad, Nadia; Kamphuis, Martijn; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M.; Bruin-Bon, H.A.C.M. Rianne de; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Bel, Arjan; Boekholdt, S. Mathijs; Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by surgery is considered curative intent treatment for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The aim was to establish hemodynamic aspects of changes in heart volume and to explore whether changes in heart volume resulted in clinically relevant changes in the dose distribution of radiotherapy. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in patients who were treated with nCRT consisting of carboplatin and paclitaxel concomitant with radiotherapy (41.4 Gy/1.8 Gy per fraction). Physical parameters, cardiac volume on CT and Cone beam CT, cardiac blood markers and cardiac ultrasound were obtained. Results: In 23 patients a significant decrease of 55.3 ml in heart volume was detected (95% CI 36.7–73.8 ml, p < 0.001). There was a decrease in both systolic (mean decrease 18 mmHg, 95% CI 11–26 mmHg, p < 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (mean decrease 8 mmHg, 95% CI 2–14 mmHg, p = 0.008) and an increase in heart rate with 6 beats/min (95% CI 1–11 beats/min, p = 0.021). Except for Troponin T, no change in other cardiac markers and echocardiography parameters were observed. The change in heart volume did not result in a clinically relevant change in radiation dose distribution. Conclusion: Heart volume was significantly reduced, but was not accompanied by overt cardiac dysfunction. All observed changes in hemodynamic parameters are consistent with volume depletion. Adaptation of the treatment plan during the course of radiotherapy is not advocated

  10. Radiographic findings in the chest of patients following cardiac transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, K.K.; Amendola, M.A.; Tisnado, J.; Cho, S.R.; Beachley, M.C.; Lower, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The postoperative chest radiographic findings in 38 patients undergoing orthotopic (37 patients) and heterotopic (1 patient) cardiac transplantation were evaluated. Findings were correlated with those of echocardiograms, sputum and blood cultures, and lung and heart biopsies. The radiographic manifestations in the chest of these patients are classified in the following three main categories: 1) newly formed cardiac silhouette findings due to the transplanted heart itself, i.e., changes in size and shape of the new heart and pericardial effusion resulting from the placement of a smaller heart in a larger pericardial sac. 2) infectious complications due to bacteria, fungal, and other opportunistic agents secondary to immunosuppressive therapy, and 3) usual postoperatice complications following thoracomoty and open-heart surgery. (orig.)

  11. Brain volumes predict neurodevelopment in adolescents after surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rhein, Michael; Buchmann, Andreas; Hagmann, Cornelia; Huber, Reto; Klaver, Peter; Knirsch, Walter; Latal, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Patients with complex congenital heart disease are at risk for neurodevelopmental impairments. Evidence suggests that brain maturation can be delayed and pre- and postoperative brain injury may occur, and there is limited information on the long-term effect of congenital heart disease on brain development and function in adolescent patients. At a mean age of 13.8 years, 39 adolescent survivors of childhood cardiopulmonary bypass surgery with no structural brain lesions evident through conventional cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and 32 healthy control subjects underwent extensive neurodevelopmental assessment and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebral scans were analysed quantitatively using surface-based and voxel-based morphometry. Compared with control subjects, patients had lower total brain (P = 0.003), white matter (P = 0.004) and cortical grey matter (P = 0.005) volumes, whereas cerebrospinal fluid volumes were not different. Regional brain volume reduction ranged from 5.3% (cortical grey matter) to 11% (corpus callosum). Adolescents with cyanotic heart disease showed more brain volume loss than those with acyanotic heart disease, particularly in the white matter, thalami, hippocampi and corpus callosum (all P-values Brain volume reduction correlated significantly with cognitive, motor and executive functions (grey matter: P < 0.05, white matter: P < 0.01). Our findings suggest that there are long-lasting cerebral changes in adolescent survivors of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease and that these changes are associated with functional outcome.

  12. Comparisons of radiographic and electrocardiographic abnormalities in canine heartworm disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvert, C.A.; Losonsky, J.M.; Brown, J.; Lewis, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Thoracic radiographs and electrocardiograms from 137 dogs with heartworm infection were independently evaluated and comparisons were made of (1) the presence or absence of right ventricular enlargement as assessed by these two diagnostic tests and (2) the presence or absence of right-sided congestive heart failure relative to the degree of right ventricular enlargement and ECG criteria of RVH. Radiographic evidence of severe, but not moderate, right ventricular enlargement was associated with right-sided congestive heart failure. Similarly the presence of three or more, but not fewer than three, ECG criteria of RVH were associated with right-sided congestive heart failure. If either the thoracic radiographs or the ECG indicated that severe right ventricular enlargement was absent, right-sided congestive heart failure was seldom present. The most accurate correlation of the radiographic evaluation of severe right ventricular enlargement was afforded by the presence of three or more ECG criteria of RVH. ECG criteria of RVH such as R/S v4 , + T v10 MEA x , and S 11 are highly specific tests; while S V2 is a highly sensitive but not highly specific test. The ECG is a good confirmation test of the presence of severe right ventricular enlargement and is a good exclusion test for the absence of right-sided congestive heart failure. (author)

  13. Significance of left ventricular volume measurement after heart transplantation using radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.; Boniaszczuk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning using Technetium 99m labeled red blood cells was used to measure left ventricular volumes in three heterotopic and one orthotopic heart transplant recipient(s). Simultaneously, an endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the degree of acute rejection was assessed by a histological scoring system. The scores were correlated to changes in ejection fraction and heart rate. Technetium 99m scanning data were pooled according to the endomyocardial biopsy score: no rejection; mild rejection; moderate rejection, and severe rejection. In each group, the median of the left ventricular volume parameters was calculated and correlated with the endomyocardial biopsy score, using a non-parametric one-way analysis of variance. A decrease in stroke volume correlated best with the endomyocardial biopsy score during acute rejection. A decrease in end-diastolic left ventricular volumes did not correlate as well. Changes in the end-systolic left ventricular volumes were not statistically significant, but using a simple correlation between end-systolic left ventricular volumes and endomyocardial biopsy the correlation reached significance. Changes in left ventricular volumes measured by Technetium 99m scanning may be useful to confirm the presence or absence of acute rejection in patients with heart grafts

  14. Quantification of pneumothorax volume on chest radiographs: comparison between the collins' and the axel's methods with three-dimensional CT as the standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Joung Taek; Kim, Kwang Ho; Suh, Chang Hae; Han, Heon

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. In a preliminary study, we evaluated the accuracy of 3-D (three-dimensional) CT for the estimation of pneumothorax volume and for providing the optimal postprocessing method for clinical study. In the clinical study, we determined which of the two methods, Collins' and Axel's, was more accurate for the estimation of pneumothorax volume, as seen on chest radiographs, using 3-D CT as the standard of reference. In the preliminary study, 3-D CT was applied to phantoms and to four patients with pneumothorax using two different postprocessing methods, manual contour delineation and thresholding. In the clinical study, 3-D CT was performed in 13 patients with pneumothorax. For the purpose of evaluating conventional radiographs, a localizer scan was used for comparing the accuracy of Collins' method with that of Axel's method, with 3-D CT as the standard of reference. The preliminary study revealed that 3-D CT estimated pneumothorax volume with great accuracy and that manual contour delineation and thresholding measured volume equally well. Because of the shorter postprocessing time required with thresholding than with manual contour delineation (5 min versus 30 min), the former was used during clinical study. The results of this indicated close correlation between the measurements obtained using Collins' method on chest radiographs and those obtained by 3-D CT(r=0.95, p 0.05). 3-D CT can estimate pneumothorax volume with great accuracy. Collins' method is superior to Axel's method for the quantification of pneumothorax volume as seen on chest radiographs

  15. Radiographic evaluation of caudal vena cava size in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmkuhl, L.B.; Bonagura, J.D.; Biller, D.S.; Hartman, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    Dilation of the caudal vena cava (CVC) on lateral thoracic radiographs is often interpreted as suggestive of right-sided congestive heart failure, To quantitate the clinical utility of evaluating CVC size as an indicator of right-sided heart disease, we compared the ratio of the diameter of the CVC as measured on a left lateral thoracic radiograph to the descending aorta (Ao), length of the thoracic vertebra above the tracheal bifurcation (VL), and width of the right fourth rib (R4) in 35 dogs with right heart disease and 35 control dogs, Each CVC ratio(CVC/Ao, CVC/VL, CVC/R4) was statistically larger in dogs with right heart disease, Response operating characteristic curves and likelihood ratios were used to determine ratios helpful in identifying dogs with right heart disease. A CVC/Ao > 1.50, CVC/VL > 1.30, or CVC/R4 > 3.50 are strongly suggestive of a right-sided heart abnormality in a patient

  16. Personalized models of bones based on radiographic photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthonnaud, E; Hilmi, R; Dimnet, J

    2009-07-01

    The radiographic photogrammetry is applied, for locating anatomical landmarks in space, from their two projected images. The goal of this paper is to define a personalized geometric model of bones, based uniquely on photogrammetric reconstructions. The personalized models of bones are obtained from two successive steps: their functional frameworks are first determined experimentally, then, the 3D bone representation results from modeling techniques. Each bone functional framework is issued from direct measurements upon two radiographic images. These images may be obtained using either perpendicular (spine and sacrum) or oblique incidences (pelvis and lower limb). Frameworks link together their functional axes and punctual landmarks. Each global bone volume is decomposed in several elementary components. Each volumic component is represented by simple geometric shapes. Volumic shapes are articulated to the patient's bone structure. The volumic personalization is obtained by best fitting the geometric model projections to their real images, using adjustable articulations. Examples are presented to illustrating the technique of personalization of bone volumes, directly issued from the treatment of only two radiographic images. The chosen techniques for treating data are then discussed. The 3D representation of bones completes, for clinical users, the information brought by radiographic images.

  17. Common pitfalls in radiographic interpretation of the Thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godshalk, C.P.

    1994-01-01

    Errors in radiographic interpretation of the thorax are common. Many mistakes result from interpreting normal anatomic variants as abnormalstructures, such as misdiagnosing dorsal and rightward deviation of the cranial thoracic trachea on lateral radiographs of normal dogs. Some of the more common errors specifically relate to misinterpretation of radiographs made on obese patients. The age of the patient also plays a role in misdiagnosis. Aging cats seem to have a horizontally positioned heart on lateral radiographs, and older dogs, primarily collies,often have pulmonary osteomas that are misdiagnosed as metastatic neoplastic disease or healed pulmonary fungal infections

  18. The impact of central lung distance, maximal heart distance, and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of the lung and heart for intact breast radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.-M.; Klein, Eric E.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Mansur, David B.; Taylor, Marie E.; Perez, Carlos A.; Myerson, Robert J.; Harms, William B.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of radiographic parameter and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of lung and heart for intact breast radiation. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with both two-dimensional (2D) and computed tomographic (CT) simulations were enrolled in the study. Central lung distance (CLD), maximal heart distance (MHD), and maximal heart length (MHL) were measured under virtual simulation. Four plans were compared for each patient. Plan A used a traditional 2D tangential setup. Plan B used clinical target volume (CTV) based three-dimensional (3D) planning. Both plans C and D used a combination of a medial breast field with shallow tangents. Plan D is a further modification of plan C. Results: Under the traditional tangential setup, the mean ipsilateral lung dose and volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated linearly with CLD (R = 0.85∼0.91). The mean ipsilateral lung dose (Gy) approximated 4 times the CLD value (cm), whereas the percentage volume (%) of ipsilateral lung at 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 10 times the CLD (cm). The mean heart dose and percentage volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated with MHD (R = 0.76∼0.80) and MHL (R 0.65∼0.75). The mean heart dose (Gy) approximated 3 times the MHD value (cm), and the percentage volume (%) of the heart at 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 6 times MHD (cm). Radiation technique impacted lung and heart dose. The 3D tangential plan (plan B) failed to reduce the volumetric dose of lung and heart from that of the 2D plan (plan A). The medial breast techniques (plans C and D) significantly decreased the volume of lung and heart receiving high doses (30 and 40 Gy). Plan D further decreased the 20 Gy volumes. By use of the medial breast technique, the lung and heart dose were not impacted by original CLD and MHD/MHL. Therefore, the improvement from the tangential technique was more remarkable for patients with CLD ≥ 3.0 cm (p<0.001). Conclusions: The CLD and MHD impact the volumetric dose of

  19. Increased ANF secretion after volume expansion is preserved in rats with heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, Young Wei; Barbee, R.W.; MacPhee, A.L.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1988-01-01

    To examine whether the failing heart has reached a maximal capacity to increase plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) concentration, the change in plasma immunoreactive ANF, measured by radioimmunoassay level due to acute blood volume expansion was determined in conscious rats with chronic heart failure. Varying degrees of myocardial infarction and thus heart failure were induced by coronary artery ligation 3 wk before study. Compared with controls, infarcted rats had decreases in mean arterial pressure cardiac index, renal blood flow, and peak left ventricle-developed pressure after aortic occlusion, and increases in central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, total peripheral resistance, plasma ANF level. Plasma ANF was correlated with infarct size, cardiac filling pressures, and left ventricle pressure-generating ability. At 5 min after 25% blood volume expansion, plasma ANF in rats with heart failure increased by 2,281 ± 345 pg/ml; the magnitude of the changes in circulating ANF and hemodynamic measurements was similar in controls. The results suggest that plasma ANF level can be used as a reliable index of the severity of heart failure, and that the capacity to increase plasma ANF concentration after acute volume expansion is preserved in rats with heart failure. There was no evidence of a relative deficiency of circulating ANF in this model of heart failure

  20. Radiographic findings of primary lung cancer with delayed detection on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Min; Kim, Jin Hwan; Jung, Bin Young; Jun, Kwang Jin; Jeong, Ki Ho; Kim, Ju Ok; Kim, Sun Young; Yang, Chang Kyu

    1999-01-01

    To analyze the causes of delayed detection of lung cancer on chest radiographs. We retrospectively reviewed 105 cases in which an initial diagnosis of lung cancer, based on an examination of plain radiographs, had been missed or misinterpreted. All occurred between October 1993 and April 1997. We reviewed the initial chest radiographs and compared the features noted with those seen on later chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) images. Undetected lung cancer was identified in 56 patients (56/105, 53.3%) It had been hidden by superimposed structures (41, 73.2%), overlapped by combined benign diseases (12, 21.4%), or the nodules were subtle (3, 5.4%). Of the 41 lung cancers hidden by a superimposed structure, the central type accounted for 29 (70.7%) and the peripheral type for 12 (29.3%). The 29 central type had been hidden by the left hilum (n=15), the right hilum (n=10), the heart (n=3), or a rib (n=1). The twelve peripheral type were hidden by a rib (n=7), the heart (n=2), the diaphragm (n=2), or the left hilum (n=1). Of the 12 lung cancers overlapped by combined benign diseases, pulmonary tuberculosis (n=6), pleural effusion (n=4), congestive heart failure (n=1), and diffuse interstitial lung disease (n=1) were present at the time of interpretation. The misinterpreted lung cancers were identified in 49 patients (49/105, 46.7%) and were seen to be combined with benign disease (16, 32.6%), or as obstructive pneumonia without a central mass (15, 30.6%), air-space consolidation (7, 14.3%), cavity (7, 14.3%), double lesion (2, 4.1%), or young age below 26 years (2,4.1%). Of the 16 lung cancers misinterpreted as combined disease, pulmonary tuberculosis (n=14) and pleural disease (n=2) had been initially diagnosed. Most commonly, lung cancer was missed or misinterpreted because it was hidden by a normal structure or combined with a benign disease. Perceptual errors can be reduced by appropriate techniques and the scrutiny of trouble spots such as the

  1. Small-volume amnioinfusion: a potential stimulus of intrapartum fetal heart rate accelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Joseph R; Flaherty, Nina; Pinette, Michael G; Blackstone, Jacquelyn; Cartin, Angelina

    2004-02-01

    We describe a recurrent nonreassuring fetal heart rate pattern in which small-volume amnioinfusions apparently evoked fetal heart rate accelerations suggested fetal well-being, allowing that progressive labor that culminated in the vaginal delivery of a healthy infant.

  2. The study of alteration in left ventricular volume and pressure to volume ratio during exercise in patients with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhonglin; Pei Zhuguo; Zang Bin

    1994-01-01

    The alterations induced by exercise in left ventricular end diastolic volume index (EDVI), end systolic volume index (ESVI) and systolic blood pressure to end systolic volume ratio (P/ESV) were studied in 15 normal subjects and 42 patients with coronary heart disease using a non-geometric count-based method and supine bicycle exercise test. Normal subjects had an increase in EDVI and a decrease in ESVI, but coronary heart disease patients had an increase in both EDVI and ESVI. The extent of increase induced by exercise in EDVI was greater in angina patients than that in normal and old myocardial infarction subjects. The P/ESV can be used to evaluate left ventricular systolic pressure-volume relationship. For the P/ESV exercise response, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for coronary heart disease were 95%, 93% and 95%, respectively

  3. Evaluation of obstructive airway lesions in complex congenital heart disease using composite volume-rendered images from multislice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Ki Seok; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Suk; Kim, Kun Il; Lee, Hyoung Doo; Ban, Ji Eun; Sung, Si Chan; Chang, Yun Hee

    2006-01-01

    Multislice CT (MSCT) allows high-quality volume-rendered (VR) and composite volume-rendered images. To investigate the clinical usefulness of composite VR images in the evaluation of the relationship between cardiovascular structures and the airway in children with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Four- or 16-slice MSCT scanning was performed consecutively in 77 children (mean age 6.4 months) with CHD and respiratory symptoms, a chest radiographic abnormality, or abnormal course of the pulmonary artery on ECHO. MSCT scanning was performed during breathing or after sedation. Contrast medium (2 ml/kg) was administered through a pedal venous route or arm vein in all patients. The VR technique was used to reconstruct the cardiovascular structures and airway, and then both VR images were composed using the commercial software (VoxelPlus 2 ; Daejeon, Korea). Stenoses were seen in the trachea in 1 patient and in the bronchi in 14 patients (19%). Other patients with complex CHD did not have significant airway stenoses. Composite VR images with MSCT can provide more exact airway images in relationship to the surrounding cardiovascular structures and thus help in optimizing management strategies in treating CHD. (orig.)

  4. The study of dose variation and change of heart volume using 4D-CT in left breast radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seon Mi; Cheon, Geum Seong; Heo, Gyeong Hun; Shin, Sung Pil; Kim, Kwang Seok; Kim, Chang Uk; Kim, Hoi Nam

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the results of changed heart volume and heart dose in the left breast cancer patients while considering the movements of respiration. During the months of March and May in 2012, we designated the 10 patients who had tangential irradiation with left breast cancer in the department of radiation Oncology. With acquired images of free breathing pattern through 3D and 4D CT, we had planed enough treatment filed for covered up the whole left breast. It compares the results of the exposed dose and the volume of heart by DVH (Dose Volume histogram). Although total dose was 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/28 fraction), reirradiated 9 Gy (1.8 Gy/5 Fraction) with PTV (Planning Target Volume) if necessary. It compares the results of heart volume and heart dose with the free breathing in 3D CT and 4D CT. It represents the maximum difference volume of heart is 40.5%. In addition, it indicated the difference volume of maximum and minimum, average are 8.8% and 27.9%, 37.4% in total absorbed dose of heart. In case of tangential irradiation (opposite beam) in left breast cancer patients, it is necessary to consider the changed heart volume by the respiration of patient and the heartbeat of patient

  5. White Matter Volume Predicts Language Development in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Caitlin K; Asaro, Lisa A; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Kussman, Barry D; Rivkin, Michael J; Bellinger, David C; Warfield, Simon K; Wypij, David; Newburger, Jane W; Soul, Janet S

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether brain volume is reduced at 1 year of age and whether these volumes are associated with neurodevelopment in biventricular congenital heart disease (CHD) repaired in infancy. Infants with biventricular CHD (n = 48) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurodevelopmental testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II and the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories at 1 year of age. A multitemplate based probabilistic segmentation algorithm was applied to volumetric MRI data. We compared volumes with those of 13 healthy control infants of comparable ages. In the group with CHD, we measured Spearman correlations between neurodevelopmental outcomes and the residuals from linear regression of the volumes on corrected chronological age at MRI and sex. Compared with controls, infants with CHD had reductions of 54 mL in total brain (P = .009), 40 mL in cerebral white matter (P Development-II scores but did correlate positively with MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory language development. Infants with biventricular CHD show total brain volume reductions at 1 year of age, driven by differences in cerebral white matter. White matter volume correlates with language development, but not broader developmental indices. These findings suggest that abnormalities in white matter development detected months after corrective heart surgery may contribute to language impairment. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00006183. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pulmonary edema: radiographic differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Dong Soo; Choi, Young Hi; Kim, Seung Cheol; An, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jee Young; Park, Hee Hong

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using chest radiography to differentiate between three different etiologies of pulmonary edema. Plain chest radiographs of 77 patients, who were clinically confirmed as having pulmonary edema, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into three groups : group 1 (cardiogenic edema : n = 35), group 2 (renal pulmonary edema : n = 16) and group 3 (permeability edema : n = 26). We analyzed the radiologic findings of air bronchogram, heart size, peribronchial cuffing, septal line, pleural effusion, vascular pedicle width, pulmonary blood flow distribution and distribution of pulmonary edema. In a search for radiologic findings which would help in the differentiation of these three etiologies, each finding was assessed. Cardiogenic and renal pulmonary edema showed overlapping radiologic findings, except for pulmonary blood flow distribution. In cardiogenic pulmonary edema (n=35), cardiomegaly (n=29), peribronchial cuffing (n=29), inverted pulmonary blood flow distribution (n=21) and basal distribution of edema (n=20) were common. In renal pulmonary edema (n=16), cardiomegaly (n=15), balanced blood flow distribution (n=12), and central (n=9) or basal distribution of edema (n=7) were common. Permeability edema (n=26) showed different findings. Air bronchogram (n=25), normal blood flow distribution (n=14) and peripheral distribution of edema (n=21) were frequent findings, while cardiomegaly (n=7), peribronchial cuffing (n=7) and septal line (n=5) were observed in only a few cases. On plain chest radiograph, permeability edema can be differentiated from cardiogenic or renal pulmonary edema. The radiographic findings which most reliably differentiated these two etiologies were air bronchogram, distribution of pulmonary edema, peribronchial cuffing and heart size. Only blood flow distribution was useful for radiographic differentiation of cardiogenic and renal edema

  7. Comparison of three contrast radiographic techniques in the dog large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, L.; Thibaut, J.; Olhaberry, E.; Born, R.; Deppe, R.

    1994-01-01

    In order to compare three radiographic techniques -pneumocolon, barium enema and double contrast- in the large intestine of the dog, three radiographic series in ventrodorsal and right lateral projections were taken. Six healthy adult dogs of both sexes with an approximate weight between 5 to 10 kg were used. Three enemas were administered 24, 12 and 2 hrs. before the series of radiographs were taken. Then dogs were anaesthetized with sodium tiopental (20 mg/kg iv) and the contrast media were introduced. Pneumocolon was carried out in the first series introducing air (20 cc/kg) in the large intestine through a Foley rectal catheter. Radiographs were taken in both projections, after 5 and 15min. respectively. Barium enema was performed in the second series introducing barium sulfate (18%) in the large intestine through a Foley rectal catheter (25 cc/kg); 5 and 15 min. later, the radiographs were taken. In the third series -double contrast- the barium sulfate, which was obtained from each dog using a catheter, was substituted by a volume of air equal to that obtained from the contrast medium. Later the radiographs were taken in both projections. The radiographic plates of each series were analized comparing the characteristics of: radiographic density, outline and volume. With the pneumocolon barium enema and double contrast, the radiographic density was, in most cases, low, high and inter-mediate respectively. The radiographic outline was, in most cases, regular for the three techniques. Thee radiographic volume was similar in all of the series. From the results obtained, it is concluded that double contrast best outlines the intestinal mucosa and more information can be obtained from it [es

  8. Thoracic and heart biometrics of non-anesthetized agouti (Dasyprocta primnolopha Wagler, 1831 measured on radiographic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaemilia das N. Diniz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The agouti is a species intensively hunted throughout the Amazon and the semi-arid regions of northeastern Brazil. Considering the current trend in conservation management of wild species, the aim of this study was to determine the morphometric reference to the heart of agouti raised in captivity, based on thoracic and cardiac measurements in these animals. Thirty adult agoutis, 1 to 3 years of age, without clinical signs of cardiac disease were selected. The animals were physically restrained and radiographies in laterolateral (LL and ventrodorsal (VD recumbence were produced. The following measures were taken: the apicobasilar length of the heart (at the most cranial height of the Carina region to the heart apex (AB, maximum width of the heart perpendicular to AB (CD, heart inclination angle (AIC, trachea inclination angle (AIT, distance from the right heart wall (DPTd, distance from the left heart wall (DPTe and vertical depth of the thorax, and the ventral face of the vertebral column to the dorsal border of the sternum at the level of the trachea bifurcation (H. The ratios between AB/CD, AB/H and CD/H were also analyzed. To calculate the vertebral heart scale (VHS, the AB and CD measurements were laid over the thoracic vertebra starting at T4. Radiographic evaluation showed values consistent with those reported in small animals and some wild and exotic species. The main biometric values in the chest cavity and heart of agouti are arranged as follows: (1 The ratios between AB/H ratio and CD/H were not sensitive for identifying heart increases (p>0.05, while the ratio AB/CD was more sensitive in this identification (p<0.05; (2 AIC: 21.2±6.4º (mean between male and famale; (3 AIT for males and females: 9.93±3.23° and 8.4±3.94°; (4 DPTd and DPTe for males: 0.97±0.40cm and 0.7±0.30cm; (5 DPTd and DPTe for females: 1.12±0.42cm and 01.02±0.43cm; (6 VHS for males and females: 7.75±0.48v e 7.61±0.34v; (7 The caudal vena cava (CVC was

  9. Effects of Physician Volume on Readmission and Mortality in Elderly Patients with Heart Failure: Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Eun; Park, Eun Cheol; Jang, Suk Yong; Lee, Sang Ah; Choy, Yoon Soo; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2018-03-01

    Readmission and mortality rates of patients with heart failure are good indicators of care quality. To determine whether hospital resources are associated with care quality for cardiac patients, we analyzed the effect of number of physicians and the combined effects of number of physicians and beds on 30-day readmission and 1-year mortality. We used national cohort sample data of the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) claims in 2002-2013. Subjects comprised 2345 inpatients (age: >65 years) admitted to acute-care hospitals for heart failure. A multivariate Cox regression was used. Of the 2345 patients hospitalized with heart failure, 812 inpatients (34.6%) were readmitted within 30 days and 190 (8.1%) had died within a year. Heart-failure patients treated at hospitals with low physician volumes had higher readmission and mortality rates than high physician volumes [30-day readmission: hazard ratio (HR)=1.291, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.020-1.633; 1-year mortality: HR=2.168, 95% CI=1.415-3.321]. Patients admitted to hospitals with low or middle bed and physician volume had higher 30-day readmission and 1-year mortality rates than those admitted to hospitals with high volume (30-day readmission: HR=2.812, 95% CI=1.561-5.066 for middle-volume beds & low-volume physicians, 1-year mortality: HR=8.638, 95% CI=2.072-36.02 for middle-volume beds & low-volume physicians). Physician volume is related to lower readmission and mortality for heart failure. Of interest, 30-day readmission and 1-year mortality were significantly associated with the combined effects of physician and institution bed volume. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2018

  10. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  11. Relationship between stroke volume, cardiac output and filling of the heart during tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, M.; Sorensen, H.; Dalsgaard, M.

    2009-01-01

    . With the supine resting position as a reference, we assessed stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and filling of the heart during graded tilt to evaluate whether SV and CO are maintained during an assumed maximal physiological filling of the heart elicited by 90 degrees HDT in healthy resting humans. METHODS...

  12. Pre-operative renal volume predicts peak creatinine after congenital heart surgery in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, J Bryan; Seckeler, Michael D; Ballengee, Cortney R; Conaway, Mark; Jayakumar, K Anitha; Charlton, Jennifer R

    2014-10-01

    Acute kidney injury is common in neonates following surgery for congenital heart disease. We conducted a retrospective analysis to determine whether neonates with smaller pre-operative renal volume were more likely to develop post-operative acute kidney injury. We conducted a retrospective review of 72 neonates who underwent congenital heart surgery for any lesion other than patent ductus arteriosus at our institution from January 2007 to December 2011. Renal volume was calculated by ultrasound using the prolate ellipsoid formula. The presence and severity of post-operative acute kidney injury was determined both by measuring the peak serum creatinine in the first 7 days post-operatively and by using the Acute Kidney Injury Network scoring system. Using a linear change point model, a threshold renal volume of 17 cm³ was identified. Below this threshold, there was an inverse linear relationship between renal volume and peak post-operative creatinine for all patients (p = 0.036) and the subgroup with a single morphologic right ventricle (p = 0.046). There was a non-significant trend towards more acute kidney injury using Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria in all neonates with renal volume ≤17 cm³ (p = 0.11) and in the subgroup with a single morphologic right ventricle (p = 0.17). Pre-operative renal volume ≤17 cm³ is associated with a higher peak post-operative creatinine and potentially greater risk for post-operative acute kidney injury for neonates undergoing congenital heart surgery. Neonates with a single right ventricle may be at higher risk.

  13. Factors affecting regional pulmonary blood flow in chronic ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistolesi, M.; Miniati, M.; Bonsignore, M.

    1988-01-01

    To assess the effect of left heart disease on pulmonary blood flow distribution, we measured mean pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures, cardiac output, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood volume, and arterial oxygen tension before and after treatment in 13 patients with longstanding ischemic heart failure and pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was evaluated by a radiographic score, and regional lung perfusion was quantified on a lung scan by the upper to lower third ratio (U:L ratio) of pulmonary blood flow per unit of lung volume. In all cases, redistribution of lung perfusion toward the apical regions was observed; this pattern was not affected by treatment. After treatment, pulmonary vascular pressures, resistance, and edema were reduced, while pulmonary blood volume did not change. At this time, pulmonary vascular resistance showed a positive correlation with the U:L ratio (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01), whereas no correlation was observed between U:L ratio and wedge pressure, pulmonary edema, or arterial oxygen tension. Hence, redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, in these patients, reflects chronic structural vascular changes prevailing in the dependent lung regions

  14. Radiological visualization of prosthetic heart valves in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmeister, H.M.; Pirschel, J.

    1986-01-01

    To determine the radiographic appearance of prosthetic heart valves 15 different models were investigated in situ. Fluoroscopy with detail radiographs and standard chest-radiographs were used for identification of the specific type of the prosthesis, for determination of details of the valve apparatus and for evaluation of the motion of the valve disc/ball. - Fluoroscopy and routine radiographs provided sufficient information to identify all prosthetic heart valves with exception of the Xenomedica bioprosthesis. If radiopaque material was used for the valve disc/ball, fluoroscopic assessment of the function of the valve was possible. Thus, in most types of disc or ball valves the opening/closing of the valve can be visualized, whereas in bioprosthesis a radiological determination of the mechanical function is not possible. (orig.) [de

  15. Radiographic findings in pulmonary hypertension from unresolved embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.W. III; Hoeck, B.E.; Chitwood, W.R. Jr.; Lyerly, H.K.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Chen, J.T.T.

    1985-04-01

    Pulmonary artery hypertension with chronic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon entity that is potentially treatable with pulmonary embolectomy. Although the classic radiographic features have been described, several recent investigators report a significant percentage of these patients with normal chest radiographs. In a series of 22 patients, no normal radiographs were seen. Findings included cardiomegaly (86.4%) with right-sided enlargement (68.4%), right descending pulmonary artery enlargement (54.5%), azygos vein enlargement (27.3%), mosaic oligemia (68.2%), chronic volume loss (27.3%), atelectasis and/or effusion (22.7%), and pleural thickening (13.6%). Good correlation with specific areas of diminished vascularity was seen on chest radiographs compared with pulmonary angiograms.

  16. Radiographic findings in pulmonary hypertension from unresolved embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.W. III; Hoeck, B.E.; Chitwood, W.R. Jr.; Lyerly, H.K.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Chen, J.T.T.

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary artery hypertension with chronic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon entity that is potentially treatable with pulmonary embolectomy. Although the classic radiographic features have been described, several recent investigators report a significant percentage of these patients with normal chest radiographs. In a series of 22 patients, no normal radiographs were seen. Findings included cardiomegaly (86.4%) with right-sided enlargement (68.4%), right descending pulmonary artery enlargement (54.5%), azygos vein enlargement (27.3%), mosaic oligemia (68.2%), chronic volume loss (27.3%), atelectasis and/or effusion (22.7%), and pleural thickening (13.6%). Good correlation with specific areas of diminished vascularity was seen on chest radiographs compared with pulmonary angiograms

  17. Validation of the plain chest radiograph for epidemiologic studies of airflow obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musk, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 125 industrial workers from rural New South Wales were examined for overinflated lungs, with and without attenuated midzonal vessels. Although the mean values of a comprehensive range of pulmonary function tests in the whole group were within normal limits, the nine subjects whose radiographs showed overinflated lungs and attenuated vessels had significantly impaired pulmonary function in comparison with 85 subjects with normal radiographs. The mean values for these nine subjects, expressed as a percentage of the mean value for subjects with normal radiographs, were: forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 75%; total lung capacity, 107%; residual volume, 143%; transpulmonary pressure at maximum inspiration, 60%; static deflation compliance, 158%; lung volume at transpulmonary pressure 10 cm H 2 O, 132%; transfer factor, 79%; and transfer factor/alveolar volume, 77%. Similar results were obtained by a second observer. Those subjects with overinflation but no vascular attenuation had significantly larger mean values for vital capacity and alveolar volume but no significant difference in total lung capacity or other tests of the mechanical properties of the lungs. Agreement on the presence of a positive sign between the two observers expressed as a percentage of those considered positive by either was 81% for overinflation and 62% for attenuated midzonal vessels. The results indicate that in groups of subjects with normal-average values of pulmonary function, the plain chest radiograph may provide information concerning pulmonary structure that is reflected in tests of function

  18. Radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs versus other dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jihye; Keh, Seoyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Junyoung; Yoon, Junghee

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnoses for canine liver disease are commonly based on radiographic estimates of liver size, however little has been published on breed variations. Aims of this study were to describe normal radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs and to compare normal measurements for this breed with other dog breeds and Pekingese dogs with liver disease. Liver measurements were compared for clinically normal Pekingese (n = 61), normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic (n = 45), normal nonbrachycephalic (n = 71), and Pekingese breed dogs with liver disease (n = 22). For each dog, body weight, liver length, T11 vertebral length, thoracic depth, and thoracic width were measured on right lateral and ventrodorsal abdominal radiographs. Liver volume was calculated using a formula and ratios of liver length/T11 vertebral length and liver volume/body weight ratio were determined. Normal Pekingese dogs had a significantly smaller liver volume/body weight ratio (16.73 ± 5.67, P dogs (19.54 ± 5.03) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (18.72 ± 6.52). The liver length/T11 vertebral length ratio in normal Pekingese (4.64 ± 0.65) was significantly smaller than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (5.16 ± 0.74) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (5.40 ± 0.74). Ratios of liver volume/body weight and liver length/T11 vertebral length in normal Pekingese were significantly different from Pekingese with liver diseases (P dogs have a smaller normal radiographic liver size than other breeds. We recommend using 4.64× the length of the T11 vertebra as a radiographic criterion for normal liver length in Pekingese dogs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  19. The Impact of Heart Irradiation on Dose-Volume Effects in the Rat Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luijk, Peter van; Faber, Hette; Meertens, Harm; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Kampinga, Harm H.; Coppes, Robert P. Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that heart irradiation increases the risk of a symptomatic radiation-induced loss of lung function (SRILF) and that this can be well-described as a modulation of the functional reserve of the lung. Methods and Materials: Rats were irradiated with 150-MeV protons. Dose-response curves were obtained for a significant increase in breathing frequency after irradiation of 100%, 75%, 50%, or 25% of the total lung volume, either including or excluding the heart from the irradiation field. A significant increase in the mean respiratory rate after 6-12 weeks compared with 0-4 weeks was defined as SRILF, based on biweekly measurements of the respiratory rate. The critical volume (CV) model was used to describe the risk of SRILF. Fits were done using a maximum likelihood method. Consistency between model and data was tested using a previously developed goodness-of-fit test. Results: The CV model could be fitted consistently to the data for lung irradiation only. However, this fitted model failed to predict the data that also included heart irradiation. Even refitting the model to all data resulted in a significant difference between model and data. These results imply that, although the CV model describes the risk of SRILF when the heart is spared, the model needs to be modified to account for the impact of dose to the heart on the risk of SRILF. Finally, a modified CV model is described that is consistent to all data. Conclusions: The detrimental effect of dose to the heart on the incidence of SRILF can be described by a dose dependent decrease in functional reserve of the lung

  20. Radiographic evaluation of caudal vena cava size as a useful parameter for the diagnosis of heart disease in dairy cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilintai; Hashiyama, S.; Gonda, Y.; Ishikawa, H.; Sato, M.; Miyahara, K.

    2006-01-01

    To quantify the radiographic parameters of the caudal vena cava (CVC) in healthy cattle and demonstrate their clinical usefulness, the present study compared the ratios of the diameter of the thoracic CVC to the diameter of the aorta (Ao) and length of the thoracic vertebrae (VL), which are all positioned in the same intercostal space, in 81 healthy control cattle (43 growing, 38 adult) and 10 cattle with heart disease. The average diameter of the CVC (CVCave) was correlated with the size of the Ao and VL in the control cows. Although the diameter and pulsation index of the CVC differed significantly between the growing and adult cows, the ratios of CVC/Ao and CVC/VL were fixed values for both the growing and mature cattle. However, in the cattle with heart disease, the pulsation index of the CVC was significantly lower or there was absence of pulsation due to a dilated CVC, and the ratio of CVCave/Ao and CVCave/VL were significantly higher than those in the healthy cattle

  1. Evaluation of single right atrial volume and function with magnetic resonance imaging in children with hypoplastic left heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijarnsorn, Chodchanok [University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Stollery Children' s Hospital, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Mahidol University, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Myers, Kimberley; Patton, David J. [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Calgary, AB (Canada); Noga, Michelle; Crawley, Cinzia; Tham, Edythe [University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Stollery Children' s Hospital, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Standardized methods to evaluate atrial properties in single ventricles are lacking. To determine the feasibility of quantifying right atrial volumes and function in hypoplastic left heart using MRI. We studied 15 infants with hypoplastic left heart prior to Glenn surgery (mean age 4.2 months [standard deviation 0.3]) who underwent cardiac MRI with evaluation of atrial volumes and emptying fraction using monoplane two-chamber, monoplane four-chamber, and biplane methods, all of which were compared to the atrial short-axial oblique stack method. We compared atrial end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and emptying fraction among these methods. We analyzed reproducibility of the methods using Bland-Altman plots. Both four-chamber and biplane methods showed high correlations for atrial end-diastolic volume (r = 0.7 and r = 0.8, respectively; P < 0.01) and end-systolic volume (r = 0.8 and r = 0.9, respectively; P < 0.01) with small mean differences (-0.2 ± 2.9 standard deviation [SD] ml and -0.8 ± 1.6 ml, respectively, for atrial end-diastolic volume and -0.8 ± 1.5 ml and -0.9 ± 0.9 ml, respectively, for atrial end-systolic volume). The short-axial oblique method was the most reproducible, followed by the four-chamber method. MRI assessment of atrial volume and function is feasible in hypoplastic left heart and might provide further insight into single-ventricle mechanics. (orig.)

  2. Epicardial adipose tissue volume estimation by postmortem computed tomography of eviscerated hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsø, Louise; Jakobsen, Lykke S; Jacobsen, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) may play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a method based on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) for the estimation of EAT volume. We PMCT-scanned the eviscerated hearts of 144 deceased individuals, wh...

  3. Normal left ventricular emptying in coronary artery disease at rest: analysis by radiographic and equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denenberg, B.S.; Makler, P.T.; Bove, A.A.; Spann, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    The volume ejected early in systole has been proposed as an indicator of abnormal left ventricular function that is present at rest in patients with coronary artery disease with a normal ejection fraction and normal wall motion. The volume ejected in systole was examined by calculating the percent change in ventricular volume using both computer-assisted analysis of biplane radiographic ventriculograms at 60 frames/s and equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculograms. Ventricular emptying was examined with radiographic ventriculography in 33 normal patients and 23 patients with coronary artery disease and normal ejection fraction. Eight normal subjects and six patients with coronary artery disease had both radiographic ventriculography and equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography. In all patients, there was excellent correlation between the radiographic and radionuclide ventricular emptying curves (r . 0.971). There were no difference in the ventricular emptying curves of normal subjects and patients with coronary artery disease whether volumes were measured by radiographic or equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography. It is concluded that the resting ventricular emptying curves are identical in normal subjects and patients with coronary artery disease who have a normal ejection fraction and normal wall motion

  4. Right heart ejection fraction, ventricular volumes, and left to right cardiac shunt measurements with a conventional Anger camera in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.A.; Go, R.T.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Moodie, D.S.; Houser, T.S.; Ceimo, J.; Underwood, D.; Yiannikas, J.

    1982-01-01

    The object of this investigation was to demonstrate that a conventional Anger camera can be used for measurement of right heart ejection fraction, ventricular volumes and left to right shunts in routine clinical determinations. The automatic selection of chamber and lung regions, the recirculation subtraction of recirculation, and the filtering of the right heart ejection fraction dilution curves are all done entirely without operator intervention. Thus, this entire evaluation has been incorporated into the routine procedures of patient care

  5. Left ventricular volume during supine exercise: importance of myocardial scar in patients with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, D.L.; Scharf, J.; Ahnve, S.; Gilpin, E.

    1987-01-01

    Existing studies suggest that exercise-induced ischemia produces an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume; however, all of these studies have included patients with previous myocardial infarction. To test whether the end-diastolic volume response to exercise is related to the extent of myocardial scar, the results of gated radionuclide supine exercise tests performed on 130 subjects were reviewed. The patient group comprised 130 subjects were reviewed. The patient group comprised 130 men aged 35 to 65 years (mean +/- SD 52 +/- 5) with documented coronary heart disease. The extent of myocardial ischemia and scar formation was assessed by stress electrocardiography and thallium-201 scintigraphy. Patients were classified into three groups on the basis of left ventricular end-diastolic volume response at peak exercise: group 1 (n = 72) had an increase of end-diastolic volume greater than 10%, group 2 (n = 41) had a change in end-diastolic volume less than 10% and group 3 (n = 17) had a decrease in end-diastolic volume greater than 10% (n = 17). At rest there was no significant difference among groups in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, end-diastolic (EDVrest) or end-systolic volumes or ejection fraction (p greater than 0.05); however, at peak exercise the end-systolic volume response was significantly greater for group 1 (p less than 0.002)

  6. Neuroendocrine and renal effects of intravascular volume expansion in compensated heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, A; Bie, P; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    2001-01-01

    To examine if the neuroendocrine link between volume sensing and renal function is preserved in compensated chronic heart failure [HF, ejection fraction 0.29 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- SE)] we tested the hypothesis that intravascular and central blood volume expansion by 3 h of water immersion (WI) elicits...... sustained angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy, n = 9) absolute and fractional sodium excretion increased (P Renal free water clearance increased during WI in control subjects but not in HF......, albeit plasma vasopressin concentrations were similar in the two groups. In conclusion, the neuroendocrine link between volume sensing and renal sodium excretion is preserved in compensated HF. The natriuresis of WI is, however, modulated by the prevailing ANG II and Aldo concentrations. In contrast...

  7. Radiographic visualization of magma dynamics in an erupting volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K M; Kusagaya, Taro; Shinohara, Hiroshi

    2014-03-10

    Radiographic imaging of magma dynamics in a volcanic conduit provides detailed information about ascent and descent of magma, the magma flow rate, the conduit diameter and inflation and deflation of magma due to volatile expansion and release. Here we report the first radiographic observation of the ascent and descent of magma along a conduit utilizing atmospheric (cosmic ray) muons (muography) with dynamic radiographic imaging. Time sequential radiographic images show that the top of the magma column ascends right beneath the crater floor through which the eruption column was observed. In addition to the visualization of this magma inflation, we report a sequence of images that show magma descending. We further propose that the monitoring of temporal variations in the gas volume fraction of magma as well as its position in a conduit can be used to support existing eruption prediction procedures.

  8. Optimization of phantom backscatter thickness and lateral scatter volume for radiographic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.P.; De Wagter, C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the optimal backscatter thickness and lateral phantom dimension beyond the irradiated volume for the dosimetric verification with radiographic film when applying large field sizes. Polystyrene and Virtual Water™ phantoms were used to study the influence of the phantom backscatter thickness. EDR2 and XV films were used in 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The results show 11.4% and 6.4% over-response of the XV2 film when compared to the ion chamber for 6 MV 30×30 and 10×10 cm 2 field sizes, respectively, when the phantom backscatter thickness is 5 cm. For the same setup, measurements with EDR2 films indicate 8.5% and 1.7% over-response. The XV2 film response in the polystyrene phantom is about 2.0% higher than in the Virtual Water™ phantom for the 6 MV beam and 20 cm backscatter thickness. Similar results were obtained for EDR2 film. In the lateral scatter study, film response was nearly constant within 5 cm of lateral thickness and it increases when lateral thickness increases due to more multiple scatter of low energy photons. The backscatter thickness of the phantom should be kept below 7 cm for the accuracy of the film dosimetry. The lateral extension of the phantom should not be more than 5 cm from the field boundary in case of large irradiated volumes.

  9. Evaluation of trabecular bone patterns on dental radiographic images: influence of cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouriq, Yves; Evenou, Pierre; Arlicot, Aurore; Normand, Nicolas; Layrolle, Pierre; Weiss, Pierre; Guédon, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    For some authors trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs. For other authors, the observed intrabony trabecular pattern is a representation of only the endosteal surface of cortical bone, not of intermedullary striae. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the true anatomical structures that are visible in routine dental radiographs and classically denoted trabecular bone. This is a major point for bone texture analysis on radiographs. Computed radiography (CR) images of dog mandible section in molar region were compared with simulations calculated from high-resolution micro-CT volumes. Calculated simulations were obtained using the Mojette Transform. By digitally editing the CT volume, the simulations were separated into trabecular and cortical components into a region of interest. Different images were compared and correlated, some bone micro-architecture parameters calculated. A high correlation was found between computed radiographs and calculated simulations from micro-CT. The Mojette transform was successful to obtain high quality images. Cortical bone did not contribute to change in a major way simulated images. These first results imply that intrabony trabecular pattern observed on radiographs can not only be a representation of the cortical bone endosteal surface and that trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs.

  10. The sharp edge: a frequent radiographic sign in neonatal pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestreich, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The sharp edge sign, an unusually sharply defined silhouette of the heart and/or hemidiaphragm on frontal radiographs of the supine neonate, has been valuable in the initial recognition of pneumothorax. In a prospective study of 50 neonatal pneumothoraces, a sharp edge sign was present on the initial pneumothorax film 49 times. In seven of these, only the hemidiaphragm showed a sharp edge, while the heart margin was superimposed on the vertebral column. Greater awareness of the sharp edge sign would promote earlier recognition of neonatal pneumothorax. 6 refs.; 3 figs

  11. Simple platelet markers: Mean platelet volume and congestive heart failure coexistent with periodontal disease. Pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniuk, Maciej R; Bartoszewicz, Zbigniew; Dudzik-Niewiadomska, Iwona; Pilecki, Tomasz; Górska, Renata; Filipiak, Krzysztof J

    2017-07-17

    Conducted pilot study concerning mean platelet volume parameter among patients suffering from congestive heart failure and periodontal disease. Examination of dynamic changes of platelet and periodontal markers in group of 50 patients before and an average of 6 months subsequent to professional periodontal treatment. Both platelet and periodontal parameters decreased after periodontal treatment, what is more, the decrease of mean platelet volume (MPV) value due to periodontal disease/mm improvement was shown to be statistically significant (p = 0.05). Improvement of periodontal status may influence decrease of MPV value andincrease of congestive heart failure treatment efficacy and effect patient comfort. It is a new, not frequently used pattern of chronic disease treatment optimalization.

  12. Volume of myocardium perfused by coronary artery branches as estimated from 3D micro-CT images of rat hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Patricia E.; Naessens, Lauren C.; Seaman, Catherine A.; Reyes, Denise A.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2000-04-01

    Average myocardial perfusion is remarkably consistent throughout the heart wall under resting conditions and the velocity of blood flow is fairly reproducible from artery to artery. Based on these observations, and the fact that flow through an artery is the product of arterial cross-sectional area and blood flow velocity, we would expect the volume of myocardium perfused to be proportional to the cross-sectional area of the coronary artery perfusing that volume of myocardium. This relationship has been confirmed by others in pigs, dogs and humans. To test the body size-dependence of this relationship we used the hearts from rats, 3 through 25 weeks of age. The coronary arteries were infused with radiopaque microfil polymer and the hearts scanned in a micro- CT scanner. Using these 3D images we measured the volume of myocardium and the arterial cross-sectional area of the artery that perfused that volume of myocardium. The average constant of proportionality was found to be 0.15 +/- 0.08 cm3/mm2. Our data showed no statistically different estimates of the constant of proportionality in the rat hearts of different ages nor between the left and right coronary arteries. This constant is smaller than that observed in large animals and humans, but this difference is consistent with the body mass-dependence on metabolic rate.

  13. In Vivo CT Direct Volume Rendering: A Three-Dimensional Anatomical Description of the Heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bruschetta, Daniele; Trimarchi, Fabio; Cacciola, Alberto; Cinquegrani, Maria; Duca, Antonio; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Alati, Emanuela; Gaeta, Michele; Milardi, Demetrio

    2016-01-01

    Since cardiac anatomy continues to play an important role in the practice of medicine and in the development of medical devices, the study of the heart in three dimensions is particularly useful to understand its real structure, function and proper location in the body. This study demonstrates a fine use of direct volume rendering, processing the data set images obtained by Computed Tomography (CT) of the heart of 5 subjects with age range between 18 and 42 years (2 male, 3 female), with no history of any overt cardiac disease. The cardiac structure in CT images was first extracted from the thorax by marking manually the regions of interest on the computer, and then it was stacked to create new volumetric data. The use of a specific algorithm allowed us to observe with a good perception of depth the heart and the skeleton of the thorax at the same time. Besides, in all examined subjects, it was possible to depict its structure and its position within the body and to study the integrity of papillary muscles, the fibrous tissue of cardiac valve and chordae tendineae and the course of coronary arteries. Our results demonstrated that one of the greatest advantages of algorithmic modifications of direct volume rendering parameters is that this method provides much necessary information in a single radiologic study. It implies a better accuracy in the study of the heart, being complementary to other diagnostic methods and facilitating the therapeutic plans

  14. Sex Dimorphism of the Heart Diameters and Cardiothoracic Ratios ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine gender associated differences in the cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) and heart diameters in a normal Nigerian population. Subject and Method: The normal heart diameters and cardiothoracic ratios were measured from posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs of healthy 510 male and 508 female ...

  15. Radiographic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The author describes how to: perform a systematic evaluation of a chest radiograph; state the classic radiographic description of hyaline membrane disease; list the conditions that cause hyperaeration and describe the radiologic feature of hyperaeration; describe the radiograph of a patient with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia; identify optimum placement of an endotracheal tube, gastric feeding tube, and umbilical artery catheter on a radiograph; differentiate between pulmonary interstitial air and hyaline membrane disease; select radiographic features that would indicate the presence of a tension pneumothorax; describe a lateral decubitus projection and state the type of problem it is most often used to identify; explain the procedure used in obtaining a lateral neck radiograph and list two problems that may require this view; and describe the radiograph of a patient with cystic fibrosis

  16. Eleven fetal echocardiographic planes using 4-dimensional ultrasound with spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC): a logical approach to fetal heart volume analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantarasaengaram, Surasak; Vairojanavong, Kittipong

    2010-09-15

    Theoretically, a cross-sectional image of any cardiac planes can be obtained from a STIC fetal heart volume dataset. We described a method to display 11 fetal echocardiographic planes from STIC volumes. Fetal heart volume datasets were acquired by transverse acquisition from 200 normal fetuses at 15 to 40 weeks of gestation. Analysis of the volume datasets using the described technique to display 11 echocardiographic planes in the multiplanar display mode were performed offline. Volume datasets from 18 fetuses were excluded due to poor image resolution. The mean visualization rates for all echocardiographic planes at 15-17, 18-22, 23-27, 28-32 and 33-40 weeks of gestation fetuses were 85.6% (range 45.2-96.8%, N = 31), 92.9% (range 64.0-100%, N = 64), 93.4% (range 51.4-100%, N = 37), 88.7%(range 54.5-100%, N = 33) and 81.8% (range 23.5-100%, N = 17) respectively. Overall, the applied technique can favorably display the pertinent echocardiographic planes. Description of the presented method provides a logical approach to explore the fetal heart volumes.

  17. Radiographic evaluation of the cardiac silluet using the VHS method (Vertebral Heart Size in young and adults coatis (Nasua nasua, Linneaus 1766 living in captivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andresa Cássia Martini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiographic examination of the toracic cavity is an usefull noninvasive method for assessment, monitoring the progress of heart disease, suggesting prognosis and guiding the treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cardiac silhouette of young and adults coatis and evaluate its relationship to the number of thoracic vertebrae (VHS, the method proposed by Buchanam and Buchele (1995 for small animals. We evaluated a group of 20 coatis, divided by age: I (GI and 8 animals aged between 4 and 5 months and group II (GII with 12 animals over 12 months old. Based in chest radiographs and VD laterolateral right projections for determining the major axis (L and short axis (Y being the sum of L and S is the value obtained by ESR, the relative depth/width (D / L chest were obtained and the results determined the type of conformation of the thorax, which results greater than 1.25 cm denote chest type deep, 0.75 to 1.25 cm chest intermediate and inferior results will 0.75cm wide chest. It was observed that the heart is alocated between the fourth and seventh pair of ribs, VHS average coatis healthy adults was 9.36 ± 0.75 and 8.06 ± 0 youth, 595 units thoracic vertebrae and the predominant conformation found was of intermediate type when compared to dogs. The mean values in this study serve as a basis for interpretation of the VHS type, however, a larger number may be required animals to determine the physiological limits of the cardiac silhouette in coati.

  18. Inspection of an artificial heart by the neutron radiography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliesi, R.; Geraldo, L.P.; Andrade, M.L.G.; Menezes, M.O.; Pereira, M.A.S.; Maizato, M.J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The neutron radiography technique was employed to inspect an artificial heart prototype which is being developed to provide blood circulation for patients expecting heart transplant surgery. The radiographs have been obtained by the direct method with a gadolinium converter screen along with the double coated Kodak-AA emulsion film. The artificial heart consists of a flexible plastic membrane located inside a welded metallic cavity, which is employed for blood pumping purposes. The main objective of the present inspection was to identify possible damages in this plastic membrane, produced during the welding process of the metallic cavity. The obtained radiographs were digitized as well as analysed in a PC and the improved images clearly identify several damages in the plastic membrane, suggesting changes in the welding process

  19. Inspection of an artificial heart by the neutron radiography technique

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliesi, R; Andrade, M L G; Menezes, M O; Pereira, M A S; Maizato, M J S

    1999-01-01

    The neutron radiography technique was employed to inspect an artificial heart prototype which is being developed to provide blood circulation for patients expecting heart transplant surgery. The radiographs have been obtained by the direct method with a gadolinium converter screen along with the double coated Kodak-AA emulsion film. The artificial heart consists of a flexible plastic membrane located inside a welded metallic cavity, which is employed for blood pumping purposes. The main objective of the present inspection was to identify possible damages in this plastic membrane, produced during the welding process of the metallic cavity. The obtained radiographs were digitized as well as analysed in a PC and the improved images clearly identify several damages in the plastic membrane, suggesting changes in the welding process.

  20. Vertebral scale system to measure heart size in thoracic radiographs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In veterinary diagnostic radiology, determination of heart size is necessary in the assessment of patients with clinical signs of cardiac anomaly. In this study, heart sizes were compared with lengths of mid-thoracic vertebrae in 12 clinically normal West African Dwarf Goats (WADGs) (8 females, 4 males). The aim of the ...

  1. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book includes a chapter on chest radiographs. A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. The chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph.

  2. Radiographic features of pleural effusions in pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bynum, L.J.; Wilson, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 155 patients with pulmonary embolism was undertaken to describe the radiographic characteristics of associated pleural effusions and related abnormalities. Approximately one half of these patients had pleural effusions. Patients with other potential causes of effusion, such as heart failure, pneumonia, or cancer, were eliminated from further analysis. In the remaining 62 patients, radiographic evidence of pulmonary infarction accompanied pleural effusions in one half of the cases. One third of patients with parenchymal consolidation had no evidence of effusion. Atelectasis and other nonspecific radiographic abnormalities occurred in less than one fifth of the cases. Typically, pleural effusions were small and unilateral, appeared soon after symptoms of thromboembolism began, and tended to reach their maximal size very early in the course of the disorder. Pulmonary infarction was associated with larger effusions that cleared more slowly and were more often bloody in appearance on thoracentesis. Chest pain occurred in all but one patient and was a valuable diagnostic clue. Pain and pleural effusions were always ipsilateral and almost always unilateral, but neither correlated well with the presence or time course of infarction. Effusions that were delayed in onset or that enlarged late in the course were associated with recurrent pulmonary embolism or superinfection. These radiographic features may be helpful in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary embolism

  3. Limitations and pitfalls in measurements of right ventricular stroke volume in an animal model of right heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vildbrad, Mads Dam; Andersen, Asger; Andersen, Thomas Krarup; Axelgaard, Sofie; Holmboe, Sarah; Andersen, Stine; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Right heart failure occurs in various heart and pulmonary vascular diseases and may be fatal. We aimed to identify limitations in non-invasive measurements of right ventricular stroke volume in an animal model of right ventricular failure. Data from previous studies randomising rats to pulmonary trunk banding (PTB, n = 33) causing pressure-overload right ventricular failure or sham operation (n = 16) was evaluated retrospectively. We measured right ventricular stroke volume by high frequency echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We found correlation between right ventricular stroke volume measured by echocardiography and MRI in the sham animals (r = 0.677, p = 0.004) but not in the PTB group. Echocardiography overestimated the stroke volume compared to MRI in both groups. Intra- and inter-observer variation did not explain the difference. Technical, physiological and anatomical issues in the pulmonary artery might explain why echocardiography over-estimates stroke volume. Flow acceleration close to the pulmonary artery banding can cause uncertainties in the PTB model and might explain the lack of correlation. In conclusion, we found a correlation in right ventricular stroke volume measured by echocardiography versus MRI in the sham group but not the PTB group. Echocardiography overestimated right ventricular stroke volume compared to MRI. (paper)

  4. Decreased right heart blood volume determined by magnetic resonance imaging: evidence of central underfilling in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Søndergaard, L; Møgelvang, J

    1995-01-01

    mL, NS), and left atrial volume (70 vs. 57 mL, P = .08) were normal or slightly increased. The right ejection fraction (68% vs. 53%, P fraction was slightly reduced (61% vs. 69%, NS). The central and arterial blood volume (CBV), assessed......Whether the central blood volume is reduced or expanded in cirrhosis is still under debate. Accordingly, the current study was undertaken to assess the volume of the heart cavities. Ten cirrhotic patients and matched controls had their right and left ventricular end-diastolic volumes (RVDV and LVDV...... as the cardiac output (CO) multiplied by the central circulation time, was significantly decreased (1.47 vs. 1.81 L, P blood volume (4.43 vs. 3.64 L, P

  5. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. This chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph

  6. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buskov, L; Abild, A; Christensen, A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital....

  7. Quality of radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    This chapter discussed on how to get a good radiograph. There are several factors that can make good radiograph such as density of radiograph, the contrast of radiograph, definition of radiograph, the present of artifact and backscattering. All of this factor will discuss detailed on each unit of chapter with some figure, picture to make the reader understand more when read this book. And at the end, the reader will introduce with penetrameter, one of device to determine the level of quality of the radiograph. There are two type of penetrameter like wire type or holes type. This standard must be followed by all the radiographer around the world to produce the good result that is standard and more reliable.

  8. The interpretation of plain film radiographs in infants and children with cardiac and vascular malformations. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautenburg, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    Chest survey radiographs frequently suffice for a differentiation of congenital defects of the heart and the vessels. Finally, angiocardiography will allow exact differentiation of the pathological findings in complex angiocardiopathies. (orig.) [de

  9. Simulation of the radiography formation process from CT patient volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bifulco, P.; Cesarelli, M.; Verso, E.; Roccasalva Firenze, M.; Sansone, M.; Bracale, M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an algorithm to simulate the radiographic image formation process using volumetric anatomical data of the patient, obtained from 3D diagnostic CT images. Many applications, including radiographic driven surgery, virtual reality in medicine and radiologist teaching and training, may take advantage of such technique. The designed algorithm has been developed to simulate a generic radiographic equipment, whatever oriented respect to the patient. The simulated radiography is obtained considering a discrete number of X-ray paths departing from the focus, passing through the patient volume and reaching the radiographic plane. To evaluate a generic pixel of the simulated radiography, the cumulative absorption along the corresponding X-ray is computed. To estimate X-ray absorption in a generic point of the patient volume, 3D interpolation of CT data has been adopted. The proposed technique is quite similar to those employed in Ray Tracing. A computer designed test volume has been used to assess the reliability of the radiography simulation algorithm as a measuring tool. From the errors analysis emerges that the accuracy achieved by the radiographic simulation algorithm is largely confined within the sampling step of the CT volume. (authors)

  10. Understanding the heterogeneity in volume overload and fluid distribution in decompensated heart failure is key to optimal volume management: role for blood volume quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Wayne L; Mullan, Brian P

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to quantitate total blood volume (TBV) in patients hospitalized for decompensated chronic heart failure (DCHF) and to determine the extent of volume overload, and the magnitude and distribution of blood volume and body water changes following diuretic therapy. The accurate assessment and management of volume overload in patients with DCHF remains problematic. TBV was measured by a radiolabeled-albumin dilution technique with intravascular volume, pre-to-post-diuretic therapy, evaluated at hospital admission and at discharge. Change in body weight in relation to quantitated TBV was used to determine interstitial volume contribution to total fluid loss. Twenty-six patients were prospectively evaluated. Two patients had normal TBV at admission. Twenty-four patients were hypervolemic with TBV (7.4 ± 1.6 liters) increased by +39 ± 22% (range, +9.5% to +107%) above the expected normal volume. With diuresis, TBV decreased marginally (+30 ± 16%). Body weight declined by 6.9 ± 5.2 kg, and fluid intake/fluid output was a net negative 8.4 ± 5.2 liters. Interstitial compartment fluid loss was calculated at 6.2 ± 4.0 liters, accounting for 85 ± 15% of the total fluid reduction. TBV analysis demonstrated a wide range in the extent of intravascular overload. Dismissal measurements revealed marginally reduced intravascular volume post-diuretic therapy despite large reductions in body weight. Mobilization of interstitial fluid to the intravascular compartment with diuresis accounted for this disparity. Intravascular volume, however, remained increased at dismissal. The extent, composition, and distribution of volume overload are highly variable in DCHF, and this variability needs to be taken into account in the approach to individualized therapy. TBV quantitation, particularly serial measurements, can facilitate informed volume management with respect to a goal of treating to euvolemia. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published

  11. Development of optimized techniques and requirements for computer enhancement of structural weld radiographs. Volume 1: Technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. R.; Hawley, S. W.; Peterson, G. R.; Salinger, S. S.; Workman, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    A hardware and software specification covering requirements for the computer enhancement of structural weld radiographs was considered. Three scanning systems were used to digitize more than 15 weld radiographs. The performance of these systems was evaluated by determining modulation transfer functions and noise characteristics. Enhancement techniques were developed and applied to the digitized radiographs. The scanning parameters of spot size and spacing and film density were studied to optimize the information content of the digital representation of the image.

  12. The magnitude and course of exercise-induced stroke volume changes determine the exercise tolerance in heart transplant recipients with heart failure and normal ejection fraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meluzín, J.; Hude, P.; Leinveber, P.; Jurák, Pavel; Soukup, L.; Viščor, Ivo; Špinarová, L.; Štěpánová, R.; Podroužková, H.; Vondra, Vlastimil; Langer, P.; Němec, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2014), s. 674-687 ISSN 1205-6626 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Keywords : heart failure * stroke volume index * exercise tolerance * bioimpedance Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 0.758, year: 2013

  13. Diagnostic value of the chest radiograph in asymptomatic neonates with a cardiac murmur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeppen, R.S.; Fairhurst, J.J.; Argent, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To establish the diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic usefulness of the chest radiograph in asymptomatic neonates with cardiac murmurs. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The chest radiographs of 68 asymptomatic neonates with cardiac murmurs were analysed retrospectively. The radiographs were anonymized and then evaluated for the presence or absence of cardiac disease by six radiologists, three who regularly interpret neonatal chest radiographs and three who do so infrequently. The eventual diagnosis for each neonate and the impact of the chest radiograph and original report on patient management were established by review of the clinical case notes. RESULTS: The results for each observer were expressed in 2 x 2 contingency tables and statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. The radiologists who were experienced in reporting neonatal chest radiographs achieved statistically significant results (P = 0.003, P = 0.002 andP = 0.007) compared with those who were less experienced (P = 0.13, P = 0.16 andP = 0.09). Review of the case notes established that the chest radiograph and original report did not influence clinical management in any of the 68 cases studied. CONCLUSIONS: Radiologists who frequently report neonatal chest radiographs achieve high accuracy in differentiating cardiac from non-cardiac disease. However, inaccuracies are unavoidable as radiological evidence of cardiac disease is often not present. A false-positive result could cause undue anxiety while a false-negative report could result in the omission of further investigations. Furthermore, a chest radiograph is unlikely to provide the definitive diagnosis. Chest radiographs did not appear to influence patient management in this study and cannot be recommended in the initial evaluation of the asymptomatic neonate with a heart murmur. Oeppen, R.S. et al. (2002)

  14. Radiographer interpretation of trauma radiographs: Issues for radiography education providers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, Maryann; Snaith, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Background: The role of radiographers with respect to image interpretation within clinical practice is well recognised. It is the expectation of the professional, regulatory and academic bodies that upon qualification, radiographers will possess image interpretation skills. Additionally, The College of Radiographers has asserted that its aspiration is for all radiographers to be able to provide an immediate written interpretation on skeletal trauma radiographs by 2010. This paper explores the readiness of radiography education programmes in the UK to deliver this expectation. Method: A postal questionnaire was distributed to 25 Higher Education Institutions in the UK (including Northern Ireland) that provided pre-registration radiography education as identified from the Society and College of Radiographers register. Information was sought relating to the type of image interpretation education delivered at pre- and post-registration levels; the anatomical range of image interpretation education; and education delivery styles. Results: A total of 19 responses (n = 19/25; 76.0%) were received. Image interpretation education was included as part of all radiographer pre-registration programmes and offered at post-registration level at 12 academic centres (n = 12/19; 63.2%). The anatomical areas and educational delivery methods varied across institutions. Conclusion: Radiography education providers have embraced the need for image interpretation education within both pre- and post-registration radiography programmes. As a result, UK education programmes are able to meet the 2010 College of Radiographers aspiration.

  15. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy. (orig.)

  16. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub

    2017-01-01

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy. (orig.)

  17. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub

    2017-11-01

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy.

  18. Radiographer led supplementary anterior cruciate ligament MRI sequences: Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Paula J.; McCall, Iain; Kraus, Alexandra; Jones, Mary; Walley, Gayle; Gibson, Kathryn; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To compare different supplementary MRI sequences of the ACL to arthroscopy and determine the diagnostic performance of each sequence. To ascertain whether radiographers could identify patients requiring supplementary MRI sequences of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, without a supervising radiologist. Methods: The study had ethical approval and two hundred and thirty one consecutive prospective MRI patients with mechanical knee symptoms (77 females, 154 males, of mean age 43.5, range 18–82 years) gave written informed consent. They then had a knee arthroscopy within seven days of the MRI. This was a pragmatic study to see if the six general MRI radiographers, each with over four years experience, could evaluate the ACL on routine orthogonal sequences (sagittal T1, Gradient Echo T2, Coronal STIR and axial fat suppressed dual echo). If they identified no ACL, then two 3D volume sequences (Dual Echo Steady State and Fast Low Angle Shot) and 2D limited sagittal oblique T1 sequences were also performed. Patients requiring extra sequences, missed by the radiographers, were recalled. The MRI sequences were independently evaluated in a blinded fashion by two consultant radiologists and a specialist radiology registrar and compared to the subsequent knee arthroscopy, as the gold standard, to determine the diagnostic performance statistics. Results: The cohort was on the knee arthroscopy weighting list and comprised 205 patients with chronic, 20 acute and 6 acute on chronic mechanical knee symptoms. There were no posterior cruciate, medial, or lateral collateral ligament tears at arthroscopy, used as the gold standard. The arthroscopy was normal and the radiographers correctly did not scan the extra sequence in 140 patients (72%) who then had normal arthroscopies. The radiographers did perform additional ACL sequences in 63 patients (27%). Of these, 10 patients had a partial and 12 complete ACL tears. Only two patients (0.9%) were recalled for additional

  19. Simulation of the radiography formation process from CT patient volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bifulco, P; Cesarelli, M; Verso, E; Roccasalva Firenze, M; Sansone, M; Bracale, M [University of Naples, Federico II, Electronic Engineering Department, Bioengineering Unit, Via Claudio, 21 - 80125 Naples (Italy)

    1999-12-31

    The aim of this work is to develop an algorithm to simulate the radiographic image formation process using volumetric anatomical data of the patient, obtained from 3D diagnostic CT images. Many applications, including radiographic driven surgery, virtual reality in medicine and radiologist teaching and training, may take advantage of such technique. The designed algorithm has been developed to simulate a generic radiographic equipment, whatever oriented respect to the patient. The simulated radiography is obtained considering a discrete number of X-ray paths departing from the focus, passing through the patient volume and reaching the radiographic plane. To evaluate a generic pixel of the simulated radiography, the cumulative absorption along the corresponding X-ray is computed. To estimate X-ray absorption in a generic point of the patient volume, 3D interpolation of CT data has been adopted. The proposed technique is quite similar to those employed in Ray Tracing. A computer designed test volume has been used to assess the reliability of the radiography simulation algorithm as a measuring tool. From the errors analysis emerges that the accuracy achieved by the radiographic simulation algorithm is largely confined within the sampling step of the CT volume. (authors) 16 refs., 12 figs., 1 tabs.

  20. Radiographic and microscopic correlation of diffuse interstitial and bronchointerstitial pulmonary patterns in the caudodorsal lung of adult Thoroughbred horses in race training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisner, E.R.; O'Brien, T.R.; Lakritz, J.; Pascoe, J.R.; Wilson, D.W.; Tyler, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Complete thoracic radiographic examinations were performed on 7 horses ranging in age from 24 to 60 months, followed by in-situ lung fixation. Radiographs were examined by 3 radiologists for the presence, degree and distribution of generalised pulmonary patterns within a region of interest in the caudodorsal lung. Pulmonary tissue was obtained from 12 sites within a designated volume of interest in the caudodorsal lung, corresponding to the area of interest evaluated radiographically, and examined for the presence, character and severity of microscopic lesions. Radiographic findings within the volume of interest consisted of mild to moderate bronchial, bronchointerstitial, or interstitial pulmonary patterns. Interstitial and bronchointerstitial radiographic findings were related to severity of peribronchiolar mononuclear cell infiltrates, the degree of bronchiolar mucosal plication, and alveolar capillary and peribronchial blood vessel erythrocyte content. The severity of the interstitial radiographic pattern was inversely associated with the perceived diagnostic quality of the radiographic examinations. There was no evidence of spatial variation in the severity of the microscopic changes examined in this limited pulmonary region. Inter-rater reliability between radiologists was good in the assessment of diagnostic quality of the radiographic examinations but poor in assessing severity of the primary generalised pulmonary patterns within the radiographic region of interest

  1. Primary infantile hyperparathyroidism: Clinical, laboratory, and radiographic features in 21 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, F.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of primary infantile hyperparathyroidism (PIH) are reported. In both cases the diagnosis was initially suspected from chest radiographs which were obtained to assess the etiology of fever and respiratory distress in one case and heart murmur in another. The first case responded well to subtotal parathyroidectomy. The second case had many unique features. (1) She never became overtly symptomatic. (2) She displayed a constellation of findings that are not yet emphasized. (3) Her indisputable radiographic findings of hyperparathyroidism vanished spontaneously by two months of age, whereas her biochemical alterations have persisted up to now, 2 1/2 years after birth. (4) Three members of her family have subclinical hyperparathyroidism (elevated serum parathormone, hypercalcemia, and hypophosphatemia). Our review of 19 more cases showed that PIH has no specific clinical symptoms and/or signs. Of the laboratory findings, hypercalcemia was most consistantly encountered. The radiographic findings, although not identical to those described in hyperparathyroid adults, had the greatest diagnostic specificity. The disorder carried a grave prognosis if not diagnosed promptly and managed surgically. (orig.)

  2. Chest radiographic findings of tuberculous pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seung Hye; Sung, Dong Wook; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1991-01-01

    When tuberculous pneumonia appears as a segmental or loabr consolidation, its is difficult to differentiate tuberculous pneumonia from nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia radiologically. The object of this study was to define the typical radiographic findings of tuberculous pneumonia through comparative analysis of tuberculous and nontuberculous pneumonia. A review of chest radiolograph in 29 patients with tuberculous pneumonia and in 23 patients with nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia was made with regard to homogeneity, volume loss, air-fluid level within the cavities, air-bronchogram, pleural disease, and predilection sites. The characteristic findings of tuberculous pneumonia are a heterogeneous density of infiltration (66%), evidence of volume loss of infiltrative lesion (52%), and cavity formation (48%) without air - fluid level. An associated parameter of analysis is the relative absence of leukocytosis (76%)

  3. The radiographic acromiohumeral interval is affected by arm and radiographic beam position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehringer, Edward V.; Rosipal, Charles E.; Rhodes, David A.; Lauder, Anthony J.; Feschuk, Connie A.; Mormino, Matthew A.; Hartigan, David E. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, Omaha, NE (United States); Puumala, Susan E. [Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Preventive and Societal Medicine, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2008-06-15

    The objective was to determine whether arm and radiographic beam positional changes affect the acromiohumeral interval (AHI) in radiographs of healthy shoulders. Controlling for participant's height and position as well as radiographic beam height and angle, from 30 right shoulders of right-handed males without shoulder problems four antero-posterior (AP) radiographic views each were obtained in defined positions. Three independent, blinded physicians measured the AHI to the nearest millimeter in 120 randomized radiographs. Mean differences between measurements were calculated, along with a 95% confidence interval. Controlling for observer effect, there was a significant difference between AHI measurements on different views (p<0.01). All pair-wise differences were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons (all p values <0.01). Even in healthy shoulders, small changes in arm position and radiographic beam orientation affect the AHI in radiographs. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of permanent I-125 prostate implants using radiographs and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerland, M.A.; Beersma, R.; Bhagwandien, R.; Wijrdeman, H.K.; Battermann, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Introduction: Localized prostatic cancer is managed by radical prostatectomy, external beam irradiation or a permanent implant with I-125 seeds. Permanent implants are indicated for small tumours (T1-T2) with a well to moderate histological differentiation. The technique used is a transrectal ultrasound guided transperineal implantation technique, which aims for a seed and dose distribution such that the initial doserate line of 7.8 cGy/h encompasses the prostate resulting in an accumulated dose of 160 Gy. Up till now the seed and dose distribution is evaluated from isocentric radiographs, which do not show the relation with the prostate. Objectives: The aim of this study is the development of a technique to reconstruct and evaluate the seed and dose distribution within the prostate. Methods: Twenty patients underwent radiography on the simulator and scanning on a whole body NMR system within 3 days after implantation of the I-125 seeds. Isocentric radiographs were used for reconstruction of the seed distribution, after which registration with the MR images provided the seed positions in relation to the prostate. Volume dose histograms were used to evaluate the implants. Results: The I-125 seeds and the prostate anatomy were well depicted on T1-weighted spin echo images with minimal read out gradient strength. To date, ten implants were evaluated. According to our method, the prostate volumes receiving the prescribed dose of 160 Gy ranged from 30 to 70% of the total prostate volumes. Conclusion: The combination of isocentric radiographs and MRI enables reconstruction of the seed and dose distribution in relation to the prostate and the computation of dose volume histograms, which may be of value in the evaluation of implant quality

  5. Fast radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1984-08-01

    Industrial radiography can be performed with shorter exposure times, when instead of X-ray film with lead intensifying screens the radiographic paper with fluorescent screen is used. With paper radiography one can obtain lower material, equipment, and labor costs, shorter exposure and processing times, and easier radiation protection. The speed of the radiographic inspection can also be increased by the use of fluorometallic intensifying screens together with a special brand of X-ray film. Before accepting either of the two fast radiographic systems one must be sure that they can produce radiographs of adequate image quality. Therefore an investigation was performed on that subject using ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters. The radiographic image quality was tested for aluminium and steel up to 30 mm thick using various brands of radiographic paper and X-ray film with fluorometallic screens and comparing them with fast X-ray films with lead screens. Both systems give satisfactory results. (author)

  6. Comparative study of ultrasonographic, radiographic and after surgery signs in fifty bitches with pyometra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, L.; Martin, F; Valdes F, Alberto; Albala, A.

    1996-01-01

    Diagnoses of pyometra are specially based on clinical signs, clinicalpathology findings and radiography. Ultrasound has been a new, only recently available diagnostic tool. To establish some relation between radiography and ultrasonography scans, fifty female dogs with clinicalsigns of pyometra were scanned with ultrasound and radiography. Lateral and ventro-dorsal views were obtained, and scored from 0 to 3 according to presence of radiographical signs. On the other hand, this study tries to correlate uterine section measurements between ultrasound and measurements of the isolated organ in 3 anatomic points after surgery: a) Caudal to kidneys, b) Lateral to navel, c) Uterine body, caudalto horn bifurcation. Lateral radiographs were more succesfull in diagnosing raised uterine volume than ventro-dorsal radiographs. The radiograph technique was less efficient than ultrasound in distinguishing positive cases with pyometra. Ultrasound was able to detect 100% of thepyometra cases. Measurements of uterine sections larger than 900 mm(2) were correlated with higher values (2 or 3) in radiographic scores (p [es

  7. Radiographic imaging. 4 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesney, D.N.; Chesney, M.O.

    1981-01-01

    This is a revised edition of the textbook previously entitled 'Radiographic Photography' and accords with the current syllabus of training for the Diploma of the Royal College of Radiographers. The aim is a non-mathematical approach to provide a guide for the student to the knowledge and understanding of the theoretical concepts which affect the quality of radiographic image; materials and practices are also reviewed, particularly in relation to the characteristics of the radiographic image, and to processing equipment and processing areas. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: the photographic process, film materials in x-ray departments, sensitometry, storage of film materials and radiographs, intensifying screens and cassettes, film processing, developing, fixing, rinsing, washing, drying, the processing area and equipment, systems for daylight film handling, the radiographic image, management of the quality, presentation of the radiograph, light images and their recording, fluorography, some special imaging processes, e.g. xerography, copying radiographs. (U.K.)

  8. Chest radiographic data acquisition and quality assurance in multicenter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, R.H.; Schluchter, M.; Easley, K.A.; Wood, B.P.; Berdon, W.E.; Boechat, M.I.; Meziane, M.; Mellins, R.B.; Norton, K.I.; Singleton, E.; Trautwein, L.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Multicenter studies rely on data derived from different institutions. Forms can be designed to standardize the reporting process allowing reliable comparison of data. Objective. The purpose of the report is to provide a standardized method, developed as a part of a multicenter study of vertically transmitted HIV, for assessing chest radiographic results. Materials and methods. Eight hundred and five infants and children were studied at five centers; 3057 chest radiographs were scored. Data were entered using a forced-choice, graded response for 12 findings. Quality assurance measures and inter-rater agreement statistics are reported. Results. The form used for reporting chest radiographic results is presented. Inter-rater agreement was moderate to high for most findings, with the best correlation reported for the presence of bronchovascular markings and/or reticular densities addressed as a composite question (kappa = 0.71). The presence of nodular densities (kappa 0.56) and parenchymal consolidation (kappa = 0.57) had moderate agreement. Agreement for lung volume was low. Conclusion. The current tool, developed for use in the pediatric population, is applicable to any study involving the assessment of pediatric chest radiographs for a large population, whether at one or many centers. (orig.)

  9. Australian rural radiographers' perspectives on disclosure of their radiographic opinion to patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squibb, Kathryn; Bull, Rosalind M.; Smith, Anthony; Dalton, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The role of Australian rural radiographers in radiographic interpretation, communication and disclosure of their radiographic opinion with a specific focus on plain film radiography was examined in a two phase, exploratory interpretive study. Data were collected using questionnaires and interviews and analysed thematically. This reports one of the key themes identified in the thematic data analysis. ‘Disclosure of Radiographic Opinion to Patients’ comprises the three interrelated sub-themes Acting Ethically, Selective Disclosure and Filtered Truth. It is wholly concerned with the ways in which rural radiographers choose to disclose their radiographic opinion to patients. Without a clear picture of where they stand medico-legally, rural radiographers draw on experience and a strong ethical framework as the basis for these complex decisions. Rural radiographers frame their disclosures to patients in a manner that is governed by the diagnostic, therapeutic and emotional impact the information disclosed may have on the patient. Disclosure to patients was found to be selective, often diagnostically vague and ethically filtered

  10. A radiographic study of mental foramen in intraoral radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jeong Ick; Choi, Karp Shik

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the position and shape of mental foramen in periapical radiographs. For this study, periapical radiographs of premolar areas were obtained from the 200 adults. Accordingly, the positional and shape changes of mental foramen were evaluated. The authors obtained radiographs according to changes in radiation beam direction in periapical radiographs of premolar areas, and then evaluated the positional and shape changes of mental foramen. The following results were obtained: 1. Shapes of mental foramen were observed elliptical (34.3%), round or oval (28.0%), unidentified (25.5%) and diffuse (12.2%) type in descending order of frequency. 2, Horizontal positions of mental foramen were most frequently observed at the 2nd premolar area (55.3%), the area between the 1st premolar and 2nd premolar (39.6%), the area between the 2nd premolar and 1st molar (3.4%), the 1st premolar area (1.0%), the area between the canine and 1st premolar (0.7%) in descending order of frequency. 3. Vertical positions of mental foramen were most frequently observed at the inferior to apex (67.1%), and at apex (24.8%), overlap with apex (6.4%), superior to apex (1.7%) in descending order of frequency. 4. Shapes of mental foramen were more obviously observed at the upward 10 degree positioned periapical radiographs. And according to the changes of horizontal and vertical position, they were observed similar to normally positioned periapical radiographs.

  11. The Effects of TM on Concurrent Heart Rate, Peripheral Blood Pulse Volume, and the Alpha Wave Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Jerome S.

    Through observation of 26 subjects over a 3 month period, this research project measured the effects of transcendental meditation (TM) on concurrent heart rate, peripheral blood pulse volume, and the alpha wave frequency. The subjects were assigned randomly to three groups. One group practiced TM as prescribed by the International Meditation…

  12. Radiographers and radiologists reporting plain radiograph requests from accident and emergency and general practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brealey, S.D.; King, D.G.; Hahn, S.; Crowe, M.; Williams, P.; Rutter, P.; Crane, S.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess selectively trained radiographers and consultant radiologists reporting plain radiographs for the Accident and Emergency Department (A and E) and general practitioners (GPs) within a typical hospital setting. METHODS: Two radiographers, a group of eight consultant radiologists, and a reference standard radiologist independently reported under controlled conditions a retrospectively selected, random, stratified sample of 400 A and E and 400 GP plain radiographs. An independent consultant radiologist judged whether the radiographer and radiologist reports agreed with the reference standard report. Clinicians then assessed whether radiographer and radiologist incorrect reports affected confidence in their diagnosis and treatment plans, and patient outcome. RESULTS: For A and E and GP plain radiographs, respectively, there was a 1% (95% confidence interval (CI) -2 to 5) and 4% (95% CI -1 to 8) difference in reporting accuracy between the two professional groups. For both A and E and GP cases there was an 8% difference in the clinicians' confidence in their diagnosis based on radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. For A and E and GP cases, respectively, there was a 2% and 8% difference in the clinicians' confidence in their management plans based on radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. For A and E and GP cases, respectively, there was a 1% and 11% difference in effect on patient outcome of radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. CONCLUSION: There is the potential to extend the reporting role of selectively trained radiographers to include plain radiographs for all A and E and GP patients. Further research conducted during clinical practice at a number of sites is recommended

  13. Influence of heart failure on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Aline Soares; Sperandio, Priscila Abreu; Mazzuco, Adriana; Alencar, Maria Clara; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; de Oliveira, Mayron Faria; O'Donnell, Denis Eunan; Neder, José Alberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of chronic heart failure (CHF) on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD, i.e., inspiratory fraction-inspiratory capacity (IC)/TLC-and relative inspiratory reserve-[1 − (end-inspiratory lung volume/TLC)]. Methods: This was a prospective study involving 56 patients with COPD-24 (23 males/1 female) with COPD+CHF and 32 (28 males/4 females) with COPD only-who, after careful clinical stabilization, underwent spirometry (with forced and slow maneuvers) and whole-body plethysmography. Results: Although FEV1, as well as the FEV1/FVC and FEV1/slow vital capacity ratios, were higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group, all major "static" volumes-RV, functional residual capacity (FRC), and TLC-were lower in the former group (p < 0.05). There was a greater reduction in FRC than in RV, resulting in the expiratory reserve volume being lower in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group. There were relatively proportional reductions in FRC and TLC in the two groups; therefore, IC was also comparable. Consequently, the inspiratory fraction was higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group (0.42 ± 0.10 vs. 0.36 ± 0.10; p < 0.05). Although the tidal volume/IC ratio was higher in the COPD+CHF group, the relative inspiratory reserve was remarkably similar between the two groups (0.35 ± 0.09 vs. 0.44 ± 0.14; p < 0.05). Conclusions: Despite the restrictive effects of CHF, patients with COPD+CHF have relatively higher inspiratory limits (a greater inspiratory fraction). However, those patients use only a part of those limits, probably in order to avoid critical reductions in inspiratory reserve and increases in elastic recoil. PMID:27832235

  14. SU-E-I-94: Automated Image Quality Assessment of Radiographic Systems Using An Anthropomorphic Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J; Wilson, J; Zhang, Y; Samei, E; Ravin, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In a large, academic medical center, consistent radiographic imaging performance is difficult to routinely monitor and maintain, especially for a fleet consisting of multiple vendors, models, software versions, and numerous imaging protocols. Thus, an automated image quality control methodology has been implemented using routine image quality assessment with a physical, stylized anthropomorphic chest phantom. Methods: The “Duke” Phantom (Digital Phantom 07-646, Supertech, Elkhart, IN) was imaged twice on each of 13 radiographic units from a variety of vendors at 13 primary care clinics. The first acquisition used the clinical PA chest protocol to acquire the post-processed “FOR PRESENTATION” image. The second image was acquired without an antiscatter grid followed by collection of the “FOR PROCESSING” image. Manual CNR measurements were made from the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions of the phantom in each image. An automated image registration algorithm was used to estimate the CNR of the same insert using similar ROIs. Automated measurements were then compared to the manual measurements. Results: Automatic and manual CNR measurements obtained from “FOR PRESENTATION” images had average percent differences of 0.42%±5.18%, −3.44%±4.85%, and 1.04%±3.15% in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions, respectively; measurements obtained from “FOR PROCESSING” images had average percent differences of -0.63%±6.66%, −0.97%±3.92%, and −0.53%±4.18%, respectively. The maximum absolute difference in CNR was 15.78%, 10.89%, and 8.73% in the respective regions. In addition to CNR assessment of the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts, the automated method also provided CNR estimates for all 75 contrast-detail inserts in each phantom image. Conclusion: Automated analysis of a radiographic phantom has been shown to be a fast, robust, and objective means for assessing radiographic

  15. Comparison of three methods of measuring vertebral heart size in German Shepherd dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasojevic-Kosic, Lj.; Krstic, N.; Trailovic, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    The method of measuring the heart size in thoracic radiography by comparing it to the length of thoracic vertebrae is marked as vertebral heart size (VHS). Besides of the original VHS measurement suggested by Buchanan and Buecheler, there are modifications of these measurements in literature. With the aim to evaluate differences between different methods of VHS measurement, we compared radiographs of six clinically healthy dogs of the same breed and age (German Shepherd dogs, 3 years of age), whose heart size was measured according to three different methods of VHS measurement. There were not significant differences between the values obtained by different methods of VHS measurement. In our study, we also compared findings of radiographs subjective assessment and VHS measurements. The second and third method of measurement were much more consistent to subjective assessment than the first method. Diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities in dgs should not be based solely on the measuremet of vertebral heart size. However, VHS measurement is very suitable for clinical practice. According to the study reported here, the second method of VHS measurement described in this paper, was recommended

  16. Comparative Effectiveness of Low-Volume Time-Efficient Resistance Training Versus Endurance Training in Patients With Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Gregers Winding; Birgitte Rosenmeier, Jaya; Petersen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    -related quality of life in lower New York Heart Association-stage HF patients, despite less time required as well as lower energy expenditure during TRE than during AMC. Therefore, TRE might represent a time-efficient exercise modality for improving adherence to exercise in patients with class I-II HF.......PURPOSE: Cardiorespiratory fitness is positively related to heart failure (HF) prognosis, but lack of time and low energy are barriers for adherence to exercise. We, therefore, compared the effect of low-volume time-based resistance exercise training (TRE) with aerobic moderate-intensity cycling...... (AMC) on maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, and vascular function. METHODS: Twenty-eight HF patients (New York Heart Association class I-II) performed AMC (n = 14) or TRE (n = 14). Maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, health-related quality of life...

  17. Optic densitometry in radiographic images to evaluate nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism in kittens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahal, S.C.; Mortari, A.C.; Caporali, E.H.G.; Vulcano, L.C.; Santos, F.A.M. dos; Takahira, R.K.; Crocci, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the modification of bone mineral density, as well as the serum biochemistry variation in the nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism. Ten crossbreed cats, initial aging between 2 and 3 months, and weighing 820 grams were used. After 10 days of adaptation, they were fed with raw beef heart for 60 days. At the end of adaptation time and every 15 days, exams were realized. The method of optical densitometry in radiographic images of the right radius and ulna was used. There was no statistical difference in the bone mineral densitometry between the end of adaptation period and with 15 days of consuming a diet of beef heart. At 30 days the bone density decreased statistically, and it was in the same level at 45 and 60 days. There was no statistical difference in the serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations in all observation time. Serum alkaline phosphatase concentration varied and it was increased above normal variation in the 45 th and 60 th day of the diet. It was possible to conclude that bone densitometry in radiographic images is an efficient method to evaluate bone demineralization, and calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase serum biochemistry analysis are limited value [pt

  18. The forgotten role of central volume in low frequency oscillations of heart rate variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Ferrario

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that central volume plays a key role in the source of low frequency (LF oscillations of heart rate variability (HRV was tested in a population of end stage renal disease patients undergoing conventional hemodialysis (HD treatment, and thus subject to large fluid shifts and sympathetic activation. Fluid overload (FO in 58 chronic HD patients was assessed by whole body bioimpedance measurements before the midweek HD session. Heart Rate Variability (HRV was measured using 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram recordings starting before the same HD treatment. Time domain and frequency domain analyses were performed on HRV signals. Patients were retrospectively classified in three groups according to tertiles of FO normalized to the extracellular water (FO/ECW%. These groups were also compared after stratification by diabetes mellitus. Patients with the low to medium hydration status before the treatment (i.e. 1st and 2nd FO/ECW% tertiles showed a significant increase in LF power during last 30 min of HD compared to dialysis begin, while no significant change in LF power was seen in the third group (i.e. those with high pre-treatment hydration values. In conclusion, several mechanisms can generate LF oscillations in the cardiovascular system, including baroreflex feedback loops and central oscillators. However, the current results emphasize the role played by the central volume in determining the power of LF oscillations.

  19. The forgotten role of central volume in low frequency oscillations of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Manuela; Moissl, Ulrich; Garzotto, Francesco; Cruz, Dinna N; Tetta, Ciro; Signorini, Maria G; Ronco, Claudio; Grassmann, Aileen; Cerutti, Sergio; Guzzetti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that central volume plays a key role in the source of low frequency (LF) oscillations of heart rate variability (HRV) was tested in a population of end stage renal disease patients undergoing conventional hemodialysis (HD) treatment, and thus subject to large fluid shifts and sympathetic activation. Fluid overload (FO) in 58 chronic HD patients was assessed by whole body bioimpedance measurements before the midweek HD session. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) was measured using 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram recordings starting before the same HD treatment. Time domain and frequency domain analyses were performed on HRV signals. Patients were retrospectively classified in three groups according to tertiles of FO normalized to the extracellular water (FO/ECW%). These groups were also compared after stratification by diabetes mellitus. Patients with the low to medium hydration status before the treatment (i.e. 1st and 2nd FO/ECW% tertiles) showed a significant increase in LF power during last 30 min of HD compared to dialysis begin, while no significant change in LF power was seen in the third group (i.e. those with high pre-treatment hydration values). In conclusion, several mechanisms can generate LF oscillations in the cardiovascular system, including baroreflex feedback loops and central oscillators. However, the current results emphasize the role played by the central volume in determining the power of LF oscillations.

  20. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 +/- 81 to 350 +/- 77 ml and from 52 +/- 26 to 43 +/- 20 volume units, respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 +/- 10 to 17 +/- 9 mm Hg and 10 +/- 5 to 6 +/- 5 mm Hg. Although stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 +/- 6% to 22+/- 5% and from 25 +/- 9% to 29 +/- 11%, respectively. During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. This, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured

  1. The radiographic image: A cultural artefact?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strudwick, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the role of the radiographic images produced by diagnostic radiographers. An ethnographic study of the workplace culture in one diagnostic imaging department was undertaken using participant observation for four months and semi-structured interviews with ten key informants. One of the key themes; that of the radiographic image as a cultural artefact, is explored in this article. The radiographic image is a cultural artefact which radiographers are protective of and take ownership of. Radiographers are conscious of the quality of their images and the images are an important aspect of their work. Radiographers take criticism of their images personally. The radiographic image is a record of the interaction that occurs between the radiographer and the patient. The way in which radiographic images are viewed, used and judged is an important aspect of the role of diagnostic radiographer

  2. Quantitative analysis of bowel gas by plain abdominal radiograph combined with computer image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yan; Peng Kewen; Zhang Houde; Shen Bixian; Xiao Hanxin; Cai Juan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To establish a method for quantitative analysis of bowel gas by plain abdominal radiograph and computer graphics. Methods: Plain abdominal radiographs in supine position from 25 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 20 health controls were studied. A gastroenterologist and a radiologist independently conducted the following procedure on each radiograph. After the outline of bowel gas was traced by axe pen, the radiograph was digitized by a digital camera and transmitted to the computer with Histogram software. The total gas area was determined as the pixel value on images. The ratio of the bowel gas quantity to the pixel value in the region surrounded by a horizontal line tangential to the superior pubic symphysis margin, a horizontal line tangential to the tenth dorsal vertebra inferior margin, and the lateral line tangential to the right and left anteriosuperior iliac crest, was defined as the gas volume score (GVS). To examine the sequential reproducibility, a second plain abdominal radiograph was performed in 5 normal controls 1 week later, and the GVS were compared. Results: Bowel gas was easily identified on the plain abdominal radiograph. Both large and small intestine located in the selected region. Both observers could finish one radiographic measurement in less than 10 mins. The correlation coefficient between the two observers was 0.986. There was no statistical difference on GVS between the two sequential radiographs in 5 health controls. Conclusion: Quantification of bowel gas based on plain abdominal radiograph and computer is simple, rapid, and reliable

  3. Standard heart and vessel size on plain films of normal children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, B.

    1986-01-01

    Standards of heart size, i.e. heart diameters and heart volume of normal children aged 4-15 years were obtained. In all cases requiring exact heart size determination, heart volume calculation is mandatory in children as well as in adults. Statistical work to date has provided precise calculation of heart volume plain films in the upright position. Additional plain films in prone position are unnecessary because no evident orthostatic influence on heart volume in children can be found. Percentiles of normal heart volume related to body weight representing the best correlation to the individual data are given as well as percentiles related to age. Furthermore ratios of normal vessel size to the height of the 8sup(th) thoracic vertebral body, measured on the same plain film, are given. In addition the ratio of upper to lower lung vessel size is calculated. These ratios are useful criteria in estimating normal vessel size and also in cases with increased pulmonary venous pressure. (orig.) [de

  4. Effects of radiographic contrast media on cellular electrophysiology in the beating heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolpers, H.G.; Baller, D.; Ensink, F.B.M.; Hoeft, A.; Korb, H.; Hellige, G.

    1982-01-01

    Electrophysiological effects of intracoronarily administered contrast media have been documented in 12 thoracotomized dogs at the cellular level by use of a modified microelectrode technique. Injections (n = 63) of 4 different contrast media uniformly led to a temporary cellular hyperpolarisation of the resting potential and prolongation of the action potential. Additional experiments with intracoronary injections of several electrolyte concentrations, mainly by a local deficiency of potassium ions and an excess of sodium ions. The significance of the findings for mechanisms underlying ECG-changes and ventricular arrhythmia by radiographic contrasts media will be discussed.

  5. Heart rate response to breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Pagh, K; Nielsen, J S

    1987-01-01

    Heart rate responses to stepwise and periodic changes in lung volume were studied in seven young healthy males. Stepwise inspiration and expiration both resulted in an increase in heart rate followed by a rapid decrease in heart rate. The fastest heart rate was reached in 1.6 +/- 0.5 s and in 3.......6 +/- 1.4 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). The slowest heart rate was reached in 4.8 +/- 1.0 s and in 7.6 +/- 1.9 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). Following this biphasic change the heart rate returned to a steady...... level. The difference between the fastest and the slowest heart rates was significantly larger in response to inspiration (21.7 +/- 7.3 beats per minute) than in response to expiration (12.0 +/- 7.3 beats per minute; P less than 0.01). Periodic changes in lung volume were performed with frequencies from...

  6. Reconstruction of pseudo three-dimensional dental image from dental panoramic radiograph and tooth surface shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, Masataka; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Oshiro, Osamu; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kagiyama, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Masakazu; Takada, Kenji; Azuma, Hiroko

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional volume data set is useful for diagnosis in dental treatments. However, to obtain three-dimensional images of a dental arch in general dental clinics is difficult. In this paper, we propose a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional dental images from a dental panoramic radiograph and a tooth surface shape which can be obtained from three dimensional shape measurement of a dental impression. The proposed method finds an appropriate curved surface on which the dental panoramic radiograph is mapped by comparing a virtual panoramic image made from a tooth surface shape to a real panoramic radiograph. The developed pseudo three-dimensional dental images give clear impression of patient's dental condition. (author)

  7. Initial image interpretation of appendicular skeletal radiographs: A comparison between nurses and radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piper, Keith J.; Paterson, Audrey

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of a short training programme on nurses and radiographers, exploring differences between their performance before and after training. Method: Twenty-two nurses and 18 radiographers interpreted 20 trauma radiographs of the appendicular skeleton before and after training. Normal and abnormal cases of a discriminatory nature were included. Total score, sensitivity and specificity values were calculated for each participant by comparison with an agreed expected answer. The area under the curve (AUC) was analysed using alternate free-response receiver operating characteristic (AFROC) methodology. Results: Significant differences were demonstrated between the total scores achieved by the two groups (pre-training: p = 0.007, post-training: p = 0.04). After training, the mean score increased significantly for both groups (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found between the radiographers mean pre-training scores and the nurses mean post-training scores (p = 0.66). Sensitivity for both groups increased following training, significantly so for the nurses (nurses: p < 0.001, radiographers: p = 0.06). Specificity reduced significantly after training for the nurses (p < 0.001), and increased for the radiographers but not significantly (p = 0.085). After training, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of sensitivity (p = 0.09) but specificity was significantly higher for the radiographers (p < 0.001). The radiographers achieved higher pre-training AUC values than the nurses (p = 0.04), although a difference remained after training this did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.15). The AUC values increased significantly after training for both groups (nurses: p = 0.012, radiographers: p = 0.004) and again there was no significant difference between the radiographers pre-training performance and the nurses post-training performance (p = 0.62). Conclusion: Improvement after training was seen in both groups

  8. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs: A comparative plain film-reading performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buskov, L.; Abild, A.; Christensen, A.; Holm, O.; Hansen, C.; Christensen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital. Materials and methods: Plain radiographs of the appendicular skeleton from 1000 consecutive emergency room patients were included in the study: 500 primarily reported by radiographers and 500 by trainee radiologists. The final reporting was subsequently undertaken by a consultant radiologist in consensus with an orthopaedic surgeon. Two observers classified reports as either true positive/negative or false positive/negative based on the final report, which was considered the reference standard. To evaluate the severity of incorrect primary reports, errors were graded into three categories concerning clinical impact and erroneous reports graded as the most severe category were subsequently analysed. Mann–Whitney and Chi-squared tests were used to compare differences and associations between radiographers versus trainee radiologists regarding film reporting. Results: The sensitivity for correct diagnosis was 99% for reporting radiographers and 94% for trainee radiologists. The specificity was found to be 97% for reporting radiographers and 99% for trainee radiologists. Radiographers missed significantly fewer fractures (n = 2) than trainee radiologists (n = 14; p = 0.006) but had a higher, but not significant, degree of overcalling. No significant difference was found between groups regarding clinical impact of incorrect reporting. Conclusion: Trained radiographers report accident radiographs of the extremities with high accuracy and constitute a qualified resource to help meet increasing workload and demands in quality standards.

  9. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  10. Right heart enlargement in heartworm-infected dogs: a radiographic, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, C.W.; Ackerman, N.

    1984-01-01

    Radiographically, the size of the right ventricle of 54 heartworm-infected dogs was graded subjectively as normal, 1 +, 2 +, and 3 + and served to classify the dogs into groups A, B, C, and D. With M-mode echocardiograms, right ventricular enlargement ratios (RVE ratios) were determined for each dog by dividing the measured right ventricular internal diastolic dimension (RVIDd) by the expected RVIDd of a normal dog of the same body weight. The normal RVIDd relation to body weight was derived from 25 healthy heartworm-free control dogs. These two variables were linearly related with a correlation coefficient r 2 = 0.59. Means and standard deviations of the RVE ratio were calculated for each group. Despite wide ranges and considerable overlap, the ratio was significantly different (t-test, p < 0.005) between groups with the exception of groups A and B, and C and D. The incidence of electrocardiographic signs of right ventricular hypertrophy was also determined for each group; it was 38% in group C and 62% in group D. From this data, it was concluded that M-mode echocardiography is a very sensitive technique for the documentation of right ventricular dilatation in heartworm-infected dogs, correlating with radiographic impressions of right ventricular enlargement. (author)

  11. Visual simulation of radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguna, G.

    1985-01-01

    A method for computer simulation of radiographs has been added to the LLNL version of the solid modeler TIPS-1 (Technical Information Processing System-1). This new tool will enable an engineer to compare an actual radiograph of a solid to its computer-generated counterpart. The appearance of discrepancies between the two can be an indication of flaws in the solid object. Simulated radiographs can also be used to preview the placement of x-ray sources to focus on areas of concern before actual radiographs are made

  12. Radiographic examination of the equine foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    A complete radiographic examination of the equine foot consists of properly exposed, processed, and positioned radiographs. For radiographic interpretation, in addition to knowing radiographic signs of disease, a knowledge of normal radiographic anatomy and possible insignificant anatomic variations is necessary

  13. Clinical associations of total kidney volume: the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Daniel A; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Chuang, Michael L; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Manning, Warren J; Fox, Caroline S

    2017-08-01

    Total kidney volume (TKV) is an imaging biomarker that may have diagnostic and prognostic utility. The relationships between kidney volume, renal function and cardiovascular disease (CVD) have not been characterized in a large community-dwelling population. This information is needed to advance the clinical application of TKV. We measured TKV in 1852 Framingham Heart Study participants (mean age 64.1 ± 9.2 years, 53% women) using magnetic resonance imaging. A healthy sample was used to define reference values. The associations between TKV, renal function and CVD risk factors were determined using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Overall, mean TKV was 278 ± 54 cm3 for women and 365 ± 66 cm3 for men. Risk factors for high TKV (>90% healthy referent size) were body surface area (BSA), diabetes, smoking and albuminuria, while age, female and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) kidney damage including albuminuria and eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, while high TKV is associated with diabetes and decreased odds of eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Prospective studies are needed to characterize the natural progression and clinical consequences of TKV. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Radiographic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuster, J.

    1978-01-01

    In view of great differencies in X-ray transmission it is more difficult to get optimum radiographs of plastics and especially of reinforced plastics than for example of metals. A procedure will be reported how to get with little effort optimum radiographs especially also in the range of long wave-length radiation corresponding 10 to 25 kV.P. (orig.) [de

  15. Assessment of Radiographic Image Quality by Visual Examination of Neutron Radiographs of the Calibration Fuel Pin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Up till now no reliable radiographic image quality standards exist for neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel. Under the Euratoro Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) Test Program neutron radiographs were produced at different neutron radiography facilities within the European Community...... of a calibration fuel pin. The radiographs were made by the direct, transfer and tracketch methods using different film recording materials. These neutron radiographs of the calibration fuel pin were used for the assessement of radiographic image quality. This was done by visual examination of the radiographs...

  16. The total right/left-volume index: a new and simplified cardiac magnetic resonance measure to evaluate the severity of Ebstein anomaly of the tricuspid valve: a comparison with heart failure markers from various modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hösch, Olga; Sohns, Jan Martin; Nguyen, Thuy-Trang; Lauerer, Peter; Rosenberg, Christina; Kowallick, Johannes Tammo; Kutty, Shelby; Unterberg, Christina; Schuster, Andreas; Faßhauer, Martin; Staab, Wieland; Paul, Thomas; Lotz, Joachim; Steinmetz, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The classification of clinical severity of Ebstein anomaly still remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction of the pathologically altered right heart with the anatomically-supposedly-normal left heart and to derive from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) a simple imaging measure for the clinical severity of Ebstein anomaly. Twenty-five patients at a mean age of 26±14 years with unrepaired Ebstein anomaly were examined in a prospective study. Disease severity was classified using CMR volumes and functional measurements in comparison with heart failure markers from clinical data, ECG, laboratory and cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and echocardiography. All examinations were completed within 24 hours. A total right/left-volume index was defined from end-diastolic volume measurements in CMR: total right/left-volume index=(RA+aRV+fRV)/(LA+LV). Mean total right/left-volume index was 2.6±1.7 (normal values: 1.1±0.1). This new total right/left-volume index correlated with almost all clinically used biomarkers of heart failure: brain natriuretic peptide (r=0.691; P=0.0003), QRS (r=0.432; P=0.039), peak oxygen consumption/kg (r=-0.479; P=0.024), ventilatory response to carbon dioxide production at anaerobic threshold (r=0.426; P=0.048), the severity of tricuspid regurgitation (r=0.692; P=0.009), tricuspid valve offset (r=0.583; P=0.004), and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (r=0.554; P=0.006). Previously described severity indices ([RA+aRV]/[fRV+LA+LV]) and fRV/LV end-diastolic volume corresponded only to some parameters. In patients with Ebstein anomaly, the easily acquired index of right-sided to left-sided heart volumes from CMR correlated well with established heart failure markers. Our data suggest that the total right/left-volume index should be used as a new and simplified CMR measure, allowing more accurate assessment of disease severity than previously described scoring systems. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Cardiac pacemaker lead placement: Do you need a lateral chest radiograph?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnex, Emer, E-mail: sonnex@ualberta.c [Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Coulden, Richard [Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    We present a case of an uneventful dual chamber permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation which, on the follow-up chest radiograph (CXR), was reported as good lead tip placement and no complications. The patient was re-admitted 7 months later. The PA CXR appearances were unchanged but, in the lateral projection, the ventricular lead tip was projected posteriorly within the heart, most likely within the LV. This was confirmed by CT showing the ventricular lead tip within the LV having passed through a patent foramen ovale (PFO).

  18. Radiographic Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.J; Yang, S.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This report contains theory, procedure technique and interpretation of radiographic examination and written for whom preparing radiographic test Level II. To determine this baseline of technical competence in the examination, the individual must demonstrate a knowledge of radiography physics, radiation safety, technique development, radiation detection and measurement, facility design, and the characteristics of radiation-producing devices and their principles of operation. (author) 98 figs., 23 tabs.

  19. CMR reference values for left ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction using computer-aided analysis : The Framingham Heart Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuang, Michael L.; Gona, Philimon; Hautvast, Gilion L.T.F.; Salton, Carol J.; Breeuwer, Marcel; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Manning, Warren J.

    Purpose To determine sex-specific reference values for left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (EF) in healthy adults using computer-aided analysis and to examine the effect of age on LV parameters. Materials and Methods We examined data from 1494 members of the Framingham Heart

  20. The radiology of prosthetic heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.M.; Flicker, S.

    1985-01-01

    The development of prosthetic heart valves in the late 1950s ushered in a new era in the treatment of heart disease. The radiologist has an important role to play preoperatively in the diagnosis of valvular heart disease. Radiology is valuable in identification of the implanted prosthetic valve and recognition of complications associated with valve implantation. Radiologists must be familiar with the imaging techniques best suited to evaluate the function of the valve prosthesis in question. In this chapter the authors discuss the radiographic approach to the evaluation of the status of patients for valve replacement and the imaging problems peculiar to the types of valves in current use. The relative value of plain-film radiography, fluoroscopy, videorecording and cinerecording, and aortography is addressed, as well as the potential value of magnetic resonance imaging and subsecond dynamic computed tomography

  1. Impact of diuretic treatment and sodium intake on plasma volume in patients with compensated systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonfils, Peter K; Damgaard, Morten; Taskiran, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: In patients with heart failure (HF), the use of diuretics may be a double-edged sword that can alleviate symptoms of congestion, but also result in over-diuresis and intravascular volume depletion. The purpose of the present study was to examine plasma volume (PV) in HF patients receiving...... difference in PV between patients with HF and control subjects (37.3 +/- 6.0 and 40.2 +/- 5.8 mL/kg, respectively, P = 0.092) with a significant tendency towards a contraction of PV with increasing use of diuretics (P = 0.031). There was no difference in extracellular volume between patients with HF...... and control subjects (P = 0.844). NT-proBNP plasma concentrations had no correlation to either sodium excretion (P = 0.193) or PV (P = 0.471) in patients with HF. CONCLUSION: Plasma volume in patients with HF was within normal limits, but patients treated with high doses of loop-diuretics tended to have...

  2. Attitudes of radiographers to radiographer-led discharge: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumsden, Laura; Cosson, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background: The traditional role of the Diagnostic Radiographer in image acquisition has gradually been extended through skill-mix, particularly to include abnormality detection. Aims: This research focused on the attitudes of Radiographers to Radiographer-led Discharge (RLD), where Radiographers discharge patients with minor injuries and perform tasks previously undertaken by Accident and Emergency staff. The effects of job role, hospital type, experience and whether RLD was used in the participant's trust were examined. Method: A multiple-indicator online questionnaire assessed attitudes to RLD. Snowball sampling was used with advertisement via emails, posters and cards, containing Quick Response (QR) codes. Statement responses were coded, with reverse coding for negative statements and total scores were calculated. A higher score represented a more positive attitude. Results: 101 questionnaires were completed (an estimated 30% response rate) and the mean total score was 84/115. 95% of participants supported radiographer involvement in abnormality detection, with 46.5% selecting RLD as the preferred system for minor injuries patients vs 48.5% preferring commenting alone. Discussion: Participants were positive about extending their role through RLD and felt confident in their image interpretation abilities, though expressed concern for the legal consequences of the role and adequate pay. Generalization of the results is limited due to the possible low response rate. Conclusion: Overall, participants demonstrated positive attitudes towards RLD but they also indicate the need for appropriate payment for any additional responsibility. These findings are promising for successful implementation of RLD, though larger-scale research including radiologists, business managers, A and E staff and patients would be beneficial. - Highlights: • 101 questionnaires were completed (an estimated 30% response rate). • 95% of participants supported radiographer involvement

  3. Digital image analysis of NDT radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeme, W.A. Jr.; Eizember, A.C.; Douglass, J.

    1989-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of Charge Coupled Device (CCD) detectors the majority of image analysis performed on NDT radiographic images was done visually in the analog domain. While some film digitization was being performed, the process was often unable to capture all the usable information on the radiograph or was too time consuming. CCD technology now provides a method to digitize radiographic film images without losing the useful information captured in the original radiograph in a timely process. Incorporating that technology into a complete digital radiographic workstation allows analog radiographic information to be processed, providing additional information to the radiographer. Once in the digital domain, that data can be stored, and fused with radioscopic and other forms of digital data. The result is more productive analysis and management of radiographic inspection data. The principal function of the NDT Scan IV digital radiography system is the digitization, enhancement and storage of radiographic images

  4. Identification of Pulmonary Hypertension Caused by Left-Sided Heart Disease (World Health Organization Group 2) Based on Cardiac Chamber Volumes Derived From Chest CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Galit; Rozenbaum, Zach; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Berliner, Shlomo; Topilsky, Yan; Fleischmann, Dominik; Sung, Yon K; Zamanian, Roham T; Guo, Haiwei Henry

    2017-10-01

    Evaluations of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly include chest CT imaging. We hypothesized that cardiac chamber volumes calculated from the same CT scans can yield additional information to distinguish PH related to left-sided heart disease (World Health Organization group 2) from other PH subtypes. Patients who had PH confirmed by right heart catheterization and contrast-enhanced chest CT studies were enrolled in this retrospective multicenter study. Cardiac chamber volumes were calculated using automated segmentation software and compared between group 2 and non-group 2 patients with PH. This study included 114 patients with PH, 27 (24%) of whom were classified as group 2 based on their pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Patients with group 2 PH exhibited significantly larger median left atrial (LA) volumes (118 mL vs 63 mL; P volumes (90 mL vs 76 mL; P = .02), and smaller median right ventricular (RV) volumes (173 mL vs 210 mL; P = .005) than did non-group 2 patients. On multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, and mean pulmonary arterial pressure, group 2 PH was significantly associated with larger median LA and LV volumes (P volume ratios of RA/LA, RV/LV, and RV/LA (P = .001, P = .004, and P volumes demonstrated a high discriminatory ability for group 2 PH (area under the curve, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.870-0.968). Volumetric analysis of the cardiac chambers from nongated chest CT scans, particularly with findings of an enlarged left atrium, exhibited high discriminatory ability for identifying patients with PH due to left-sided heart disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Large-Animal Biventricular Working Heart Perfusion System with Low Priming Volume-Comparison between in vivo and ex vivo Cardiac Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abicht, Jan-Michael; Mayr, Tanja Axinja Jelena; Jauch, Judith; Guethoff, Sonja; Buchholz, Stefan; Reichart, Bruno; Bauer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Existing large-animal, ex vivo, cardiac perfusion models are restricted in their ability to establish an ischemia/reperfusion condition as seen in cardiac surgery or transplantation. Other working heart systems only challenge one ventricle or require a substantially larger priming volume. We describe a novel biventricular cardiac perfusion system with reduced priming volume. Juvenile pig hearts were cardiopleged, explanted, and reperfused ex vivo after 150 minutes of cold ischemia. Autologous whole blood was used as perfusate (minimal priming volume 350 mL). After 15 minutes of Langendorff perfusion (LM), the system was switched into a biventricular working mode (WM) and studied for 3 hours. During reperfusion, complete unloading of both ventricles and constant-pressure coronary perfusion was achieved. During working mode perfusion, the preload and afterload pressure of both ventricles was controlled within the targeted physiologic range. Functional parameters such as left ventricular work index were reduced in ex vivo working mode (in vivo: 787 ± 186 vs. 1 h WM 498 ± 66 mm Hg·mL/g·min; p  hours while functional and blood parameters are easily accessible. Moreover, because of the minimal priming volume, the novel ex vivo cardiac perfusion circuit allows for autologous perfusion, using the limited amount of blood available from the organ donating animal. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Pocket atlas of radiographic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.; Stark, P.

    1993-01-01

    The 'Pocket Atlas of Radiographic Anatomy' presents 170 radiographs of the various body regions of adults, showing only the normal radiographic anatomy. Each radiograph is supplemented on the opposite page by a drawing of the particular body region. There is no commenting text, but the drawings are provided with captions in English. The atlas is a useful guide for interpreting radiographs. The pictures are arranged in chapters entitled as follows: Skeletal Imaging (skull, spine, upper extremity), lower extremity; Miscellaneous Plain Films (chest, mammogram, trachea, lung tomograms); Contrast Examinations (gastrointestinal tract, intravenous contrast examinations, arthrography, angiography); Special Examinations (myelograms, lymphangiograms, bronchograms, sialograms). (UWA). 348 figs [de

  7. Validity of PRV margins around lung and heart during left breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovski, Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Planning organ at risk volumes (PRV) has a minor use in radiotherapy treatment planning. During left breast irradiation two critical volumes are of special importance the lung and the heart. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in volume doses after adding appropriate margins around these organs at risk and compare them with the effect that the systematic positioning error has on the volume doses. Methods: Treatment plans for 44 patients with left breast cancer were analyzed. Two changes for each plan were made, and dose-volume histogram values for hearts and lungs volumes were recorded. In the first case margins of 5 mm to hearts and lungs were added. Volumes that were enclosed by 30% isodose for hearts and volumes that were enclosed by 20% isodose of lungs were recorded. In the second case plans were made with a systematic error of 5 mm employed, depicting a translation of isocenter posterior and to the right. In this second case, monitor units were taken from the original plan. The critical volumes for hearts and lungs were recorded as in the first case. Results: Our policy for breast cancer irradiation demands that the lung volume receiving 20 Gy should be kept under 25% of the whole left-lung volume, and no more than 10% of the heart volume should receive more than 30 Gy. The first case simulation showed that 23% of the patients have a heart overdose while 11% of them have a lung overdose according to the criteria above. Simulation of the second kind showed that the systematic error in isocenter positioning of 5 mm gives bigger a volume of the heart (in average 0.69% of heart volume) to be enclosed in critical isodose than in PRV case. For the lung the situation was opposite; namely in PRV case the lung volume that is encompassed with critical isodose is greater (in average 1.47% of lung volume) than in a case of displaced isocenter. Conclusions: Adding PRV margins around the heart and the lung does not give straightforward and unambiguous result

  8. The analysis of correlation between changes of myocardial enzymes level in serum before and after radiation and dose-volume histogram parameters of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xiuping; Li Hongjun; Li Baosheng; Wang Dongqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the correlation between the changes of myocardial enzyme level in serum before and after radiotherapy and dose - volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the heart. Methods: A total of 102 patients with 68 cases of lung cancer and 34 cases of esophageal cancer were recruited. All patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with the radiation beams passing through the heart. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase isozyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (α-HBDH) were determined in the serum before and after radiotherapy. All the enzyme levels before and after radiotherapy were compared through paired t-test. Independent sample t-test was conducted between sub-groups. And the dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the heart were calculated (the volume percentage of heart receiving dose equal to or exceeding x Gy (V x ). The correlation between myocardial enzyme level and DVH parameters was analyzed through Pearson method. Results: Serum AST, CK-MB, LDH, α-HBDH levels increased significantly after radiotherapy (19.42: 27.89, 14.72:19.57, 178.80 : 217.57, 140.32 : 176.25, t =-3.39 - -6.92, all P=0.000). In Group IMRT, significant correlations between the increase of myocardial enzyme concentration and DVH parameters of the heart are found, AST with V 20 , V 25 , V 30 of heart ( r=0.302 - 0.431, P =0.039 - 0.003), CK with V 30 of heart (r=0.345, P=0.013), and CK-MB, LDH, α-HBDH with V 25 , V 30 (r=0.465 -0.376, P=0.001-0.005). In Group CRT, there are significant correlations between changes of CK-MB, LDH level and V 30 of heart (r =0.330, 0.274, P=0.014, 0.033), α-HBDH and V 25 , V 30 , and V 35 of heart (r=0.270-0.331, P=0.046-0.014). When the irradiation dose was more than 50 Gy, significant correlations were found between the concentration changes of AST, LDH, α-HBDH and V 25 , V 30 of heart (r=0

  9. Radiographic examination of the equine head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Radiographic examinations of the equine head can be performed with portable x-ray machines. The views comprising the examination depend on the area of the head being examined. With a knowledge of radiographic anatomy and radiographic signs of disease, valuable diagnostic information can be obtained from the radiographic examination. In addition, the radiographic information can also be used to develop a prognosis and determine the most appropriate therapy

  10. Rapidly processable radiographic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabandere, L.A. de; Borginon, H.A.; Pattyn, H.A.; Pollet, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    A new rapidly processable radiographic silver halide material is described for use in mammography and non-destructive testing of industrial materials. The radiographic material is used for direct exposure to penetrating radiation without the use of fluorescent-intensifying screens. It consists of a transparent support with a layer of hydrophilic colloid silver halide emulsion on one or both sides. Examples of the preparation of three different silver halide emulsions are given including the use of different chemical sensitizers. These new radiographic materials have good resistance to the formation of pressure marks in rapid processing apparatus and they have improved sensitivity for direct exposure to penetrating radiation compared to conventional radiographic emulsions. (U.K.)

  11. An investigation into work related stressors on diagnostic radiographers in a local district hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verrier, William; Harvey, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research on the effects of work related stress amongst healthcare professions and the NHS has been undertaken. However, very little is known about the incidence of stress amongst UK radiographers although the few studies which have been conducted indicate that the prevalence and impact of stress on radiographers are considerable. The purpose of this study was to examine work related stressors which affect diagnostic radiographers in the imaging department of a local district hospital. The study utilised the HSE Indicator and Analysis Tools for Work Related Stress. These tools are based upon the HSE Management Standards for Work Related Stress which identifies six areas that represent potential stress hazards if managed inadequately. Two free response questions and a comments box were appended to the Indicator Tool to gain further insights into the radiographers' experiences of work related stress. The results of the study indicated that the hazards associated with work related stress risk were not being optimally managed in the department. Areas of Managers' Support, Relationships, Role and Change represented the greatest risks. In addition, the radiographers cited staff shortages, heavy workload and volume of patients as the greatest sources of pressure at work and their most common recommendations to reduce stress at work were increased staffing, improved communication and more effective feedback systems.

  12. Three-dimensional hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs: comparison with standard radiographic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Buck, Florian M.; Espinosa, Norman

    2013-01-01

    To establish a hindfoot alignment measurement technique based on low-dose biplanar radiographs and compare with hindfoot alignment measurements on long axial view radiographs, which is the current reference standard. Long axial view radiographs and low-dose biplanar radiographs of a phantom consisting of a human foot skeleton embedded in acrylic glass (phantom A) and a plastic model of a human foot in three different hindfoot positions (phantoms B1-B3) were imaged in different foot positions (20 internal to 20 external rotation). Two independent readers measured hindfoot alignment on long axial view radiographs and performed 3D hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs on two different occasions. Time for three-dimensional (3D) measurements was determined. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. Hindfoot alignment measurements on long axial view radiographs were characterized by a large positional variation, with a range of 14 /13 valgus to 22 /27 varus (reader 1/2 for phantom A), whereas the range of 3D hindfoot alignment measurements was 7.3 /6.0 to 9.0 /10.5 varus (reader 1/2 for phantom A), with a mean and standard deviation of 8.1 ± 0.6/8.7 ± 1.4 respectively. Interobserver agreement was high (ICC = 0.926 for phantom A, and ICC = 0.886 for phantoms B1-B3), and agreement between different readouts was high (ICC = 0.895-0.995 for reader 1, and ICC = 0.987-0.994 for reader 2) for 3D measurements. Mean duration of 3D measurements was 84 ± 15/113 ± 15 s for reader 1/2. Three-dimensional hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs were independent of foot positioning during image acquisition and reader independent. In this phantom study, the 3D measurements were substantially more precise than the standard radiographic measurements. (orig.)

  13. Probabilities of Pulmonary and Cardiac Complications and Radiographic Parameters in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, O Kyu; Paek, Sung Ho; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang Wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Jong Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the relationship between the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of 3- dimensional (3-D) radiotherapy and the radiographic parameters of 2-dimensional (2-D) radiotherapy such as central lung distance (CLD) and maximal heart distance (MHD). We analyzed 110 patients who were treated with postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. A two-field tangential technique, a three-field technique, and the reverse hockey stick method were used. The radiation dose administered to whole breast or the chest wall was 50.4 Gy, whereas a 45 Gy was administered to the supraclavicular field. The NTCPs of the heart and lung were calculated by the modified Lyman model and the relative seriality model. For all patients, the NTCPs of radiation-induced pneumonitis and cardiac mortality were 0.5% and 0.7%, respectively. The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis was higher in patients treated with the reverse hockey stick method than in those treated by other two techniques (0.0%, 0.0%, 3.1%, p<0.001). The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis increased with CLD. The NTCP of cardiac mortality increased with MHD (R2=0.808). We found a close correlation between the NTCP of 3-D radiotherapy and 2-D radiographic parameters. Our results are useful to reanalyze the previous 2-D based clinical reports about breast radiation therapy complications as a viewpoint of NTCP.

  14. Probabilities of Pulmonary and Cardiac Complications and Radiographic Parameters in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, O Kyu; Paek, Sung Ho; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang Wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of 3- dimensional (3-D) radiotherapy and the radiographic parameters of 2-dimensional (2-D) radiotherapy such as central lung distance (CLD) and maximal heart distance (MHD). We analyzed 110 patients who were treated with postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. A two-field tangential technique, a three-field technique, and the reverse hockey stick method were used. The radiation dose administered to whole breast or the chest wall was 50.4 Gy, whereas a 45 Gy was administered to the supraclavicular field. The NTCPs of the heart and lung were calculated by the modified Lyman model and the relative seriality model. For all patients, the NTCPs of radiation-induced pneumonitis and cardiac mortality were 0.5% and 0.7%, respectively. The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis was higher in patients treated with the reverse hockey stick method than in those treated by other two techniques (0.0%, 0.0%, 3.1%, p<0.001). The NTCP of radiation-induced pneumonitis increased with CLD. The NTCP of cardiac mortality increased with MHD (R2=0.808). We found a close correlation between the NTCP of 3-D radiotherapy and 2-D radiographic parameters. Our results are useful to reanalyze the previous 2-D based clinical reports about breast radiation therapy complications as a viewpoint of NTCP.

  15. Radiographic positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, R.L.; Dennis, C.A.; May, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book concentrates on the routine radiographic examinations commonly performed. It details the wide variety of examinations possible and their place in initial learning and in the radiology department as references for those occasions when an unusual examination is requested. This book provides information ranging from basic terminology to skeletal positioning to special procedures. Positions are discussed and supplemented with a picture of a patient, the resulting radiograph, and a labeled diagram. Immobilization and proper shielding of the patient are also shown

  16. Dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment in acute pulmonary embolism - correlation with D-dimer level, right heart strain and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Ralf W.; Frellesen, Claudia; Schell, Boris; Lehnert, Thomas; Jacobi, Volkmar; Vogl, Thomas J.; Kerl, J.M.; Renker, Matthias; Ackermann, Hanns; Schoepf, U.J.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the role of perfusion defect (PD) size on dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment as predictor of right heart strain and patient outcome and its correlation with d-dimer levels in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). 53 patients with acute PE who underwent DECT pulmonary angiography were retrospectively analyzed. Pulmonary PD size caused by PE was measured on DE iodine maps and quantified absolutely (VolPD) and relatively to the total lung volume (RelPD). Signs of right heart strain (RHS) on CT were determined. Information on d-dimer levels and readmission for recurrent onset of PE and death was collected. D-dimer level was mildly (r = 0.43-0.47) correlated with PD size. Patients with RHS had significantly higher VolPD (215 vs. 73 ml) and RelPD (9.9 vs. 2.9%) than patients without RHS (p 5% RelPD, while no such events were found for patients with <5% RelPD. Pulmonary blood volume on DECT in acute PE correlates with RHS and appears to be a predictor of patient outcome in this pilot study. (orig.)

  17. A radiographic study of the position and shape of mental foramen in panoramic radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Karp Shik; Kim, Dong Youn; Sohn, Jeong Ick; Bae, Yong Chul

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the position and shape of mental foramen in panoramic radiographs. For this study, panoramic radiographs were obtained from the 200 adults and evaluated the position and shape of mental foramen. According to various positional changes in panoramic radiographs of the patients, the author also obtained panoramic radiographs from the 100 adults and then evaluated the positional and shape changes of mental foramen. The following results were obtained : 1. Shapes of mental foramen were observed elliptical (43.3%), round or oval (42.5%), unidentified (7.5%) and diffuse (6.7%) type in descending order of frequency. 2. Horizontal position of mental foramen were most frequently observed at the 2nd premolar area (54.2%), and area between the 1st premolar and 2nd premolar (43.1%), area between the 2nd premolar and 1st molar (2.7%), and at apex (9.7%), overlap with apex (1.9%), superior of apex (0.2%) in descending order of frequency. 4. According to various positional changes in panoramic radiographs of the patients, shape changes of mental foramen were more obviously observed at the forward 10 mm and chin down 10 degree positioned panoramic radiographs, And changes of horizontal and vertical position were observed in similar to compared with normal positioned panoramic radiographs.

  18. Radiographic and high resolution CT findings of non-specific interstitial pneumonia/fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Satoshi [Tosei General Hospital, Seto, Aichi (Japan); Yokoi, Toyoharu; Suzuki, Ryujiro; Noda, Yasunobu; Kato, Toshiyuki; Kaneko, Michie

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the radiographic and high resolution CT findings in fifteen patients with biopsy proven nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. The most common radiographic findings in NSIP were bilateral infiltrates involving alveolar pattern, interstitial pattern, and mixed alveolar-interstitial pattern, which distributed mainly in the middle and lower lung zones. Loss of lung volumes were common. The predominant findings of linear and reticular opacities on HRCT were peribronchovascular interstitial thickening, parenchymal bands, intralobular interstitial thickening, and traction bronchiectasis. Honeycombing was not noted in any patient on initial CT scans. The predominant findings of increased lung opacity were mixed pattern of ground glass opacity and consolidation. Because these findings mimic those of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia, distinction between NSIP and IPF/UIP seems to be difficult by radiographic and HRCT findings. The response to corticosteroid therapy was good. At follow up HRCT, the pulmonary abnormalities observed on initial scans had disappeared or were diminished in most cases. Intralobular interstitial thickening and traction bronchiectasis, that have been considered to be an indicator of irreversible fibrosis, occasionally disappeared after corticosteroid therapy. (author)

  19. HipMatch: an object-oriented cross-platform program for accurate determination of cup orientation using 2D-3D registration of single standard X-ray radiograph and a CT volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan; Steppacher, Simon D; Murphy, Stephen B; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Tannast, Moritz

    2009-09-01

    The widely used procedure of evaluation of cup orientation following total hip arthroplasty using single standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is known inaccurate, largely due to the wide variability in individual pelvic orientation relative to X-ray plate. 2D-3D image registration methods have been introduced for an accurate determination of the post-operative cup alignment with respect to an anatomical reference extracted from the CT data. Although encouraging results have been reported, their extensive usage in clinical routine is still limited. This may be explained by their requirement of a CAD model of the prosthesis, which is often difficult to be organized from the manufacturer due to the proprietary issue, and by their requirement of either multiple radiographs or a radiograph-specific calibration, both of which are not available for most retrospective studies. To address these issues, we developed and validated an object-oriented cross-platform program called "HipMatch" where a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining an iterative landmark-to-ray registration with a 2D-3D intensity-based registration was implemented to estimate a rigid transformation between a pre-operative CT volume and the post-operative X-ray radiograph for a precise estimation of cup alignment. No CAD model of the prosthesis is required. Quantitative and qualitative results evaluated on cadaveric and clinical datasets are given, which indicate the robustness and the accuracy of the program. HipMatch is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway), VTK, and Coin3D and is transportable to any platform.

  20. Radiographic localization of unerupted mandibular anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, S G

    2000-10-01

    The parallax method and the use of 2 radiographs taken at right angles to each other are the 2 methods generally used to accurately localize teeth. For the parallax method, the combination of a rotational panoramic radiograph with an occlusal radiograph is recommended. This combination involves a vertical x-ray tube shift. Three case reports are presented that illustrate: (1) how this combination can accurately localize unerupted mandibular anterior teeth, (2) how a deceptive appearance of the labiolingual position of the unerupted tooth can be produced in an occlusal radiograph, (3) how increasing the vertical angle of the tube for the occlusal radiograph makes the tube shift easier to discern, (4) why occlusal radiographs are preferable to periapical radiographs for tube shifts, and (5) how localization can also be carried out with 2 radiographs at right angles to each other, one of which is an occlusal radiograph taken with the x-ray tube directed along the long axis of the reference tooth.

  1. Heart Rate and Increased Intravascular Volume

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, M.; Kára, T.; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Špinarová, L.; Meluzín, J.; Toman, J.; Řiháček, I.; Šumbera, J.; Fráňa, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, - (2003), s. 137 - 140 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/02/1339 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : kidneys * heart rate * atrial mechanisms Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  2. Producing quality radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullinan, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book gives an overview of physics, equipment, imaging, and quality assurance in the radiology department. The chapters are laid out with generous use of subheads to allow for quick reference, Points are illustrated with clear, uncluttered line diagrams and well-produced images. The accompanying explanations are miniature lessons by themselves. Inserted at various points throughout the text are important notes that highlight key concepts. The chapter ''Image Evaluation and Application of Radiographic Principles'' present a systematic approach to evaluating radiographs and contains several sample radiographs to illustrate the points made

  3. Radiographic progession of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siozos, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis can be graded on a 0-IV scala. For this purpose five objective criteria are used: a) destruction, b) osteoporosis, c) narrowing of joint space, d) luxation and e) ankylosis. The grading of the radiographic progression is defined by the extent and the number of the measured alterations. The radiographic progression can be registered yearly. (orig.) [de

  4. Radiographic interpretation of the appendicular skeleton: A comparison between casualty officers, nurse practitioners and radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Liz; Piper, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To assess how accurately and confidently casualty officers, nurse practitioners and radiographers, practicing within the emergency department (ED), recognize and describe radiographic trauma within an image test bank of 20 appendicular radiographs. Method: The participants consisted of 7 casualty officers, 13 nurse practitioners and 18 radiographers. All 20 radiographic examinations selected for the image test bank had been acquired following trauma and included some subtle, yet clinically significant abnormalities. The test bank score (maximum 40 marks), sensitivity and specificity percentages were calculated against an agreed radiological diagnosis (reference standard). Alternative Free-response Receiver Operating Characteristic (AFROC) analysis was used to assess the overall performance of the diagnostic accuracy of these professional groups. The variation in performance between each group was measured using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) test, to identify any statistical significant differences in the performance in interpretation between these groups. The relationship between the participants' perceived image interpretation accuracy during clinical practice and the actual accuracy of their image test bank score was examined using Pearson's Correlation Coefficient (r). Results: The results revealed that the radiographers gained the highest mean test bank score (28.5/40; 71%). This score was statistically higher than the mean test bank scores attained by the participating nurse practitioners (21/40; 53%) and casualty officers (21.5/40; 54%), with p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively. When compared with each other, the scores from these latter groups showed no significant difference (p = 0.91). The mean 'area under the curve' (AUC) value achieved by the radiographers was also significantly higher (p < 0.01) in comparison to the AUC values demonstrated by the nurse practitioners and casualty officers, whose results, when compared, showed no significant

  5. The radiographer's role in child protection: Comparison of radiographers perceptions by use of focus groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Michaela; Reeves, Pauline

    2006-01-01

    The research presented in this paper is taken from a larger study whose aims were to devise a holistic picture of how diagnostic radiographers approach child protection issues and to explore how radiographers and other professionals see the role of radiographers in the chain of evidence in relation to child protection as this applies to children who present at the Imaging Department with suspected non-accidental injuries (NAI). A focus group methodology was used with focus groups being conducted in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. The results indicated that both United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland radiographers agreed that they had a role in child protection; however, they identified a wide interpretation as to the extent of that role. Although radiographers in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland work within different legal systems there were themes identified which were common to both countries. Although radiographers referred to a duty to the child as to all patients, no radiographer specifically mentioned the system and child care law under which it is assumed they operate. This research revealed an area which would benefit from more detailed research using a wider audience. However, the study revealed a need for training in relation to possible NAI indicators and the correct procedure for documenting their suspicions and initiating an NAI referral

  6. Chesneys' radiographic imaging. 5. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Price, T.

    1989-01-01

    This new edition of Chesney and Chesney: Radiographic Imaging has been completely written by two new authors. The book reflects the change in emphasis in radiology from photographic processes towards electronic imaging methods. There is new material on image intensifiers and television imaging, digital imaging and digital subtractions. Analyses of the various characteristics of, and defects in, images on radiographs, xeroradiographs and the television screen are included. The methods, equipment and materials used to record the cathode ray tube image are described and there is new material on the principles of alternative diagnostic imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography and radionuclide imaging which provide cathode ray tube images. The book is primarily for student radiographers studying for the Diploma of the College of Radiographers, but radiographers studying for postdiplomate qualifications such as the Higher Diploma (HDCR) will also find the book helpful. (author)

  7. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions

  8. Interpreting radiographs. 4. The carpus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burguez, P.N.

    1984-01-01

    The complexity of the carpus which has three major joints, seven or eight carpal bones and five adjacent bones, each of which articulates with one or more of the carpal elements, necessitates good quality radiographs for definitive radiographic interpretation may be extremely difficult because of the disparity between radiographic changes and obvious clinical signs and, therefore, must be discussed in the light of a thorough clinical assessment

  9. Desmin loss and mitochondrial damage precede left ventricular systolic failure in volume overload heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Jason L; Rogowski, Michael; Agnetti, Giulio; Fu, Lianwu; Powell, Pamela; Wei, Chih-Chang; Collawn, James; Dell'Italia, Louis J

    2017-07-01

    Heart failure due to chronic volume overload (VO) in rats and humans is characterized by disorganization of the cardiomyocyte desmin/mitochondrial network. Here, we tested the hypothesis that desmin breakdown is an early and continuous process throughout VO. Male Sprague-Dawley rats had aortocaval fistula (ACF) or sham surgery and were examined 24 h and 4 and 12 wk later. Desmin/mitochondrial ultrastructure was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Protein and kinome analysis were performed in isolated cardiomyocytes, and desmin cleavage was assessed by mass spectrometry in left ventricular (LV) tissue. Echocardiography demonstrated a 40% decrease in the LV mass-to-volume ratio with spherical remodeling at 4 wk with ACF and LV systolic dysfunction at 12 wk. Starting at 24 h and continuing to 4 and 12 wk, with ACF there is TEM evidence of extensive mitochondrial clustering, IHC evidence of disorganization associated with desmin breakdown, and desmin protein cleavage verified by Western blot analysis and mass spectrometry. IHC results revealed that ACF cardiomyocytes at 4 and 12 wk had perinuclear translocation of αB-crystallin from the Z disk with increased α, β-unsaturated aldehyde 4-hydroxynonelal. Use of protein markers with verification by TUNEL staining and kinome analysis revealed an absence of cardiomyocyte apoptosis at 4 and 12 wk of ACF. Significant increases in protein indicators of mitophagy were countered by a sixfold increase in p62/sequestosome-1, which is indicative of an inability to complete autophagy. An early and continuous disruption of the desmin/mitochondrial architecture, accompanied by oxidative stress and inhibition of apoptosis and mitophagy, suggests its causal role in LV dilatation and systolic dysfunction in VO. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study provides new evidence of early onset (24 h) and continuous (4-12 wk) desmin misarrangement and disruption of the normal sarcomeric and mitochondrial

  10. Total elbow arthroplasty: a radiographic outcome study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xue Susan [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Box 357115, Seattle, WA (United States); Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M. [Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Ha, Alice S. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Box 354755, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) is becoming a popular alternative to arthrodesis for patients with end-stage elbow arthrosis and comminuted distal humeral fractures. Prior outcome studies have primarily focused on surgical findings. Our purpose is to determine the radiographic outcome of TEA and to correlate with clinical symptoms such as pain. This is an IRB-approved retrospective review from 2005 to 2015 of all patients with semiconstrained TEA. All available elbow radiographs and clinical data were reviewed. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meier survival curves for radiographic and clinical survival. A total of 104 total elbow arthroplasties in 102 patients were reviewed; 75 % were in women and the mean patient age was 63.1 years. Mean radiographic follow-up was 826 days with average of four radiographs per patient. Seventy TEAs (67 %) developed radiographic complications, including heterotopic ossification (48 %), perihardware lucency (27 %), periprosthetic fracture (23 %), hardware subluxation/dislocation (7 %), polyethylene wear (3 %), and hardware fracture/dislodgement (3 %); 56 patients (55 %) developed symptoms of elbow pain or instability and 30 patients (30 %) underwent at least one reoperation. In patients with radiographic complications, 66 % developed elbow pain, compared to 19 % of patients with no radiologic complications (p = 0.001). Of the patients with radiographic complications, 39 % had at least one additional surgery compared to 0 % of patients without radiographic complications (p = 0.056). Radiographic complications are common in patients after total elbow arthroplasty. There is a strong positive association between post-operative radiographic findings and clinical outcome. Knowledge of common postoperative radiographic findings is important for the practicing radiologist. (orig.)

  11. Dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment in acute pulmonary embolism - correlation with D-dimer level, right heart strain and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Ralf W.; Frellesen, Claudia; Schell, Boris; Lehnert, Thomas; Jacobi, Volkmar; Vogl, Thomas J.; Kerl, J.M. [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Renker, Matthias [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashley River Tower, Charleston, SC (United States); Ackermann, Hanns [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Biostatistics and Mathematical Modelling, Frankfurt (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashley River Tower, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2011-09-15

    To investigate the role of perfusion defect (PD) size on dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment as predictor of right heart strain and patient outcome and its correlation with d-dimer levels in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). 53 patients with acute PE who underwent DECT pulmonary angiography were retrospectively analyzed. Pulmonary PD size caused by PE was measured on DE iodine maps and quantified absolutely (VolPD) and relatively to the total lung volume (RelPD). Signs of right heart strain (RHS) on CT were determined. Information on d-dimer levels and readmission for recurrent onset of PE and death was collected. D-dimer level was mildly (r = 0.43-0.47) correlated with PD size. Patients with RHS had significantly higher VolPD (215 vs. 73 ml) and RelPD (9.9 vs. 2.9%) than patients without RHS (p < 0.003). There were 2 deaths and 1 readmission due of PE in 18 patients with >5% RelPD, while no such events were found for patients with <5% RelPD. Pulmonary blood volume on DECT in acute PE correlates with RHS and appears to be a predictor of patient outcome in this pilot study. (orig.)

  12. Radiographer commenting of trauma radiographs: a survey of the benefits, barriers and enablers to participation in an Australian healthcare setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neep, Michael J.; Steffens, Tom; Owen, Rebecca; McPhail, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Radiographer abnormality detection systems that highlight abnormalities on trauma radiographs ('red dot' system) have been operating for more than 30 years. Recently, a number of pitfalls have been identified. These limitations initiated the evolution of a radiographer commenting system, whereby a radiographer provides a brief description of abnormalities identified in emergency healthcare settings. This study investigated radiographers' participation in abnormality detection systems, their perceptions of benefits, barriers and enablers to radiographer commenting, and perceptions of potential radiographer image interpretation services for emergency settings. A cross-sectional survey was implemented. Participants included radiographers from four metropolitan hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Conventional descriptive statistics, histograms and thematic analysis were undertaken. Seventy-three surveys were completed and included in the analysis (68% response rate); 30 (41%) of respondents reported participating in abnormality detection in 20% or less of examinations, and 26(36%) reported participating in 80% or more of examinations. Five overarching perceived benefits of radiographer commenting were identified: assisting multidisciplinary teams, patient care, radiographer ability, professional benefits and quality of imaging. Frequently reported perceived barriers included 'difficulty accessing image interpretation education', 'lack of time' and 'low confidence in interpreting radiographs'. Perceived enablers included 'access to image interpretation education' and 'support from radiologist colleagues'. A range of factors are likely to contribute to the successful implementation of radiographer commenting in addition to abnormality detection in emergency settings. Effective image interpretation education amenable to completion by radiographers would likely prove valuable in preparing radiographers for participation in abnormality detection and commenting systems in

  13. Radiographic testing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Radiographic testing is a nondestructive inspection technique which uses penetrating radiation. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a broad spectrum of equipment and techniques for radiographic testing. These resources include low-energy vacuum systems, low- and mid-energy cabinet and cell radiographic systems, high-energy linear accelerators, portable x-ray machines and radioisotopes for radiographic inspections. For diagnostic testing the NDE Section also has real-time and flash radiographic equipment

  14. Interpretation and digestion of radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Radiography digestion is final test for the radiography to make sure that radiograph produced will inspect their quality of the image before its interpreted. This level is critical level where if there is a mistake, all of the radiography work done before will be unaccepted. So as mention earlier, it can waste time, cost and more worst it can make the production must shut down. So, this step, level two radiographers or interpreter must evaluate the radiograph carefully. For this purpose, digestion room and densitometer must used. Of course all the procedure must follow the specification that mentioned in document. There are several needs must fill before we can say the radiograph is corrected or not like the location of penetrameter, number of penetrameter that showed, the degree of density of film, and usually there is no problem in this step and the radiograph can go to interpretation and evaluation step as will mentioned in next chapter.

  15. Reporting by radiographers: a policy and practice guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, Audrey M.; Price, Richard C.; Thomas, Adrian; Nuttall, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    Reporting by radiographers and other non-medical staff has developed considerably in the past decade, and especially so since the College of Radiographers published its vision paper on reporting by radiographers, in 1997. It was felt necessary, therefore, to develop guidance to assist radiographers and others undertaking radiographic reporting. The guidance provided includes guidance on planning and implementing a reporting service using reporting radiographers; the education, continuing education and support required by reporting radiographers; quality and standards related to reporting; and the nature of a report. Broader issues that will need to be addressed as reporting by radiographers becomes the norm are also raised

  16. Radiographic markers for measuring tibial rotation based on CT-reconstructed radiographs. An accuracy and feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakimian, David; Khoury, Amal; Mosheiff, Rami; Liebergall, Meir; Weil, Yoram A.

    2018-01-01

    Malreduction in the axial plane (malrotation) following tibial fracture surgery is often undiagnosed. A few clinical and radiographic methods have been proposed for measuring tibial rotation intraoperatively, yet have failed to match the accuracy of computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study was to develop radiographic tools for future intraoperative assessment of the tibial shaft rotation profile. The setting was a laboratory computerized analysis. Twenty lower limb CT scans were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) model using AMIRA copyright software. A virtual 3D cylinder was implanted in the posterior condylar line and in the transmalleolar axis. The 3D models were used to simulate four standard knee and ankle plain radiographs. On each radiograph, four landmarks were depicted by two observers and their relation with the cylinder was measured and analyzed for accuracy and reproducibility. A cadaveric lower leg was implanted with two Kirschner wires. A CT scan was performed in addition to 2D fluoroscopy. The simulated radiographs and the fluoroscopy were compared for accuracy. Measurement of the landmarks showed reliability in most of the knee anteroposterior and ankle mortise radiographs (coefficients of variation < 0.01 and = 0.01) respectively. Cadaveric measurement of the landmarks using real fluoroscopy and simulated radiographs were similar. To date, no reliable and common methods have been reported for the evaluation of tibial axial rotation. We propose a model in which simple radiographic landmarks can be used to calculate a 3D coordinate system that accurately assesses the axial rotation angle of the tibial shaft. (orig.)

  17. Radiographic markers for measuring tibial rotation based on CT-reconstructed radiographs. An accuracy and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimian, David; Khoury, Amal; Mosheiff, Rami; Liebergall, Meir; Weil, Yoram A. [Hadassah Hebrew University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2018-04-15

    Malreduction in the axial plane (malrotation) following tibial fracture surgery is often undiagnosed. A few clinical and radiographic methods have been proposed for measuring tibial rotation intraoperatively, yet have failed to match the accuracy of computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study was to develop radiographic tools for future intraoperative assessment of the tibial shaft rotation profile. The setting was a laboratory computerized analysis. Twenty lower limb CT scans were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) model using AMIRA copyright software. A virtual 3D cylinder was implanted in the posterior condylar line and in the transmalleolar axis. The 3D models were used to simulate four standard knee and ankle plain radiographs. On each radiograph, four landmarks were depicted by two observers and their relation with the cylinder was measured and analyzed for accuracy and reproducibility. A cadaveric lower leg was implanted with two Kirschner wires. A CT scan was performed in addition to 2D fluoroscopy. The simulated radiographs and the fluoroscopy were compared for accuracy. Measurement of the landmarks showed reliability in most of the knee anteroposterior and ankle mortise radiographs (coefficients of variation < 0.01 and = 0.01) respectively. Cadaveric measurement of the landmarks using real fluoroscopy and simulated radiographs were similar. To date, no reliable and common methods have been reported for the evaluation of tibial axial rotation. We propose a model in which simple radiographic landmarks can be used to calculate a 3D coordinate system that accurately assesses the axial rotation angle of the tibial shaft. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of vasodilator therapy in patients with severe congestive heart failure: limitations of measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, B.G.; Dehmer, G.J.; Markham, R.V. Jr.; Willerson, J.T.; Hillis, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Although noninvasive techniques are often used to assess the effect of vasodilator therapy in patients with congestive heart failure, it is unknown whether changes in noninvasively determined left ventricular ejection fraction, volume, or dimension reliably reflect alterations in intracardiac pressure and flow. Accordingly, we compared the acute effect of sodium nitroprusside on left ventricular volume and ejection fraction (determined scintigraphically) with its effect on intracardiac pressure and forward cardiac index (determined by thermodilution) in 12 patients with severe, chronic congestive heart failure and a markedly dilated left ventricle. Nitroprusside (infused at 1.3 +/- 1.1 [mean +/- standard deviation] microgram/kg/min) caused a decrease in mean systemic arterial, mean pulmonary arterial, and mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure as well as a concomitant increase in forward cardiac index. Simultaneously, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes decreased, but the scintigraphically determined cardiac index did not change significantly. Left ventricular ejection fraction averaged 0.19 +/- 0.05 before nitroprusside administration and increased by less than 0.05 units in response to nitroprusside in 11 of 12 patients. The only significant correlation between scintigraphically and invasively determined variables was that between the percent change in end-diastolic volume index and the percent change in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (r . 0.68, p . 0.01). Although nitroprusside produced changes in scintigraphically determined left ventricular ejection fraction, end-systolic volume index, and cardiac index, these alterations bore no predictable relation to changes in intracardiac pressure, forward cardiac index, or vascular resistance. Furthermore, nitroprusside produced a considerably greater percent change in the invasively measured variables than in the scintigraphically determined ones

  19. Radiographic cup anteversion measurement corrected from pelvic tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liao; Thoreson, Andrew R; Trousdale, Robert T; Morrey, Bernard F; Dai, Kerong; An, Kai-Nan

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel technique to improve the accuracy of radiographic cup anteversion measurement by correcting the influence of pelvic tilt. Ninety virtual total hip arthroplasties were simulated from computed tomography data of 6 patients with 15 predetermined cup orientations. For each simulated implantation, anteroposterior (AP) virtual pelvic radiographs were generated for 11 predetermined pelvic tilts. A linear regression model was created to capture the relationship between radiographic cup anteversion angle error measured on AP pelvic radiographs and pelvic tilt. Overall, nine hundred and ninety virtual AP pelvic radiographs were measured, and 90 linear regression models were created. Pearson's correlation analyses confirmed a strong correlation between the errors of conventional radiographic cup anteversion angle measured on AP pelvic radiographs and the magnitude of pelvic tilt (P cup anteversion angle from the influence of pelvic tilt. The current method proposes to measure the pelvic tilt on a lateral radiograph, and to use it as a correction for the radiographic cup anteversion measurement on an AP pelvic radiograph. Thus, both AP and lateral pelvic radiographs are required for the measurement of pelvic posture-integrated cup anteversion. Compared with conventional radiographic cup anteversion, the errors of pelvic posture-integrated radiographic cup anteversion were reduced from 10.03 (SD = 5.13) degrees to 2.53 (SD = 1.33) degrees. Pelvic posture-integrated cup anteversion measurement improves the accuracy of radiographic cup anteversion measurement, which shows the potential of further clarifying the etiology of postoperative instability based on planar radiographs. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Calcification of the heart: A rare manifestation of chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, C.R. de

    1986-01-01

    A case is presented in which chronic renal failure led to intense visceral calcification, mainly to the lungs and heart. The discovery of cardiac calcifications on plain chest radiographs is exceedingly rare in renal patients. Puncate calcific deposits with an almost homogeneous distribution throughout the cardiac muscle were the main feature of this case. (orig.)

  1. Radiographic examination for successful dental implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul

    2005-01-01

    Recently implant has become an important field in dental clinic. Radiographic examination of pre- and post-operation is essential for successful treatment. Clinicians should have knowledge about the purpose of the radiographic examination, suitable imaging modality for the cases, anatomic landmarks of tooth and jaw bone, advantage and limitation of panoramic radiographic examination for implant, principle and interpretation of cross-sectional imaging, bone mineral density, post-operative radiographic examination. This paper will be helpful to get above information for dentists who want to do dental implant successfully.

  2. Closing the loop: modelling of heart failure progression from health to end-stage using a meta-analysis of left ventricular pressure-volume loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, David R; Brown, Alistair G; Varma, Susheel; Sheridan, Paul J; Lawford, Patricia; Hose, David R; Al-Mohammad, Abdallah; Shi, Yubing

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) guidelines for the classification of heart failure (HF) are descriptive but lack precise and objective measures which would assist in categorising such patients. Our aim was two fold, firstly to demonstrate quantitatively the progression of HF through each stage using a meta-analysis of existing left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume (PV) loop data and secondly use the LV PV loop data to create stage specific HF models. A literature search yielded 31 papers with PV data, representing over 200 patients in different stages of HF. The raw pressure and volume data were extracted from the papers using a digitising software package and the means were calculated. The data demonstrated that, as HF progressed, stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF%) decreased while LV volumes increased. A 2-element lumped parameter model was employed to model the mean loops and the error was calculated between the loops, demonstrating close fit between the loops. The only parameter that was consistently and statistically different across all the stages was the elastance (Emax). For the first time, the authors have created a visual and quantitative representation of the AHA/ACC stages of LVSD-HF, from normal to end-stage. The study demonstrates that robust, load-independent and reproducible parameters, such as elastance, can be used to categorise and model HF, complementing the existing classification. The modelled PV loops establish previously unknown physiological parameters for each AHA/ACC stage of LVSD-HF, such as LV elastance and highlight that it this parameter alone, in lumped parameter models, that determines the severity of HF. Such information will enable cardiovascular modellers with an interest in HF, to create more accurate models of the heart as it fails.

  3. Closing the loop: modelling of heart failure progression from health to end-stage using a meta-analysis of left ventricular pressure-volume loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Warriner

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The American Heart Association (AHA/American College of Cardiology (ACC guidelines for the classification of heart failure (HF are descriptive but lack precise and objective measures which would assist in categorising such patients. Our aim was two fold, firstly to demonstrate quantitatively the progression of HF through each stage using a meta-analysis of existing left ventricular (LV pressure-volume (PV loop data and secondly use the LV PV loop data to create stage specific HF models. METHODS AND RESULTS: A literature search yielded 31 papers with PV data, representing over 200 patients in different stages of HF. The raw pressure and volume data were extracted from the papers using a digitising software package and the means were calculated. The data demonstrated that, as HF progressed, stroke volume (SV, ejection fraction (EF% decreased while LV volumes increased. A 2-element lumped parameter model was employed to model the mean loops and the error was calculated between the loops, demonstrating close fit between the loops. The only parameter that was consistently and statistically different across all the stages was the elastance (Emax. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, the authors have created a visual and quantitative representation of the AHA/ACC stages of LVSD-HF, from normal to end-stage. The study demonstrates that robust, load-independent and reproducible parameters, such as elastance, can be used to categorise and model HF, complementing the existing classification. The modelled PV loops establish previously unknown physiological parameters for each AHA/ACC stage of LVSD-HF, such as LV elastance and highlight that it this parameter alone, in lumped parameter models, that determines the severity of HF. Such information will enable cardiovascular modellers with an interest in HF, to create more accurate models of the heart as it fails.

  4. Validity of radiographic assessment of ankylosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenvik, A.; Beyer-Olsen, E.; Aabyholm, F.; Haanaes, H.R.; Gerner, N.W.

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy and sensitivity of radiographic assessments of reactive processes in dental tissues were evaluated by comparison of radiographs and histologic sections. Experimental lesions inflicted on the roots of 10 monkey incisors had been observed by means of serially obtained radiographs over a period of 315 to 370 days. The material was used for evaluation of radiographic assessment of ankylosis. For comparative purposes, assessment of the experimental lesion penetrating to the pulp and periapical radiolucency was added. True and falsely positive or negative recordings formed the basis for calculation of the accuracy and sensitivity of the radiographic assessment. The sensitivity, or the obsevers ability to detect the actual changes, was high for pulp penetration, intermediate for inflammation, and low for ankylosis. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Radiographic testing - optimum radiographs of plastics and composite materials with dosimeter control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuster, J.

    1978-01-01

    In view of great differencies in X-ray transmission it is more difficult to get optimum radiographs of plastics and especially of reinforced plastics than for example of metals. A procedure will be reported how to get with little effort optimum radiographs especially also in the range of long wavelength radiation corresponding 10 to 25 kV.P. (orig.) [de

  6. 21 CFR 892.1840 - Radiographic film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic film. 892.1840 Section 892.1840 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1840 Radiographic film. (a) Identification. Radiographic film is a device that consists of a thin sheet of radiotransparent material coated on one or both...

  7. Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

  8. Radiographic bone loss in a Scottish non-smoking Type 1 Diabetes mellitus population; a Bitewing Radiographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessas, Anastasios; Robertson, Douglas P; Hodge, Penny J

    2018-05-15

    The dental complications of uncontrolled diabetes include reduced salivary flow rate, candidiasis and periodontal manifestations. A recent meta-analysis concluded that diabetes patients have a significantly higher severity, but not extent, of destructive periodontal disease than non-diabetes people. The authors reported that most type-1 diabetes studies using dental radiographic data have not controlled for confounding factors such as smoking. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare radiographic alveolar bone loss between type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and non-diabetes (NDM) participants in a Scottish non-smoking population. Digital bitewing radiographs for 174 Scottish adult never or ex-smoker (> 5 years) participants (108 T1DM, 66 NDS), recruited from outpatient clinics throughout Greater Glasgow and Clyde, were included in the analysis. A single blinded, trained and calibrated examiner recorded the radiographic bone loss seen on bitewing radiographs using the digital screen caliper. The bone loss was measured as the distance between the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and the deepest radiographic alveolar bone margin interproximally of each tooth. T1DM participants had more radiographic alveolar bone loss throughout the all teeth measured (median:1.27 mm vs 1.06 mm, P diabetes subjects. Patients suffering from type 1 diabetes are at higher risk of periodontitis even when controlling for multiple possible confounding factors and this difference can be detected on routine dental radiographs at an early stage. These data confirm radiographically the previously reported association between T1DM and periodontal bone loss. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 American Academy of Periodontology.

  9. Non-radiographic methods for IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, Manoj K.

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of radiation therapy is to deliver a tumouricidal dose within a defined target volume while minimizing dose to surrounding normal tissues. In recent years, advanced technologies such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been used to meet the goal. High dose conformity and steep dose gradients beyond the target volume achieved with these technologies warrant high level of accuracy in the dose delivery. Therefore, accurate patient localization, target segmentation and motion compensation have become mandatory requirements. Several technologies have been developed over the years to image the patient for treatment planning and for subsequent daily imaging/tracking while the patient is on the treatment table. For image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) some of the technologies are kilovoltage (kV) x-rays imaging, in-room computed tomography (CT), kV and MV cone-beam CT(CBCT). One of the chief drawbacks of these technologies is addition of radiation dose to the patients. There are other technologies that do not use ionizing radiation such as USG, MRI, patient surface monitoring using infrared and optical radiation, and radiofrequency (RF)-based localization/tracking systems that are also being developed for the purpose. These technologies may be collectively called as non-radiographic (NR) technologies for IGRT

  10. Reproductive health of male radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhatreh, Farouk M.

    2001-01-01

    To compare certain reproductive health problems reported in 2 groups of males, one of which was exposed to x-ray radiation (radiographers) and the other group that was not exposed to x-ray radiation. The reproductive health problems were miscarriage, congenital anomalies, still births and infertility. Two groups of men were selected (90 in each group). The first group consisted of radiographers and the other groups consisted of men not exposed to x-ray radiation. The 2 groups were matched for age and source. Relative risk, attributable risk percentage and level of significance were calculated. Incidence rate of reproductive health problems was increasing with the increase in duration of exposure to x-ray radiation ranging between 17% (for those exposed for 1-5 years) to 91% (for those exposed for more than 15 years). There were significant associations between exposure to radiation and miscarriage (relative risk = 1.67, attributable risk percentage = 40%), congenital anomalies (relative risk = 10, attributable risk percentage 90%), still birth (relative risk = 7, attributable risk percentage = 86%), and infertility (relative risk = 4.5, attributable risk = 78%). The incidence rates of reproductive health problems reported by male radiographers were significantly higher than that reported by the non exposed group and higher than the incidence rates reported in community-based studies in Jordan. The incidence rates of fetal death (miscarriage and stillbirth together) and infertility reported by our radiographers were higher than had been reported by the British radiographers. An immediate plan of action is needed to protect our radiographers. Further studies are needed in this field taking into account all extraneous variables that may affect the reproductive health of radiographers. (author)

  11. Multivariate Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Heart Valve Dysfunction in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cella, Laura; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Conson, Manuel; D’Avino, Vittoria; Salvatore, Marco; Pacelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced asymptomatic heart valvular defects (RVD). Methods and Materials: Fifty-six patients treated with sequential chemoradiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) were retrospectively reviewed for RVD events. Clinical information along with whole heart, cardiac chambers, and lung dose distribution parameters was collected, and the correlations to RVD were analyzed by means of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (Rs). For the selection of the model order and parameters for NTCP modeling, a multivariate logistic regression method using resampling techniques (bootstrapping) was applied. Model performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: When we analyzed the whole heart, a 3-variable NTCP model including the maximum dose, whole heart volume, and lung volume was shown to be the optimal predictive model for RVD (Rs = 0.573, P<.001, AUC = 0.83). When we analyzed the cardiac chambers individually, for the left atrium and for the left ventricle, an NTCP model based on 3 variables including the percentage volume exceeding 30 Gy (V30), cardiac chamber volume, and lung volume was selected as the most predictive model (Rs = 0.539, P<.001, AUC = 0.83; and Rs = 0.557, P<.001, AUC = 0.82, respectively). The NTCP values increase as heart maximum dose or cardiac chambers V30 increase. They also increase with larger volumes of the heart or cardiac chambers and decrease when lung volume is larger. Conclusions: We propose logistic NTCP models for RVD considering not only heart irradiation dose but also the combined effects of lung and heart volumes. Our study establishes the statistical evidence of the indirect effect of lung size on radio-induced heart toxicity

  12. Right ventricular volume determination by two-dimensional echocardiography and radiography in model hearts using a subtraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, W.; Erbel, R.; Schweizer, P.; Richter, H.A.; Massberg, I.; Meyer, J.; Effert, S.; Henn, G.

    1982-01-01

    The irregularity and complexity of the right ventricle is the reason why no accurate method for right ventricular volume determination exists. A new method for right ventricular volume determination particularly for two-dimensional echocardiography was developed - it is called subtraction method - and was compared with the pyramid and Simpson's methods. The partial volume of the left ventricle and septum was subtracted from total volume of right and left ventricle including interventricular septum. Thus right ventricular volume resulted. Total and partial volume were computer-assisted calculated by use of biplane methods, preferably Simpson's rule. The method was proved with thinwall silicon-rubber model hearts of the left and right ventricle. Two orthogonal planes in the long-axis were filmed by radiography or scanned in a water bath by two-dimensional echocardiography equivalent to RAO and LAO-projections of cineangiocardiograms or to four- and two-chamber views of apical two-dimensional echocardiograms. For calculation of the major axes of the elliptical sections, summed up by Simpson's rule, they were derived from the LAO-projection and the four-chamber view, respectively, the minor axis approximated from the RAO-projection and the two-chamber view. For comparison of direct-measured volume and two-dimensional echocardiographically determined volume, regression equation was given by y = 1.01 x - 3.2, correlation-coefficient, r = 0.977, and standard error of estimate (SEE) +-10.5 ml. For radiography, regression equation was y = 0.909 x + 13.3, r = 0.983, SEE = +-8.0 ml. For pyramid method and Simpson's rule, higher standard errors and lower correlation coefficients were found. Between radiography and two-dimensional echocardiography a mean difference of 4.3 +- 13.2 ml, using subtraction method, and -10.2 +- 22.9 ml, using pyramid method, as well as -0.6 +- 18.5 ml, using Simpson's rule, were calculated for right ventricular volume measurements. (orig./APR) [de

  13. Evaluation on the influence of electrocardiograph modulated milliampere on image quality and exposure dosage of volume CT heart scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Sen; Du Xiangke; Li Jianyin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To find out whether the use of ECG modulated current (mA) will influence image quality and to decide whether the electrocardiograph (ECG) modulated mA will effectively reduce the exposure dosage. Methods: The cardiac pulsating phantom was set at three speed levels, i.e. high, medium, and low speed so as to simulate different heart rates. The phantom was scanned with ECG modulated mA turned on and off, and the exposure dosage of each scan sequence was documented. The images were reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm that matched the different levels of heart rate. CT values and their corresponding standard deviations at uniform areas on the images and the variation of the CT values at different locations were measured. The results from the two groups with and without ECG modulated mA were analyzed. Results: Under the same level of heart rate, the exposure dosage was remarkably reduced when the ECG modulated mA was on than when it was off. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference (P>0.05) between the images from the two groups. Conclusion: When scanning the heart with volume CT (VCT), the application of ECG modulated mA can effectively reduce the exposure dosage without sacrificing the image quality. (authors)

  14. RADIOGRAPHIC THORACIC ANATOMY OF THE RED PANDA (AILURUS FULGENS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makungu, Modesta; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Groenewald, Hermanus B; Koeppel, Katja N

    2016-09-01

    The red panda ( Ailurus fulgens ) is classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. The natural distribution of the red panda is in the Himalayas and southern China. Thoracic diseases such as dirofilariasis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, tracheal obstruction, lung worm infestation, and pneumonia have been reported in the red panda. The aim of this study was to describe the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of captive red pandas as a species-specific reference for routine health examinations and clinical cases. Right lateral (RL) and dorsoventral (DV) inspiratory phase views of the thorax were obtained in 11 adult captive red pandas. Measurements were made and ratios calculated to establish reference ranges for the mean vertebral heart score on the RL (8.34 ± 0.25) and DV (8.78 ± 0.34) views and the mean ratios of the caudal vena cava diameter to the vertebral body length above tracheal bifurcation (0.67 ± 0.05) and tracheal diameter to the width of the third rib (2.75 ± 0.24). The majority of animals (10/11) had 14 thoracic vertebrae, except for one animal that had 15 thoracic vertebrae. Rudimentary clavicles were seen in 3/11 animals. The ovoid, oblique cardiac silhouette was more horizontally positioned and elongated in older animals. A redundant aortic arch was seen in the oldest animal. The trachea was seen with mineralized cartilage rings in all animals. The carina was clearly seen in the majority of animals (10/11). Variations exist in the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of different species. Knowledge of the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of the red panda should prove useful for routine health examinations and in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases.

  15. Accuracy of radiographer reporting of paediatric brain CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Andrew; Louw, Brand; Dekker, Gerrit; Andronikou, Savvas; Wieselthaler, Nicki; Kilborn, Tracy; Bertelsman, Jessica; Dreyer, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Radiographer reporting has been studied for plain films and for ultrasonography, but not in paediatric brain CT in the emergency setting. To study the accuracy of radiographer reporting in paediatric brain CT. We prospectively collected 100 paediatric brain CT examinations. Films were read from hard copies using a prescribed tick sheet. Radiographers with 12 years' and 3 years' experience, respectively, were blinded to the history and were not trained in diagnostic film interpretation. The radiographers' results were compared with those of a consultant radiologist. Three categories were defined: abnormal scans, significant abnormalities and insignificant abnormalities. Both radiographers had an accuracy of 89.5% in reading a scan correctly as abnormal, and radiographer 1 had a sensitivity of 87.8% and radiographer 2 a sensitivity of 96%. Radiographer 1 had an accuracy in detecting a significant abnormality of 75% and radiographer 2 an accuracy of 48.6%, and the sensitivities for this category were 61.6% and 52.9%, respectively. Results for detecting the insignificant abnormalities were poorer. Selected radiographers could play an effective screening role, but lacking the sensitivity required for detecting significant abnormality, they could not be the final diagnostician. We recommend that the study be repeated after both radiographers have received formal training in interpretation of paediatric brain CT. (orig.)

  16. An exploratory study of radiographer's perceptions of radiographer commenting on musculo-skeletal trauma images in rural community based hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Morag L.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study sought to explore the perceptions of community hospital based radiographers in North East Scotland regarding the practice of radiographer commenting on musculo-skeletal trauma images. Method: A purposive sample of radiographers (n = 8) were recruited from community hospitals throughout the North-east of Scotland. A qualitative, exploratory study was conducted employing semi-structured interviews consisting of one focus group and two individual interviews. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed in full to allow thematic analysis of the data using a framework adapted from Pope and Mays (2006). Main findings: This study revealed that the practice of radiographer commenting in the community provides a valuable front line opinion on musculo-skeletal trauma image appearances to enhance diagnostic outcomes for patients and streamline their care pathway. The appreciation shown from inter-professional colleagues for this practice induced feelings of professional pride and job satisfaction in the sample group. All participants expressed a desire to undertake additional training to allow progression from radiographer commenting to radiographer reporting of musculo-skeletal trauma images. Perceived barriers to the practice of radiographer commenting were time constraints and a lack of support with regards to continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities and mentorship from radiology colleagues. Conclusion: The practice of radiographer commenting in the community setting should be supported by ongoing training, and radiologist involvement in mentoring could provide radiographers with a valuable support mechanism. The voice of all radiographers regarding this extended role must be heard by professional leaders to ensure that the skills and education required for radiographer commenting are provided and subsequent patient care is not compromised

  17. Mediastinal and heart wall invasion by actinomycosis: CT and MRI appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, C.; Schmutz, G.R.; Benko, A.J.; Kastler, B.

    1994-01-01

    Widespread use of antibiotics facilitates the development of some uncommon chronic infections such as actinomycosis. The clinical and radiographic findings overlap those of other inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. With a review of the literature, we report the CT and MRI findings in a case of thoracic actinomycosis, presenting with right ventricular failure caused by heart involvement. CT was helpful in identifying the mediastinal extent of the disease and in demonstrating the absence of pulmonary involvement. MRI, however, offered complementary information, especially in assessing heart involvement without the need for intravenous contrast media. On T2-weighted images the mediastinal process was noted to be of relatively low signal intensity, possibly indicating its benign nature. The association with heart involvement was suggestive of thoracic actinomycosis. (orig.)

  18. Radiograph identifying means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    A flexible character-indentable plastics embossing tape is backed by and bonded to a lead strip, not more than 0.025 inches thick, to form a tape suitable for identifying radiographs. The lead strip is itself backed by a relatively thin and flimsy plastics or fabric strip which, when removed, allows the lead plastic tape to be pressure-bonded to the surface to be radiographed. A conventional tape-embossing gun is used to indent the desired characters in succession into the lead-backed tape, without necessarily severing the lead; and then the backing strip is peeled away to expose the layer of adhesive which pressure-bonds the indented tape to the object to be radiographed. X-rays incident on the embossed tape will cause the raised characters to show up dark on the subsequently-developed film, whilst the raised side areas will show up white. Each character will thus stand out on the developed film. (author)

  19. Camera-cinematography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.E.; Meyer, G.; Bitter, F.; Kampmann, H.; Bargon, G.; Stauch, M.; Ulm Univ.

    1975-01-01

    By 'camera-cinematography' of the heart, we mean an isotope method which permits detailed observation of cardiac mechanics without the use of a catheter. All that is necessary is an intravenous injection of 10 to 15 mCisup(99m)Tc human serum albumin followed after ten minutes by a five to ten minute period of observation with a scintillation camera. At this time the isotope has become distributed in the blood. Variations in the precordial impulses correspond with intra-cardiac changes of blood volume during a cardiac cycle. Analysis of the R-wave provides adequate information of cyclical volume changes in limited portions of the heart. This is achieved by a monitor with a pseudo-3-dimensional display; contraction and relaxation of the myocardium can be shown for any chosen longitudinal or horizontal diameter of the heart. Our programme allows simultaneous presentation of the movement of any point on the myocardium as a time-activity curve. The method is recommended as an addition to chest radiography, heart screening or cardiac kymography before carrying out cardiac catheterisation. (orig.) [de

  20. H1N1 influenza infection in children: Frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, S.-Y.; Kim, J.H.; Eo, H.; Jeon, T.Y.; Shin, K.E.; Shin, W.S.; Jung, H.N.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To describe the frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Materials and methods: Three hundred and fourteen paediatric patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection who underwent chest radiography at presentation at a single institution during the outbreak in 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal chest radiographic findings related to acute infection were analysed in terms of frequency, pattern, and distribution. Medical records and follow-up radiographs were also reviewed to assess clinical features and outcomes. Results: Chest lesions suggesting acute infection were identified in 49 (16%) patients (mean age 8.2 years, range approximately 1.8-18.5 years). The most common finding was prominent peribronchial marking (71%), followed by air-space opacity (51%) with or without volume decrease, generalized hyperinflation (24%), and pleural effusion (20%). Other minor findings included pneumomediastinum (n = 2) and a nodule (n = 1). Distributions were bilateral (55%) or unilateral (45%) with frequent involvement of lower (78%), and middle (59%) lung zones. Thirty-nine patients (80%) were hospitalized and six (12%) required mechanical ventilation, followed by recovery. Thirty-one out of the 33 patients that underwent follow-up radiography showed marked resolution of all radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: The frequency of a chest radiographic abnormality was found to be low in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Although typical radiographic findings of a viral lower respiratory infection were more common, unilateral involvement and air-space opacity were common, often with pleural effusion. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions showed near complete resolution on follow-up radiographs in the majority of patients.

  1. H1N1 influenza infection in children: Frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.-Y. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.H., E-mail: jhkate@skku.ed [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, H.; Jeon, T.Y.; Shin, K.E.; Shin, W.S.; Jung, H.N. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.-J. [Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Aim: To describe the frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Materials and methods: Three hundred and fourteen paediatric patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection who underwent chest radiography at presentation at a single institution during the outbreak in 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal chest radiographic findings related to acute infection were analysed in terms of frequency, pattern, and distribution. Medical records and follow-up radiographs were also reviewed to assess clinical features and outcomes. Results: Chest lesions suggesting acute infection were identified in 49 (16%) patients (mean age 8.2 years, range approximately 1.8-18.5 years). The most common finding was prominent peribronchial marking (71%), followed by air-space opacity (51%) with or without volume decrease, generalized hyperinflation (24%), and pleural effusion (20%). Other minor findings included pneumomediastinum (n = 2) and a nodule (n = 1). Distributions were bilateral (55%) or unilateral (45%) with frequent involvement of lower (78%), and middle (59%) lung zones. Thirty-nine patients (80%) were hospitalized and six (12%) required mechanical ventilation, followed by recovery. Thirty-one out of the 33 patients that underwent follow-up radiography showed marked resolution of all radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: The frequency of a chest radiographic abnormality was found to be low in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Although typical radiographic findings of a viral lower respiratory infection were more common, unilateral involvement and air-space opacity were common, often with pleural effusion. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions showed near complete resolution on follow-up radiographs in the majority of patients.

  2. Modification of a Volume-Overload Heart Failure Model to Track Myocardial Remodeling and Device-Related Reverse Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzun, Egemen; Bick, Roger; Kadipasaoglu, Cihan; Conger, Jeffrey L.; Poindexter, Brian J.; Gregoric, Igor D.; Frazier, O. H.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Radovancevic, Branislav

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To provide an ovine model of ventricular remodeling and reverse remodeling by creating congestive heart failure (CHF) and then treating it by implanting a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Methods. We induced volume-overload heart failure in 2 sheep; 20 weeks later, we implanted an LVAD and assessed recovery 11 weeks thereafter. We examined changes in histologic and hemodynamic data and levels of cellular markers of CHF. Results. After CHF induction, we found increases in LV end-diastolic pressure, LV systolic and diastolic dimensions, wall thickness, left atrial diameter, and atrial natriuretic protein (ANP) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels; β-adrenergic receptor (BAR) and dystrophin expression decreased markedly. Biopsies confirmed LV remodeling. After LVAD support, LV systolic and diastolic dimensions, wall thickness, and mass, and ANP and ET-1 levels decreased. Histopathologic and hemodynamic markers improved, and BAR and dystrophin expression normalized. Conclusions. We describe a successful sheep model for ventricular and reverse remodeling. PMID:22347659

  3. Variability of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes with quantitative gated SPECT: influence of algorithm, pixel size and reconstruction parameters in small and normal-sized hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambye, Anne-Sophie; Vervaet, Ann; Dobbeleir, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Several software packages are commercially available for quantification of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and volumes from myocardial gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), all of which display a high reproducibility. However, their accuracy has been questioned in patients with a small heart. This study aimed to evaluate the performances of different software and the influence of modifications in acquisition or reconstruction parameters on LVEF and volume measurements, depending on the heart size. In 31 patients referred for gated SPECT, 64 2 and 128 2 matrix acquisitions were consecutively obtained. After reconstruction by filtered back-projection (Butterworth, 0.4, 0.5 or 0.6 cycles/cm cut-off, order 6), LVEF and volumes were computed with different software [three versions of Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS), the Emory Cardiac Toolbox (ECT) and the Stanford University (SU-Segami) Medical School algorithm] and processing workstations. Depending upon their end-systolic volume (ESV), patients were classified into two groups: group I (ESV>30 ml, n=14) and group II (ESV 2 to 128 2 were associated with significantly larger volumes as well as lower LVEF values. Increasing the filter cut-off frequency had the same effect. With SU-Segami, a larger matrix was associated with larger end-diastolic volumes and smaller ESVs, resulting in a highly significant increase in LVEF. Increasing the filter sharpness, on the other hand, had no influence on LVEF though the measured volumes were significantly larger. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes in patients with congenital heart disease and abnormal left ventricular geometry. Comparison of MRI and transthoracic 3-dimensional echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutberlet, M.; Grothoff, M.; Roettgen, R.; Lange, P.; Felix, R.; Abdul-Khaliq, H.; Schroeter, J.; Schmitt, B.; Vogel, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the new method of 3-dimensional echocardiography in comparison to the 'gold standard' MRI as to its ability to calculate left ventricular volumes in patients with congenital heart disease. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients between the ages of 3.9 to 37.3 years (mean: 12.8±9.7) with a geometrically abnormal left ventricle were examined using a 1.5 T scanner with a fast gradient-echo sequence (TR=14 ms, TE=2.6-2.9 ms, FOV=300-400 mm, flip angle=20 , matrix=128:256, slice thickness=5 mm, retrospective gating) in multislice-multiphase technique. Transthoracic 3D-echocardiography was performed with a 3.5 MHz transducer and a Tomtec trademark (Munich, Germany) system for 3D reconstruction. Results: Volume calculation was possible in all patients with 3D-echocardiography, but the muscle mass calculation only succeeded in 11 to 18 patients (61%) due to inadequate visualization of the entire myocardium. Comparing MRI and 3D-echocardiography, the correlation was r=0.97 for the end-systolic volumes, r=0.98 for the end-diastolic volumes, r=0.79 for the end-systolic muscle mass and r=0.77 for the end-diastolic muscle mass. The agreement between both methods was considered good for the calculated end-diastolic volumes and sufficient for the calculated end-systolic volumes. The muscle mass calculations showed larger differences especially for the end-systolic mass. Mean intraobserver variability was 18.6% for end-systolic and 8.3% for end-diastolic volumes. Conclusion: In patients with an abnormal left ventricular configuration due to congenital heart disease, the new method of 3D-echocardiography is sufficient for volume calculations in preselected patients. The high intraobserver variability is still a limitation of transthoracic 3D-echocardiography in comparison to MRI. (orig.) [de

  5. Legalities of the radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The radiograph itself plays a major role in medical malpractice cases. Also, many questions arise concerning the rights to and storage of x-ray films. These issues are addressed in this chapter. To keep the terminology simple, the word radiograph represents all imaging documentation on hard copy film (x-rays, nuclear medicine, computer-assisted studies, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging)

  6. Consultant breast radiographers: Where are we now?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, Zebby

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to: • Evaluate the current role of the consultant breast radiographer. • Compare current practice with the four key components for consultant practice. • Gauge the support of radiologist colleagues. • Determine the other professional commitments involved with the role. This study could be the precursor for a macro study of all consultant radiographer practice in other specialities. Methodology: Methodology used was a comparative ethnographic study. Questionnaires to the 24 consultant breast radiographers currently in post, and consultant breast radiologists, who work with them, were conducted. Data collection was a qualitative thematic approach. Conclusion: Consultant breast radiographers provide high quality care to patients through excellent clinical practice, leadership and good communication. However, this study shows hospital Trusts emphasis for non medical consultants is for clinical practice first. Some radiologists are still a barrier to progression for consultant breast radiographers, and radiologists have a big influence in recruitment decisions. Consultant breast radiographer posts are well established, their numbers are increasing through recognition of the role and of their abilities and performance. Consultant breast radiographers state that becoming a consultant is the major achievement of their career, proving the Society of Radiographers' vision of the four-tier career structure has been well received by the radiography profession

  7. Importance of radiographic monitoring of endoscopic sphincterotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, H.M.; Goldberg, H.I.; Shapiro, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic features of endoscopic sphincterotomies performed in 44 patients were evaluated. Radiographic landmarks aided in proper sphincterotome placement and also disclosed conditions and anatomic variations that made catheter placement difficult. Fluoroscopic and radiographic monitoring not only assisted the performance of endoscopic sphincterotomy, but also confirmed successful results and revealed reasons for failure. Radiographic changes in the biliary tract after sphincterotomy, as well as potential complications of sphincterotomy, are discussed and illustrated

  8. Radiation protection - radiographer's role and responsibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popli, P.K.

    2002-01-01

    Ever since discovery of x-rays, radiographers has been the prime user of radiation. With the passage of time, the harmful effects of radiation were detected. Some of radiographers, radiologists and public were affected by radiation, but today with enough knowledge of radiation, the prime responsibility of radiation protection lies with the radiographers only. The radiologist and physicist are also associated with radiation protection to some extent

  9. Intra-observer reproducibility and interobserver reliability of the radiographic parameters in the Spinal Deformity Study Group's AIS Radiographic Measurement Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Natasha Radhika; Moreau, Marc J; Hill, Douglas L; Mahood, James K; Raso, James

    2005-05-01

    Retrospective cross-sectional assessment of the reproducibility and reliability of radiographic parameters. To measure the intra-examiner and interexaminer reproducibility and reliability of salient radiographic features. The management and treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) depends on accurate and reproducible radiographic measurements of the deformity. Ten sets of radiographs were randomly selected from a sample of patients with AIS, with initial curves between 20 degrees and 45 degrees. Fourteen measures of the deformity were measured from posteroanterior and lateral radiographs by 2 examiners, and were repeated 5 times at intervals of 3-5 days. Intra-examiner and interexaminer differences were examined. The parameters include measures of curve size, spinal imbalance, sagittal kyphosis and alignment, maximum apical vertebral rotation, T1 tilt, spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis, and skeletal age. Intra-examiner reproducibility was generally excellent for parameters measured from the posteroanterior radiographs but only fair to good for parameters from the lateral radiographs, in which some landmarks were not clearly visible. Of the 13 parameters observed, 7 had excellent interobserver reliability. The measurements from the lateral radiograph were less reproducible and reliable and, thus, may not add value to the assessment of AIS. Taking additional measures encourages a systematic and comprehensive assessment of spinal radiographs.

  10. Catheters, wires, tubes and drains on postoperative radiographs of pediatric cardiac patients: the whys and wherefores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teele, Sarah A.; Thiagarajan, Ravi R. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Emani, Sitaram M. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Teele, Rita L. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Starship Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Grafton (New Zealand)

    2008-10-15

    Surgical treatment of congenital heart disease has advanced dramatically since the first intracardiac repairs in the mid-20th century. Previously inoperable lesions have become the focus of routine surgery and patients are managed successfully in intensive care units around the world. As a result, increasing numbers of postoperative images are processed by departments of radiology in children's hospitals. It is important that the radiologist accurately documents and describes the catheters, wires, tubes and drains that are present on the chest radiograph. This article reviews the reasons for the placement and positioning of perioperative equipment in children who have surgical repair of atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect or transposition of the great arteries. Also included are a brief synopsis of each cardiac anomaly, the surgical procedure for its correction, and an in-depth discussion of the postoperative chest radiograph including illustrations of catheters, wires, tubes and drains. (orig.)

  11. Catheters, wires, tubes and drains on postoperative radiographs of pediatric cardiac patients: the whys and wherefores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teele, Sarah A.; Thiagarajan, Ravi R.; Emani, Sitaram M.; Teele, Rita L.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical treatment of congenital heart disease has advanced dramatically since the first intracardiac repairs in the mid-20th century. Previously inoperable lesions have become the focus of routine surgery and patients are managed successfully in intensive care units around the world. As a result, increasing numbers of postoperative images are processed by departments of radiology in children's hospitals. It is important that the radiologist accurately documents and describes the catheters, wires, tubes and drains that are present on the chest radiograph. This article reviews the reasons for the placement and positioning of perioperative equipment in children who have surgical repair of atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect or transposition of the great arteries. Also included are a brief synopsis of each cardiac anomaly, the surgical procedure for its correction, and an in-depth discussion of the postoperative chest radiograph including illustrations of catheters, wires, tubes and drains. (orig.)

  12. Emerging hemodynamic signatures of the right heart (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bradley A

    2014-12-01

    Despite the importance of preserved right ventricular structure and function with respect to outcome across the spectrum of lung, cardiac, and pulmonary vascular diseases, only recently have organized efforts developed to consider the pulmonary vascular-right ventricular apparatus as a specific unit within the larger context of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. The Third International Right Heart Failure Summit (Boston, MA) was a multidisciplinary event dedicated to promoting a dialogue about the scientific and clinical basis of right heart disease. The current review provides a synopsis of key discussions presented during the section of the summit titled "Emerging Hemodynamic Signatures of the Right Heart." Specifically, topics emphasized in this element of the symposium included (1) the effects of pulmonary vascular dysfunction at rest or provoked by exercise on the right ventricular pressure-volume relationship, (2) the role of pressure-volume loop analysis as a method to characterize right ventricular inefficiency and predict right heart failure, and (3) the importance of a systems biology approach to identifying novel factors that contribute to pathophenotypes associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension and/or right ventricular dysfunction. Collectively, these concepts frame a forward-thinking paradigm shift in the approach to right heart disease by emphasizing factors that regulate the transition from adaptive to maladaptive right ventricular-pulmonary vascular (patho)physiology.

  13. Influence of heart failure on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Aline Soares de; Sperandio, Priscila Abreu; Mazzuco, Adriana; Alencar, Maria Clara; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; Oliveira, Mayron Faria de; O'Donnell, Denis Eunan; Neder, José Alberto

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of chronic heart failure (CHF) on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD, i.e., inspiratory fraction-inspiratory capacity (IC)/TLC-and relative inspiratory reserve-[1 - (end-inspiratory lung volume/TLC)]. This was a prospective study involving 56 patients with COPD-24 (23 males/1 female) with COPD+CHF and 32 (28 males/4 females) with COPD only-who, after careful clinical stabilization, underwent spirometry (with forced and slow maneuvers) and whole-body plethysmography. Although FEV1, as well as the FEV1/FVC and FEV1/slow vital capacity ratios, were higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group, all major "static" volumes-RV, functional residual capacity (FRC), and TLC-were lower in the former group (p grupo DPOC+ICC; 23 homens/1 mulher) e 32 (28 homens/4 mulheres) com DPOC isolada foram submetidos à espirometria forçada e lenta e pletismografia de corpo inteiro. Os pacientes do grupo DPOC+ICC apresentaram maior VEF1, VEF1/CVF e VEF1/capacidade vital lenta; porém, todos os principais volumes "estáticos" - VR, capacidade residual funcional (CRF) e CPT - foram menores que aqueles do grupo DPOC (p grupo DPOC+ICC que no grupo DPOC. Houve redução relativamente proporcional da CRF e da CPT nos dois grupos; logo, a CI também foi similar. Consequentemente, a fração inspiratória no grupo DPOC+ICC foi maior que no grupo DPOC (0,42 ± 0,10 vs. 0,36 ± 0,10; p grupo DPOC+ICC, a reserva inspiratória relativa foi notadamente similar entre os grupos (0,35 ± 0,09 vs. 0,44 ± 0,14; p < 0,05). Apesar dos efeitos restritivos da ICC, pacientes com DPOC+ICC apresentam elevações relativas dos limites inspiratórios (maior fração inspiratória). Entretanto, esses pacientes utilizam apenas parte desses limites, com o provável intuito de evitar reduções críticas da reserva inspiratória e maior trabalho elástico.

  14. Radiographic, high detail radiographic, microangiographic and histological findings of the distal portion of the tarsus in weanling young and adult horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverty, S.; Stover, S.M.; Bélanger, D.; O'Brien, T.R.; Pool, R.R.; Pascoe, J.R.; Taylor, K.; Harrington, T.

    1991-01-01

    Clinical radiographic (LM and D35L-P1MO reviews), high detail radiographic, microangiographic and histological findings of distal portion of the tarsus of 16 horses (five weanling, four young and six adult), without known clinical histories, were evaluated to determine the sensitivity of clinical radiographs for the detection of abnormalities in the distal tarsus and the prevalence of abnormalities in this population. Clinical radiographic and high detail radiographic abnormalities were observed in at least 30 per cent of the tarsi examined. Statistical agreement between observations from clinical radiographs and corresponding post mortem high detail radiographs was not good for subchondral bone plate irregularities and joint margin changes. Three patterns of sclerosis of the medullary spongiosa were visualized on high detail radiographs; thickening of the subchondral bone plate was seen commonly in the weaning group,, whereas arching and bridging patterns were more prevalent in the young and adult groups. Bone production on the dorsal cortex of the central and third tarsal bones did not increase with age. Abnormalities in vascular perfusion and articular cartilage histology were observed in association with subchondral bone plate irregularities and focal regions of osteopenia observed on high detail radiographs

  15. Colloid volume loading does not mitigate decreases in central blood volume during simulated hemorrhage while heat stressed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crandall, Craig G; Wilson, Thad E; Marving, Jens

    2012-01-01

    attenuates the reduction in regional blood volumes during a simulated hemorrhagic challenge imposed via lower-body negative pressure (LBNP). Seven subjects underwent 30 mmHg LBNP while normothermic, during passive heat stress (increased internal temperature ~1°C), and while continuing to be heated after...... intravenous colloid volume loading (11 ml/kg). Relative changes in torso and regional blood volumes were determined by gamma camera imaging with technetium-99m labeled erythrocytes. Heat stress reduced blood volume in all regions (ranging from 7 to 16%), while subsequent volume loading returned those values...... to normothermic levels. While normothermic, LBNP reduced blood volume in all regions (torso: 22±8%; heart: 18±6%; spleen: 15±8%). During LBNP while heat stressed, the reductions in blood volume in each region were markedly greater when compared to LBNP while normothermic (torso: 73±2%; heart: 72±3%; spleen: 72...

  16. Simulated radiographic bone and joint modeling from 3D ankle MRI: feasibility and comparison with radiographs and 2D MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordeck, Shaun M. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical College, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Koerper, Conrad E.; Adler, Aaron [University of Texas Southwestern Medical College, Dallas, TX (United States); Malhotra, Vidur; Xi, Yin [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Liu, George T. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this work is to simulate radiographs from isotropic 3D MRI data, compare relationship of angle and joint space measurements on simulated radiographs with corresponding 2D MRIs and real radiographs (XR), and compare measurement times among the three modalities. Twenty-four consecutive ankles were included, eight males and 16 females, with a mean age of 46 years. Segmented joint models simulating radiographs were created from 3D MRI data sets. Three readers independently performed blinded angle and joint space measurements on the models, corresponding 2D MRIs, and XRs at two time points. Linear mixed models and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was ascertained, with p values less than 0.05 considered significant. Simulated radiograph models were successfully created in all cases. Good agreement (ICC > 0.65) was noted among all readers across all modalities and among most measurements. Absolute measurement values differed between modalities. Measurement time was significantly greater (p < 0.05) on 2D versus simulated radiographs for most measurements and on XR versus simulated radiographs (p < 0.05) for nearly half the measurements. Simulated radiographs can be successfully generated from 3D MRI data; however, measurements differ. Good inter-reader and moderate-to-good intra-reader reliability was observed and measurements obtained on simulated radiograph models took significantly less time compared to measurements with 2D and generally less time than XR. (orig.)

  17. Radiation protection education and training of radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsakkers, P.

    1995-01-01

    The International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technicians (ISRRT) is an international non-governmental organisation in official relationship with the World Health Organization. Over 50 countries are members of the ISRRT. The ISRRT encourages and facilitates communication between radiographers throughout the world. The ISRRT has produced several documents, e.g. ''The Role of the Radiographer in Europe''. The ISRRT has also done research and developed initiatives to analyse the quality of training of radiographers in the different member states of the EC. Research was done in the member states to analyse the efforts in the field of quality control. An extended study was performed on the current level of education in radiation protection in the European member states. The ICRP recommends in its publications the need of good training and continuing education for all radiographers. An important part of the basic training of radiographers should focus on the performance of radiation protection and quality control tests. Good daily practice can decrease patient dose in many ways. (Author)

  18. Predicting lower third molar eruption on panoramic radiographs after cephalometric comparison of profile and panoramic radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Begtrup, Anders; Grønastøð, Halldis Á; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2012-01-01

    and to find a simple and reliable method for predicting the eruption of the mandibular third molar by measurements on panoramic radiographs. The material consisted of profile and panoramic radiographs, taken before orthodontic treatment, of 30 males and 23 females (median age 22, range 18-48 years......Previous studies have suggested methods for predicting third molar tooth eruption radiographically. Still, this prediction is associated with uncertainty. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the association between cephalometric measurements on profile and panoramic radiographs...... the length from the ramus to the incisors (olr-id) showed a statistically significant correlation. By combining this length with the mesiodistal width of the lower second molar, the prediction of eruption of the lower third molar was strengthened. A new formula for calculating the probability of eruption...

  19. Ergonomic strategies to improve radiographers' posture during mammography activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernean, Nicolai; Serranheira, Florentino; Gonçalves, Pedro; Sá Dos Reis, Cláudia

    2017-08-01

    To identify alternatives for radiographers' postures while performing mammography that can contribute to reduce the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs). Radiographers' postures to positioning craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views were simulated without any intervention for three scenarios: radiographer/patient with similar statures, radiographer smaller than patient and radiographer taller than patient. Actions were taken to modify the postures: seated radiographer; patient on a step; seated patient; radiographer on a step. All the postures were analysed using kinovea 0.8.15 software and the angles were measured twice and classified according to European standard EN1005-4: 2005. The non-acceptable angles were measured mainly during MLO positioning when radiographer was taller than the patient: 139° and 120° for arm-flexion and abduction, 72° for trunk and -24° for head/neck-flexion. The introduction of alternative postures (radiographer seated), allowed improvements in posture (60° and 99° for arm flexion and abduction, 14° for trunk and 0° for head/neck flexion), being classified as acceptable. The alternative postures simulated have the potential to reduce the risk of developing WRMSDs when radiographers and patients have different statures. • Radiographers' postures in mammography can contribute to work-related musculoskeletal disorders • Non-acceptable posture was identified for MLO breast positioning (radiographer taller than patient) • Adapting posture to patient biotype reduces the WRMSD risk for radiographers.

  20. Chest radiograph interpretation by medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, D.R.; Goddard, P.R.; Callaway, M.P.; Greenwood, R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the ability of final year medical students to interpret conventional chest radiographs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten conventional chest radiographs were selected from a teaching hospital radiology department library that were good radiological examples of common conditions. All were conditions that a medical student should be expected to recognize by the end of their training. One normal radiograph was included. The radiographs were shown to 52 final year medical students who were asked to describe their findings. RESULTS: The median score achieved was 12.5 out of 20 (range 6-18). There was no difference between the median scores of male and female students (12.5 and 12.3, respectively, p=0.82) but male students were more likely to be certain of their answers than female students (median certainty scores 23.0 and 14.0, respectively). The overall degree of certainty was low. On no radiograph were more than 25% of students definite about their answer. Students had received little formal radiology teaching (2-42 h, median 21) and few expressed an interest in radiology as a career. Only two (3.8%) students thought they were good at interpreting chest radiographs, 17 (32.7%) thought they were bad or awful. CONCLUSION: Medical students reaching the end of their training do not perform well at interpreting simple chest radiographs. They lack confidence and have received little formal radiological tuition. Perhaps as a result, few are interested in radiology as a career, which is a matter for concern in view of the current shortage of radiologists in the UK

  1. Radiographic markers - A reservoir for bacteria?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tugwell, Jenna; Maddison, Adele

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Amongst the most frequently handled objects in the radiology department are radiographic markers. They are personal accessories used with every patient, and are kept in the radiographers pockets when not utilised. Upon enquiry it was discovered that many radiographers disregarded the potential of these accessories to become a vector for cross-contamination thus never or rarely clean them. The aims of this study were therefore to identify if radiographic markers are a reservoir for bacteria and to establish an effective cleaning method for decontaminating them. Methodology: 25 radiographers/student radiographers were selected for this study. Swabbing of their markers prior and post cleaning took place. The microbiology laboratory subsequently analyzed the results by quantifying and identifying the bacteria present. The participants also completed a closed questionnaire regarding their markers (e.g. frequency of cleaning and type of marker) to help specify the results gained from the swabbing procedure. Results: From the sample swabbed, 92% were contaminated with various organisms including Staphylococcus and Bacillus species, the amount of bacteria present ranged from 0 to >50 CFU. There were no significant differences between disinfectant wipes and alcohol gel in decontaminating the markers. Both successfully reduced their bacterial load, with 80% of the markers post cleaning having 0 CFU. Conclusion: The results indicated that radiographic markers can become highly contaminated with various organisms thus serve as a reservoir for bacteria. In addition, the markers need to be cleaned on a regular basis, with either disinfectant wipes or alcohol gel to reduce their bacterial load.

  2. A case of horseshoe lung and complex congenital heart disease in a term newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeewa, Aamir; Culham, J.A.G.; Human, Derek G.

    2010-01-01

    We describe and illustrate a rare association of hypoplastic left heart syndrome, absent hilar left pulmonary artery, and an unusual bronchopulmonary malformation. This case highlights the utility of combination imaging of echocardiography and CT angiography in diagnosing a cyanotic newborn with a chest radiograph that is suspicious for lung hypoplasia. (orig.)

  3. A case of horseshoe lung and complex congenital heart disease in a term newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeewa, Aamir [British Columbia Children' s Hospital and University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Vancouver (Canada); Culham, J.A.G. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver (Canada); Human, Derek G. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital and University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Vancouver (Canada); B.C. Children' s Hospital, Children' s Heart Centre, Vancouver (Canada)

    2010-02-15

    We describe and illustrate a rare association of hypoplastic left heart syndrome, absent hilar left pulmonary artery, and an unusual bronchopulmonary malformation. This case highlights the utility of combination imaging of echocardiography and CT angiography in diagnosing a cyanotic newborn with a chest radiograph that is suspicious for lung hypoplasia. (orig.)

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of rectum and bladder using image-based CT planning and orthogonal radiographs with ICRU 38 recommendations in intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to compare CT-based dosimetry with International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU 38 bladder and rectum reference points in patients of carcinoma of uterine cervix treated with intracavitary brachytherapy (ICA. Twenty-two consecutive patients were evaluated. Orthogonal radiographs and CT images were acquired and transferred to PLATO planning system. Bladder and rectal reference points were identified according to ICRU 38 recommendations. Dosimetry was carried out based on Manchester system. Patient treatment was done using 192 Iridium high dose rate (HDR remote after-loading machine based on the conventional radiograph-based dosimetry. ICRU rectal and bladder point doses from the radiograph plans were compared with D 2 , dose received by 2 cm 3 of the organ receiving maximum dose from CT plan. V 2 , volume of organ receiving dose more than the ICRU reference point, was evaluated. The mean (±standard deviation volume of rectum and bladder was 60 (±28 cm 3 and 138 (±41 cm 3 respectively. The mean reference volume in radiograph and CT plan was 105 (±7 cm 3 and 107 (±7 cm 3 respectively. It was found that 6 (±4 cm3 of rectum and 16 (±10 cm 3 of bladder received dose more than the prescription dose. V2 of rectum and bladder was 7 (±1.7 cm 3 and 20.8 (±6 cm 3 respectively. Mean D 2 of rectum and bladder was found to be 1.11 (±0.2 and 1.56 (±0.6 times the mean ICRU reference points respectively. This dosimteric study suggests that comparison of orthogonal X-ray-based and CT-based HDR ICA planning is feasible. ICRU rectal point dose correlates well with maximum rectal dose, while ICRU bladder point underestimates the maximum bladder dose.

  5. Electrical admittance for filling of the heart during lower body negative pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Yujia; Holm, S; Jenstrup, M

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate whether electrical admittance of intracellular water is applicable for monitoring filling of the heart, we determined the difference in intracellular water in the thorax (Thorax(ICW)), measured as the reciprocal value of the electrical impedance for the thorax at 1.5 and 100 kHz during...... lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in humans. Changes in Thorax(ICW) were compared with positron emission tomography-determined C(15)O-labeled erythrocytes over the heart. During -40 mmHg LBNP, the blood volume of the heart decreased by 21 +/- 3% as the erythrocyte volume was reduced by 20 +/- 2.......6 to 40.9 +/- 5.0 S. 10(-4); P = 0.08). The correlation between Thorax(ICW) and heart erythrocyte volume was 0.84 (P electrical admittance of intracellular water can be applied to evaluate changes in blood volume of the heart during LBNP in humans....

  6. Volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris in osteoartritic hip joints of adult dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mande, J.D.; Mbithi, P.M.F.; Mbugua, S.W.; Buoro, I.B.J.; Gathumbi, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Ventrodorsal pelvic radiographs were made of 32 adult dogs under general anaesthesia. The hip joints were evaluated according to the severity of osteoarthritic changes graded as 0, 1, 2 or 3. The dogs were euthanased, the hip joints opened and the ligamentum capitis femoris dissected out in toto. The volume of each ligament was determined using a water displacement technique and the mean volume compared to the four radiographic grades of osteoarthritis. There was an inverse correlation (r = -0.75) between the mean volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris and the increasing severity of osteoarthritis as assessed by radiography. The results confirmed the crucial role of radiography in the clinical evaluation of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis in the adult dog. Assessment of the volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris revealed that it is an important tool for research in canine hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis

  7. Volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris in osteoarthritic hip joints of adult dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Mande

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Ventrodorsal pelvic radiographs were made of 32 adult dogs under general anaesthesia. The hip joints were evaluated according to the severity of osteoarthritic changes graded as 0, 1, 2 or 3. The dogs were euthanased, the hip joints opened and the ligamentum capitis femoris dissected out in toto. The volume of each ligament was determined using a water displacement technique and the mean volume compared to the four radiographic grades of osteoarthritis. There was an inverse correlation (r = -0.75 between the mean volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris and the increasing severity of osteoarthritis as assessed by radiography. The results confirmed the crucial role of radiography in the clinical evaluation of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis in the adult dog. Assessment of the volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris revealed that it is an important tool for research in canine hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis.

  8. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts...... of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as fabricated parts are included. The collection contains 158 neutron radiographs, reproduced on photographic paper...

  9. PACS influence the radiographer's work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridell, Kent; Aspelin, Peter; Edgren, Lars; Lindskoeld, Lars; Lundberg, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Radiological departments are changing rapidly due to the implementation of digital images and PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication Systems). The introduction of new technology seems to dissolve boundaries between the professions in the work environment where the technology is introduced. This process tends to change the organization and its routines. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore changes in radiographers' work with regard to skills, work practice and technology. The study used open-ended interviews to explore the radiographers' perceptions of such changes, and to identify problems and solutions pertaining to work practice. Inspiration is taken from grounded theory to explain the changes in work that were found. Respondents were selected from a total of 133 potential participants as a theoretical or purposive sample. The changing trends within the professional role indicated that radiographers, as image producers, shifted their focus from the ability to set the optimal exposure parameters in order to obtain the optimal image for diagnosis to become expert in exposure parameters, projection techniques and diagnostic practice, having multifaceted skills, as being the jack of all trades. When implementing PACS there was an obvious change in image production. At the start there were visions of new routines, and therefore the radiographers became early adopters to the new technology; in practice the organization was stacked in old routines, as the routines were inflexible and PACS work was pushed into old work routines. Although inflexible, this does not mean that they cannot change, and obviously in 2006 new routines had been implemented making it possible for the radiographers in finding new ways for collaborating with colleagues. The new technology immediately created a vision of improved service to the clinicians. In order to optimize the service the radiographers developed an insight into the need for a more comprehensive change in work using

  10. Echocardiographic and radiographic findings in a cohort of healthy adult green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsen, Kate A; Saunders, Ashley B; Young, Benjamin D; Winter, Randolph L; Hoppes, Sharman M

    2014-09-01

    To describe characteristics of echocardiography and cranial coelomic radiography in a cohort of iguanas. Twenty apparently healthy adult green iguanas (Iguana iguana) from a reptile sanctuary. Physical examination, radiography, two-dimensional and color Doppler echocardiography were performed to assess cardiac structures and function, and any related normal or abnormal findings were recorded. Echocardiographic examination was possible without sedation and allowed visualization of the great vessels, atria, and ventricle. Some structures could not be evaluated in a minority of the iguanas due to individual differences in bony conformation and imaging quality. Suspected abnormal echocardiographic findings in 3 iguanas included pericardial effusion (n = 1) and enlarged caudal vena cava and/or sinus venosus (n = 2). Objective measurements were repeatable as assessed by within-subject coefficient of variation, and reliable as assessed by intra-observer intraclass correlation coefficient. Left atrial and ventricular measurements were significantly correlated with body weight. Valve regurgitation was common, with atrioventricular valve regurgitation present in 53% (9/17) and aortic or pulmonic valve regurgitation in 71% (12/17) of otherwise normal iguanas. A heart murmur was not appreciated during examination of any of the iguanas. Heart size cannot be measured radiographically due to superimposition and silhouetting of other coelomic structures. Echocardiographic or radiographic findings consistent with mineralization of the great vessels were present in 76% of iguanas (13/17). Echocardiography in iguanas is well tolerated without sedation and allowed both subjective evaluation and structural measurements. Valve regurgitation and great vessel mineralization were commonly observed in this cohort of apparently healthy adult iguanas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiographic enhancement and analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic image enhancement and analysis techniques are discussed as they apply to nondestructive inspection. A system is described which has been developed to enhance and quantitatively evaluate radiographic images using digital computer techniques. Some examples of typical applications are also presented as an introduction to this new inspection technique. (author)

  12. Agreement between radiographic and photographic trabecular patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korstjens, C.M.; Geraets, W.G.M.; Stelt, P.F. van der [Dept. of Oral Radiology, Academic Centre for Dentistry, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Spruijt, R.J. [Div. of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mosekilde, L. [Dept. of Cell Biology, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)

    1998-11-01

    Purpose: It has been hypothesized that photographs can facilitate the interpretation of the radiographic characteristics of trabecular bone. The reliability of these photographic and radiographic approaches has been determined, as have various agreements between the two approaches and their correlations with biomechanical characteristics. Material and Methods: Fourteen vertebral bodies were obtained at autopsy from 6 women and 8 men aged 22-76 years. Photographs (n=28) and radiographs (n=28) were taken of midsagittal slices from the third lumbar vertebra. The radiographs and photographs were digitized and the geometric properties of the trabecular architecture were then determined with a digital images analysis technique. Information on the compressive strength and ash density of the vertebral body was also available. Results: The geometric properties of both radiographs and photographs could be measured with a high degree of reliability (Cronbach`s {alpha}>0.85). Agreement between the radiographic and photographic approaches was mediocre as only the radiographic measurements showed insignificant correlations (p<0.05) with the biomechanical characteristics. We suggest that optical phenomena may result in the significant correlations between the photographs and the biomechanical characteristics. Conclusion: For digital image processing, radiography offers a superior description of the architecture of trabecular bone to that offered by photography. (orig.)

  13. Agreement between radiographic and photographic trabecular patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korstjens, C.M.; Geraets, W.G.M.; Stelt, P.F. van der; Spruijt, R.J.; Mosekilde, L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: It has been hypothesized that photographs can facilitate the interpretation of the radiographic characteristics of trabecular bone. The reliability of these photographic and radiographic approaches has been determined, as have various agreements between the two approaches and their correlations with biomechanical characteristics. Material and Methods: Fourteen vertebral bodies were obtained at autopsy from 6 women and 8 men aged 22-76 years. Photographs (n=28) and radiographs (n=28) were taken of midsagittal slices from the third lumbar vertebra. The radiographs and photographs were digitized and the geometric properties of the trabecular architecture were then determined with a digital images analysis technique. Information on the compressive strength and ash density of the vertebral body was also available. Results: The geometric properties of both radiographs and photographs could be measured with a high degree of reliability (Cronbach's α>0.85). Agreement between the radiographic and photographic approaches was mediocre as only the radiographic measurements showed insignificant correlations (p<0.05) with the biomechanical characteristics. We suggest that optical phenomena may result in the significant correlations between the photographs and the biomechanical characteristics. Conclusion: For digital image processing, radiography offers a superior description of the architecture of trabecular bone to that offered by photography. (orig.)

  14. Cardiac damage in athlete's heart: When the "supernormal" heart fails!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Andreina; D'Andrea, Antonello; Riegler, Lucia; Scarafile, Raffaella; Pezzullo, Enrica; Martone, Francesca; America, Raffaella; Liccardo, Biagio; Galderisi, Maurizio; Bossone, Eduardo; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2017-06-26

    Intense exercise may cause heart remodeling to compensate increases in blood pressure or volume by increasing muscle mass. Cardiac changes do not involve only the left ventricle, but all heart chambers. Physiological cardiac modeling in athletes is associated with normal or enhanced cardiac function, but recent studies have documented decrements in left ventricular function during intense exercise and the release of cardiac markers of necrosis in athlete's blood of uncertain significance. Furthermore, cardiac remodeling may predispose athletes to heart disease and result in electrical remodeling, responsible for arrhythmias. Athlete's heart is a physiological condition and does not require a specific treatment. In some conditions, it is important to differentiate the physiological adaptations from pathological conditions, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic dysplasia of the right ventricle, and non-compaction myocardium, for the greater risk of sudden cardiac death of these conditions. Moreover, some drugs and performance-enhancing drugs can cause structural alterations and arrhythmias, therefore, their use should be excluded.

  15. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Yano, Y.; Moyer, B.R.; Mathis, C.A.; Ganz, E.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart can measure blood perfusion, metabolism of fatty acids, metabolism of sugars, uptake of amino acids and can quantitate infarction volume. The principles which are basic to PET instrumentation and procedures for quantitative studies of the heart muscle with examples of measurements of myocardial flow and metabolism, are reviewed

  16. Radiographical measurements for distal intra-articular fractures of the radius using plain radiographs and cone beam computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suojaervi, Nora; Lindfors, N. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Hand Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Sillat, T.; Koskinen, S.K. [HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-12-15

    Operative treatment of an intra-articular distal radius fracture is one of the most common procedures in orthopedic and hand surgery. The intra- and interobserver agreement of common radiographical measurements of these fractures using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and plain radiographs were evaluated. Thirty-seven patients undergoing open reduction and volar fixation for a distal radius fracture were studied. Two radiologists analyzed the preoperative radiographs and CBCT images. Agreement of the measurements was subjected to intra-class correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman analyses. Plain radiographs provided a slightly poorer level of agreement. For fracture diastasis, excellent intraobserver agreement was achieved for radiographs and good or excellent agreement for CBCT, compared to poor interobserver agreement (ICC 0.334) for radiographs and good interobserver agreement (ICC 0.621) for CBCT images. The Bland-Altman analyses indicated a small mean difference between the measurements but rather large variation using both imaging methods, especially in angular measurements. For most of the measurements, radiographs do well, and may be used in clinical practice. Two different measurements by the same reader or by two different readers can lead to different decisions, and therefore a standardization of the measurements is imperative. More detailed analysis of articular surface needs cross-sectional imaging modalities. (orig.)

  17. Radiographical measurements for distal intra-articular fractures of the radius using plain radiographs and cone beam computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suojärvi, Nora; Sillat, T; Lindfors, N; Koskinen, S K

    2015-12-01

    Operative treatment of an intra-articular distal radius fracture is one of the most common procedures in orthopedic and hand surgery. The intra- and interobserver agreement of common radiographical measurements of these fractures using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and plain radiographs were evaluated. Thirty-seven patients undergoing open reduction and volar fixation for a distal radius fracture were studied. Two radiologists analyzed the preoperative radiographs and CBCT images. Agreement of the measurements was subjected to intra-class correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman analyses. Plain radiographs provided a slightly poorer level of agreement. For fracture diastasis, excellent intraobserver agreement was achieved for radiographs and good or excellent agreement for CBCT, compared to poor interobserver agreement (ICC 0.334) for radiographs and good interobserver agreement (ICC 0.621) for CBCT images. The Bland-Altman analyses indicated a small mean difference between the measurements but rather large variation using both imaging methods, especially in angular measurements. For most of the measurements, radiographs do well, and may be used in clinical practice. Two different measurements by the same reader or by two different readers can lead to different decisions, and therefore a standardization of the measurements is imperative. More detailed analysis of articular surface needs cross-sectional imaging modalities.

  18. Digital interactive learning of oral radiographic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuchkova, J; Maybury, T; Farah, C S

    2012-02-01

    Studies reporting high number of diagnostic errors made from radiographs suggest the need to improve the learning of radiographic interpretation in the dental curriculum. Given studies that show student preference for computer-assisted or digital technologies, the purpose of this study was to develop an interactive digital tool and to determine whether it was more successful than a conventional radiology textbook in assisting dental students with the learning of radiographic anatomy. Eighty-eight dental students underwent a learning phase of radiographic anatomy using an interactive digital tool alongside a conventional radiology textbook. The success of the digital tool, when compared to the textbook, was assessed by quantitative means using a radiographic interpretation test and by qualitative means using a structured Likert scale survey, asking students to evaluate their own learning outcomes from the digital tool. Student evaluations of the digital tool showed that almost all participants (95%) indicated that the tool positively enhanced their learning of radiographic anatomy and interpretation. The success of the digital tool in assisting the learning of radiographic interpretation is discussed in the broader context of learning and teaching curricula, and preference (by students) for the use of this digital form when compared to the conventional literate form of the textbook. Whilst traditional textbooks are still valued in the dental curriculum, it is evident that the preference for computer-assisted learning of oral radiographic anatomy enhances the learning experience by enabling students to interact and better engage with the course material. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Radiographic manifestations of hypochondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heselson, N G; Cremin, B J [Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Beighton, P

    1979-01-01

    Hypochrondroplasia is an inherited skeletal dysplasia that resembles achondroplasia in mild degree. Radiographic manifestations encountered in 12 affected individuals in South Africa include slight shortening of all segments of the tubular bones, moderate caudal diminution of the lumbar interpedicular distances, increased lumbar lordosis with cacral tilt and distal prolongation of the fibular. Hypochondroplasia can be distinguished from other osteochondrodystrophies such as achondroplasia, pseudo-achondroplasia and metaphyseal chondroplasia by the recognition of it clinical and radiographic manifestations.

  20. Xamoterol in severe congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tangø, M; Lyngborg, K; Mehlsen, J

    1992-01-01

    Twelve patients in severe congestive heart failure were given placebo, 100 mg xamoterol (Corwin) twice daily and 200 mg xamoterol twice daily, respectively, in 3 two-week periods in a double-blind randomised study. At the end of each treatment period the patients were evaluated. No differences were...... found between placebo and xamoterol in the following parameters: New York Heart Association function group index, heart volume, body weight, exercise duration on bicycle and treadmill, heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest. However, during exercise we found significantly lower...... heart rate and rate-pressure product during xamoterol treatment. This reduction is probably indicating occupation of beta-adrenoreceptors with concomitant reduced oxygen consumption during exercise....

  1. Consultant radiographers: Profile of the first generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, Lesley J.; Maehle, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this research is to examine the profile of first generation consultant radiographers: their demographics, educational backgrounds, qualifications and training, career experience and progression, teaching, lecturing and research activities. Method: Participant recruitment was drawn from the Society and College of Radiographers consultant radiographer group. Data collection involved a self-administered paper based and web based questionnaire. Results: Participant response rate of 55% (n = 11). Conclusions: The profile of the first consultant radiographer cohort reflects a diverse and eclectic mix. While some aspects of their development such as educational background, clinical training and skills enhancement are comparable to nurse consultants, clinical experience and employment history show some differences. Commitment to development of expert clinical skills is evident within the profile of the first generation cohort of consultant radiographers however research and leadership training are not strong features.

  2. Consultant radiographers: Profile of the first generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, Lesley J., E-mail: l.forsyth@rgu.ac.u [School of Health Sciences, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, AB10 7QG (United Kingdom); Maehle, Valerie [Faculty of Health and Social Care, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, AB10 7QG (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    Aim: The aim of this research is to examine the profile of first generation consultant radiographers: their demographics, educational backgrounds, qualifications and training, career experience and progression, teaching, lecturing and research activities. Method: Participant recruitment was drawn from the Society and College of Radiographers consultant radiographer group. Data collection involved a self-administered paper based and web based questionnaire. Results: Participant response rate of 55% (n = 11). Conclusions: The profile of the first consultant radiographer cohort reflects a diverse and eclectic mix. While some aspects of their development such as educational background, clinical training and skills enhancement are comparable to nurse consultants, clinical experience and employment history show some differences. Commitment to development of expert clinical skills is evident within the profile of the first generation cohort of consultant radiographers however research and leadership training are not strong features.

  3. Interpretation and evaluation of radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    After digestion, the interpreter must interpreted and evaluate the image on film, usually many radiograph stuck in this step, if there is good density, so there are no problem. This is a final stage of radiography work and this work must be done by level two or three radiographer. This is a final stages before the radiographer give a result to their customer for further action. The good interpreter must know what kind of artifact, is this artifact are dangerous or not and others. In this chapter, the entire artifact that usually showed will be discussed briefly with the good illustration and picture to make the reader understand and know the type of artifact that exists.

  4. Heart irradiation as a risk factor for radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ellen X.; El Naqa, Issam; Deasy, Joseph O.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Trovo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the potential role of incidental heart irradiation on the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) for patients receiving definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods. Two hundred and nine patient datasets were available for this study. Heart and lung dose-volume parameters were extracted for modeling, based on Monte Carlo-based heterogeneity corrected dose distributions. Clinical variables tested included age, gender, chemotherapy, pre-treatment weight-loss, performance status, and smoking history. The risk of RP was modeled using logistic regression. Results. The most significant univariate variables were heart related, such as heart heart V65 (percent volume receiving at least 65 Gy) (Spearman Rs = 0.245, p < 0.001). The best-performing logistic regression model included heart D10 (minimum dose to the hottest 10% of the heart), lung D35, and maximum lung dose (Spearman Rs 0.268, p < 0.0001). When classified by predicted risk, the RP incidence ratio between the most and least risky 1/3 of treatments was 4.8. The improvement in risk modeling using lung and heart variables was better than using lung variables alone. Conclusions. These results suggest a previously unsuspected role of heart irradiation in many cases of RP

  5. SU-F-T-119: Development of Heart Prediction Model to Increase Accuracy of Dose Reconstruction for Radiotherapy Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, E; Choi, M; Lee, C; Jones, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess individual variation in heart volume and location in order to develop a prediction model of the heart. This heart prediction model will be used to calculate individualized heart doses for radiotherapy patients in epidemiological studies. Methods: Chest CT images for 30 adult male and 30 adult female patients were obtained from NIH Clinical Center. Image-analysis computer programs were used to segment the whole heart and 8 sub-regions and to measure the volume of each sub- region and the dimension of the whole heart. An analytical dosimetry method was used for the 30 adult female patients to estimate mean heart dose during conventional left breast radiotherapy. Results: The average volumes of the whole heart were 803.37 cm"3 (COV 18.8%) and 570.19 cm"3 (COV 18.8%) for adult male and female patients, respectively, which are comparable with the international reference volumes of 807.69 cm"3 for males and 596.15 cm"3 for females. Some patient characteristics were strongly correlated (R"2>0.5) with heart volume and heart dimensions (e.g., Body Mass Index vs. heart depth in males: R"2=0.54; weight vs. heart width in the adult females: R"2=0.63). We found that the mean heart dose 3.805 Gy (assuming prescribed dose of 50 Gy) in the breast radiotherapy simulations of the 30 adult females could be an underestimate (up to 1.6-fold) or overestimate (up to 1.8-fold) of the patient-specific heart dose. Conclusion: The study showed the significant variation in patient heart volumes and dimensions, resulting in substantial dose errors when a single average heart model is used for retrospective dose reconstruction. We are completing a multivariate analysis to develop a prediction model of the heart. This model will increase accuracy in dose reconstruction for radiotherapy patients and allow us to individualize heart dose calculations for patients whose CT images are not available.

  6. SU-F-T-119: Development of Heart Prediction Model to Increase Accuracy of Dose Reconstruction for Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, E; Choi, M; Lee, C [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (United States); Jones, E [Radiology and Imaging Sciences Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess individual variation in heart volume and location in order to develop a prediction model of the heart. This heart prediction model will be used to calculate individualized heart doses for radiotherapy patients in epidemiological studies. Methods: Chest CT images for 30 adult male and 30 adult female patients were obtained from NIH Clinical Center. Image-analysis computer programs were used to segment the whole heart and 8 sub-regions and to measure the volume of each sub- region and the dimension of the whole heart. An analytical dosimetry method was used for the 30 adult female patients to estimate mean heart dose during conventional left breast radiotherapy. Results: The average volumes of the whole heart were 803.37 cm{sup 3} (COV 18.8%) and 570.19 cm{sup 3} (COV 18.8%) for adult male and female patients, respectively, which are comparable with the international reference volumes of 807.69 cm{sup 3} for males and 596.15 cm{sup 3} for females. Some patient characteristics were strongly correlated (R{sup 2}>0.5) with heart volume and heart dimensions (e.g., Body Mass Index vs. heart depth in males: R{sup 2}=0.54; weight vs. heart width in the adult females: R{sup 2}=0.63). We found that the mean heart dose 3.805 Gy (assuming prescribed dose of 50 Gy) in the breast radiotherapy simulations of the 30 adult females could be an underestimate (up to 1.6-fold) or overestimate (up to 1.8-fold) of the patient-specific heart dose. Conclusion: The study showed the significant variation in patient heart volumes and dimensions, resulting in substantial dose errors when a single average heart model is used for retrospective dose reconstruction. We are completing a multivariate analysis to develop a prediction model of the heart. This model will increase accuracy in dose reconstruction for radiotherapy patients and allow us to individualize heart dose calculations for patients whose CT images are not available.

  7. Animal radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter presents historical x rays of a wide variety of animals taken within 5 years of the discovery of x radiation. Such photos were used as tests or as illustrations for radiographic publications. Numerous historical photographs are included. 10 refs

  8. Meta-Analysis of Ultrafiltration versus Diuretics Treatment Option for Overload Volume Reduction in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkoudah, Ebrahim; Kodali, Sindhura; Okoroh, Juliet; Sethi, Rosh; Hulten, Edward; Suemoto, Claudia; Bittencourt, Marcio Sommer

    2015-05-01

    Although diuretics are mainly used for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), inadequate responses and complications have led to the use of extracorporeal ultrafiltration (UF) as an alternative strategy for reducing volume overloads in patients with ADHF. The aim of our study is to perform meta-analysis of the results obtained from studies on extracorporeal venous ultrafiltration and compare them with those of standard diuretic treatment for overload volume reduction in acute decompensated heart failure. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were systematically searched using a pre‑specified criterion. Pooled estimates of outcomes after 48 h (weight change, serum creatinine level, and all-cause mortality) were computed using random effect models. Pooled weighted mean differences were calculated for weight loss and change in creatinine level, whereas a pooled risk ratio was used for the analysis of binary all-cause mortality outcome. A total of nine studies, involving 613 patients, met the eligibility criteria. The mean weight loss in patients who underwent UF therapy was 1.78 kg [95% Confidence Interval (CI): -2.65 to -0.91 kg; p diuretic therapy. The post-intervention creatinine level, however, was not significantly different (mean change = -0.25 mg/dL; 95% CI: -0.56 to 0.06 mg/dL; p = 0.112). The risk of all-cause mortality persisted in patients treated with UF compared with patients treated with standard diuretics (Pooled RR = 1.00; 95% CI: 0.64-1.56; p = 0.993). Compared with standard diuretic therapy, UF treatment for overload volume reduction in individuals suffering from ADHF, resulted in significant reduction of body weight within 48 h. However, no significant decrease of serum creatinine level or reduction of all-cause mortality was observed.

  9. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellows, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats

  10. Measure by image analysis of industrial radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillault, B.

    1988-01-01

    A digital radiographic picture processing system for non destructive testing intends to provide the expert with computer tool, to precisely quantify radiographic images. The author describes the main problems, from the image formation to its characterization. She also insists on the necessity to define a precise process in order to automatize the system. Some examples illustrate the efficiency of digital processing for radiographic images [fr

  11. Advanced radiographic scanning, enhancement and electronic data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoie, C.; Rivest, D.

    2003-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that radiographs deteriorate with time. Substantial cost is attributed to cataloguing and storage. To eliminate deterioration issues and save time retrieving radiographs, laser scanning techniques were developed in conjunction with viewing and enhancement software. This will allow radiographs to be successfully scanned and stored electronically for future reference. Todays radiographic laser scanners are capable Qf capturing images with an optical density of up to 4.1 at 256 grey levels and resolutions up to 4096 pixels per line. An industrial software interface was developed for the nondestructive testing industry so that, certain parameters such as scan resolution, number of scans, file format and location to be saved could be adjusted as needed. Once the radiographs have been scanned, the tiff images are stored, or retrieved into Radiance software (developed by Rivest Technologies Inc.), which will help to properly interpret the radiographs. Radiance was developed to allow the user to quickly view the radiographs correctness or enhance its defects for comparison and future evaluation. Radiance also allows the user to zoom, measure and annotate areas of interest. Physical cost associated with cataloguing, storing and retrieving radiographs can be eliminated. You can now successfully retrieve and view your radiographs from CD media or dedicated hard drive at will. For continuous searches and/or field access, dedicated hard drives controlled by a server would be the media of choice. All scanned radiographs will be archived to CD media (CD-R). Laser scanning with a proper acquisition interface and easy to use viewing software will permit a qualified user to identify areas of interest and share this information with his/her colleagues via e-mail or web data access. (author)

  12. Reversibility of cortical hyperostosis following long-term prostaglandin E1 therapy in infants with ductus-dependent congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A; Halken, S; Andersen, P E

    1988-01-01

    Two neonates with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease, receiving long-term prostaglandin E1 infusion, for 59 and 78 days respectively, demonstrated significant radiographic changes of symmetric cortical hyperostosis of the long bones. Bone biopsies from one of the patients elucidated...

  13. Radiographic aspects of xeroradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.U.V.; Fatouros, P.P.

    1980-01-01

    The quality of a conventional radiographic image can be characterized in terms of five basic parameters; density, contrast, latitude, resolution and noise. Since xeroradiographic images exhibit very limited broad area contrasts, and image formation is predominantly due to edge enhancement, a straightforward description of image quality using the same five parameters is not adequate. A detailed study was made of the radiographic aspects of xeroradiography with special reference to mammography, and a summary of major findings to date with appropriate references to published papers is presented

  14. Simulation study of a magnetocardiogram based on a virtual heart model: effect of a cardiac equivalent source and a volume conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shou Guo-Fa; Xia Ling; Dai Ling; Ma Ping; Tang Fa-Kuan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a magnetocardiogram (MCG) simulation study using the boundary element method (BEM) and based on the virtual heart model and the realistic human volume conductor model. The different contributions of cardiac equivalent source models and volume conductor models to the MCG are deeply and comprehensively investigated. The single dipole source model, the multiple dipoles source model and the equivalent double layer (EDL) source model are analysed and compared with the cardiac equivalent source models. Meanwhile, the effect of the volume conductor model on the MCG combined with these cardiac equivalent sources is investigated. The simulation results demonstrate that the cardiac electrophysiological information will be partly missed when only the single dipole source is taken, while the EDL source is a good option for MCG simulation and the effect of the volume conductor is smallest for the EDL source. Therefore, the EDL source is suitable for the study of MCG forward and inverse problems, and more attention should be paid to it in future MCG studies. (general)

  15. Radiologist perceptions of radiographer role development in Scotland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, Lesley J. [School of Health Sciences, Robert Gordon University, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Garthdee Road, Garthdee, Aberdeen AB10 7QG (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: l.forsyth@rgu.ac.uk; Robertson, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: e.m.robertson@arh.grampian.scot.nhs.uk

    2007-02-15

    Aim: To survey the perceptions of the Scottish radiology community in relation to radiographer role development. Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to all consultant radiologists recorded on the NHS Scotland database of consultants. Results: Response rate was 63%. (i) Respondents considered increased professional standing of radiographers, best use of manpower resources, reduced pressure on the service and improved recruitment and retention, as positive advantages of radiographer development. (ii) The potential impact on radiology specialist registrar training, lack of clear medico-legal responsibilities and radiographers recognising the limitations of their abilities were identified as the main areas of radiologist anxiety. (iii) Fifty-seven percent did not consider current post-registration radiography education and training resources adequate to underpin the requirement of developed roles. (iv) Barriers to radiographer development were identified as lack of radiography and radiology staff, suitable education, financial constraints, traditional views and resistance to change. (v) Eighty-two percent reported support for radiographer role development and willingness to participate actively in developments. Conclusion: Despite reservations Scottish radiologists are supportive of the development of radiography colleagues, however, guidance is required on the medico-legal and accountability aspects of radiographers assuming new roles. Radiologist involvement in education and training for new roles may increase their confidence and trust in radiographers to work within the limitations of their competency and training.

  16. Radiologist perceptions of radiographer role development in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, Lesley J.; Robertson, Elizabeth M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To survey the perceptions of the Scottish radiology community in relation to radiographer role development. Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to all consultant radiologists recorded on the NHS Scotland database of consultants. Results: Response rate was 63%. (i) Respondents considered increased professional standing of radiographers, best use of manpower resources, reduced pressure on the service and improved recruitment and retention, as positive advantages of radiographer development. (ii) The potential impact on radiology specialist registrar training, lack of clear medico-legal responsibilities and radiographers recognising the limitations of their abilities were identified as the main areas of radiologist anxiety. (iii) Fifty-seven percent did not consider current post-registration radiography education and training resources adequate to underpin the requirement of developed roles. (iv) Barriers to radiographer development were identified as lack of radiography and radiology staff, suitable education, financial constraints, traditional views and resistance to change. (v) Eighty-two percent reported support for radiographer role development and willingness to participate actively in developments. Conclusion: Despite reservations Scottish radiologists are supportive of the development of radiography colleagues, however, guidance is required on the medico-legal and accountability aspects of radiographers assuming new roles. Radiologist involvement in education and training for new roles may increase their confidence and trust in radiographers to work within the limitations of their competency and training

  17. Comparison of Gated SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging with Echocardiography for the Measurement of Left Ventricular Volumes and Ejection Fraction in Patients With Severe Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeifard, Maryam; Ghaedian, Tahereh; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Malek, Hadi; Firoozabadi, Hasan; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad; Haghjoo, Majid; Amin, Ahmad; Azizian, Nasrin; Rastgou, Feridoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is known as a feasible tool for the measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and volumes, which are of great importance in the management and follow-up of patients with coronary artery diseases. However, considering the technical shortcomings of SPECT in the presence of perfusion defect, the accuracy of this method in heart failure patients is still controversial. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the results from gated SPECT MPI with those from echocardiography in heart failure patients to compare echocardiographically-derived left ventricular dimension and function data to those from gated SPECT MPI in heart failure patients. Patients and Methods: Forty-one patients with severely reduced left ventricular systolic function (EF ≤ 35%) who were referred for gated SPECT MPI were prospectively enrolled. Quantification of EF, end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) was performed by using quantitative gated spect (QGS) (QGS, version 0.4, May 2009) and emory cardiac toolbox (ECTb) (ECTb, revision 1.0, copyright 2007) software packages. EF, EDV, and ESV were also measured with two-dimensional echocardiography within 3 days after MPI. Results: A good correlation was found between echocardiographically-derived EF, EDV, and ESV and the values derived using QGS (r = 0.67, r = 0.78, and r = 0.80 for EF, EDV, and ESV, respectively; P echocardiography. ECTb-derived EDV was also significantly higher than the EDV measured with echocardiography and QGS. The highest correlation between echocardiography and gated SPECT MPI was found for mean values of ESV different. Conclusions: Gated SPECT MPI has a good correlation with echocardiography for the measurement of left ventricular EF, EDV, and ESV in patients with severe heart failure. However, the absolute values of these functional parameters from echocardiography and gated

  18. Effect of volume loading on the Frank-Starling relation during reductions in central blood volume in heat-stressed humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Wilson, T E; Seifert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    During reductions in central blood volume while heat stressed, a greater decrease in stroke volume (SV) for a similar decrease in ventricular filling pressure, compared to normothermia, suggests that the heart is operating on a steeper portion of a Frank-Starling curve. If so, volume loading...... of heat-stressed individuals would shift the operating point to a flatter portion of the heat stress Frank-Starling curve thereby attenuating the reduction in SV during subsequent decreases in central blood volume. To investigate this hypothesis, right heart catheterization was performed in eight males...... from whom pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), central venous pressure and SV (via thermodilution) were obtained while central blood volume was reduced via lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) during normothermia, whole-body heating (increase in blood temperature 1 degrees C), and during whole...

  19. Evaluation of methods for MR imaging of human right ventricular heart volumes and mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauhiainen, T.; Jaervinen, V.M.; Hekali, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of two different imaging directions in the evaluation of human right ventricular (RV) heart volumes and mass with MR imaging; to compare breath-hold vs. non-breath-hold imaging in volume analysis; and to compare turbo inversion recovery imaging (TIR) with gradient echo imaging in RV mass measurement. Material and Methods: We examined 12 healthy volunteers (age 27-59 years). Breath-hold gradient echo MR imaging was performed in two imaging planes: 1) perpendicular to the RV inflow tract (RVIT view), and 2) in the transaxial view (TA view). The imaging was repeated in the TA view while the subjects were breathing freely. To analyze RV mass using TIR images, the RV was again imaged at end-diastole using the two views. The RV end-diastolic cavity (RVEDV) and muscle volume as well as end-systolic cavity volume (RVESV) were determined with the method of discs. All measurements were done blindly twice to assess repeatability of image analysis. To assess reproducibility of the measurements, 6 of the subjects were imaged twice at an interval of 5-9 weeks. Results: RVEDV averaged 133.2 ml, RVESV 61.5 ml and the RVmass 46.2 g in the RVIT view and 119.9 ml, 56.9 ml and 38.3 g in the TA view, respectively. The volumes obtained with breath-holding were slightly but not significantly smaller than the volumes obtained during normal breathing. There were no marked differences in the RV muscle mass obtained with gradient echo imaging compared to TIR imaging in either views. Repeatability of volume analysis was better in TA than RVIT view: the mean differences were 0.7±4.0 ml and 5.4±14.0 ml in end-diastole and 1.6±3.1 ml and 1.5±13.9 ml in end-systole, respectively. Repeatability of mass analysis was good in both TIR and cine images in the RVIT view but slightly better in TIR images: 0.5±2.4 g compared to 0.8±2.9 g in cine images. Reproducibility of imaging was good, mean differences for RVEDV and RVESV were 1.0±4.8 ml and 0.8±2.8 ml

  20. Chest radiographic findings in acute paraquat poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Gyeong Gyun; Lee, Mi Sook; Kim, Hee Jun; Sun, In O [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To describe the chest radiographic findings of acute paraquat poisoning. 691 patients visited the emergency department of our hospital between January 2006 and October 2012 for paraquat poisoning. Of these 691, we identified 56 patients whose initial chest radiographs were normal but who developed radiographic abnormalities within one week. We evaluated their radiographic findings and the differences in imaging features based on mortality. The most common finding was diffuse consolidation (29/56, 52%), followed by consolidation with linear and nodular opacities (18/56, 32%), and combined consolidation and pneumomediastinum (7/56, 13%). Pleural effusion was noted in 17 patients (30%). The two survivors (4%) showed peripheral consolidations, while the 54 patients (96%) who died demonstrated bilateral (42/54, 78%) or unilateral (12/54, 22%) diffuse consolidations. Rapidly progressing diffuse pulmonary consolidation was observed within one week on follow-up radiographs after paraquat ingestion in the deceased, but the survivors demonstrated peripheral consolidation.

  1. Radiographic findings of femoroacetabular impingement in National Football League Combine athletes undergoing radiographs for previous hip or groin pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepple, Jeffrey J; Brophy, Robert H; Matava, Matthew J; Wright, Rick W; Clohisy, John C

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of radiographic findings of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in elite football players with a history of hip pain or groin injury who underwent radiographs. We performed a retrospective review of athletes undergoing hip radiography at the National Football League Combine from 2007 to 2009. Radiographs were obtained in athletes with a history of hip pain or injury. Anteroposterior pelvis and frog-lateral radiographs were obtained in 123 hips (107 players) that met our inclusion criteria. Radiographic indicators of cam-type FAI (alpha angle, head-neck offset ratio) and pincer-type FAI (acetabular retroversion, center-edge angle, acetabular inclination) were recorded. Findings were correlated with clinical factors (previous groin/hip pain, position, race, and body mass index). The most common previous injuries included groin strain (n = 57) and sports hernia/abdominal strain (n = 21). Markers of cam- and/or pincer-type FAI were present in 94.3% of hips (116 of 123). Radiographic evidence of combined cam- and pincer-type FAI was the most common (61.8%, 76 hips), whereas isolated cam-type FAI (9.8%, 12 hips) and pincer-type FAI (22.8%, 28 hips) were less common. The most common deformities included acetabular retroversion (71.5%) and an abnormal alpha angle (61.8%). A body mass index greater than 35 was associated with the presence of global overcoverage (46.2% v 17.3%, P = .025). Radiographic indicators of FAI are very common among athletes evaluated at the National Football League Scouting Combine subjected to radiographic examination for the clinical suspicion of hip disease. Elite football athletes with significant or recurrent pain about the hip should be evaluated clinically and radiographically for FAI, because pain from FAI may be falsely attributed to or may be present in addition to other disorders. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America

  2. A radiographic analysis of implant component misfit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharkey, Seamus

    2011-07-01

    Radiographs are commonly used to assess the fit of implant components, but there is no clear agreement on the amount of misfit that can be detected by this method. This study investigated the effect of gap size and the relative angle at which a radiograph was taken on the detection of component misfit. Different types of implant connections (internal or external) and radiographic modalities (film or digital) were assessed.

  3. The use and abuse of radiographic grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brough, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    It is generally accepted that scattered radiation degrades the quality of the radiographic image. When this problem occurs, a radiographic grid may be applied which necessitates an increase in exposure. Investigations are reported in the following areas: reasons for the introduction of a radiographic grid; the ratio between kilovoltage and grid ratio; techniques resulting in higher contrast and resolution at low patient dose and the abuse of grids

  4. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used to...

  5. Complications from radiographer-performed double contrast barium enemas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora, P.; Chapman, A. E-mail: anthony.chapman@leedsth.nhs.uk

    2004-04-01

    AIM: To determine the types and rates of complications encountered by radiographers when performing double contrast barium enemas (DCBE). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven hundred and forty-one questionnaires were posted to radiographers who had in the last 5 years attended one of the biannual barium enema training courses. RESULTS: Of 741 questionnaires posted 407 (54.9%) were returned completed. Approximately 348,000 barium enema examinations had been performed. Fifty-nine radiographers reported 89 complications, including 13 intra-peritoneal and 11 extra-peritoneal perforations. There were five deaths (mortality 1 in 70,000). Deaths resulted from two of 24 (10%) perforations, two of 45 (5%) cardiac events and one cerebrovascular accident that occurred during an examination. CONCLUSIONS: Radiographers have been regularly performing DCBEs for almost a decade. The mortality for radiographer-performed DCBE is similar to that previously reported for radiologists, although a slightly higher rate of perforation is noted and so this is an area where radiographer training should be targeted.

  6. Complications from radiographer-performed double contrast barium enemas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, P.; Chapman, A.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the types and rates of complications encountered by radiographers when performing double contrast barium enemas (DCBE). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven hundred and forty-one questionnaires were posted to radiographers who had in the last 5 years attended one of the biannual barium enema training courses. RESULTS: Of 741 questionnaires posted 407 (54.9%) were returned completed. Approximately 348,000 barium enema examinations had been performed. Fifty-nine radiographers reported 89 complications, including 13 intra-peritoneal and 11 extra-peritoneal perforations. There were five deaths (mortality 1 in 70,000). Deaths resulted from two of 24 (10%) perforations, two of 45 (5%) cardiac events and one cerebrovascular accident that occurred during an examination. CONCLUSIONS: Radiographers have been regularly performing DCBEs for almost a decade. The mortality for radiographer-performed DCBE is similar to that previously reported for radiologists, although a slightly higher rate of perforation is noted and so this is an area where radiographer training should be targeted

  7. Voluntary Deep Inspiration Breath-hold Reduces the Heart Dose Without Compromising the Target Volume Coverage During Radiotherapy for Left-sided Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hammadi, Noora; Caparrotti, Palmira; Naim, Carole; Hayes, Jillian; Rebecca Benson, Katherine; Vasic, Ana; Al-Abdulla, Hissa; Hammoud, Rabih; Divakar, Saju; Petric, Primoz

    2018-03-01

    During radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer, parts of the heart are irradiated, which may lead to late toxicity. We report on the experience of single institution with cardiac-sparing radiotherapy using voluntary deep inspiration breath hold (V-DIBH) and compare its dosimetric outcome with free breathing (FB) technique. Left-sided breast cancer patients, treated at our department with postoperative radiotherapy of breast/chest wall +/- regional lymph nodes between May 2015 and January 2017, were considered for inclusion. FB-computed tomography (CT) was obtained and dose-planning performed. Cases with cardiac V25Gy ≥ 5% or risk factors for heart disease were coached for V-DIBH. Compliant patients were included. They underwent additional CT in V-DIBH for planning, followed by V-DIBH radiotherapy. Dose volume histogram parameters for heart, lung and optimized planning target volume (OPTV) were compared between FB and BH. Treatment setup shifts and systematic and random errors for V-DIBH technique were compared with FB historic control. Sixty-three patients were considered for V-DIBH. Nine (14.3%) were non-compliant at coaching, leaving 54 cases for analysis. When compared with FB, V-DIBH resulted in a significant reduction of mean cardiac dose from 6.1 +/- 2.5 to 3.2 +/- 1.4 Gy (p FB and V-DIBH, respectively (p FB- and V-DIBH-derived mean lung dose (11.3 +/- 3.2 vs. 10.6 +/- 2.6 Gy), lung V20Gy (20.5 +/- 7 vs. 19.5 +/- 5.1 Gy) and V95% for the OPTV (95.6 +/- 4.1 vs. 95.2 +/- 6.3%) were non-significant. V-DIBH-derived mean shifts for initial patient setup were ≤ 2.7 mm. Random and systematic errors were ≤ 2.1 mm. These results did not differ significantly from historic FB controls. When compared with FB, V-DIBH demonstrated high setup accuracy and enabled significant reduction of cardiac doses without compromising the target volume coverage. Differences in lung doses were non-significant.

  8. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Z.S.; Norman, A.; Solomon, G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  9. Radiographers' preconditions for evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, Sanna-Mari; Liikanen, Eeva

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential in today's health care, but its establishment requires several preconditions from individuals and organizations (e.g. knowledge, understanding, attitudes, abilities, self-confidence, support, and resources). Previous studies suggest that radiographers do generate and use evidence in their work, but evidence-based radiography (EBR) is not yet used routinely as established practice, especially in terms of research utilization. This paper aims to describe radiographers' preconditions for EBR, and their participation in research activities. Main focus is on research utilization. Using an electronic questionnaire developed for this study, a survey was conducted: data collected from Finnish radiographers and radiotherapists (N = 438) were analysed both statistically and qualitatively. The final response rate was 39%. The results suggest radiographers' preconditions for EBR to consist of knowledge of research, significance of research activities, research-orientated way of working, and support. In addition, adequate resourcing is essential. Reading scientific journals, participation in research activities, a higher degree of education, and senior post seem to be significant promoters of EBR and research utilization. The results support the notion that EBR, and especially research utilization, are not yet well-established in Finland, and radiographers' viewpoints concerning the role and significance of research evidence and research activities still seem to vary.

  10. Radiographic evaluation of the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiographic evaluation of the foot in the patient with diabetes mellitus is discussed in this paper. According to the author, it can only be of value when the soft tissue and bony and joint pathologic conditions, which occur more frequently in the diabetic patient are also considered and understood. Although not pathognomic for diabetes mellitus, neuroarthopathy, osteomyelitis, soft tissue infection, and some rheumatic disorders are present with greater frequency in diabetic populations than in non-diabetic populations. Frequently, edema, erythema, hyperthermia, and tenderness are present as nonspecific clinical findings, in which case radiographic evaluation is called upon to define the specific etiology of a particular patient's pathology. Unfortunately, many radiographic, computerized tomographic, and radionuclide studies demonstrate less than optimal positive and negative predictive values unless interpreted in view of clinical history and examination and integrated with the results of other laboratory data. Radiographic evaluation of the diabetic foot may be utilized to establish the presence of disease, the extent of pedal involvement, and the response to therapy. The establishment of the nature of disease processes from radiographic findings alone, however, may be problematic. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis, for example, rests on the recovery of the offending microorganisms from bone aspiration or culture

  11. Prediction of acute cardiac rejection by changes in left ventricular volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.K.; Boniaszczuk, J.

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen patients underwent heart transplantation (11 orthotopic, five heterotopic). Monitoring for acute rejection was by both endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) and multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning with technetium 99m-labelled red blood cells. From the scans information was obtained on left ventricular volumes (stroke, end-diastolic, and end-systolic), ejection fraction, and heart rate. Studies (208) were made in the 16 patients. There was a highly significant correlation between the reduction in stroke volume and end-diastolic volume (and a less significant correlation in end-systolic volume) and increasing acute rejection seen on EMB. Heart rate and ejection fraction did not correlate with the development of acute rejection. Correlation of a combination of changes in stroke volume and end-diastolic volume with EMB showed a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 96%. Radionuclide scanning is therefore a useful noninvasive tool for monitoring acute rejection

  12. Radiographic features of periapical cysts and granulomas

    OpenAIRE

    Zain, R. B.; Roswati, N.; Ismail, K.

    1989-01-01

    Many studies have been reported on radiographic lesion sizes of periapical lesions. However no studies have been reported on prevalences of subjective radiographic features in these lesions except for the early assumption that a periapical cyst usually exhibit a radiopaque cortex. This study is conducted to evaluate the prevalences of several subjective radiographic features of periapical cysts and granulomas in the hope to identify features that maybe suggestive of either diagnosis. The resu...

  13. [Camera-cinematography of the heart (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W E; Meyer, G; Bitter, F; Kampmann, H; Bargon, G; Stauch, M

    1975-07-01

    By "camera-cinematography" of the heart, we mean an isotope method which permits detailed observation of cardiac mechanics without the use of a catheter. All that is necessary is an intravenous injection of 10 to 15 mCi 99mTc human serum albumen followed after ten minutes by a five to ten minute period of observation with a scintilation camera. At this time the isotope has become distributed in the blood. Variations in the precordial impulses correspond with intra-cardiac changes of blood volume during a cardiac cycle. Analysis of the R-wave provides adequate information of cyclical volume changes in limited portions of the heart. This is achieved by a monitor with a pseudo-3-dimensional display; contraction and relaxation of the myocardium can be shown for any chosen longitudinal or horizontal diameter of the heart. Our programme allows simultaneous presentation of the movement of any point on the myocardium as a time-activity curve. The method is recommended as an addition to chest radiography, heart screening or cardiac kymography before carrying out cardiac catheterisation.

  14. Comparison of film/screen and PCR digital lateral cervical spine radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, D.I.; Kreipke, D.L.; Tarver, R.; Braunstein, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors compared film/screen and Phillips computed radiography (PCR) radiographs of the cervical spine. In 109 patients. fiilm/screen and digital radiographs were compared for adequate visualization (readability) of bone, soft tissue, and trachea. The lowest cervical vertebra seen was noted in each case. The radiographs were interpreted by four radiologists, and both interobserver and intraobserver consistency were measured. Of the PCR radiographs, 97% were readable with a viewbox alone. Of the film/screen radiographs, 9% were readable with a viewbox. With a hotlight, 83% of the film/screen radiographs became readable. Bone, soft tissue, and trachea were better seen on PCR radiographs than on film/screen radiographs (P<.001). There was less interobserver variation on digital radiographs. Readability of cervical spine radiographs was significantly improved with PCR

  15. Radiographic identification of the equine ventral conchal bulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, C M; Townsend, N B; Barnett, T P; Barakzai, S Z

    Involvement of the ventral conchal sinus (VCS) is an important diagnostic and prognostic feature in cases of the equine sinus disease. The authors aimed to ascertain if the caudo-dorsal extension of the VCS, the ventral conchal bulla (VCB) is identifiable on plain radiographs of cadaver skulls without sinus disease. Bilateral frontonasal sinus flaps were made in 10 equine cadaver skulls. Plain lateral, lateral oblique and dorso-ventral radiographs were then obtained followed by the same views taken with stainless steel wire outlining the caudal border of the VCB. Plain radiographs were randomised and blindly evaluated by two observers who marked where they believed the VCB to be positioned. This was then correlated with the true position of the VCB using radiographs with wires in place. The ease of identification of the VCB was classified as 'easy' or 'difficult'. The VCB was correctly identified in 70 per cent of lateral radiographs, but only 45 per cent of lateral oblique radiographs and 17 per cent of dorso-ventral radiographs. If a clinician was confident that he or she could identify the VCB, they were usually correct. Conversely if the clinician judged VCB identification as 'difficult', they usually identified it incorrectly. In the authors' clinical experience, the VCB of horses with sinusitis involving this compartment is more radiologically evident than in clinically normal horses. Knowledge of the normal radiographic anatomy of this structure should aid clinicians in identifying horses with sinusitis affecting the VCS.

  16. Contribution to identification of factors causing radiographic image unsharpness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branzan, C.; Popescu, A.; Radu, R.

    1995-01-01

    Radiographic image quality is crucial for the ability of the radiographic method to give us a maximum information about the macroscopic structure of materials and pieces, investigated by penetrating radiation. Radiographic image quality depends on several factors. A high quality image is able to show small and typical defects. One of the most important factor affecting radiographic image is unsharpness. The total effective unsharpness of the film must be some function of several factors and their contribution is taken into account by summing up different kinds of unsharpness: geometric unsharpness, internal unsharpness, screen unsharpness, and accidental unsharpness. This work analyses the weight of the radiographic image unsharpness and the possibilities for determining its influence on the quality of the radiographic image. (author)

  17. Variation in critical care unit admission rates and outcomes for patients with acute coronary syndromes or heart failure among high- and low-volume cardiac hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Sean; Bakal, Jeffrey A; Lin, Meng; Kaul, Padma; McAlister, Finlay A; Ezekowitz, Justin A

    2015-02-27

    Little is known about cross-hospital differences in critical care units admission rates and related resource utilization and outcomes among patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) or heart failure (HF). Using a population-based sample of 16,078 patients admitted to a critical care unit with a primary diagnosis of ACS (n=14,610) or HF (n=1467) between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2013 in Alberta, Canada, we stratified hospitals into high (>250), medium (200 to 250), or low (<200) volume based on their annual volume of all ACS and HF hospitalization. The percentage of hospitalized patients admitted to critical care units varied across low, medium, and high-volume hospitals for both ACS and HF as follows: 77.9%, 81.3%, and 76.3% (P<0.001), and 18.0%, 16.3%, and 13.0% (P<0.001), respectively. Compared to low-volume units, critical care patients with ACS and HF admitted to high-volume hospitals had shorter mean critical care stays (56.6 versus 95.6 hours, P<0.001), more critical care procedures (1.9 versus 1.2 per patient, <0.001), and higher resource-intensive weighting (2.8 versus 1.5, P<0.001). No differences in in-hospital mortality (5.5% versus 6.2%, adjusted odds ratio 0.93; 95% CI, 0.61 to 1.41) were observed between high- and low-volume hospitals; however, 30-day cardiovascular readmissions (4.6% versus 6.8%, odds ratio 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.99) and cardiovascular emergency-room visits (6.6% versus 9.5%, odds ratio 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.94) were lower in high-volume compared to low-volume hospitals. Outcomes stratified by ACS or HF admission diagnosis were similar. Cardiac patients hospitalized in low-volume hospitals were more frequently admitted to critical care units and had longer hospitals stays despite lower resource-intensive weighting. These findings may provide opportunities to standardize critical care utilization for ACS and HF patients across high- and low-volume hospitals. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American

  18. Effect of metformin therapy on cardiac function and survival in a volume-overload model of heart failure in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beneš, J.; Kazdová, L.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Houštěk, Josef; Medříková, Daša; Kopecký, Jan; Kovářová, Nikola; Vrbacký, Marek; Sedmera, David; Strnad, Hynek; Kolář, Michal; Petrák, J.; Benada, Oldřich; Škaroupková, P.; Červenka, L.; Melenovský, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 1 (2011), s. 29-41 ISSN 0143-5221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA MZd(CZ) NS9757; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS10497; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/1390 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : AMP-activated protein kinase * energy metabolism * heart failure * metformin * survival * volume overload Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 4.317, year: 2011

  19. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von [Dept. of Radiology MBC28, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1993-01-01

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  20. [Resonance hypothesis of heart rate variability origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheĭkh-Zade, Iu R; Mukhambetaliev, G Kh; Cherednik, I L

    2009-09-01

    A hypothesis is advanced of the heart rate variability being subjected to beat-to-beat regulation of cardiac cycle duration in order to ensure the resonance interaction between respiratory and own fluctuation of the arterial system volume for minimization of power expenses of cardiorespiratory system. Myogenic, parasympathetic and sympathetic machanisms of heart rate variability are described.

  1. Clinical results and radiographic appearance of the Rashkind double umbrella device in patients with occlusion of the ductus arteriosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galal, O.; Sinner, W. von; Azhari, N.; Al-Fadley, F.; De Moor, M.; Boecker, J.; Fawzy, M.E..; Al-Halees, Z.

    1997-01-01

    Background. The Rashkind double umbrella device for patent arterial duct occlusion has been used in many patients. Its radiographic appearance has not been sufficiently described. Objective. To present the varying radiographic appearances of the Rashkind double umbrella device on the chest X-ray. Materials and methods. The chest radiographs of 69 patients (median age 60 months; median weight 17 kg), who underwent closure of their patent arterial duct between March 1990 and August 1994, were reviewed. The following parameters were evaluated: (1) the size of the heart (cardio-thoracic ratio) and pulmonary vessels, (2) the position of the device in AP/PA and lateral projections. The results of occlusion of the patent arterial duct were also reviewed. Results. Sixty-two of 69 (90 %) pa- tients had complete occlusion after a follow-up between 2 months and 3 1 / 2 years. The cardio-thoracic ratio showed significant reduction at follow-up (P < 0.001). The two different size devices could be well differentiated in the AP and the lateral projection. In 14 patients (20 %) the device was in an asymmetrical position. There was no significant correlation between position of the device and success of occlusion in our material. Conclusion. Complete occlusion of the arterial duct using Rashkind double umbrella devices can be achieved in 90 % of our population. In 20 % the device will have an asymmetrical position. There is no correlation between asymmetrical position of the device in the chest radiograph and residual shunting. (orig.)

  2. Radiographic alterations of the frontal sinus morphology according to variations of the vertical angle in posteroanterior radiographs of the skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonan Ferreira Silva

    2014-03-01

    The frontal sinuses play a highly relevant role in comparative human identification processes. Since forensic radiology is a branch in the forensic sciences, adequate radiological analysis of the frontal sinuses is essential for comparative human identifications. The current study investigates radiographic morphological changes in the frontal sinuses according to vertical angle distortions in posteroanterior (PA radiographs. A standard PA radiograph of the skull of an adult was obtained. Eight addition PA radiographs were taken at different vertical angles. Frontal sinuses were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively according to Ribeiro´s (2000 technique. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses revealed significant image distortions. Further, overlapping anatomical structures were reported when PA radiographs were analyzed in negative angulation distortions (from -10° to -40°. Positive and negative angular distortions up to 20º slightly affected the qualitative morphological analysis. However, 10° positive and negative distortions provided a significant interference in quantitative analysis and impaired the measuring process. Most forensic techniques for the analysis of frontal sinuses comprise measurements of morphological distances. Distortions of approximately 10° or over in vertical angulation of cranial PA radiographs should be avoided so that more accurate comparative human identifications could be achieved.

  3. Implications of the Hemodynamic Optimization Approach Guided by Right Heart Catheterization in Patients with Severe Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís E. Rohde

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report the hemodynamic and functional responses obtained with clinical optimization guided by hemodynamic parameters in patients with severe and refractory heart failure. METHODS: Invasive hemodynamic monitoring using right heart catheterization aimed to reach low filling pressures and peripheral resistance. Frequent adjustments of intravenous diuretics and vasodilators were performed according to the hemodynamic measurements. RESULTS: We assessed 19 patients (age = 48±12 years and ejection fraction = 21±5% with severe heart failure. The intravenous use of diuretics and vasodilators reduced by 12 mm Hg (relative reduction of 43% pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (P<0.001, with a concomitant increment of 6 mL per beat in stroke volume (relative increment of 24%, P<0.001. We observed significant associations between pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and mean pulmonary artery pressure (r=0.76; P<0.001 and central venous pressure (r=0.63; P<0.001. After clinical optimization, improvement in functional class occurred (P< 0.001, with a tendency towards improvement in ejection fraction and no impairment to renal function. CONCLUSION: Optimization guided by hemodynamic parameters in patients with refractory heart failure provides a significant improvement in the hemodynamic profile with concomitant improvement in functional class. This study emphasizes that adjustments in blood volume result in imme-diate benefits for patients with severe heart failure.

  4. Unicystic Jaw Lesions: A Radiographic Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giju George

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The unilocular radiolucencies remain the topic of much interest for the clinicians and histhopathologists for decades. Adequate use of diagnostic aids and careful observation will clinically help the dentist to arrive at a proper diagnosis and renders quality treatment to patients. Despite of the development of various cross-sectional imaging modalities, the radiograph still remains as the first and most important investigation. Jaw bone lesions, especially unilocular ones, are difficult to diagnose radiologically because of their similar radiographic appearance. It is, thus, very important for the clinician to have a sound knowledge of various radiographic features of the tooth and its supporting structures.

  5. Comparison of three contrast radiographic techniques in the dog large intestine; Comparacion de tres tecnicas radiograficas de contraste en el intestino grueso del perro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, L.; Thibaut, J.; Olhaberry, E.; Born, R.; Deppe, R. [Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile)

    1994-07-01

    In order to compare three radiographic techniques -pneumocolon, barium enema and double contrast- in the large intestine of the dog, three radiographic series in ventrodorsal and right lateral projections were taken. Six healthy adult dogs of both sexes with an approximate weight between 5 to 10 kg were used. Three enemas were administered 24, 12 and 2 hrs. before the series of radiographs were taken. Then dogs were anaesthetized with sodium tiopental (20 mg/kg iv) and the contrast media were introduced. Pneumocolon was carried out in the first series introducing air (20 cc/kg) in the large intestine through a Foley rectal catheter. Radiographs were taken in both projections, after 5 and 15min. respectively. Barium enema was performed in the second series introducing barium sulfate (18%) in the large intestine through a Foley rectal catheter (25 cc/kg); 5 and 15 min. later, the radiographs were taken. In the third series -double contrast- the barium sulfate, which was obtained from each dog using a catheter, was substituted by a volume of air equal to that obtained from the contrast medium. Later the radiographs were taken in both projections. The radiographic plates of each series were analized comparing the characteristics of: radiographic density, outline and volume. With the pneumocolon barium enema and double contrast, the radiographic density was, in most cases, low, high and inter-mediate respectively. The radiographic outline was, in most cases, regular for the three techniques. Thee radiographic volume was similar in all of the series. From the results obtained, it is concluded that double contrast best outlines the intestinal mucosa and more information can be obtained from it [Spanish] Con la finalidad de comparar tres tecnicas radiograficas del intestino grueso del perro -neumocolon, enema baritado y doble contraste-, se tomaron tres series radiograficas en proyeccion ventrodorsal y lateral derecha en 6 perros adultos, de 5 a 10 kg de peso, que

  6. Adult Sail Sign: Radiographic and Computed Tomographic Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu-Jin; Han, Daehee; Koh, Young Hwan; Zo, Joo Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Jeong Sang; Moon, Hyeon Jong; Kim, Jong Seung; Chun, Eun Ju; Youn, Byung Jae; Lee, Chang Hyun; Kim, Sam Soo (Dept. of Radiology, Cheil General Hospital, Kwandong Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (KR))

    2008-02-15

    Background: The sail sign is a well-known radiographic feature of the pediatric chest. This sign can be observed in an adult population as well, but for a different reason. Purpose: To investigate the sail sign appearing in adult chest radiography. Material and Methods: Based on two anecdotal adult cases in which frontal chest radiographs showed the sail sign, we prospectively screened radiographs of 10,238 patients to determine the incidence of the sail sign found in adults in their 40s or older. The cause of the sail sign was assessed using computed tomography (CT). Results: The sail sign was revealed in 10 (seven males, three females; median age 60.6 years) of 10,238 patients. Of these 10 patients with a sail sign on frontal radiographs, eight underwent CT. The frontal radiographs of these 10 patients showed a concave superior margin toward the lung in nine patients, a concave inferior margin in five, and a double-lined inferior margin in three. Lateral radiographs disclosed a focal opacity over the minor fissure in five of six patients, which was either fuzzy (n = 4) or sharp (n = 1) in its upper margin, and was sometimes double lined in the inferior margin (n = 3). CT revealed the anterior mediastinal fat to be the cause of the radiographic sail sign, which stretched laterally from the mediastinum to insinuate into the minor fissure. Conclusion: The incidence of sail sign on adult chest radiographs is about 0.1%. The sign is specific enough to eliminate the need for more sophisticated imaging

  7. Adult Sail Sign: Radiographic and Computed Tomographic Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yu-Jin; Han, Daehee; Koh, Young Hwan; Zo, Joo Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Jeong Sang; Moon, Hyeon Jong; Kim, Jong Seung; Chun, Eun Ju; Y oun, Byung Jae; Lee, Chang Hyun; Kim, Sam Soo

    2008-01-01

    Background: The sail sign is a well-known radiographic feature of the pediatric chest. This sign can be observed in an adult population as well, but for a different reason. Purpose: To investigate the sail sign appearing in adult chest radiography. Material and Methods: Based on two anecdotal adult cases in which frontal chest radiographs showed the sail sign, we prospectively screened radiographs of 10,238 patients to determine the incidence of the sail sign found in adults in their 40s or older. The cause of the sail sign was assessed using computed tomography (CT). Results: The sail sign was revealed in 10 (seven males, three females; median age 60.6 years) of 10,238 patients. Of these 10 patients with a sail sign on frontal radiographs, eight underwent CT. The frontal radiographs of these 10 patients showed a concave superior margin toward the lung in nine patients, a concave inferior margin in five, and a double-lined inferior margin in three. Lateral radiographs disclosed a focal opacity over the minor fissure in five of six patients, which was either fuzzy (n = 4) or sharp (n = 1) in its upper margin, and was sometimes double lined in the inferior margin (n = 3). CT revealed the anterior mediastinal fat to be the cause of the radiographic sail sign, which stretched laterally from the mediastinum to insinuate into the minor fissure. Conclusion: The incidence of sail sign on adult chest radiographs is about 0.1%. The sign is specific enough to eliminate the need for more sophisticated imaging

  8. Adult sail sign: radiographic and computed tomographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Jin; Han, Daehee; Koh, Young Hwan; Zo, Joo Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Jeong Sang; Moon, Hyeon Jong; Kim, Jong Seung; Chun, Eun Ju; Youn, Byung Jae; Lee, Chang Hyun; Kim, Sam Soo

    2008-02-01

    The sail sign is a well-known radiographic feature of the pediatric chest. This sign can be observed in an adult population as well, but for a different reason. To investigate the sail sign appearing in adult chest radiography. Based on two anecdotal adult cases in which frontal chest radiographs showed the sail sign, we prospectively screened radiographs of 10,238 patients to determine the incidence of the sail sign found in adults in their 40s or older. The cause of the sail sign was assessed using computed tomography (CT). The sail sign was revealed in 10 (seven males, three females; median age 60.6 years) of 10,238 patients. Of these 10 patients with a sail sign on frontal radiographs, eight underwent CT. The frontal radiographs of these 10 patients showed a concave superior margin toward the lung in nine patients, a concave inferior margin in five, and a double-lined inferior margin in three. Lateral radiographs disclosed a focal opacity over the minor fissure in five of six patients, which was either fuzzy (n = 4) or sharp (n = 1) in its upper margin, and was sometimes double lined in the inferior margin (n = 3). CT revealed the anterior mediastinal fat to be the cause of the radiographic sail sign, which stretched laterally from the mediastinum to insinuate into the minor fissure. The incidence of sail sign on adult chest radiographs is about 0.1%. The sign is specific enough to eliminate the need for more sophisticated imaging.

  9. Method for taking X radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, G.

    1983-01-01

    The method is aimed at obtaining X radiographs of any human organ with the aid of an X-ray-shadowless radiation detector of a dose measuring device, which is arranged between patient and imaging system, and of a controlling microprocessor system, so that the image-forming parameters are automatically adjusted to the specific properties of the patient. This procedure minimices the efforts in preparing the radiograph and the radiation exposure of the patient

  10. Successful heart transplantation in patients with total artificial heart infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taimur, Sarah; Sullivan, Timothy; Rana, Mennakshi; Patel, Gopi; Roldan, Julie; Ashley, Kimberly; Pinney, Sean; Anyanwu, Anelechi; Huprikar, Shirish

    2018-02-01

    Data are limited on clinical outcomes in patients awaiting heart transplant (HT) with total artificial heart (TAH) infections. We retrospectively reviewed all TAH recipients at our center. TAH infection was classified as definite if a microorganism was isolated in cultures from the exit site or deep tissues around the TAH; as probable in patients without surgical or microbiologic evidence of infection but no other explanation for persistent or recurrent bloodstream infection (BSI); or possible in patients with clinical suspicion and radiographic findings suggestive of TAH infection, but without surgical intervention or microbiologic evidence. From 2012 to 2015, a total of 13 patients received a TAH, with a median age at implantation of 52 years (range: 28-60). TAH infection occurred in nine patients (seven definite, one probable, one possible) a median of 41 days after implant (range: 17-475). The majority of TAH infections were caused by Staphylococcus species. Seven of nine patients underwent HT (four had pre-HT mediastinal washout, and five had positive HT operative cultures). Three patients had an active BSI caused by the same pathogen causing TAH infection at the time of HT, with one developing a post-HT BSI with the same bacteria. No patient developed post-HT surgical site infection caused by the TAH infection pathogen. No deaths among HT recipients were attributed to infection. TAH infection is frequently associated with BSI and mediastinitis and Staphylococcus was the most common pathogen. A multimodal approach of appropriate pre- and post-HT antimicrobial therapy, surgical drainage, and heart transplantation with radical mediastinal debridement was successful in curing infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Neonates do not need to be handled for radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slade, Dawn; Alfaham, Mazin; Davis, Peter; Tuthill, David; Harrison, Sara; Morris, Susan; Guildea, Zoe

    2005-01-01

    The handling of sick neonates may have detrimental effects such as hypoxia or bradycardia. Such handling is inevitable due to the frequent need for practical procedures; however, minimising handling reduces these adverse events and may improve outcome. Radiography is one of the commonest procedures performed on neonates. Usually the infant is lifted and placed onto the radiographic cassette; however, modern incubators often incorporate a tray beneath the mattress in which the radiographic cassette can be placed without the need to disturb the infant. To compare the quality of chest radiographs taken using the standard direct contact method, with those taken using the under-tray technique. A series of chest radiographs taken over a 21-month period were analysed independently by two consultant paediatric radiologists unaware of the radiographic details. The position of the radiograph, i.e. direct contact or under-tray, was determined by the radiographer. Radiographic quality was scored on the following features: exposure, blurring, rotation, cut-off or coning, and side markers. A subjective score was also included. The results from each radiologist were analysed separately. Seventy chest radiographs were analysed - 25 standard method, 45 under-tray. A statistically significant advantage for the under-tray method was seen on two analyses - radiologist 1 for exposure, and radiologist 2 for cut-off. No other significant differences were noted. There were no differences in the infants' weights or radiation exposure. The under-tray method for taking radiographs may produce films of at least equivalent quality to the standard method. Since the standard method involves handling with potential desaturation and bradycardia, this technique should cease. (orig.)

  12. Radiographic evaluation of dentigerous cyst with cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Chan; Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to accurately analyze the radiographic characteristics of dentigerous cyst (DC) with multiplanar images of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Thirty eight radiographically and histopathologically proven cases of DCs were analyzed with panoramic radiograph and CBCT, retrospectively. The radiographic CT pattern, symmetry of radiolucency around the unerupted tooth crown, ratio of long length to short length, degree of cortical bone alternation, effects on adjacent tooth, and cyst size were analyzed. Relative frequencies of these radiographic features were evaluated. In order to compare the CBCT features of DC with those of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), 9 cases of OKCs were analyzed with the same method radiographically. DCs consisted of thirty unilocular cases (79.0%), seven lobulated cases (18.4%) and one multilocular case (2.6%). Eight were asymmetric (21.0%) and thirty were symmetric (79.0%). Maxillary DC showed rounder shape than mandibular DC (L/S ratio; maxilla 1.32, mandible 1.67). Alternations of lingual cortical bone (14 cases, 48.2%) were more frequent than those of buccal side (7 cases, 24.1%). CBCT images of DC showed definite root resorption and bucco-lingual tooth displacement. These findings were hardly observed on panoramic radiographs of DCs. Comparison of CBCT features of DC with those of OKC showed several different features. CBCT images of DC showed various characteristic radiographic features. Therefore, CBCT can be helpful for the diagnosis of DC radiographically.

  13. Radiographic evaluation of dentigerous cyst with cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Chan; Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do [School of Dentisity, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to accurately analyze the radiographic characteristics of dentigerous cyst (DC) with multiplanar images of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Thirty eight radiographically and histopathologically proven cases of DCs were analyzed with panoramic radiograph and CBCT, retrospectively. The radiographic CT pattern, symmetry of radiolucency around the unerupted tooth crown, ratio of long length to short length, degree of cortical bone alternation, effects on adjacent tooth, and cyst size were analyzed. Relative frequencies of these radiographic features were evaluated. In order to compare the CBCT features of DC with those of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), 9 cases of OKCs were analyzed with the same method radiographically. DCs consisted of thirty unilocular cases (79.0%), seven lobulated cases (18.4%) and one multilocular case (2.6%). Eight were asymmetric (21.0%) and thirty were symmetric (79.0%). Maxillary DC showed rounder shape than mandibular DC (L/S ratio; maxilla 1.32, mandible 1.67). Alternations of lingual cortical bone (14 cases, 48.2%) were more frequent than those of buccal side (7 cases, 24.1%). CBCT images of DC showed definite root resorption and bucco-lingual tooth displacement. These findings were hardly observed on panoramic radiographs of DCs. Comparison of CBCT features of DC with those of OKC showed several different features. CBCT images of DC showed various characteristic radiographic features. Therefore, CBCT can be helpful for the diagnosis of DC radiographically.

  14. Relationships between rotator cuff tear types and radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee Soo Jung; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik; Zhang, Ying [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    To determine relationships between different types of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. The shoulder radiographs of 104 patients with an arthroscopically proven rotator cuff tear were compared with similar radiographs of 54 age-matched controls with intact cuffs. Two radiologists independently interpreted all radiographs for; cortical thickening with subcortical sclerosis, subcortical cysts, osteophytes in the humeral greater tuberosity, humeral migration, degenerations of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints, and subacromial spurs. Statistical analysis was performed to determine relationships between each type of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. Inter-observer agreements with respect to radiographic findings were analyzed. Humeral migration and degenerative change of the greater tuberosity, including sclerosis, subcortical cysts, and osteophytes, were more associated with full-thickness tears (p < 0.01). Subacromial spurs were more common for full-thickness and bursal-sided tears (p < 0.01). No association was found between degeneration of the acromioclavicular or glenohumeral joint and the presence of a cuff tear. Different types of rotator cuff tears are associated with different radiographic abnormalities.

  15. Relationships between rotator cuff tear types and radiographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee Soo Jung; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    To determine relationships between different types of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. The shoulder radiographs of 104 patients with an arthroscopically proven rotator cuff tear were compared with similar radiographs of 54 age-matched controls with intact cuffs. Two radiologists independently interpreted all radiographs for; cortical thickening with subcortical sclerosis, subcortical cysts, osteophytes in the humeral greater tuberosity, humeral migration, degenerations of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints, and subacromial spurs. Statistical analysis was performed to determine relationships between each type of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. Inter-observer agreements with respect to radiographic findings were analyzed. Humeral migration and degenerative change of the greater tuberosity, including sclerosis, subcortical cysts, and osteophytes, were more associated with full-thickness tears (p < 0.01). Subacromial spurs were more common for full-thickness and bursal-sided tears (p < 0.01). No association was found between degeneration of the acromioclavicular or glenohumeral joint and the presence of a cuff tear. Different types of rotator cuff tears are associated with different radiographic abnormalities.

  16. Assessment of correlation between knee notch width index and the three-dimensional notch volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, C.F.; Martins, C.A.Q.; Lorenz, S.G.F.; Fu, F.H.; Smolinski, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study was done to determine whether there is a correlation between the notch volume and the notch width index (NWI) as measured on the three most frequently used radiographic views: the Holmblad 45A degrees, Holmblad 70A degrees, and Rosenberg view. The notch volume of 20 cadaveric knees was

  17. Appearance of the mandibular incisive canal on panoramic radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, R.; Mraiwa, N.; van Steenberghe, D.; Sanderink, G.C.H.; Quirynen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Panoramic radiographs are routinely used in the dental office for various diagnostic purposes. This study aimed to evaluate the visibility of neurovascular structures in the mandibular interforaminal region on such radiographs. Panoramic radiographs were obtained with a Cranex Tome (Soredex) from

  18. Application of harmonic analysis in quantitative heart scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.; Knopp, R.; Breuel, H.P.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative scintigraphy of the heart after equilibrium distribution of a radioactive tracer permits the measurement of time activity curves in the left ventricle during a representative heart cycle with great statistical accuracy. By application of Fourier's analysis, criteria are to be attained in addition for evaluation of the volume curve as a whole. Thus the entire information contained in the volume curve is completely described in a Fourier spectrum. Resynthesis after Fourier transformation seems to be an ideal method of smoothing because of its convergence in the minimum quadratic error for the type of function concerned. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Correlation of radiological assessment of congestive heart failure with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, P.G.; Kahn, A.; Kallman, C.E.; Rojas, K.A.; Bodenheimer, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) has been considered a reliable indicator of left ventricular function. The purpose of this study was to correlate the radiologic assessment of congestive heart failure with LVEDP. The population of the study consisted of 85 consecutive cases in four ranges of LVEDP ( 24). The PA chest radiographs obtained 1 day prior to cardiac catherization were assessed for radiological evidence of congestive heart failure and were graded from normal to abnormal (0-3). The results will be summarized in the authors' presentation. The discordance of radiological assessment of congestive heart failure in patients with elevated LVEDP will be discussed in light of recent advances in pathophysiologic understanding of left ventricular function and the impact of new classes of drugs in the management of these patients

  20. The radiographic manifestations of hypochondroplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heselson, N.G.; Cremin, B.J.; Beighton, P.

    1979-01-01

    Hypochrondroplasia is an inherited skeletal dysplasia that resembles achondroplasia in mild degree. Radiographic manifestations encountered in 12 affected individuals in South Africa include slight shortening of all segments of the tubular bones, moderate caudal diminution of the lumbar interpedicular distances, increased lumbar lordosis with cacral tilt and distal prolongation of the fibular. Hypochondroplasia can be distinguished from other osteochondrodystrophies such as achondroplasia, pseudo-achondroplasia and metaphyseal chondroplasia by the recognition of it clinical and radiographic manifestations. (author)

  1. Industrial radiography on radiographic paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1977-11-01

    An investigation was performed to compare the quality of radiographic paper with that of X-ray film, after a review had been made of the rather scarce literature on the subject. The equipment used throughout the investigation is described, and characteristic curves for Agfa-Gevaert and Kodak papers exposed with different intensifying screens in the low and intermediate voltage range are reproduced. The relative speed, contrast and exposure latitude were computed from these curves. The quality of the radiographic image was checked on U/Al blocks and plates, Al and Fe blocks, and fiber-reinforced composites. Exposure charts for Al and Fe were made for various paper and screen combinations. Both the sharpness of the radiographic image as well as the influence of processing on speed and contrast were checked. Examples are given of the practical application of the paper for radiography of castings, weldings, solderings, assemblies, etc. (author)

  2. Caries detection in dental radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Caries, or the decay of teeth are difficult to automatically detect in dental radiographs because of the small area of the image that is occupied by the decay. Images of dental radiographs has distinct regions of homogeneous gray levels, and therefore naturally lead to a segmentation based automatic caries detection algorithm. This paper describes a method for caries detection based on a multiclass, area independent thresholding and segmenting scheme. This multiclass thresholding algorithm is an extension of the uniform error threshold, an area independent, distribution free thresholding method used for images of only two classes of objects. The authors first consider the problem of caries detection and the image features that characterize the presence of caries. Next, the uniform error threshold is reviewed, and the general multiclass uniform error threshold algorithm is presented. This algorithm is used to automatically detect caries in dental radiographs

  3. Clinical and radiographic assessment of approximal carious lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espelid, I.; Tveit, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the radiographic diagnosis of approximal carious lesions with visual observations of the approximal surfaces and within drilled Class II cavities (made into the pulp). Sound (n=28) and carious (n=123) approximal surfaces of extracted premolars and molars were radiographed. The radiographs were studied by seven observers to diagnose caries. Lesions without cavitation were most often classified as sound (61.3%). When lesions had cavities, the rate of detection increased to 89.1%. Sound surfaces were erroneously classified as carious in 15.7% of cases. Statistically, about 6 our of every 10 qualitative assessments of lesion depth on the basis of radiographs, correctly recorded lesions as being in enamel or extending into dentin. The interexaminer variation in radiographic caries diagnosis were mostly due to difference in diagnostic criteria, whereas differences in diagnostic capability were less important

  4. Image rejects/retakes-radiographic challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waaler, D.; Hofmann, B.

    2010-01-01

    A general held position among radiological personnel prior to digitalisation was that the problem of image rejects/retakes should more or less vanish. However, rejects/retakes still impose several challenges within radiographic imaging; they occupy unnecessary resources, expose patients to unnecessary ionizing radiation and may also indicate suboptimal quality management. The latter is the main objective of this paper, which is based on a survey of international papers published both for screen/film and digital technology. The digital revolution in imaging seems to have reduced the percentage of image rejects/retakes from 10-15 to 3-5%. The major contribution to the decrease appears to be the dramatic reduction of incorrect exposures. At the same time, rejects/retakes due to lack of operator competence (positioning, etc.) are almost unchanged, or perhaps slightly increased (due to lack of proper technical competence, incorrect organ coding, etc.). However, the causes of rejects/retakes are in many cases defined and reported with reference to radiographers' subjective evaluations. Thus, unless radiographers share common views on image quality and acceptance criteria, objective measurements and assessments of reject/retake rates are challenging tasks. Interestingly, none of the investigated papers employs image quality parameters such as 'too much noise' as categories for rejects/retakes. Surprisingly, no reject/retake analysis seems yet to have been conducted for direct digital radiography departments. An increased percentage of rejects/retakes is related to 'digital skills' of radiographers and therefore points to areas for extended education and training. Furthermore, there is a need to investigate the inter subjectivity of radiographers' perception of, and attitude towards, both technical and clinical image quality criteria. Finally, there may be a need to validate whether reject/retake rate analysis is such an effective quality indicator as has been asserted

  5. Image rejects/retakes--radiographic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaler, D; Hofmann, B

    2010-01-01

    A general held position among radiological personnel prior to digitalisation was that the problem of image rejects/retakes should more or less vanish. However, rejects/retakes still impose several challenges within radiographic imaging; they occupy unnecessary resources, expose patients to unnecessary ionizing radiation and may also indicate suboptimal quality management. The latter is the main objective of this paper, which is based on a survey of international papers published both for screen/film and digital technology. The digital revolution in imaging seems to have reduced the percentage of image rejects/retakes from 10-15 to 3-5 %. The major contribution to the decrease appears to be the dramatic reduction of incorrect exposures. At the same time, rejects/retakes due to lack of operator competence (positioning, etc.) are almost unchanged, or perhaps slightly increased (due to lack of proper technical competence, incorrect organ coding, etc.). However, the causes of rejects/retakes are in many cases defined and reported with reference to radiographers' subjective evaluations. Thus, unless radiographers share common views on image quality and acceptance criteria, objective measurements and assessments of reject/retake rates are challenging tasks. Interestingly, none of the investigated papers employs image quality parameters such as 'too much noise' as categories for rejects/retakes. Surprisingly, no reject/retake analysis seems yet to have been conducted for direct digital radiography departments. An increased percentage of rejects/retakes is related to 'digital skills' of radiographers and therefore points to areas for extended education and training. Furthermore, there is a need to investigate the inter-subjectivity of radiographers' perception of, and attitude towards, both technical and clinical image quality criteria. Finally, there may be a need to validate whether reject/retake rate analysis is such an effective quality indicator as has been asserted.

  6. Radiographic and Clinical Analysis of Lateral Epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillito, Matthew; Soong, Maximillian; Martin, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    The literature suggests that radiographs may be unnecessary in the initial evaluation of lateral epicondylitis because treatment is rarely altered as a result of the radiographic findings. The most commonly reported radiographic finding is calcification at the lateral epicondyle. Our goal was to perform a quantitative and qualitative analysis of this finding to determine its importance and possible relationship with various clinical factors and patient-reported measures. All patients diagnosed with lateral epicondylitis by a single surgeon during a 5-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Age, sex, laterality, hand dominance, pain visual analog scale, duration of symptoms, Quick-Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire score, and history of steroid injection were recorded. Calcifications on standard elbow radiographs, acquired digitally and viewed at 200% magnification on a 24-inch monitor, were characterized by size and relationship with the lateral epicondyle. We reviewed 245 patients diagnosed with lateral epicondylitis. A total of 115 elbows (47%) demonstrated lateral epicondyle calcifications. Patients with and without calcifications were similar with regard to clinical factors, as were patients with larger or smaller lesions. Eighty-five elbows (35%) had additional radiographic findings. Treatment was not altered by the radiographic findings in any case. Lateral epicondyle calcifications are much more common in lateral epicondylitis than previously reported, possibly owing to modern digital radiography and magnification, although they do not appear to be related to clinical factors including patient-reported measures. Thus, patients and surgeons should be careful to avoid overinterpretation of such findings. Although radiographs may be helpful in ruling out additional pathology, we did not find other clinically important contributions to the initial evaluation and management of this condition, and thus we do not recommend their routine use

  7. Early characteristic radiographic changes in mucolipidosis II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Lillian M. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital and Stanford University, Pediatric Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Lachman, Ralph S. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital and Stanford University, Pediatric Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States); University of California, International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Although mucolipidosis type II has similar metabolic abnormalities to those found in all the mucopolysaccharidoses and mucolipidoses, there are distinctive diagnostic radiographic changes of mucolipidosis II in the perinatal/newborn/infant period. To describe the early characteristic radiographic changes of mucolipidosis II and to document when these changes manifest and resolve. We retrospectively reviewed radiographs and clinical records of 19 cases of mucolipidosis II from the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry (1971-present; fetal age to 21/2 years). A radiologist with special expertise in skeletal dysplasias evaluated the radiographs. The most common abnormalities were increased vertebral body height (80%, nonspecific), talocalcaneal stippling (86%), periosteal cloaking (74%) and vertebral body rounding (50%). Unreported findings included sacrococcygeal sclerosis (54%) and vertebral body sclerosis (13%). Rickets and hyperparathyroidism-like (pseudohyperparathyroidism) changes (rarely reported) were found in 33% of cases. These changes invariably started in the newborn period and resolved by 1 year of age. The conversion from these early infantile radiographic features to dysostosis multiplex changes occurred in 41% of cases, and within the first year after birth. Several findings strongly suggest the diagnosis of mucolipidosis II, including cloaking in combination with one or more of the following radiographic criteria: talocalcaneal stippling, sacrococcygeal or generalized vertebral body sclerosis, vertebral body rounding, or rickets/hyperparathyroidism-like changes in the perinatal/newborn/infancy period. These findings are not found in the other two forms of mucolipidosis nor in any of the mucopolysaccharidoses. (orig.)

  8. Early characteristic radiographic changes in mucolipidosis II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Lillian M.; Lachman, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    Although mucolipidosis type II has similar metabolic abnormalities to those found in all the mucopolysaccharidoses and mucolipidoses, there are distinctive diagnostic radiographic changes of mucolipidosis II in the perinatal/newborn/infant period. To describe the early characteristic radiographic changes of mucolipidosis II and to document when these changes manifest and resolve. We retrospectively reviewed radiographs and clinical records of 19 cases of mucolipidosis II from the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry (1971-present; fetal age to 21/2 years). A radiologist with special expertise in skeletal dysplasias evaluated the radiographs. The most common abnormalities were increased vertebral body height (80%, nonspecific), talocalcaneal stippling (86%), periosteal cloaking (74%) and vertebral body rounding (50%). Unreported findings included sacrococcygeal sclerosis (54%) and vertebral body sclerosis (13%). Rickets and hyperparathyroidism-like (pseudohyperparathyroidism) changes (rarely reported) were found in 33% of cases. These changes invariably started in the newborn period and resolved by 1 year of age. The conversion from these early infantile radiographic features to dysostosis multiplex changes occurred in 41% of cases, and within the first year after birth. Several findings strongly suggest the diagnosis of mucolipidosis II, including cloaking in combination with one or more of the following radiographic criteria: talocalcaneal stippling, sacrococcygeal or generalized vertebral body sclerosis, vertebral body rounding, or rickets/hyperparathyroidism-like changes in the perinatal/newborn/infancy period. These findings are not found in the other two forms of mucolipidosis nor in any of the mucopolysaccharidoses. (orig.)

  9. A radiographic study of pediatric ulnar anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravino, Mattia; Oni, Julius K; Sala, Debra A; Chu, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The adult ulna has a unique bony architecture that has been described in the literature, but, to the best of our knowledge, the ulnar anatomy in children has not been described. We examined 75 anteroposterior (AP) and 64 lateral radiographs (29 were bilateral) of 50, 0.5- to 11-year-old, healthy children's forearms. On AP radiographs, the total ulnar length, the ulnar proximal angle, the ulnar distal angle, and the distance between each angle from the tip of the triceps insertion; and, on lateral radiographs, the ulnar length and bow deviation were measured. The correlation between age and radiographic measurements, differences based on sex, differences compared with adults' measurements, and interobserver/intraobserver reliability were assessed. Age had a very strong/strong positive correlation with length/distance measurements on both AP and lateral radiographs. Only AP ulnar distal angle was significantly different between sexes (females > males). Compared with the adult ulnar studies, the AP proximal angle in children is significantly smaller and the location of this angle is significantly more distal. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were very good for length/distance measurements on AP and lateral radiographs. The knowledge of pediatric ulnar anatomy could be helpful in the treatment of forearm deformities due to multiple hereditary exostosis and osteogenesis imperfecta, and in the treatment of ulnar fractures, particularly in Monteggia variants, where restoration of the correct forearm anatomy is essential to obtain good clinical and functional results. Study of diagnostic test, Level II.

  10. Radiographer performed single contrast small bowel enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Robert L.; Slack, Nicola; Harvey, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To analyse the technical success and reporting sensitivity of radiographer performed small bowel enteroclysis (SBE) undertaken by a specialist radiographer according to a standard technique [Nolan DJ, Cadman PJ. The small bowel enema made easy. Clinical Radiology 1987;38(3):295-301]. Methods: Patients (1413) had 1646 SBE in 10 years from May 1992 to April 2002. The original request card and the separate radiographer and consultant radiologist reports were reviewed. Where the radiology reports were discordant or inconclusive, the clinical notes were also reviewed. Results: Patients (1022) X-ray films were available. Nine hundred and forty-three (93.3%) SBEs had been successfully completed. Radiographer and consultant radiologist reporting had a 99.3% concordance. There was a 98.4% sensitivity for Crohn's disease (181 of 184 cases where Crohn's disease was the clinical final diagnosis). Overall reporting sensitivity was 93.7% although correct 'probably normal and abnormal' reporting bias suggests a sensitivity of 96.9%. Sixty of 943 (6.4%) reports were inconclusive. Of 1022 patients, 68 (6.6%) of small bowel intubations were not achieved, or else consent was withdrawn at the time of the procedure. Conclusion: Specialist radiographers can perform small bowel enteroclysis with a reporting sensitivity equal to that of a consultant radiologist. Radiographers accustomed to providing an SBE service become skilled at passing fine bore feeding tubes into the small bowel and can provide this service also

  11. Radiographic caries diagnosis and restorative treatment decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileman, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a single diagnostic technique: the bitewing radiograph, and the way it is used by dentists to decide on patient treatment need for interproximal caries. The variation in caries diagnosis and treatment decisions using bitewing radiographs is described and the radiographic criteria of choice for minimizing over and undertreatment according to a norm are investigated. Three possible diagnostic strategies in interproximal caries diagnosis using a decision analysis approach are described and evaluated, and the effect of the reported diagnostic behaviour and knowledge of practicing Dutch dentists in their use of bitewing radiographs for the diagnosis and treatment of interproximal caries is described and analyzed. (Auth.)

  12. Evaluation of underexposed conventional radiographs after digitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.

    1993-01-01

    Inadequate exposure of analogue radiographs is reported in the literature to occur in 5-25% of cases. Therefore, the present study was performed to test whether selective image processing after digitization could reveal diagnostic details on underexposed radiographs. In addition, the minimal exposure values required for diagnostic purposes after adequate image processing were studied. Phantom studies, organ preparations and measurements of physical parameters with decreasing exposure values were performed. The detection of anatomic and pathologic (nondisplaced fracture lines, microcalcification and renal stones) structures were evaluated by 12 readers. Radiographs with exposure values 20-40% lower than 'ideal' values can provide adequate diagnostic images after digital processing. The diagnostic information is significantly impaired with values under 50% of the correct exposure values. In conclusion, this method is adequate to save underexposed radiographs for diagnostic purposes and to avoid repeated examinations. (orig.) [de

  13. Do general radiographic examinations resemble a person-centred environment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayre, C.M.; Blackman, S.; Eyden, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim and objective: It is argued whether general radiographic examinations adhere to a person-centred approach within the direct digital radiography (DDR) environment. General radiographic examinations continue to increase and constitute approximately 90% of all examinations undertaken in the clinical environment. This study explored the potential impact patients experience whilst undergoing general imaging examinations. Method: An ethnographic methodology provided insight of two general radiography environments in the United Kingdom (UK) using participant observation and semi-structured interviews. Findings: The findings highlighted an ‘in and out’ culture whereby patients are ‘hurried’ and ‘rushed’ out of X-ray rooms in response to increasing time pressures experienced by diagnostic radiographers. In addition, this study challenged that patients may begin to rank ‘speed’ and ‘waiting times’ above other elements of radiographic care thus presenting new challenges for radiographers within the clinical environment. Conclusion: It is asserted that radiographers should remain holistic healthcare professionals and not begin to resemble operators on the production line. Further, it challenges whether patients are beginning to rank aspects of radiographic care within contemporary practices. Advances in knowledge: Few studies have explored the radiographer–patient relationship within the DDR environment, yet this study provides insight of person-centred practices within contemporary practices. - Highlights: • Challenges whether the use of DDR conforms to a person-centred approach. • Challenges whether radiographers are ‘treating patients as persons’ using DDR. • Patients may begin to rank ‘speed’ and ‘waiting times’ above other aspects of radiographic care.

  14. Magnesium-enriched hydroxyapatite compared to calcium sulfate in the healing of human extraction sockets: radiographic and histomorphometric evaluation at 3 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Roberto; Capparè, Paolo; Gherlone, Enrico

    2009-02-01

    Reduction of alveolar height and width after tooth extraction may present problems for implant placement, especially in the anterior maxilla where bone volume is important for biologic and esthetic reasons. Different graft materials have been proposed to minimize the reduction in ridge volume. The aim of this study was to compare radiographic and histomorphometric results of magnesium-enriched hydroxyapatite (MHA) and calcium sulfate (CS) grafts in fresh sockets after tooth extractions. Forty-five fresh extraction sockets with three bone walls were selected in 15 patients. A split-mouth design was used: 15 sockets on the right side of the jaw received MHA, 15 sockets on the left side received CS, and 15 random unfilled sockets were considered the control (C) group. Intraoral digital radiographs were taken at baseline and at 3 months after graft material placement. At 3 months, cylinder bone samples were obtained for histology and histomorphometry analysis. The difference in mean radiographic vertical bone level from baseline to 3 months was -2.48 +/- 0.65 mm in the CS group, -0.48 +/- 0.21 mm in the MHA group, and -3.75 +/- 0.63 mm in the unfilled C group. Statistically significant differences (P sockets showed 13.9% +/- 3.4% residual implant material, whereas the MHA-treated sockets showed 20.2% +/- 3.2% residual material. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (P <0.05). Radiographs revealed a greater reduction of alveolar ridge in the CS group than in the MHA group. Histologic examination showed more bone formation and faster resorption in the CS group and more residual implant material in the MHA group.

  15. A case of a found radiographic source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucelj, B.; Korun, M.; Kavsek, D.; Kreft, Z.; Krizman, M.; Martincic, R.; Rosman, M.; Sutej, T.

    1996-01-01

    High dose-rate levels were detected outdoors in the vicinity of a bunker used for storage of radiographic sources in a plant which manufactures metallic products. The investigation revealed that radiation was due to a buried sealed radiographic source, containing 28 GBq of 137 Cs. A special republic radiological emergency team removed the source in a carefully planned operation. There was no evidence for overexposure of the population or of radiographic and other workers of the plant. The highest dose to the recovery team was 50 μSv

  16. Vortex ring behavior provides the epigenetic blueprint for the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Per M; Kovács, Sándor J; Töger, Johannes; Borgquist, Rasmus; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2016-02-26

    The laws of fluid dynamics govern vortex ring formation and precede cardiac development by billions of years, suggesting that diastolic vortex ring formation is instrumental in defining the shape of the heart. Using novel and validated magnetic resonance imaging measurements, we show that the healthy left ventricle moves in tandem with the expanding vortex ring, indicating that cardiac form and function is epigenetically optimized to accommodate vortex ring formation for volume pumping. Healthy hearts demonstrate a strong coupling between vortex and cardiac volumes (R(2) = 0.83), but this optimized phenotype is lost in heart failure, suggesting restoration of normal vortex ring dynamics as a new, and possibly important consideration for individualized heart failure treatment. Vortex ring volume was unrelated to early rapid filling (E-wave) velocity in patients and controls. Characteristics of vortex-wall interaction provide unique physiologic and mechanistic information about cardiac diastolic function that may be applied to guide the design and implantation of prosthetic valves, and have potential clinical utility as therapeutic targets for tailored medicine or measures of cardiac health.

  17. Radiographic findings in immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obregon, R.; Lynch, D.A.; Cink, T.M.; Newell, J.D.; Kirkpatrick, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the chest radiographs and high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans in patients with immunodeficiency disorders and define the role of HRCT. Thirty-three cases were retrospectively graded according to the consensus of two radiologists. Patients with HIV seropositivity and asthma were excluded. HRCT was performed in 12 cases with standard techniques. Diagnoses included common variable hypogammaglobulinemia (n = 19), X-linked agammaglobulinemia (n = 4), chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (n = 4), and selective immunoglobulin g deficiencies (n = 2). Chest radiographs showed bronchiectasis in 11 of 33 cases with a predominant lower lobe distribution (82%). Nodules were present in six cases and mucus plugs in four cases. HRCT showed bronchiectasis in nine of 12 cases; in five of these nine cases, bronchiectasis was not apparent on chest radiographs. Other HRCT findings included segmental air trapping (four of 12), mucus plugs (three of 12), hazy consolidation (four of 12), nodules (five of 12), and bronchiolectasis (two of 12). Therapy was altered in seven of 12 cases in which HRCT was performed. Most pertinent to clinical management were the presence of a thymoma (n = 1) and severe focal of diffuse bronchiectasis

  18. Radiographic testing of wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, K.; Zscherpel, U.; Raedel, C.; Weidemann, G.; Meinel, D.; Goebbels, J.; Ewert, U.; Hasenstab, A.; Buecherl, T.

    2007-01-01

    Wood is an old and established consumption and construction material. It is still the most common material for constructing furniture, roofs, playgrounds and mine supports. In contrast to steel and concrete, wood warns of extreme loads by creaking. Its mechanical stability is more influenced by decay than by peripheral cracks. While external cracks are visible, internal decay by fungus growth is undetectable from outside. This may be a safety problem in supporting structures. The best analysis of the internal structure is provided by computed tomography, but this is also the most complex method, much more so than simple radiographic testing. However, the latter is made inaccurate by scattered radiation resulting from internal moisture. With the image processing options of digital radiographic techniques, the structural information can be separated effectively from noise. In contrast to X-ray and gamma radiography, neutron radiography provides information on the spatial distribution of moisture. In healthy wood, water is conducted in the sapwood while the hardwood is dry. Moisture in hardwood is caused by infestations, e.g. fungus growth. The contribution presents a comparative analysis of the available radiographic methods. (orig.)

  19. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, J. S.; Stewart, Lacey; Wilke, M. D.; King, N. S.; Baker A, S.; Lewis, Wilfred

    1999-01-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics

  20. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Dong Soo [Dept. of Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University , Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-11-15

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  1. Radiographic study on temporomandibular joint Arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Dong Soo

    1980-01-01

    The author analysed the routine radiographic changes and clinical symptoms of 205 cases of temporomandibular joint arthrosis. The clinical symptoms of the patients were classified and the morphological changes of condylar head, articular eminence, and articular fossa were analyzed and discussed from radiographic view point. The positional change of condylar head and articular fossa relation in TMJ arthrosis were observed. The frequencies of coincidence between the site of complaints and the site of the abnormal images which could be detected were examined. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Bone erosion, deformity, marginal proliferation and sclerosis were selected from many abnormal images as the radiographic diagnostic criteria of TMJ arthritic lesions. 2. Abnormal radiographic findings were revealed in 150 cases (73.9%) of 205 total TMJ arthrosis cases and site with abnormal findings coincided with the site of complaints in 105 cases (70.7%) of 150 cases and coincidence rates were higher above fourth decades than below third decades. 3. Sclerosis of the abnormal radiographic findings could be found more often below third decades than above fourth decades. 4. The positional changes of condylar head were revealed in 176 cases (85.9%) of 205 total cases. 5. Pain complaints were revealed in 170 cases(82.9%) and clicking sounds were revealed in 120 cases (58.6%) of clinical symptoms of TMJ arthrosis. 6. No tendency was found so far the differential diagnosis between pain dysfunction syndrome and osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  2. TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

    1985-09-01

    Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies

  3. Cardiac resynchronization induces major structural and functional reverse remodeling in patients with New York Heart Association class I/II heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    St John Sutton, Martin; Ghio, Stefano; Plappert, Ted

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves LV structure, function, and clinical outcomes in New York Heart Association class III/IV heart failure with prolonged QRS. It is not known whether patients with New York Heart Association class I/II systolic heart failure exhibit left...... ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling with CRT or whether reverse remodeling is modified by the cause of heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: Six hundred ten patients with New York Heart Association class I/II heart failure, QRS duration > or =120 ms, LV end-diastolic dimension > or =55 mm, and LV ejection...... reduction in LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes and a 3-fold greater increase in LV ejection fraction in patients with nonischemic causes of heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: CRT in patients with New York Heart Association I/II resulted in major structural and functional reverse remodeling at 1 year...

  4. Black Lung Benefits Act: standards for chest radiographs. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-17

    Physicians and adjudicators use chest radiographs (X-rays) as a tool in evaluating whether a coal miner suffers from pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Accordingly, the Department's regulations implementing the Black Lung Benefits Act allow the submission of radiographs in connection with benefit claims and set out quality standards for administering and interpreting film-based chest radiographs. This final rule updates the Department's existing film-radiograph standards and provides parallel standards for digital radiographs. This rule also updates outdated terminology and removes certain obsolete provisions.

  5. Merrill's Atlas of radiographic positions and radiologic procedures. Volumes 1-3. Sixth edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Merrill's Atlas describes and explains the routine and specialized radiologic procedures for all body systems. This edition thoroughly reorganized, updated and expanded. Volumes one and two describe all routine and flouroscopic procedures; and volume three describes more specialized areas in the profession

  6. Automatic Cobb Angle Determination From Radiographic Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sardjono, Tri Arief; Wilkinson, Michael H. F.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Purnama, Ketut E.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Automatic measurement of Cobb angle in patients with scoliosis. Objective. To test the accuracy of an automatic Cobb angle determination method from frontal radiographical images. Summary of Background Data. Thirty-six frontal radiographical images of patients with scoliosis. Methods.

  7. Reflections on the role of consultant radiographers in the UK: What is a consultant radiographer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.; Henwood, S.; Miller, P.

    2016-01-01

    Context: This paper is the second paper from a two year in depth case study, exploring the role of consultant radiographers in the UK. Methods: A longitudinal case study approach was used to determine the role of consultant radiographers. Interviews were used to explore experiences of being a consultant, which were analysed using thematic analysis. Eight consultant radiographers participated (Note, two of the consultants withdrew after the first interview due to workload). Therefore two consultants were interviewed only once. The remaining six consultants were interviewed twice over a 12 month period. Findings: The data presented in this paper explores the nature of the role, differences between roles, the four domains of practice, and how the role fits into local organisational structures. The study shows wide variation in the types of roles undertaken, reflecting that the creation of these roles were in response to local clinical need and often related to an individual practitioner's skills. The broad scope of the role was shown across all the consultants, with evidence of roles developing into new areas of service delivery. Conclusions: The paper offers insight into the role(s) of consultant radiographers in the UK. The range and scope of their practice is extensive, with much variation. It is evident that the clinical aspect of the role dominates, with research being the least supported domain of practice. There remains a lack of clarity around the role, with concerns about remuneration and other limitations that may restrict the role developing further. - Highlights: • This paper shows the variation in roles between consultant radiographers. • The commonality with medical roles is highlighted. • Problem solving is identified as a core skill in consultant radiography. • Consultants offered evidence of the roles developing service provision. • While all four domains of practice are covered, research is the least well supported.

  8. Fourier analysis of heart SPECT slices: from remodelation to function?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigman, M.; Prpic, H.; Lokner, V.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine character of the spatial distribution of marked erythrocytes in heart chambers, lungs and great blood vessels in relation to function of the left and right heart. Investigation included total of 142 subjects, 28 of which were without subjective and clinical signs of heart disease as well as 56 after myocardial infarction (30 of anterior localization, 26 of inferior infarction), 35 with predominant left heart disease (aortic valve disease, dilatative myocardiopathy, etc.) and 23 with predominant right heart disease (atrial septal defect, mitral valve disease). Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) at rest, and thorax SPECT were performed in all subjects with 740 MBq Tc-99m after in vivo erythrocyte labelling with pyrophosphate. Ultrasound investigation was performed on all the subjects with heart disease and 87 of them underwent invasive cardiac investigation. RNV analysis revealed scintigraphic data on left and right ventricle: global ejection fraction (GEF), end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), fast tilling rate (FFR), fast emptying rate (FER) as well as regional wall motion shortening. Reconstruction of 64x64x8 SPECT images resulted in 3x64 slices (transversal, coronal and sagittal slices). Fourier analysis of 20-32 reconstructed slices in all three dimensions gave amplitude image of the intensity distribution of marked erythrocytes in heart chambers lungs and great blood vessels as well as phase display of spatial localization of regional amplitude values. Results of joint ROC curves constructed for detection, localization and character of heart disease in all subjects revealed significant clinical information content of SPECT data. Evaluation of RI retention using amplitude images in 3D provides insight in regional changes of volume, particular for atrial and lung involvement. (author)

  9. Tale of 2 cities: heart transplant progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iturralde, M.P.; Novitzky, D.

    1986-01-01

    Heart transplantation, today an accepted modality in managing selected terminal heart disease patients, still suffers from the major complications of acute rejection and infection. Joint research at Pretoria and Cape Town shows that the use of radionuclide techniques allows non-invasive, reliable and rapid quantification of ventricular function and myocardial perfusion for the diagnosis and management of heart transplant patients. Blood pool scintigraphy, using the in vivo labelling with sup(99m) Tc, was used to measure left ventricular volumes. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using Tl 201 was also performed in some patients

  10. The one-leg standing radiograph

    OpenAIRE

    Pinsornsak, P.; Naratrikun, K.; Kanitnate, S.; Sangkomkamhang, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the joint space width between one-leg and both-legs standing radiographs in order to diagnose a primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Digital radiographs of 100 medial osteoarthritic knees in 50 patients were performed. The patients had undergone one-leg standing anteroposterior (AP) views by standing on the affected leg while a both-legs standing AP view was undertaken while standing on both legs. The severity of the osteoarthritis wa...

  11. Film holder for radiographing tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.V.; Foster, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    A film cassette is described which may be easily placed about tubing or piping and readily held in place while radiographic inspection is performed. A pair of precurved light-impervious semi-rigid plastic sheets, hinged at one edge, enclose sheet film together with any metallic foils or screens. Other edges are made light-tight with removable caps, and the entire unit is held securely about the object to be radiographed with a releasable fastener such as a strip of Velcro

  12. Film holder for radiographing tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Earl V.; Foster, Billy E.

    1976-01-01

    A film cassette is provided which may be easily placed about tubing or piping and readily held in place while radiographic inspection is performed. A pair of precurved light-impervious semi-rigid plastic sheets, hinged at one edge, enclose sheet film together with any metallic foils or screens. Other edges are made light-tight with removable caps, and the entire unit is held securely about the object to be radiographed with a releasable fastener such as a strip of Velcro.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of barium enemas performed by radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lorraine; Desai, Sharad

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To assess the cost-effectiveness of barium enemas performed by radiographers compared to those performed by consultant radiologists. METHOD: Prospective study of 200 barium enemas carried out by a senior radiographer and a consultant radiologist. The sample was a consecutive sample of adult out-patients over a 3-month period, with no exclusion. The length of time of the enema and the numbers and grades of staff involved in the procedure were recorded. This was translated into staffing costs using the appropriate pay scales. RESULTS: The barium enemas performed by the superintendent radiographer were more cost-effective than those performed by the consultant radiologist (1406 pounds for 100 radiographer-performed barium enemas compared to 1787 pounds for 100 carried out by the consultant radiologist). CONCLUSION: In terms of staffing costs, radiographers performing barium enemas not only liberates radiologist time, it is also a cost-effective method of providing an out-patient barium enema service. Brown, L. and Desai, S. (2002)

  14. Neutron radiographic findings in light water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1979-06-01

    The assessment of neutron radiographs of nuclear fuel elements can be much easier, faster and simpler if reference can be made to typical defects, which can be revealed by neutron radiography. In other fields of industrial radiography collections of reference radiographs, showing typical defects in welding, or casting have been completed and published long ago. Since 1974 neutron radiography is routinely used at Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark, for the quality and performance control of nuclear fuel. About 2000 neutron radiographs were taken, mainly during the post irradiation examination of light water reactor fuel. During assessment of neutron radiographs some typical defects of the fuel were found and it was felt that a classification of such defects will help to speed up the assessment procedure. Therefore an attempt was made to establish such a classification, which is currently used at Risoe now. This classification is presented in this atlas, which contains 36 neutron radiographs reproduced on film (in original size) and on paper (twice enlarged). (author)

  15. Radiographers' performance in chest X-ray interpretation: the Nigerian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbe, N O; Akpan, B E

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the performance of Nigerian radiographers in interpretation of plain chest radiographs and to assess whether age, years since qualification and sector of practice are associated with performance. Methods: A test set of 50 radiographs containing 23 cases with no pathology (normal) and 27 abnormal cases (cardiopulmonary conditions) independently confirmed by 3 radiologists were presented to 51 radiographers in a random order. Readers independently evaluated radiographs for absence or presence of disease and stated the location, radiographic features and diagnosis. Readers self-reported their age, years since qualification and sector of practice. Receiver operating characteristic was used to assess the performance. Mann–Whitney U test was used to assess whether age, years since qualification and sector of practice were associated with performance. Results: Mean location sensitivity was 88.9 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.787–0.980]. Mean sensitivity and specificity were 76.9 (95% CI, 0.658–0.864) and 79.8 (95% CI, 0.658–0.864), respectively. Age was not associated with performance (p = 0.07). Number of years qualified as radiographer (p = 0.005) and private practice (p = 0.004) were positively associated with performance. Conclusion: Nigerian radiographers can correctly report chest radiographs to a reasonable standard, and performance is associated with number of years since qualification and the sector of practice. Advances in knowledge: There are less than 300 radiologists serving a Nigerian population of about 170 million; therefore, X-ray interpretation by radiographers deserves consideration. Nigerian radiographers have potential to interpret chest X-ray in the clinical setting, and this may significantly improve radiology service delivery in this region. PMID:25966290

  16. Radiographic evaluation of coxofemoral joint laxity in dogs part I: New stress-radiographic positioning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phiwipha Kamonrat; Duangdaun Kaenkangploo

    2002-01-01

    Two new stress-radiographic positioning techniques, namely 60 deg and 90 deg stress techniques, were introduced for quantifying hip joint laxity in dogs. The comparative characteristics and efficiency of these new techniques with angled hindlimbs were evaluated relative to the standard hip-extended radiographic technique. Forty, healthy, mongrel dogs with normal hip joint conformation were anesthetized and placed in dorsal recumbency before 3 radiograhps of the standard, 60 deg , and 90 deg stress techniques were taken. For the 60 deg stress technique, hindlimbs were extended in parallel to each other at 60 deg angled to the table top and stifles were slightly rotated inward, femoral heads were manually pushed in a craniodorsal direction during exposure. For the 90 deg stress technique, femurs were positioned perpendicular to the table top, stifles were 90 deg flexed and adducted and femoral heads were manually pushed in a craniodorsal direction during exposure. The subluxation index (SI) and dorsolateral subluxation score (DLS score) were calculated from 3 radiographic views for both hip joints to quantitate the relative degree of joint laxity. Results of the study indicated that the 60 deg (SI = 0.20+-0.045, DLS score = 62.5+-7.96 percent) and 90 deg (SI = 0.23+-0.044, DLS score = 61.2+-9.47 percent) stress-radiographs yielded significantly (p0.001) higher degree of hip joint laxity than the standard technique (SI)

  17. Radiographic arthrosis after elbow trauma: interobserver reliability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindenhovius, A.; Karanicolas, P.J.; Bhandari, M.; Ring, D.; Kampen, A. van; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study measured observer variation in radiographic rating of elbow arthrosis. METHODS: Thirty-seven independent orthopedic surgeons graded the extent of elbow arthrosis in 20 consecutive sets of plain radiographs, according to the Broberg and Morrey rating system (grade 0, normal joint;

  18. Radiographic Arthrosis After Elbow Trauma: Interobserver Reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindenhovius, Anneluuk; Karanicolas, Paul Jack; Bhandari, Mohit; Ring, David; Allan, Cristopher; Axelrod, Terry; Baratz, Mark; Beingessner, Daphne; Cassidy, Charles; Coles, Chad; Conflitti, Joe; Rocca, Gregory Della; van Dijk, C. Niek; Elmans, L. H. G. J.; Feibe, Roger; Frihagen, Frede; Gosens, Taco; Greenberg, Jeffrey; Grosso, Elena; Harness, Neil; van der Heide, Huub; Jeray, Kyle; Kalainov, David; van Kampen, Albert; Kawamura, Sumito; Kloen, Peter; McCormac, Bob; McKee, Michael; Page, Richard; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Peters, Anil; Petrisor, Brad; Poolman, Rudolf; Richardson, Martin; Seiler, John; Swiontkowski, Marc; Trumble, Thomas; Wright, Thomas; Zalavras, Charalampos; Zura, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study measured observer variation in radiographic rating of elbow arthrosis. Methods Thirty-seven independent orthopedic surgeons graded the extent of elbow arthrosis in 20 consecutive sets of plain radiographs, according to the Broberg and Morrey rating system (grade 0, normal joint;

  19. Radiographic abnormalities in tricyclic acid overdose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnell, R.M.; Richardson, M.L.; Vincent, J.M.; Godwin, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several case reports have described adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to tricyclic acid (TCA) overdose. During a 1-year period 83 patients requiring intubation secondary to drug overdose were evaluated. Abnormalities on chest radiographs occurred in 26 (50%) of the 54 patients with TCA overdose, compared to six (21%) of the 29 patients overdosed with other drugs. In addition, five (9%) of the patients with TCA overdose subsequently had radiographic and clinical abnormalities meeting the criteria for ARDS. Only one (3%) of the patients with non-TCA overdose subsequently had change suggesting ARDS. TCAs should be added to the list of drugs associated with ARDS, and TCA overdose should be considered a major risk factor in the development of radiographically evident abnormalities

  20. Opportunistic esophagitis in AIDS: Radiographic diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.S.; Woldenberg, R.; Herlinger, H.; Laufer, I.

    1987-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1986, 35 of 90 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had double-contrast esophagograms to rule out opportunistic esophagitis. The radiographs were reviewed without knowledge of the clinical or endoscopic findings. Candida esophagitis was diagnosed radiographically in 17 patients who had varying degrees of plaque formation and viral esophagitis in three who had discrete ulcers without plaques. All three patients with viral esophagitis (herpes in 2 and cytomegalo virus in one) and 15 of 17 with Candida esophagitis had endoscopic and/or clinical corroboration of the radiographic diagnosis. Thus, the authors' experience suggests that fungal and viral esophagitis can often be differentiated on double-contrast esophagography, so that appropriate antifungal or antiviral therapy can be instituted without need for endoscopic intervention

  1. [Measurement of the electric field of the heart in a homogeneous volume conductor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukerman, B M; Titomir, L I

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a technique and some results of experimental measurements of electrical potentials generated by an isolated dog heart in homogeneous conductor, drawing equipotential maps of the field, and calculating the characteristics of the dipole equivalent generator of the heart. The form of potential distribution on a spherical surface around the heart and its ideal orthogonal vectorcardiograms are discussed.

  2. Evaluation of therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure by iodine-123 metaiodobenzyl-guanidine imaging. Comparison with heart rate variability power spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shou-lin; Ikeda, Jun; Takita, Tamotsu; Sekiguchi, Yohei; Demachi, Jun; Chikama, Hisao; Goto, Atsushi; Shirato, Kunio [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-11-01

    The relationship between the myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) and heart rate variability parameters has not been determined. This study determined the relationship between the change in myocardial uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG and improvement in left ventricular function after treatment, to determine the usefulness of {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging to assess the effect of therapy on heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were performed before and after treatment in 17 patients with heart failure due to DCM. The following parameters were compared before and after treatment: New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, radiographic cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), blood pressure, echocardiographic data (left ventricular end-systolic (LVDs) and end-diastolic (LVDd) diameters, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)), plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine, heart rate variability power spectral analysis data (mean low frequency (MLF) and high frequency power (MHF)) and the myocardium to mediastinum activity ratio (MYO/M) obtained in early and late images, and washout rate calculated by anterior planar imaging of {sup 123}I-MIBG. The NYHA functional class, LVEF, LVDs, CTR, MLF and MHF improved after treatment. Early MYO/M and late MYO/M improved after treatment. The rate of increase in late MYO/M was positively correlated with the rate of improvement of LVEF after treatment. Furthermore, the late MYO/M was negatively correlated with MLF. Washout rate revealed no correlation with hemodynamic parameters. These findings suggest that late MYO/M is more useful than washout rate to assess the effect of treatment on heart failure due to DCM. Furthermore, the {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging and heart rate variability parameters are useful to assess the autonomic tone in DCM with heart failure. (author)

  3. Evaluation of therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure by iodine-123 metaiodobenzyl-guanidine imaging. Comparison with heart rate variability power spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shou-lin; Ikeda, Jun; Takita, Tamotsu; Sekiguchi, Yohei; Demachi, Jun; Chikama, Hisao; Goto, Atsushi; Shirato, Kunio

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between the myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) and heart rate variability parameters has not been determined. This study determined the relationship between the change in myocardial uptake of 123 I-MIBG and improvement in left ventricular function after treatment, to determine the usefulness of 123 I-MIBG imaging to assess the effect of therapy on heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). 123 I-MIBG imaging and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were performed before and after treatment in 17 patients with heart failure due to DCM. The following parameters were compared before and after treatment: New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, radiographic cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), blood pressure, echocardiographic data (left ventricular end-systolic (LVDs) and end-diastolic (LVDd) diameters, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)), plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine, heart rate variability power spectral analysis data (mean low frequency (MLF) and high frequency power (MHF)) and the myocardium to mediastinum activity ratio (MYO/M) obtained in early and late images, and washout rate calculated by anterior planar imaging of 123 I-MIBG. The NYHA functional class, LVEF, LVDs, CTR, MLF and MHF improved after treatment. Early MYO/M and late MYO/M improved after treatment. The rate of increase in late MYO/M was positively correlated with the rate of improvement of LVEF after treatment. Furthermore, the late MYO/M was negatively correlated with MLF. Washout rate revealed no correlation with hemodynamic parameters. These findings suggest that late MYO/M is more useful than washout rate to assess the effect of treatment on heart failure due to DCM. Furthermore, the 123 I-MIBG imaging and heart rate variability parameters are useful to assess the autonomic tone in DCM with heart failure. (author)

  4. Right Ventricular Volumes and Systolic Function by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and the Impact of Sex, Age, and Obesity in a Longitudinally Followed Cohort Free of Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Disease: The Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Murilo; Arora, Garima; Gona, Philimon; Ashrafi, Arman; Salton, Carol J; Yeon, Susan B; Blease, Susan J; Levy, Daniel; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Manning, Warren J; Chuang, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance is uniquely well suited for noninvasive imaging of the right ventricle. We sought to define normal cardiac magnetic resonance reference values and to identify the main determinants of right ventricular (RV) volumes and systolic function using a modern imaging sequence in a community-dwelling, longitudinally followed cohort free of clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. The Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort has been followed since 1971. We scanned 1794 Offspring cohort members using steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance and identified a reference group of 1336 adults (64±9 years, 576 men) free of prevalent cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. RV trabeculations and papillary muscles were considered cavity volume. Men had greater RV volumes and cardiac output before and after indexation to body size (all Pheart rate account for most of the variability in RV volumes and function in this community-dwelling population. We report sex-specific normative values for RV measurements among principally middle-aged and older adults. RV ejection fraction is greater in women. RV volumes increase with body size, are greater in men, and are smaller in older people. Body surface area seems to be appropriate for indexation of cardiac magnetic resonance-derived RV volumes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Pre-procedural scout radiographs are unnecessary for routine pediatric fluoroscopic examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creeden, Sean G.; Rao, Anil G.; Eklund, Meryle J.; Hill, Jeanne G.; Thacker, Paul G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Although practice patterns vary, scout radiographs are often routinely performed with pediatric fluoroscopic studies. However few studies have evaluated their utility in routine pediatric fluoroscopy. To evaluate the value of scout abdomen radiographs in routine barium or water-soluble enema, upper gastrointestinal (GI) series, and voiding cystourethrogram pediatric fluoroscopic procedures. We retrospectively evaluated 723 barium or water-soluble enema, upper GI series, and voiding cystourethrogram fluoroscopic procedures performed at our institution. We assessed patient history and demographics, clinical indication for the examination, prior imaging findings and impressions, scout radiograph findings, additional findings provided by the scout radiograph that were previously unknown, and whether the scout radiograph contributed any findings that significantly changed management. We retrospectively evaluated 723 fluoroscopic studies (368 males and 355 females) in pediatric patients. Of these, 700 (96.8%) had a preliminary scout radiograph. Twenty-three (3.2%) had a same-day radiograph substituted as a scout radiograph. Preliminary scout abdomen radiographs/same-day radiographs showed no new significant findings in 719 (99.4%) studies. New but clinically insignificant findings were seen in 4 (0.6%) studies and included umbilical hernia, inguinal hernia and hip dysplasia. No findings were found on the scout radiographs that would either alter the examination performed or change management with regard to the exam. Pre-procedural scout abdomen radiographs are unnecessary in routine barium and water-soluble enema, upper GI series, and voiding cystourethrogram pediatric fluoroscopic procedures and can be substituted with a spot fluoroscopic last-image hold. (orig.)

  6. Radiographic features of appendiceal colic in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schisgall, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of appendiceal colic was introduced in 1980 to explain the common problem of recurrent crampy abdominal pain (RAP) in children. Children with appendiceal colic often have inspissated casts of stool as foreign bodies of the appendix. The radiographic findings of 115 children operated upon for appendiceal colic have been reviewed. The radiographic features of this syndrom have included: filling defects of the appendix (83% incidence of inspissated casts of stool within the appendix); partial filling of the appendix (44% incidence of fecal casts); retained barium behind 72 h (92% incidence of fecal casts blocking egress of barium); non-visualization of the appendix (42% incidence of fecal casts); and distention of the appendix (100% incidence of fecal casts). The correlation of radiographic and operative findings will be presented. A rational approach to the radiographic workup of a child with RAP will be presented. (orig.)

  7. Radiographic diagnoses and treatment decisions on approximal caries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espelid, I.

    1987-01-01

    Mineral loss which represents a threshold value for radiographic diagnosis, cannot be defined exactly. For clinical use 10% mineral loss in the direction of the X-ray beam may constitute a border line lesion for radiographic detection, and caries lesions without cavitation seemed to be beyond this diagnostic threshold. The degree of caries estimated by using radiographs is fairly closely related to the depth of the tissue changes recorded in the prepared cavity. Radiographic examinations more often lead to underestimation than overestimation of the degree of caries. Radiographic caries diagnoses made at different degrees of penetration toward the pulp showed insignificant variations with respect to quality, but the observers were more confident of caries being present (used more strict criterion) when they scored caries in inner dentin. Consensus on diagnostic criteria and improved diagnostic quality are considerably more important to the quality of therapeutic decisions on approximal caries than viewing conditions and film density. A semi-radiopaque material in Class II fillings seems to offer advantages compared to amalgam in respect of the diagnosis of secondary caries and marginal defects. There is a danger that dentists will restore approximal caries lesions too early and before these can be diagnosed in dentin radiographically

  8. Definitive radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with radiographically positive retropharyngeal nodes: Incomplete radiographic response does not necessarily indicate failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Mancuso, Anthony A.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Amdur, Robert J.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to report the control rate of radiographically positive retropharyngeal (RP) nodes with radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate posttreatment imaging with clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients treated with definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer had radiographically positive RP nodes (size >1 cm in largest axial dimension, or presence of focal enhancement, lucency, or calcification), and both pre-RT and post-RT image sets available for review. An additional 21 patients with unconfirmed radiographically positive RP nodes had post-RT imaging, which consisted of computed tomography (CT) at a median of 4 weeks after completing RT. Patients with positive post-RT RP nodes underwent observation with serial imaging. Results: Of 16 patients with pre-RT and post-RT images available for review, 9 (56%) had a radiographic complete response, and of 21 patients with unconfirmed positive RP nodes with post-RT images available for review, 14 (67%) had a radiographic complete response. In all, 14 patients with incomplete response on post-RT imaging experienced control of their disease with no further therapy, and no RP node or neck failures were noted during a median follow-up of 2.8 years. Six patients with positive post-RT RP nodes had serial imaging available for review, and none demonstrated radiographic progression of disease. Conclusions: Radiographic response at 4 weeks may not accurately reflect long-term locoregional control, as RP nodes may continue to resolve over time. The highest index of suspicion should be reserved for patients with progressive changes in size, focal lucency, or focal enhancement on serial imaging after RT

  9. Comparative analysis of human and bovine teeth: radiographic density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Luis Oshiro Tanaka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since bovine teeth have been used as substitutes for human teeth in in vitro dental studies, the aim of this study was to compare the radiographic density of bovine teeth with that of human teeth to evaluate their usability for radiographic studies. Thirty bovine and twenty human teeth were cut transversally in 1 millimeter-thick slices. The slices were X-rayed using a digital radiographic system and an intraoral X-ray machine at 65 kVp and 7 mA. The exposure time (0.08 s and the target-sensor distance (40 cm were standardized for all the radiographs. The radiographic densities of the enamel, coronal dentin and radicular dentin of each slice were obtained separately using the "histogram" tool of Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software. The mean radiographic densities of the enamel, coronal dentin and radicular dentin were calculated by the arithmetic mean of the slices of each tooth. One-way ANOVA demonstrated statistically significant differences for the densities of bovine and human enamel (p 0.05. Based on the results, the authors concluded that: a the radiographic density of bovine enamel is significantly higher than that of human enamel; b the radiodensity of bovine coronal dentin is statistically lower than the radiodensity of human coronal dentin; bovine radicular dentin is also less radiodense than human radicular dentin, although this difference was not statistically significant; c bovine teeth should be used with care in radiographic in vitro studies.

  10. Clinical results and radiographic appearance of the Rashkind double umbrella device in patients with occlusion of the ductus arteriosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galal, O [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); [Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, MBC 16, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, PO Box 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Sinner, W von; Azhari, N; Al-Fadley, F; De Moor, M; Boecker, J; Fawzy, M E; Al-Halees, Z [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1997-12-01

    Background. The Rashkind double umbrella device for patent arterial duct occlusion has been used in many patients. Its radiographic appearance has not been sufficiently described. Objective. To present the varying radiographic appearances of the Rashkind double umbrella device on the chest X-ray. Materials and methods. The chest radiographs of 69 patients (median age 60 months; median weight 17 kg), who underwent closure of their patent arterial duct between March 1990 and August 1994, were reviewed. The following parameters were evaluated: (1) the size of the heart (cardio-thoracic ratio) and pulmonary vessels, (2) the position of the device in AP/PA and lateral projections. The results of occlusion of the patent arterial duct were also reviewed. Results. Sixty-two of 69 (90 %) pa- tients had complete occlusion after a follow-up between 2 months and 3{sup 1}/{sub 2} years. The cardio-thoracic ratio showed significant reduction at follow-up (P < 0.001). The two different size devices could be well differentiated in the AP and the lateral projection. In 14 patients (20 %) the device was in an asymmetrical position. There was no significant correlation between position of the device and success of occlusion in our material. Conclusion. Complete occlusion of the arterial duct using Rashkind double umbrella devices can be achieved in 90 % of our population. In 20 % the device will have an asymmetrical position. There is no correlation between asymmetrical position of the device in the chest radiograph and residual shunting. (orig.) With 7 figs., 12 refs.

  11. Digitization of radiographic inspection for pipeline girth welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Shimpei

    2016-01-01

    In radiographic inspection for the girth welded joints of natural gas pipeline, film radiographic testing (FRT) is applied presently in Japan. However, as of July 2016, the work of establishing JIS standard for radiographic inspection with digital detector is in progress. In order to provide users with the merit of digitization as soon as possible, the authors have developed NSDART (Nittetsu-Sumikin digital detector array technology) as a field X-ray inspection system for the girth welded joints of pipeline. This paper reports the required performances discussed in face of development of NSDART, selection of digital detector, and outline of NSDART, and shows part of the radiographic images acquired with NSDART. As required performances, the following were established: (1) required image quality for radiographic image, (2) identifiable minimum wire diameter of transmission meter, (3) density range of radiographic image and value of gradation meter, (4) spatial resolution via Duplex Wire, (5) X-ray generator, (6) real time performance, and (7) display for observing radiographic image. As for the selection of digital detector, flat panel detector was judged to be the most suitable, and its incorporation to NSDART was determined. NSDART devices are composed of a magnet-wheeled self-propelled imaging device, personal computer, controller, and externally installed display for judgment. (A.O.)

  12. Horizontal fissure on neonatal plain chest radiographs: clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarzewska, J.; Zawadzka-Kepczynska, A.; Bianek-Bodzak, A.; Kawinska-Kilianczyk, A.; Domzalska-Popadiuk, I.

    2005-01-01

    Regardless of etiology, pleural fluid, even in small amounts, can be visualized on the neonatal chest x-ray picture within pulmonary fissures. It remains unclear whether a marked horizontal fissure unaccompanied by any other radiological symptoms is of diagnostic value or not. Ninety-one consecutive neonatal chest radiographs with marked horizontal fissure were retrospectively analyzed. The images were made between 1999 and 2005 on 69 newborns admitted to the Neonatology Department, Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Gdansk. Analysis of the radiographs was conducted independently by three radiologists based on the following criteria: fissure thickness (marked or thickened), bronchovascular markings (increased or normal), size and shape of the heart (normal or abnormal), presence or absence of pulmonary infiltration, atelectasis, and changes related to wet lung syndrome. Due to divergent interpretations, the ultimate interpretation was established by consensus in 25 cases. The radiological findings were compared with clinical data. The compatibility of the three independent interpreters was statistically significant (p<0.0001). Marked transverse fissure was the only radiological finding on 66 x-rays. In 63 cases (69.2%) the children were asymptomatic as well. In 3 cases (3.3%) clinical symptoms of respiratory tract infection occurred. On the other 25 images, horizontal fissure was accompanied by other radiological symptoms. Chest x-ray results corresponded with clinical symptoms in 24 cases (26.4%). One child (1.1%) with radiological evidence of wet lung syndrome did not present any typical clinical symptoms of it. Horizontal fissure noted on a neonatal chest x-ray seems to be of minor diagnostic value if not accompanied by any other radiological symptoms. (author)

  13. Commitment of the radiographer - does it matter to the patient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagoeva, D.; Shuleva, L.; Goudeva, V.; Stoinova, V.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Radiographers are responsible for providing safe and accurate imaging examinations in a wide range of clinical environments, using a variety of imaging modalities and techniques so that appropriate management and treatment of patients and clients can proceed. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss: the responsibilities of radiographer in the clinical radiology department; their professional judgment to decide how to achieve a diagnostic outcome; the relationship patient/radiographer; the impact of the radiographer on patient care. Patient care and advocacy has always been an integral part of the radiography profession. The radiographer should respect the patient at all the times, be genuine in nature and empathies with the patient‘s condition. Good listening and observational skills are also very important components. The radiographers are personally accountable for their work and professional conduct

  14. Chest Radiographic Findings in Newly Diagnosed Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five hundred newly diagnosed cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis were treated with directly observed short-course treatment and 100 of them had chest radiographic examination done. The various chest radiographic patterns in the 100 subjects were studied and included: Fluffy exudative changes 80(80%), fibrosis 70(70%) ...

  15. Radiographic and Histologic Study After Infusion of Contrast Media into Rabbit Submandibular Gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Kyung Soo; Park, Tae Won

    1990-01-01

    50 submandibular glands of rabbits were examined historadiologically after infusion with normal and over volumes of physiologic saline and 5 radiographic contrast media. The results were as follows: 1. All water soluble contrast media showed similar radiographic contrasts and absorbed about 5 minutes after infusion except Telebrix 30 which took 30 minutes in both normal and overfilled glands. 2. Lipid soluble medium, Lipiodol UF had excellent radiographic contrast and could be seen on the radiograms even after 24 hours after infusion. 3. Salivary glands infused with physiologic saline didn't show any histologic changes except slight duct dilation right after infusion. 4. Telebrix 30 caused mild to moderate duct dilation and inflammation at immediate and 24 hours after infusion which was more severe in overfilled glands. At 7 days after infusion, there were mild to moderate fibrosis of the gland and areas of necrosis was seen in overfilled glands. 5. Hypaque 60% showed similar histologic reactions to Telebrix 30 except more severe tissue destruction at 7 days after infusion. 6. Urografin 60% showed mildest histologic changes among the media used in the study. 7. Biliscopin had mild duct dilation which returned to normal after 7 days but there were moderate inflammation and tissue necrosis at that time. 8. Lipiodol UF showed severe duct dilation with numerous vacuoles and there were tissue fibrosis at 7 days after infusion but no tissue necrosis was seen.

  16. Radiographic features of bisphosphonate therapy in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grissom, L.E.; Theodore Harcke, H. [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Nemours Children' s Clinic, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Background: Pediatric patients are being treated with bisphosphonates for low bone mineral density. Skeletal radiographic findings have been described with bisphosphonates given orally and intravenously. Objective: To determine and describe the radiographic findings of cyclic intravenous bisphosphonate therapy in the growing skeleton. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of radiographs of 32 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta or cerebral palsy treated with intravenous bisphosphonates on a quarterly schedule. Results: Principal observations were metaphyseal bands and increased bone mineral density. The bands varied in spacing according to the age of the patient, rate of growth, and the location of the metaphysis. Fractures continued to be seen in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. Conclusion: Cyclic bisphosphonate therapy results in distinctive radiographic findings in the growing skeleton. (orig.)

  17. Radiographic features of bisphosphonate therapy in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grissom, L.E.; Theodore Harcke, H.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pediatric patients are being treated with bisphosphonates for low bone mineral density. Skeletal radiographic findings have been described with bisphosphonates given orally and intravenously. Objective: To determine and describe the radiographic findings of cyclic intravenous bisphosphonate therapy in the growing skeleton. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of radiographs of 32 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta or cerebral palsy treated with intravenous bisphosphonates on a quarterly schedule. Results: Principal observations were metaphyseal bands and increased bone mineral density. The bands varied in spacing according to the age of the patient, rate of growth, and the location of the metaphysis. Fractures continued to be seen in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. Conclusion: Cyclic bisphosphonate therapy results in distinctive radiographic findings in the growing skeleton. (orig.)

  18. Equipment for fully automatic radiographic pipe inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basler, G.; Sperl, H.; Weinschenk, K.

    1977-01-01

    The patent describes a device for fully automatic radiographic testing of large pipes with longitudinal welds. Furthermore the invention enables automatic marking of films in radiographic inspection with regard to a ticketing of the test piece and of that part of it where testing took place. (RW) [de

  19. Reestablishment of radiographic kidney size in Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jungmin; Yun, Sookyung; Lee, Jeosoon; Chang, Dongwoo; Choi, Mincheol; Yoon, Junghee

    2017-01-10

    Kidney size may be altered in renal diseases, and the detection of kidney size alteration has diagnostic and prognostic values. We hypothesized that radiographic kidney size, the kidney length to the second lumbar vertebra (L2) length ratio, in normal Miniature Schnauzer dogs may be overestimated due to their shorter vertebral length. This study was conducted to evaluate radiographic and ultrasonographic kidney size and L2 length in clinically normal Miniature Schnauzers and other dog breeds to evaluate the effect of vertebral length on radiographic kidney size and to reestablish radiographic kidney size in normal Miniature Schnauzers. Abdominal radiographs and ultrasonograms from 49 Miniature Schnauzers and 54 other breeds without clinical evidence of renal disease and lumbar vertebral abnormality were retrospectively evaluated. Radiographic kidney size, in the Miniature Schnauzer (3.31 ± 0.26) was significantly larger than that in other breeds (2.94 ± 0.27). Relative L2 length, the L2 length to width ratio, in the Miniature Schnauzer (1.11 ± 0.06) was significantly shorter than that in other breeds (1.21 ± 0.09). However, ultrasonographic kidney sizes, kidney length to aorta diameter ratios, were within or very close to normal range both in the Miniature Schnauzer (6.75 ± 0.67) and other breeds (7.16 ± 1.01). Thus, Miniature Schnauzer dogs have breed-specific short vertebrae and consequently a larger radiographic kidney size, which was greater than standard reference in normal adult dogs. Care should be taken when evaluating radiographic kidney size in Miniature Schnauzers to prevent falsely diagnosed renomegaly.

  20. Effects of passive heating on central blood volume and ventricular dimensions in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crandall, C.G.; Wilson, T.E.; Marving, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mixed findings regarding the effects of whole-body heat stress on central blood volume have been reported. This study evaluated the hypothesis that heat stress reduces central blood volume and alters blood volume distribution. Ten healthy experimental and seven healthy time control (i.e. non-heat...... stressed) subjects participated in this protocol. Changes in regional blood volume during heat stress and time control were estimated using technetium-99m labelled autologous red blood cells and gamma camera imaging. Whole-body heating increased internal temperature (> 1.0 degrees C), cutaneous vascular...... conductance (approximately fivefold), and heart rate (52 +/- 2 to 93 +/- 4 beats min(-1)), while reducing central venous pressure (5.5 +/- 07 to 0.2 +/- 0.6 mmHg) accompanied by minor decreases in mean arterial pressure (all P heat stress reduced the blood volume of the heart (18 +/- 2%), heart...

  1. The reliability of tablet computers in depicting maxillofacial radiographic landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadinada, Aditya; Mahdian, Mina; Sheth, Sonam; Chandhoke, Taranpreet K.; Gopalakrishna, Aadarsh; Potluri, Anitha; Yadav, Sumit [University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the reliability of the identification of anatomical landmarks in panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs on a standard medical grade picture archiving communication system (PACS) monitor and a tablet computer (iPad 5). A total of 1000 radiographs, including 500 panoramic and 500 lateral cephalometric radiographs, were retrieved from the de-identified dataset of the archive of the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology of the University Of Connecticut School Of Dental Medicine. Major radiographic anatomical landmarks were independently reviewed by two examiners on both displays. The examiners initially reviewed ten panoramic and ten lateral cephalometric radiographs using each imaging system, in order to verify interoperator agreement in landmark identification. The images were scored on a four-point scale reflecting the diagnostic image quality and exposure level of the images. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between the two displays regarding the visibility and clarity of the landmarks in either the panoramic or cephalometric radiographs. Tablet computers can reliably show anatomical landmarks in panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs.

  2. Radiographic and Histologic Evaluation of a Bone Void that Formed After Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2-Mediated Sinus Graft Augmentation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Joo; Jun, Choong-Man; Yun, Jeong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In the present case report, the authors describe radiographic and histologic observations of a bone void that formed after a sinus augmentation using a graft material that contained recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and discuss clinical and histologic implications of their findings. Sinus augmentation was performed using a graft material comprising 1 g of hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate, which contained 1 mg of rhBMP-2. Radiographic evaluation was conducted with panoramic radiographs and computed tomography images of the augmented maxillary sinus, which were analyzed using a three-dimensional image-reconstruction program. Histologic evaluation was also performed on a biopsy specimen obtained 6 months after the sinus augmentation. The total augmented volume increased from 1,582.2 mm(3) immediately after the sinus augmentation to 3,344.9 mm3 at 6 months after the augmentation because of the formation of a bone void. Twenty-six months after the sinus augmentation, the bone void remained but had reduced in volume, with the total augmented volume reduced to 2,551.7 mm(3). Histologically, new bone was observed to be in contact with the grafted particles, and a fatty marrow-like tissue was present in the area of the bone void. This case report shows that the bone void that had formed after sinus augmentation resolved over time and seemed to be partially replaced with new bone. Furthermore, none of the implants failed, and clinical adverse events were not observed during the follow-up period.

  3. Measurement of four chambers' volumes and ventricular masses by cardiac CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Motomasa; Naito, Hiroaki; Ohta, Mitsushige; Kozuka, Takahiro; Kito, Yoshitsugu

    1983-01-01

    Using cardiac computed tomography (CT), the ''mean'' volume of each cardiac chamber and both ventricular masses were calculated from summation of a sliced volume by ungated scans obtained using rapid sequential scanning covering the whole heart. 1. Estimation of a normal value of each chamber's volume was attempted in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease and with normal heart function. The ''mean'' volume of the right atrium (RAMV), right ventricle (RVMV), and left atrium (LAMV) was 22.3 +- 6.5, 40.3 +- 6.5 and 28.7 +- 8.2ml/m 2 , respectively. 2. In 54 patients with valvular heart diseases, each chamber's volume obrained by CT was compared with the grade of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) estimated by ultrasonic Doppler technique or the grade of mitral regurgitation (MR) by left ventriculography (LVG). The RAMV (234 +- 119 ml/m 2 ) and the RVMV (101 +- 39 ml/m 2 ) were markedly increased in patients with severe TR (grade 3 to 4) (p 2 ) was also increased in patients with severe mitral regurgitation (grade 3 to 4) (p<0.01). 3. In 46 patients with valvular heart diseases, the LVMV by CT was well correlated with end-diastolic volume (EDV) obtained by LVG (r=0.92), and the LVEDVs by ECG gated CT and by LVG showed a fairly good correlation (r=0.95). 4. CT examination was performed before and after surgery in 17 patients with MR or TR for evaluation of the change of chamber volumes. The mean reduction ratio (MRR) of the RAMV after tricuspid annuloplasty, the LVMV after mitral valve plasty, and the LAMV after left atrial plication was 44%, 41%, and 60%, respectively. (author)

  4. Matching hand radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, J.A.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Bernelot Moens, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Biometric verification and identification methods of medical images can be used to find possible inconsistencies in patient records. Such methods may also be useful for forensic research. In this work we present a method for identifying patients by their hand radiographs. We use active appearance

  5. Effects of Different Viewing Conditions on Radiographic Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahkameh Moshfeghi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Optimum viewing conditions facilitate identification of radiographic details and decrease the need for retakes, patients’ costs and radiation dose. This study sought to evaluate the effects of different viewing conditions on radiographic interpretation.Materials and Methods: This diagnostic study was performed by evaluating radiograph of a 7mm-thick aluminum block, in which 10 holes with 2mm diameters were randomly drilled with depths ranging from 0.05 mm to 0.50mm. The radiograph was viewed by four oral radiologists independently under four viewing conditions, including a white light viewing light box in a lit room, yellow light viewing light box in a lit room, white light viewing light box in a dark room and yellow light viewing light box in a dark room. Number of circular shadows observed on the film was recorded. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA.Results: The mean number of detected circular shadows was 6.75, 7.5, 7.25 and 7.75 in white light viewing light box in a lit room, white light viewing light box in a dark room, yellow light viewing light box in a lit room and yellow light viewing light box in a dark room, respectively. Although the surrounding illumination had statistically significant effect on the radiographic details (P≤0.03, the light color of the viewing light box had no significant effect on visibility of the radiographic details.Conclusion: White and yellow light of the viewing light box had no significant effect on visibility of the radiographic details but more information was obtained in a dark room.

  6. Dental Radiographs Ordered by Dental Professionals: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Even in resource limited settings dental caries is still the regular indication for taking dental radiographs, and periapical views are the most frequent type of radiograph ordered. Maxillary central incisors and mandibular molars were types of teeth commonly x-rayed mainly due to the aesthetic importance of the ...

  7. A new automated method for analysis of gated-SPECT images based on a three-dimensional heart shaped model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomsky, Milan; Richter, Jens; Johansson, Lena

    2005-01-01

    A new automated method for quantification of left ventricular function from gated-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images has been developed. The method for quantification of cardiac function (CAFU) is based on a heart shaped model and the active shape algorithm. The model....... The maximal differences between the CAFU estimations and the true left ventricular volumes of the digital phantoms were 11 ml for the end-diastolic volume (EDV), 3 ml for the end-systolic volume (ESV) and 3% for the ejection fraction (EF). The largest differences were seen in the smallest heart....... In the patient group the EDV calculated using QGS and CAFU showed good agreement for large hearts and higher CAFU values compared with QGS for the smaller hearts. In the larger hearts, ESV was much larger for QGS than for CAFU both in the phantom and patient studies. In the smallest hearts there was good...

  8. Four-dimensional ultrasonography of the fetal heart with spatiotemporal image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luís F; Lee, Wesley; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Espinoza, Jimmy; Schoen, Mary Lou; Falkensammer, Peter; Treadwell, Marjorie; Romero, Roberto

    2003-12-01

    This study was undertaken to describe a new technique for the examination of the fetal heart using four-dimensional ultrasonography with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC). Volume data sets of the fetal heart were acquired with a new cardiac gating technique (STIC), which uses automated transverse and longitudinal sweeps of the anterior chest wall. These volumes were obtained from 69 fetuses: 35 normal, 16 with congenital anomalies not affecting the cardiovascular system, and 18 with cardiac abnormalities. Dynamic multiplanar slicing and surface rendering of cardiac structures were performed. To illustrate the STIC technique, two representative volumes from a normal fetus were compared with volumes obtained from fetuses with the following congenital heart anomalies: atrioventricular septal defect, tricuspid stenosis, tricuspid atresia, and interrupted inferior vena cava with abnormal venous drainage. Volume datasets obtained with a transverse sweep were utilized to demonstrate the cardiac chambers, moderator band, interatrial and interventricular septae, atrioventricular valves, pulmonary veins, and outflow tracts. With the use of a reference dot to navigate the four-chamber view, intracardiac structures could be simultaneously studied in three orthogonal planes. The same volume dataset was used for surface rendering of the atrioventricular valves. The aortic and ductal arches were best visualized when the original plane of acquisition was sagittal. Volumes could be interactively manipulated to simultaneously visualize both outflow tracts, in addition to the aortic and ductal arches. Novel views of specific structures were generated. For example, the location and extent of a ventricular septal defect was imaged in a sagittal view of the interventricular septum. Furthermore, surface-rendered images of the atrioventricular valves were employed to distinguish between normal and pathologic conditions. Representative video clips were posted on the Journal's Web

  9. Use your good judgement - Radiographers' knowledge in image production work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, W.; Lundberg, N.; Hillergard, K.

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that the demand for radiography services has markedly increased and radiographers' work has become more complex as their role has changed. More specifically, it entails new activities, new ways of communicating and new responsibilities. This means that radiographers work in new ways and need new ways to learn. The knowledge needed in this learning process is still unexplored. The aim of this study is to identify and present how radiographers use knowledge in image production work using PACS. This is explored by studying how radiographers use their knowledge in practice. The study adopts a qualitative approach, using participant observation of and semi-structured interviews with radiographers at five Swedish hospitals. To identify properties of knowledge, Blackler's theory of knowledge components was applied. The results of this study show that radiographers use the knowledge components in different situations in their image production work. They use embrained knowledge in planning X-ray examinations and in viewing images. Encoded knowledge is required for the use of various kinds of documentation, such as manuals and protocols. Embodied knowledge is action-oriented and involves 'gut feelings'. The study also illustrates that radiographers use their knowledge at different levels as routine actors or as reflective actors, in a more static way or with a flexible attitude, more unreflectively or more as critical reflectors, and finally more as performing automatic action or problem-solving action. This study concludes that radiographers need more reflective actors in the image production process when working with PACS. The study also illustrates that radiographers need to be flexible in their work; there is little room for static work. In work they need to analyze images, it is not enough to 'check them off'; they cannot just read documents, you need to interpret them to optimize work performance. Overall, radiographers need to have a critical and

  10. Radiographic evaluation of coxofemoral joint laxity in dogs part II: Comparison of stress-radiographic positioning techniques in dogs with hip dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duangdaun Kaenkangploo; Phiwipha Kamonrat; Marissak Kalpravidh

    2002-01-01

    Two stress-radiographic positioning techniques for evaluation of coxofemoral joint laxity in dogs with hip dysplasia were compared with the standard technique. Forty, healthy, large breed dogs were divided into two groups of 20 dogs. Group 1 had normal hips. Group 2 were dogs with mild to moderated grade of hip dysplasia according to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) standard. Dogs were anesthetized and placed in dorsal recumbency before 3 radiographic techniques, standard hip-extended, 60 deg and 90 deg stress techniques, were taken. For the 60 deg stress technique, hind legs were extended in parallel to each other at 60 deg to the table top and femoral heads were manually pushed craniodorsally during exposure. For the 90 deg stress technique, femurs were positioned perpendicular to the table top, stifles were 90 deg flexed and adducted and femoral heads were manually pushed in a craniodorsal direction during exposure. Subluxation index (SI) and dorsolateral subluxation score (DLS score) of coxofemoral joints were assessed from radiographs. The SI of normal dogs from standard, 60 deg and 90 deg stress techniques were 0.15, 0.20 and 0.23 and of dysplastic dogs were 0.34, 0.40 and 0.41 respectively. The degress of subluxation assessed from the two stress technique radiographs were significantly greater (p0.05) than those shown on the standard technique radiographs in both groups of dogs. DLS scores of normal dogs from standard, 60 deg and 90 deg stress techniques were 65.1, 64.3 and 61.0 percent and of dysplastic dogs were 55.4, 53.6 and 47.6 percent respectively. Mean of DLS scores assessed from the 90 deg radiographs was significantly lower (p0.05) than those assessed from radiographs of other two teachniques in both groups of dogs. The findings suggested that the 90 deg stress technique is more efficient than the standard and 60 deg stress techniques for radiographic evaluation of coxofemoral joint laxity in dogs with mild hip dysplasia and early

  11. Chest radiographic findings of tsutsugamushi disease and murine typhus in Chunchon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heung Chul; Han, Tae Giun; Jang, Won Ho; Hwang, Woo Chul; Park, Man Soo; Lee, Myoung Gu; Kim, Yoon Won [School of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Choong Ki [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    To evaluate the chest radiographic findings of rickettsial disease including murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease in Chunchon. Chest radiographic films of 81 cases diagnosed as rickettsial disease(55 cases of tsutsugamushi disease, 26 cases of murine typhus) by immunofluorescence test were retrospectively analyzed. Main serotypes of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi were Gilliam and Karp. Incidence rate of tsutsugamushi disease was 2.1 times greater than that of murine typhus. Chest radiographs were abnormal in 63.6% of tsutsugamushi disease, and in 30.8% of murine typhus. Radiographic findings were Kerly's B line, reticulonodular densities, hilar enlargement, pleural effusion, and splenomegaly in both entities, but pulmonary consolidation was only found in tsutsugamushi disease. The patients with the abnormal radiographic findings were statistically well correlated with cardiomegaly ({rho} < 0.01) and azygos engorgement ({rho} < 0.05), as compared to the patients with normal radiographic findings. Radiographic findings of both murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease were interstitial pattern. But the chest radiographs in patients with tsutsugamushi disease showed more severe pattern with higher rate of abnormality.

  12. Chest radiographic findings of tsutsugamushi disease and murine typhus in Chunchon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heung Chul; Han, Tae Giun; Jang, Won Ho; Hwang, Woo Chul; Park, Man Soo; Lee, Myoung Gu; Kim, Yoon Won; Park, Choong Ki

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the chest radiographic findings of rickettsial disease including murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease in Chunchon. Chest radiographic films of 81 cases diagnosed as rickettsial disease(55 cases of tsutsugamushi disease, 26 cases of murine typhus) by immunofluorescence test were retrospectively analyzed. Main serotypes of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi were Gilliam and Karp. Incidence rate of tsutsugamushi disease was 2.1 times greater than that of murine typhus. Chest radiographs were abnormal in 63.6% of tsutsugamushi disease, and in 30.8% of murine typhus. Radiographic findings were Kerly's B line, reticulonodular densities, hilar enlargement, pleural effusion, and splenomegaly in both entities, but pulmonary consolidation was only found in tsutsugamushi disease. The patients with the abnormal radiographic findings were statistically well correlated with cardiomegaly (ρ < 0.01) and azygos engorgement (ρ < 0.05), as compared to the patients with normal radiographic findings. Radiographic findings of both murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease were interstitial pattern. But the chest radiographs in patients with tsutsugamushi disease showed more severe pattern with higher rate of abnormality

  13. Chest radiographic findings of tsutsugamushi disease and murine typhus in Chunchon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heung Chul; Han, Tae Giun; Jang, Won Ho; Hwang, Woo Chul; Park, Man Soo; Lee, Myoung Gu; Kim, Yoon Won [School of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Choong Ki [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    To evaluate the chest radiographic findings of rickettsial disease including murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease in Chunchon. Chest radiographic films of 81 cases diagnosed as rickettsial disease(55 cases of tsutsugamushi disease, 26 cases of murine typhus) by immunofluorescence test were retrospectively analyzed. Main serotypes of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi were Gilliam and Karp. Incidence rate of tsutsugamushi disease was 2.1 times greater than that of murine typhus. Chest radiographs were abnormal in 63.6% of tsutsugamushi disease, and in 30.8% of murine typhus. Radiographic findings were Kerly's B line, reticulonodular densities, hilar enlargement, pleural effusion, and splenomegaly in both entities, but pulmonary consolidation was only found in tsutsugamushi disease. The patients with the abnormal radiographic findings were statistically well correlated with cardiomegaly ({rho} < 0.01) and azygos engorgement ({rho} < 0.05), as compared to the patients with normal radiographic findings. Radiographic findings of both murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease were interstitial pattern. But the chest radiographs in patients with tsutsugamushi disease showed more severe pattern with higher rate of abnormality.

  14. Radiographic and tomographic study of the elbow joint in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sendyk-Grunkraut, Alessandra; Martin, Claudia M.; Souza, Alexandre N.A.; Patricio, Geni Cristina F.; Lorigados, Carla A.B.; Matera, Julia M.; Fonseca-Pinto, Ana C.B.C.

    2017-01-01

    Elbow dysplasia disease includes an united anconeal process, fragmented medial coronoid process, osteochondrosis of humeral trochlea, articular incongruity and degenerative joint disease. The aim of this study was to present detailed morphologic and morphometric aspects of the elbow joint in dog in clinical and correlate with radiographic and tomographic (CT) exam. Inter-observer variation for articular incongruity measurements by CT, comparative analysis in the radiographic exam, angle in ulnar notch and its comparative analysis between radiographic and tomographic agreement examination in 44 elbow of dogs with different ages were evaluated. The statistics analyses included the kappa coefficient and interclass correlation and Fischer's test and McNemar's test. It was evidenced that individual performance of each radiographic incidence had poor agreement with the tomographic exam, suggesting that the accomplishment of more than two radiograph views are needed. There was no agreement between the three evaluators in the ulnar notch angle at radiographic and tomographic exams. However, there was good/moderate agreement for articular incongruity measurement in the sagittal plane between evaluators. It was possible to conclude that none of the five radiographic incidences was better than the others for radiographic analysis because each incidence had a better identification of a particular elbow compartment; measurements at the tomographic exam to evaluate radioulnar incongruity had no reproductiveness in the frontal plane, but in sagittal plan had a good/moderate agreement between observers and the angle in ulnar notch presented no repeatability at radiographic exam and no reproductiveness at tomographic exam. (author)

  15. When disaster strikes; the role of the forensic radiographer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, Mary; Reeves, Pauline; Scott, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Forensic radiography is a vital tool utilised in the many facets of Forensic Medicine. This paper investigates the role of the forensic radiographer in a mass disaster situation; it also explores the psychological impact of this type of work on radiographers. A literature review indicated that limited work had been documented on the role of the radiographer in mass disasters. This ultimately creates doubt about whether or not the radiographer is acknowledged for the vital role he/she plays and if proper provisions were in place to assess any emotional damage in the aftermath of an emotionally and physically straining situation. A qualitative method of research was used (semi-structured interviews) in order to elicit radiographers' feelings and perceptions. This method is best suited to this research topic because it is a delicate subject. Four interviews were carried out and the responses are presented in themes including emergency versus mass grave experiences (including issues of time and preparation). Other themes include the role of the radiographer and interaction with other members of the team, as well as a discussion of the aftermath of their experiences, including the feelings of pride experienced

  16. Structural and functional changes in the heart and clinical features of heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in patients after myocardial infarction, comorbided with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Syvolap

    2013-12-01

    class I, 32% - NYHA class II, 48% - NYHA class III and 10% have NYHA class IV. In the first group revealed a significant increase of left ventricular end diastolic volume (13,8%, p <0,05, left ventricular end systolic volume (14,9%, p <0,05 and left atrial volume index (35%, p <0,05 compared with patients from the second group. Patients from the second group had a significant increase of left ventricular mass index (15,2%, p <0,05, left ventricular posterior wall ( 12,8%, p <0,05 and interventricular septum (10%, p <0,05 compared with patients from the third group. Patients from the first group had a higher E/E ' ratio (26%, p <0,05 compared with patients from the second group. In patients from the second group revealed decreased E/A (30,8%, p <0,05, E '(35,7%, p <0,05 and increased E/E' (13, 3%, p <0,05 compared with patients from the third group. Patients after myocardial infarction with arterial hypertension and diastolic heart failure had diastolic dysfunction mainly on the type of violation of relaxation (74%. 22% of these patients had pseudonormal type of diastolic dysfunction and 4% had restrictive LV filling type. Conclusion: In patients with post-infarction cardiosclerosis and diastolic heart failure with arterial hypertension severity of clinical manifestations of heart failure correlates with left atrial volume index and markers of diastolic dysfunction such as E' and E/E'. In patients with post-infarction cardiosclerosis and arterial hypertension with diastolic heart failure had predominantly concentric hypertrophy with increased left atrial volume index and moderate left ventricular dilatation and mild diastolic dysfunction. In patients after myocardial infarction with arterial hypertension and asymptomatic diastolic dysfunction observed structural and functional changes in the type of concentric hypertrophy with thickened walls and increased left ventricular mass index.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  18. Methodology to evaluation of the density in radiographic image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louzada, M.J.Q.; Pela, C.A.; Belangero, W.D.; Santos-Pinto, R.

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed in order to optimize the optical densitometry technique in radiographic images by the setorization of the characteristic curves of the radiographic films. We used 24 radiographs of a stepped aluminium wedge that were taken without rigorous control development and manually revealed. The densitometric values of the steps images and its thickness, for each radiographic, was utilized to generate its particular mathematics expressions that represent its characteristic densitometric curves and then it were used for setorization. The densitometric values were obtained by a Macbeth TD528 densitometer. The study showed an optimization in the representation of the relationship between the optical density of the steps images of the wedge and its correspondent thickness, provided by the setorization, with mean square error around 10 -5 . This optimization will allow the use of this methodology in quantitative evaluations of bone mass, by radiographic images. (author)

  19. Anaesthesia for the child with congenital heart disease: pointers and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) causes a volume or pressure overload to the ... venous drainage (TAPVD), high left atrial pressure (e.g. hypoplastic left heart ... function. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the commonest birth defect, with a reported .... Is there valve regurgitation? ... tubing to avoid systemic air emboli.

  20. Radiographic anatomy of the medial coronoid process of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyabayashi, T.; Takiguchi, M.; Schrader, S.C.; Biller, D.S.

    1995-01-01

    Mediolateral, flexed mediolateral, mediocaudal-laterocranial 15 degrees oblique (extended and supinated mediolateral), and craniolateral-caudomedial 20 degrees to 30 degrees oblique radiographs of 16 elbow-joint specimens were produced to study the radiographic anatomy of the medial coronoid process. On the mediolateral view, the cranial point of the coronoid process was at the level of the distal one-third of the radial epiphysis. Degree of superimposition of the proximal radius and ulna determined how the medial coronoid process was projected on the radiographs. Mediocaudal-laterocranial oblique radiographs best showed the cranial outline of the medial coronoid process with moderate superimposition of the proximal radius and ulna

  1. Optimizing radiation exposure for CT localizer radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohrer, Evelyn; Maeder, Ulf; Fiebich, Martin [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection-IMPS; Schaefer, Stefan; Krombach, Gabriele A. [Univ. Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Noel, Peter B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-08-01

    The trend towards submillisievert CT scans leads to a higher dose fraction of localizer radiographs in CT examinations. The already existing technical capabilities make dose optimization of localizer radiographs worthwhile. Modern CT scanners apply automatic exposure control (AEC) based on attenuation data in such a localizer. Therefore not only this aspect but also the detectability of anatomical landmarks in the localizer for the desired CT scan range adjustment needs to be considered. The effective dose of a head, chest, and abdomen-pelvis localizer radiograph with standard factory settings and user-optimized settings was determined using Monte Carlo simulations. CT examinations of an anthropomorphic phantom were performed using multiple sets of acquisition parameters for the localizer radiograph and the AEC for the subsequent helical CT scan. Anatomical landmarks were defined to assess the image quality of the localizer. CTDI{sub vol} and effective mAs per slice of the helical CT scan were recorded to examine the impact of localizer settings on a helical CT scan. The dose of the localizer radiograph could be decreased by more than 90% while the image quality remained sufficient when selecting the lowest available settings (80 kVp, 20 mA, pa tube position). The tube position during localizer acquisition had a greater impact on the AEC than the reduction of tube voltage and tube current. Except for the use of a pa tube position, all changes of acquisition parameters for the localizer resulted in a decreased total radiation exposure. A dose reduction of CT localizer radiograph is necessary and possible. In the examined CT system there was no negative impact on the modulated helical CT scan when the lowest tube voltage and tube current were used for the localizer.

  2. Radiographic assessment of venous catheter position in children: Value of the lateral view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Brasch, R.C.; Gooding, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Frontal chest radiographs can be misleading in the evaluation of central venous catheter placement. Lateral chest radiographs were obtained, in addition to the standard frontal radiographs, in 25 young children. In five (20%) of the children, the catheters were found to be malpositioned, and the frontal radiograph showed evidence of the abnormality in all five. The lateral radiographs also showed evidence of the abnormality in all five children; however, in three of the five, the lateral radiographs provided additional, more specific, diagnostic information. The lateral chest radiographs also demonstrated satisfactory catheter positioning in three other children in whom the frontal radiographs suggested abnormal positioning. Accurate assessment of catheter position was possible in all patients using both frontal and lateral chest radiographs. Injection of contrast material was not necessary to locate malpositioned catheters. Lateral radiographs are recommended whenever an abnormal catheter position is suspected clinically or from findings on the routine frontal radiograph. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of intraoperative volume and pressure-controlled ventilation modes in patients who undergo open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoşten, Tülay; Kuş, Alparslan; Gümüş, Esra; Yavuz, Şadan; İrkil, Serhat; Solak, Mine

    2017-02-01

    Respiratory problems occur more frequently in patients who undergo open heart surgery. Intraoperative and postoperative ventilation strategies can prevent these complications and reduce mortality. We hypothesized that PCV would have better effects on gas exchange, lung mechanics and hemodynamics compared to VCV in CABG surgery. Our primary outcome was to compare the PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio. Patients were randomized into two groups, (VCV, PCV) consisting of 30 individuals each. Two patients were excluded from the study. I/E ratio was adjusted to 1:2 and, RR:10/min fresh air gas flow was set at 3L/min in all patients. In the VCV group TV was set at 8 mL/kg of the predicted body weight. In the PCV group, peak inspiratory pressure was adjusted to the same tidal volume with the VCV group. PaO2/FiO2 was found to be higher with PCV at the end of the surgery. Time to extubation and ICU length of stay was shorter with PCV. Ppeak was similar in both groups. Pplateau was lower and Pmean was higher at the and of the surgery with PCV compared to VCV. The hemodynamic effects of both ventilation modes were found to be similar. PVC may be preferable to VCV in patients who undergo open heart surgery. However, it would be convenient if our findings are supported by similar studies.

  4. Endodontic radiography: who is reading the digital radiograph?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewary, Shalini; Luzzo, Joseph; Hartwell, Gary

    2011-07-01

    Digital radiographic imaging systems have undergone tremendous improvements since their introduction. Advantages of digital radiographs over conventional films include lower radiation doses compared with conventional films, instantaneous images, archiving and sharing images easily, and manipulation of several radiographic properties that might help in diagnosis. A total of 6 observers including 2 endodontic residents, 3 endodontists, and 1 oral radiologist evaluated 150 molar digital periapical radiographs to determine which of the following conditions existed: normal periapical tissue, widened periodontal ligament, or presence of periapical radiolucency. The evaluators had full control over the radiograph's parameters of the Planmeca Dimaxis software program. All images were viewed on the same computer monitor with ideal vie-wing conditions. The same 6 observers evaluated the same 150 digital images 3 months later. The data were analyzed to determine how well the evaluators agreed with each other (interobserver agreement) for 2 rounds of observations and with themselves (intraobserver agreement). Fleiss kappa statistical analysis was used to measure the level of agreement among multiple raters. The overall Fleiss kappa value for interobserver agreement for the first round of interpretation was 0.34 (P value for interobserver agreement for the second round of interpretation was 0.35 (P fair (0.2-0.4) agreement among the 6 raters at both observation periods. A weighted kappa analysis was used to determine intraobserver agreement, which showed on average a moderate agreement. The results indicate that the interpretation of a dental radiograph is subjective, irrespective of whether conventional or digital radiographs are used. The factors that appeared to have the most impact were the years of experience of the examiner and familiarity of the operator with a given digital system. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  5. Factors for lifelong job retention among Swiss radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, P.; Meystre, N. Richli; Mamboury, N.

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, a shortage of radiographers in the three radiology domains, radio-diagnostic, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine, is supposed to increase in the upcoming years. As job satisfaction has been shown to contribute to workplace retention, one purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between workplace retention and duration in the profession with job satisfaction. The study was based on two surveys. The institutional survey was addressed to all chiefs of radiology units in hospitals and ambulatory institutes (340, response rate 48%). All radiographers were asked to complete the individual survey (3000, response rate 25%). Two thirds of radiographers had been employed for five or more years in the same workplace, and nearly half intended to stay for 10 more years. The professional lifespan of radiographers is estimated to be approximately 27 years. 75% expressed their satisfaction with key aspects of professional activity, including the content of the work, autonomy, technology and their relationships with professionals and patients. These factors were not linked to a particular workplace, but to the profession itself. The radiographers build their own propitious work environment, even if salary and recognition by physicians are contributing to their dissatisfaction. The retention in the profession, consolidated by a high level of satisfaction, is an essential feature for a workforce policy. However, active measures for reinforcing retention are still necessary when considering that a lifelong career needs challenges and rewards. Additionally, the retention rate does not provide a guarantee adequacy for the future projected needs in the profession. - Highlights: • Retention in the profession, with a high level of satisfaction, is a major point for a workforce policy. • Job satisfaction of radiographers is not linked to a particular workplace, but to the profession itself. • The professional lifespan of radiographers in Switzerland is

  6. Occupational kneeling and radiographic tibiofemoral and patellofemoral osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Søren; Egund, Niels; Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective of our study was to evaluate the association between occupational kneeling and compartment specific radiographic tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Questionnaire data and bilateral knee radiographs were obtained in 134 male...

  7. Digital image processing of mandibular trabeculae on radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogino, Toshi

    1987-06-01

    The present study was aimed to reveal the texture patterns of the radiographs of the mandibular trabeculae by digital image processing. The 32 cases of normal subjects and the 13 cases of patients with mandibular diseases of ameloblastoma, primordial cysts, squamous cell carcinoma and odontoma were analyzed by their intra-oral radiographs in the right premolar regions. The radiograms were digitized by the use of a drum scanner densitometry method. The input radiographic images were processed by a histogram equalization method. The result are as follows : First, the histogram equalization method enhances the image contrast of the textures. Second, the output images of the textures for normal mandible-trabeculae radiograms are of network pattern in nature. Third, the output images for the patients are characterized by the non-network pattern and replaced by the patterns of the fabric texture, intertwined plants (karakusa-pattern), scattered small masses and amorphous texture. Thus, these results indicates that the present digital image system is expected to be useful for revealing the texture patterns of the radiographs and in the future for the texture analysis of the clinical radiographs to obtain quantitative diagnostic findings.

  8. Understanding chest radiographic anatomy with MDCT reformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussmann, A.R. [Department of Radiology, Thoracic Imaging, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Ko, J.P., E-mail: jane.ko@nyumc.or [Department of Radiology, Thoracic Imaging, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Chest radiograph interpretation requires an understanding of the mediastinal reflections and anatomical structures. Computed tomography (CT) improves the learning of three-dimensional (3D) anatomy, and more recently multidetector CT (MDCT) technology has enabled the creation of high-quality reformations in varying projections. Multiplanar reformations (MPRs) of varying thickness in the coronal and sagittal projections can be created for direct correlation with findings on frontal and lateral chest radiographs, respectively. MPRs enable simultaneous visualization of the craniocaudal extent of thoracic structures while providing the anatomic detail that has been previously illustrated using cadaveric specimens. Emphasis will be placed on improving knowledge of mediastinal anatomy and reflections including edges, lines, and stripes that are visible on chest radiographs.

  9. The interest of radiographical investigations of bone diseases in the selection of stallions [orthopedic lesions, abnormal radiographic findings, multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valette, J.P.; Touzot, G.; Denoix, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Breeding of sport horses requires products with qualities for performance traits. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relation between radiographical examination and descendant of sires. Foots, fetlocks of both thoracic and pelvic limbs, carpus, tarsus and stifles were examined radiographically in 225 3-year old horses descent from 25 stallions. Data were analysed by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that descendant of a stallion presents the same abnormal radiographic findings. It is concluded that bone diseases are of great importance in breeding sport horses and that these abnormalities could have a genetic component [fr

  10. Chest radiographic abnormalities in HIV-infected African children: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Richard D; Lombard, Carl J; Cotton, Mark F; Beningfield, Stephen J; Workman, Lesley; Zar, Heather J

    2015-09-01

    There is limited knowledge of chest radiographic abnormalities over time in HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings. To investigate the natural history of chest radiographic abnormalities in HIV-infected African children, and the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Prospective longitudinal study of the association of chest radiographic findings with clinical and immunological parameters. Chest radiographs were performed at enrolment, 6-monthly, when initiating ART and if indicated clinically. Radiographic abnormalities were classified as normal, mild or moderate severity and considered persistent if present for 6 consecutive months or longer. An ordinal multiple logistic regression model assessed the association of enrolment and time-dependent variables with temporal radiographic findings. 258 children (median (IQR) age: 28 (13-51) months; median CD4+%: 21 (15-24)) were followed for a median of 24 (18-42) months. 70 (27%) were on ART at enrolment; 130 (50%) (median age: 33 (18-56) months) commenced ART during the study. 154 (60%) had persistent severe radiographic abnormalities, with median duration 18 (6-24) months. Among children on ART, 69% of radiographic changes across all 6-month transition periods were improvements, compared with 45% in those not on ART. Radiographic severity was associated with previous radiographic severity (OR=120.80; 95% CI 68.71 to 212.38), lack of ART (OR=1.72; 95% CI 1.29 to 2.27), enrolment age ART was beneficial, reducing the risk of radiographic deterioration or increasing the likelihood of radiological improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Main factors of efficiency of automated radiographic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopov, V.S.; Voronin, S.A.; Grachev, A.V.; Golenishchev, I.A.; Majorov, A.N.; Meshalkin, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of work providing an assessment of the efficiency of a complex for automatized radiographic control is considered. The technique involves four stages. An analysis was performed to ascertain the efficiency of control of flaw detectability with regard to each of the stages of radiographic control. The relationships used in determining control efficiency and cited in the paper serve as a foundation for optimizing the technical parameters of the devices of the automatized complex and for creating calculation methods for generalized assessments of the efficiency of radiographic control

  12. Echocardiographic Parameters and Survival in Chagas Heart Disease with Severe Systolic Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction < 35%. Study with retrospective analysis of pre-specified echocardiographic parameters prospectively collected from 60 patients included in the Multicenter Randomized Trial of Cell Therapy in Patients with Heart Diseases (Estudo Multicêntrico Randomizado de Terapia Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p < 0.0001) and E/Em ratio (HR = 0.95; p = 0.1261) were excluded. The indexed left atrial volume was an independent predictor in relation to the endpoint, and values > 70.71 mL/m 2 were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction

  13. Echocardiographic Parameters and Survival in Chagas Heart Disease with Severe Systolic Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo, E-mail: dani.rassi@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina e Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos [Instituto do Coração da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins [Instituto de Radiologia da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hotta, Viviane Tiemi [Instituto do Coração da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador [Faculdade de Medicina e Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction < 35%. Study with retrospective analysis of pre-specified echocardiographic parameters prospectively collected from 60 patients included in the Multicenter Randomized Trial of Cell Therapy in Patients with Heart Diseases (Estudo Multicêntrico Randomizado de Terapia Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p < 0.0001) and E/Em ratio (HR = 0.95; p = 0.1261) were excluded. The indexed left atrial volume was an independent predictor in relation to the endpoint, and values > 70.71 mL/m{sup 2} were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction.

  14. Dental radiographic units - radiation safety and patient doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, J.S.; Varadharajan, Geetha

    2001-01-01

    Three models of dental radiographic machines have been examined for radiation safety. Using TL dosemeters, doses received by the patients at chest level and the gonads have been estimated. Care should be taken to shield gonads during dental radiographic examinations. (author)

  15. A survey of the radiographic cassettes disinfection of university hospitals in seoul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Park, Peom; Kim, Moon Sun; Kim, Dong Sung

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prevent nosocomial infection in patients through contact of radiographic cassettes. Data were collected from radiographers working in 29 university hospitals in Seoul in February and March 2001. Radiographic cassettes were disinfected daily in 5 hospitals, weekly in 4 hospitals, monthly in 5 hospitals, bimonthly in 1 hospital and once every three months in another hospital. 12 other hospitals do not practice regular disinfections of radiographic cassettes. Gauze soaked in disinfectant solution is used in 7 hospitals while 11 hospitals used cotton and cloth soaked in disinfectant solution to clean the radiographic cassettes. 26 hospitals used 99% alcohol based disinfectant solutions while 3 hospitals used 75% alcohol based disinfectant, 26 hospitals use of intercourse cassettes outpatients and in patients. In 26 hospitals, all patients shared the same set of radiographic cassettes used in the hospitals, or in 26 hospitals, separate sets of radiographic cassettes are used for outpatients and inpatients. Separate sets of cassettes are used for ICU and inpatients in 6 others hospitals. 23 hospitals used the same sets of radiographic cassettes for all their patients. radiographic cassettes are cleaned in wash area in the study room of the radiographic department in 17 hospitals. 12 other hospitals do not have designated cleaning areas for the cassettes. All radiographers practiced hands washing with soap. All 29 hospitals surveyed have infection control committee. However, only 9 out of the 29 hospitals surveyed provided Infection · disinfections control education to radiographers. Only 3 hospitals have radiographers sitting in the infection control committee. Infection management education is conducted in 63 hospitals annually, twice a year in 1 hospital and once every 3 months in 2 hospitals

  16. Radiographic analysis of partial or total vertebral body resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitten, C.G.; Hammer, G.H.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Hugus, J.; Weinstein, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    Partial and total vertebrectomies are used in the treatment of primary and metastatic neoplasms of the spine. Serial radiographic studies are crucial in the follow-up of patients with vertebrectomies. This paper presents 33 cases and illustrates radiographic examples of both successful and complicated vertebrectomies, including radiographic signs of local tumor recurrence, loosening, migration or fracture of the hardware or methylmethacrylate, bone graft failure, and progressive spinal instability

  17. Influence of Radiographic Positioning on Canine Sacroiliac and Lumbosacral Angle Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Susan; Savage, Mason; Naughton, Brian; Singh, Susheela; Robertson, Ian; Roe, Simon C; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Mathews, Kyle G

    2018-01-01

     To evaluate the influence of radiographic malpositioning on canine sacroiliac and lumbosacral inclination angles.  Using canine cadavers, lateral pelvic radiographs were acquired with the radiographic beam in a neutral position and then rotated 5, 10 and 15° to mimic rotational malpositioning. The focal point of the beam was then focused over the abdomen and again over mid-diaphysis of the femur to mimic an abdominal or femoral radiographic study.  Five degrees of rotational malpositioning did not influence measurements of sacroiliac or lumbosacral inclination, but malpositioning by more than 5° led to a significant decrease in both sacroiliac and lumbosacral angles. Moving the focal point to the femur significantly decreased the measured lumbosacral angle. Abdominally centred radiographs had no effect on lumbosacral and sacroiliac angle measurements.  When evaluating canine lumbosacral and sacroiliac angles radiographically, pelvic rotation of more than 5° should be avoided as should the use of lateral radiographs centred over the femur. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  18. Comparison of ultrasonographic and radiographic findings in cows with traumatic reticuloperitonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, U.; Fluckiger, M.; Gotz, M.

    1994-01-01

    The radiographic and ultrasonographic findings in 26 cows with traumatic reticuloperitonitis were compared. The cows were divided into three groups based on the radiographic findings; the first group consisted of 12 cows in which the principal radiographic finding was a foreign body penetrating the reticulum; the second group contained four cows in which the principal radiographic finding was gas shadows or a gas-fluid interface, the third group consisted of 10 cows that had no reliable radiographic evidence of traumatic reticuloperitonitis, such as an abnormal contour, position or shape of the reticulum. In no case could the foreign bodies be visualised by ultrasonography. In all the cows except one with radiographic evidence of abnormal gas inclusions and gas-fluid interfaces, ultrasonography revealed echogenic, partitioned and capsulated structures with central hypoechogenic cavities. In addition, in some of the cows with no radiographic evidence of the condition, severe changes indicative of inflammatory processes were visible by ultrasonography

  19. Is the frontal radiograph alone sufficient to evaluate for pneumonia in children?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Strife, Janet L.; Johnson, Neil D.; Atherton, Harry D.; Kotagal, Uma R.; Pommersheim, William

    2004-01-01

    In our cost- and radiation-conscious environment, the feasibility of performing only a frontal radiograph for the diagnosis of pneumonia in children needs to be reassessed. To determine the diagnostic efficacy of the frontal radiograph alone in comparison to the frontal and lateral combined radiographs for the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia in children. Three radiologists retrospectively and independently reviewed the frontal radiographs alone and separately reviewed the frontal and lateral radiographs of 1,268 children referred from the emergency room for chest radiographs. A majority interpretation of at least two radiologists for the frontal views alone was compared with majority interpretation of the frontal and lateral combined views for the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia. ''Pneumonia'' was defined as a focus of streaky or confluent lung opacity. For the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, the sensitivity and specificity of the frontal view alone were 85% and 98%, respectively. For the confluent lobar type of pneumonia, the sensitivity and specificity increased to 100%. When the frontal view alone yields a diagnosis of confluent lobar pneumonia, this is highly reliable. However, nonlobar types of infiltrates will be underdiagnosed in 15% of patients using the frontal view alone. The clinical impact of these radiographically underdiagnosed pneumonias needs to be assessed prior to implementing the practice of using only frontal radiographs for diagnosing pneumonia. (orig.)

  20. Is the frontal radiograph alone sufficient to evaluate for pneumonia in children?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, OH 45229, Cincinnati (United States); Department of Medical Imaging No. 9, Children' s Memorial Hospital, 2300 Children' s Plaza, IL 60614, Chicago (United States); Strife, Janet L.; Johnson, Neil D. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, OH 45229, Cincinnati (United States); Atherton, Harry D.; Kotagal, Uma R. [Department of Health Policy and Clinical Effectiveness, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, OH 45229, Cincinnati (United States); Pommersheim, William [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, OH 45229, Cincinnati (United States); Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Meads Hall, 2nd Floor, NC 27157, Winston-Salem (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In our cost- and radiation-conscious environment, the feasibility of performing only a frontal radiograph for the diagnosis of pneumonia in children needs to be reassessed. To determine the diagnostic efficacy of the frontal radiograph alone in comparison to the frontal and lateral combined radiographs for the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia in children. Three radiologists retrospectively and independently reviewed the frontal radiographs alone and separately reviewed the frontal and lateral radiographs of 1,268 children referred from the emergency room for chest radiographs. A majority interpretation of at least two radiologists for the frontal views alone was compared with majority interpretation of the frontal and lateral combined views for the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia. ''Pneumonia'' was defined as a focus of streaky or confluent lung opacity. For the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, the sensitivity and specificity of the frontal view alone were 85% and 98%, respectively. For the confluent lobar type of pneumonia, the sensitivity and specificity increased to 100%. When the frontal view alone yields a diagnosis of confluent lobar pneumonia, this is highly reliable. However, nonlobar types of infiltrates will be underdiagnosed in 15% of patients using the frontal view alone. The clinical impact of these radiographically underdiagnosed pneumonias needs to be assessed prior to implementing the practice of using only frontal radiographs for diagnosing pneumonia. (orig.)

  1. Heart failure: when form fails to follow function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Arnold M; Rolett, Ellis L

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac performance is normally determined by architectural, cellular, and molecular structures that determine the heart's form, and by physiological and biochemical mechanisms that regulate the function of these structures. Impaired adaptation of form to function in failing hearts contributes to two syndromes initially called systolic heart failure (SHF) and diastolic heart failure (DHF). In SHF, characterized by high end-diastolic volume (EDV), the left ventricle (LV) cannot eject a normal stroke volume (SV); in DHF, with normal or low EDV, the LV cannot accept a normal venous return. These syndromes are now generally defined in terms of ejection fraction (EF): SHF became 'heart failure with reduced ejection fraction' (HFrEF) while DHF became 'heart failure with normal or preserved ejection fraction' (HFnEF or HFpEF). However, EF is a chimeric index because it is the ratio between SV--which measures function, and EDV--which measures form. In SHF the LV dilates when sarcomere addition in series increases cardiac myocyte length, whereas sarcomere addition in parallel can cause concentric hypertrophy in DHF by increasing myocyte thickness. Although dilatation in SHF allows the LV to accept a greater venous return, it increases the energy cost of ejection and initiates a vicious cycle that contributes to progressive dilatation. In contrast, concentric hypertrophy in DHF facilitates ejection but impairs filling and can cause heart muscle to deteriorate. Differences in the molecular signals that initiate dilatation and concentric hypertrophy can explain why many drugs that improve prognosis in SHF have little if any benefit in DHF. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. System for pathology categorization and retrieval in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Uri; Greenspan, Hayit; Konen, Eli; Sharon, Michal; Goldberger, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present an overview of a system we have been developing for the past several years for efficient image categorization and retrieval in large radiograph archives. The methodology is based on local patch representation of the image content, using a bag of visual words approach and similarity-based categorization with a kernel based SVM classifier. We show an application to pathology-level categorization of chest x-ray data, the most popular examination in radiology. Our study deals with pathology detection and identification of individual pathologies including right and left pleural effusion, enlarged heart and cases of enlarged mediastinum. The input from a radiologist provided a global label for the entire image (healthy/pathology), and the categorization was conducted on the entire image, with no need for segmentation algorithms or any geometrical rules. An automatic diagnostic-level categorization, even on such an elementary level as healthy vs pathological, provides a useful tool for radiologists on this popular and important examination. This is a first step towards similarity-based categorization, which has a major clinical implications for computer-assisted diagnostics.

  3. Comparison of the critical shoulder angle in radiographs and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouaicha, Samy [University of British Columbia, Divison of Arthroscopic, Reconstructive Surgery and Joint Preservation, Department of Orthopaedics, Vancouver (Canada); Zurich University Hospital, Division of Trauma, Zurich (Switzerland); Ehrmann, Christine [University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, Vancouver (Canada); Slankamenac, Ksenija [Zurich University Hospital, Division of Trauma, Zurich (Switzerland); Regan, William D. [University of British Columbia, Divison of Arthroscopic, Reconstructive Surgery and Joint Preservation, Department of Orthopaedics, Vancouver (Canada); Moor, Beat K. [Insel University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    The critical shoulder angle (CSA) is an indicator of degenerative shoulder pathologies. CSAs above 35 are associated with degenerative rotator cuff disease, whereas values below 30 are common in osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. Measurements are usually performed on radiographs; however, no data have been reported regarding the reliability of CT scan measurements between different readers or the reproducibility of measurements from radiographs to CT scans. The purpose of our study was to clarify whether CSA measurements on radiographs and CT scans of the same patients show similar values. CSA measurements of 60 shoulders (59 patients) were performed on radiographs and multiplanar reconstructions of corresponding CT scans. Inter-reader reliability and inter-method correlation were calculated. The mean discrepancy between readers was only 0.2 (SD ±1.0 ) on radiographs. CT scan measurements showed a mean discrepancy of 0.3 (SD ±1.2 ). The inter-reader reliability was 0.993 for radiographs and 0.989 for CT scans. There was a very strong inter-method correlation between the CSA measured on radiographs and CT scans (Spearman's rho = 0.974). The mean differences between angles on radiographs and CT measurements were -0.05 (SD ±1.2 ) and 0.1 (SD ±1.2 ), respectively. Measurements of the CSA on anterior-posterior radiographs and CT scans are highly correlated, and inter-modality differences are negligible. (orig.)

  4. Lung Function before and Two Days after Open-Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Urell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced lung volumes and atelectasis are common after open-heart surgery, and pronounced restrictive lung volume impairment has been found. The aim of this study was to investigate factors influencing lung volumes on the second postoperative day. Open-heart surgery patients (n=107, 68 yrs, 80% male performed spirometry both before surgery and on the second postoperative day. The factors influencing postoperative lung volumes and decrease in lung volumes were investigated with univariate and multivariate analyses. Associations between pain (measured by numeric rating scale and decrease in postoperative lung volumes were calculated with Spearman rank correlation test. Lung volumes decreased by 50% and were less than 40% of the predictive values postoperatively. Patients with BMI >25 had lower postoperative inspiratory capacity (IC (33±14% pred. than normal-weight patients (39±15% pred., (P=0.04. More pain during mobilisation was associated with higher decreases in postoperative lung volumes (VC: r=0.33, P=0.001; FEV1: r=0.35, P≤0.0001; IC: r=0.25, P=0.01. Patients with high BMI are a risk group for decreased postoperative lung volumes and should therefore receive extra attention during postoperative care. As pain is related to a larger decrease in postoperative lung volumes, optimal pain relief for the patients should be identified.

  5. Lung Function before and Two Days after Open-Heart Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urell, Charlotte; Westerdahl, Elisabeth; Hedenström, Hans; Janson, Christer; Emtner, Margareta

    2012-01-01

    Reduced lung volumes and atelectasis are common after open-heart surgery, and pronounced restrictive lung volume impairment has been found. The aim of this study was to investigate factors influencing lung volumes on the second postoperative day. Open-heart surgery patients (n = 107, 68 yrs, 80% male) performed spirometry both before surgery and on the second postoperative day. The factors influencing postoperative lung volumes and decrease in lung volumes were investigated with univariate and multivariate analyses. Associations between pain (measured by numeric rating scale) and decrease in postoperative lung volumes were calculated with Spearman rank correlation test. Lung volumes decreased by 50% and were less than 40% of the predictive values postoperatively. Patients with BMI >25 had lower postoperative inspiratory capacity (IC) (33 ± 14% pred.) than normal-weight patients (39 ± 15% pred.), (P = 0.04). More pain during mobilisation was associated with higher decreases in postoperative lung volumes (VC: r = 0.33, P = 0.001; FEV(1): r = 0.35, P ≤ 0.0001; IC: r = 0.25, P = 0.01). Patients with high BMI are a risk group for decreased postoperative lung volumes and should therefore receive extra attention during postoperative care. As pain is related to a larger decrease in postoperative lung volumes, optimal pain relief for the patients should be identified.

  6. Clinical evaluation of ischemic heart diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Fumio

    1983-01-01

    Attempt were made to detect the existence of myocardial ischemia by means of both radiographic and scintigraphic techniques. Firstly, a new polygraph was especially designed for selecting the arbitrary phases in a cardiac cycle at which the corresponding radiogram should be synchronously obtained. A comparative investigation on the difference between end-systolic and-diastolic cardiac transverse diameters revealed a remarkable difference of 3.6% in normal subjects and 0.6% in patients with ischemic heart disease. These data indicating the difference of overall heart size was reflected in local dyskinesis documentation of recently developed techniques. For daily clinical purposes, radiography of the chest based on synchronously selected phases would contribute to accurate diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Secondly, scintigraphic display using intravenously injected thallium-201 was clinically applied. For detection of ischemia, comparative study was performed of initial image relative to selective coronary cineangiography and stress scintigraphy. The former indicated a good correlation of 90%, whereas the latter served to enhnace sensitivity. Sequential images (initial and delayed) facilitated the distinction of normal, necrotic, and ischemic areas. Scintigram was used for objective evaluation of coronary dilator (dilazep), either at immediate or follow-up stage. In the same way, it was also possible to indicate the effectiveness of sublingually given nitroglycerin by myocardial scintigram, where by significant increase of uptake was observed 20 minutes after administration. Rehabilitation after acute heart disease was discussed, especially on the peripheral effect. Ratio of the thigh muscle to myocardium shown in this study was useful fer objective evaluation. Another preliminary study is to separate normal coronary arteries from myocardial necrosis. (J.P.N.)

  7. Clinical evaluation of ischemic heart diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Fumio [Sendai Railway Hospital (Japan)

    1983-09-01

    Attempt were made to detect the existence of myocardial ischemia by means of both radiographic and scintigraphic techniques. Firstly, a new polygraph was especially designed for selecting the arbitrary phases in a cardiac cycle at which the corresponding radiogram should be synchronously obtained. A comparative investigation on the difference between end-systolic and-diastolic cardiac transverse diameters revealed a remarkable difference of 3.6% in normal subjects and 0.6% in patients with ischemic heart disease. These data indicating the difference of overall heart size was reflected in local dyskinesis documentation of recently developed techniques. For daily clinical purposes, radiography of the chest based on synchronously selected phases would contribute to accurate diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Secondly, scintigraphic display using intravenously injected thallium-201 was clinically applied. For detection of ischemia, comparative study was performed of initial image relative to selective coronary cineangiography and stress scintigraphy. The former indicated a good correlation of 90%, whereas the latter served to enhance sensitivity. Sequential images (initial and delayed) facilitated the distinction of normal, necrotic, and ischemic areas. Scintigram was used for objective evaluation of coronary dilator (dilazep), either at immediate or follow-up stage. In the same way, it was also possible to indicate the effectiveness of sublingually given nitroglycerin by myocardial scintigram, where by significant increase of uptake was observed 20 minutes after administration. Rehabilitation after acute heart disease was discussed, especially on the peripheral effect. Ratio of the thigh muscle to myocardium shown in this study was useful for objective evaluation. Another preliminary study is to separate normal coronary arteries from myocardial necrosis.

  8. Conventional frontal radiographs compared with frontal radiographs obtained from cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Metin; Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Bayram, Mehmet; Celikoglu, Mevlut; Kilkis, Dogan; Sezgin, Omer Said

    2012-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that there is no difference between measurements performed on conventional frontal radiographs (FRs) and those performed on FRs obtained from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. This study consisted of conventional FRs and CBCT-constructed FRs obtained from 30 young adult patients. Twenty-three landmarks were identified on both types of cephalometric radiographs. Twenty-one widely used cephalometric variables (14 linear distances, 4 angles, and 3 ratios) were calculated. Paired t-tests were performed to compare the means of corresponding measurements on two cephalometric radiographs of the same patient. Reproducibility of measurements ranged from 0.85 to 0.99 for CBCT-constructed FRs, and from 0.78 to 0.96 for conventional FRs. A statistically significant difference was observed between conventional FRs and CBCT-constructed FRs for all linear measurements (eurR-eurL, loR-loL, moR-moL, zygR-zygL, lapR-lapL, mxR-mxL, maR-maL, umR-umL, lmR-lmL, agR-agL, me-ans) (P .05). However, no statistically significant differences were noted between conventional FRs and CBCT-constructed FRs for ratios and angular measurements (P > .05). The hypothesis was rejected. A difference has been noted between measurements performed on conventional FRs and those performed on CBCT-constructed FRs, particularly in terms of linear measurements.

  9. Evaluating the role of the diagnostic research radiographer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Karen; Edwards, Hazel

    2011-01-01

    The NHS has an increasingly strong focus on evidence-based medicine to underpin policy making and the development of a culture of evaluation and learning. Good quality research is the foundation for this ethos. Numbers of research projects and clinical trials involving imaging are increasing and therefore more radiographers are contributing to these studies but perhaps on some occasions they may be unaware. This paper describes the benefits of having a dedicated research radiographer within a radiology department to organise and monitor studies. We explain the procedures of the research process, the knowledge and skills that such a radiographer requires and the value of coordination and governance in developing a culture of research in a radiology department. We make suggestions to overcome perceived barriers to engaging with research and discuss the advantages and limitations of the role. Others who are considering appointing a dedicated research radiographer may find our experience helpful.

  10. Reading screening mammograms - Attitudes among radiologists and radiographers about skill mix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Lena Westphal; Brodersen, John

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Because of shortage of personnel for the Danish mammography screening programme, the aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of radiologists and radiographers towards a future implementation of radiographers reading screening mammograms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven...... of managers, and improved working relations. Organization related obstacles: shortage of radiographers and negative attitudes of managers. Professional related possibilities: positive experience with skill mix. Professional related obstacles: worries about negative consequences for the training...... and financial consequences of skill mix. Despite of this all radiologists and radiographers experienced with skill mix were strong advocates for reading radiographers....

  11. New view on the initial development site and radiographic classification system of osteoarthritis of the knee based on radiographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ki-Ho

    2012-12-01

    Radiographic pathology of severe osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) such as severe osteophyte at tibial spine (TS), compartment narrowing, marginal osteophyte, and subchondral sclerosis is well known. Kellgren-Lawrence grading system, which is widely used to diagnose OAK, describes narrowing-marginal osteophyte in 4-grades but uses osteophyte at TS only as evidence of OAK without detailed-grading. However, kinematically the knee employs medial TS as an axis while medial and lateral compartments carry the load, suggesting that early OAK would occur sooner at TS than at compartment. Then, Kellgren-Lawrence system may be inadequate to diagnose early-stage OAK manifested as a subtle osteophyte at TS without narrowing-marginal osteophyte. This undiagnosed-OAK will deteriorate becoming a contributing factor in an increasing incidence of OAK. This study developed a radiographic OAK-marker based on both osteophyte at TS and compartment narrowing-marginal osteophyte and graded as normal, mild, moderate, and severe. With this marker, both knee radiographs of 1,728 patients with knee pain were analyzed. Among 611 early-stage mild OAK, 562 or 92% started at TS and 49 or 8% at compartment. It suggests the initial development site of OAK, helping develop new site-specific radiographic classification system of OAK accurately to diagnose all severity of OAK at early, intermediate, or late-stage. It showed that Kellgren-Lawrence system missed 92.0% of early-stage mild OAK from diagnosis. A subtle osteophyte at TS is the earliest radiographic sign of OAK. A new radiographic classification system of OAK was suggested for accurate diagnosis of all OAK in severity and at stage.

  12. Right Heart Failure in an African Penguin ( Spheniscus demersus ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Lara; Field, Cara; McDermott, Alexa; Pogue, Brandon; Clauss, Tonya; Bossart, Gregory; Camus, Alvin

    2016-09-01

    A 19-year-old male African penguin ( Spheniscus demersus ) was presented with coelomic distention after a 6-week history of lethargy and decreased appetite. Results of radiographs showed loss of coelomic detail, and ultrasound and computed tomography results revealed coelomic fluid and dilated hepatic veins. Echocardiography revealed moderate right atrial enlargement. Findings were consistent with right-sided cardiac disease. Treatment with furosemide initially reduced ascites, but the clinical condition worsened weeks later and enalapril, pimobendan, and sildenafil were added to the medical therapy. At 12 weeks after presentation, results of an echocardiogram revealed persistent right atrioventricular valve regurgitation, moderate ascites, and dilation of hepatic veins. Clinical signs of right heart failure were managed through adjustments in medical therapy and coelomic fluid aspiration, but the bird died 18 weeks after initial presentation. Gross and microscopic findings were consistent with valvular insufficiency and right-sided heart failure. To our knowledge, this case is the first documented report of cardiac disease in an African penguin.

  13. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  14. Radiographer-led breast boost localisation – A service evaluation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.; Comins, C.

    2015-01-01

    A radiation boost to the tumour bed as part of breast conserving therapy reduces the rate of local recurrence. Radiographer-led planning for tangential field radiotherapy has been the practice at our centre since 2007. The transition from conventional simulation to computed tomography (CT) and virtual simulation enhanced the radiographer's role in the breast planning process. Electron boost mark ups continued to be marked up freehand by doctors using available imaging to determine tumour bed. The paper reports on a service evaluation undertaken to establish a change in practice for electron breast boosts to be simulated using the virtual simulator by suitably trained radiographers. The retrospective simulation of ten patients confirmed the consistency of radiographer tumour bed localisation, followed by the prospective simulation of ten patients' boost fields. The introduction of a radiographer-led planning breast boost service has given greater autonomy and job satisfaction to individuals as well as resulting in a cost effective use of available resources. - Highlights: • A service evaluation study was undertaken to train a radiographer to perform breast boost planning. • Retrospective breast boost planning established proposed technique was workable. • Prospective planning by radiographer proved their competence. • Introduction of new technique provided job satisfaction and service improvement

  15. Image quality preferences among radiographers and radiologists. A conjoint analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ween, Borgny; Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Hamilton, Glenys A.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality preferences among radiographers and radiologists. The radiographers' preferences are mainly related to technical parameters, whereas radiologists assess image quality based on diagnostic value. Methods: A conjoint analysis was undertaken to survey image quality preferences; the study included 37 respondents: 19 radiographers and 18 radiologists. Digital urograms were post-processed into 8 images with different properties of image quality for 3 different patients. The respondents were asked to rank the images according to their personally perceived subjective image quality. Results: Nearly half of the radiographers and radiologists were consistent in their ranking of the image characterised as 'very best image quality'. The analysis showed, moreover, that chosen filtration level and image intensity were responsible for 72% and 28% of the preferences, respectively. The corresponding figures for each of the two professions were 76% and 24% for the radiographers, and 68% and 32% for the radiologists. In addition, there were larger variations in image preferences among the radiologists, as compared to the radiographers. Conclusions: Radiographers revealed a more consistent preference than the radiologists with respect to image quality. There is a potential for image quality improvement by developing sets of image property criteria

  16. Limitations of radiographs in evaluating non-displaced osteochondral lesions of the talus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dheer, Sachin; Khan, Mustafa; Zoga, Adam C.; Morrison, William B.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate what limitations, if any, radiographs have in detecting and characterizing the morphology of non-displaced OCLTs (size, cystic change, fragmentation, and avascular necrosis [AVN]). Thirty-three OCLTs in 32 patients were reviewed in consensus by a board-certified, fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist and orthopedic surgeon, on radiographs and MRI examinations performed within 15 days of one another. Location, dimensions, and characteristics of the OCLT (fragmentation, bone marrow edema, cystic change, and necrosis) were documented on the radiographs and MRI examinations. There was an average of 7.5 days (range: 1-15 days) between the MRIs and radiographs. Eighteen (55%) medial and 15 (45%) lateral OCLTs were found; none was displaced. OCLTs were categorized into three groups: Group 1 - initially diagnosed with radiographs (4/33; 12%), Group 2 - diagnosed with radiographs only after MRI correlation (20/33; 61%), and Group 3 - not identifiable on radiographs despite MRI correlation (9/33; 27%). The dimensions of all of the lesions in Groups 1 and 2 were underestimated on radiographs. Only 1 of the 4 (25%) lesions in Group 1 and 1 of the 20 (5%) lesions in Group 2 could be measured in the anteroposterior (AP) dimension (using a lateral radiograph). The most common radiographic appearance of non-displaced OCLTs was an ''ill-defined'' lucency at the talar dome (20/33; 61%). Across all three groups, fragmentation, cystic change, and AVN were radiographically apparent in 3/10 (30%), 4/19 (21%), and 1/6 (17%) cases respectively. Compared with MRI, radiographs are limited in their evaluation of the size (particularly the AP dimension) and characteristics (fragmentation, cystic change, and AVN) of non-displaced OCLTs. The most common appearance of non-displaced OCLTs is an ''ill-defined'' lucency at the talar dome. When this appearance is also considered, the estimated retrospective sensitivity of radiographs improves considerably. (orig.)

  17. Radiographic follow-up study of Little Leaguer's shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanematsu, Yoshiji; Iwase, Takenobu; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Sairyo, Koichi; Kashiwaguchi, Shinji; Iwame, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Little Leaguer's shoulder is a syndrome involving the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. Conservative treatment usually resolves the symptoms. However, there are no reports of a radiographic follow-up study of this disease. The purpose of this study was to show the radiographic healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder. A total of 19 male baseball players diagnosed as having Little Leaguer's shoulder were retrospectively evaluated. The mean age at first presentation was 12.7 years. External rotation anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulder were taken. All patients were treated with rest from throwing, and no throwing was recommended until remodeling was confirmed. Follow-up radiographs were taken at 1-month intervals to assess healing. All patients were observed until healing was confirmed radiographically, after which they returned to baseball. The mean follow-up period was 8.5 months. In addition to radiography, patients were asked whether they had any symptoms and whether they had been able to return to baseball. At the first examination, radiographs showed a wider epiphyseal plate of the throwing side compared with the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder. Healing was observed in all cases. Healing occurred first along the medial side and was then extended laterally. The mean time required for healing was 4.7 months. All patients were able to return to playing baseball at their pre-injury level of play and were asymptomatic when examined at the final follow-up. The healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder advanced from medial to lateral, and healing was achieved about 5 months after initial examination. (orig.)

  18. Radiographic findings in tuberculosis of the calvarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patankar, T.; Varma, R.; Krishnan, A.; Prasad, S. [Dept. of Radiology, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Parel, Bombay (India); Desai, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Bombay (India); Castillo, M. [Dept. of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2000-07-01

    We reviewed the pattern of involvement of the calvarium by tuberculosis (TB) in five patients and the role of imaging in its management. Four patients presented with localised scalp swelling and one with generalized seizures. Radiographs revealed lucent lesions with minimal surrounding sclerosis in the frontal (2), parietal (2) and occipital (1) bones. CT showed lesions involving the entire thickness of the calvarium and accompanying contrast-enhancing soft tissue. The patient presenting with seizures had a ring-enhancing lesion in the parietal lobe in addition to the extra-axial lesions. Although radiographs in all cases demonstrated calvarial TB, CT showed the extent of the defect, involvement of adjacent soft tissues, and in one case an intra-axial lesion. Radiographs suffice for follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of the styloid process on digital panoramic radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, Chandramani B; Asrani, Mukesh K

    2010-01-01

    The styloid process is an anatomical structure, whose clinical importance is not well understood. Proper clinical and radiographic evaluation can detect an elongated styloid process and calcification of the stylohyoid ligament. It has been reported that 2 – 28% of the general population show radiographic evidence of mineralization of a portion of the stylohyoid chain. The elongated styloid process may be symptomatic in many cases. Panoramic radiography is the best imaging modality to view the styloid process bilaterally. To assess the styloid process on digital panoramic radiographs. The study was conducted on 500 digital panoramic radiographs available in the archives of our department as soft copies. These radiographs were taken using a digital panoramic system. The radiographic length of the styloid process was measured on both sides using the measurement toolbars on the accompanying analysis software. For statistical analysis we used the unpaired t test, Chi-square test, and one-way ANOVA test, as necessary. The average length of the left styloid was 25.41 ± 6.32 mm and that of the right styloid was 25.53 ± 6.62 mm. The length of both styloids increased with age and males had longer styloids than females. Elongated styloids were present in 19.4% of the panoramic radiographs. Langlais type I elongated styloids and a partial calcification pattern were more common than others. Panoramic radiography is useful for detection of an elongated styloid process and / or ossification of the stylohyoid ligament in patients with or without symptoms, and helps avoid a misdiagnosis of tonsillar pain or pain of dental, pharyngeal, or muscular origin

  20. Radiographic scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofe, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A stable radiographic scanning agent on a sup(99m)Tc basis has been developed. The substance contains a pertechnetate reduction agent, tin(II)-chloride, chromium(II)-chloride, or iron(II)-sulphate, as well as an organospecific carrier and ascorbic acid or a pharmacologically admissible salt or ester of ascorbic acid. (VJ) [de

  1. The pathophysiology of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Clinton D; Conte, John V

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that results when the heart is unable to provide sufficient blood flow to meet metabolic requirements or accommodate systemic venous return. This common condition affects over 5 million people in the United States at a cost of $10-38 billion per year. Heart failure results from injury to the myocardium from a variety of causes including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Less common etiologies include cardiomyopathies, valvular disease, myocarditis, infections, systemic toxins, and cardiotoxic drugs. As the heart fails, patients develop symptoms which include dyspnea from pulmonary congestion, and peripheral edema and ascites from impaired venous return. Constitutional symptoms such as nausea, lack of appetite, and fatigue are also common. There are several compensatory mechanisms that occur as the failing heart attempts to maintain adequate function. These include increasing cardiac output via the Frank-Starling mechanism, increasing ventricular volume and wall thickness through ventricular remodeling, and maintaining tissue perfusion with augmented mean arterial pressure through activation of neurohormonal systems. Although initially beneficial in the early stages of heart failure, all of these compensatory mechanisms eventually lead to a vicious cycle of worsening heart failure. Treatment strategies have been developed based upon the understanding of these compensatory mechanisms. Medical therapy includes diuresis, suppression of the overactive neurohormonal systems, and augmentation of contractility. Surgical options include ventricular resynchronization therapy, surgical ventricular remodeling, ventricular assist device implantation, and heart transplantation. Despite significant understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in heart failure, this disease causes significant morbidity and carries a 50% 5-year mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Echocardiographic parameters and survival in Chagas heart disease with severe systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador

    2014-03-01

    Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p 70.71 mL/m2 were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction.

  3. Occupational stress among radiographers: the impact of sonagraphy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sonography responsibility on radiographers did not have any significant effect on psychosocial stress. A balance in the extended role could aid efficiency in service delivery while improving the social strength of the individual. Keywords: Occupational stress; radiographers; sonographers. Internet Journal of Medical Update ...

  4. Standardization of thorax, skull and pelvis radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, D.R.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Trad, C.S.; Brochi, M.A. Corte; Duarte, S.B.; Pina, S.R.

    2001-01-01

    The radiographic techniques for production of chest, skull and pelvis exam were determined for the standard patient. These techniques produced the quality image with smaller dose, for a standard patient, at any conventional X-ray equipment. The radiographic contrast produced for these techniques was measured utilizing the realistic-analytic phantom and classified as an ideal radiographic contrast. This work has the aim to keep the standard of the quality image, for any thickness of patients usually found in clinic routine of the radiodiagnosis service, satisfying the relation risk-benefit for the patient and cost- benefit for the institution. (author)

  5. Maximal conservation and minimal usage of blood products in open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, P E; Pastoriza-Pinol, J; McMillan, J; Smith, B F; Stirling, G R

    1980-05-01

    Open heart surgery has previously been associated with the use of large volumes of blood products. This paper describes methods of blood conservation and a simple method of intraoperative autotransfusion that together have resulted in minimal blood product usage in elective open heart surgery cases. This has reduced our dependence on blood bank supplies for the performance of elective open heart surgery.

  6. Effect of dependency versus nondependency on lung lesion visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechman, R.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Paraffin blocks and mineral oil were used as a model to determine the effect of dependency versus nondependency on radiographic visualization of lung lesions in lateral thoracic radiographs. It was concluded that the increased opacity of the material surrounding the lesion, not contact between the heart and the lesion, was responsible for the inability to detect lung disease in the dependent lung. The results were tested in dogs with pneumonia in the right middle lung lobe. When the dog was in right lateral recumbency, the dependent right lung was increased in opacity and decreased in volume and the pulmonary lesion was difficult to detect. When the dog was in left lateral recumbency, the non dependent right lung was increased in volume and decreased in opacity and the pulmonary disease was clearly visible. A single recumbent lateral radiograph must not be used to assess a dog with suspected lung disease because lesions in the dependent lung lobes may not be detected

  7. Development of low-silver radiographic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troitskij, V.A.; Novikov, I.A.; Nikitin, V.F.; Krasnyj-Admoni, L.V.; Valevich, M.I.; Belyj, N.G.; Grom, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of investigations on radiographic testing of welded joints of St20, 08Kh18N10T steels, the AMG-6 alloy, copper, titanium using radiographic detectors with the low silver content are presented. The roentgenographic and photographic paper, as well as the samples of experimental films with heavy elements in the photolayer are tested using intensifying screens of different types. Experimental films containing silver 2 times as less as standard X-ray films are shown to provide the similar sensitivity of testing under equal conditions, but the exposure time is two times higher. Prints on the radiophotographic paper in quality and exposure time approach to prints obtained on the RT-1 film containing silver 10 times less than that in the roentgenographic film. The exposure time of the radiographic paper is several times less than that of the ''unibrom'' contrast paper. The testing sensitivity decreases to some extent in this case

  8. Clinical use of nuclear cardiology in the assessment of heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lei; Shi Hongcheng

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is the most commonly performed non-invasive cardiac imaging test in patients with heart failure, and it plays an important role in their assessment and management. Quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography is used to assess quantitatively cardiac volume, left ventricular ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac diastolic function. Resting and stress myocardial perfusion imaging can not only identify nonischemic heart failure and ischemic heart failure, but also demonstrate myocardial viability. Diastolic heart failure also termed as heart failure with a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction is readily identified by nuclear cardiology techniques and can accurately be estimated by peak filling rate and time to peak filling rate. With newer techniques such as three-dimensional, quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography can assess movement of the left ventricle, and wall thickening evaluation aids its assessment. Myocardial perfusion imaging is also commonly used to identify candidates for implantable cardiac defibrillator and cardiac resynchronization therapies. Neurotransmitter imaging using 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine offers prognostic information in patients with heart failure. Metabolism and function in the heart are closely related, and energy substrate metabolism is a potential target of medical therapies to improve cardiac function in patients with heart failure. Cardiac metabolic imaging using 123 I-15-(p-iodophenyl) 3-R, S-methylpentadecacoic acid is a commonly used tracer in clinical studies to diagnose metabolic heart failure. Nuclear cardiology tests, including neurotransmitter imaging and metabolic imaging, are now easily preformed with new tracers to improve heart failure diagnosis. Nuclear cardiology techniques contribute significantly to identifying patients with heart failure and to guiding their management decisions. (authors)

  9. Transfer function analysis of radiographic imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, C.E.; Doi, K.

    1979-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental aspects of the techniques of transfer function analysis used in radiographic imaging systems are reviewed. The mathematical principles of transfer function analysis are developed for linear, shift-invariant imaging systems, for the relation between object and image and for the image due to a sinusoidal plane wave object. The other basic mathematical principle discussed is 'Fourier analysis' and its application to an input function. Other aspects of transfer function analysis included are alternative expressions for the 'optical transfer function' of imaging systems and expressions are derived for both serial and parallel transfer image sub-systems. The applications of transfer function analysis to radiographic imaging systems are discussed in relation to the linearisation of the radiographic imaging system, the object, the geometrical unsharpness, the screen-film system unsharpness, other unsharpness effects and finally noise analysis. It is concluded that extensive theoretical, computer simulation and experimental studies have demonstrated that the techniques of transfer function analysis provide an accurate and reliable means for predicting and understanding the effects of various radiographic imaging system components in most practical diagnostic medical imaging situations. (U.K.)

  10. The screening pelvic radiograph in pediatric trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, M.J.; Aickin, R.; Kolbe, A.; Teele, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Background. Pelvic radiographs are routinely obtained in adult trauma to optimise early management. In adults, pelvic fractures are associated with high early transfusion requirement, high injury severity scores and an increased incidence of other abdominal and thoracic injuries. It is unclear whether this holds true in children. Objective. To determine whether the screening pelvic radiograph is necessary in paediatric trauma. Materials and methods. The notes of all patients who presented after trauma to the Starship Children's Hospital and were triaged to the resuscitation room during 1997 were reviewed. Results of initial radiography were obtained and correlated with later imaging. Results. Our review of 444 injured children seen over a period of 1 year revealed that of 347 children who had screening pelvic radiographs, only 1 had a pelvic fracture. The fracture in this child was clinically apparent and required no specific treatment. Conclusions. The presence of a pelvic fracture is rare in injured children. By omitting screening pelvic radiographs there are potential benefits, including reduced radiation exposure to children and cost savings. Uninterpretable or abnormal clinical examination or haematuria requires further investigation, but routine screening for pelvic fracture is unnecessary. (orig.)

  11. Ex vivo stretch reveals altered mechanical properties of isolated dystrophin-deficient hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Barnabei

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a progressive and fatal disease of muscle wasting caused by loss of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. In the heart, DMD results in progressive cardiomyopathy and dilation of the left ventricle through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Previous reports have shown that loss of dystrophin causes sarcolemmal instability and reduced mechanical compliance of isolated cardiac myocytes. To expand upon these findings, here we have subjected the left ventricles of dystrophin-deficient mdx hearts to mechanical stretch. Unexpectedly, isolated mdx hearts showed increased left ventricular (LV compliance compared to controls during stretch as LV volume was increased above normal end diastolic volume. During LV chamber distention, sarcomere lengths increased similarly in mdx and WT hearts despite greater excursions in volume of mdx hearts. This suggests that the mechanical properties of the intact heart cannot be modeled as a simple extrapolation of findings in single cardiac myocytes. To explain these findings, a model is proposed in which disruption of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex perturbs cell-extracellular matrix contacts and promotes the apparent slippage of myocytes past each other during LV distension. In comparison, similar increases in LV compliance were obtained in isolated hearts from β-sarcoglycan-null and laminin-α(2 mutant mice, but not in dysferlin-null mice, suggesting that increased whole-organ compliance in mdx mice is a specific effect of disrupted cell-extracellular matrix contacts and not a general consequence of cardiomyopathy via membrane defect processes. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel and cell-death independent mechanism for the progressive pathological LV dilation that occurs in DMD.

  12. Cirurgia cardíaca em uma sociedade multiétnica: a experiência do Caribbean Heart Care Cardiac surgery in a multi-ethnic low volume service: the Caribbean Heart Care Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Burgos-Irazabal

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A população do Caribe constitui uma sociedade multiétnica, incluindo caucasianos, afro-caribenhos, indianos, asiáticos, hispânicos, europeus e nativos, com uma grande variabilidade de padrões socioeconômicos. A incidência e os tipos de doenças cardíacas também variam significativamente entre essas etnias. Relatamos aqui a experiência (em pacientes adultos e pediátricos em um serviço de cirurgia cardíaca de baixo volume em Trinidad e Tobago, no Caribe. MÉTODO: O programa de cirurgia cardíaca de adultos começou em novembro de 1993, são reportados os dados de 878 pacientes (629 homens, idade entre 18 e 88 anos, com média de 67 anos. Destes, 39,4% eram diabéticos e 46,5% hipertensos. Os procedimentos incluíram cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica (CRM, reparo e substituição de valvas e cirurgias da aorta. O programa de cirurgia cardíaca pediátrica (idades entre duas semanas e 21 anos começou em setembro de 1998, tendo sido realizado um total de 279 operações. RESULTADOS: Adultos - a mortalidade total foi de 3,8%. A maioria dos procedimentos foi CRM (82,3% com mortalidade total de 2,8% (0% em 2004. A técnica sem circulação extracorpórea foi empregada em 43% dos procedimentos de CRM (71,2% em 2004. A cirurgia de valva aórtica foi feita em 49 pacientes, e a substituição/reparo da valva mitral em 96 doentes. Pediátricos - a maioria dos procedimentos foi correção de comunicação interventricular (111, comunicação interatrial (57, tetralogia de Fallot (23, e 88 outros (com mortalidade de 1,5%. CONCLUSÃO: Cirurgia cardíaca em um serviço multiétnico de baixo volume pode ser realizada com excelentes resultados, comparáveis com padrões internacionais de qualidade.INTRODUCTION: The Caribbean is a multi-ethnic society, including Caucasian, Afro-Caribbean, East Indians, Asians, Hispanics, European and natives, which has a broad range of living standards. The incidence and types of heart diseases

  13. Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation of total knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.; Soudry, M.

    1986-01-01

    Various radiographic and scintigraphic methods are used to supplement clinical findings in the evaluation of total knee arthroplasty and its complications. Serial roentgenograms offer reliable information for diagnosing mechanical loosening. Wide and extensive radiolucency at the cement-bone interface and shift in position and alignment of prosthetic components can be seen in almost all cases by the time revision is necessary. Radiographic abnormalities are usually not present in acute infection, but are often present in chronic infection. Bone scanning has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of infection or loosening, but is nonspecific because increased uptake is often present around asymptomatic total knee arthroplasties with normal radiographs. Differential bone and Gallium scanning and scanning with Indium 111-labeled leukocytes have a greater specificity for diagnosis of infection than does bone or Gallium scanning alone. Routine radiographic and scintigraphic studies have shown a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the calf after total knee arthroplasty. Clinically significant pulmonary embolization is infrequent

  14. Effects of thyroid hormones on the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Uricoechea, Hernando; Bonelo-Perdomo, Anilsa; Sierra-Torres, Carlos Hernán

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have a significant impact on heart function, mediated by genomic and non-genomic effects. Consequently, thyroid hormone deficiencies, as well as excesses, are expected to result in profound changes in cardiac function regulation and cardiovascular hemodynamics. Thyroid hormones upregulate the expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-activated ATPase and downregulate the expression of phospholamban. Overall, hyperthyroidism is characterized by an increase in resting heart rate, blood volume, stroke volume, myocardial contractility, and ejection fraction. The development of "high-output heart failure" in hyperthyroidism may be due to "tachycardia-mediated cardiomyopathy". On the other hand, in a hypothyroid state, thyroid hormone deficiency results in lower heart rate and weakening of myocardial contraction and relaxation, with prolonged systolic and early diastolic times. Cardiac preload is decreased due to impaired diastolic function. Cardiac afterload is increased, and chronotropic and inotropic functions are reduced. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is relatively common in patients over 65 years of age. In general, subclinical hypothyroidism increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality and CHD events, but not of total mortality. The risk of CHD mortality and atrial fibrillation (but not other outcomes) in subclinical hyperthyroidism is higher among patients with very low levels of thyrotropin. Finally, medications such as amiodarone may induce hypothyroidism (mediated by the Wolff-Chaikoff), as well as hyperthyroidism (mediated by the Jod-Basedow effect). In both instances, the underlying cause is the high concentration of iodine in this medication. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of a consultant breast radiographer: A description and a reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Judith; Hogg, Peter; Henwood, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Consultant radiographers are a relatively new concept within the British healthcare system, with them being first established in 2003. Consultant radiographer job roles are broad and include advanced clinical activities (often being similar in nature to those delivered by medical practitioners, e.g. radiologists), professional leadership, teaching and education and service improvement. Given their relative novelty almost no literature exists to describe in detail specific roles of consultant breast radiographers. Consequently, in this article we use a case study approach to describe and reflect critically upon the role of one consultant breast radiographer. The article commences with a general introduction about consultant radiographers; it then progresses to outline the context in which the case study of the breast consultant radiographer sits. Through description and reflective commentary we take the reader through the role of the consultant breast radiographer to highlight where the role has had perceived value and also to highlight where the role has been particularly challenging for the post holder. As a consequence of the case study approach taken, the article is written partly in the first person (taken from interview comments made by the consultant breast radiographer) and partly in the third person. The final element of the article is a reflective commentary given by the consultant radiographer regarding her feelings about her first few years as a consultant breast radiographer

  16. Conversion into numerical form of radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappabianca, C.; Della Rocca, A.B.; Ferriani, S.

    1986-01-01

    Radiographic means are widely used for non destructive testing. However, human and technological factors strongly influence reliability of the results and further use of these technique. Image Processing can help to overtake those difficulties if radiographic films are previously digitized. This paper shows methods and equipments used in this field. The system EDI (Enea Digital. Imagery) operating in Casaccia Energy Research Centre is described

  17. Influence of radiographic contrast media on phagocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, F.; Georgsen, J.; Grunnet, N.; Aalborg Sygehus

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of radiographic contrast media (CM) on human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PML), the ability of these cells to ingest latex particles after in vitro exposure to five different radiographic contrast media was investigated. All CM inhibited the phagocytic properties of PML. The inhibition was dose dependent. The inhibitory effect was partly due to hyperosmolality but CM specific inhibition was also evident. (orig.)

  18. Chest radiographic findings in bronchogenic carcinoma in pakistani population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, M.I.; Ali, B.; Majeed, H.; Qureshi, F.

    2008-01-01

    To observe the common radiographic findings in histologically confirmed cases of bronchogenic carcinoma. This descriptive study comprised of 35 consecutive histopathologically / cytological confirmed cases of bronchogenic carcinoma that were admitted from January 2000 to April 2003 in Bahawal Victoria Hospital Bahawalpur. Plain chest radiographs were obtained in all cases Two radiologists blinded to the cell types were asked to interpret the radiographs. Hilar mass was the major manifestation in 62.8% cases. Chest radiographs showed 7 different types of lesions in four cell varieties in 35 cases, these included hilar mass in 62% cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Cavitation and rib erosion were found exclusively in squamous cell type carcinoma. In small cell carcinomas, hilar Involvement was present in 83.3% cases. Half of large cell carcinomas and one case of adenocarcinoma presented with a peripheral mass. Hilar mass was seen in 50% cases with adenocarcinoma Wide mediastinum was seen only in cases with small cell carcinoma. The chest radiograph findings in bronchogenic carcinoma has more or less a standard patterns which Can help the physician in better suspicion and diagnosis. (author)

  19. Justification of radiographic examinations: What are the key issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vom, Jason; Williams, Imelda

    2017-09-01

    Justification of radiographic examinations is the practice of evaluating requested radiological examinations to assess for clinical merit and appropriateness based on clinical notes and patient information. This implies that justification in radiography requires the evaluation of requested examinations, the justification of exposures being applied and determining whether patients fit the recommended criteria for the procedure. Medico-legal requirements by the professional registration body, the Medical Radiation Practice Board of Australia (MRPBA), identify justification as an advocated and obligatory practice for radiographers. Yet, justification remains an inconsistent practice implemented amongst Australian radiographers. This review aims to identify associated barriers inhibiting the consistent practice of justification and the hesitance by radiographers in practicing justification responsibilities. It also recommends a change in workplace culture which encourages radiographers to accept a more autonomous role that cultivates critical thinking, reflection and research-informed decision making as justification will ultimately benefit patients. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  20. Radiographic aspects of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the miniature dachshund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirberger, R.M.; Lobetti, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    The thoracic radiographic changes of Pneumocystis carinii in 7 miniature Dachshunds were reviewed, The dogs were 7-12 months old and presented with polypnea, exercise intolerance and clinical signs suggestive of immune-incompetence. P. carinii pneumonia was diagnosed in all the dogs using transtracheal aspirate cytology and confirmed at postmortemin 3 dogs that died. Radiographically, diffuse pulmonary changes we represent and varied from a mild interstitial and bronchial pattern to an alveolar pattern. Radiographic evidence of cor pulmonale was present in 1 dog. The most severe radiographic changes were seen in 2 of the dogs that died

  1. Pulp polyp - A periapical lesion: Radiographic observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandagal V Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pulp polyp (PP is a chronic hyperplastic condition resulting in formation of granulation tissue and proliferative mass. The radiographic appearance of PP has innumerable presentations. Diagnosing and treatment planning of periapical lesions, heavily relies on the radiographic changes surrounding the root structures. Objective: To evaluate different radiographic periapical changes in clinically detected PP patients. Materials and Methods: Patients reporting to Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology and who were clinically diagnosed with PP by an oral diagnostician were subjected to radiographic examination. Digital intraoral periapical radiographs of 50 patients with PP were taken. Various periapical changes in the digital radiographs were recorded by a skilled oral radiologist. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS ver 17.0 and P-value was set at <0.05 as significant. Result: Periapical changes like periodontal space widening (PDLW, loss of lamina dura, periapical abscess, periapical granuloma, hypercementosis, condensing osteitis and root resorption were noted. Periodontal space widening was seen in all patients (100%, loss of lamina dura was noted in 72%, periapical rarefying osteitis in 56%, condensing osteitis in 8%, hypercementosis, periapical granuloma, and root resorption were seen in 4% of PP patients. Majority of PP were asymptomatic (66%. Pulp polyp was commonly seen in mandibular first molar followed by mandibular second molar and maxillary first molar. Statistically significant difference was noticed between periapical changes in PP patients (P value <0.0001. All PP patients showed definite periapical changes suggesting it to be a periapical lesion. Conclusion: Pulp polyp is confined to the pulpal portion of the tooth which, may or may not cause changes in periapical region. The results of the present study showed that majority of the PP patients were associated with definite periapical

  2. Radiological findings of chest in patients with chronic renal insufficiency submitted to hemodyalisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, M; Guerrisi, R; Vidiri, A; D' Angelo, A R

    1986-01-01

    111 radiographic findings of the chest of 58 patients with chronic renal insufficiency who underwent hemodyalisis are taken into consideration. The results show that the pulmonary congestion with 1 to 1 distribution and the increase of the heart volume are more frequently found. Also interstitial edema, calcification and pleura involvements are present in few cases. 18 refs.

  3. Radiographic indices for lumbar developmental spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Pui Yin Cheung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with developmental spinal stenosis (DSS are susceptible to developing symptomatic stenosis due to pre-existing narrowed spinal canals. DSS has been previously defined by MRI via the axial anteroposterior (AP bony spinal canal diameter. However, MRI is hardly a cost-efficient tool for screening patients. X-rays are superior due to its availability and cost, but currently, there is no definition of DSS based on plain radiographs. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop radiographic indices for diagnosing DSS. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 148 subjects consisting of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (patient group and asymptomatic subjects recruited openly from the general population (control group. Ethics approval was obtained from the local institutional review board. All subjects underwent MRI for diagnosing DSS and radiographs for measuring parameters used for creating the indices. All measurements were performed by two independent investigators, blinded to patient details. Intra- and interobserver reliability analyses were conducted, and only parameters with near perfect intraclass correlation underwent receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis to determine the cutoff values for diagnosing DSS using radiographs. Results Imaging parameters from a total of 66 subjects from the patient group and 82 asymptomatic subjects in the control group were used for analysis. ROC analysis suggested sagittal vertebral body width to pedicle width ratio (SBW:PW as having the strongest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DSS. Cutoff indices for SBW:PW were level-specific: L1 (2.0, L2 (2.0, L3 (2.2, L4 (2.2, L5 (2.5, and S1 (2.8. Conclusions This is the first study to define DSS on plain radiographs based on comparisons between a clinically relevant patient group and a control group. Individuals with DSS can be identified by a simple radiograph using a screening tool allowing for better

  4. Modeling dental radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Radiological Health has been actively collaborating with the Clinical Investigations Branch, NIDR, in applied research involving diagnostic use of ionizing radiation in dentistry. This work has centered on the search for alternatives to conventional radiographic systems in an attempt to improve diagnostic performance while reducing the required exposure. The basic approach involves analysis of factors limiting performance of properly defined diagnostic tasks and the modeling alternative systems with an eye toward increasing objective measures of performance. Previous collaborative work involved using a nonlinear model to compare various x-ray spectra. The data were expressed as brightness-contrast versus exposure for simulated tasks of clinical interest. This report supplements these findings by extending the number of parameters under investigation and modifying the mode of data display so that an actual radiographic image can be simulated on a television screen

  5. Reappearance of beriberi heart disease in Japan. A study of 23 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, C; Wakabayashi, A; Matsumura, T; Yui, Y

    1980-09-01

    Twenty-three Japanese patients with beriberi heart disease, 17 of them teenagers, were studied. The recent tendency for teenagers to take excessive sweet carbonated soft drinks, instant noodles and powermill-polished rice readily induces relative thiamine deficiency. A sudden increase in thiamine requirements due to strenuous exercise can result in overt beriberi heart disease. Alcohol had nothing to do with the development of the disease. Characteristic features commonly seen in teenage patients include peripheral edema, low peripheral vascular resistance, increased venous pressure enlarged heart, T wave abnormalities, hyperkinetic circulatory state and increased circulating blood volume. Thiamine deficiency was confirmed by a decrease in blood thiamine concentration, a decrease in erythrocyte transketolase activity and an increase in thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) effect. Improvement was rapidly achieved with thiamine administration, balanced nutrition and rest, especially in the teenage patients. Increased circulating blood volume was useful in differentiating beriberi heart disease from hyperthyroidism.

  6. Radiographic diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia: review of 60 cases in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbaig

    2004-06-01

    Sixty cases of diaphragmatic hernia in dogs and cats were radiologically reviewed and categorized by their characteristic radiographic signs. Any particular predilection for age, sex, or breed was not observed. Liver, stomach and small intestine were more commonly herniated. At least two radiographs, at different angles, were required for a valid diagnosis, because some radiographic signs were not visible in a single radiographic view and more clearly detectable in two radiographic views. In addition to previously reported radiographic signs for diaphragmatic hernia, we found that the location of the stomach axis and the displacement of tracheal and bronchial segments were also useful radiographic signs.

  7. Evaluation of the styloid process on digital panoramic radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    More Chandramani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The styloid process is an anatomical structure, whose clinical importance is not well understood. Proper clinical and radiographic evaluation can detect an elongated styloid process and calcification of the stylohyoid ligament. It has been reported that 2 - 28% of the general population show radiographic evidence of mineralization of a portion of the stylohyoid chain. The elongated styloid process may be symptomatic in many cases. Panoramic radiography is the best imaging modality to view the styloid process bilaterally. Aim: To assess the styloid process on digital panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 500 digital panoramic radiographs available in the archives of our department as soft copies. These radiographs were taken using a digital panoramic system. The radiographic length of the styloid process was measured on both sides using the measurement toolbars on the accompanying analysis software. For statistical analysis we used the unpaired t test, Chi-square test, and one-way ANOVA test, as necessary. Results: The average length of the left styloid was 25.41 ± 6.32 mm and that of the right styloid was 25.53 ± 6.62 mm. The length of both styloids increased with age and males had longer styloids than females. Elongated styloids were present in 19.4% of the panoramic radiographs. Langlais type I elongated styloids and a partial calcification pattern were more common than others. Conclusion: Panoramic radiography is useful for detection of an elongated styloid process and / or ossification of the stylohyoid ligament in patients with or without symptoms, and helps avoid a misdiagnosis of tonsillar pain or pain of dental, pharyngeal, or muscular origin.

  8. Radiographers' commitment to continuing professional development: A single-centre evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to examine radiographers' commitment to continuing professional development (CPD), and to ascertain what types of activities are preferred so a model for provision of departmental activities could be developed. Methods: An online survey was used to obtain information from all departmental radiographers regarding their commitment to CPD. Statistical analysis, using Spearman's Rho and Chi-Square test, was utilised to investigate any associations. Results: All radiographers (n = 57) were invited via email. A response rate of 67% (n = 38) prevailed. Radiographers feel CPD is important and a positive correlation existed with feelings regarding compulsory CPD (r value = .718, P value = .001). Thirty-four percent had logged the SOR-recommended twelve or more pieces of CPD in the last 2 years. One to three hours a month is the preferred amount of own time radiographers are willing to dedicate. Negative correlations exist between the amount of own time radiographers are willing to commit to CPD activities and their feelings regarding compulsory CPD (r value = −.419, P value = .009), and HCPC audit (r value = −.509, P value .001). Conclusion: Although radiographers recognise the importance of CPD many spend less than four hours of their own time a month on CPD. Departmental activities should be free, short lasting, lunchtime presentations with theory presentation that encourage interaction and discussion with inclusion of practical elements. Further research investigating the barriers that prevent radiographers from partaking in CPD and the causes for insufficient CPD records is recommended. - Highlights: • The large majority of radiographers feel CPD is important or very important to them. • The majority had positive opinions regarding compulsory CPD and HCPC audit. • 50% of radiographers commit less than 4 h of their own time to CPD. • As radiographers get older they log less CPD and commit less time to CPD.

  9. Cases report of ossifying fibroma showing various radiographic appearances in posterior mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Do; Oh, Seung Hwan; Son, Hyun Jin

    2010-01-01

    Common radiographic appearances of ossifying fibroma (OF) are well demarcated margin, radiolucent or mixed lesion. Lesions for the radiographic differential diagnosis with OF include fibrous dysplasia, focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. Other confusing lesions might be the mixed lesions such as calcifying odontogenic cyst, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, and benign cementoblastoma. We reported three cases of OF in posterior mandible. These cases showed a little distinguished radiographic features of OF and diagnosed from a combination of clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic information. We need to further refine radiographic and histopathological features of OF and other confusing lesions with literatures review because some cases of these lesions are not easily differentiated radiographically and histopathologically.

  10. Cases report of ossifying fibroma showing various radiographic appearances in posterior mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Do; Oh, Seung Hwan [School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyun Jin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Eulji University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Common radiographic appearances of ossifying fibroma (OF) are well demarcated margin, radiolucent or mixed lesion. Lesions for the radiographic differential diagnosis with OF include fibrous dysplasia, focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. Other confusing lesions might be the mixed lesions such as calcifying odontogenic cyst, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, and benign cementoblastoma. We reported three cases of OF in posterior mandible. These cases showed a little distinguished radiographic features of OF and diagnosed from a combination of clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic information. We need to further refine radiographic and histopathological features of OF and other confusing lesions with literatures review because some cases of these lesions are not easily differentiated radiographically and histopathologically.

  11. Effects of occupational stress and coping mechanisms adopted by radiographers in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashong, G.G.N.A.; Rogers, H.; Botwe, B.O.; Anim-Sampong, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that population of radiography staff within various hospitals in Ghana decreased by 30% in the last decade due to several reasons. One of such reasons understood to be related to stress and job satisfaction which affect work output. Purpose: To investigate the effects of occupational stress and the coping mechanisms adopted by radiographers in Ghana. Method: A descriptive survey using a five-point Likert-scale questionnaire with pre-coded responses was administered via email to respondents. Purposive sampling method was used to select 190 radiographers who work in hospitals in Ghana. Descriptive statistics was mainly used to analyse the data using SPSS Version 20. Results: Of a total 190 questionnaires sent, 122 were completed and returned giving a 64.3% response rate. Majority 78 (64%) of respondents were males and the predominant area of work was conventional radiography. Most radiographers revealed they were stressed with 63% indicating high/very high levels of stress. The consequent effects of stress on radiographers were sick absence, depression and job dissatisfaction. Most of the radiographers used primary interventions to cope with stress. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that most radiographers in Ghana are stressed. However, they cope well with problem-solving mechanisms. This suggests that the decrease in number of radiographers within various facilities in Ghana by 30% may not necessarily be caused by stress but other factors which need to be investigated. Nevertheless, occupational stress has an effect on radiographers' quality of working life and may directly impact on their behaviour during service delivery. - Highlights: • There is high level of occupational stress among Ghanaian Radiographers. • Some sources and causes of occupational stress among Ghanaian Radiographers were workload, poor pay and shortage of staff. • Job dissatisfaction, depression and sick absence were effects of occupational

  12. Limitations of radiographs in evaluating non-displaced osteochondral lesions of the talus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dheer, Sachin [Department of Radiology, Kennedy Health System, Cherry Hill, NJ (United States); Khan, Mustafa [University of Toledo Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Toledo, OH (United States); Zoga, Adam C.; Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate what limitations, if any, radiographs have in detecting and characterizing the morphology of non-displaced OCLTs (size, cystic change, fragmentation, and avascular necrosis [AVN]). Thirty-three OCLTs in 32 patients were reviewed in consensus by a board-certified, fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist and orthopedic surgeon, on radiographs and MRI examinations performed within 15 days of one another. Location, dimensions, and characteristics of the OCLT (fragmentation, bone marrow edema, cystic change, and necrosis) were documented on the radiographs and MRI examinations. There was an average of 7.5 days (range: 1-15 days) between the MRIs and radiographs. Eighteen (55%) medial and 15 (45%) lateral OCLTs were found; none was displaced. OCLTs were categorized into three groups: Group 1 - initially diagnosed with radiographs (4/33; 12%), Group 2 - diagnosed with radiographs only after MRI correlation (20/33; 61%), and Group 3 - not identifiable on radiographs despite MRI correlation (9/33; 27%). The dimensions of all of the lesions in Groups 1 and 2 were underestimated on radiographs. Only 1 of the 4 (25%) lesions in Group 1 and 1 of the 20 (5%) lesions in Group 2 could be measured in the anteroposterior (AP) dimension (using a lateral radiograph). The most common radiographic appearance of non-displaced OCLTs was an ''ill-defined'' lucency at the talar dome (20/33; 61%). Across all three groups, fragmentation, cystic change, and AVN were radiographically apparent in 3/10 (30%), 4/19 (21%), and 1/6 (17%) cases respectively. Compared with MRI, radiographs are limited in their evaluation of the size (particularly the AP dimension) and characteristics (fragmentation, cystic change, and AVN) of non-displaced OCLTs. The most common appearance of non-displaced OCLTs is an ''ill-defined'' lucency at the talar dome. When this appearance is also considered, the estimated retrospective sensitivity of radiographs

  13. The relationship of hip joint space to self reported hip pain. A survey of 4.151 subjects of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: the Osteoarthritis Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, Kjeld

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To evaluate the effect of pelvic orientation on measurements of hip joint space widths (JSW) in cadaver pelvic radiographs, thereby validating the pelvic radiographs of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: The Osteoarthritis Substudy (CCHS III) cohort of 4.152 subjects, and (2...... was significantly associated to self reported pain in or around the hip joint in both sexes. CONCLUSION: Measurements of minimum hip JSW did not seem to be significantly influenced by varying spatial orientation of the pelvis during X-ray recordings. An inclusion criteria of minimum JSW

  14. Radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Pearcy, E.A.; Conces, D.J. Jr.; Mathur, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 95 patients with the new diagnosis of atypical turberculosis were reviewed to determine if any significant differences between atypical tuberculosis and that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be discerned. Findings included upper lobe involvement in B4 of the 95 patients and cavities in 76, with nearly equal groups having no, moderate, or extensive surrounding alveolar disease. Nodules were common; in six patients a nodule was the sole manifestation of disease. Adenopathy was seen in 12 of the 95 patients, atlectasis in 45, pleural thickening in 90, and effusions in three. These radiographic findings did not allow the radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

  15. Skeletal changes mimicking intrathoracic disease on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelderen, WFC van

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Various chest radiographs are illustrated to demonstrate features where bony changes may mimic intrathoracic disease. To confirm the skeletal origin and nature, further conventional radiographs often suffice, and the need for CT or scintigraphy may therefore be obviated. At the time of presentation for radiography of the chest, further pertinent clinical details can be obtained from the patient by the department staff, as required. All previous radiographs and radiological reports should be readily available. In order to add to the educational value of the 13 cases illustrated, all are presented in quiz format, with the answers and further images included in the text.

  16. Radiographic appearance of the navicular bone in sound horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser-Hotz, B.; Ueltschi, G.

    1992-01-01

    Radiographs of the navicular bone in 523 sound horses were reviewed. Detailed evaluation criteria were used. The incidence of radiographic changes and variations in normal horses were recorded. Results were tested for right-left limb difference and for age relationship. Variation in shape and bone structure was commonly seen in the navicular bone. Radiographic changes with an incidence of less than 2% included flexor cortex defects and calcification on the flexor surface. Fragments at the distal navicular bone border, calcification in the impar ligament and enthesiophytes at the proximal border were radiographic findings with an incidence of 2% to 10%. Abnormal canals at the distal border were found in 11% horses. Elongation of the lateral proximal extremity was commonly found. The mean width of the flexor cortex was 3.6 mm

  17. A survey to assess audit mechanisms practised by skeletal reporting radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, H.C.; Manning, D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the role of plain film reporting radiographers and the methods they employ to evaluate the quality of their performance. Method: The survey was conducted in 2003. Questionnaires were sent, via the universities, to radiographers who had registered on a post-graduate musculoskeletal image interpretation course at a University in England since their introduction (9 years earlier). Results: The response rate was 37% (n = 112). Sixty-four percent of the trained reporting radiographers surveyed are creating independent reports on musculoskeletal images and an additional 15% contribute to a double reporting system. Twenty-one percent of the reporting radiographers in this study are not undertaking audit of their practice. Of the 79% who are participating in audit programmes the variety of methods being used are widespread. In order to protect against litigation, 19% of reporting radiographers have a portfolio of evidence supporting their competency; 71% have a specific job description for their advanced role; 73% of reporting radiographers are members of a trade union; and 82% of reporting radiographers work to a departmental protocol. Conclusion: The majority of reporting radiographers are participating in some form of audit. However, it is imperative that the sizeable minority who are not should initiate this process promptly. It is important that national standards are set so that these audit processes become embedded into practice for the protection of both the patient and radiographer. The inconsistency shown with regard to audit processes and protection against litigation suggests that further clarification is required from the professional bodies

  18. A survey to assess audit mechanisms practised by skeletal reporting radiographers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.C. [Directorate of Radiology, Royal Liverpool University Hospital Trust, Prescot Street, Liverpool L7 8XP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: helen.jones@rlbuht.nhs.uk; Manning, D. [School of Medical Imaging Sciences, St. Martin' s College, Lancaster LA1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the role of plain film reporting radiographers and the methods they employ to evaluate the quality of their performance. Method: The survey was conducted in 2003. Questionnaires were sent, via the universities, to radiographers who had registered on a post-graduate musculoskeletal image interpretation course at a University in England since their introduction (9 years earlier). Results: The response rate was 37% (n = 112). Sixty-four percent of the trained reporting radiographers surveyed are creating independent reports on musculoskeletal images and an additional 15% contribute to a double reporting system. Twenty-one percent of the reporting radiographers in this study are not undertaking audit of their practice. Of the 79% who are participating in audit programmes the variety of methods being used are widespread. In order to protect against litigation, 19% of reporting radiographers have a portfolio of evidence supporting their competency; 71% have a specific job description for their advanced role; 73% of reporting radiographers are members of a trade union; and 82% of reporting radiographers work to a departmental protocol. Conclusion: The majority of reporting radiographers are participating in some form of audit. However, it is imperative that the sizeable minority who are not should initiate this process promptly. It is important that national standards are set so that these audit processes become embedded into practice for the protection of both the patient and radiographer. The inconsistency shown with regard to audit processes and protection against litigation suggests that further clarification is required from the professional bodies.

  19. Stabilized radiographic scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzi, M.B.

    1979-01-01

    A stable composition useful in preparation of technetium-99m-based radiographic scanning agents has been developed. The composition contains a stabilizing amount of gentisate stabilizer selected from gentisic acid and its soluble pharmaceutically-acceptable salts and esthers. (E.G.)

  20. An evaluation of musculoskeletal discomfort experience by radiographers performing mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, A.G.; May, J

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether breast screening radiographers experience any problems of musculoskeletal discomfort, and if so the nature and extent of these problems. The study was then further extended to investigate and determine possible occupational, causal or contributory factors, and to suggest recommendations to help alleviate any discomfort. To investigate this problem five main approaches were undertaken. These consisted of; a national survey, an observational study, the comparison of the physical measurements of the mammography units with anthropometric data, a detailed task analysis, and a body mapping study. The national survey set out to determine if the nature and frequency of such problems were higher in mammography than in other areas of radiography or in the general population. Additionally, comparisons were made with non-radiographic staff working at the same breast screening centres. Video recordings of radiographers performing breast screening were also made and posture analysis performed on these data. A detailed task analysis was conducted to identify interaction points and possible problems between the radiographer and the equipment which she is required to use. Physical measurements of the mammography units were made and compared with anthropometric measurements and guidelines. The body mapping study measured the build up of discomfort throughout the working day on several different mammography units. The results from the survey questionnaire indicated that some breast screening radiographers do experience musculoskeletal problems, and that these are different in nature and prevalence from the musculoskeletal discomfort reported by the two control groups. The prevalence of back pain reported by radiographers undertaking mammography was higher than that present in the normal population. No comparison could be made with other body areas as data regarding other types of musculoskeletal discomfort in the general population are

  1. A full-mouth radiographic survey of periodontal bone loss in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlica, Z.; Erjavec, V.; Erzen, D.; Petelin, M.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between clinically observed periodontal disease indicators and radiographic findings using fullmouth radiographs in poodles. The dogs were divided into three groups according to their age. Upper and lower incisors, canines and premolars/molars were used for clinical and radiographic analyses. The prevalence and severity of periodontal disease increased with age. In addition, the deepest pockets and most severe bone loss were found around the canine teeth. The values obtained from radiographic analysis correlated well with clinical measurements. Fullmouth radiographic surveys show clearly the alveolar bone level around the whole dentition of dogs. It should be performed prior to the institution of any treatment

  2. Evaluation of contrast in duplicated radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunthy, K.H.; Weinberg, R.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation evaluated changes in the contrast of duplicated radiographs made at different ultraviolet light exposures. Increasing ultraviolet light exposure had different effects on the duplicates of originals of different background densities. When correctly exposed, a duplicate radiograph enhanced contrast. When originals had the same contrast but different background densities, their duplicates did not have the same contrast. It was not possible to duplicate accurately all the different contrasts measured on an original. It was possible, however, to produce duplicates with all contrasts greater than those of the original

  3. An evaluation of radiographer performed and interpreted barium swallows and meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, E.E.; Nightingale, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether radiographers are able to perform and interpret barium swallows and meals (BSM) to an acceptable standard. Materials and methods: A retrospective audit was performed of all radiographer-managed BSMs over a 4-year period in an acute hospital. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse patient demographics, radiation doses, referral sources, and imaging findings. Radiographer reports were compared with radiologist reports assumed to be the reference standard, and correlated with patient outcomes via electronic record searches and case note scrutiny. Reporting accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated. Results: Three radiographers performed a total of 962 BSMs in the 4-year audit period, including a varied and complex case-mix. Only 13 (0.01%) cases were abandoned due to technical reasons, with all other examinations of diagnostic quality. Although radiation dose levels were initially variable, following the installation of modern fluoroscopy equipment they remained comfortably within the national and regional diagnostic reference levels. Consultant radiologists verified the majority of the radiographer reports, with the most experienced radiographer independently reporting 230 cases (24%). Follow-up of patient outcome was possible in 935 cases. The overall radiographer accuracy based on the 935 cases was 98.9%, sensitivity 98%, and specificity 98.9%. Conclusions: Appropriately trained radiographers are able to perform and interpret BSM examinations to a very high standard.

  4. Reducing dose in paediatric CT: a preliminary study of radiographers' knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heagney, J.; Lewis, S.; Chaffey, C.; Howlett, G.; Moran, A.; McLean, D.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the responses of Australian radiographers in comparison with current literature on paediatric protocols and scanning recommendations in order to determine how and if paediatric Computed Tomography (CT) exposure reductions are taking place within Medical Imaging Departments. Subjects and Methods: The method involved a dual format; consisting of surveying 30 CT radiographers, and additionally, interviewing 5 senior CT radiographers. Of the 30 surveys completed, one was completed by a PDY radiographer, 7 by CT Senior radiographers and 22 by CT radiographers. The survey contained a range of questions about appropriate paediatric CT scanning parameters and protocols. Five CT Seniors were interviewed to ascertain the current level and opinion of training in paediatric protocols, in-house educational programs and the implementation of radiation dose saving parameters. Radiographers demonstrated reasonable ability to identify suitable paediatric protocols and believed the in-house CT protocols resident to their medical imaging department to be adequate, despite many utilising exposures higher than those from recommended literature. The interviews revealed that no further training in CT paediatric dose reduction was currently available, however survey responses indicated that further training would be beneficial. This study demonstrates that radiographers are aware of the need to reduce exposure parameters for paediatric CT and tend to follow protocols in place within their workplace, regardless of suitability and patient needs. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  5. Reducing dose in paediatric CT: a preliminary study of radiographers' Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heagney, Jillian; Lewis, Sarah; Chaffey, Clare; Howlett, Genevieve; Moran, Alexander; McLean, Donald

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the responses of Australian radiographers in comparison with current literature on paediatric protocols and scanning recommendations in order to determine how and if paediatric Computed Tomography (CT) exposure reductions are taking place within Medical Imaging Departments. Subjects and Methods: The method involved a dual format; consisting of surveying 30 CT radiographers, and additionally, interviewing 5 senior CT radiographers. Of the 30 surveys completed, one was completed by a PDY radiographer, 7 by CT Senior radiographers and 22 by CT radiographers. The survey contained a range of questions about appropriate paediatric CT scanning parameters and protocols. Five CT Seniors were interviewed to ascertain the current level and opinion of training in paediatric protocols, in-house educational programs and the implementation of radiation dose saving parameters. Radiographers demonstrated reasonable ability to identify suitable paediatric protocols and believed the in-house CT protocols resident to their medical imaging department to be adequate, despite many utilising exposures higher than those from recommended literature. The interviews revealed that no further training in CT paediatric dose reduction was currently available, however survey responses indicated that further training would be beneficial. This study demonstrates that radiographers are aware of the need to reduce exposure parameters for paediatric CT and tend to follow protocols in place within their workplace, regardless of suitability and patient needs Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  6. Distortion of digital panoramic radiographs used for implant site assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayyan Abdulhamid Kayal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study is conducted to determine the amount of distortion of digital panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods: Panoramic radiographs of all patients who received dental implants in the years 2012 and 2013 were selected from the records at the faculty of dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Radiographs were analyzed using the R4 Kodak Software for linear measurements of implants length and width. The measurements were compared to the actual size of the implant, and the amount of distortion was calculated. Results: A total of 169 implants were analyzed. Horizontally, there was a statistically significant increase of 0.4 mm in width in the radiographic measurement compared to the actual size in the incisor region. Vertically, the sample overall exhibited a decrease by 0.4 mm compared to the actual size. Incisors had the highest difference with a decrease of 1.7 mm in the radiographic measurements compared to actual size. The highest distortion was found in the incisor region for both diameter and length (1.1 and 0.86, respectively. Conclusion: Digital panoramic radiographs show minimal to no distortion. The highest distortion is found in the anterior area.

  7. A novel tool for automated evaluation of radiographic weld images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, C.; Venkatraman, B.; Jayakumar, T.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Raj, B.

    2004-01-01

    Radiography is one of the oldest and the most widely used NDT method for the detection of volumetric defects in welds and castings. Once a radiograph of a weld or a casting or an assembly is taken, the radiographer examines the same. The task of the radiographer consists of identifying the defects and quantitatively evaluating the same based on codes and specifications. Radiographic interpretation primarily depends on the expertise of the individual radiographer. To overcome the subjectivity involved in human interpretation, it is thus desirable to develop a computer based automated system to aid in the interpretation of radiographs. Towards this goal, the authors have developed a flowchart chalking out the various stages involved. Typical weld images of tube to tubesheet weld joints were digitised using high resolution digitiser. The images were segmented and 52 invariant moments were computed to be used as features. The results of these are presented in this paper. Once the features (invariant moments) are extracted and ranked, a neural network classifier based on error back-propagation has to classify the (top ranking) features and evaluate the image for acceptance or rejection. (author)

  8. Evaluation of a standardised radiographic technique of the equine hoof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummer, M.; Lischer, C.; Ohlerth, S.; Vargas, J.; Auer, J.

    2004-01-01

    Radiography of the equine hoof is often used to obtain a diagnosis. Quantitative interpretation, especially for research purposes requires high quality and accuracy of radiographs. The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate a radiographic technique for the lateromedial (LM) and the dorsopalmar (DP) view of the equine hoof. Ten radiographs for each view from one cadaver limb and from both front feet in a standing horse were taken in order to assess repeatability of the radiographic technique. The method requires easy to use adjustable and portable equipment and strictly defined external radio opaque markers on the hoof capsule. The digitalised radiographs were processed and analysed with the software package Metron PXTM, measuring 13 parameters in the LM view and 10 parameters in the DP view, respectively. Results show that with few exceptions measurements of these parameters revealed a coefficient of variation that was smaller than 0.05. It was concluded that this easy to use standardised radiographic technique ensures excellent accuracy and repeatability for both the LM and DP view. Hence, this method provides an adequate tool for quantitative assessment of the equine hoof, inter- and intraindividually

  9. Chest radiographic findings in neurotuberculosis without pulmonary signs and symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb, S.; Badshah, M.; Khan, B.R.S.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the chest radiographic findings in patients of adult neurotuberculosis, with no pulmonary signs and symptoms. A total of 100 patients fulfilling pre-defined criteria of neurotuberculosis were included. Chest radiographic (CXR) evidence of pulmonary TB was looked for in those patients and its frequency, pattern and association with the clinical grades at presentation was determined by using Chi-square test. Out of the 100 patients of neurotuberculosis, with no clinical evidence of pulmonary TB, radiographic evidence of pulmonary TB was seen in only 30% patients. The predominant patterns on CXR were apical infiltration (26.6%), military mottling (20%) and hilar enlargement (16.6%). Positive CXR was found in 16.7% patients in clinical grade I and 40% and 43.3% in patients in grade II and III respectively. There was a strong association of grade II and grade III with positive chest radiographic findings (p= 0.03). Patients of neurotuberculosis may have chest radiographic evidence of pulmonary TB even in the absence of pulmonary signs and symptoms at presentation. There is a strong association of clinical grade II and grade III with positive chest radiographic findings. (author)

  10. Radiographic measurement of the cardiothoracic ratio in pet macaques from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillaci, Michael A. [Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada)], E-mail: schillaci@utsc.utoronto.ca; Parish, Stephanie [Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada); Jones-Engel, Lisa [National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, 1705 N.E. Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The relative size of the heart, as measured by the cardiothoracic ratio, is often used as an index of ventricular hypertrophy-an important measure of myocardial pathophysiology in human primates. Despite its widespread use in human medicine, use of the cardiothoracic ratio in nonhuman primate veterinary medicine has been poorly documented. This report describes the results of our radiographic study of the cardiothoracic ratio in a sample of pet monkeys from Sulawesi, Indonesia. We assessed the effects of age and sex on cardiothoracic ratios, and compared our estimates with those presented in the literature for the Formosan macaque (Macaca cyclopis). Our results indicated a significant difference between the Sulawesi macaque species groupings in cardiothoracic ratios. Sex and age-related differences were not significant. Comparisons of cardiothoracic ratios with published ratios indicated similarity between M. cyclopis and Macaca nigra, but not between M. cyclopis and Macaca tonkeana.

  11. Radiographic measurement of the cardiothoracic ratio in pet macaques from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, Michael A.; Parish, Stephanie; Jones-Engel, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The relative size of the heart, as measured by the cardiothoracic ratio, is often used as an index of ventricular hypertrophy-an important measure of myocardial pathophysiology in human primates. Despite its widespread use in human medicine, use of the cardiothoracic ratio in nonhuman primate veterinary medicine has been poorly documented. This report describes the results of our radiographic study of the cardiothoracic ratio in a sample of pet monkeys from Sulawesi, Indonesia. We assessed the effects of age and sex on cardiothoracic ratios, and compared our estimates with those presented in the literature for the Formosan macaque (Macaca cyclopis). Our results indicated a significant difference between the Sulawesi macaque species groupings in cardiothoracic ratios. Sex and age-related differences were not significant. Comparisons of cardiothoracic ratios with published ratios indicated similarity between M. cyclopis and Macaca nigra, but not between M. cyclopis and Macaca tonkeana.

  12. Is the owner entitled to radiographs taken of his animal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung, K.

    1990-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany a veterinarian owns radiographs taken of animals in his practice. They have to be filed like any other results of diagnostic procedures. This is important, because evidence is required in the case of a law suit. On the other hand, it has to be stressed that taking radiographs is the subject of a free contract between owner and veterinarian. So it is possible to take the radiographs solely with the purpose of giving them to the owner, who may have them analysed by any other veterinarian of his choice. This is especially true in hip radiographs, which are evaluated and filed by an adjudicator of the breed association. In any case the radiologist has the obligation to lend the radiographs to another veterinarian on request for inspection. The second veterinarian has to give them back as soon as possible

  13. A high-accuracy image registration algorithm using phase-only correlation for dental radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koichi; Nikaido, Akira; Aoki, Takafumi; Kosuge, Eiko; Kawamata, Ryota; Kashima, Isamu

    2008-01-01

    Dental radiographs have been used for the accurate assessment and treatment of dental diseases. The nonlinear deformation between two dental radiographs may be observed, even if they are taken from the same oral regions of the subject. For an accurate diagnosis, the complete geometric registration between radiographs is required. This paper presents an efficient dental radiograph registration algorithm using Phase-Only Correlation (POC) function. The use of phase components in 2D (two-dimensional) discrete Fourier transforms of dental radiograph images makes possible to achieve highly robust image registration and recognition. Experimental evaluation using a dental radiograph database indicates that the proposed algorithm exhibits efficient recognition performance even for distorted radiographs. (author)

  14. Fluorine-18 heart dosimetry in myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, Janine M.; Trindade, Bruno; Campos, Tarcísio P.R., E-mail: janine.toledo@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências e Técnicas Nucleares

    2017-07-01

    This paper conducts a recalling in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) followed by a spatial dosimetric investigation of the Fluorine-18 distributed at the myocardium by self-absorption of the heart uptake. Methods and Results: Radiological data manipulation was prepared and a computational heart voxelized model was assembled. A set of images from the abdominal aorta and angiotomography of the thorax was set up providing anatomic and functional information for heart modeling in SISCODES code. A homogeneous distribution of fluorine-18 was assumed into the heart myocardial wall. MCNP – Monte Carlo Code was used to provide the photon transport into the heart model taken in consideration the interactions into the tissues. The spatial dose distribution and histogram dose versus volume are presented. An analytical alternative model was addressed to the data validation. The present developed tools can produce spatial dose distribution in MPI at heart. Specially, the dosimetry performed elucidates imparted dose in the myocardial muscle per unit of injected Fluorine-18 activity by self-absorption of the heart uptake, which can contribute to future deterministic effect investigations. (author)