WorldWideScience

Sample records for radioecological reservation radiatsionnaya

  1. Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, W.

    1982-07-01

    In this review, the basic concepts necessary for a complete understanding of ecology and radioecology are initially outlined. This is followed by an insight into the natural radiation doses of individual components of an ecosystem. The behaviour of radionuclides in terrestrial and aquatic food chains is described and followed, finally, by the presentation of a number of radioecological models. (MG) [de

  2. Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's Radioecology programme are: (1) to evaluate, based on laboratory and field experiments, the mechanisms and dynamic (fluxes) of radionuclide transfers in the biosphere, considering all factors affecting the transfer parameters and their variability; (2) to advise on appropriate countermeasures and remediation options to reduce public exposure to artificial and man-enhanced natural radioactivity and to evaluate their feasibility, cost effectiveness and sustainable character; (3) to provide information to national and international authorities to enable these to assess the consequences of routine and accidental releases for populations and to select the most adequate mitigation actions; (4) to educate professionals, students and the public on different aspects of radioecology through lectures, conferences and brochures. Main achievements in 1997 are reported

  3. Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, H.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's Radioecology programme are: (1) to evaluate, based on laboratory and field experiments, the mechanisms and dynamic (fluxes) of radionuclide transfers in the biosphere, considering all factors affecting the transfer parameters and their variability; (2) to develop and optimise models to predict the fate of radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) to advise on appropriate countermeasures and remediation options to reduce public exposure to artificial and technologically-enhanced natural radioactivity and to evaluate the feasibility, cost effectiveness and sustainable character of these options; (4) to provide information to national and international authorities to enable these to assess the consequences of routine and accidental releases for populations and to select the most adequate mitigation actions. Main achievements in 2000 are reported

  4. Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, H

    2001-04-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's Radioecology programme are: (1) to evaluate, based on laboratory and field experiments, the mechanisms and dynamic (fluxes) of radionuclide transfers in the biosphere, considering all factors affecting the transfer parameters and their variability; (2) to develop and optimise models to predict the fate of radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) to advise on appropriate countermeasures and remediation options to reduce public exposure to artificial and technologically-enhanced natural radioactivity and to evaluate the feasibility, cost effectiveness and sustainable character of these options; (4) to provide information to national and international authorities to enable these to assess the consequences of routine and accidental releases for populations and to select the most adequate mitigation actions. Main achievements in 2000 are reported.

  5. Radioecological aspects of the consequence of contamination of the Poles'e reserve territory. Chapter 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunin, V.F.; Parejko, O.A.; Odintsova, T.M.; Voronetskij, N.N.; Tyshkevich, V.E.

    1998-01-01

    The characteristic of populations of wild ungulate animals, predators and some other animals in the radionuclide contamination conditions in the 30-km zone of the Chernobyl NPP accident are presented. The Poles'e reserve is a unique territory for the research not only the effects of external and internal irradiation but the influence of second radioecological factors such as diminution of anthropological load and conducting of safeguard regime too. The estimation of structure and dynamic of populations of different animals in the Poles'e reserve is necessary to the understanding of adaptation process in new conditions of inhabitancy and for elaboration of conception of populations management in similar situations

  6. Dynamics of radionuclide accumulation at amphibians and reptiles in the Poles'e state radioecological reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novitskij, R.V.

    1998-01-01

    It was studied the peculiarity of the radionuclide intake to organism of amphibians and reptiles in the Poles'e radioecological reserve in 1997. The radioactive contamination level of investigated area was from 15 to 40 Ci/km 2 . It was measured 38 samples (26 for amphibians and 12 for reptiles) from points with background gamma-irradiation from 35 to 800 micro R/h. For the last eleven years of investigation it was revealed the total tendency to reduction of level of gamma-radioactive accumulation in 18,8-42,6 times for amphibians and in 2,8-52,5 times for reptiles

  7. Influence of elevated radionuclide contamination on Natural Plant Polessky State Radioecological Reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, N.; Matsko, V.; Zhebrakova, I.; Montik, T.

    1998-01-01

    A group of meadow dominants was selected - representatives of the families Gramineae, Compositae, Primulaceae, Rosaceae, in which the 137 Cs migration from soil to overgrown phytomass relates closely with the sum of atmospheric precipitations. The fact has to be taken into account that in the conditions of chronic irradiation, the vegetation of the majority of meadow dominants (representatives of families of Gramineae and Leguminosae) is completed by the formation of valued seed posterity able to produce a new generation. The radiological situation in meadow grassland was evaluated in the territory of the Polessky State Radioecological Reserve. In a 9-year population monitoring experiment it was found that the radiosensitivity of different plants species was different due to the different specificity of the genetic systems and bioecological peculiarities of the species. The plant species with a narrow ecological amplitude, high ploidy, apomictic breeding are the most radiosensitive, as well as the plants which grow in Southern Belarus as a limit of their natural dissemination. Decrease in number was noted for the majority of such species, or elimination from plants communities. The anthropogenic load removal from the evacuation territories followed by the radical phytocenoses reconstruction is of ecological significance as the ionising radiation effect. It may be inferred that long-time chronic action of radionuclides on plants in the fallout zone will depend on specific features of their accumulation by some plant species, the age related radiosensitivity and some other factors, associated with their growing conditions such as soil types, forms of radionuclide fallout, chemical and physical effect

  8. Transformation of natural complexes, conservation of biodiversity and ecological management of the Polessky radio-ecological nature reserve territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslovskij, O.M.; Rykovskij, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of mechanisms of radionuclide contamination influence on natural complexes after the Chernobyl diaster showed that the contamination level is not dangerous for the majority of plant and animal species within the larger part of 30km zone and outside it. Medical aspects are discussed in another article. The nature as a whole has coped with the negative influence of the Chernobyl disaster. At the same time natural complexes of the Polessky State Radio-Ecological Nature Reserve (PSRENR) have transformed after the removal of antropogenic stress. Different succession changes take place, biodivesity has sharply increased. It allows us to consider this territory as one of the most important nature protection objects nor only in Belarus but also in East Europe

  9. 10 years anniversary of the Poles'e state radioecological reserve (collected articles)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfenov, V.I.

    1998-01-01

    The results of long time investigations of radionuclide contamination dynamics of soils, flora and fauna conducted by research workers of the reserve and National Academy of Sciences of Belarus on the territory of the reserve are offered. The different aspects of plant growth and animal behaviour in new ecological conditions are estimated

  10. Radioecological sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Brenda J.; Strand, Per; Assimakopoulos, Panayotis

    2003-01-01

    After the release of radionuclide into the environment it is important to be able to readily identify major routes of radiation exposure, the most highly exposed individuals or populations and the geographical areas of most concern. Radioecological sensitivity can be broadly defined as the extent to which an ecosystem contributes to an enhanced radiation exposure to Man and biota. Radioecological sensitivity analysis integrates current knowledge on pathways, spatially attributes the underlying processes determining transfer and thereby identifies the most radioecologically sensitive areas leading to high radiation exposure. This identifies where high exposure may occur and why. A framework for the estimation of radioecological sensitivity with respect to humans is proposed and the various indicators by which it can be considered have been identified. These are (1) aggregated transfer coefficients (Tag), (2) action (and critical) loads, (3) fluxes and (4) individual exposure of humans. The importance of spatial and temporal consideration of all these outputs is emphasized. Information on the extent of radionuclide transfer and exposure to humans at different spatial scales is needed to reflect the spatial differences which can occur. Single values for large areas, such as countries, can often mask large variation within the country. Similarly, the relative importance of different pathways can change with time and therefore assessments of radiological sensitivity are needed over different time periods after contamination. Radioecological sensitivity analysis can be used in radiation protection, nuclear safety and emergency preparedness when there is a need to identify areas that have the potential of being of particular concern from a risk perspective. Prior identification of radioecologically sensitive areas and exposed individuals improve the focus of emergency preparedness and planning, and contribute to environmental impact assessment for future facilities. The

  11. Tropical radioecology

    CERN Document Server

    Baxter, M

    2012-01-01

    Tropical Radioecology is a guide to the wide range of scientific practices and principles of this multidisciplinary field. It brings together past and present studies in the tropical and sub-tropical areas of the planet, highlighting the unique aspects of tropical systems. Until recently, radioecological models for tropical environments have depended upon data derived from temperate environments, despite the differences of these regions in terms of biota and abiotic conditions. Since radioactivity can be used to trace environmental processes in humans and other biota, this book offers examples of studies in which radiotracers have been used to assess biokinetics in tropical biota. Features chapters, co-authored by world experts, that explain the origins, inputs, distribution, behaviour, and consequences of radioactivity in tropical and subtropical systems. Provides comprehensive lists of relevant data and identifies current knowledge gaps to allow for targeted radioecological research in the future. Integrate...

  12. Conference on radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    32 abstracts of contributions presented at the conference and covering all aspects of radioecology are included. The lecturers were mainly from Czechoslovakia; contributions from the USSR, France, Belgium, Hungary, Bulgaria, etc., however, were also presented. (P.A.)

  13. Advances in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Paz, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    Radioecology or the study of the relationship between living things and radioactive environments becomes important in order to understand and predict environmental impact and to safeguard populations from any hazard arising from radioactive discharge. Assessment of transfer coefficients, soil plant transfer factors, field experiments, transfer factors in the aquatic and marine ecosystem and modeling of environmental transfer are fully discussed. The future trends and needs of radioecology are given. (ELC)

  14. The Radioecology Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Catherine L.; Beresford, Nicholas A.; Patel, Sabera; Wells, Claire; Howard, Brenda J. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Mora, Juan Carlos; Real, Almudena [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida complutense 22, Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Hinton, Thomas [IRSN-Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92260 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Vesterbacka, Pia; Muikku, Maarit; Outola, Iisa [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FI-00881 Helsinki (Finland); Skuterud, Lavrans; AlbumYtre-Eide, Martin [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini Naeringspark 13, Oesteraas, 1332 (Norway); Bradshaw, Clare; Stark, Karolina; Jaeschke, Ben [Stockholms Universitet, Universitetsvaegen 10, Stockholm, 10691 (Sweden); Oughton, Deborah; Skipperud, Lindis [NMBU Norwegian University of Life Science P.O. Box 5003N-1432 Aas, Oslo (Norway); Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Vanhoudt, Nathalie [SCK.CEN, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Avenue Herrmann-Debroux 40, BE-1160 Brussels (Belgium); Willrodt, Christine; Steiner, Martin [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Willy-Brandt-Strasse 5, 38226 Salzgitter (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The Radioecology Exchange (www.radioecology-exchange.org) was created in 2011 under the EU FP7 STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology) network of excellence. The project aims to integrate the research efforts on radioecology of nine European organisations into a sustainable network. The web site (together with associated Twitter feeds and Facebook page) currently provides the gateway to project outputs and other on-line radiation protection and radioecological resources. In 2013, the EU FP7 COMET (Coordination and implementation of a pan-European instrument for radioecology) project commenced; it aims to strengthen research on the impact of radiation on man and the environment. COMET includes the STAR partners with the addition of one Japanese and two Ukrainian research institutes. As STAR and COMET interact closely together and with the European Radioecology Alliance (www.er-alliance.org/), the Radioecology Exchange will be modified to become an international 'hub' for information related to radioecology. Project specific information will be hosted on separate web sites www.star-radioecology.org and www.comet-radioecology.org. This paper will present an overview of the resources hosted on the Radioecology Exchange inviting other scientists to contribute. Highlighted aspects of the site include: Social media (News blog, Twitter, Facebook) - Items announcing project outputs, training courses, jobs, studentships etc. Virtual laboratory - Information which encourages integration through joint research and integrated use of data and sample materials. These pages will focus on three categories: (1) Methodological: descriptions and video clips of commonly used analytical methods and protocols and the procedures used in STAR and COMET; (2) Informative: databases made available by STAR/COMET partners together with details of sample archives held. Fact-sheets on radio-ecologically important radionuclides and 'topical descriptions' which show absorbed

  15. The Radioecology Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Catherine L.; Beresford, Nicholas A.; Patel, Sabera; Wells, Claire; Howard, Brenda J. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Mora, Juan Carlos; Real, Almudena [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida complutense 22, Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Hinton, Thomas [IRSN-Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92260 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Vesterbacka, Pia; Muikku, Maarit; Outola, Iisa [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FI-00881 Helsinki (Finland); Skuterud, Lavrans; AlbumYtre-Eide, Martin [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini Naeringspark 13, Oesteraas, 1332 (Norway); Bradshaw, Clare; Stark, Karolina; Jaeschke, Ben [Stockholms Universitet, Universitetsvaegen 10, Stockholm, 10691 (Sweden); Oughton, Deborah; Skipperud, Lindis [NMBU Norwegian University of Life Science P.O. Box 5003N-1432 Aas, Oslo (Norway); Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Vanhoudt, Nathalie [SCK.CEN, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Avenue Herrmann-Debroux 40, BE-1160 Brussels (Belgium); Willrodt, Christine; Steiner, Martin [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Willy-Brandt-Strasse 5, 38226 Salzgitter (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The Radioecology Exchange (www.radioecology-exchange.org) was created in 2011 under the EU FP7 STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology) network of excellence. The project aims to integrate the research efforts on radioecology of nine European organisations into a sustainable network. The web site (together with associated Twitter feeds and Facebook page) currently provides the gateway to project outputs and other on-line radiation protection and radioecological resources. In 2013, the EU FP7 COMET (Coordination and implementation of a pan-European instrument for radioecology) project commenced; it aims to strengthen research on the impact of radiation on man and the environment. COMET includes the STAR partners with the addition of one Japanese and two Ukrainian research institutes. As STAR and COMET interact closely together and with the European Radioecology Alliance (www.er-alliance.org/), the Radioecology Exchange will be modified to become an international 'hub' for information related to radioecology. Project specific information will be hosted on separate web sites www.star-radioecology.org and www.comet-radioecology.org. This paper will present an overview of the resources hosted on the Radioecology Exchange inviting other scientists to contribute. Highlighted aspects of the site include: Social media (News blog, Twitter, Facebook) - Items announcing project outputs, training courses, jobs, studentships etc. Virtual laboratory - Information which encourages integration through joint research and integrated use of data and sample materials. These pages will focus on three categories: (1) Methodological: descriptions and video clips of commonly used analytical methods and protocols and the procedures used in STAR and COMET; (2) Informative: databases made available by STAR/COMET partners together with details of sample archives held. Fact-sheets on radio-ecologically important radionuclides and 'topical descriptions' which show absorbed dose estimations for

  16. Engineering radioecology: Methodological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechaev, A.F.; Projaev, V.V.; Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The term ''radioecology'' has been widely recognized in scientific and technical societies. At the same time, this scientific school (radioecology) does not have a precise/generally acknowledged structure, unified methodical basis, fixed subjects of investigation, etc. In other words, radioecology is a vast, important but rather amorphous conglomerate of various ideas, amalgamated mostly by their involvement in biospheric effects of ionizing radiation and some conceptual stereotypes. This paradox was acceptable up to a certain time. However, with the termination of the Cold War and because of remarkable political changes in the world, it has become possible to convert the problem of environmental restoration from the scientific sphere in particularly practical terms. Already the first steps clearly showed an imperfection of existing technologies, managerial and regulatory schemes; lack of qualified specialists, relevant methods and techniques; uncertainties in methodology of decision-making, etc. Thus, building up (or maybe, structuring) of special scientific and technological basis, which the authors call ''engineering radioecology'', seems to be an important task. In this paper they endeavored to substantiate the last thesis and to suggest some preliminary ideas concerning the subject matter of engineering radioecology

  17. Radioecology. University textbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This textbook of radioecology for university students consists of next chapters: (1) Radioecology as special part of ecology; (2) Radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) Radioactivity of atmosphere an factors influenced its value; (4) Radioactivity of waters and factors influenced its value; (5) Radioactivity of soil and its connection with mechanical structure and chemical composition of soil as well ass with used agricultural-technical and agricultural-chemical procedures; (6) Radioactivity of plants and factors influenced its value; (7) Radioactivity of animals and animal organs and factors influenced its value; (8) Ionisation radiation and human organism. Radioactivity of human tissues; (9) Behaviour of individual groups of radionuclide in the environment; (10) Determination of radionuclides in components of the environment; (11) Radioactive wastes; (12) Nullification of nuclear reactors; (13) Radionuclides in medicine; (14) Radionuclides in vegetal production and food processing; (15) Safety of work in nuclear scientific and technological disciplines; (16) Assessment and regulation of radiation risks for the environment

  18. FGI - Programme 2: RADIOECOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville-Cavelin, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, B.P. 17, F - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Biesold, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH, GRS, Schwertnergasse 1, D - 50667 Koeln (Germany); Chabanyuk, V. [Radioactive Waste and Radioecology, Department Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Chernobylsk (Ukraine)

    2003-07-01

    The main purpose of the RADIOECOLOGY Program focuses on studying the radioecological consequences of the accident mainly in the Kyiv, Zhytomyr regions of Ukraine, Gomel, Mogilev regions of Belarus and Bryansk, Kaluga regions of Russia. The results of solutions of tasks presented below are integrated into the geographic and technical Radio Ecological Database After Chernobyl, REDAC. This database we be used for the subsequent study of the impacts, for modeling, and for the development of strategies for the waste control and counter measures. The following task of the programme are highlighted: ecological portrait; contamination; wastes dumps and operational database; radionuclide transfers from soil to plants, by surfaces run off, in aquatic environment and from plants to animals; urban environment, implying modeling transfers and countermeasures; countermeasures in natural and agricultural areas.

  19. An invitation to contribute to a strategic research agenda in radioecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, T G; Garnier-Laplace, J; Vandenhove, H; Dowdall, M; Adam-Guillermin, C; Alonzo, F; Barnett, C; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Beresford, N A; Bradshaw, C; Brown, J; Eyrolle, F; Fevrier, L; Gariel, J-C; Gilbin, R; Hertel-Aas, T; Horemans, N; Howard, B J; Ikäheimonen, T; Mora, J C; Oughton, D; Real, A; Salbu, B; Simon-Cornu, M; Steiner, M; Sweeck, L; Vives i Batlle, J

    2013-01-01

    via a link on the STAR website (www.star-radioecology.org). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. International Union of Radioecology response to the Chernobyl radioecological situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, A.; Kirchmann, R.

    1995-01-01

    A review of International Union of Radioecology response to the Chernobyl radioecological situation is given. A scope of the activities ((1) Increase of contacts and cooperation with CIS scientists; (2) Organization, usually in collaboration with intergovernmental institution, of international scientific meetings; (3) Synthesis reports dealing with impacts of the Chernobyl fallout; (4) Collaboration with other international organizations and projects (SCOPE-RADPATH, UNESCO-CESN, IAEA); (5) Training of young scientists; and (6) Progress of current activities) is reviewed

  1. [The radioecological lessons of Chernobyl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksakhin, R M

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radioecological studies undertaken within the area exposed to ionizing radiation after Chernobyl disaster. Conclusions are made concerning the major regularities in radionuclide migration within various natural media and action of ionizing radiation on natural and artificial ecosystems. The efficiency of basic protective ecological measures in eliminating the accident consequences has been determined. The contribution of radioecological studies to the elimination of Chernobyl disaster sequences assessed.

  2. Radiation Protection Research: Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecasteele, C.; Vandenhove, H

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's Radioecology programme are (1) to evaluate, based on laboratory and field experiments, the mechanisms and dynamic (fluxes) of radionuclide transfers in the biosphere, considering all factors affecting the transfer parameters and their variability; (2) to develop and optimise models to predict the fate of radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) to advise on appropriate countermeasures and remediation options to reduce public exposure to artificial and man-enhanced natural radioactivity and to evaluate their feasibility, cost effectiveness and sustainable character; (4) to provide information to national and international authorities to enable these to assess the consequences of routine and accidental releases for populations and to select the most adequate mitigation actions. Main achievements in 1999 are reported.

  3. Radiation Protection Research: Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.; Vandenhove, H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's Radioecology programme are (1) to evaluate, based on laboratory and field experiments, the mechanisms and dynamic (fluxes) of radionuclide transfers in the biosphere, considering all factors affecting the transfer parameters and their variability; (2) to develop and optimise models to predict the fate of radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) to advise on appropriate countermeasures and remediation options to reduce public exposure to artificial and man-enhanced natural radioactivity and to evaluate their feasibility, cost effectiveness and sustainable character; (4) to provide information to national and international authorities to enable these to assess the consequences of routine and accidental releases for populations and to select the most adequate mitigation actions. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  4. Marine radioecology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsson, S.E.

    1998-06-01

    Results of the EKO-1 project for the period 1994-1997 are summarised in this report. The aim of the project was to make a joint Nordic study on radionuclides in sediment and water and the interaction between these two phases. Relatively less emphasis has been put on this factor compared to others in previous Nordic studies on marine radioecology. For some of the participating countries this work was the first of its kind undertaken. The project work involved field, laboratory and model studies. Results of the study have appeared in various scientific journal and it has formed the bases for two Ph.D. theses and two M.Sc. theses. (au)

  5. Belt of Yotvings. Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazheika, J.; Petroshius, R.; Strzelecki, R.; Wolkovitcz, S.; Lewandowski, P.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The map of gamma radiation dose of 'Belt of Yotvings' area displays the summarized gamma radiation coming from natural radionuclides of 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and from cesium isotopes 137 Cs, 134 Cs, artificially supplied into the environment after the Chernobyl disaster. The average value of gamma radiation dose for 'Belt of Yotvings' area is 44.2 n Gy/h, with a distinct regional differentiation. The content of uranium varies from 0 to 4.5 g/t, with the average value of about 1.4 g/t. Thorium content varies from 0 to 10.3 g/t, with the average value of 4.3 g/t. Potassium content varies from 0.1 up to 2.5 %, with the average value of 1.2 %. The concentration of caesium radioisotopes reaches up to 11.6 kBq/m 2 , the average value being 3.8 kBq/m 2 . Radon concentration in soil air has been determined in 55 sites (83 analyses). Radon concentration has been noticed in volumes from trace amounts up to 55 kBq/m3.The radioecological mapping has documented that the highest concentrations of natural radioisotopes and, correspondingly, the highest total gamma radiation dose were observed in the northeastern part of the area studied, which is covered by clay-silty glaciolacustrine deposits. Slightly lower values are typical for the whole northwestern part of 'Belt of Yotvings'. Very low contents of radioactive elements and low total radiation doses are typical for eolian and sandur sands, occurring south-eastward from the line Augustow-Veisiejai. The Chernobyl NPP accident polluted the studied region with artificial cesium radioisotopes un significantly. The concentrations are low and they involve no radioecological hazard. The investigation of radon concentration in soil air have revealed several places affected by high radon emanation. These places should be studied in a more detailed way

  6. Radioecology of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Cadwell, L.L.; Emery, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    This study provides information to help assess the environmental impacts and certain potential human hazards associated with nuclear fuel cycles. A data base is being developed to define and quantify biological transport routes which will permit credible predictions and assessment of routine and potential large-scale releases of radionuclides and other toxic materials. Information obtained from existing storage and disposal sites will provide a meaningful radioecological perspective with which to improve the effectiveness of waste management practices. This paper focuses on terrestrial and aquatic radioecology of waste management areas and biotic transport parameters

  7. Preventive radioecological assessment of territory for optimization of monitoring and countermeasures after radiation accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prister, B S; Vinogradskaya, V D; Lev, T D; Talerko, M M; Garger, E K; Onishi, Y; Tischenko, O G

    2018-04-01

    A methodology of a preventive radioecological assessment of the territory has been developed for optimizing post-emergency monitoring and countermeasure implementation in an event of a severe radiation accident. Approaches and main stages of integrated radioecological zoning of the territory are described. An algorithm for the assessment of the potential radioecological criticality (sensitivity) of the area is presented. The proposed approach is validated using data of the dosimetric passportization in Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident for the test site settlements. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. International Union of Radioecology response to the Chernobyl radioecological situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, A.; Kirchmann, R.

    1997-01-01

    International Union of Radioecology (UIR) main objective, as NGO and international scientific association of more than 500 members working in 255 organizations from 37 different countries, is to encourage the exchange of information and expertise in the field of radioecology, particularly in case of major accidental release of radioactive materials, such as the Chernobyl accident (1986 April, 26th) which based the problem of a contamination on a large scale. This primary objective of UIR is not restricted to information on the transfer of important radionuclides in the environment but includes information which can aid in understanding the impact of radiation exposure on populations of living organisms and ecosystems. The response of UIR to the Chernobyl accidental situation occurred in various members taking advantage of the structure and the potential of the organization

  9. Marine radioecology: some aspects of research applied to radioecological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancellin, J.

    1977-01-01

    Radioecological studies involve more specialy researches on behavior of radionuclides in the different components of the oceanic environment: water, sediments, organisms. Two main vectors of contamination are to be considered concerning organisms: water and food. Regarding the last one a decreasing of concentration factors, rather an increasing, is observed in relation with the elevation of trophic levels. Actual data on radionuclides distribution in the marine environment can be mainly derived from in situ observations [fr

  10. A Nordic view on perspectives for radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, S.P.

    2002-01-01

    At the turn of millennium, several scientists have expressed their thoughts on the future of radioecology and related topics in the Journal of Environmental Radioactivity. These contributions are listed and commented upon. The role of radioecology in the 6th Euratom Framework Programme (2002-2006) is discussed. Previous Nordic radioecology seminars are summarised and trends identified, and suggestions are given for future Nordic activities and developments in the field of environmental radioactivity. (au)

  11. A Nordic view on perspectives for radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, S P [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-04-01

    At the turn of millennium, several scientists have expressed their thoughts on the future of radioecology and related topics in the Journal of Environmental Radioactivity. These contributions are listed and commented upon. The role of radioecology in the 6th Euratom Framework Programme (2002-2006) is discussed. Previous Nordic radioecology seminars are summarised and trends identified, and suggestions are given for future Nordic activities and developments in the field of environmental radioactivity. (au)

  12. Radioecological characteristics of Lake Zarnowieckie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soszka, G.J.; Grzybowska, D.; Rostek, J.; Pietruszewski, A.; Wardaszko, T.; Kalinowska, A.; Tomczak, J.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented of the radioecological studies carried out in Lake Zarnowieckie as a part of pre-operational investigations related to the construction of a nuclear power station at this lake. Concentrations of essential radionuclides were determined in water, bottom sediments and selected plants and animals. Analyses were made of the distribution and spreading of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in the lake ecosystem and in the near-by meadows. 28 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs. (author)

  13. The European radioecology alliance: encouraging the coordination and integration of research activities in radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, A. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas - CIEMAT (Spain); European Radioecology Alliance Association, French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety - IRSN, 31 Avenue de la Division Leclerc, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Currivan, Lorraine [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland - RPII (Ireland); Gariel, Jean-Christophe [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN (France); Hardeman, Frank [SCK.CEN (Belgium); Howard, Brenda [Natural Environment Research Council - NERC, UK (United Kingdom); Lukashenko, Sergey [Kazakhstan Republic Institute of Nuclear Physics - NNCRK (Kazakhstan); Lund, Ingemar [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority - SSM (Sweden); Sabatier, Laure [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA (France); Sachs, Susanne [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf - HZDR (Germany); Salomaa, Sisko [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK (Finland); Smith, James [University of Portsmouth - UoP (United Kingdom); Steiner, Martin [Federal Office for Radiation Protection - BfS (Germany); Strand, Per [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA (Norway); Tschiersch, Jochen [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - HMGU (Germany); Hinton, Thomas [Strategy for Allied Radioecology - STAR Coordinator, IRSN (France); Vandenhove, Hildegarde [COordination and iMplementation of a pan-European instrumenT for radioecology - COMET Coordinator, SCK.CEN (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    The European Radioecology Alliance was established in 2009 with a firm conviction from its eight founding European organizations that joining forces would enhance the competence of radioecology science in Europe. The main objective of the Radioecology Alliance is to progressively strengthen the coordination and integration of research in the field of radioecology at national, European and international level. The integration of the European radioecology community will be a key aspect facing the upcoming EURATOM Horizon 2020 framework programme. In 2012, the Radioecology Alliance was officially constituted as an Association, and in June 2013 grew from 8 to 14 members from 10 different countries (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Kazakhstan, Norway, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom). Within the framework of the Radioecology Alliance, a Network of Excellence in Radioecology STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology) was created in 2011 with financial support of the EC FP7. More recently, the project COMET (Coordination and implementation of a pan-European instrument for radioecology) has been also funded by the EC to strengthen the pan-European research initiative on the radiation impact on man and the environment by facilitating the integration of the Research and Development activities in radioecology. The Radioecology Alliance, in close collaboration with STAR in the first phase, and more recently with COMET, has developed for the first time a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on Radioecology. The SRA identifies three challenges: (1) To predict human and wildlife exposure more robustly by quantifying the key processes that most influence radionuclide transfers; (2) To determine ecological consequences under realistic exposure conditions and (3) To improve human and environmental protection by integrating radioecology. Within these 3 challenges, 15 research lines have been identified. After a consultation process which included not only the scientific community

  14. Radioecological Observatories - Breeding Grounds for Innovative Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Martin; Urso, Laura; Wichterey, Karin; Willrodt, Christine [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS, Willy-Brandt-Strasse 5, 38226 Salzgitter (Germany); Beresford, Nicholas A.; Howard, Brenda [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology - CEH, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, Clare; Stark, Karolina [Stockholms Universitet - SU, Universitetsvaegen 10, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Dowdall, Mark; Liland, Astrid [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA, P.O. Box 55, NO-1332 Oesteraas (Norway); Eyrolle- Boyer, Frederique; Guillevic, Jerome; Hinton, Thomas [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Gashchak, Sergey [Chornobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology - Chornobyl Center, 77th Gvardiiska Dyviiya str.7/1, 07100 Slavutych (Ukraine); Hutri, Kaisa-Leena; Ikaeheimonen, Tarja; Muikku, Maarit; Outola, Iisa [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK, P.O. Box 14, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Michalik, Boguslaw [Glowny Instytut Gornictwa - GIG, Plac Gwarkow 1, 40-166 Katowice (Poland); Mora, Juan Carlos; Real, Almudena; Robles, Beatriz [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas - CIEMAT, Avenida complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Oughton, Deborah; Salbu, Brit [Norwegian University of Life Sciences - NMBU, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Sweeck, Lieve [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK.CEN), Avenue Herrmann- Debroux 40, BE-1160 Brussels (Belgium); Yoschenko, Vasyl [National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine (NUBiP of Ukraine), Herojiv Obrony st., 15, Kyiv-03041 (Ukraine)

    2014-07-01

    Within the EC-funded (FP7) Network of Excellence STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology, www.star-radioecology.org) the concept of Radioecological Observatories is currently being implemented on a European level for the first time. Radioecological Observatories are radioactively (and chemically) contaminated field sites that will provide a focus for joint long-term radioecological research. The benefit of this innovative approach is to create synergistic research collaborations by sharing expertise, ideas, data and resources. Research at the Radioecological Observatories will primarily focus on radioecological challenges outlined in the Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). Mechanisms to use these sites will be established under the EC-funded project COMET (Coordination and Implementation of a Pan-European Instrument for Radioecology, www.comet-radioecology.org). The European Radioecological Observatory sites were selected using a structured, progressive approach that was transparent, consistent and objective. A first screening of potential candidate sites was conducted based on the following exclusion criteria: long-term perspective for shared field work and suitability for addressing the radioecological challenges of the SRA. The proposed sites included former uranium mining and milling sites in France and Germany, the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) in Ukraine/Belarus and the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) in Poland. All candidate sites were prioritized based on evaluation criteria which comprised scientific issues, available infrastructure, administrative/legal constraints and financial considerations. Multi-criteria decision analysis, group discussions and recommendations provided by external experts were combined to obtain a preference order among the suggested sites. Using this approach, the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) in Poland and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) were selected as Radioecological Observatories. The two sites have similar multi

  15. Radioecological studies at the Unterweser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, W.; Kanisch, G.; Kellermann, H.J.; Vobach, M.

    1990-01-01

    Radioecological investigations carried through from 1972 to 1984 in the area of the Unterweser reactor (KKU) revealed that the radioactivity of the river water is essentially determined by the natural radionuclide K 40. What can be measured apart from this on the long-lived fission products Sr-90 and Cs-137 stemming from the nuclear arms tests of the 50s and 60s, tritium, both as a natural and artificial radionuclide, short-lived I-131 and, in very small concentrations, plutonium isotopes, equally stemming from the nuclear arms tests. (orig.) [de

  16. Radiation Polymerization in the Solid Phase; Polymerisation radiochimique en phase solide; Radiatsionnaya polimerizatsiya v tverdoj faze; Radiopolimerizacion en fase solida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkalov, I. M.; Gol' danskij, V. I.; Enikolopov, N. S.; Terekhova, S. F.; Trofimova, G. M.

    1963-11-15

    energfa de activacion, a diferencia de la postpolimerizacion lenta, que exige la misma energia de activacion que el proceso en fase liquida. (author) [Russian] Radiatsionnoj polimerizatsii tverdykh i zamorozhennykh monomerov za poslednee vremya udelyaetsya bol'shoe vnimanie. EHtot vopros predstavlyaet bol'shoj interes kak s prakticheskoj tochki zreniya, tak i s tochki zreniya novykh teorij khimicheskoj kinetikich radiatsionnoj khimii. Kak izvestno, strogaya prostranstvennaya uporyadochennost' monomernykh edinits v polimere obuslavlivaet rezkoe uluchshenie fiziko-mekhanicheskikh svojstv bez izmeneniya khimicheskogo sostava. Dlya sinteza stereoregulyarnykh polimerov ispol'zuetsya printsip matritsy, t.e. monomernaya edinitsa strogo orientiruetsya v prostranstve putem obrazovaniya kompleksa s katalizatorom ili kakim-libo drugim veshchestvom. Naprimer, pri radiatsionnoj polimerizatsii ryada monomerov, orientirovannykh v klatratnykh kompleksakh mocheviny i tiomocheviny, polucheny kristallicheskie stereopegulyarnye polimery. Odnako naibolee prostym variantom yavlyaetsya orientatsiya monomera v sobstvennoj kristallicheskoj reshetke. Khotya mnogie teoreticheskie voprosy v ehtoj oblasti ostayutsya neyasnymi, prakticheskoe ispol'zovanie ehtogo sposoba ves'ma zamanchivo. Tak, pri radiatsionnoj polimerizatsii kristallicheskogo trioksana uzhe poluchen vysokokristallicheskij polioksimetilen. Trebuetsya, odnako, dal'nejshaya teoreticheskaya razrabotka ehtogo metoda. Neobkhodimo dlya kazhdogo otdel'nogo monomera vyyasnit' vklad razlichnykh vidov reaktsij, proiskhodyashchikh pri obluchenii i posleduptsem plavlenii tverdykh monomerov (spetsificheskaya radiatsionnaya reaktsiya, postpolimerizatsiya i polimerizatsiya v tochkakh fazovykh perekhodov) v obshchuyu kartinu protsessa. Vypolnennoe v poslednee vremya v Institute khimicheskoj fiziki podrobnoe issledovanie kinetiki radiatsionnoj tverdofaznoj polimerizatsii ryada monomerov s primeneniem kalorimetricheskogo metoda i s nablyudeniem signala

  17. Radioecological situation in the Khibiny mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedova, N.B.

    2008-01-01

    Radioecological situation in the Khibiny Mountains is considered. Two former areas of engineering nuclear explosions are monitored. The accumulation and migration of radionuclides in soil, vegetation and snow are examined.

  18. Creation of a European alliance in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real, A.; Mora, J. C.; Robles, B.; Cancio, D.

    2011-01-01

    Eight European organizations, including the CIEMAT, have created an Alliance Radioecology, pledging to integrate part of their R and D on a new Strategic Research Agenda, in order to integrate and sustain long-term research in this discipline.

  19. Radioecological sensitivity. Danish fallout data revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, S.P.; Oehlenschlaeger, M.

    1999-01-01

    Danish fallout data covering four decades are interpreted in terms of radioecological sensitivity. The radioecological sensitivity is the time-integrated radionuclide concentration in an environmental sample from a unit ground deposition (e.g. Bq y kg -1 per Gq m -2 ). The fallout data comprise observed levels of the radionuclides 137 Cs and 90 Sr in precipitation, grass, milk, beef and diet. The data are analysed with different types of radioecological models: traditional UNSCEAR models and more recent dynamic models. The traditional models provide empirical relationships between the annual fallout from precipitation and the annual average levels in grass, milk, beef and diet. The relationships may be derived from spreadsheet calculations. ECOSYS and FARMLAND represent more recent radioecological models, which are available as software for personal computers. These models are more mechanistic and require information on a range of topics, e.g. mode of deposition, nuclide dependent and nuclide independent parameters. The more recent models do not reproduce the fallout data better than the traditional models. But the general features of the more recent models make them suited for prediction of radiological consequences of routine and accidental releases in areas where limited radioecological data are available. The work is part of the NKS/BOK-2.1 project on Important Nordic Food Chains aiming at characterising radioecological sensitivity and variability across the Nordic countries. (au)

  20. Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    Food chains are important contributors to the radiological dose of populations exposed to radionuclides released from the nuclear fuel cycle. A good understanding of the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment and a profound insight in the transfer mechanisms of radioisotopes through the ecosystem component is required in order to assess radiological exposure through the diet, to select appropriate remedial action to limit the contamination levels in food, and to restore contaminated sites. This research project aims to evaluate the mechanisms and dynamics of radionuclide transfers in the biosphere, considering all circumstances affecting the transfer parameters and their variability. The scientific methodology consists of laboratory and field experiments. The results of the research can contribute to the selection of appropriate countermeasures for the reduction of the transfer of radionuclides through the food-chain. The feasibility and effectiveness of these countermeasures are experimentally tested. Another important objective is to provide information to the authorities, enabling to assess the consequences of routine and accidental releases. The main achievements for 1997 are given

  1. Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzl, K.; Kralik, M.; Bossew, P.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the radioactivity measurement and monitoring in Austria. The geographical distribution and the depth distribution of the cesium, plutonium and americium isotope content of the soil is given. The radionuclide migration in soil, hydrosphere, forests and the whole ecosystem is studied. The tritium content in atmospheric precipitation is monitored. The European map of cesium-137 deposition of the year 1996 and the actual positions of nuclear power stations around Austria is given. (a.n.)

  2. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity special issue: II International Conference on Radioecological Concentration Processes. (50 years later).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Tenorio, Rafael; Holm, Elis

    2018-06-01

    An international conference on Radioecological Concentration Processes was held in Seville, Spain, 6-9 November 2016 at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores. It was attended by 160 participants from 35 different countries. This was the 2nd conference on this item since 1966, 50 years ago. The conference covered aspects of radiological important radionuclides on terrestrial, marine and freshwater environments and has allowed obtaining a clear picture of the status of the Radioecology as a consolidated discipline in the 21st century. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Finland [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, J. K.

    1967-01-01

    The research ideas given below are mainly based on experiences obtained in studies of radioecology in fresh waters but may be useful at least for comparison when considering radioecological studies in brackish and true ocean waters

  4. 'RECASS'. Radioecological analysis support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shershakov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The RECASS is developed as a computer system designed for radiation monitoring and decision-making support in a nuclear emergency. The RECASS system has excellent capabilities for collecting, storing, and presenting data from the radiological situation of contaminated areas. It is well designed for modeling radionuclide migration in the environmental media and for assessing countermeasures in terms of doses received by population groups as a result of radioactive contamination. For RECASS to be used as a basis for solving the problems of radioecological analysis, it is essential that mapping facilities are provided and that scaling capabilities allow data to be presented with the necessary degree of detail and accuracy. Because of the on-line links with the operating network of radiological monitoring, RECASS is capable of collecting meteorological and radiological data from across the country and storing this information in its databases. The availability of data from the network of radiological monitoring makes it possible to develop RECASS as a real-time emergency response system. (R.P.)

  5. Radioecology of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Cadwell, L.L.; Emery, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Sites where radioactive wastes are found are solid waste burial grounds, soils below liquid stoage areas, surface ditches and ponds, and the terrestrial environment around chemical processing facilities that discharge airborne radioactive debris from stacks. This study provides information to help assess the environmental impacts and certain potentiall human hazards associated with nuclear fuel cycles. A data base is being developed to define and quantify biological transport routes which will permit credible predictions and assessment of routine and potential large-scale releases of radionuclides and other toxic materials. These data, used in assessment models, will increase the accuracy of estimating radiation doses to man and other life forms. Information obtained from existing storage and disposal sites will provide a meaningful radioecological perspective with which to improve the effectiveness of waste management practices. Results will provide information to determine if waste management procedures on the Hanford Site have caused ecological perturbations, and if so, to determine the source, nature, and magnitude of such disturbances

  6. Nuclear industry and radioecological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V. G.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of XXI century is marked with increasing public concern over impact of man-made activity, including nuclear technologies, on the environment. Currently, the anthropocentric principle is applied in the course of the radioecological safety guaranteeing for the environment, which postulates that human protectability serves as guarantee of the environmental one. However, this principle correctness is called in question recently. The ecocentric principle is proposed as an alternative doctrine, defining balance between human importance and that of any other elements of biota. The system recommended isn't intended for the regulatory standards development yet, because of substantial gaps in scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, renunciation of the anthropocentric principle can result in unwarranted tightened regulatory basis, decreasing of nuclear industry evolution rates, and, consequently, breaching of societal and economical priorities. It is obvious that for the safety guaranteeing, nuclear industry shouldn't stand out against a background of other fields of human activity involved hazard factors. Therefore, new conceptions applying within the regulatory system is to be weighted and exclude formal using of discussion theses. More than semi-centennial experience of the anthropocentric approach applying serves as an evidence of safe protection of ecosystems against radiation exposure that ensures safe ecological development of nuclear power industry and other fields of nuclear technologies application. (author)

  7. Cryoconite. An exotic radio-ecological delicacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tieber, A.; Wilflinger, T.; Lettner, H.; Hubmer, A.K.; Bossew, P.; Sattler, B.

    2009-01-01

    Five years of research on the radio-ecology of cryconite, a sediment of mineral and organic compounds found on glacier surfaces and within glacier ice, has led to amazing insights into the properties of an environmental medium which has been neglegted almost completely previously. It has turned out that a surprising radio-ecological diversity exists on and within glaciers, apart from their quality as thrieving biotopes, also not known for long. This presentation summarizes results from different research projects related to high-Alpine radio-ecology: radionuclide inventories and spatial distributions of cryoconite, hypotheses about their origin and formation, their cycling on and within glaciers, and their role in glacier melting due to global warming. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation bases for calculation methods in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleck-Neuhaus, J.; Boikat, U.; Franke, B.; Hinrichsen, K.; Hoepfner, U.; Ratka, R.; Steinhilber-Schwab, B.; Teufel, D.; Urbach, M.

    1982-03-01

    The seven contributions in this book deal with the state and problems of radioecology. In particular it analyses: The propagation of radioactive materials in the atmosphere, the transfer of radioactive substances from the soil into plants, respectively from animal feed into meat, the exposure pathways for, and high-risk groups of the population, the uncertainties and the band width of the ingestion factor, as well as the treatment of questions of radioecology in practice. The calculation model is assessed and the difficulty evaluated of laying down data in the general calculation basis. (DG) [de

  9. Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-03-01

    This report consists of answers submitted by various laboratory directors or individual investigators who responded to an International Atomic Energy Agency questionnaire concerning their present research programme, future scope of that programme, the investigators' ideas and opinions on marine radioecology research. Information on the possibility of co-operation with other laboratories is also included

  10. ECOMOD - An ecological approach to radioecological modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, Tatiana G.

    2000-01-01

    A unified methodology is proposed to simulate the dynamic processes of radionuclide migration in aquatic food chains in parallel with their stable analogue elements. The distinguishing feature of the unified radioecological/ecological approach is the description of radionuclide migration along with dynamic equations for the ecosystem. The ability of the methodology to predict the results of radioecological experiments is demonstrated by an example of radionuclide (iron group) accumulation by a laboratory culture of the algae Platymonas viridis. Based on the unified methodology, the 'ECOMOD' radioecological model was developed to simulate dynamic radioecological processes in aquatic ecosystems. It comprises three basic modules, which are operated as a set of inter-related programs. The 'ECOSYSTEM' module solves non-linear ecological equations, describing the biomass dynamics of essential ecosystem components. The 'RADIONUCLIDE DISTRIBUTION' module calculates the radionuclide distribution in abiotic and biotic components of the aquatic ecosystem. The 'DOSE ASSESSMENT' module calculates doses to aquatic biota and doses to man from aquatic food chains. The application of the ECOMOD model to reconstruct the radionuclide distribution in the Chernobyl Cooling Pond ecosystem in the early period after the accident shows good agreement with observations

  11. Sustainability and integration of radioecology-position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muikku, M; Beresford, N A; Garnier-Laplace, J; Real, A; Sirkka, L; Thorne, M; Vandenhove, H; Willrodt, C

    2018-03-01

    This position paper gives an overview of how the COMET project (COordination and iMplementation of a pan-European instrumenT for radioecology, a combined Collaborative Project and Coordination and Support Action under the EC/Euratom 7th Framework Programme) contributed to the integration and sustainability of radioecology in Europe via its support to and interaction with the European Radioecology ALLIANCE. COMET built upon the foundations laid by the FP7 project STAR (Strategic Network for Integrating Radioecology) Network of Excellence in radioecology. In close association with the ALLIANCE, and based on the Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), COMET developed innovative mechanisms for joint programming and implementation of radioecological research. To facilitate and foster future integration under a common federating structure, research activities developed within COMET were targeted at radioecological research needs identified in the SRA. Furthermore, COMET maintained and developed strong mechanisms for knowledge exchange, dissemination and training to enhance and maintain European capacity, competence and skills in radioecology. In the short term the work to promote radioecology will continue under the H2020 project EJP-CONCERT (European Joint Programme for the Integration of Radiation Protection Research). The EJP-CONCERT project (2015-2020) aims to develop a sustainable structure for promoting and administering joint programming and open research calls in the field of radiation protection research for Europe. In the longer term, radioecological research will be facilitated by the ALLIANCE. External funding is, however, required in order to be able to answer emerging research needs.

  12. The North Cotentin radioecology group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miserey, Y.; Pellegrini, P.

    2007-01-01

    On January 11., 97, the epidemiologist Jean-Francois Viel publishes a study on the risks of leukaemia of the children in the canton of Beaumont-Hague (Manche), situated near the site of the reprocessing plant of spent fuel of Cogema. Advancing the hypothesis of a link between the exposure to radioactive waste and the appearance of case of the disease in the region, the study creates at once the scandal within the scientific community and within the general public. Worrying about the affair, Ministers in charge of environment and health decide to create a first scientific commission in which participates Jean-Francois Viel. But the tensions are so important within this association that at the end of six months its president decides to resign. It is at this moment there of the story of this debate that the evidence was imperative: it was necessary to innovate by putting around the table experts of any origin to estimate the risks of leukaemia which can result from exposures of the populations of the North Cotentin to ionizing radiations. Placed under Annie Sugier presidency, then manager of the protection in the I.P.S.N. (Institute of protection and nuclear safety), the pluralistic group, called 'North Cotentin radioecology group' ( G.R.N.C.), who collected 50 experts, represents an innovative way of entering in the evaluation and the management of the risks and in the acceptability of the uncertainty. The originality of the G.R.N.C. lies in a critical step as exhaustive as possible which allows to end in the production of shared knowledge. The direction the economic studies and the environmental evaluation of the Ministry of ecology and sustainable development considered important to make the story of the G.R.N.C. better known. To bring to a successful conclusion this project of edition, a work group was set up by the service of Research) and the forward-looking and the drafting of the work was entrusted to a journalist, Yves Miserey and to an ethnologist, Patricia

  13. Radioecological studies in early period of NIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Ryushi

    2004-01-01

    Japanese tuna-fishing boat Fukuryumaru No.5 was exposed to heavy radioactive fallout due to the nuclear test explosion carried out by U.S.A. at Bikini Atoll of Marshal Islands in the central part of Pacific Ocean on March 1, 1954. Following this accident, radioactivity was detected in various environmental samples including rain, marine fishes and agricultural crops. Science Council of Japan organized the new research group of many scientists in the field of fisheries, agricultural, medical and biological studies and radiation protection studies. Government of Japan established National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in 1957. In this Institute various radioecological studies have been carried out. In this paper, some of these radioecological studies carried out in early period of NIRS are described. (author)

  14. Spruce needles used as radioecological biotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.; Gruber, V.; Baumgartner, A.

    2009-01-01

    In a two years project spruce needle samples of the Austrian Bioindicator Grid were analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of radionuclides in spruce needles of the last 25 years with the main focus on the radioactive contamination before and after the Chernobyl fallout 1986. More than 600 spruce needle samples at selected locations of the Bioindicator Grid were analysed for different natural and anthropogenic radionuclides: 137 Cs, 40 K, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 238 U. Additionally, soil samples were taken at selected sites to study the soil-to-plant transfer. This radioecological evaluation is an important part of an existing environmental surveillance programme in Upper Austria in order to gain basic information on the impact of environmental changes on the radioecological behaviour of spruce trees. (orig.)

  15. Measured radioecological parameters after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.

    1989-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident the radioactivity in the environment in Aachen was measured in detail. The change of the different radionuclies in the eco-system made it possible to obtain radioecological parameters especially for iodine and caesium. The most important data obtained like deposition velocity, washout coefficient, retention factor, removal rate constant, and transfer factor food-milk, food-beef, and soil-grass are reported. (orig.)

  16. Radioecology and Environmental Decision Support Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semioshkina, N.; Voigt, G.; Fiedler, I.

    2015-01-01

    According to Wikipedia Radioecology is a branch of ecology, which studies how radioactive substances interact with nature; how different mechanisms affect the substances’ migration and uptake in food chains and ecosystems. Investigations in radioecology might include aspects of field sampling, designed field and laboratory experiments and the development of predictive simulation models. This science combines techniques from some of the more basic, traditional fields, such as physics, chemistry, mathematics, biology, and ecology, with applied concepts in radiation protection. Radioecological studies form the basis for estimating doses and assessing the consequences of radioactive pollution for human health and the environment. Significant economic and social disruptions arise after radioactive contamination of land as a result of releases of radioactivity into the environment be it from accidents, routine and war operations or during decommissioning and waste management of nuclear facilities. Measures carried out to reduce and minimise radiation doses to the public can give rise to even more concerns as often they are not understood and the stakeholders are often not involved into the decision making process. Countermeasures are needed to reduce population exposure, at the same time minimising economic and social costs. The effectiveness of countermeasures is not only highly dependent on factors which are connected to environmental transfer, but also to special behaviour and consumption behaviours in varying food production systems. A central aspect of radioecology is the identification of vulnerable areas which, by virtue of the processes governing the transfer of radiocaesium through food chains, deliver high individual, or collective doses to man. Social factors (e.g. dietary preferences) and agricultural production techniques also contribute to vulnerability. (author)

  17. The Radioecological Aspects OF Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branica, G.; Franic, Z.; Marovic, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the links between radioecology and radiation protection. The traditional radiation protection framework of the International Commission Radiological Protection (ICRP), adopted by the legislation of most countries, is shifting from the paradigm that 'if man is adequately protected from ionizing radiation, then other living things are also likely to be sufficiently protected' towards more efficient protection of non-human biota. However, the estimation of radiation doses, especially low ones, to non-human organisms is very complex issue since they have been studied to a far lesser extent compared to human doses. The first step in dose calculations (i.e. risk assessment) is the measurement of real field data for various radionuclides in various compartments of the biosphere as well as dose rate measurements. Once we obtain relevant data, it is reasonable to argue that biota is adequately protected if the dose rates to the maximally exposed individual from this population are below a certain (safe) limit. The problem arises when one attempts to identify such an individual within a contaminated environment described by measured radioecological parameters. Computer simulation techniques, like Monte Carlo methods are used to generate a 'population' of doses with known distributional qualities. Then, using statistical methods, a part of this population is mathematically 'sampled' to compare the ability of the various statistics at estimating the representative sample of maximally exposed individuals. This exposure, depending on environmental conditions is subject to radioecological investigations. Radioecological investigations regarding fission products in Croatia are implemented as part of an extended and still ongoing radioactive contamination monitoring programme of the human environment that has been fully harmonized with European legislation, i.e. the European Commission's recommendation of June 2000 on the

  18. Radioecological activity limits for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmet, E. Osmanlioglu

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Near surface disposal is an option used by many countries for the disposal of radioactive waste containing mainly short lived radionuclides. Near surface disposal term includes broad range of facilities from simple trenches to concrete vaults. Principally, disposal of radioactive waste requires the implementation of measures that will provide safety for human health and environment now and in the future. For this reason preliminary activity limits should be determined to avoid radioecological problems. Radioactive waste has to be safely disposed in a regulated manner, consistent with internationally agreed principles and standards and with national legislations to avoid serious radioecological problems. The purpose of this study, presents a safety assessment approach to derive operational and post-closure radioecological activity limits for the disposal of radioactive waste. Disposal system has three components; the waste, the facility (incl. engineered barriers) and the site (natural barriers). Form of the waste (unconditioned or conditioned) is effective at the beginning of the migration scenerio. Existence of the engineered barriers in the facility will provide long term isolation of the waste from environment. The site characteristics (geology, groundwater, seismicity, climate etc.) are important for the safety of the system. Occupational exposure of a worker shall be controlled so that the following dose limits are not exceeded: an effective dose of 20mSv/y averaged over 5 consecutive years; and an effective dose of 50mSv in any single year. The effective dose limit for members of the public recommended by ICRP and IAEA is 1 mSv/y for exposures from all man-made sources [1,2]. Dose constraints are typically a fraction of the dose limit and ICRP recommendations (0.3 mSv/y) could be applied [3,4]. Radioecological activity concentration limits of each radionuclide in the waste (Bq/kg) were calculated. As a result of this study radioecological activity

  19. Overview of the Radioecological Research at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lim, Kang Muk; Kim, Byung Ho; Keum, Dong Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper presents a brief history of the research and a summary of the data production. During the past 30 years, a comparatively large amount of radioecological data for food crops was produced at KAERI. Some of the data have been used for the off-site dose calculation or dynamic food-chain model validation in one way or another. A considerable amount of KAERI data was included in an IAEA's handbook and underlying TECDOC. Further studies should be conducted to have sufficient numbers of parameter values to realistically cover various environmental and agricultural conditions. It is desirable for as many of the produced data as possible to be used by the dose assessor. Not only the data producer but also the dose assessor needs to make an effort for a greater amount of the domestic data to be used in estimating the public dose for Koreans. Radioecology is a scientific discipline for studying the movement and accumulation of radionuclides within ecosystems composed of air, soil, water and living organisms including humans. It started in the late 1940s in the USSR and the early 1950s in the USA for the purpose of assessing the environmental impact of the radionuclides released by military uses of fissile material. With an increase in the peaceful use of nuclear energy, radioecologists took a great interest in the environmental impact assessment of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Radiation doses to the public by the planned and ongoing operations of such nuclear installations should be estimated for both normal operation and an accident. These estimations are made using assessment models which require parameter values to quantify various transfer processes of radionuclides in the ecosystem. In KAERI, radioecological research has been conducted for the past 30 years with an emphasis put on the production of data on the transfer of radionuclides to major food crops.

  20. Overview of the Radioecological Research at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lim, Kang Muk; Kim, Byung Ho; Keum, Dong Kwon

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of the research and a summary of the data production. During the past 30 years, a comparatively large amount of radioecological data for food crops was produced at KAERI. Some of the data have been used for the off-site dose calculation or dynamic food-chain model validation in one way or another. A considerable amount of KAERI data was included in an IAEA's handbook and underlying TECDOC. Further studies should be conducted to have sufficient numbers of parameter values to realistically cover various environmental and agricultural conditions. It is desirable for as many of the produced data as possible to be used by the dose assessor. Not only the data producer but also the dose assessor needs to make an effort for a greater amount of the domestic data to be used in estimating the public dose for Koreans. Radioecology is a scientific discipline for studying the movement and accumulation of radionuclides within ecosystems composed of air, soil, water and living organisms including humans. It started in the late 1940s in the USSR and the early 1950s in the USA for the purpose of assessing the environmental impact of the radionuclides released by military uses of fissile material. With an increase in the peaceful use of nuclear energy, radioecologists took a great interest in the environmental impact assessment of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Radiation doses to the public by the planned and ongoing operations of such nuclear installations should be estimated for both normal operation and an accident. These estimations are made using assessment models which require parameter values to quantify various transfer processes of radionuclides in the ecosystem. In KAERI, radioecological research has been conducted for the past 30 years with an emphasis put on the production of data on the transfer of radionuclides to major food crops

  1. Paleo-radioecology of Lake Sevan, Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalbandyan, A.; Ananyan, V.; Burnett, W.; Cable, J.

    2005-01-01

    This joint Armenian-American research was performed on Lake Sevan in period 2002-2004 in the frame of a NFSAT/CRDF project P aleoecology and paleo-radioecology of Lake Sevan, Armenia . The basic goal was conducting a detailed paleolimnological and radio-ecological study of Lake Sevan by sediment dating with 210Pb and 137Cs and geochemical analyses of sediment cores to reveal both natural and man-made changes that occurred in the lake over the last 120 years. The research was being performed by the CENS Laboratory of Radioecology and the Departments of Oceanography at the FSU and LSU (USA). The study object - Lake Sevan, the second highest freshwater lake in the world - is situated at a height 1916 m a.s.l. Such geographical position makes the lake an ideal site for obtaining and preserving valuable historical radio-ecological records of natural variations, man-induced changes, global fallout after nuclear weapon testing and the 1986 Chernobyl accident. Coring was accomplished during two cruises in 2002 and 2003. Sediment cores up to ∼ 1 m in length were collected from 8 locations in the Sevan. An important part of this research was sediment dating via analysis of 210Pb and 137Cs by direct-spectrometry (FSU, LSU). 226Ra, 137Cs, 40K, 234Th concentrations were determined at CENS through a low-background -spectrometry. To explore the possibility of ecological changes we analyzed several ecological indicators in the lake sediments: biogenic Si, total and available P (AVP), carbonates, and organic carbon. As found out, 210Pb is mainly concentrated in upper sediment layers (0-30cm), deeper its contents significantly decrease and approach equilibrium with 226Ra; 137Cs accumulates in the upper sediment layer (0-50cm) and shows two maxima representing fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl accident and from global bomb-testing that reached the peak in 1963. The ages of each level in the cores were calculated through CRS (constant rate of supply) model. There are some substantial

  2. Presentation of radioecology in the Scandinavian countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnedal, P.O.

    1980-01-01

    One of the working groups dealt with the activity of the committee and in its report it is said that three types for the joint Scandinavian work could be identified: 1. - Projects. 2. - Conferences and training-courses. 3. - Publications and information. Among projects 'Intercalibration' regarding sampling techniques and analytical methods. Transport models, consequences of large accidents, were mentioned and in other groups the same type of projects was given. Another working group dealt with international cooperation in the field of radioecology and in its report it was said that it is important to present the work performed in the Scandinavian countries

  3. Radioecology: nuclear energy and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.; Schultz, V.

    1982-01-01

    Radioecology is the field of study in which elements of physical and biological sciences are combined to pursue knowledge of radioactivity in the environment, including movement of radioactive materials and the effects of ionizing radiation on populations and on ecological organization. Volume I contains chapters on ecological principles, radiological principles, environmental radioactivity and radionuclide behavior in ecosystems. Chapter Four on environmental radioactivity characterizes sources, types, and amounts of material and man-made radioactive materials and radiation in the environment. Concepts of radionuclide behavior in ecosystems and behavior (movements and concentrations) of several important element groups in selected ecosystems are surveyed. A chapter on methods used for quantitative predictions of radionuclide transport in the environment gives a reasonably complete treatment to environmental transport processes, radionuclide kinetics in ecosystem compartments, and the use of transport models. Two chapters summarize the known effects of ionizing radiation on species, populations, and higher levels of ecological organization. This information is put into perspective in terms of risk and other consequences. Both volumes are well referenced. Appendices contain listings of major proceedings and books, reviews of specific radionuclides in the environment, and physical data used to characterize radionuclides. The authors succeed in presenting an excellent survey of a broad field of study, and these volumes should serve as a standard reference work on radioecology for a long while

  4. Proceedings of the 8. Nordic seminar on radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilus, E. [STUK (FI)] (ed.)

    2002-04-01

    This report contains proceedings of the 8th Nordic Seminar on Radioecology held on February 25-28, 2001 in Rovaniemi, Finland. The Seminar was arranged by STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland and supported by the NKS. The Seminar was intended to be a 'final forum' of the four-year NKS radioecology project BOK-2, Radioecological and Environmental Consequences, which was focused on the consequences of releases of man-made radionuclides into the environment. The programme of the Seminar consisted of 3 invited lectures, 31 oral presentations and 22 poster presentations dealing with marine, terrestrial and freshwater radioecology, methods, foodstuffs, models, whole-body counting and doses to man. (au)

  5. Proceedings of the 8. Nordic seminar on radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilus, E [STUK (FI)

    2002-04-01

    This report contains proceedings of the 8th Nordic Seminar on Radioecology held on February 25-28, 2001 in Rovaniemi, Finland. The Seminar was arranged by STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland and supported by the NKS. The Seminar was intended to be a 'final forum' of the four-year NKS radioecology project BOK-2, Radioecological and Environmental Consequences, which was focused on the consequences of releases of man-made radionuclides into the environment. The programme of the Seminar consisted of 3 invited lectures, 31 oral presentations and 22 poster presentations dealing with marine, terrestrial and freshwater radioecology, methods, foodstuffs, models, whole-body counting and doses to man. (au)

  6. Radioecological data concerning La Hague marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancellin, J.; Bovard, P.

    1979-01-01

    New radioecological observations have been made in the environment of the La Hague (North-West Cotentin) spent fuel processing plant to supplement earlier studies on the transfer of sea-borne radioactive wastes and on radioactivity levels found in the North-West sector of the Cotentin and some distance away on the channel coasts. Of the radionuclides discharged by the plant, ruthenium-106 and cerium-144 account for most of the artificial γ activity found in living species and sediments. Together with plutonium they tend to disperse less than a radionuclide present in essentially soluble form such as cesium-137. Certain coastal deposits moreover tend to be more pronounced South-West than East-South-East of the discharge point. Finally the radioactivity levels observed and their repercussions on public health show good agreement with the results of the previsional study carried out before the plant was started up [fr

  7. Certain theoretical and applied aspects of radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, N.V.; Tikhomirov, F.A.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.

    1978-01-01

    Discussed are various aspects of radioecology, studying mechanisms of migration, distribution and biological effect of radionuclides in various biogeocenoses as well as the problems, connected with the prediction of consequences of biosphere radioactive pollution, ecological rating of the above pollution and reduction of its harmfull effect. The problems of agrochemistry of radioactive fission products, and the problem of studying the effect of increased radiation level on organisms and their communities are considered. Underlined is the importance of the data, accumulated in this or that field, necessary for practical recommendations to reduce the transition of strontium-90 and cesium-137 radionuclides in the ration of cattle and man and rating disposal of radioactive substances in the environment

  8. Integrated management system best practices in radioecological laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Claudia Aparecida Zerbinatti de [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. da Qualidade], e-mail: clau.zerbina@gmail.com; Zouain, Desiree Moraes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: dmzouain@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a Master dissertation advancements with the target of studying the best practices, in order to give support to an IMS conceptual model ?Integrated Management System (quality, environment, work safety and health), applied to radioecological laboratories. The planning of the proposed research comprises the following stages: first stage - the bibliographic and documental survey in IMS; a survey and study of the applied standards (QMS NBR ISO 9000 (2005), NBR ISO 9001 (2008), NBR ISO 9004 (2000), EMS 14001(2004) and OHSMS OHSAS 18001 (2007) and OHSAS 18002 (2008)); identification and characterization in radioecological laboratories processes; a methodological study of better practices and benchmarking is carried out. In the second stage of the research, the development of a case study is forecast (qualitative research, with electronic questionnaires and personal interviews, when possible), preceded by a survey and selection of international and national radioecological laboratories to be studied and, in sequence, these laboratories should be contacted and agree to participate in the research; in a third stage, the construction of a matrix of better practices, which incur in the results able to subside an IMS conceptual model proposition for radioecological laboratories; the fourth and last stage of the research comprises the construction of a conceptual proposal of an IMS structure for radioecological laboratories. The first stage of the research results are presented concisely, as well as a preliminary selection of laboratories to be studied. (author)

  9. Integrated management system best practices in radioecological laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Claudia Aparecida Zerbinatti de

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Master dissertation advancements with the target of studying the best practices, in order to give support to an IMS conceptual model ?Integrated Management System (quality, environment, work safety and health), applied to radioecological laboratories. The planning of the proposed research comprises the following stages: first stage - the bibliographic and documental survey in IMS; a survey and study of the applied standards (QMS NBR ISO 9000 (2005), NBR ISO 9001 (2008), NBR ISO 9004 (2000), EMS 14001(2004) and OHSMS OHSAS 18001 (2007) and OHSAS 18002 (2008)); identification and characterization in radioecological laboratories processes; a methodological study of better practices and benchmarking is carried out. In the second stage of the research, the development of a case study is forecast (qualitative research, with electronic questionnaires and personal interviews, when possible), preceded by a survey and selection of international and national radioecological laboratories to be studied and, in sequence, these laboratories should be contacted and agree to participate in the research; in a third stage, the construction of a matrix of better practices, which incur in the results able to subside an IMS conceptual model proposition for radioecological laboratories; the fourth and last stage of the research comprises the construction of a conceptual proposal of an IMS structure for radioecological laboratories. The first stage of the research results are presented concisely, as well as a preliminary selection of laboratories to be studied. (author)

  10. An index of radioecology, what has been important?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Journal of Environmental Radioactivity (JER) has been published for the last 20 years, an important time frame for the discipline of radioecology. Certainly the study of radioecology accelerated following the Chernobyl incident. As the discipline moves forward, there will be less emphasis on that incident, and scientists will find a new focus. Issues related to waste management and decommissioning may come to the fore. There is also a large effort world-wide to deal more quantitatively with the estimation of dose and consequences to non-human biota. All researchers in radioecology will have opinions on what topics are important now and will be important in the future. Indeed, Policy Board members and Associate Editors of JER have provided a number of Editorials in the Millennium Editorial Series with their perspectives. This paper explores the trends among papers published in JER since 1995, using the Science Direct on-line search capability to objectively categorize the papers and quantify the relative numbers of contributions. Obviously, this is somewhat imperfect, but it does provide an index of what has been important in radioecology, and provides some quantification to recent statements about the future of radioecology. (author)

  11. An index of radioecology, what has been important?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S.C. E-mail: sheppards@ecomatters.com

    2003-07-01

    The Journal of Environmental Radioactivity (JER) has been published for the last 20 years, an important time frame for the discipline of radioecology. Certainly the study of radioecology accelerated following the Chernobyl incident. As the discipline moves forward, there will be less emphasis on that incident, and scientists will find a new focus. Issues related to waste management and decommissioning may come to the fore. There is also a large effort world-wide to deal more quantitatively with the estimation of dose and consequences to non-human biota. All researchers in radioecology will have opinions on what topics are important now and will be important in the future. Indeed, Policy Board members and Associate Editors of JER have provided a number of Editorials in the Millennium Editorial Series with their perspectives. This paper explores the trends among papers published in JER since 1995, using the ScienceDirect on-line search capability to objectively categorize the papers and quantify the relative numbers of contributions. Obviously, this is somewhat imperfect, but it does provide an index of what has been important in radioecology, and provides some quantification to recent statements about the future of radioecology.

  12. An index of radioecology, what has been important?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Journal of Environmental Radioactivity (JER) has been published for the last 20 years, an important time frame for the discipline of radioecology. Certainly the study of radioecology accelerated following the Chernobyl incident. As the discipline moves forward, there will be less emphasis on that incident, and scientists will find a new focus. Issues related to waste management and decommissioning may come to the fore. There is also a large effort world-wide to deal more quantitatively with the estimation of dose and consequences to non-human biota. All researchers in radioecology will have opinions on what topics are important now and will be important in the future. Indeed, Policy Board members and Associate Editors of JER have provided a number of Editorials in the Millennium Editorial Series with their perspectives. This paper explores the trends among papers published in JER since 1995, using the ScienceDirect on-line search capability to objectively categorize the papers and quantify the relative numbers of contributions. Obviously, this is somewhat imperfect, but it does provide an index of what has been important in radioecology, and provides some quantification to recent statements about the future of radioecology

  13. Integrated management system best practices in radioecological laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Claudia Aparecida Zerbinatti de

    2010-01-01

    The research aims to study the best practices to support a conceptual proposal for IMS - Integrated Management System (quality, environment, safety and health) applicable to Radioecology laboratories. The research design is organized into the following steps: in a first step, it was developed the bibliographic and documentary research in IMS, survey and study of standards (QMS ISO 9000 (2005), ISO 9001 (2008), ISO 9004 (2000), EMS ISO 14001 (2004) and OHSMS OHSAS 18001 (2007) and OHSAS 18002 (2008)), identification and characterization of processes in Radioecology Laboratories and study of best practices methodology and benchmarking; in the second stage of the research it was developed a case study (qualitative research, with questionnaires via e-mail and interviews, when possible), preceded by a survey and selection of international and national radioecology laboratories and then these laboratories were contacted and some of them agreed to participate in this research; in the third stage of the research it was built the framework of best practices that showed results that could support the conceptual proposal for the IMS Radioecology Laboratory; the fourth and final stage of research consisted in the construction of the proposed conceptual framework of SGI for Radioecology Laboratory, being then achieved the initial objective of the research. (author)

  14. Radioecological models for inland water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.; Popov, A.; Zheleznyak, M.J.

    1998-04-01

    Following a nuclear accident, radioactivity may either be directly discharged into rivers, lakes and reservoirs or - after the re-mobilisation of dry and wet deposited material by rain events - may result in the contamination of surface water bodies. These so-called aquatic exposure pathways are still missing in the decision support system IMIS/PARK. Therefore, a study was launched to analyse aquatic and radioecological models with respect to their applicability for assessing the radiation exposure of the population. The computer codes should fulfil the following requirements: 1. to quantify the impact of radionuclides in water systems from direct deposition and via runoff, both dependent on time and space, 2. to forecast the activity concentration in water systems (rivers and lakes) and sediment, both dependent on time and space, and 3. to assess the time dependent activity concentration in fish. To that purpose, a literature survey was conducted to collect a list of all relevant computer models potentially suitable for these tasks. In addition, a detailed overview of the key physical process was provided, which should be considered in the models. Based on the three main processes, 9 codes were selected for the runoff from large watersheds, 19 codes for the river transport and 14 for lakes. (orig.) [de

  15. Review of Development of Adriatic Marine Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branica, G.; Franic, Z.; Marovic, G.; Petrinec, B.; Hanzek, B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a historical overview and some research results of radioactive contamination of the Adriatic Sea and coastal areas caused by natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, with emphasis on the eastern Adriatic coast. The results of the first known survey of radioactivity of the Adriatic Sea have been published in 1909, by Prof. Dr. Peter Salcher from the Imperial and Royal Naval Academy (k.u.k. Marine Akademie) in the city of Rijeka. These were compared with similar studies conducted in the Atlantic Ocean. Systematic radioecological research of the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea that began in 1961 at three locations (Rovinj, Split and Dubrovnik) have been organized by the Directorate for Civil Protection of the State Secretariat for people's defence, targeting the activity concentrations of fission products 90Sr and 137Cs in seawater. Editing and standardization of data has been coordinated by the engineer Velimir Popovic, an associate of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health.Nowadays, contemporary radieocological monitoring in the Republic of Croatia related to the Adriatic Sea today is conducted by Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health within the framework of 'Monitoring of environmental radioactivity in the Republic of Croatia' and the scientific project R adioecology of the Adriatic sea and Coastal Areas , project no. 022-0222882-2823 funded by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports of the Republic of Croatia.(author)

  16. Environment protection: The current challenge in radioecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréchignac, F.

    2012-04-01

    Radioecology, a multifaceted scientific discipline which addresses environmental issues relevant to radioprotection, has for a long time been focused on environmental transfers through the environment to feed the needs of human radioprotection. This quite anthropocentric initial scope is now moving to a more ecocentric view capable of assessing ecological risk mediated by ionising radiation. The central issue consists in reaching an ability to understand the effects of radiation on the environment components, from individual organisms up to populations of species and ecosystems, together with their interaction with the abiotic compartments. Dominated by operational goals, the system of radiological protection of the environment which is under development emphasises a concept based upon reference organisms supported by traditional toxicological data on individual organisms. Whilst there are immediate advantages to this approach (pragmatism, consistency with other approaches in use for man and biota), there are also clear limitations which need to be acknowledged and further considered. The most important probably is to rely on effects data gathered almost exclusively for individual organisms to meet protection goals which are usually set at population and ecosystem levels. Overcoming this limitation leads to scientific and methodological approaches featuring the ecosystem concept.

  17. Manual on oil-gas industry waste utilization radioecological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashev, V.A.; Lukashenko, S.N.; Tuleushev, A.Zh.; Marabaev, Zh.N.; Pasysaev, V.A.; Kayukov, P.G.; Kozhakhmetov, N.B.; Shevtsov, S.P.

    2003-01-01

    The development of a new document - 'Manual on radio-ecologically safe utilization of waste from oil-and-gas production' is carried out. This document regulates the whole cycle of environment protection measures at waste utilization for the named industry in Kazakhstan and is aimed on lowering the radiation risks and assurance of radioecological safety both at present and for the future. The document presents a set regulations necessary for radioactive wastes handling in the oil-gas industry. The normative document was agreed in both the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kazakhstan (RK) and Ministry of Environment Protection of RK

  18. Radioecology of an urban landscape on the example of Pripyat'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gashchak, S.P.; Bondar'kov, M.D.; Ivanov, Yu.A.; Maksimenko, A.M.; Martynenko, V.I.; Arkhipov, A.N.

    2009-01-01

    The results of analysis of own and published data about the peculiarities of formation and subsequent development of radioecological situation in the town of Pripyat in 1996-2006 years are given. It is noted that radioecological processes in the urban environment characterized by specific features that distinguish them from similar processes taking place in forest and meadow ecosystems. First of all, it is expressed in canalization of distribution and redistribution of radioactive substances, in formation of specific locations of radionuclide accumulation, peculiar only to urban landscape, in high initial speed of radionuclides vertical migration in the soil.

  19. Ecological and radioecological studies of nuclear installation sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caries, J. C.; Hugon, J.; Grauby, A.

    1988-01-01

    The site study method consists of a dynamic and estimated analysis and of following up the release impact on all natural or non natural media compartments that take a part in the protection of man and his environment. The stages of knowing a nuclear site include the site preliminary radioecological evaluation, diffusion parameters evaluation, the quantification of factors of radioelements transfer to man, the ecological baseline carrying out, the radioactive baseline establishment, the radioecological synthesis of the results, the site radioactive and ecological control. This method applys to selection and detailed study of site. 1 tab., 7 refs. (F.M.)

  20. Towards worldwide harmonization of radioecology networks: IUR initiates the 'FORUM' - Towards worldwide harmonization of radioecology networks: an initiative of the International Union of Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechignac, F. [International Union of Radioecology (IUR) and Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Direction General, Centre of Cadarache, Bldg 229, BP 1, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance cedex (France); Bollhoefer, A. [South Pacific Environmental Radioactivity Association (SPERA) and Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist, Department of the Environment, Darwin, NT 0810 (Australia); Frogg, K.E.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), P.O. Box 55, N-1332 Oesteraas (Norway); Higley, K. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, 100 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97331-5902 (United States); Hinton, T. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Centre of Cadarache, BP 1, 13115 St Paul-lez- Durance cedex (France); Kapustka, L. [LK Consultancy, P.O. Box 373, Turner Valley, Alberta (Canada); Kuhne, W. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Leonard, K.S. [Cefas, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Masson, O. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Centre of Cadarache, Bldg 153, BP 1, 13115 St Paul-lez- Durance cedex (France); Nanba, K. [Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, Fukushima University, 1 Kanayagawa, Fukushima, Fukushima 960- 1296 (Japan); Smith, G. [GMS Abingdon Ltd, Tamarisk, Radley Road, Abingdon, OX14 3PP (United Kingdom); Smith, K. [RadEcol Consulting Ltd, Fell View, Middletown, Cumbria, CA22 2UG (United Kingdom); Vandenhove, H. [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Institute of Environment Health and Safety, Radiological Impact and Performance Assessment, Boeretang, 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Yankovich, T. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Yoshida, S. [Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 263-8555, Chiba-shi (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Many specialized networks have been designed in the past years to meet specific radioecological objectives, whether regional or sectorial (purpose-oriented). Regional networks deal with an array of radioecological issues related to their territories, such as waste problems, environmental modelling, prevention of impacts, regulation, etc- In Europe, a network of excellence in radioecology has been set up in order to design a strategic research agenda. It is currently being expected to become part of a European platform for radiation protection. Sectorial networks are more problem-oriented, often with wider international representativeness, but restricted to one specific issue like waste, low-level atmospheric contamination, etc. Other kind of sectorial networks result from international agreements for wide environment surveillance. IUR, founded on its large and long-existing international representation, with a current membership spread in nearly 60 countries worldwide, has now identified the need to bridge all such regional and/or sectorial networks together in order to promote the emergence of a worldwide coordinated development process for radioecology. This is especially warranted at a breakeven period where nuclear industry is starting, or expected, to spread beyond the small historical club of nuclearized countries in response to growing energetic demands throughout the world. Furthermore, with more than 30 years of existence, IUR with its dedicated task groups has a long tradition of promoting recommendations on the scientific needs to advance radioecology. In consequence, the construction of a process for worldwide international harmonization of R and D programmes and efforts is becoming highly desirable. This harmonization process would have the objectives to optimize efficiency, avoid duplications, optimize efficient exploitation of existing infrastructures, support harmonised and coherent regulatory developments, help the development of well informed

  1. Radiation Polymerization of Acetylene Hydrocarbons. Special Features; Particularites de la polymerisation radiochimique des hydrocarbures acetyleniques; Radiatsionnaya polimerizatsiya atsetilenovykh proizvodnykh; Particularidades de la radiopolimerizacion de los hidrocarburos acetilenicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkalov, I. M.; Gol' danskij, V. I.; Go, Min' -Gao

    1963-11-15

    termo- i fotookislitel'noj destruktsii polimerov. Udobnym sposobom polucheniya podobnykh polimerov yavlyaetsya radiatsionnaya polimerizatsiya atsetilenovykh proizvodnykh. Tol'ko ehtot sposob obespechivaet poluchenie polimerov, svobodnykh ot zagryazneniya initsiatorami pri nizkikh temperaturakh. Kinetika radiatsionnoj polimerizatsii fenilatsetilena i drugikh atsetilenovykh proizvodnykh imeet ryad osobennostej, kharakternykh dlya ionnoj polimerizatsii, no sovershenno neobychnykh dlya radikal'noj (skorost' polimerizatsii proportsional'na pervoj stepeni skorosti initsiirovaniya; ehnergiya aktivatsii ochen' mala; ket ingibirovaniya kislorodom). Tem ne menee ehta polimerizatsiya yavlyaetsya, vidimo, radikal'noj. K takomu vyvodu my prishli na osnove issledovaniya initsiirovaniya polimerizatsii atsetilenovykh uglevodorodov tipichno radikal'nymi initsiatorami - perekis'yu benzoila i dinitrilom azoizomaslyanoj kisloty. V ehtoj svyazi izuchalis' osobennosti kinetiki i mekhanizma raspada perekisi v prisutstvii atsetilenovykh uglevodorodov (naprimer, fenilatsetilena, dejtero-fenilatsetilena i metilfenilatsetilena). Izuchalis' takzhe kinetika radiatsionnoj sopolimerizatsii fenilatsetilena s razlichnymi vinilovymi monomerami i sostav sopolimerov pri razlichnykh iskhodnykh smesyakh. EHti dannye, a takzhe rezul'taty izucheniya kinetiki ingibirovannoj polimerizatsii fenilatsetilena (ingibitor - benzokhinon) ukazyvayut na maluyu reaktsionnuyu spooobnost' fenilatsetilenovogo radikala. Sil'nye otkloneniya ot pravila additivnosti pri radiatsionnoj polimerizatsii v razlichnykh rastvoritelyakh svidetel'stvuyut o nalichii sil'nogo perenosa ehnergii k atsetilenovym uglevodorodam i ikh polimeram. (author)

  2. Basic considerations in radioecology - or: Radioecology, do we really need it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergan, T.D.

    2005-01-01

    Nordic radioecology has always held a strong position in the international community. There has been lots of resources put into this field, ever since the early era of testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. Accidents, radiofobia and the geographical closeness to former Soviet Union has since then kept this line of science alive, some will claim. Especially the consequences following the Chernobyl-accident has been thoroughly studied. Surely, we must know everything there is to know by now. Still, some radioecologists still come up with new ideas and new projects that should be explored. An important task today is to communicate the knowledge gained, and implement them in emergency preparedness, decision support systems and framework for protecting the environment

  3. Basic considerations in radioecology - or: Radioecology, do we really need it{gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergan, T.D. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway)

    2005-09-15

    Nordic radioecology has always held a strong position in the international community. There has been lots of resources put into this field, ever since the early era of testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. Accidents, radiofobia and the geographical closeness to former Soviet Union has since then kept this line of science alive, some will claim. Especially the consequences following the Chernobyl-accident has been thoroughly studied. Surely, we must know everything there is to know by now. Still, some radioecologists still come up with new ideas and new projects that should be explored. An important task today is to communicate the knowledge gained, and implement them in emergency preparedness, decision support systems and framework for protecting the environment.

  4. Database on radioecological situation in Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkebaev, T.Eh.; Kislitsin, S.B.; Lopuga, A.D.; Kuketaev, A.T.; Kikkarin, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakstan is to define radioecological situation in details, conduct a continuous monitoring and eliminate consequences of nuclear explosions at Semipalatinsk nuclear test site. Investigations of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site area contamination by radioactive substances and vindication activity are the reasons for development of computer database on radioecological situation of the test site area, which will allow arranging and processing the available and entering information about the radioecological situation, assessing the effect of different testing factors on the environment and health of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site area population.The described conception of database on radioecological situation of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site area cannot be considered as the final one. As new information arrives, structure and content of the database is updated and optimized. New capabilities and structural elements may be provided if new aspects in Semipalatinsk nuclear test site area contamination study (air environment study, radionuclides migration) arise

  5. The IUR Forum: Worldwide Harmonisation of Networks to Support Integration of Scientific Knowledge and Consensus Development in Radioecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréchignac, F; Alexakhin, R; Bollhöfer, A; Frogg, K E; Hardeman, F; Higley, K; Hinton, T G; Kapustka, L A; Kuhne, W; Leonard, K; Masson, O; Nanba, K; Smith, G; Smith, K; Strand, P; Vandenhove, H; Yankovich, T; Yoshida, S

    2017-04-01

    During the past decades, many specialised networks have formed to meet specific radioecological objectives, whether regional or sectorial (purpose-oriented). Regional networks deal with an array of radioecological issues related to their territories. Examples include the South Pacific network of radioecologists, and the European network of excellence in radioecology. The latter is now part of the European platform for radiation protection. Sectorial networks are more problem-oriented, often with wider international representativeness, but restricted to one specific issue, (e.g. radioactive waste, low-level atmospheric contamination, modelling). All such networks, while often working in relative isolation, contribute to a flow of scientific information which, through United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR's) efforts of synthesis, feeds into the radiation protection frameworks of protecting humans and the environment. The IUR has therefore prompted a co-construction process aimed at improving worldwide harmonisation of radioecology networks. An initiative based on an initial set of 15 networks, now called the IUR FORUM, was launched in June 2014. The IUR Forum agreed to build a framework for improved coordination of scientific knowledge, integration and consensus development relative to environmental radioactivity. Three objectives have been collectively assigned to the IUR FORUM: (1) coordination, (2) global integration and construction of consensus and (3) maintenance of expertise. One particular achievement of the FORUM was an improved description and common understanding of the respective roles and functions of the various networks within the overall scene of radioecology R&D. It clarifies how the various networks assembled within the IUR FORUM interface with UNSCEAR and other international regulatory bodies (IAEA, ICRP), and how consensus on the assessment of risk is constructed. All these agencies interact with regional

  6. Proceedings of the International conference on radioecology and environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The conference contains 404 presentations on: 1) Emergency preparedness and rehabilitation with emphasis on radiation and radioactivity determination and monitoring, protection and contamination and pollution. 2) TNORM/NORM including radon with focus on radioactivity in the environmental and isotope evaluation. 3) Radioecology and speciation including arctic radioecology, focusing on accidents, radiation and radioactivity effects, nuclear waste disposal, handling, impacts, safety and risks, pollution and its sources, accumulation of isotopes and various medical aspects. 4) Risk assessment with emphasis on the environmental and ecological aspects, modeling, recommendations and international cooperation and discussion of the effects of climatic changes. 5) Radiation in society. 6) Environmental protection with focus on radionuclide studies, radiation effects and protection measures, isotope accumulation effects, nuclide distribution, migration and pollution and effects and handling of nuclear accidents. The global aspects of the topics are evident and there are discussions on non-ionizing and ionizing radiation effect, various simulation problems and public and general health aspects (tk)

  7. Spruce needles used as radioecological biotracers; Fichtennadeln als radiooekologische Bioindikatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, C.; Gruber, V.; Baumgartner, A. [BOKU - Univ. fuer Bodenkultur Wien (Austria). LLC-Labor Arsenal; Idinger, J. [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.; Fuerst, A. [BFW - Bundesforschungs- und Ausbildungszentrum fuer Wald, Naturgefahren und Landschaft, Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Waldschutz, Pflanzenanalyse; Maringer, F.J. [BOKU - Univ. fuer Bodenkultur Wien (Austria). LLC-Labor Arsenal; BEV - Bundesamt fuer Eich- und Vermessungswesen, Wien (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    In a two years project spruce needle samples of the Austrian Bioindicator Grid were analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of radionuclides in spruce needles of the last 25 years with the main focus on the radioactive contamination before and after the Chernobyl fallout 1986. More than 600 spruce needle samples at selected locations of the Bioindicator Grid were analysed for different natural and anthropogenic radionuclides: {sup 137}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 238}U. Additionally, soil samples were taken at selected sites to study the soil-to-plant transfer. This radioecological evaluation is an important part of an existing environmental surveillance programme in Upper Austria in order to gain basic information on the impact of environmental changes on the radioecological behaviour of spruce trees. (orig.)

  8. 1991 annual report of the Lower Saxony Institute of Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Annual Report gives an overview of the staff of the Lower Saxony Institute of Radioecology (NIR), its board of curators, its scientific advisory board, its budget, research and development projects, scientific contacts with other institutions, and publications in journals, reports, proceedings, and lectures and posters. Seven progress reports deal with the following priorities: behaviour of tritium and radioactive iodine in the biosphere; extraction of humic substances; particle measurements in the Arctic, and comparison between two dust measuring devices. (BBR) [de

  9. Model study on radioecology in Biblis. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    The present volume 'Water Pathway II' of the model study radioecology Biblis contains the remaining six part studies on the subjects: 1. Concentration of radionuclides in river sediments. 2. Incorporation via terrestrial food (milk, fruit, vegetables). 3. Radioactive substances in the Rhine not arising from nuclear power stations. 4. Dynamic model for intermittent outlet during reactor operation. 5. Exposure to radiation of the Rhine-fishes. 6. Influence of contaminated waste water on industrial utilization of surface waters.

  10. Some topics on radioecological research in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Makoto

    1993-01-01

    In Japan, systematic researches on marine environmental radioactivity started in 1954 when 'Bikini incidence' occurred. After several years of handling emergency situations, basic studies were carried out to understand processes and mechanisms of contamination of aquatic organisms by radionuclides. At this period 'Hiyama Group' had a large contribution to the development of this new field of research. Important concepts and items have already been dealt with in this Grant Group. Toward the end of 'Hiyama Group', a new project started in Nuclear Safety Research Association. This project, so-called 'Kaihohtoku', aimed at gathering necessary information for safety assessment on the release of low-level radioactive liquid wastes from a newly planned spent-fuel reprocessing plant at Tokai. NIRS-Nakaminato Branch was established first as Marine Radioecological Station in this project. The term 'radioecology' got popularity also in this period. Many important results were obtained and scientific basis of the safety assessment was established in this project. Today we have not any urgent matter to be handled concerning radioecology in our coastal environment. Nuclides found are exclusively of fallout and of a quite low level. We have also established methodology of radiological assessment. So, what is the problem? The problem is 'from conservative to realistic', which is the trend in the world. Here, from this viewpoint, some topics such as models and parameters including concentration factors and their validation and verification in the natural environment were discussed. (author)

  11. COMET- co-ordination and implementation of a pan-European instrument for radioecology - COMET- co-ordination and implementation of a pan-European project for radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Muikku, Maarit [STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FI-00881 Helsinki (Finland); Liland, Astrid [NRPA, Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini Naeringspark 13, Oesteraas, 1332 (Norway); Adam-Guillermin, Christelle [IRSN-Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92260 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Howard, Brenda [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The EC-FP7 project COMET (June 2013 - May 2017) intends to strengthen the pan-European research initiative on the impact of radiation on man and the environment by facilitating the integration of 'radioecological' research. The COMET consortium currently has thirteen partners; eight from EU member states, two from Norway, two from Ukraine and one from Japan. COMET operates in close association with the FP7-STAR Network of Excellence[1]and the Radioecology Alliance[2], COMET will develop initiatives to encourage organisations from the European (and larger) radioecological research community to join the Radioecology Alliance to help address the priorities identified in the Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) for radioecological research. Capacity, competence and skills in radioecology will thus be strengthened at a pan-European level. Mechanisms for knowledge exchange, dissemination and training will be established to enhance and maintain European capacity, competence and skills in radioecology, partially through an open access web site, topical workshops and training activities. COMET will develop innovative mechanisms for joint programming and implementation of radioecological research. Mechanisms for planning and carrying out joint research activities in radioecology will be developed based on the scientific requirements identified in the SRA and via interaction with a wide range of stakeholders. COMET will strengthen the bridge with other radiation protection and ecological communities. A roadmap and associated implementation plan is being developed in collaboration with the Radioecology Alliance and the allied platforms on low dose risk research (MELODI[3]), and emergency management research (NERIS[4]) and the radioecology community at large who is invited to become associated to the development of roadmap and implementation plan. COMET will initiate innovative research on key needs identified by the radioecology community, the (post) emergency management

  12. Interaction Matrices as a Tool for Prioritizing Radioecology Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, J.C.; Robles, Beatriz [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas - CIEMAT (Spain); Bradshaw, Clare; Stark, Karolina [Stockholm University (Sweden); Sweeck, Liev; Vives i Batlle, Jordi [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Beresford, Nick [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology - CEH (United Kingdom); Thoerring, Havard; Dowdall, Mark [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA (Norway); Outola, Iisa; Turtiainen, Tuukka; Vetikko, Virve [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland); Steiner, Martin [Federal Office for Radiation Protection - BfS (Germany); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Fevrier, Laureline; Hurtevent, Pierre; Boyer, Patrick [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN (France)

    2014-07-01

    Interaction Matrices as a Tool for Prioritizing Radioecology Research J.C. Mora CIEMAT In 2010 the Strategy for Allied Radioecology (STAR) was launched with several objectives aimed towards integrating the radioecology research efforts of nine institutions in Europe. One of these objectives was the creation of European Radioecology Observatories. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) and the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB), a coal mining area in Poland, have been chosen after a selection process. A second objective was to develop a system for improving and validating the capabilities of predicting the behaviour of the main radionuclides existing at these observatories. Interaction Matrices (IM) have been used since the 1990's as a tool for developing ecological conceptual models and have also been used within radioecology. The Interaction Matrix system relies on expert judgement for structuring knowledge of a given ecosystem at the conceptual level and was selected for use in the STAR project. A group of experts, selected from each institution of STAR, designed two matrices with the main compartments for each ecosystem (a forest in CEZ and a lake in USCB). All the features, events and processes (FEPs) which could affect the behaviour of the considered radionuclides, focusing on radiocaesium in the Chernobyl forest and radium in the Rontok-Wielki lake, were also included in each IM. Two new sets of experts were appointed to review, improve and prioritize the processes included in each IM. A first processing of the various candidate interaction matrices produced a single interaction matrix for each ecosystem which incorporated all experts combined knowledge. During the prioritization of processes in the IMs, directed towards developing a whole predictive model of radionuclides behaviour in those ecosystems, raised interesting issues related to the processes and parameters involved, regarding the existing knowledge in them. This exercise revealed several processes

  13. Comparison of experimentally determined translocation of 134Cs in potatoes with the radioecological code CHECOSYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesen, T.; Egli, J.; Andres, R.

    1997-01-01

    The verification and adoption of radioecological models is a continuous process. Greenhouse trials on the translocation of radiocaesium from leaves to potato tubers showed a 4-12 times higher translocation rate compared to the radioecological code CHECOSYS. The possible reasons for the differences are discussed. (author) 1 tab., 3 refs

  14. The activity and the development of radioecology marine laboratory in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, E.; Umbara, H.; Yarbaini, S.; Unandjar, G.

    1999-01-01

    The activities in the field of marine radioecology in Indonesia are spreading in many government institutions and more focused in terrestrial. In this paper, beside the RML proposed is explained also the radioecology studies at NPP candidate site of Muria Peninsula during fiscal year 1997 - 1998 are reported

  15. An invitation to contribute to a strategic research agenda in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, T.G.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Vandenhove, H.; Dowdall, M.; Adam-Guillermin, C.; Alonzo, F.; Barnett, C.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Beresford, N.A.; Bradshaw, C.; Brown, J.; Eyrolle, F.; Fevrier, L.; Gariel, J.-C.; Gilbin, R.; Hertel-Aas, T.; Horemans, N.; Howard, B.J.; Ikäheimonen, T.; Mora, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    With intentions of integrating a portion of their respective research efforts into a trans-national programme that will enhance radioecology, eight European organisations recently formed the European Radioecology ALLIANCE ( (www.er-alliance.org)). The ALLIANCE is an Association open to other organisations throughout the world with similar interests in promoting radioecology. The ALLIANCE members recognised that their shared radioecological research could be enhanced by efficiently pooling resources among its partner organizations and prioritising group efforts along common themes of mutual interest. A major step in this prioritisation process was to develop a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). An EC-funded Network of Excellence in Radioecology, called STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology), was formed, in part, to develop the SRA. This document is the first published draft of the SRA. The SRA outlines a suggested prioritisation of research topics in radioecology, with the goal of improving research efficiency and more rapidly advancing the science. It responds to the question: “What topics, if critically addressed over the next 20 years, would significantly advance radioecology?” The three Scientific Challenges presented within the SRA, with their 15 associated research lines, are a strategic vision of what radioecology can achieve in the future. Meeting these challenges will require a directed effort and collaboration with many organisations the world over. Addressing these challenges is important to the advancement of radioecology and in providing scientific knowledge to decision makers. Although the development of the draft SRA has largely been a European effort, the hope is that it will initiate an open dialogue within the international radioecology community and its stakeholders. This is an abbreviated document with the intention of introducing the SRA and inviting contributions from interested stakeholders. Critique and input for improving the SRA are

  16. An invitation to contribute to the agenda strategic research in Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, T. G.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Vandenhove, H.; Dowdall, M.; Adam-Guillermin, C.; Alonzo, F.; Barnett, C.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Beresford, N. A.; Bradshaw, C.; Brown, J.; Eyrolle, F.; Fevrier, L.; Gariel, J. C.; Gilbin, R.; Hertel-Aas, T.; Horemans, N.; Howard, B. J.; Ikaheimonen, T.; Mora, J. C.; Oughton, D.; Real, A.; Salbu, B.; Simon-Cornu, M.; Steiner, M.; Sweeck, L.; Vives Batlle, J.

    2013-01-01

    With intentions of integrating a portion of their respective research efforts into a trans-national programme that will enhance radioecology, eight European organisations recently farmed the European Radioecology ALLIANCE. The Alliance is an Association open to other organisations throughout the world with similar interests in promoting radioecology. The ALLIANCE members recognised that their shared could be enhanced by efficiently pooling resources among its partner organizations and prioritising group efforts along common themes of mutual interest. A major step in this prioritisation process was to develop a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). an EC funded Network of Excellence in Radioecology, called STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology), was formed, in part, to develop the SRA. This document is the first published draft of the SRA. The SRA outlines a suggested prioritisation of research topics in radioecology, with the goal of improving research efficiency and more rapidly advancing the science. It responds to the question. What topics, if critically addressed over the next 20 years, would significantly advance radioecology. The three Scientific Challenges presented within the SRA, with their 15 associated research lines, are a strategic vision of what radioecology can achieve in the future. Meeting these challenges will require a directed effort and collaboration with many organisations the world over. Addressing these challenges is important to the advancement of radioecology and in providing scientific knowledge to decision makers. Although the development of the draft SRA has largely been a European effort, the hope is that it will initiate an open dialogue within the international radioecology community and its stake holders. This is an abbreviated document with the intention of introducing the SRA and inviting contribution from interested stake holders. Critique and input for improving the SRA are welcomed via link on the STAR web site. (Author) 52 refs.

  17. Complex of radioanalytical methods for radioecological study of STS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemev, O.I.; Larin, V.N.; Ptitskaya, L.D.; Smagulova, G.S.

    1998-01-01

    Today the main task of the Institute of Radiation Safety and Ecology is the assessment of parameters of radioecological situation in areas of nuclear testing on the territory of the former Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS). According to the diagram below, the radioecological study begins with the Field radiometry and environmental sampling followed by the coordinate fixation. This work is performed by the staff of the Radioecology Laboratory equipped with the state-of-the-art devices of dosimetry and radiometry. All the devices annually undergo the State Check by the RK Gosstandard Centre in Almaty. The air samples are also collected for determination of radon content. Environmental samples are measured for the total gamma activity in order to dispatch and discard samples with the insufficient level of homogenization. Samples are measured with the gamma radiometry installation containing NaJ(TI) scintillation detector. The installation background is measured everyday and many times. Time duration of measurement depends on sample activity. Further, samples are measured with alpha and beta radiometers for the total alpha and beta activity that characterizes the radioactive contamination of sampling locations. Apart from the Radiometry Laboratory the analytical complex includes the Radiochemistry and Gamma Spectrometry Laboratories. The direct gamma spectral (instrumental) methods in most cases allow to obtain the sufficiently rapid information about the radionuclides present in a sample. The state-of-the-art equipment together with the computer technology provide the high quantitative and qualitative precision and high productivity as well. One of the advantages of the method is that samples after measurement maintain their state and can be used for the repeated measurements or radiochemical reanalyzes. The Gamma Spectrometry Laboratory has three state-of-the-art gamma spectral installations consisting of high resolution semi-conductive detectors and equipped with

  18. Japan [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiki, M.

    1967-01-01

    Among the present research programmes: Studies on rcidiochemical analysis of sea-water and fishes; Studies on uptake of radionuclides by marine organisms; Studies on internal exposure arising from marine products; The convenient and appropriate method of analysis and determination of radioactivity in sea— water and fishes is investigated; Biological concentration of fission products and induced products in fishes and plankton arc studied from the radioecological point of view; Contribution of radionuclides in fishes and algae to those in the total Japanese diet is studied, in connection with fall-out studies

  19. Procedures for radioecological studies with marine benthic invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilquin, A.; Fowler, S.W.; Renfro, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for the collection, transportation, and pre-experimental handling are briefly described. In designing radioecological experiments on marine benthic invertebrates it is important to prevent overcrowding and to choose healthy, well-acclimated animals. Feeding of the animals and presence or absence of sediments in the aquaria are critical variables in many experiments. Length of time the experiment is run and interim growth of the experimental animals may result in significant variability in results. The physico-chemical form of the radiotracer is another important experimental variable. (author)

  20. Procedures for Radioecological Studies with Marine Benthic Invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilquin, A.; Fowler, S.W.; Renfro, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for the collection transportation, and pre-experimental handling are briefly described. In designing radioecological experiments on marine benthic invertebrates it is important to prevent overcrowding and to choose healthy, well-acclimated animals. Feeding of the animals and presence or absence of sediments in the aquaria are critical variables in many experiments. Length of time the experiment is run and interim growth of the experimental animals may result in significant variability in results. The physico-chemical form of the radiotracer is another important experimental variable. (author)

  1. Avian radioecology on a nuclear power station site. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, C.K.; Maletskos, C.J.; Youngstrom, K.A.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of a six-year avian radioecology study at the site of a nuclear power plant in Massachusetts is reported. A completed historical summary is followed by a description of mathematical models developed to calculate the effects on bird body burdens of various changes in environmental radionuclide levels. Examples are presented. Radionuclide metabolism studies in which acute doses of /sup 131/I and /sup 137/Cs were administered to four species of wild birds are presented. Radionuclides were administered both intravenously and orally; no apparent differences in uptake or elimination rates were observed between the two methods.

  2. Use of sulfur concrete for radioecological problems solution in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takibaev, Zh.; Belyashov, D.; Vagin, S.

    2001-01-01

    At present during intensive development of oil and gas fields in Kazakhstan a lot amount of sulfur is extracting. The problem of sulfur utilization demands its immediate solution. One of the perspective trends of sulfur utilization is use it in production of sulfur polymer concrete. It is well known, that encapsulation of low level radioactive and toxic wastes in sulfur polymer concrete and design from it radiation protection facilities have good perspectives for solution of radioecological problems. Sulfur concrete has high corrosion and radiation stability, improved mechanical and chemical properties. Unique properties of sulfur concrete allow to use it in materials ensuring protection from external irradiation

  3. The Chernobyl radioecological consequences for the Russian Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miretsky, G.I.; Teodorovich, O.A.; Bilinkin, S.V.; Popov, A.O.

    1997-01-01

    Radioecological situation in the Western part of Nenetsk region and of region Arkhangelsk was studied in summer 1993 at zone of reindeer-breeding. Increased radiocaesium concentration from 600 to 1200 Bq/kg was discovered in the meat of winter reindeers. Whole-body measurements on reindeer-herders, reindeer-breeders and environmental analyses were performed during two summer expeditions. The functions of radiocaesium specific activity distribution on the body of reindeer-breeders (solid line) and the reindeers (dotted line) were constructed

  4. Avian radioecology on a nuclear power station site. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, C.K.; Maletskos, C.J.; Youngstrom, K.A.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of a six-year avian radioecology study at the site of a nuclear power plant in Massachusetts is reported. A completed historical summary is followed by a description of mathematical models developed to calculate the effects on bird body burdens of various changes in environmental radionuclide levels. Examples are presented. Radionuclide metabolism studies in which acute doses of 131 I and 137 Cs were administered to four species of wild birds are presented. Radionuclides were administered both intravenously and orally; no apparent differences in uptake or elimination rates were observed between the two methods

  5. Ecorad 2001. Radioecology/ ecotoxicology in continental and estuarine media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    This conference about radioecology is divided in eight sessions that concern the following subjects: behaviour and transfer of radionuclides in soil, in terrestrial ecosystems (plants and animal transfers), in freshwater ecosystems, in estuaries are the subjects of the four first sessions. The effects of toxicants in environment are detailed in the fifth session. The sixth session is devoted to the methods of measurement of environmental radioactivity. The seventh session is relative to the consequences of accidental and chronicle situations (Chernobyl consequences, countermeasures and decontamination). This conference ends with the ethical aspects of environmental radio ecotoxicology with the eighth session. (N.C.)

  6. Radioecological problems, and how they are tackled in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleck-Neuhaus, J.

    1981-01-01

    Evaluation of radioecological hazards is an issue that is in the field of tension between science, law, and government. Licences granted by the authorities, the author states, often are based on expert opinions that rely on incorrect data, or on values obtained by taking the mean, which falsifies real conditions. Examples are given. There is another fact that puts on edge to discussions, namely current practice in this field which accepts that the relevant authorities are given two-fold competency, being the executive power with regard to the Atomic Energy Act on the one hand, and an instrument for implementing the government's strategies to support the utilization of nuclear energy. (DG) [de

  7. Marine radioecology and waste management in the Adriatic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franić, Zdenko; Petrinec, Branko

    2006-09-01

    This paper gives a review of marine radioecology research in the Adriatic area carried out by the Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health. Measurements of radioactivity in the Adriatic started in 1963 as a part of an extended monitoring programme of radioactivity in Croatian environment. The main sources of radioactive contamination of the Adriatic Sea are the fallout from past nuclear weapon testing conducted in the atmosphere and the Chernobyl accident. In 2005, the activity concentrations of fission radionuclides were detectable at very low levels in all environmental samples collected on the Adriatic. The 90Sr data obtained from long-term monitoring were used to estimate the upper limit of the Adriatic seawater turnover time, which turned out to be (3.4 +/- 0.4) years. Detailed knowledge about seawater circulation, including the turnover time is essential for planning an overall communal and other wastewater management on the Adriatic coast. The paper concludes with the prospects for future marine radioecological investigations.

  8. Russian radioecology: a bibliography of Soviet publications with citations of English translations and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, V.

    1976-09-01

    Reports on radioecological research by Soviet scientists are listed, indicating those papers for which English translations are known to exist. Volumes 26 through 33 of Nuclear Science Abstracts were searched

  9. Summaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioecology and Ecology Program research projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markham, O.D.

    1987-06-01

    This report provides summaries of individual research projects conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioecology and Ecology Program. Summaries include projects in various stages, from those that are just beginning, to projects that are in the final publication stage

  10. Consideration of radioecological studies in French regulations on the discharges of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, J.

    1980-01-01

    For each of the lines of approach of the regulations on radioactive effluent discharges utilized in France, the report examines the place of radioecology. Developments in greater depth will be devoted to the preliminary and definitive studies foreseen by the conditions of effluent discharges coming from the base nuclear facilities. The place of radioecology in general international law on pollution across national borders or of the sea will also be examined [fr

  11. Intercomparison and harmonization of methodologies, identification of future objectives in radioecology, training and exchange of scientists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarkrog, A.

    1993-01-01

    Global objectives of the project are: cooperation and the exchange of information between radioecologists from countries outside EC and from countries which are not associated with the Radiation Protection Research Programme, in order to stimulate interactions that would increase the understanding of Radioecology problems; training of young scientists will be emphasized in the IUR new programme; IUR will develop a curriculum for a basic course in radioecology; furthermore IUR will play various roles in the field of informing the public. (R.P.)

  12. Traditions and New Perspectives for Marine Radioecology in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrascu, V.; Bologa, A. S. [Grigore Antipa National Institute for Marine Research and Development, Constanta (Romania)

    2013-07-15

    The Marine Radioecology Laboratory started its operation in the 1980s, when Romania launched a nuclear programme. Its first activities were developed within a collaboration framework. The beta and gamma global methods have been used for radioactivity measurements in marine samples or in situ. Experimental work was followed by monochannel spectrometry using radiotracers in biota. The IAEA has supported and improved the use of modern methods such as high resolution multichannel spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. Sustainable monitoring of marine radioactivity has been initiated. Participation in national and international intercomparison tests gave good results. Many research projects and scientific collaborations have been supported. The published results are a reference for further work and impact assessments of contaminants. Nowadays, using European funds, the Laboratory has new perspectives based on modern methods and installations. (author)

  13. Design of laboratory radiotracer studies in marine radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, E.H.

    1997-01-01

    A condensed description of methods used in laboratory radiotracer studies in marine radioecology is presented showing also the difficulties which may be encountered in order to obtain realistic and comparable information on the general behaviour of radionuclides in marine organisms. Practical guidance on the choice of the biological material and how to setup laboratory experiments and to control properly important experimental conditions are given. Key parameters like concentration factors and biological half-lives are defined and the theoretical estimation and practical determination of input, uptake, accumulation and loss of radionuclides in marine biota are formulated by the aid of mathematical equations. Examples of uptake and loss curves obtained in the laboratory are shown. The importance of some environmental factors (temperature, food, growth) on uptake and loss of radionuclides are demonstrated. Comparison of experimental and field data of concentration factors is reported to show the difficulty in extrapolating from laboratory experiments to nature. (author)

  14. Radioecological monitoring of transboundary rivers of the Central Asian Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuldashev, B.S.; Salikhbaev, U.S.; Kist, A.A.; Radyuk, D.S.; Vdovina, E.D.; Zhuk, L.I.

    2005-01-01

    Results of radioecological investigation of Central Asian rivers are presented. Investigation was done as part of the Navruz Project, a cooperative, transboundary river monitoring project involving rivers and institutions in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan, and facilitated by Sandia National Laboratories in the United States. The study of waterborne radionuclides and metals concentrations in Central Asia is of particular interest because of the history of nuclear materials mining, fabrication, transport, and storage there, when it was part of the Soviet Union. This development left a legacy of radionuclides and metals contamination in some Central Asian regions, which poses a clear health hazard to populations who rely heavily upon surface water for agricultural irrigation and direct domestic consumption. (author)

  15. Radioecology of the Tejo river, 1981-1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreiro, M.C.V.; Bettencourt, A.O.; Sequeira, M.M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The survey of the natural and artificial radioactivity of the Tejo river has been carried out since 1975; although there are no nuclear power plants in the Portuguese sector of the river, they do exist upstream, in Spain. A radioecological study of the river was also accomplished between the middle of 1986 and the end of 1989 (contract (CEC) Bl6-B-198-P). A brief outline of the main characteristics of the river water, sediments, and biological material, is given in the present paper and the data on the artificial radioactivity survey from 1981 to 1989 are analysed. An increase of the radioactivity in water was detected during the years 1987 and 1989 and in sediments, hydrophytes and fish during 1988; an attempt of explanation is done. Data appear to confirm that sediments are the best compartment to detect 137 Cs contamination in the river [fr

  16. Investigation of species diversity of fauna of the Palesse state radioecological reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinichenko, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    In territory of Republic of Belarus the rare kind of a moth - She-bear Geba - Eucharia festiva (Hufnagel, 1766) is found out. Acknowledgement of existence of a steady population demands the further researches. (authors)

  17. Radioecology of human food chains and forests in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, Aino H.

    2003-01-01

    Ageing of radioactive fallout also signifies that contributions of various foodstuffs to the human ingestion dose will change with time. The long-term contamination of forest vegetation has motivated studies on contribution of wild food to dietary radiocaesium and radiostrontium. Consumption rates of these foodstuffs have shown variation by geographical regions in Finland, the loss of radiocaesium during cooking of mushrooms has been found significant, and the approximation of the loss using survey data on the actual practices in households was also shown important for dietary assessment. Forest industry needs information for planning its own emergency response, particularly concerning production of acceptable timber after contamination of forests by radioactive fallout. In recent years experimental evidence has been obtained for the mitigating effect of forest management methods, namely soil preparation and fertilisation, on radioactive contamination of forest vegetation. Thereby realistic options for intervention have been suggested. Further testing will improve the information on effectiveness of different methods and duration of management influence in different types of forests. Results from systematic field experiments have also provided data and conceptual views for forest modelling, e.g. for RODOS, a European decision support system for off-site emergency preparedness. The future topics in terrestrial radioecology will altogether support production of safe foodstuffs and safe use of forests after contamination of rural areas. Evaluation of practicability of countermeasures will greatly benefit from measured radioecological parameters in the contaminated areas and from additional field tests. Natural radionuclides and their connection to both agricultural and semi-natural dose pathways ought to be studied. Radiation impact due to bioenergy production and use of ash is close to forest ecosystem studies. Returning of wood ash to forests will maintain and

  18. Proceedings of the international symposium on environmental modeling and radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Ueda, Shinji; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Akata, Naofumi

    2007-03-01

    Environmental models using radioecological parameters are essential for predicting the behavior of radionuclides in the environment. Due to the complex behaviors of radionuclides in the environment, simplified models and parameters with ample margins are used for the safety assessment of nuclear facilities to ensure the safety of people in the surrounding area. As a consequence, radiation exposure doses from the radionuclides have generally been overestimated. Information with more precise predictions of the fate of the radionuclides in the environment and realistic radiation dose estimates are necessary for the public acceptance of nuclear facilities. Realistic dose estimates require continuous improvement of the models and their parameters as well as using state of the art modeling techniques and radioecological knowledge. The first commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan has been built in Rokkasho, Aomori, and the Institute for Environmental Sciences was established for the purpose of assessing the effects of radionuclides released from the plant. Test runs by the plant using actual spent nuclear fuel began in March 2006. With commercial operation soon to begin, there is increasing concern regarding the behavior of radionuclides in the environment. This was a good time to hold a symposium here in Rokkasho to discuss recent progress in the field of environmental modeling and studies of the behaviors of radionuclides in the environment. The exchange of up-to-date information between modelers and experiments was an important aspect of the symposium. The symposium featured 26 oral lectures and 32 poster presentations. The 57 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Contemporary radioecological situation on the Republic of Kazakhstan territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malgazhdarov, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    Common radioecological situation related with nuclear tests and radioactive waste disposal in Kazakhstan is considered. It is noted, that area of three tests sites are contaminated by products of nuclear tests. In the result of atmospheric tests on Semipalatinsk test site (STS) the strontium-90 and cesium-137 with activity 0.62·10 17 and 1·10 17 Bq, relatively have being formed. Because of radioactive gases release into atmosphere after underground explosions on STS the cesium-137 with activity 1.1-1.5·10 15 Ci has been discharged. Total activity of nuclear explosions wastes make up 4.77·10 18 Bq. In the modern conditions after termination of all kinds of test the main source of environment contamination are wastes of uranium mining industry, with total mass - 217.7 million tones and sum activity 8.8·10 18 Bq. Global contamination of environment by products of nuclear decay results to widespread increase of natural radiation background, which varying from 10 to 10,000 μR/h. However, high values of exposure doses capacity are keeping only on the places where open nuclear tests are conducted (200-10,000 μR/h) and places of nuclear wastes disposal (2,800-50,000 μR/h)

  20. Radioecology of the ocean and the inland waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, W.

    1974-01-01

    Three very different ecosystems can be studied in aquatic radioecology: the open sea, the shelf regions of the coast, and the inland waters (to be subdivided into stagnant and running waters). The total amount of radioactive pollutants in the oceans in the year 1970 was estimated to be 2-6 x 10 8 Ci of fission and activation products and 10 9 Ci of tritium. The greater part is located in the surface layer which has a thickness of 800 m. The radiation protection problem of deep-sea dumping of radioactive waste is discussed by the example of the ENEA's experimental dumping between 1967 and 1971. The shelf regions of the coast are an intensively populated ecological system which is characterized by a wide variety in all links of the food chains and by the raising of fry. In 1972, about 35 Ci Sr-90 and Cs-137 have been discharged into the Deutsche Bucht by the rivers Ems, Weser, and Elbe. The manifold utilization of this region poses some special problems of radiation protection which are discussed in detail by the example of a few measured values. With increasing frequency, nuclear power stations are constructed near the big rivers. The extremely complicated interaction processes between the biotic and abiotic components in the tidal regions bring about some special problems which are illustrated by a few examples. The concept of 'acceptable activity admission' is discussed, and methods for its determination are described. (orig./AK) [de

  1. Radioecological investigations of the Bilibino Nuclear Power Station area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emelyanova, L.; Neretin, L. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Geographical Faculty]|[Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). P.P. Shirshov Inst. of Oceanology

    1995-12-31

    The landscape structure of the territory and the current radioactive state of ecosystems in the vicinity of Bilibino Nuclear Power Station (Western Chukotka Peninsula) within the area of its potential influence on the environment were studied in 1989--1990. Accumulation of strontium-90 and cesium-137 radionuclides in several key biological members of the ecosystems has been analyzed. Maximal weighted content of cesium-137 was revealed in mountain pine cones (Pinus pumila) -- 9,200 Bq/kg.d.w., cowberry fruits have demonstrated considerable contamination by strontium and cesium isotopes. The purification of first two components of food chain ``lichen-reindeer-man`` was pointed out in the investigated area. Besides the chemical characteristics, visual biological anomalies of biocomponents nearby the Bilibino NPS ecosystems are observed. On the basis of field radioecological investigations and future work, programs were developed for the conditions of the Bilibino Nuclear Power Station area. This experience could be applied to the researches of radioactive contamination in ecosystems of other northern territories.

  2. Environmental Characterization and Radioecological Assessment of Suez Canal Area, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.A.; Zaki, A.H.; Diab, M.; Al-Ashry, KH.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the environmental characteristic and radioecological assessment of the Suez Canal area, Egypt. The hydrochemical parameters including major elements (Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, SO 4 , HCO 3 ) and trace elements (Zn, Pb, Fe, Cu, Cd) of the soil, plant and water samples collected from the Suez Canal area were measured. The natural radioactivity and man-made radionuclides were measured in the same samples.The specific activities of 238 U series, 232 Th series, 40 K and 137 Cs (Bq/kg dry weight) were measured using gamma ray spectrometers based on hyper pure germanium detectors. The absorbed radiation dose rates in air (nGy/h) due to natural radionuclides in soil, and radium equivalent activity index (Bq/kg) were calculated. The average specific activity of 238 U series, 232 Th series and 40 K in soil samples were 12.9, 10.2 and 144.9 Bq/kg, respectively. The activity concentrations of 137 Cs in the different collected samples and 238 U and 232 Th series in plant and water samples were less than the lower detection limit. The average specific activity of 40 K in plant samples was 325.8 Bq/kg. The concentration and distribution pattern of 238 U series in soil can be used to trace the radiological impact of the non-nuclear industries on the Suez Canal area.

  3. Synthesis of the radiohydrobiology publications of the radioecology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulquier, Luc

    1978-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize all work in the field of radiohydrobiology published since 1966 by the Radioecology Department. It analyzes 46 publications and describes the experimental protocols. The radionuclides used were Caesium-137, Strontium-90 and 85, Manganese-54, Sodium-22, Zinc-65 and Chrome-51. The organisms studied were mosses, higher aquatic plants, crustaceans, mollusks and fish. The author describes the main features of the radionuclide absorption and desorption processes, and gives the effects of concentration factors, radionuclide distribution in the organism and biological half-lives on contamination kinetics. The author points out that there is too wide a gap between available knowledge and the users' requirements. For example, for certain important radionuclides a fairly large number of results are available on direct exchanges between the water and the organisms, but very few on indirect transfers via food chains. A critical analysis on the use and expression of experimental results points up the need calculating isotopic balances [fr

  4. Radioecology, radioactivity and ecosystems: a short presentation of a publication of the Union Internationale de Radioecologie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stricht, E. van der; Kirchmann, R.

    2002-01-01

    This book is the outcome of a long-standing project of the International Union of Radioecology (registered name, UIR, Union Internationale de Radioecologie). The project was launched in 1992 by the late UIR President Stan Myttenaere, with the help of a number of dedicated members. Norman Pattenden was the editor and he did the fundamental initial work of setting up discussions with the contributors as well as taking the responsibility to write two sections. Sadly, he also didn't live to see the book published. Inevitable delays ensued. They have been beneficial for one thing. It allowed including recent advances. But, surely enough, the book retained most features of the initial endeavours and it is in this respect a testimony for the continuing evolution of thoughts in radioecology. It sees the light at the crucial time of the now outstanding re-evaluation of radioecology as such

  5. Information and analytical data system on radioecological impact of the Russian nuclear complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskra, A. A.; Serezhnikov, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    The information and analytical system contains data on enterprises of the Russian nuclear complex, beginning from mining and processing of uranium ores and ending by processing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and ionizing radiation sources (IRS). Radioecological information is presented about radiation hazardous objects of civil mission of the Federal Agency for Atomic Energy (Rosatom): underground leaching sites, radioactive waste (RW) storage facilities, tailing dumps, burials, reactors and critical facilities, etc. Radioecological impact is examined and information and regulatory-methodical documents of Federal Agency on Hydro meteorology and Environmental Monitoring, Federal Agency for Atomic Energy, Federal Agency on ecological, technological and atomic control, Federal Agency on Geodesy and Cartography is used concerning: -radionuclide discharges from the enterprises; -radionuclide releases from the enterprises under routine and accidental conditions; -contaminated lands; -radioecological consequences of RW dumped in the Arctic and Far-East seas. The report is accompanied by the operating sophisticated database demonstration

  6. Selection of terrestrial transfer factors for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter value for a radioecological assessment model is not a single value but a distribution of values about a central value. The sources that contribute to the variability of transfer factors to predict foodchain transport of radionuclides are enumerated. Knowledge of these sources, judgement in interpreting the available data, consideration of collateral information, and established criteria that specify the desired level of conservatism in the resulting predictions are essential elements when selecting appropriate parameter values for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides. 39 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  7. Selection of terrestrial transfer factors for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter value for a radioecological assessment model is not a single value but a distribution of values about a central value. The sources that contribute to the variability of transfer factors to predict foodchain transport of radionuclides are enumerated. Knowledge of these sources, judgement in interpreting the available data, consideration of collateral information, and established criteria that specify the desired level of conservatism in the resulting predictions are essential elements when selecting appropriate parameter values for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides. 39 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Uncertainties in radioecological assessment models-Their nature and approaches to reduce them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, G.; Steiner, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radioecological assessment models are necessary tools for estimating the radiation exposure of humans and non-human biota. This paper focuses on factors affecting their predictive accuracy, discusses the origin and nature of the different contributions to uncertainty and variability and presents approaches to separate and quantify them. The key role of the conceptual model, notably in relation to its structure and complexity, as well as the influence of the number and type of input parameters, are highlighted. Guidelines are provided to improve the degree of reliability of radioecological models

  9. THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR RADIOECOLOGY: A NETWORK OF EXCELLENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND HUMAN RADIATION RISK REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, T.

    2013-01-09

    Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950s when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re-establish a

  10. United States of America. Report 1 [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, R.E.

    1967-01-01

    Biology Department's aquatic research activities are primarily in freshwater radioecology and not in marine radioecology. The major reason for this lack of marine work is geographical location of our laboratory on the banks of the Columbia River, roughly 300 miles from the ocean. Recently, however, we have completed some preliminary work with 65 Zn metabolism in Anonyx sp., a marine benthic amphipod. Lake some inland laboratories, we have found that limited marine work can be done by hauling in sea water. We have been able to maintain the amphipods in a reasonably healthy state in our laboratory for about four weeks

  11. Study on Radioecology and Tracer of Iodine-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaolin, Hou

    2004-01-01

    Iodine-129 (15.7 Ma) is a naturally occurring radioisotope of iodine. The ratio of 129 I/ 127 I was estimated to be ∼ 10 -12 in the ocean and 10 -11 in the territorial environment in pre-nuclear era, releases from nuclear weapon tests have increased this ratio to ∼ 10 -10 . However, a large amount of iodine-129 was released from various nuclear facilities, and the greatest releases of 129 I are from two European reprocessing plants, especially in recent years. By 1998, 2600 Kg and 220 Kg 129 I have been discharged to the marine environment and atmosphere from La Hague (France) and Sellafield reprocessing plants, respectively. This amount is tens times larger than the total 129 I inventory in the pre-nuclear ocean and weapon test releases. Although there is no significant radiation risk for the human health at present level of 129 I, the continuously increasing production and release of 129 I make the accumulation of 129 I in the environment, immigration, cycle and long term radioecological risk should be give more attention due to its long half-life, high accumulation in human thyroid and high mobility. Iodine is a conservative element in the ocean, the large amount of iodine-129 discharged to the marine system can therefore be used as a oceanographic tracer to study the physical dispersion, mixing and circulative processes of water mass in the ocean. In Riso national laboratory, a radiochemical neutron activation analysis method was developed, using this method the radioecology and tracer of iodine-129 was studied. Some representative works are presented below. (1) Evaluation of radiation exposure of humans to iodine-129. The human and animal thyroids collected from different places, such as Tianjin in China, Gemol in Belarus, Ribe in Denmark, human urine in Denmark, seafood in China were analysed for iodine-129 concentration and 129 I/ 127 I ratio, the exposure level were compared with other places. (2) Reconstruction of radiation dose from I-131 in the

  12. Radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, Ph.; Beaugelin, K.; Maubert, H.; Ledenvic, Ph.

    1997-11-01

    This study has as objective a survey of the radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France, as well as a prognosis for the years to come. It was requested by the Direction of Nuclear Installation Safety (DSIN) in relation to different organisms which effected measurements after this accident. It is based on the use of combined results of measurements and modelling by means of the code ASTRAL developed at IPSN. Various measurements obtained from five authorities and institutions, were made available, such as: activity of air and water, soil, processed food, agricultural and natural products. However, to achieve the survey still a modelling is needed. ASTRAL is a code for evaluating the ecological consequences of an accident. It allows establishing the correspondence between the soil Remnant Surface Activities (RSA, in Bq.m -2 ), the activity concentration of the agricultural production and the individual and collective doses resulting from external and internal exposures (due to inhalation and ingestion of contaminated nurture). The results of principal synthesis documents on the Chernobyl accident and its consequences were also used. The report is structured in nine sections, as follows: 1.Introduction; 2.Objective and methodology; 3.Characterization of radioactive depositions; 4;Remnant surface activities; 5.Contamination of agricultural products and foods; 6.Contamination of natural, semi-natural products and of drinking water; 7.Dosimetric evaluations; 8.Proposals for the environmental surveillance; 9.Conclusion. Finally, after ten years, one concludes that at present the dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France were rather limited. For the period 1986-2046 the average individual effective dose estimated for the most struck zone is lower than 1500 μSv, which represents almost 1% of the average natural exposure for the same period. At present, the cesium 137 levels are at often inferior to those recorded before

  13. Participation of CIEMAT in studies of radioecology in european marine ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Meral, J.; Anton, M.P.; Gonzalez, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    In this report the different objectives and results achieved through the participation of the Aquatic Radioecology Laboratory for CIEMAT in some European Projects from 1994 up to now are detailed. A Description of the studied ecosystems, the sampling campaigns performed, and the analytical methods developed are presented as well. Finally the main results and conclusions obtained are summarized. (Author)

  14. Radioecological situation on agricultural territories of the Ukrainian Polissya for the period 1998 - 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, T.D.; Tishchenko, O.G.; Piskun, V.N.; Teslyuk, L.V.

    2006-01-01

    Materials of the radioecological situation assessment on agricultural territories at the level of farms and settlements of 5 contaminated regions of Ukraine are represented: Volynskay, Zhytomyrskay, Kievskay, Rovenskay and Chernigovskay. Classification of farms with the selection of critical territories was conducted with tools of the GIS systems

  15. Radioecological monitoring of the environment of a French nuclear power plant after 12 years in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulquier, L.; Descamps, B.; Roussel, S.

    1992-01-01

    Taking Fessenheim Nuclear Power Plant as an example, this paper gives a description of various types of environmental test carried out under the responsibility of the Operator of Nuclear Power Plants in France: permanent monitoring of radioactivity, periodic radioecological assessments. The main results of measurements taken, show the effect of the Plant to be negligible. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  16. Models for the detection and analysis of radioecological processes in rivers and oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, W.

    1984-01-01

    A short review is given in some examples on the research in the field of aquatic radioecology. The problems in calculating the sedimentation of radioactive materials are described. Measurements of the uptake of radionuclides in fishes of the rivers, the North Sea and in deep sea fish are given. (orig.) [de

  17. Principles of developing the bench mark net for radioecological monitoring in the territory of Byelorussia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshkevich, M.N.

    1991-01-01

    The principles of developing the radioecological monitoring bench mark net proposed include the regularity pattern of reference point setting, the bench mark net hierarchy, accounting for a land-tenure structure and the landscape and geochemical conditions of the radionuclide migration as well as a passport system and informational adequacy. The expression has been obtained for determining the location of sampling points

  18. Training-methodical guide on radioecology and radiation waste management in the Kazakhstan conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The guide is compiled with purpose to render assistance to specialists, secondary schools' teachers for elder classes' pupils and population on radioecology and radiation waste management for understanding of a more deep problems in this field. The guide consists of a lot of illustrative and tabular materials including of results of the authors own investigations

  19. Radioecological aspects of the discharge of radioactive substances with waste water and exhaust air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachner, D.; Becker, A.; Biesold, H.

    1976-01-01

    Radioecological aspects concerning radioactive effluents via air and water are under discussion. The essential patterns are defined and two food-chains (green vegetables-man, fish-man) will be taken here as an example for a look at the main parameters. Under typical emission conditions the environmental impacts for various pathways are given. (orig.) [de

  20. A Korean radioecology model to simulate radionuclide behavior in agricultural ecosystems following a nuclear emergency and its application to countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W.T.; Suh, K.S.; Kim, E.H.; Han, M.H.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, C.W.

    2003-01-01

    A Korean radioecology model to simulate radionuclide behavior in agricultural ecosystems has been developed as a module for evaluating the ingestion dose in a Korean real-time dose assessment system FADAS, which evaluates the comprehensive radiological consequences in an accidental release of radionuclides to the environment. Using the predictive results of a Korean radioecology model, a methodology for the optimization of countermeasures has been designed based on a cost-benefit analysis. In this manuscript, a Korean radioecology model including agricultural countermeasures was introduced, and discussed with the sample calculations for the postulated accidental release of radionuclides to the environment. (author)

  1. Analysis of activity of information inquired group on radioecology and public communication in Ozersk (the town of nuclear industry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govyrina, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Information Inquiry Group on Radioecology and Public Communication is a branch of the Department of Production Association Mayak. Mayak was formed in 1989. The main tasks as well as main functions of the group are presented. (author)

  2. [Radioecology as a branch of natural science: some thoughts on the interesting past, intricate and vital present and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksakhin, R M; Prister, B S

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes more than a century-old history of radioecology, science which studies radionuclide migration in the environment and ionizing radiation effects on biota. The main stages are identified in the development of this branch of natural science associated with the study of problems of radioactive contamination of the biosphere (global radionuclide fallout after nuclear weapons tests, radiation accidents with the release of radioactive substances to the environment). Currently, the basic imperative of radioecological investigations is the analysis of radioecological aspects of nuclear power engineering (mainly problems of radioactive waste management). Issues are discussed of radiation protection of biota (environment)--the anthropocentric (sanitary-hygienic) and ecocentric approaches. The importance of radioecology is indicated as the most advanced field of ecology in studying anthropogenic effects on the nature.

  3. Principles of the landscape-geochemical and radio-ecological mapping of the territory polluted by technogenic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotovich, Eh.V.; Shestopalov, V.M.; Pushkarev, A.V.; Mezhdunardonyj Nauchnyj Tsentr' Institut Chernobylya' Ukrainskogo Otdeleniya Vsemirnoj Laboratorii, Kiev; Institut Sel'skokhozyajstvennoj Radiologii, Akademii Agrarnykh Nauk Ukrainy, Kiev; Gosudarstvennoe Geologicheskoe Predpriyatie 'Geoprogn oz' Goskomiteta Geologii i Ispol'zovaniya Nedr Ukrainy, Kiev; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev

    1993-01-01

    The conceptual and methodical principles of radio-ecological mapping of the territory polluted by radionuclides as a result of catastrophe at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant are reported. The radio-ecological mapping is based on the landscape-geochemical mapping of the polluted territory which is regarded as a unique natural-technogenic geochemical province. The ecological risk for the inhabitants residing here depends both on the degree and nature of pollution by radionuclides and on the landscape-geochemical factors influencing the radionuclide redistribution and secondary accumulation in different biosphere elements. It is substantiated as necessary to compile three types of radio-ecological maps which are of different purpose: control over the economic activities, protection of the population viability, the prediction of radio-ecological situation and the informing of population

  4. The evolution and perfection of the 'Raldeg-Radinfo' radioecological information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskra, A. A.; Burykin, A. A.; Lebedev, O. G.

    2004-01-01

    The ISTC 2097 RadInfo project entitled 'The Development of a Sophisticated Information System Including a Meta-Database and Regional Radioecological Cadastres for Assessment of the Radiation Impact on the Environment and Population. Evaluation Study of the North-West Russia and Krasnoyarsk Region' launched on August 1, 2002 is based on use and substantial extension of information system formed in previous five-year period within the framework of the ISTC 245 RADLEG project and describing radiation-hazardous objects of the FSU nuclear complex. Under the project the RADLEG-RadInfo information system development is anticipated including formation of a number of new components, such as: a meta-database describing primary information resources related to characteristics of radiation-hazardous objects of the FSU states, regional radioecological cadastres on radioactive source-terms and contamination in the North-West Russia and Krasnoyarsk region, subject-oriented radioecological cadastres (peaceful nuclear explosions, NPP radioecology etc). For the present designing of the RadIinfo meta-database has been completed. On the basis of a conceptual model developed earlier in the form of entities diagram (Entity Relationship (ER)-model), a physical data model has been constructed. It means that tables and descriptions of the database structures for chosen DBMS have been formed. For that purpose the MS ACCESS-97/ 2000 DBMS was used. A demonstration prototype, based on designed meta-database, has been formed. The MDB users interface (a data input form) has been developed. A radioecological GIS-cadastre of the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, presenting the radiological status of the Yenisei River flood plain in the Combine impact zone, as well as a regional radioecological cadastre of the North-West Russia have been formed. For the GIS-cadastres preparation digital maps at the following scale were chosen: Regional - 1:8 000

  5. Lower Saxonian Institute of Radioecology at the University of Hannover. Annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The tasks of the Institute of Radioecology of Lower Saxonia mainly aim at the experimental and theoretical establishment of basic data, and derive to a large extent from the scope of the radiation protection regulation as to updating and deepened knowledge of radioecologic research. This led to the development of three points of main emphasis relating to the atmosphere near the soil, the soil itself, and the terrestrian food chain. The following individual investigations were carried through in the period under report: determination of concentration factors of diverse fission products and natural radioactive elements in the food chain; investigations into the physico-chemical behaviour of tritium-labelled water and hydrogen on transition from the air near the soil into the soil; and experiments in the propagation and deposition of artificially created aerosols. The development of the analysis of β-nuclides in environmental samples by Cherenkov counting was continued with a view to determining individual nuclides without radiochemical separation. (MG) [de

  6. Radioecological studies tied to the French nuclear power station programme: aims, nature and mode of execution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delile, G.

    1980-01-01

    Under present French practice, assessing the effects of radioactive discharges due to the various likely accident situations comes under 'L'Analyse de Surete Nucleaire' (Nuclear Safety Analysis). The assessment of radioactive discharges relating to normal working comes within the framework of radioecologic studies. Radioecology studies are undertkaen for every power station project. They consist in: - studying what is to be done with radioelements discharged as liquids or gases, - estimating their impact on the populations in the areas of influence of the power station and checking that this impact is permissible, - establishing a surveillance measuring programme for checking against the predictions made and, if required, determining the modifications to be made to the facilities or to their method of operation [fr

  7. The radioecological sensitivity of territories: towards an operational tool through the SENSIB Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercat-Rommens, C.; Roussel-Debet, S.; Briand, B.; Durand, V.; Besson, B.; Renaud, P.

    2007-01-01

    Radioecological sensitivity represents the intensity of a region's global reaction to an accidental or chronic radioactive pollution. The prospects for an operational application of this concept are investigated by I.R.S.N. within the framework of the S.E.N.S.I.B. project. The first aim of S.E.N.S.I.B. is to represent globally the territorial consequences of a situation of radioactive contamination, which requires to collect and to investigate the radioecological and contextual data. For this purpose, varied innovative methods of knowledge treatment are investigated. The second objective is to elaborate a management tool of this knowledge which could be shared by various stake holders (authorities, population, experts), and that is envisaged by the application of supporting methods to decision-making. The strategy, the preliminary results and the avenues of research of the project S.E.N.S.I.B. are briefly presented. (authors)

  8. Urgent problems of radioecology concerned with the problems of the Atomic Energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksakhin, R.M.; Polikarpov, G.G.

    1982-11-01

    Fundamentals tasks of contemporary radioecology concerning migration of natural and artificial radionuclides and the effect of ionizing radiation on natural biogeocenosis are expounded which arose from the developing production and uses of atomic energy. The authors discuss the problems of ecological control over radiation affection of ecosystems and present the classification of natural areas according to their ecological condition. The authors also stress the urgency of studies of migration in the biosphere of radionuclides of the complete nuclear fuel turnover [fr

  9. Nuclides.net: A computational environment for nuclear data and applications in radioprotection and radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthou, V.; Galy, J.; Leutzenkirchen, K.

    2004-01-01

    An interactive multimedia tool, Nuclides.net, has been developed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements. The Nuclides.net 'integrated environment' is a suite of computer programs ranging from a powerful user-friendly interface, which allows the user to navigate the nuclides chart and explore the properties of nuclides, to various computational modules for decay calculations, dosimetry and shielding calculations, etc. The product is particularly suitable for environmental radioprotection and radioecology. (authors)

  10. Third international radioecological conference. The fate of spent nuclear fuel: problems and reality. Abstracts collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In the book there are abstracts collection of the third International radioecological conference 'The fate of spent nuclear fuel: problems and reality' (June, 22-27, 1996, Krasnoyarsk, Russia) and International workshop meeting 'Defence nuclear waste disposal in Russia'. In the collection there are materials concerning the problems of technology, economics, ecology and safety of two types of nuclear cycle as well as the problems of health of population living near nuclear ojects and on contaminated territories

  11. Proposal for a test using aquatic mosses for the radioecological control of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin-Jaulent, Y.; Descamps, B.

    1985-01-01

    Field experiments demonstrated that a test using aquatic mosses (bags made of plastic netting and containing a small amount of moss) could be considered for the radioecological monitoring of a uranium mining complex. This test has the required qualities: easy operation, reliability and low cost. It also makes it possible to assess inorganic pollution due, for instance, to heavy metals, or organic pollution by products such as chlorinated compounds [fr

  12. Long-term monitoring of the Danube river-Sampling techniques, radionuclide metrology and radioecological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, F.J.; Gruber, V.; Hrachowitz, M.; Baumgartner, A.; Weilner, S.; Seidel, C.

    2009-01-01

    Sampling techniques and radiometric methods, developed and applied in a comprehensive radioecological study of the Danube River are presented. Results and radiometric data of sediment samples, collected by sediment traps in Austria and additionally by grab sampling in the Danube during research cruises between Germany and the delta (Black sea) are shown and discussed. Goal of the investigation is the protection of public and environment, especially the sustainable use and conservation of human freshwater resources against harmful radioactive exposure.

  13. Feeding habit and mode of living of benthic organisms, in relation to the radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikoshi, Masuoki

    1975-01-01

    The type of feeding habit, size spectrum (megalo-, macro-, meio-, and micro-benthos), life form (epi-, and endo-biose) and other modes of living of benthic organisms on and within the bottom sediments are briefly mentioned. Knowledge hitherto obtained concerning radio-ecology is also briefly reviewed in relation to those items mentioned above. Special attention is given to the relationship between the stratification and the mixing of bottom deposits, and the reworking and feeding activities of benthic animals. (auth.)

  14. The radioecological monitoring of the some water ecosystems of the contaminated districts of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvalej, O.D.; Dackevich, P.I.; Komissarov, F.D.; Basharina, L.P.

    2002-01-01

    The main results of the long-term radioecological monitoring of the some water ecosystems of the contaminated districts of Belarus are presented. The main components of water ecosystem (water, suspensions, bottom sediments, water vegetation) were observed. The migration of Cs 137 and Sr 90 on the water-collection areas were investigated in detail. The tendency of Sr 90 increasing in the components of the surface water systems is observed

  15. 1992 annual report of the Lower Saxony Institute of Radioecology at Hannover University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb-Bunnenberg, G.; Popp, M.

    1993-01-01

    The 1992 Annual Report gives an overview of the staff of the Lower Saxony Institute of Radioecology (NIR), its board of curators, its scientific advisory board, its budget, research and development projects, scientific contacts with other institutions, and publications in journals, reports, proceedings, and lectures and posters. The various activity reports have been analysed and can be separately retrieved from the database. (orig./BBR) [de

  16. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl. Programme 2 study of the radio-ecological consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-03-15

    The data compiled and processed within the framework of the French-German Initiative represent the so far most comprehensive collection of electronic data that has ever been put together on the topic of the 'Study of the radioecological consequences of the Chernobyl accident'.The R.E.D.A.C. database system provides a powerful tool for the reconstruction of the dispersion of radionuclides through ecosystems and food chains and for the interpretation and prediction of their long-term behaviour. This allows the development of effective countermeasures to minimise risks to human health and improve the overall environmental situation. R.E.D.A.C. can also be used for the development and verification of realistic radioecology models. As the data were acquired under realistic conditions, the results can be used directly for model calculations in emergencies. This allows concrete planning, e. g. in connection with the securing of waste, its disposal, and the ecological restoration of waste disposal sites. The data also allow a reconstruction of the radioecological situation in the past, an analysis of the current situation, and predictions of future developments of the accident consequences on a large as well as on a small scale. (N.C.)

  17. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl. Programme 2 study of the radio-ecological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    The data compiled and processed within the framework of the French-German Initiative represent the so far most comprehensive collection of electronic data that has ever been put together on the topic of the 'Study of the radioecological consequences of the Chernobyl accident'.The R.E.D.A.C. database system provides a powerful tool for the reconstruction of the dispersion of radionuclides through ecosystems and food chains and for the interpretation and prediction of their long-term behaviour. This allows the development of effective countermeasures to minimise risks to human health and improve the overall environmental situation. R.E.D.A.C. can also be used for the development and verification of realistic radioecology models. As the data were acquired under realistic conditions, the results can be used directly for model calculations in emergencies. This allows concrete planning, e. g. in connection with the securing of waste, its disposal, and the ecological restoration of waste disposal sites. The data also allow a reconstruction of the radioecological situation in the past, an analysis of the current situation, and predictions of future developments of the accident consequences on a large as well as on a small scale. (N.C.)

  18. Aspects of the incorporation of spatial data into radioecological and restoration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beresford, N.A.; Wright, S.M.; Howard, B.J.; Crout, N.M.J.; Arkhipov, A.; Voigt, G.

    2002-01-01

    In the last decade geographical information systems have been increasingly used to incorporate spatial data into radioecological analysis. This has allowed the development of models with spatially variable outputs. Two main approaches have been adopted in the development of spatial models. Empirical Tag based models applied across a range of spatial scales utilize underlying soil type maps and readily available radioecological data. Soil processes can also be modelled to allow the dynamic prediction of radionuclide soil to plant transfer. We discuss a dynamic semi-mechanistic radiocaesium soil to plant-transfer model, which utilizes readily available spatially variable soil parameters. Both approaches allow the identification of areas that may be vulnerable to radionuclide deposition, therefore enabling the targeting of intervention measures. Improved estimates of radionuclide fluxes and ingestion doses can be achieved by incorporating spatially varying inputs such as agricultural production and dietary habits in to these models. In this paper, aspects of such models, including data requirements, implementation and outputs are discussed and critically evaluated. The relative merits and disadvantages of the two spatial model approaches adopted within radioecology are discussed. We consider the usefulness of such models to aid decision-makers and access the requirements and potential of further application within radiological protection. (author)

  19. Radioecological impact around the nuclear power plant - general public perception and facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karunakara, N.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear science and technology have contributed immensely to the overall societal developmental. Today, nuclear applications can be found in almost every social and economical sector, and in virtually every corner of the globe. Radiation and radioisotopes find wide applications in the fields of agriculture, food preservation, health care, industry, water management, etc. During the last five decades, India has established a strong technological base for producing safe and economic electricity through nuclear power, and in the use of radiation and radioisotopes for the benefit of society. Although people in general have been appreciating many of the above achievements, some of them are skeptical about the safety of nuclear reactors and impact on the environment. Large sections of society are also not aware of or are indifferent to many positive contributions that nuclear science and technology have made to everyday life. The Radioecology Research Laboratory of the University Science Instrumentation Centre, Mangalore University is engaged in frontline research studies on radioecology and radiation protection around the Kaiga Nuclear Power Plant in the west coast of India for the past 23 years. The general public perception on nuclear power and the results of the detailed scientific study on radioecology in the environment of a nuclear power plant are discussed

  20. Integrating environment protection, a new challenge: strategy of the International Union of Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, F.; Alexakhin, R.; Godoy, J.M.; Oughton, D.; Sheppard, S.; Strand, P.

    2008-01-01

    Born in the fifties together with the emergence of the nuclear technologies, radioecology is a scientific discipline that primarily addresses environmental issues relevant to radioprotection. With a current membership of nearly 600 worldwide, the International Union of Radioecology was founded in the seventies as a non-governmental knowing society dedicated to the development and the promotion of this discipline. The scientific directions taken in Radioecology have been drastically influenced in the past by the Chernobyl accident, which forced a focus on environmental transfers through the environment to feed human radioprotection needs. Currently, a profound evolution is underway towards more ecological effects research and studies, under the driving pressure of the raise of society concern on environmental issues and the concomitant re-boost of nuclear industry to face global warming and the future energetic demands. The I.U.R. plays a central role within this evolution which is described here in more details along a description of its four major tools of action: dedicated task groups; workshops, seminars and conferences; training courses; web site tool for information and communication. Finally, together with the recent election of a new Board of Council to manage the Union, the main lines of the new strategic plan for the coming years are given. (author)

  1. Compilation of selected marine radioecological data for the US Subseabed Program: Summaries of available radioecological concentration factors and biological half-lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, L.S.; Marietta, M.G.; Jackson, D.W.

    1987-04-01

    The US Subseabed Disposal Program has compiled an extensive concentration factor and biological half-life data base from the international marine radioecological literature. A microcomputer-based data management system has been implemented to provide statistical and graphic summaries of these data. The data base is constructed in a manner which allows subsets to be sorted using a number of interstudy variables such as organism category, tissue/organ category, geographic location (for in situ studies), and several laboratory-related conditions (e.g., exposure time and exposure concentration). This report updates earlier reviews and provides summaries of the tabulated data. In addition to the concentration factor/biological half-life data base, we provide an outline of other published marine radioecological works. Our goal is to present these data in a form that enables those concerned with predictive assessment of radiation dose in the marine environment to make a more judicious selection of data for a given application. 555 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs

  2. Compilation of selected marine radioecological data for the US Subseabed Program: Summaries of available radioecological concentration factors and biological half-lives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, L.S.; Marietta, M.G.; Jackson, D.W.

    1987-04-01

    The US Subseabed Disposal Program has compiled an extensive concentration factor and biological half-life data base from the international marine radioecological literature. A microcomputer-based data management system has been implemented to provide statistical and graphic summaries of these data. The data base is constructed in a manner which allows subsets to be sorted using a number of interstudy variables such as organism category, tissue/organ category, geographic location (for in situ studies), and several laboratory-related conditions (e.g., exposure time and exposure concentration). This report updates earlier reviews and provides summaries of the tabulated data. In addition to the concentration factor/biological half-life data base, we provide an outline of other published marine radioecological works. Our goal is to present these data in a form that enables those concerned with predictive assessment of radiation dose in the marine environment to make a more judicious selection of data for a given application. 555 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Integrated management system best practices in radioecological laboratories; Sistema de gestao integrado: melhores praticas para laboratorios radioecologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Claudia Aparecida Zerbinatti de

    2010-07-01

    The research aims to study the best practices to support a conceptual proposal for IMS - Integrated Management System (quality, environment, safety and health) applicable to Radioecology laboratories. The research design is organized into the following steps: in a first step, it was developed the bibliographic and documentary research in IMS, survey and study of standards (QMS ISO 9000 (2005), ISO 9001 (2008), ISO 9004 (2000), EMS ISO 14001 (2004) and OHSMS OHSAS 18001 (2007) and OHSAS 18002 (2008)), identification and characterization of processes in Radioecology Laboratories and study of best practices methodology and benchmarking; in the second stage of the research it was developed a case study (qualitative research, with questionnaires via e-mail and interviews, when possible), preceded by a survey and selection of international and national radioecology laboratories and then these laboratories were contacted and some of them agreed to participate in this research; in the third stage of the research it was built the framework of best practices that showed results that could support the conceptual proposal for the IMS Radioecology Laboratory; the fourth and final stage of research consisted in the construction of the proposed conceptual framework of SGI for Radioecology Laboratory, being then achieved the initial objective of the research. (author)

  4. Radioecology applied to the studies of nuclear power station sites. Radioecological study of the middle Rhone. Pt.1. Trial interpretation of 'in situ' determination of sedimentary activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picat, P.; Debeuns, G.; Maubert, H.; Cartier, Y.; Lacroix, D.; Angeli, A.; Diraison, J.; Caudoux, B.; Tempier, C.

    1980-01-01

    The Rhone section investigated over a distance of around 100 km includes many nuclear facilities in operation, under construction or projected; such as gas diffusion and reprocessing plants, graphite-gas, PWR type and breeder reactors. It is worthwhile defining the radioecological situation on the basis of existing discharges and with the prospect of the complete commissioning of six nuclear power station sites. The study of the activity of sediments and fishes has been selected. The results are analyzed in terms of the future prospects of nuclear sitings. It would appear that attention should be focused on the effects of the discharge technique (duration, method of dilution) and the follow-up of quantities and activity levels of the liquid effluents in relation with the changes in the hydrological components of the river. Such an approach aims to define those areas most sensitive to the total impact of the fall-out and of the nuclear industry [fr

  5. The National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE): A Network of Excellence for Environmental and Human Radiation Risk Reduction - 13365

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhne, W.W.; Jannik, G.T.; Farfan, E.B.; Knox, A.S.; Mayer, J.J.; Murray, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950's when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re

  6. Assessment of radioecological state of surface waters in the Gomel and Mogilev regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvaley, O.D.; Datskevich, P.I.; Komissarov, F.D.; Levosechko, S.I.

    2000-01-01

    Article states that aplication of the republican Admissible Levels (RAL-96) in practice and their juxtaposition with the obtained results of analyses are not always justified because water of the studied systems is excluded from economic water supply to population in resettlement zone. The radioecological criteria of quality of surface waters were developed in 1993 by Ukrainian hydrobiologists O.P.Oksiyuk, V.N.Zhukinsky and others contain six levels (classes) of radioecological pollution of water: 1 - non-polluted, 2 - lowly polluted, 3 - moderately polluted, 4 - highly polluted, 5 - very high pollution, 6 - utmost pollution; three classes of water quality and six categories of water quality. It is believed that according to this complex clasification of quality of surface terrestrial waters, water of the studied systems of Gomel and Mogilev regions very often has exceeded the RAL-96 for 90Sr. According to the proposed complex classification of quality of surface terrestrial waters, water of the studied systems belongs mainly - for 137Cs and 90Sr - to the quality categories: 3b ''lowly polluted'' and 4a ''moderately polluted'' independent on sampling period. On some sites of 30...10 km zone, water quality corresponds to categories 5a ''very high pollution'' and 5b ''utmost pollution'' for 90Sr (rivers Slovechna, Nesvich and Pogonyansky channel). Thus, in the studied water systems, in radioecological relation, there is not a single one with water quality corresponding to indices 3a, i.e.sufficiently clean. 90Sr has high migration ability and is able to participate in different migration cycles including biological (food chains). The cases of exceeding the RAL indices for 90Sr in water indicate the necessity to study also other components of water systems of Belarus relating to this isotope

  7. Position of radioecology in view of radiation protection: Facts and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmet, G.

    2004-01-01

    Radioecology can best be described in view of the aims it is after. In order to do this, it has to be put in its correct content. As the word says it deals with the ecology of radioactive compounds in the environment. Being dealing with radioactive substances however it is also necessary to respect the requirements of radiation protection, which eventually means the determination of the doses and risks eventually means the determination of the doses and risks a man possibly incurs after a radiocontamination. In order to cover as much as possible these requirements, the radioecology part of the CZC Radiation Protection Programme has worked out a number of projects under contract now with Member State Institutes. These radioecological projects are all intended to work out the basic phenomena that govern the transfer of radionuclides through the environment. This is meant to reduce the uncertainty of the radiological assessment modelling, not by refinement of statistical skills but by a better understanding of the relationship between the activity of the biosphere and the behaviour of the radionuclides. These projects deal therefore with sensitive steps of the transfer in agricultural and semi-natural ecosystems, cycling in forest ecosystems, problems of availability, true absorption and transfer in ruminants taking into account feeding habits, digestibilities, age of animals, etc, phenomena of loading and throughflow in fresh waters, and behaviour of actinides in the marine environment. These basic radiological studies hopefully will permit to describe as adequately as possible the transfer of radionuclides in nature. Combinations of the relevant findings should enable to make adequate improvements to existing general descriptions of radionuclide transfer. (author)

  8. Distribution and speciation of radionuclides in the environment: their implication in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Following the discovery of X-ray and radioactivity, radioecological researches were initiated all over the world. But only after the 2nd World War the knowledge of the effects of ionizing radiations on the organisms and the processes of the diffusion of radionuclides in the environment achieved an outstanding level. On account of the great sensitivity of the radioactivity measurements, negligible amounts of radionuclides could be easily identified and measured in different environmental compartments without any slight interference with the metabolisms of living organisms. Many processes and phenomena could then be detected and studied. Ecology took advantage from such studies and its growth in a few years was probably greater than in the whole of the previous century. As a result a great interest in the determination of concentration factors in any organism spread widely in many laboratories, a large number of values were available in a few years time. Further it appeared that the transfer of the radionuclides from the environment to man could be better evaluated and monitored through the definition of some 'critical' quantity: a critical group, a critical radionuclide, a critical pathway, etc. The fallout dispersed by the experimental detonation of nuclear weapons and, more recently, the contamination due to the Chernobyl accident, were the most important sources of radionuclides in most of the environmental compartments. Undoubtedly in the post Chernobyl situation radioecology is in a better position because the description of the environment is presently much closer to reality and its conclusions much more reliable. But, as it is usual in science development, new problems appeared and new questions were asked. Speciation of radionuclides and other pollutants is considered and some of the effects on the diffusion and consequences are discussed. Finally, the application of the great amount of knowledge obtained by the radioecological research to a better

  9. The consequences of the Chernobyl accident - the radioecological database Redac of the French-German initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville-Cavelin, G.; Biesold, H.; Chabanyuk, V. [Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Institute (IRSN), Dir. of Environment and Intervention (DEI) - CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The French-German Initiative for Chernobyl (FGI), implemented by IRSN and GRS from 1997 until the end of 2003, included the 'Project on the Radioecological Consequences of the Accident'. The most relevant fields of radioecology and post-accidental aspects have been studied, such as radionuclides transfers to plants, to animals, by surface runoff, in the aquatic environment and in the urban environment, wastes management and countermeasures. The main goal was to collect and harmonise, from Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, the highest possible amount of data and results on these different topics. These data have been verified, validated and organized in a common geo-referenced database REDAC (Radioecological Database After Chernobyl). For linking the different data, maps of initial and present contamination by {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr have been drawn up and relevant environmental non-radioactive data have been included. The operational database built will also allow the management of the wastes disposal sites. Countermeasures used after the accident for urban areas, natural and agricultural environment, have been described and classified. A methodology for evaluating their effectiveness has been developed. This database constitutes a tool for the development and validation of operational, assessment and explicative models. This allows the quantification and assessment of radionuclide transfer in the different compartments of ecosystems. So the main parameters influencing the transfers can be identified. REDAC should be completed by further investigations, for example on transuranic elements and extended to larger geographical zones. The database should also be combined with others provided by different organisations (IAEA, IRSN, UIR, ). (author)

  10. The consequences of the Chernobyl accident - the radioecological database Redac of the French-German initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville-Cavelin, G.; Biesold, H.; Chabanyuk, V.

    2004-01-01

    The French-German Initiative for Chernobyl (FGI), implemented by IRSN and GRS from 1997 until the end of 2003, included the 'Project on the Radioecological Consequences of the Accident'. The most relevant fields of radioecology and post-accidental aspects have been studied, such as radionuclides transfers to plants, to animals, by surface runoff, in the aquatic environment and in the urban environment, wastes management and countermeasures. The main goal was to collect and harmonise, from Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, the highest possible amount of data and results on these different topics. These data have been verified, validated and organized in a common geo-referenced database REDAC (Radioecological Database After Chernobyl). For linking the different data, maps of initial and present contamination by 137 Cs and 90 Sr have been drawn up and relevant environmental non-radioactive data have been included. The operational database built will also allow the management of the wastes disposal sites. Countermeasures used after the accident for urban areas, natural and agricultural environment, have been described and classified. A methodology for evaluating their effectiveness has been developed. This database constitutes a tool for the development and validation of operational, assessment and explicative models. This allows the quantification and assessment of radionuclide transfer in the different compartments of ecosystems. So the main parameters influencing the transfers can be identified. REDAC should be completed by further investigations, for example on transuranic elements and extended to larger geographical zones. The database should also be combined with others provided by different organisations (IAEA, IRSN, UIR, ). (author)

  11. The experience on the use of morphological methods in radioecological monitoring of mouse rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materij, L.D.; Ermakova, O.V.

    1996-01-01

    Hysto-cytological and morphometrical methods are recommended for use in radio-ecological monitoring. Morphological studies were carried out on Microtus oeconomus Pull from the 30 km accident zone of the Chernobyl NPP. The micropopulation of vole was exposed to acute irradiation at the beginning of the accident at a dose of about 1 Gy. Later on the exposure transformed into low-background irradiation (external and internal). Tissue analysis for crucial systems made it possible to determine the order of radiation response development in the organism in different vole generations, as well as the formation of steady pathological changes

  12. 1986 annual report of the Lower Saxony Institute for Radio-Ecology at the Hanover University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The research and development projects deal with the HTO exchange within the system of atmosphere/soil, with the conversion of HT to HTO/OBT in the soil, with the determination of Sr-90 and Cs-137 in environmental samples and with a stock taking of I-129 in human thyroids. Additional studies following the Chernobyl accident concern the determination of transfer factors, enrichments and migration of fission products or uranium. The research programme is supplemented by aerophysical studies, special radio-ecological issues (aerosol determination, washout, deposition, dispersion) and by the non-destructive biomass assay using gamma rays and microwaves. (DG) [de

  13. A radioecological model of radionuclide bioaccumulation in the ecosystems of the Barents and Kara Seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic model is developed to assess the radioecological consequences of the radioactive waste dumping in the Arctic Ocean, with a special focus on the impact on fisheries. The contamination of important commercial species of Arctic fish is modelled with consideration for their living and feeding habits. Model predictions are made for biologically significant and long-lived radionuclides, such as 137 Cs and 90 Sr. The potential consequences of the dumping for Russian and Norwegian fisheries are analyzed, based on the statistical data for commercial fishery in the Arctic Ocean. Doses to humans due to the consumption of contaminated marine foodstuffs from the Arctic Ocean are estimated

  14. Diversity of dietary habits in the population as important factor of the regional radioecological sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travnikova, I.; Bruk, G.; Shutov, V.

    2001-01-01

    The assessment of the ways and regularities of internal dose formation in the population is impossible without the determination of food consumption habits for the population residing in contaminated areas. Food habits of peoples inhabiting the former Soviet Union differ both due to historical reasons and to religious traditions. Variation of food consumption is an important factor of radio-ecological sensitivity of the population. We try to show this on the example of south-west districts of the Bryansk region contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident. In these regions, a set of countermeasures has been applied that strongly deformed traditional food consumption. (orig.)

  15. Radioactive cesium in a boreal forest ecosystem. Ecological concepts in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palo, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    Radioecology is traditionally viewing ecosystems as process functional units while modern ecology focus more on interactions among populations and communities. Taken separately they may lead to incomplete conclusion about radionuclide behaviour and give a too simplified view of the system. I adopt an hierarchical approach by focusing on the forest ecosystem, populations and individuals. I present a theoretical framework commonly used in analysis of herbivore- plant interactions and give an example on how individual behaviour perturbate to higher levels of ecological organizations. (au) (20 refs.)

  16. A radioecological survey of eatable organisms for natural radionuclides in hot spring water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, H.; Huang, X.; Song, H.; Li, J.; Zhang, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports a radioecological survey on some aquatic eatable organisms raised in a hot spring water, which is rich in 226 Ra, in Hubei Province; and on agricultural products irrigated with the water. The contents of 226 Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Po in the water, some aquatic organisms, rice, vegetable an some other connected environmental samples were determined. The Concentration Factor (CF) or Transfer Coefficient (TC) from environmental medium into the eatable parts of the organisms for these nuclides as well as relative Distribution Factor (DF) was calculated. (author). 6 refs, 1 fig., 9 tabs

  17. A radioecological research on Chilopod species Scolopendra cingulata (Latreille, 1829) from Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antovic, I.; Stojanovic, D.; Svrkota, N.; Zizic, R.; Antic, D.; Antovic, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    In a transition from historical (anthropocentric) to modern (biocentric) approach in radioecological research, animals and plants should be considered not only as contaminants to humans, but also as targets. Therefore, investigations of (as more as possible) various species are warranted. Radioecological research on chilopod species Scolopendra cingulata occurring in Serbia has been performed for the first time. This species (with the Mediterranean zoogeographical affinities) is typical representative of surface soil layers fauna, and the top 5 cm of soil was also analyzed for radioactivity due to some natural radioisotopes and artificial 137 Cs - at the localities were S. cingulata had been sampled. Among individuals of S. cingulata sampled in 2010 and 2012 (at three localities in Serbia - Pcinja, Izbice and Novi Pazar), 10 were included in this analysis. They had been taken (under rocks) by pencers, while their full determination were carried out using binocular ZEISS Discovery V8 stereomicroscope and adequate literature. The ORTEC HPGe spectrometers: GEM-40190, relative efficiency 40 %, and GEM - 30185-S, relative efficiency (35 %) are used to perform radioisotope activity measurements. Those from the 232 Th and 238 U( 226 Ra) series were analyzed (i.e., 228 Ac, 212 Pb, and 214 Pb, 214 Bi - respectively), as well as naturally occurring 40 K, and fission product 137 Cs. They were considered through their intensive (gamma) photopeaks

  18. Use of Monte Carlo Bootstrap Method in the Analysis of Sample Sufficiency for Radioecological Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A. N. C. da; Amaral, R. S.; Araujo Santos Jr, J.; Wilson Vieira, J.; Lima, F. R. de A.

    2015-01-01

    There are operational difficulties in obtaining samples for radioecological studies. Population data may no longer be available during the study and obtaining new samples may not be possible. These problems do the researcher sometimes work with a small number of data. Therefore, it is difficult to know whether the number of samples will be sufficient to estimate the desired parameter. Hence, it is critical do the analysis of sample sufficiency. It is not interesting uses the classical methods of statistic to analyze sample sufficiency in Radioecology, because naturally occurring radionuclides have a random distribution in soil, usually arise outliers and gaps with missing values. The present work was developed aiming to apply the Monte Carlo Bootstrap method in the analysis of sample sufficiency with quantitative estimation of a single variable such as specific activity of a natural radioisotope present in plants. The pseudo population was a small sample with 14 values of specific activity of 226 Ra in forage palm (Opuntia spp.). Using the R software was performed a computational procedure to calculate the number of the sample values. The re sampling process with replacement took the 14 values of original sample and produced 10,000 bootstrap samples for each round. Then was calculated the estimated average θ for samples with 2, 5, 8, 11 and 14 values randomly selected. The results showed that if the researcher work with only 11 sample values, the average parameter will be within a confidence interval with 90% probability . (Author)

  19. Haematological studies on micropopulations of Clethrionomys rutilus Pall under different radioecological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodkin, P.A.; Testov, B.V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on living organisms is studied. The blood of Clethrionomys rutilus Pall which habitates under various radioecological conditions is studied. It is taken into account that hematologic indices reflex the general state of the organism and prove to be a sensitive test of physiological alterations in the organism. The animals were taken on the territory with the increased amount of uranium and thorium in the underlying original rock. Average radiation doses from external gamma radiation on experimental and control territories constitute 0.86 and 0.1 rem/year, respectively. Radiation from thoron, radon and products of their decay condition the dose of 2 rem/year on the experimental territory and 0.1 rem/year on the control territory. Blood for investigation is taken with the method of decapitation. A 5% level of importance of differences is taken for the statistic processing of results obtained. The investigation has revealed no considerable differences between micropopulations of Clethrionomys rutilus Pall habitating different radioecological conditions over all indices of the red blood studied. As considers the composition of white blood, statistically considerable excess of the general amount of leukocytes in wintered males from the radioactive territory is found. An insignificant excess of this index has been noted in other groups of animals, as well

  20. Contemporary radioecological state of the North-western Black Sea and the problems of environment conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshchenko, N.N.; Mirzoyeva, N.Yu.; Gulin, S.B.; Milchakova, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Contamination of the ecosystem components by the radioactive isotopes 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239, 240 Pu. • The maps of the temporal–spatial change in distribution of isotopes are submitted. • Zones with an increased ability to accumulate these radioactive pollutants were revealed. • Estimations of the flows of elimination of the radionuclides into the bottom sediments were carried out. • Assessment of dose rates formed by 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 239,240 Pu for Black Sea hydrobionts was obtained. - Abstract: Review is devoted to the analysis of a radioecological situation in the North-western Black Sea and concerns the levels of contamination of the components of an ecosystem by the main artificial radioactive isotopes ( 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239,240 Pu). The long-term accumulation trends of these radionuclides were analyzed in components of the Black Sea ecosystem after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Zones that have an increased ability to accumulate these radioisotopes were revealed. The assessment of irradiation dose rates formed by 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 239,240 Pu in Black Sea hydrobionts was obtained. The strategy for biodiversity conservation and sustainable management of natural resources should include monitoring of the radioecological state of the marine ecosystems, and the formation of a complex of biogeochemical criteria for assessment of an ecological situation in the sea. This approach is important for marine protected areas, since it allows the formation of a basis for scientific and practical function

  1. Nonlinear transfer of elements from soil to plants: impact on radioecological modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S.; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Roivainen, Paeivi; Kumlin, Timo; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 1627, Kuopio (Finland)

    2016-08-15

    In radioecology, transfer of radionuclides from soil to plants is typically described by a concentration ratio (CR), which assumes linearity of transfer with soil concentration. Nonlinear uptake is evidenced in many studies, but it is unclear how it should be taken into account in radioecological modeling. In this study, a conventional CR-based linear model, a nonlinear model derived from observed uptake into plants, and a new simple model based on the observation that nonlinear uptake leads to a practically constant concentration in plant tissues are compared. The three models were used to predict transfer of {sup 234}U, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 210}Pb into spruce needles. The predictions of the nonlinear and the new model were essentially similar. In contrast, plant radionuclide concentration was underestimated by the linear model when the total element concentration in soil was relatively low, but within the range commonly observed in nature. It is concluded that the linear modeling could easily be replaced by a new approach that more realistically reflects the true processes involved in the uptake of elements into plants. The new modeling approach does not increase the complexity of modeling in comparison with CR-based linear models, and data needed for model parameters (element concentrations) are widely available. (orig.)

  2. How can we use the radioecological sensitivity concept as a tool for risk management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercat-Rommens, C.; Renaud, P.

    2004-01-01

    The consequences for the man and the environment of the discharges of nuclear facilities depend on the importance and the nature of the discharges, but also on the environment which receives them. Thus, the impact of a pollution, which is expressed in term of toxicity, risk or economic consequences, varies according to the characteristics of the environment and the use of this environment by the man. The radioecological sensitivity can be defined as the response of the environment to a radioactive pollution. For a determined discharge, the higher is the response, the more sensitive is the environment. If all the ecosystems appear sensitive, their sensitivity does not concern the same criteria and it is currently difficult to compare these criteria between them. The idea of the SENSIB project is to create a standardized tool which makes it possible to represent and to compare with the same scale the sensitivity of various ecosystems. The SENSIB project aims to develop both a methodology to calculate sensitivity indexes and a radioecological sensitivity scale usable for risk management. (orig.)

  3. Radioecological behaviour of elementary tritium, especially dry deposition and its dependence on soil porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerstel, H.

    1997-01-01

    The inventory of fusion reactors mainly consists of deuterium and tritium. The amount of tritium of each reactor is equal to the natural inventory of the earth's atmo- and hydrosphere. Elementary tritium (HT) itself is not dangerous to man, for it is hardly dissolved in water, that is neither taken up by human tissues nor metabolized anywhere in our body. In contrast to HT the tritiated water HTO quickly exchanges with any wet surface and with the humidity of air. After an accidental release into the atmosphere the main pathway of intake into the human body is as HTO via the lung; its surface is comparable to a soccer playground. HT released into air will be quickly oxidised within the upper centimetres of the soil when the plume touches the ground. Each soil tested by us until now had oxidized HT, that had shown hydrogenase activity. Neither the biological function nor the catalytic system wee identified yet. The hypothesis of a correlation between hydrogenase activity and soil nitrogen fixation could not be confirmed (nitrogen fixation shows a leakage of hydrogen): nitrogen fixing plants (nodules) do not oxidize HT. The presentation will summarize ten years of work in the laboratory and in the field. A concise picture of the radioecological behaviour of elementary tritium after an accidental release could be obtained. The work was partly done as cooperation within the frame of the EU or within the International Union of Radioecology

  4. U.S. Radioecology Research Programs of the Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichle, D.E.

    2004-01-12

    This report contains two companion papers about radiological and environmental research that developed out of efforts of the Atomic Energy Commission in the late 1940s and the 1950s. Both papers were written for the Joint U.S.-Russian International Symposium entitled ''History of Atomic Energy Projects in the 1950s--Sociopolitical, Environmental, and Engineering Lessons Learned,'' which was hosted by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxemberg, Austria, in October 1999. Because the proceedings of this symposium were not published, these valuable historic reviews and their references are being documented as a single ORNL report. The first paper, ''U.S. Radioecology Research Programs Initiated in the 1950s,'' written by David Reichle and Stanley Auerbach, deals with the formation of the early radioecological research programs at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's nuclear production facilities at the Clinton Engineering Works in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; at the Hanford Plant in Richland, Washington; and at the Savannah River Plant in Georgia. These early radioecology programs were outgrowths of the environmental monitoring programs at each site and eventually developed into the world renowned National Laboratory environmental program sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy. The original version of the first paper was presented by David Reichle at the symposium. The second paper, ''U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Environmental Research Programs Established in the 1950s,'' summarizes all the environmental research programs supported by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and discusses their present-day legacies. This paper is a modified, expanded version of a paper that was published in September 1997 in a volume commemorating the 50th anniversary symposium of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of

  5. SFRP conference days on 'Eco-toxicology, radioecology: situation and perspectives'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    Environment protection and biodiversity preservation are increasing human and society concerns. In this context, the Environment Section and the Research and Health section of the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) have join their efforts to organize two scientific days with the aim to make a status of the environment protection awareness in the nuclear industry under the view of ecotoxicology and radioecology. This document gathers the presentations (slides) given during these 2 days: 1 - We cannot save mankind without saving the Earth (Boeuf, G.); 2 - CIPR and IUR: todays and tomorrow recommendations in radiologic protection of the environment (Brechignac, F.); 3 - The new Basic Safety Standards Directive and its Implications for the Protection of the Environment (Janssens, A.); 4 - Environment protection in the French law (Chevalier, S.); 5 - Uranium: towards an environmental quality standard for French rivers (Gilbin, R.); 6 - Ecological consequences of the Chernobyl accident: a still debated topic (Garnier-Laplace, J.); 7 - From bio-tests to field studies: eco-toxicity characterization tools (Thybaud, E.); 8 - A Strategic Research Agenda for Radioecology (Hinton, T.); 9 - The initial environmental state of the Cigeo geologic disposal facility (Perocheau, S.); 10 - Environmental risk evaluation: practical concepts and new developments (Andres, S.); 11 - Elements of reflection of the CEA about the environmental evaluation approach (Monfort, M.); 12 - Method of radioecological impact evaluation around EdF's nuclear power plants (Le Druillennec, T.); 13 - Evaluation of the potential impacts of ancient French uranium mining sites on ecosystems (Gibeaux, A.); 14 - UK Habitat Assessments for Radioactive Substances (Copplestone, D.); 15 - Impact of facilities effluents on the eco-complex of Cadarache area (Jourdain, F.); 16 - Radionuclides transfer from sea water to biological compartments: kinetic effects and operational modeling in accidental situation

  6. Radioecological Investigations in the Russian Far-East and Public Opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaevich Soyfer, V.

    1992-01-01

    At the first stage of this investigation a report based on the data collected by departmental radiation monitoring services radioecological investigations fulfilled by RECH has beer prepared. The report gives an assessment of radiation conditions of the Russian Far-East region and adjacent seas as well as of the activities of the above-said services. Among the radiator monitoring survives subject to inspection were NPP, Hydrometsosurvics, Civil defence offices, Sanitary epidemiological survive and also plants and bases for exploitation and repairs of nuclear power submarines. In the course of the inspection of these objects it was inevitable to face a wide spectrum of public opinion of different orientation and organizational forms concerning nuclear problems. The report analyzes the relationships between the population on the one hand and the administrations and the staff of the territories and object on the other, in connection with the radiation situation in the ares

  7. Summer school on radio monitoring as a part of radioecological education and emergency preparedness program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyarkov, V.; Kadenko, I.; Jordynsky, D.; Nazarov, A.; Dubchak, S. [Ministry of Emergemcies, Kiev (Ukraine). Ukrainian Radiation Trainig Center

    1997-12-31

    The International Summer School is organized by the Ukrainian Radiation Training Centre of the Ministry of Ukraine of Emergencies and Affairs of Population Protection from the Consequences of Chernobyl Catastrophe to provide training and experience in the techniques of environmental radiation monitoring and emergency preparedness training of students and to enhance knowledge`s of specialists in different fields of radioecology as well. It includes classroom instructions and training in areas affected by the Chernobyl accident. Within selected areas dose rates and gamma flux measurements have been conducted at two different heights. Ten measurements for dose rate and for gamma flux were done at each selected point of sites. The main results of summer school activities are briefly presented 4 refs., 1 fig., 8 tab.

  8. [Assessment of modern radioecological situation at nuclear explosion "Chagan" (Balapan Site, Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, Kazakhstan)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evseeva, T I; Maĭstrenko, T A; Geras'kin, S A; Belykh, E S; Umarov, M A; Sergeeva, I Iu; Sergeev, V Iu

    2008-01-01

    Results on estimation of modern radioecological situation at nuclear explosion "Chagan" based on large-scale cartographic studies (1:25000) of a test area (4 km2) are presented. Maximum gamma-irradiation doses were observed at bulk of ground surrounded a crater and at radioactive fall-outs extended to the North-East and to the SouthWest from the crater. Based on data on artificial radionuclide specific activity most part of soil samples were attributed to radioactive wastes according to IAEA (1996) and OSPORB (1999). Natural decrease of soil radioactivity up to safety level due to 60Co, 137Cs, 90Sr, 152Eu, 154Eu radioactive decay and 241Am accumulation-decay will not take place within the next 60 years at the studied area.

  9. Radioecological reduction of acute and long-term environmental contamination with 129I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettelkopf, H.

    1978-01-01

    In the course of the research project 'Investigations on the radioecology of 129 I', analytical methods with extremely low detection limits for all important test materials have been developed. The behaviour of 129 I in a reprocessing plant and its emission from a reprocessing plant has been completely investigated and understood. The feared long-term hazard due to a single environmental contamination with 129 I is not to be expected as the biological availability of 129 I in the ground is reduced with a half-life of 0.3a. The 'basis for calculation' recommended by the Federal Minister of the Interior overestimate 129 I doses by at least a factor of 45. (orig.) [de

  10. Pre and post-operational radioecological studies around Kaiga Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karunakara, N.

    2018-01-01

    Four PHWR rectors of 220 MWe each are operating at Kaiga. The Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Radioactivity (CARER), Mangalore University is engaged in frontline research studies on different aspects of environmental radioactivity and radioecology studies around Kaiga and West Coast of India for the last 30 years. Extensive studies were carried out on radiation levels, radionuclides distribution, and transfer of radionuclides through terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric pathways in the environment of West Coast of India including the Kaiga nuclear power plant. The baseline studies on radioactivity levels around Kaiga region was carried out well before the nuclear power plant became operational and the data generated under these studies are considered to be highly valuable for impact assessments. The nuclear power plant became operational in the year 1999 and since then extensive studies were carried out on radiological impact assessments, through collaboration with Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and Nuclear Power Corporation of India (NPCIL)

  11. Radioecological state of some surface water systems of contaminated areas of both Gomel and Mogilev Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datskevich, P. I.; Komissariv, F. D.; Khvale', O. D.; Basharina, L. P.; Lobach, I. L.

    1997-01-01

    The radioecological situation of different ecosystems of Belarus and their components has been analysed. Such components of the surface water ecosystems as water, suspensions, sediments and soils of water-collection areas were used for the investigation of the content of cesium 137 and strontium 90. The received data were given since 1990. The content of cesium 137 and strontium 90 in the components of water ecosystems was counted in the laboratory conditions by means of standard methods of beta radiometry, semiconductor gamma spectrometry and radiochemistry. The error of measurement of radioactivity was not higher than 25 and 35% for cesium 137 and strontium 90 accordingly. Water ecosystems were distinguished by the state of contamination of water-collection areas and hydrological parameters. These and some other reasons considered in the article influence on the character of cesium 137 and strontium 90 behaviour in water ecosystems

  12. Radio-ecological studies on the air-soil-vine-wine food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.

    1987-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of the first three years (1983-85) of the radio-ecological studies on wine which were performed on eight sites from major German wine-growing regions involving red and white wine varieties typical of their region. The radionuclides of tritium, carbon 14, strontium 90, cesium 137, radium 226 and sodium 40 were examined for their contents and presence in the food chain of air-soil-vine-wine in order to determine the pollution situation in grapes and wine and to gain information on their behaviour in the food chain. A number of soil parameters important for nutrient uptake were determined to describe the site. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Summer school on radio monitoring as a part of radioecological education and emergency preparedness program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poyarkov, V.; Kadenko, I.; Jordynsky, D.; Nazarov, A.; Dubchak, S.

    1997-01-01

    The International Summer School is organized by the Ukrainian Radiation Training Centre of the Ministry of Ukraine of Emergencies and Affairs of Population Protection from the Consequences of Chernobyl Catastrophe to provide training and experience in the techniques of environmental radiation monitoring and emergency preparedness training of students and to enhance knowledge's of specialists in different fields of radioecology as well. It includes classroom instructions and training in areas affected by the Chernobyl accident. Within selected areas dose rates and gamma flux measurements have been conducted at two different heights. Ten measurements for dose rate and for gamma flux were done at each selected point of sites. The main results of summer school activities are briefly presented

  14. Radioecology of the Rhone basin: data on the fish of the Rhone (1974-1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrechts, A.; Foulquier, L.

    1987-01-01

    Some twenty nuclear sites are located along the Rhone. A radioecological study of the river has been in progress since 1974 and a brief outline is given of its hydrological, chemical, sedimentological and biological features. The techniques used for sampling, processing and radioactivity measurement in fish are also described. A summary of the results demonstrates the influence of the nuclear power stations and fuel cycle plants on the evolution of radioactivity levels in fish as a function of time or distance from liquid waste discharge points. Comparison with data for the Meuse shows that activities in fish downstream of the nuclear power stations are comparable in both rivers. Levels are, however, higher in the Rhone downstream from the Marcoule reprocessing plant. The data collected in situ together with the results of laboratory experiments demonstrate the mechanisms of transfer of radionuclides into the aquatic environment and supply information for the protection of environmental health. (author)

  15. Nord-Cotentin radioecology group: an innovative experiment in pluralist expertise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Schneider, T.; Crouail, P.; Heriard-Dubreuil, G.; Gadbois, S.; Oudiz, A.

    2000-11-01

    This report gives a synthetic overview of the procedure and the main results of the GRNC (Nord-Cotentin Radioecology Group), and lessons that can be drawn from it. In particular, it is intended to demonstrate the innovation of the pluralist approach adopted by summarizing its historic context and differences with the similar experiment carried out in the United Kingdom for the Sellafield nuclear site 1. It also presents the different steps in the evaluation of exposures and risks associated with ionising radiation. Finally, it emphasizes prospects opened as a result of the Group's experiment on the involvement of stakeholders in the evaluation and management of radiological risk. This final aspect could open up new means of ''preventively'' dealing with questions related to risks to health and the environment inherent to industrial activities. (A.L.B.)

  16. U.S. Radioecology Research Programs Initiated in the 1950s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    In the early postwar years, beginning in 1949 and extending to the mid-1960s, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) research on the fate and effects of radionuclides in the environment was driven by distinct environmental concerns-- the releases of radioactive materials around production sites, fallout from nuclear weapons tests, and radiation effects from both external and internal exposures. These problem areas spawned development of the scientific field of radioecology. To understand the perspectives in the 1950s of the United States on the issues of nuclear energy and the environment, we have reviewed the early research programs. Keeping to the theme of the papers in this environmental session, we will focus on the first area of concern -- the scientific studies to understand the environmental consequences of nuclear production and fuel reprocessing at the three primary production sites: the Hanford Works in the state of Washington, Clinton Laboratories in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. The driving environmental issue was the fate and effects of waste products from nuclear fuel production and reprocessing -- concern about entry into environmental pathways. Early operational monitoring and evaluation by health physicists led to realization that additional emphasis needed to be placed on understanding environmental fate of radionuclides. What followed was forward-thinking R and D planning and development of interdisciplinary research teams for experimentation on complex environmental systems. What follows is a review of the major U.S. AEC radioecology research programs initiated during the 1950s, the issues leading to the establishment of these programs, early results, and their legacies for environmental protection and ecological research in the following decades

  17. Radioecology of urban areas by the example of Pripyat and Slavutych

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaschak, S.; Arkhipov, A.; Ryabushkin, A.; Maksimenko, A.; Oskolkov, B.; Bondarkov, M.; Ivanov, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Peculiarities of urban radioecology have been compared for two towns: 1) the town of Pripyat abandoned after the Chernobyl accident, and 2) the town of Slavutych built after the Chernobyl accident within the contaminated area and populated now. Both towns were contaminated by radioactive fallouts and then decontaminated to varying degrees. Research reports clearly demonstrate that radioactive contamination of the urban environment and its further spread has a set of specific features that are not peculiar to natural and semi-natural ecosystems. In particular, there is an extremely large variety of biotic and abiotic factors, which define adhesion and deflation of radioactive substances, their accumulation and transfer. It is caused by the presence of a large number of many-storied constructions, vast areas of asphalt and concrete covers, soil properties and hydrological conditions atypical for local natural ecosystems, etc. Specific places of radionuclide accumulation, parameters of its migration and bioavailability were identified in the towns. The current state of the towns causes certain differences in their radioecology. Pripyat remains a heavily contaminated environment (up to tens MBq/m 2 in total), and natural factors are the most important in radionuclide behaviour. The radiation situation in Slavutych depends on human activities and it is much milder than in Pripyat. The doses received by the public are mainly determined by the internal intake of radionuclides via ingestion of food. Pripyat represents a large natural laboratory where the influence of the urban environment on specific elements of radioactive material distribution and redistribution can be studied, and decontamination techniques for contaminated urban areas can be applied in actual practice. (author)

  18. Radioecological consequences of potential accident in Norwegian coastal waters. Uncertainties and knowledges gaps in methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iosjpe, M.; Reistad, O.; Brown, J.; Jaworska, A.; Amundsen, I.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. A potential accident involving the transport of spent nuclear fuel along the Norwegian coastline has been choosen for evaluation of a dose assessment methodology. The accident scenario assumes that the release the radioactivity takes place under water and that there is free exchange of water between the spent fuel and the sea. The inventory has been calculated using the ORIGEN programme. Radioecological consequences are provided by the NRPA compartment model which includes the processes of advection of radioactivity between compartments and water-sediment interactions. The contamination of biota is further calculated from the radionuclide concentrations in filtered seawater in the different water regions. Doses to man are calculated on the basis of radionuclide concentrations in marine organisms, water and sediment and dose conversion factors. Collective dose-rates to man, doses to the critical groups, concentration of radionuclides in biota/sea-foods and doses to marine organisms were calculated through the evaluation of radioecological consequences after accidents. Results of calculations indicate that concentrations of radionuclides for some marine organisms can exceed guideline levels. At the same time collective dose rates to man as well as doses to a critical group are not higher than guideline levels. Comparison of results from calculations with provisional benchmark values suggests that doses to biota are in most cases unlikely to be of concern. However, to some marine organisms can be much higher than the screening dose of 10 μGyh over long periods. It is apparent that water-sediment distribution coefficients and concentration factors constitute the main sources of uncertainties in the present case. It is important to note that knowledge gaps concerning the influence of relatively low dose to populations of marine organisms over long time periods (many generations) substantially constrain the accessor's ability to

  19. Accumulation of {sup 137}Cs in wetlands and their importance in radioecological risk assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, K; Nylen, T; Wallberg, P [Stockholm University, Dept. of Systems Ecology, SE (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Wetlands function as nurseries and feeding areas for both terrestrial and aquatic species and are habitats for many endangered species such as frogs, salamanders and snakes. Wetlands alter the hydrology of streams and rivers, enhance sediment deposition and work as a filter to coastal waters retaining nutrients as well as contaminants. Due to the lack of easily identifiable direct pathways to humans wetland ecosystems have generally been neglected within radioecological research. There is a large diversity of wetlands and some of them can accumulate and function as sinks for radionuclides. In Sweden wetlands are among the ecosystems where the highest activity concentrations have accumulated after the Chernobyl accident. This paper summarizes factors that are important to the accumulation of radionuclides in wetlands. As an example, one wetland ecosystem in Sweden contaminated by {sup 137}Cs due to the Chernobyl accident will be described in more detail. The average activity concentration in this wetland is 1.1 MBq/m{sup 2}, i.e. 10 times higher than in the surrounding areas. Soil and sediment samples were collected and the {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations were measured. A budget calculation of {sup 137}Cs in the wetland area was conducted, indicating that the accumulation of {sup 137}Cs is still ongoing seventeen years after the accident. High activity concentrations are likely to remain in this ecosystem for a long time, resulting in long-term exposure for organisms living there. The maximum external {sup 137}Cs dose rate to frogs was estimated to 96 mGy/year. Hence, identification and consideration of wetlands that accumulate radionuclides to a high extent are important in radioecological risk assessments for the protection of plants and animals from ionizing radiation. (author)

  20. U.S. Radioecology Research Programs Initiated in the 1950s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1999-10-01

    In the early postwar years, beginning in 1949 and extending to the mid-1960s, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) research on the fate and effects of radionuclides in the environment was driven by distinct environmental concerns-- the releases of radioactive materials around production sites, fallout from nuclear weapons tests, and radiation effects from both external and internal exposures. These problem areas spawned development of the scientific field of radioecology. To understand the perspectives in the 1950s of the United States on the issues of nuclear energy and the environment, we have reviewed the early research programs. Keeping to the theme of the papers in this environmental session, we will focus on the first area of concern -- the scientific studies to understand the environmental consequences of nuclear production and fuel reprocessing at the three primary production sites: the Hanford Works in the state of Washington, Clinton Laboratories in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. The driving environmental issue was the fate and effects of waste products from nuclear fuel production and reprocessing -- concern about entry into environmental pathways. Early operational monitoring and evaluation by health physicists led to realization that additional emphasis needed to be placed on understanding environmental fate of radionuclides. What followed was forward-thinking R and D planning and development of interdisciplinary research teams for experimentation on complex environmental systems. What follows is a review of the major U.S. AEC radioecology research programs initiated during the 1950s, the issues leading to the establishment of these programs, early results, and their legacies for environmental protection and ecological research in the following decades.

  1. Radio-ecological studies on the river Lippe (1982-1983)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, W.; Kanisch, G.; Kanisch, M.; Kellermann, H.J.; Lauer, R.; Nagel, G.; Vobach, M.

    1984-01-01

    In 1982 and 1983 the Laboratory for Radio-ecology of water bodies of the Federal Institute for Fishery performed radio-ecological studies on the river Lippe, on the Datteln-Hamm-Canal and on one section of the Rhine near the city of Wesel in order to enable expert examination of the population's exposure to radiation originating from effluents of the planned Hamm Nuclear Power Plant (HNP). The present-day distribution of artificial and natural radionuclides in water, fish, seston, sediment and in drill cores from the Lippe and the pastures lying within the flood area was examined using radio-chemical methods and the nuclear-radiation measurement technique. The contents of the stable elements of antimony, nickel, cobalt, zinc, manganese, iron, silver and phosphorus in water and fish were determined to obtain some suggestions concerning the behaviour of radionuclides which are expected in the waste water of the HNP but which cannot be found in the environment at present. Concerning uptake and incorporation of radioactive nuclides in the bodies of fish from the Lippe and the Rhine section studied, mean concentration factors could be calculated from the measured values for the state of equilibrium. One single-time emission with the cooling water of the Westfalen nuclear power plant was examined using the inactive tracer of Dysprosium in order to study the behaviour of the emission cloud when running off with the river water. With this examination, complete cross-mixing at 800 m downstream from the cooling-water re-entry building was found at a Lippe downstream flow rate of 22 cbm/s which corresponds to its annual mean. The down-stream flow graph could be described by a dispersion graph showing a marked trailing effect. The cloud-fail values which were higher compared with those of the graph, could possibly be explained by recirculation obtaining with cooling water influx. (orig.) [de

  2. Influence of Paraiba uranium deposit in the evaluation of radioecological dosimetry from Sao Mamede- PB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damascena, Kennedy Francys Rodrigues; Santos Junior, Jose Araujo; Charfuelan, Juana Maria Jimenez; Amaral, Romilton dos Santos; Silva, Alberto Antonio da; Santos, Josineide Marques do Nascimento; Fernandez, Zahily Herrero; Maciel Neto, Jose de Almeida, E-mail: kennedy.eng.ambiental@gmail.com, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: juanitamariaj@gmail.com, E-mail: neideden@hotmail.com, E-mail: zahily1985@gmail.com, E-mail: profjosemaciel@gmail.com, E-mail: alberto.silva@barreiros.ifpe.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (RAE/DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Radioecologia. Departamento de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Regions with different levels of natural radionuclides should be investigated from the radioecological viewpoint, to establish protection criteria for environment and the population. The municipality of São Mamede in the state of Paraiba, is one of the closest of the uranium deposit in Espinharas - PB, and can be influenced, given its geological formation, which justifies conducting environmental dosimetric studies. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) established in 2008 a value for the environmental equivalent effective dose rate of 2.44 mSv / y, considering the different forms of exposure and outdoor environments and internal. The calculation for estimating the outdoor dose rate considered a factor of 0.2, which corresponds therefore to a dose rate of 0.46 mSv / y for these environments. The objective of this study was to determine the levels of natural ionizing radiation that municipality using estimated effective dose rate measured in air and 1.0 m from the surface, points to the presence of rocky outcrops using portable detector with discriminator combined probe of NaI (Tl) and BGO. The experimental setup allowed the evaluation of eighty-one points, dose rates ranged from 0.34 to 4.0 mSv / y, with an average of 0.76 mSv / y, exceeding the global average by a factor of 9, which characterizes the need to investigate the dosimetry for internal environments, which can define criteria to check a possible estimate of radioecological risk. (author)

  3. Influence of Paraiba uranium deposit in the evaluation of radioecological dosimetry from Sao Mamede- PB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damascena, Kennedy Francys Rodrigues; Santos Junior, Jose Araujo; Charfuelan, Juana Maria Jimenez; Amaral, Romilton dos Santos; Silva, Alberto Antonio da; Santos, Josineide Marques do Nascimento; Fernandez, Zahily Herrero; Maciel Neto, Jose de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Regions with different levels of natural radionuclides should be investigated from the radioecological viewpoint, to establish protection criteria for environment and the population. The municipality of São Mamede in the state of Paraiba, is one of the closest of the uranium deposit in Espinharas - PB, and can be influenced, given its geological formation, which justifies conducting environmental dosimetric studies. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) established in 2008 a value for the environmental equivalent effective dose rate of 2.44 mSv / y, considering the different forms of exposure and outdoor environments and internal. The calculation for estimating the outdoor dose rate considered a factor of 0.2, which corresponds therefore to a dose rate of 0.46 mSv / y for these environments. The objective of this study was to determine the levels of natural ionizing radiation that municipality using estimated effective dose rate measured in air and 1.0 m from the surface, points to the presence of rocky outcrops using portable detector with discriminator combined probe of NaI (Tl) and BGO. The experimental setup allowed the evaluation of eighty-one points, dose rates ranged from 0.34 to 4.0 mSv / y, with an average of 0.76 mSv / y, exceeding the global average by a factor of 9, which characterizes the need to investigate the dosimetry for internal environments, which can define criteria to check a possible estimate of radioecological risk. (author)

  4. Radiation monitoring and dosimetry near the semipalatinsk nuclear test site. Radioecological situation, exposure of the population of the semipalatinsk region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.F.; Tsyb, A.F.; Bogatyriova, T.I.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluation of radioecological situation around the nuclear test site as well as estimation of radioecological situation after the underground nuclear test of July 8, 1989 has been carried out. Radiation doses received by the public for the period of surface and atmospheric nuclear tests conducted from 1949 until 1963 about 10000 individuals received additional external and internal doses. The highest accumulated effective doses were estimated in the residuals of Dolon (1.6 Gy the first nuclear test of 1949), Karaul (0.37 Gy), Sarzhal (0.20 Gy). Semenovka (0.02 Gy). Yearly effective doses for the residents of Semipalatinsk during that period did not exceed 0.0056 Gy (maximum value). Collective doses were estimated for different periods from 1949 to 1989 too. Results of measuring of the environmental exposure gamma dose rates in the inspected areas and soil, plants, water, milk, meat radioactive contamination are presented too

  5. A radioecological risk assessment tool for post-accidental situations. Application in the Toulon marine area (South of France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffa, Celine; Thebault, Herve

    2010-01-01

    To estimate any post-accidental consequences in the environment and to propose adapted management plans, data concerning both radionuclides spatial dispersion and environmental sensitivity to this contamination are necessary. IRSN develops integrated tools to support experts and decision makers in post-accident situation concerning this area. This management tool aims to combine radionuclides dispersion modelling and radioecological sensitivity local maps to outline vulnerable areas front of a known release. An example of application to a maritime environment is given: the naval base of Toulon. Calculation of radionuclides dispersion is based on the existing MARS 3D hydrodynamic model. The radioecological sensitivity of the marine environment is based on the ecosystem intrinsic characteristics and the socio-economical resources. Mapping radionuclides dispersion results and sensitivity of defined zones of the studies area, we show that the Little Bay and the western part of Toulon marine area are the most vulnerable in case of accidental release occuring in the harbour. (orig.)

  6. The National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE): A Network of Excellence for Environmental and Human Radiation Risk Reduction - 13365

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhne, W.W.; Jannik, G.T.; Farfan, E.B.; Knox, A.S.; Mayer, J.J.; Murray, A.M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950's when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re

  7. Conception and syllabus on radiochemistry and radioecology principles for general student groups of a university chemical department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of basic principles of selecting materials for general courses on diverse subjects in chemical science is discussed. Relying on certain general rules and proceeding from specificity of radiochemistry, the author suggests a variant of syllabus including radiochemical and radioecological blocks intented for 48 academic hours. In methodical respect emphasis is made on theoretical material presentation in close combination with various nuclear methods used in chemical studies. 6 refs., 1 fig

  8. Radio-ecological characterization and radiological assessment in support of regulatory supervision of legacy sites in northwest Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, M K; Kiselev, M; Shandala, N K

    2014-05-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has been implementing a regulatory cooperation program in the Russian Federation for over 10 years, as part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action for enhancing nuclear and radiation safety in northwest Russia. The overall long-term objective has been the enhancement of safety culture and includes a special focus on regulatory supervision of nuclear legacy sites. The initial project outputs included appropriate regulatory threat assessments, to determine the hazardous situations and activities which are most in need of enhanced regulatory supervision. In turn, this has led to the development of new and updated norms and standards, and related regulatory procedures, necessary to address the often abnormal conditions at legacy sites. This paper presents the experience gained within the above program with regard to radio-ecological characterization of Sites of Temporary Storage for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha in the Kola Peninsula in northwest Russia. Such characterization is necessary to support assessments of the current radiological situation and to support prospective assessments of its evolution. Both types of assessments contribute to regulatory supervision of the sites. Accordingly, they include assessments to support development of regulatory standards and guidance concerning: control of radiation exposures to workers during remediation operations; emergency preparedness and response; planned radionuclide releases to the environment; development of site restoration plans, and waste treatment and disposal. Examples of characterization work are presented which relate to terrestrial and marine environments at Andreeva Bay. The use of this data in assessments is illustrated by means of the visualization and assessment tool (DATAMAP) developed as part of the regulatory cooperation program, specifically to help control radiation exposure in operations and to support

  9. Eurac: a project to strengthen scientific academic competence and analytical skills within radiation protection, radiochemistry and radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamponnet, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Salbu, B.; Skipperud, L. [Norwegian Univ. of Life Sciences, Aas (Norway); Mitchell, P. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Holm, E. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Garciatenorio, R. [Seville Univ. (Spain); Kovats, N. [Veszprem Univ. (Hungary); Abbott, A. [Westlakes Research Institute, Moor Row (United Kingdom); Davids, C. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Osteras (Norway); Garelick, H.; Priest, N. [Middlesex Univ., Enfield (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The E.u.r.a.c. project is consultative or consensual and aims to assess the current and potential levels of postgraduate provision in selected linked disciplines associated with radiological protection and radioecological competence within universities and other higher education institutes of the Eu and new entrant nations in the context of demand. Based on consultations with European stakeholders E.u.r.a.c. will propose those actions that could be taken by European Institutions and relevant organisations in Member States to secure the future of nuclear radiological protection, radiochemistry and radioecology postgraduate education in an expanded Eu. The objective are: assess the needs for co-ordinated postgraduate education in the Eu and new entrant nations in order to strengthen the scientific academic competence and analytical skills within radiological protection, radiochemistry and radioecology, secure the future recruitment of appropriately skilled postgraduates to meet the needs of European stakeholders; recommend, following consultations, actions that could be taken within the Eu to help the postgraduate education needs identified. four work packages are studied: determination of existing competence and infrastructures, estimation of future scientific needs, development of possible postgraduate education solutions, assessments and recommendations. (N.C.)

  10. Eurac: a project to strengthen scientific academic competence and analytical skills within radiation protection, radiochemistry and radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamponnet, C.; Salbu, B.; Skipperud, L.; Mitchell, P.; Holm, E.; Garciatenorio, R.; Kovats, N.; Abbott, A.; Davids, C.; Garelick, H.; Priest, N.

    2006-01-01

    The E.u.r.a.c. project is consultative or consensual and aims to assess the current and potential levels of postgraduate provision in selected linked disciplines associated with radiological protection and radioecological competence within universities and other higher education institutes of the Eu and new entrant nations in the context of demand. Based on consultations with European stakeholders E.u.r.a.c. will propose those actions that could be taken by European Institutions and relevant organisations in Member States to secure the future of nuclear radiological protection, radiochemistry and radioecology postgraduate education in an expanded Eu. The objective are: assess the needs for co-ordinated postgraduate education in the Eu and new entrant nations in order to strengthen the scientific academic competence and analytical skills within radiological protection, radiochemistry and radioecology, secure the future recruitment of appropriately skilled postgraduates to meet the needs of European stakeholders; recommend, following consultations, actions that could be taken within the Eu to help the postgraduate education needs identified. four work packages are studied: determination of existing competence and infrastructures, estimation of future scientific needs, development of possible postgraduate education solutions, assessments and recommendations. (N.C.)

  11. The consequences of the Chernobyl accident: REDAC, the radioecological database of the French-German Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville-Cavelin, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Biesold, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, GRS, mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Koeln (Germany); Chabanyuk, V. [Intelligence Systems GEO, Chernobyl Centre for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Wastes and Radioecology (Ukraine)

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this work is to built a database for integrating the results of Project 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative. This database incorporates: an ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfers, by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. A specific methodology was applied, namely, the original 'Project Solutions Framework' which implies an information system developed as a soft integrated portal and a geo-information system (all spatial data geo-coded). The structure of database contains five packages of elements: Publications, all classical information, original data; Products, storage of open publications of the Project; Processes, management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services, information and software objects, help; Basics, information on system and organizational development. A table presents the REDAC content, implying the following sub-projects: Ecological portrait; Contamination; Wastes; Soil-plant transfers; Transfers to animals; Transfers by runoff; Transfers in aquatic ecosystem; Urban transfers, countermeasures; Countermeasures. The table identifies the nature of data and their number for each of the sub-project. As soft integration a cartography system is given. This comprises: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server) with the cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. An example of map extraction for SP1 'initial contamination' is given. An additional soft integration is based on portlets and DDB. Portlets are mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts. Digital Dashboards (DDB) mean Portlets plus web parts. DDB sites mean collections of DDB, adjustable by users. The

  12. The IUR forum: worldwide harmonisation of networks to support integration of scientific knowledge and consensus development in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, F.; Alexakhin, R.; Bollhoefer, A.; Frogg, K.E.; Strand, P.; Hardeman, F.; Vandenhove, H.; Higley, K.; Hinton, T.G.; Nanba, K.; Kapustka, L.A.; Kuhne, W.; Leonard, K.; Masson, O.; Smith, G.; Smith, K.; Yankovich, T.; Yoshida, S.

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many specialised networks have formed to meet specific radioecological objectives, whether regional or sectorial (purpose-oriented). Regional networks deal with an array of radioecological issues related to their territories. Examples include the South Pacific network of radio-ecologists, and the European network of excellence in radioecology. The latter is now part of the European platform for radiation protection. Sectorial networks are more problem-oriented, often with wider international representativeness, but restricted to one specific issue, (e.g. radioactive waste, low-level atmospheric contamination, modelling). All such networks, while often working in relative isolation, contribute to a flow of scientific information which, through United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR's) efforts of synthesis, feeds into the radiation protection frameworks of protecting humans and the environment. The IUR has therefore prompted a co-construction process aimed at improving worldwide harmonisation of radioecology networks. An initiative based on an initial set of 15 networks, now called the IUR Forum, was launched in June 2014. The IUR Forum agreed to build a framework for improved coordination of scientific knowledge, integration and consensus development relative to environmental radioactivity. Three objectives have been collectively assigned to the IUR Forum: (1) coordination, (2) global integration and construction of consensus and (3) maintenance of expertise. One particular achievement of the Forum was an improved description and common understanding of the respective roles and functions of the various networks within the overall scene of radioecology R and D. It clarifies how the various networks assembled within the IUR Forum interface with UNSCEAR and other international regulatory bodies (IAEA, ICRP), and how consensus on the assessment of risk is constructed. All these agencies interact with

  13. Making the most of what we have: application of extrapolation approaches in radioecological wildlife transfer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beresford, Nicholas A.; Wood, Michael D.; Vives i Batlle, Jordi; Yankovich, Tamara L.; Bradshaw, Clare; Willey, Neil

    2016-01-01

    We will never have data to populate all of the potential radioecological modelling parameters required for wildlife assessments. Therefore, we need robust extrapolation approaches which allow us to make best use of our available knowledge. This paper reviews and, in some cases, develops, tests and validates some of the suggested extrapolation approaches. The concentration ratio (CR_p_r_o_d_u_c_t_-_d_i_e_t or CR_w_o_-_d_i_e_t) is shown to be a generic (trans-species) parameter which should enable the more abundant data for farm animals to be applied to wild species. An allometric model for predicting the biological half-life of radionuclides in vertebrates is further tested and generally shown to perform acceptably. However, to fully exploit allometry we need to understand why some elements do not scale to expected values. For aquatic ecosystems, the relationship between log_1_0(a) (a parameter from the allometric relationship for the organism-water concentration ratio) and log(K_d) presents a potential opportunity to estimate concentration ratios using K_d values. An alternative approach to the CR_w_o_-_m_e_d_i_a model proposed for estimating the transfer of radionuclides to freshwater fish is used to satisfactorily predict activity concentrations in fish of different species from three lakes. We recommend that this approach (REML modelling) be further investigated and developed for other radionuclides and across a wider range of organisms and ecosystems. Ecological stoichiometry shows potential as an extrapolation method in radioecology, either from one element to another or from one species to another. Although some of the approaches considered require further development and testing, we demonstrate the potential to significantly improve predictions of radionuclide transfer to wildlife by making better use of available data. - Highlights: • Robust extrapolation approaches allowing best use of available knowledge are needed. • Extrapolation approaches are

  14. Regular monitoring, analysis and forecast of radioecological environment of Azgir test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmetov, E.; Agymov, I.; Gilmanov, Zh.; Ermanov, A.; Zhetbaev, A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of investigations: basing on the results of regular annual measurements of radiation conditions on the sites of underground nuclear cavities of the Azgir test site, specific concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals in soil and underground aquifers on the test site and adjacent territories to obtain data on migration and transfer of radionuclides and heavy metals. This will give a real possibility to make probability predictions of ways and qualitative characteristics of spreading of radionuclides and heavy metals in the region of the northern Pricaspian lowland. The Essence of the Problem The Azgir test site is located in the arid zone of the Great Azgir salt cupola near the Azgir village of Kurmangazinskiy rayon, Atyrau region. This cupola is located in the western periphery of Pricaspian salt-bearing province situated to the north of the Caspian sea between the Volga and Emba rivers. Major Tasks: - Development of technical requirements for carrying out regular examination of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination of the Azgir test site. - Preparation of material and technical base for field works on the Azgir test site. - Radiometric measurements on the sites and around them. - Taking of soil, soil and ground waters samples both on the test site and on the adjacent territories. - Spectrometric and radiochemical investigations of soil, soil and ground water samples. - Analysis and generalization of the results creating premises for forecasting of the radioecological conditions. - Investigation of the possibility of radioactive waste disposal in underground cavities. Expected Results: - Detection and outlining of local areas of radioactive contamination on the site and adjacent territories. - Data on real structure of spreading and concentration of artificial and natural radionuclides and heavy metals in soil layer of the test site region. - Results of analytic investigations of water samples of underground sources of the site and adjacent

  15. Advantages of Synthetic Noise and Machine Learning for Analyzing Radioecological Data Sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available The ecological effects of accidental or malicious radioactive contamination are insufficiently understood because of the hazards and difficulties associated with conducting studies in radioactively-polluted areas. Data sets from severely contaminated locations can therefore be small. Moreover, many potentially important factors, such as soil concentrations of toxic chemicals, pH, and temperature, can be correlated with radiation levels and with each other. In such situations, commonly-used statistical techniques like generalized linear models (GLMs may not be able to provide useful information about how radiation and/or these other variables affect the outcome (e.g. abundance of the studied organisms. Ensemble machine learning methods such as random forests offer powerful alternatives. We propose that analysis of small radioecological data sets by GLMs and/or machine learning can be made more informative by using the following techniques: (1 adding synthetic noise variables to provide benchmarks for distinguishing the performances of valuable predictors from irrelevant ones; (2 adding noise directly to the predictors and/or to the outcome to test the robustness of analysis results against random data fluctuations; (3 adding artificial effects to selected predictors to test the sensitivity of the analysis methods in detecting predictor effects; (4 running a selected machine learning method multiple times (with different random-number seeds to test the robustness of the detected "signal"; (5 using several machine learning methods to test the "signal's" sensitivity to differences in analysis techniques. Here, we applied these approaches to simulated data, and to two published examples of small radioecological data sets: (I counts of fungal taxa in samples of soil contaminated by the Chernobyl nuclear power plan accident (Ukraine, and (II bacterial abundance in soil samples under a ruptured nuclear waste storage tank (USA. We show that the proposed

  16. Impact of environmental change on the radioecology of spruce trees in Upper Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Claudia; Gruber, V.; Baumgartner, A.; Fuerst, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a two years project spruce needle samples of the Austrian Bioindicator Grid were analysed by gamma spectrometry to detect the geographical and temporal distribution of radionuclides in spruce needles of the last 25 years with the main focus on the radioactive contamination before and after the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. This radioecological evaluation is an important part of an existing environmental surveillance programme in Upper Austria in order to gain basic information on the impact of environmental changes on the radioecological behaviour of spruce trees. Moreover, the results of the current studies can be an important input for the discussion of using whole trees for biomass energy. Every year spruce needle samples of the two youngest needle sprouts are taken from two spruce trees at each location of the Bioindicator Grid. For this study samples of selected locations evenly spaced out among the area of Upper Austria were analysed for different natural and anthropogenic radionuclides: 137 Cs, 40 K, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 238 U. Additionally, soil samples were taken at selected sites to study the relationship between 137 Cs and 40 K-activity concentrations in soils and spruce needles and to estimate transfer factors. Another important question of the study is the correlation between anthropogenic pollutants and radionuclides. To date more than 500 spruce needle samples were analysed. 137 Cs- activity concentrations reach D.L. (2 Bq/kg)-5150 Bq/kg, whereas the maximum was measured after the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. In time series of 137 Cs-activity concentrations Caesium cycling was observed. The activity concentrations of 40 K reached D.L. (15 Bq/kg)- 294 Bq/kg and 210 Pb reach D.L. (5 Bq/kg)-45 Bq/kg. The measured 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 238 U concentrations were mostly below detection limits. Most samples of younger sprouts revealed higher 137 Cs activity concentrations than older sprouts. 40 K-activity concentrations showed nearly the same level in

  17. Task group of international union of radioecology 'ecosystem approach to environment protection'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuma, Shoichi

    2011-01-01

    An ecosystem approach is a holistic (i.e., top-down) strategy for protection of ecosystem structures and functions from perturbations. A task group of International Union of Radioecology 'Ecosystem Approach to Environment Protection' was launched in April, 2010. This task group is preparing a report on the following topics: (1) goals of environmental protection; (2) legislation about environmental protection; (3) assessment of the Reference Animals and Plants (RAP) concept in the general context of environmental protection; (4) limitations and uncertainties of the RAPs concept; (5) justification and merits of the ecosystem approach; (6) assessing the feasibility of the ecosystem approach; (7) research and development required for the ecosystem approach; and (8) recommendations with respect to radiation protection. The topics 1, 3, 4 and 5 have been almost completely prepared, and demonstrate that the ecosystem approach is required for radiation protection of the environment. On the other hand, methods of the ecosystem approach which should be adopted for radiation protection of the environment are not clear in the current draft report. They should be specified by reviewing the Convention on Biological Diversity, fish stock management and other activities where the ecosystem approach is already adopted. (author)

  18. Implementation of radioecological education in secondary school by a 'Radiation and man' elective course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinova, B.; Boyanova, L.; Tsakovski, S.; Pavlova, P.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a didactic investigation within the period 1998-2000 carried out at the Chair of Chemistry Didactics at Sofia University 'St. Kliment Ohridski'. The proposed system, which includes a program, supplied with appropriate literature, visualization aids and control tools was approbated in three variants, as follows: Elective training; Presentation of seminars or discussion lessons; Inclusion of several topics in the existing physics educational section 'From Atoms to Space', which is enough to provide substantial radioecological information corresponding to the amount planned in the 'Radiation and Man' educational program. The project was carried out at two secondary schools: 'Vassil Levski' in Velingrad and 'Yane Sandanski' in Sandanski. These schools were chosen mainly because of their location - outside the city of Sofia and far from the 30 km zone around the Kozloduy NPP. The project implementation started in the middle of the 2001/2002 school year second term and ended before the end of the term. The current paper summarizes results from teaching of the elective course to secondary school students (10 th grade). Questionnaires and results evaluation scheme are worked out. The data are treated by correlation and cluster analysis

  19. Social advertising and radio-ecological education as new principles of advertising campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stonogina, Julia

    1999-01-01

    Probably everyone would name commercial interest and high costs as the basic features of advertising campaign. In 1998 Radon decided to conduct the public information campaign in radioecology. The program consists of several key areas, which include close contacts with journalists, primarily with TV reporters, relating to the above-mentioned topic. This approach helped to promote the idea of public radiation safety to TV screens. From July to December 1998, TV clips about radioactive pollution in new residential districts located on former waste grounds and dumps came out on a weekly basis. Thus, the new dwellers became well aware of potential danger and could protect themselves against it. We also gave priority to the stories about an increased radiation background or high concentrations of radon or mercury in children's care centers and schools. We hoped that it would make the parents be more careful in choosing the places where their children had to spend a lot of time. The third popular topic with the reporters was the city markets during radiological checks of products, such as mushrooms, berries, meat, etc. The environmental public informational campaign is unique in Russia

  20. Enewetak Radioecology Research Program. I. Ecological studies on Engebi Island, 1975--1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koranda, J.J.; Robison, W.; Thompson, S.E.; Stuart, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    As part of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Enewetak Radioecology Research Program, we studied radionuclide cycling from soil to plant to soil on Engebi Island at the Enewetak Atoll. Mature and dying leaves, young and old litter, humus, and soil beneath these organic strata were collected from 1975-76 at three Engebi sites. To study radionuclide depth distributions, five trenches of > 1 m were dug and sampled. From three representative sites, we found that 137 Cs rapidly cycles from the plant biomass through the litter and humus into the vegetation. Continuously deposited litter decomposes within 6 to 12 months, but the constituent radionuclides are released early during physical decomposition. Soil radionuclides generally occur in the upper 40 cm of the soil profile, strongly associated with the organic horizon. Radionuclides such as 60 Co, 152-155 Eu, 207 Bi, and 241 Am are complexed in the finely divided organic matter or humus where 137 Cs and 40 K predominate. Our data suggest that there is a circulating pool of rapidly cycling 137 Cs in the Engebi ecosystem that may be entirely associated with the plant biomass and organic strata of the soil. Soilbound radionuclides below the humus are low in concentration and may not enter into this pool because they are below the vegetation root zone, where they may be leached by rainwater. This information is needed in making realistic long-term radionuclide dose assessments for the Enewetak peoples

  1. National intercomparison programme for radionuclide analysis in environmental samples: Aramar radioecological laboratory performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arine, Bruno Burini Robles, E-mail: bruno.arine@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP/ARAMAR), Ipero, SP (Brazil). Lab. Radioecologico; Moraes, Marco Antonio P.V., E-mail: marco.proenca@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The radioecological laboratory is concerned with the measurements of background radiation (mainly uranium and thorium natural series) and present effluents in the Aramar Experimental Centre, as well as in its surroundings. The laboratory is directly subordinated to the Navy Technological Centre in Sao Paulo (CTMSP - Sao Paulo - Brazil), a military research organization whose goal is to develop nuclear and energy systems for the Brazilian naval ship propulsion. The measurements were performed in addition to the Environmental Monitoring Programme carried out in the same region. For this endeavour, the laboratory has attended to the National Intercomparison Programme conducted by the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD) by analyzing several kinds of solid and liquid samples containing specific radionuclides through gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation, alpha-beta total counting and fluorimetry techniques, since December 1995. In the last 15 years, our results were compared to another 19 laboratories and rated as 'very good' and 'acceptable' in at least 90% of the results. (author)

  2. Proceedings of the summary seminar within the NKS-B programme 2002-2005[Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilus, E [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, STUK (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    This report contains the proceedings of the NKS-B Summary Seminar held on 24-25 October 2005 in Tartu, Estonia. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for presenting and discussing the results obtained in the NKS-B programme during the project period 2002 - 2005. The main attention was focused on radioecology and measurement techniques including presentations on the work done in the Projects INDOFERN (New Indicator Organisms for Environmental Radioactivity), LABINCO (Intercomparison of Laboratory Analyses of Radionuclides in Environmental Samples) and ECODOSES (Improving Radiological Assessments of Doses to Humans from Terrestrial Ecosystems). The total number of presentations in the seminar was 27. The seminar was also the final seminar of the four-year INDOFERN Project. The objective of the project was to identify new indicator organisms and biomarkers for assessment of environmental radioactivity in normal and emergency situations. The goal was to search new useful organisms accumulating effectively and specifically certain radionuclides in various Nordic ecosystems (forest, fresh water, marine), and to compare their indicator value to those of the earlier known indicators. The project yielded new data on the occurrence and transport of radionuclides in a wide scale of Nordic ecosystems. A summary of the whole project, and summaries of the work done in all the participating laboratories were presented in 13 presentations in the seminar.

  3. Radioecological characterization of a uranium mining site located in a semi-arid region in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Horst M.; Lamego Simoes Filho, F. Fernando; Perez, Valeska; Franklin, Mariza Ramalho; Gomiero, Luiz Alberto

    2006-01-01

    The work presents the radioecological characterization of the new Brazilian uranium mining and milling site located in a semi-arid region of the country. The process characterization demonstrated that in heap leach plants most of the 226 Ra remains in the leached ore. Despite the potential higher availability of radium isotopes in the soils of the studied region the lack of precipitation in that area reduces the leaching/mobilization of the radionuclides. High 226 Ra and 228 Ra concentrations were found in manioc while 21 Pb was significant in pasture. It was suggested that a range from 10 -3 to 10 -1 may conveniently encompass most of the transfer factors (TF) values for soil/plant systems (i.e. involving different cultures, different soils and natural radionuclides). Impacts due to aerial transportation of aerosols and radon generated in the mining were proved to be minimal and restricted to an area not greater than 15 km 2 . Finally, uranium complexation by carbonates was shown to be the main mechanism responding for the elevated radionuclide concentration in groundwater

  4. Radioecological monitoring of the Black Sea basin following the Chernobyl NPP accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulebakina, L.G.; Polikarpov, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    A monitoring programme was drawn up to study the radioecological situation of the Black Sea basin following the Chernobyl NPP accident, with studies being carried out from May 1986 onwards to determine the levels of radioactive contamination in various parts of the Black Sea, the Sea of Azov and the Aegean Sea, including the estuaries of major rivers (Dnieper, Danube, Dniester and Don) and shelf areas of the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. The work focused on long-lived radionuclides ( 90 Sr and 137 Cs), with the migration dynamics of these radionuclides in the aquatic environment, bed sediments and aquatic biota (including plants, molluscs, crustacea and fish) being studied. We compared the behaviour of radionuclides in the aquatic environment of the Dnieper reservoirs following the Chernobyl accident (our data) with the behaviour of radionuclides in lakes in the Urals following the Kyshtym accident (published data). As in the case of the lakes in the Urals, the Dnieper waters contain substantial concentrations of 90 Sr as a result of the Chernobyl accident, and 90 Sr therefore enters the Black Sea with the Dnieper waters. The paper compares the contribution of the Chernobyl accident to radioactive contamination of the Black Sea with that of global fallout. (author)

  5. Radioecological consequences of a potential accident during transport of spent nuclear fuel along an Arctic coastline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iosjpe, M.; Reistad, O.; Amundsen, I.B.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents results pertaining to a risk assessment of the potential consequences of a hypothetical accident occurring during the transportation by ship of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) along an Arctic coastline. The findings are based on modelling of potential releases of radionuclides, radionuclide transport and uptake in the marine environment. Modelling work has been done using a revised box model developed at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Evaluation of the radioecological consequences of a potential accident in the southern part of the Norwegian Current has been made on the basis of calculated collective dose to man, individual doses for the critical group, concentrations of radionuclides in seafood and doses to marine organisms. The results of the calculations indicate a large variability in the investigated parameters above mentioned. On the basis of the calculated parameters the maximum total activity ('accepted accident activity') in the ship, when the parameters that describe the consequences after the examined potential accident are still in agreement with the recommendations and criterions for protection of the human population and the environment, has been evaluated

  6. Radioecological studies of activation products released from a nuclear power plant into the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, S.; Nilsson, M.; Holm, E.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1967 samples of Fucus serratus and Fucus vesi--culosus from the Swedish west-coast were collected for analysis of the concentration of fallout products, natural actinides and products released by the nuclear industry. During this time two nuclear power stations were built and began operation in this area, ''Ringhals'' in 1974 and ''Barseback'' in 1975. When detectable concentrations of Co-60 and other activation products were found in Fucus, the sampling program was intensified, both in the vicinity of ''Barseback'' and at localities up to 150 km north. Our studies have shown that measurements on Fucus can be used to map the distribution of various radionuclides from a nuclear power station in the marine environment. Knowledge of this distribution and of factors affecting it are needed to construct a radioecological model for the estimation of individual and collective dose equivalent commitment arising from intake of food and water from the marine environment of the south-west of Sweden. (H.K.)

  7. Review of annual radioecological studies carried out since 1991 in the French nuclear power plants environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffa, C.; Gontier, G.; Renaud, P.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1991, the IRSN carries out annual radioecological studies in the environment of the French Nuclear Power Plants. More than 5,000 samples, collected in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems around the 20 studied plants, have been analysed by low-level gamma spectrometry. This paper presents the main goals and methods for such studies, and the lessons learnt from 11 years results. The French NPP routine atmospheric releases do not lead to detectable radioactive inputs into their surroundings. For this reason, IRSN decided to reduce the number of analysis concerning terrestrial samples since 2000. On the other hand, NPP liquid discharges into rivers are responsible for the presence of low 60 Co, 58 Co, 110m Ag and 54 Mn activities and significant difference in 137 Cs/ 134 Cs activity ratios measured in aquatic compartments. Radioactive discharges of artificial gamma emitters are also detectable in the Channel marine environment around NPP. Nevertheless, this influence is often concealed by radionuclides released by COGEMA-La Hague nuclear reprocessing plant. Beyond important evaluations concerning the presence of artificial radionuclides in NPP's environment, studies conducted since 1991 give us an important database that can be used for a better knowledge of transfers and distribution of radioactivity through the environment. (author)

  8. Cytogenetic monitoring of children from regions with a different radioecological situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amvrosiev, A.P.; Nikolaevich, L.N.

    1993-01-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes of children from some districts of Gomel region of Belarus Republic with different radioecological situations has been studied by the cytogenetic examination for the population exposed to additional irradiation due to the Chernobyl disaster. Radiocontamination density in the territory of these settlements made up 20.0-40.0; 17.0; 6.0-9.0 Ci/Km 2 for Cs-137; 1.0-1.7; 2.1; 0.4-1.5 Ci/Km 2 for Sr-90; γ background being 0.130-0.16; 0.106-0.209; 0.90-0.250 mR/h. The results show that aberrant cell frequency in children of the first group is 1.5 times the control one. In a group of children from the settlement strelichevo the average level of aberrant cells is also 1.2 times the control one. In children from Sudkovo aberration frequency of the chromosome type is 1.6 times the control values. The specific for radiation action cytogenetic effect in the children examined increased with the rise in 137 Cs area contamination density

  9. Radioecological education and perception of radiation risk in the conditions of the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrej, Stavrov

    1995-01-01

    As a result of catastrophe at the Chernobyl NPP almost the forth part of the territory of the Republic of Belarus has been contaminated with radioactive elements, near two billion people continue to live at this territory. An enormous economic damage to the republic has been caused, what affects all the population. The situation in considerable extent is complicated because of the heavy energy crisis in Belarus. One of the main reason of the crisis is practically complete absence of fuel resources in Belarus. These circumstances caused the return of the idea to create atomic power engineering in Belarus. Coincidence in time of the events mentioned above has created the situation when public opinion up to the recent time was negative in respect to construction of a NPP in spite of availability of strong factors in favour of that. The reason is evident - Chernobyl NPP accident. Activity related to public acceptance of nuclear power in Belarus has specific features, since the people suffered from nuclear power directly. That circumstance has required the development of nonstandard approach, composing both advertisement of positive features and merits of NPP and radioecological education of practically all population of the republic to satisfy the measures on radiation protection and overcoming the consequences of catastrophe

  10. Radiobiological and radioecological studies with the unicellular marine algae Acetabularia, Batophora and Dunaliella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Luttke, A.; Strack, S.; Kirchmann, R.; Hoursiangou, D.; Puiseux-Dao, S.

    1980-01-01

    The biological effects of X-rays on the unicellular marine algae Acetabularia mediterranea, Acetabularia peniculus and Batophora oerstedii were studied. Increasing doses of X-rays (0 to 150 kr) were shown to interfere with the main morphogenetic processes of these algae. Labelling experiments with 3 H-thymidine, 3 H-uridine and 3 H-leucine showed that X-rays (50 kr) provoked a strong reduction of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis in the chloroplasts of A. mediterranea. Radioecological studies were also performed showing that Acetabularia cells, grown in the presence of HTO, incorporate a significant amount of 3 H in the total nucleic acid and protein fraction. However, 3 H supplied to Acetabularia in the form of tritiated water was not accumulated. When organically bound 3 H was supplied to Acetabularia or to Dunaliella, a selective accumulation of some substances was observed. Thus the results of this study illustrate the impact of radiation on living organisms and the biological behaviour of 3 H in the aquatic system. (UK)

  11. Using radioecological data to determine prey selection by the Alaska wolf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holleman, D.F.; Luick, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    Recently the predation of the Alaska wolf (Canis lupus pambasileus) upon various species of big game has been the subject of considerable controversy between game management specialists and environmentalists. The basis of this controversy centers primarily on the selectivity and extent of prey utilization by the wolf. This report suggests how radioecological data can be used to assess both qualitative and quantitative aspects of wolf predation. Primary prey species of the wolf have distinctly different fallout radiocesium body burdens; e.g., reindeer/caribou have high radiocesium body burdens, whereas moose and small game have low radiocesium body burdens. Consequently, the resulting radiocesium body burden of the wolf depends upon the type and quantity of prey species consumed. Laboratory measurements for this study show a wide variation of radiocesium concentrations of skeletal muscle of wolves within Alaska. Values ranged from 263 to 17,300 pCi 137 Cs/kg of wet muscle. These data relate to known degrees of reindeer/caribou predation by the wolves. A radiocesium kinetic model was constructed from data obtained with wolves and other arctic carnivores and was used to estimate reindeer/caribou intake by wolves. Estimates ranged from 40 to 1650 g of reindeer/caribou muscle per day per wolf. Although the application has limitations, it could yield useful information for evaluating the food habits of wolves, especially in areas of the state where it is important to know the extent of reindeer/caribou utilization by the wolf

  12. Radioecological of the Vardar river catchment area after the Chernobyl release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetanovska, L.; Anovski, T.

    1997-01-01

    Vardar river with its length of 301.6 km and its catchment area of 28,338 km 2 covers almost 80% of the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Various usage of the surface and underground water flows of this hydro system (water supply, irrigation, etc.) to which gravitate cca 2/3 of the population of our Country, are subject of increased interest for their protection. In this sense, radioecological investigations (due to a presence of a local not well prospected uranium deposits and a factor, for phosphate fertilizers) were in progress. The first preliminary results of performed gamma-spectrometric analysis showed that besides many others, the following isotopes: I-131, I-132, Cs-134, Cs-137 and Ru-103, dominated into the investigated water, air and food samples. Different from the concentration of I-131 into the filtered Skopje air which was 12 Bq/m 3 on the 5th of May, 1986, the concentration of Cs-137 was up to 15 Bq/m 3 in air, 122 Bq/L in local precipitation, up to 800 Bq/kg in sediments and 0.29 Bq/L in the water samples from the Vardar river

  13. Overview Of The Cooperation Between The Chernobyl Center's International Radioecology Laboratory In Slavutych, Ukraine And U.S. Research Centers Between 2000-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-01-01

    The International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) located in Slavutych, Ukraine was created in 1999 under the initiative of the United States Government and the Government of Ukraine in the framework of international cooperation on evaluation and minimization of consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) accident. Since the time the IRL was founded, it has participated in a large number of projects, including the following: (1) study of radionuclide accumulation, distribution, and migration in components of various ecological systems of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); (2) radiation dose assessments; (3) study of the effects of radiation influence on biological systems; (4) expert analysis of isotopic and quantitative composition of radioactive contaminants; (5) development of new methods and technologies intended for radioecological research; (6) evaluation of future developments and pathways for potential remediation of the ChEZ areas; (7) assistance in provision of physical protection systems for ionizing irradiation sources at Ukrainian enterprises; (8) reviews of open Russian language publications on issues associated with consequences of the ChNPP accident, radioactive waste management, radioecological monitoring, and ChNPP decommissioning; (9) conduct of training courses on problems of radioecology, radiation safety, radioecological characterization of test sites and environmental media, and on research methods; (10) conduct of on-site scientific conferences and workshops on the ChEZ and radioecology problems; participation in off-site scientific conferences and meetings; and (11) preparation of scientific and popular science publications, and interactions with mass media representatives. This article provides a brief overview of the major achievements resulting from this cooperation between the IRL and U.S. research centers.

  14. OVERVIEW OF THE COOPERATION BETWEEN THE CHERNOBYL CENTER'S INTERNATIONAL RADIOECOLOGY LABORATORY IN SLAVUTYCH, UKRAINE AND U.S. RESEARCH CENTERS BETWEEN 2000-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    The International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) located in Slavutych, Ukraine was created in 1999 under the initiative of the United States Government and the Government of Ukraine in the framework of international cooperation on evaluation and minimization of consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) accident. Since the time the IRL was founded, it has participated in a large number of projects, including the following: (1) study of radionuclide accumulation, distribution, and migration in components of various ecological systems of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); (2) radiation dose assessments; (3) study of the effects of radiation influence on biological systems; (4) expert analysis of isotopic and quantitative composition of radioactive contaminants; (5) development of new methods and technologies intended for radioecological research; (6) evaluation of future developments and pathways for potential remediation of the ChEZ areas; (7) assistance in provision of physical protection systems for ionizing irradiation sources at Ukrainian enterprises; (8) reviews of open Russian language publications on issues associated with consequences of the ChNPP accident, radioactive waste management, radioecological monitoring, and ChNPP decommissioning; (9) conduct of training courses on problems of radioecology, radiation safety, radioecological characterization of test sites and environmental media, and on research methods; (10) conduct of on-site scientific conferences and workshops on the ChEZ and radioecology problems; participation in off-site scientific conferences and meetings; and (11) preparation of scientific and popular science publications, and interactions with mass media representatives. This article provides a brief overview of the major achievements resulting from this cooperation between the IRL and U.S. research centers.

  15. Overview of the cooperation between the Chernobyl Center's International Radioecology Laboratory in Slavutych, Ukraine, and U.S. research centers between 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Gaschak, Sergey P; Oskolkov, Boris Ya; Maksimenko, Andrey M; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy; Labone, Elizabeth D

    2011-10-01

    The International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) located in Slavutych, Ukraine, was created in 1999 under the initiative of the United States Government and the Government of Ukraine in the framework of international cooperation on evaluation and minimization of consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) accident. Since the time the IRL was founded, it has participated in a large number of projects, including the following: 1) study of radionuclide accumulation, distribution, and migration in components of various ecological systems of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); 2) radiation dose assessments; 3) study of the effects of radiation influence on biological systems; 4) expert analysis of isotopic and quantitative composition of radioactive contaminants; 5) development of new methods and technologies intended for radioecological research; 6) evaluation of future developments and pathways for potential remediation of the ChEZ areas; 7) assistance in provision of physical protection systems for ionizing irradiation sources at Ukrainian enterprises; 8) reviews of open Russian language publications on issues associated with consequences of the ChNPP accident, radioactive waste management, radioecological monitoring, and ChNPP decommissioning; 9) conduct of training courses on problems of radioecology, radiation safety, radioecological characterization of test sites and environmental media, and research methods; 10) conduct of on-site scientific conferences and workshops on the ChEZ and radioecology problems; participation in off-site scientific conferences and meetings; and 11) preparation of scientific and popular science publications and interactions with mass media representatives. This article provides a brief overview of the major achievements resulting from this cooperation between the IRL and U.S. research centers.

  16. Problems of radio-nuclear risks and radioecological safety, caused by migration and contamination of seas and Arctic Ocean waters in Northern regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koupri, K.

    1997-01-01

    Northern Russian radio-ecological and nuclear risks are connected with several objective factors: disposal, exploitation, supplying of the cycle of atomic military and ice-breaking fleets; disposal of enterprises and bases for maintenance of ships with nuclear-power installations (NPI) in Murmansk and Archangel regions; place the State Atomic Shipbuilding Center (RSASBC) enterprises in Archangel and partly in Murmansk regions; exploitation of the Kola Atomic Station (APS); functioning of the Novaya Zemlya archipelago nuclear range; functioning Russian Plesetsk cosmo-drome. Technical proposals and projects for radio-ecology in the North are outlined. (R.P.)

  17. Status and prospects of radioecological data base for State register of individuals exposed to radiation as a result of ChNPP accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyb, A.F.; Pitkevich, V.A.; Duba, V.V.; Ivanov, V.K.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation ecology register for radioecological data base is being elaborated. The basic components of register are as follows: the basis of the initial documents according to districts and inhabitated localities; software for the data analysis and processing; software for implementation of physical models of radionuclide behaviour in the environment and absorbed dose formation; radioecological certificates (passports) for inhabitated localities and regions; software for evaluating the individual radiation loads induced by various radiation factors according to the requirements made by the Russian State medico-dosimetric register; data base. 2 refs.; 3 figs

  18. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 2: REDAC, the radioecological database after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville-Cavelin, G.; Biesold, H.; Chabanyuk, V.

    2006-01-01

    Goals: to built a database for integrating the results of programme 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative: Ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfer, transfer by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. Specific methodology: original 'Project Solutions Framework': Information system developed as a soft integrated portal, Geo-information system: all spatial data geo-coded. DB structure: Publications: all classical informations, original data; Products: storage of open publications of the Project; Processes: management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services: information and software objects, help; Basics: information on system and organizational development. - Soft integration: cartography system: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases, Loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server); Cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. - Soft integration: portlets and DDB: Portlets = mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts; Digital Dashboards (DDB) Portlets + web parts DDB sites = collections of DDB, adjustable by users. - General conclusions: REDAC, powerful and useful radioecological tool: All elements easily accessible through the original tool, ProSF, developed by IS Geo; Relations constructed between the documents (files, databases, documentation, reports,...); All elements structured by a meta-information; Mechanisms of search; Global radioecological glossary; Spatial data geo-coded; Processes, tools and methodology suitable for similar projects; Data useful for scientific studies, modelling, operational purposes, communication with mass media. - Outlook: Addition of functionality, support and maintenance Strong integration: Thematic integration = merging of all DB in an

  19. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 2: REDAC, the radioecological database after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville-Cavelin, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Environment and Emergency Operations Div. - Dept. for the Study of Radionuclide Behaviour in Ecosystems, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Biesold, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany); Chabanyuk, V. [Chornobyl Center (CC), Kiev regoin (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    Goals: to built a database for integrating the results of programme 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative: Ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfer, transfer by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. Specific methodology: original 'Project Solutions Framework': Information system developed as a soft integrated portal, Geo-information system: all spatial data geo-coded. DB structure: Publications: all classical informations, original data; Products: storage of open publications of the Project; Processes: management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services: information and software objects, help; Basics: information on system and organizational development. - Soft integration: cartography system: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases, Loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server); Cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. - Soft integration: portlets and DDB: Portlets = mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts; Digital Dashboards (DDB) Portlets + web parts DDB sites = collections of DDB, adjustable by users. - General conclusions: REDAC, powerful and useful radioecological tool: All elements easily accessible through the original tool, ProSF, developed by IS Geo; Relations constructed between the documents (files, databases, documentation, reports,...); All elements structured by a meta-information; Mechanisms of search; Global radioecological glossary; Spatial data geo-coded; Processes, tools and methodology suitable for similar projects; Data useful for scientific studies, modelling, operational purposes, communication with mass media. - Outlook: Addition of functionality, support and maintenance Strong integration: Thematic

  20. Dose assessment and radioecological consequences to aquatic organisms in the areas of Russia exposed to radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryshev, I.I.; Sazykina, T.G.

    1996-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the radioecological state of aquatic ecosystems in the territory of Russia was performed. The following water bodies were considered: lakes and rivers in the Ural and Chernobyl contaminated areas, the Yenisei River, cooling ponds of nuclear power plants, and the Arctic Seas. It was demonstrated that in all cases under consideration, doses to aquatic organisms were markedly higher than those to humans. Especially high exposure levels to fish and molluscs much in excess of the natural background were observed in a number of water bodies in the Ural and Chernobyl contaminated areas

  1. Workshop on Radioanalytical Chemistry for Radioecology and Waste Management: Report, evaluation, abstracts and full papers of presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Radiation Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark))

    2010-03-15

    A NKS-B workshop on radioanalytical chemistry for radioecology and waste management was held at Risoe, Roskilde, Denmark in 16-20th November 2009. The workshop was organized as 3 days lectures and presentations and two days laboratory practice. 48 peoples participated the workshop, including 32 young participants from Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Lithuania and Ireland. This report gives a brief description of the workshop and an evaluation of the workshop by statistic analysis of questionnaires feed back from the participants. The book of abstracts and proceedings presented in the workshop is enclosed. (author)

  2. Workshop on Radioanalytical Chemistry for Radioecology and Waste Management: Report, evaluation, abstracts and full papers of presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, X.

    2010-03-01

    A NKS-B workshop on radioanalytical chemistry for radioecology and waste management was held at Risoe, Roskilde, Denmark in 16-20th November 2009. The workshop was organized as 3 days lectures and presentations and two days laboratory practice. 48 peoples participated the workshop, including 32 young participants from Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Lithuania and Ireland. This report gives a brief description of the workshop and an evaluation of the workshop by statistic analysis of questionnaires feed back from the participants. The book of abstracts and proceedings presented in the workshop is enclosed. (author)

  3. Ecorad 2001. Radioecology/ ecotoxicology in continental and estuarine media; Ecorad 2001. Radioecologie / ecotoxicologie des milieux continentaux et estuariens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    This conference about radioecology is divided in eight sessions that concern the following subjects: behaviour and transfer of radionuclides in soil, in terrestrial ecosystems (plants and animal transfers), in freshwater ecosystems, in estuaries are the subjects of the four first sessions. The effects of toxicants in environment are detailed in the fifth session. The sixth session is devoted to the methods of measurement of environmental radioactivity. The seventh session is relative to the consequences of accidental and chronicle situations (Chernobyl consequences, countermeasures and decontamination). This conference ends with the ethical aspects of environmental radio ecotoxicology with the eighth session. (N.C.)

  4. Analysis of activity of information inquired group on radioecology and public communication in Ozyorsk (the town of nuclear industry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govyrina, E.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this report is an analysis of the activity of Information Inquired Group on radioecology and public communication, existed in the town of atomic industry Ozyorsk on the base of production association M ayak . Main tasks and functions of this organization, its management structure, forms of activity are considered in this report. In the report the emphasis is laid on the specification of nuclear branch and problems of the work with the public, connected with it. Conclusions maintain the practical recommendation by the work with the public, made on the experience of the Information Inquired Group's activity, and the results of functioning of the organization during ten years. (author)

  5. Radioecological studies at the National Accelerator Centre based on the determination of 129I by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Gutierrez, J. M.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Chamizo, E.; Santos, F. J.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2006 a compact system of mass spectrometry with Accelerator (AMS) is installed at the National Center of Accelerators, Seville. After an initial set-up and study have been opening many lines of research in fields such as archeology, geology, paleontology, oceanography, oceanography, internal dosimetry and characterization of radioactive waste, among others. In particular, based on the measurement of 1 29I have made contributions to the field of radioecology and radiation protection. In this work they are summarized and presented some of these investigations. (Author)

  6. Long-lived Radionuclides in the Environment: On the Radioecology of Iodine-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.; Klipsch, K.; Ernst, Th.; Vahlbruch, J.; Jakob, D.; Synal, H.A.; Schnabel, C.; Lopez-Gutierrez, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, nuclear accidents, and emissions from reprocessing plants have changed the natural abundances of the long-lived radionuclide 129 I (T 1/2 = 15.7 Ma) in a sustainable manner. But still today, the radioecology of 129 I is just incompletely known. In this paper, we summarize the results of a long-term project aimed on a comprehensive understanding of the abundances of 129 I and 127 I in Lower Saxony, Germany, and of their pathways through the different environmental compartments to man. To this end, accelerator mass spectrometry, radiochemical neutron activation analysis, ion chromatography, and ICP-MS were applied to measure the iodine isotopes in sea-water, air, precipitation, surface and ground waters, soils, plants, animals, foodstuffs, total diet, and human and animal thyroid glands. For air-borne iodine, the speciation as well as the particle size distribution of aerosols was determined. Soil depth profiles were investigated down to depths of 2.5 m in order to study the iodine migration as well as individual surface soil samples to allow for the determination of transfer factors of the iodine isotopes into plants. Also the transfer factors for feed-milk and feed-meat transfer were determined both for farm and wild animals. The iodine isotopes are in severe disequilibrium in the different environmental compartments. The pre-nuclear equilibrium 129 I/ 127 I ratio in the biosphere was determined to be 2.0 10 -13 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.39. Today, the environmental isotopic ratios in Northern Germany range from 10 -6 to 10 -10 . The highest ratios were found in North Sea water, the lowest in deep soil samples and ground water. The North Sea appears as the dominant source of air-borne iodine in Northern Germany due to the emissions of European reprocessing plants. A differentiation by about a factor of ten between the iodine isotopes was observed for the different air-borne species demonstrating the complexity of

  7. Radioecological synthesis of the various compartments of La Hague (Cotentin) marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmet, D.

    1986-03-01

    Permits for low level radioactive liquid waste releases by the LA HAGUE (Cotentin, France) fuel reprocessing plant are based on an accurate radioecological study of the marine environment. Since 1967, the monitoring of indicators such as seawater, sediments and marine organisms (Fucus serratus, Laminaria sp., Mytilus sp., ...) have made it possible to create an important environmental data base. A statistical treatment has been used to quantify the spatio-temporal (daily, seasonal, local and regional) variabilities of these indicators from 1975 up to now. It has demonstrated the interest of F. serratus seaweed as bioindicators of radioactivity. Moreover it appears that seawater-soluble radionuclides such as 125 Sb and 137 Cs are monitored through longer distance from the outlet than those bound to particles such as 144 Ce. A study of the sestonic load by satellite images suggested a number of geographical sites of potential accumulation through particle transport, some of which were verified by radioactivity measurements of sediments. However, such accumulation was not confirmed by the particle size distribution at the level of the Cap de LA HAGUE associated with radioactive measurements of seawater. A spectral analysis of biota radioactive levels vs radioactive waste releases showed a time delay of 2 - 4 months for F. serratus and Mytilus sp. collected in the local area of LA HAGUE after either an increase or a decrease of the releases. Modeling of marine currents fields associated with a transfer model can now be used to predict, at small time scales, the radioactivity levels inthe various Cotentin marine compartments from the liquid waste releases [fr

  8. Importance of the mooring system using in marine radioecology, present and planned studies in our country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, O.; Belivermis, M.; Cotuk, Y.; Topcuoglu, S.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, the most important biomonitor organism is Mediterranean mussel species (Mytilus galloprovincialis) in handled monitoring studies in the marine radioecology content. This bio indicator species is also important both of the national and international monitoring programs. In this sense, Mediterranean and Black Sea mussel monitoring project was carried out with participating many countries which they have bank to Mediterranean and Black Sea by supported CIESM (Commission Internationale pour l'Expolaration Scientiphique de la mer Mediterranee) during the period of 2002-2004. All scientific data collected in a data bank. Furthermore, some new techniques were created for sampling and preparation of samples in monitoring of radionuclides and chemical pollutants by this project. On the other hand, the advantages of active bio monitoring compare to the passive bio monitoring were presented by discussed significance of mooring system.The mussel transplantation is carried out using of mooring systems for two goals. First one of them, available pollutants are to monitor in the absence of the mussel species in the stations by mussel transplantation in those stations. The other one of them, mussels which they are in same length and physiological state are to transplant the mooring systems and to monitor pollutants in mussel living and intended stations. In our country, the first mussel transplantation with established the mooring system was performed at the Oeluedeniz, Antalya, Tasucu, Botas and Arsuz stations. Active monitoring results of the works for radionuclide concentrations were given in this presented paper as well as passive monitoring findings were compared with the results obtained from Black Sea and Marmara Sea stations. Besides, it was presented the aim and content of mooring system that we planned to establish in the Golden Horn in this presentation.

  9. Radio-ecological study of the Lodeve mining complex (France) 1981-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descamps, B.

    1987-11-01

    The radio-ecological study of the Lodeve mining complex (mine + uranium process plant) was carried out between 1981 and 1985. Four aquatic compartments -water, sediments, vegetals, fish- were studied in eight stations selected on the basis of the existence of two liquid wastes. The measurements essentially concerned radium 226 and uranium 238 but also lead 210 (1985), thorium 232, potassium 40 and cesium 137. Spectrometry γ Ge-Li, emanometry and fluorimetry were used. Only a small brook -Rivernoux- an affluent of the Lergue river, shows radium and uranium activity levels higher than those measured upstream of the site; and this for the four compartments. In water, radium is associated with the solved cationic fraction (66%) and with materials in suspension (21%), whereas uranium is essentially associated with the solved anionic fraction (84%); the radium migration potentialities are therefore lesser than that of uranium. Radium distribution in fish is as follows: flesh (5 to 15%), skeleton (12%), viscera (30%) and skin + fins (30%). Radium concentration (or exchange) factors are always higher than those corresponding to uranium. In general, they are more important in non-influenced zones than in influenced zones (Rivernoux); this implies that radium and uranium evacuated by the mining complex are, at least partly, in non bio-available forms. For water/fish exchange a concentration factor of 100 will be considered for radium. On the basis of this value a weekly consumption of 200 g of fried gudgeon gives an annual committed dose equivalent corresponding to 0.86% of the dose authorized for the public (5.10 -3 Sv.an -1 ) [fr

  10. University of Washington's radioecological studies in the Marshall Islands, 1946-1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, L R; Seymour, A H; Nevissi, A E

    1997-07-01

    Since 1946, personnel from the School of Fisheries, University of Washington (Applied Fisheries Laboratory, 1943-1958; Laboratory of Radiation Biology, 1958-1967; and Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, since 1967), have studied the effects of nuclear detonations and the ensuing radioactivity on the marine and terrestrial environments throughout the Central Pacific. A collection of reports and publications about these activities plus a collection of several thousand samples from these periods are kept at the School of Fisheries. General findings from the surveys show that (1) fission products were prevalent in organisms of the terrestrial environment whereas activation products were prevalent in marine organisms; (2) the best biological indicators of fallout radionuclides by environments were (a) terrestrial-coconuts, land crabs; (b) reef-algae, invertebrates; and (c) marine-plankton, fish. Studies of plutonium and americium in Bikini Atoll showed that during 1971-1977 the highest concentrations of 241Am, 2.85 Bq g(-1) (77 pCi g(-1)) and 239,240Pu, 4.44 Bq g(-1) (120 pCi g(-1)), in surface sediments were found in the northwest part of the lagoon. The concentrations in the bomb craters were substantially lower than these values. Concentrations of soluble and particulate plutonium and americium in surface and deep water samples showed distributions similar to the sediment samples. That is, the highest concentration of these radionuclides in the water column were at locations with highest sediment concentration. Continuous circulation of water in the lagoon and exchange of water with open ocean resulted in removal of 111 G Bq y(-1) (3 Ci y(-1)) 241Am and 222 G Bq y(-1) (6 Ci y(-1)) 239,240Pu into the North Equatorial Current. A summary of the surveys, findings, and the historical role of the Laboratory in radioecological studies of the Marshall Islands are presented.

  11. Experimental verification of dynamic radioecological models established after the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, G.; Mueller, H.; Proehl, G.; Stocke, H.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1991-01-01

    The experiments reported were carried out for a verification of existing, dynamic radioecological models, especially of the ECOSYS model. The database used for the verification covers the radioactivity concentrations of Cs-134, Cs-137, I-131 measured after the Chernobyl reactor accident in foodstuffs and environmental samples, the results of field experiments on radionuclide translocation after foliar uptake or absorption by the roots of edible plants. The measured data were compared with the model predictions for the radionuclides under review. The Cs-134 and Cs-137 translocation factors which describe the redistribution of these radionuclides in the plant after foliar uptake were experimentally determined by a single sprinkling with Chernobyl rainwater, and were measured to be the following as a function of sprinkling time: winter wheat, 0.002-0.13; spring wheat, 0.003-0.09; winter rye, 0.002-0.27; barley, 0.002-0.04; potatoes, 0.05-0.35; carrots, 0.02-0.07; bush beans, 0.04-0.3; cabbage, 0.1-0.5. The weathering half-life of the radionuclides in lettuce was determined to be ten days. Transfer factors determined for root absorption of Cs-137 were measured to be an average of 0.002 for grains, 0.002 for potatoes, 0.004 for white cabbage, 0.003 for bush beans and carrots, and 0.007 for lettuce. There was an agreement between the ECOSYS model predictions and the measured radioactivity concentrations of the corresponding radionuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Derivation of radioecological parameters from the long-term emission of iodine-129. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.; Klipsch, K.; Ernst, T.; Gorny, M.; Jakob, D.; Vahlbruch, J.; Synal, H.A.; Schnabel, C.

    2004-01-01

    In this project, the distribution and behaviour of 129 I and 127 I in the environment and its pathways through the environment to man were comprehensively investigated in order to provide a basis for estimating the radiation exposure to man due to releases of 129 I. To this end, the actual situation in Lower Saxony, Germany, was studied for exemplary regions near to and far from the coast of the North Sea. Accelerator mass spectrometry, radiochemical neutron activation analysis, ion chromatography, and ICP-MS were applied to measure the iodine isotopes, 129 I and P 127 I, in sea-water, air, precipitation, surface and ground waters, soils, plants, animals, foodstuffs, total diet, and human and animal thyroid glands. For air-borne iodine, the speciation as well as the particle size distribution of aerosols was determined. Soil depth profiles were investigated down to depths of 2.5 m in order to study the iodine migration as well as individual surface soil samples to allow for the determination of transfer factors of the iodine isotopes into plants. From the analytical results radioecological parameters for the long-term behaviour of 129 I in the pedo- and biosphere were derived. The iodine isotopes are in severe disequilibrium in the different environmental compartments. The pre-nuclear equilibrium 129 I/ 127 I ratio in the biosphere was determined to be 2.0 x 10 -13 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.39. Today, the environmental isotopic ratios in Northern Germany range from 10 -6 to 10 -10 . The highest ratios are found in North Sea water, the lowest in deep soil samples and ground water. The North Sea appears as the dominant source of air-borne iodine in Northern Germany due to the emissions of European reprocessing plants. The results are discussed with respect to their radiological relevance and in view of the general protection of the environment, i.e. air, water, soil and the biosphere. (orig.)

  13. Quality assurance and quality control procedures in river water radioecological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalbandyan, A.; Stepanyan, A.

    2006-01-01

    For recent decades the issue of radioactive pollution of environmental components has acquired a global character as a result of nuclear weapon testing, accidents in NPPs, development of nuclear technologies and so on. A study object of this research is river water as it is known to be radionuclide transport and accumulation mediums and radioactive elements in river water are available as radioactive salts and mechanic and biological pollutants. Moreover, river water is widely used for various economic and commercial purposes and serves a drinking water supply source as well. The ongoing research is performed in the frame of a NATO/OSCE project 'South Caucasus River Monitoring'. The topicality of the problem dictates a necessity of getting credible and compatible results. For adequate radioactive pollution assessment, decisive are the application and keeping standard QA/QC procedures at all the stages of radioecological monitoring. In our research we apply the following ISO standard-based QA/QC procedures: sampling (emphasizing sample identification: sample collection site, date and method), sample transportation (keeping sample conservation and storing requirements), sample treatment and preparation in the lab, radiometric measurements of samples with regard for the time that past from sampling moment to analysis, control and calibration of analytic instruments, control analysis of samples. The obtained data are processed through standard statistic methods of QC to check measurement errors. Gamma-spectrometric measurements are maid using a Genie-2000 (Canberra) software that includes a separate program for measurement QC. The ultimate outcomes are arranged in special protocols (analysis and sampling tasks protocols, sampling task form, field measurement protocol, sample chain of custody form, sample analysis protocol) and compiled in appropriate databases

  14. The role of Palesse state radiation environmental reserve in preserving of biological variety of surface vertebrates in belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchmel', S.V.

    2007-01-01

    6 species rodents, 1 species ungulate and 4 - predators are brought in to the third edition of the Red Data Book of Belarus. From these three groups on territory Palesse State radioecological reservation (PSRER) is registered 6 species (54,5 %), from 72 rare birds - is registered 34 (47,2 %) species, from 4 species reptiles and amphibians - 3 (75 %). Territory PSRER not only territory of preservation biodiversity of region of Palesse and Republic, but also having the international meaning for preservation rare and maintenance of stability of populations of usual species of animals. (authors)

  15. Replacing reserve requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Edward J. Stevens

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the fading significance of the Federal Reserve System's reserve requirements and the recent flowering of required clearing balances, a rapidly growing feature of Reserve Bank operations.

  16. Environmental studies on radioecological sensitivity and variability with special emphasis on the fallout nuclides 90Sr and 137Cs. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarkrog, A.

    1979-06-01

    Radioecological sensitivity and variability are quantities that are used to characterize the radioecological properties of environmental samples. The radioecological sensitivity is the infinite time-integrated radionuclide concentration in the environmental sample considered arising from a deposition of 1 mCi KM -2 of the radionuclide in question. This quantity makes it possible to compare various environments as to their vulnerability to a given radioactive contamination. The variability of the concentrations of a radionuclide in an environmental sample, with respect to a given parameter, is defined as the partial coefficient of variation due to this parameter. The variability with time is a useful way to assess the route of contamination of the sample and the local variability is a measure of environmental inhomogenity with respect to radioactive contamination. Radioecology sensitivity and variability were applied to the 90 Sr and 137 Cs data obtained from the environmental studies on the human foodchain carried out during the last two decades in Denmark, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland. The per caput effective dose-equivalent commitments from radioactive debris from nuclear weapons testing was estimated to be 1.6 mSv in Denmark, 4.2 mSv in the Faroe Islands, and 1.6 mSv in Greenland. (author)

  17. 15. Mendeleev's meeting on general and applied chemistry. Obninsk Symposium. Radioecological problems in nuclear energetics and in industry conversion. Abstracts. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Works devoted to the problems of radioecology, radiochemistry, ecological monitoring, human health in zones subjected to radioactive contamination as a result of the Chernobyl accident, were presented at the 15. Mendeleev congress of general and applied chemistry which took place in Obninsk in 1993

  18. Participation of CIEMAT in studies of radioecology in european marine ecosystems; Participacion del Ciemat en estudios de radioecologia en ecosistemas marinos Europeos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Meral, J.; Gonzalez, A. M. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    In this report the different objectives and results achieved through the participation of the Aquatic Radioecology Laboratory for CIEMAT in some European Projects from 1994 up to now are detailed. A Description of the studied ecosystems, the sampling campaigns performed, and the analytical methods developed are presented as well. Finally the main results and conclusions obtained are summarized. (Author)

  19. {sup 239+240}Pu in the Barents Sea Regions. Sources and radioecological assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iosjpe, Mikhail [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, N-1332 Oesteraas (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    The radioecological assessment for {sup 239+240}Pu in the Barents sea regions was made using the compartment modelling approach. The following sources of radioactive contamination were under consideration: global fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, transport of {sup 239+240}Pu from the Sellafield and La Hauge nuclear plants and underwater testing of nuclear weapons in Chernaya Bay, Novaya Zemlya. The box model developed at NRPA uses a modified approach for compartmental modeling, which takes into account the dispersion of radionuclides over time. The box structures for surface, mid-depth and deep water layers have been developed based on the description of polar, Atlantic and deep waters in the Arctic Ocean and the Northern Seas, as well as site-specific information for the boxes. The volume of the three water layers in each box has been calculated using detailed bathymetry together with Geographical Information Systems. The box model includes the processes of advection of radioactivity between compartments, sedimentation, diffusion of radioactivity through pore water in sediments, resuspension, mixing due to bioturbation, particle mixing and a burial process for radionuclides in deep sediment layers. Radioactive decay is calculated for all compartments. The contamination of biota is further calculated from the known radionuclide concentrations in filtered seawater in the different water regions. Doses to man are calculated on the basis of seafood consumptions, in accordance with available data for seafood catches and assumptions about human diet in the respective areas. Dose to biota are determined on the basis of calculated radionuclide concentrations in marine organisms, water and sediment, using dose conversion factors. Results of the calculations show that atmospheric deposition is the dominant source for the Barents Sea, except for the Chernaya Bay region. It is also demonstrated that the impact of the Sellafield nuclear facilities has

  20. Transport of Aquatic Contaminant and Assessment of Radioecological Exposure with Spatial and Temporal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ying

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the radioecological exposure assessment for a contaminated aquatic ecosystem has been performed in this dissertation. The primary objectives of this research were to advance the understanding of radiation exposure in nature and to increase current capabilities for estimating aquatic radiation exposure with the consideration of spatial and temporal effect in nature. This was accomplished through the development of a two-dimensional aquatic exposure assessment framework and by applying the framework to the contaminated Chernobyl cooling lake (pond). This framework integrated spatial and temporal heterogeneity effects of contaminant concentration, abundance and distribution of ecosystem populations, spatial- and temporal-dependent (or density-dependent) radionuclide ingestion, and alternative food web structures. The exposure model was built on the population level to allow for the integration of density dependent population regulation into the exposure assessment. Plankton population dynamics have been integrated into the hydrodynamic-transport model to determine plankton biomass density changes and distributions. The distribution of contaminant in water was also calculated using a hydrodynamic-transport model. The significance of adding spatial and temporal effects, spatial and temporal related ecological functions, and hydrodynamics in the exposure assessment was illustrated through a series of case studies. The results suggested that the spatial and temporal heterogeneity effects of radioactive environments were substantial. Among the ecological functions considered, the food web structure was the most important contributor to the variations of fish exposure. The results obtained using a multiple prey food web structure differed by a factor of 20 from the equilibrium concentration, and by a factor of 2.5 from the concentration obtained using a single-prey food web. Impacts of changes in abundance and distribution of biomass on contaminant

  1. Establishment of Foundation for Export of Korean Environmental Assessment Technology through IAEA International Radioecology Project(EMRAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Y. H.; Keum, D. K.; Kang, H. S.; Suh, K. S.; Choi, H. J.; Lee, C. W

    2005-08-15

    This study was performed to obtain the international verification of Korea developed assessment code and experimental data on radioecology through the participation of EMRAS joint research program of IAEA, and consequently to establish the export foundation of the related technologies. The work scope includes 1) the provision of Korean experimental data and the verification of tritium assessment codes within Tritium Working Group, 2) the verification of Korean experimental data to be included in IAEA TRS364 Revision Group, and 3) the collection of information on other Working Groups activities. Major results comprise the comparison of model predictions between 12 organizations for Korean soybean scenario (to be published in IAEA TECDOC), and the verification of data (the interception factor for foliar contamination by dry(wet) deposition, weathering loss rate and translocation factor) submitted by update IAEA TRS364.

  2. Establishment of Foundation for Export of Korean Environmental Assessment Technology through IAEA International Radioecology Project(EMRAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Y. H.; Keum, D. K.; Kang, H. S.; Suh, K. S.; Choi, H. J.; Lee, C. W.

    2005-08-01

    This study was performed to obtain the international verification of Korea developed assessment code and experimental data on radioecology through the participation of EMRAS joint research program of IAEA, and consequently to establish the export foundation of the related technologies. The work scope includes 1) the provision of Korean experimental data and the verification of tritium assessment codes within Tritium Working Group, 2) the verification of Korean experimental data to be included in IAEA TRS364 Revision Group, and 3) the collection of information on other Working Groups activities. Major results comprise the comparison of model predictions between 12 organizations for Korean soybean scenario (to be published in IAEA TECDOC), and the verification of data (the interception factor for foliar contamination by dry(wet) deposition, weathering loss rate and translocation factor) submitted by update IAEA TRS364

  3. Marine radioecology. Final reports from sub-projects within the Nordic nuclear safety research project EKO-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsson, S.E.

    2001-04-01

    This report contains a collection of eight papers describing research done in the NKS/EKO-1 project. It also contains a preface giving a summary of the results. The EKO-1 project as a whole has been described in the report NKS(97)FR4. The aim of the project was to make a joint Nordic study on radionuclides in sediments and water and the interaction between these two phaseS. Relatively less emphasis had been put on this factor compared to others in previous Nordic studies on marine radioecology. For some of the participating countries this work was the first of its kind undertaken. The project involved field, laboratory and model studies. The work and results helped to highlight the important role of sediments when assessing the consequences of real or possible releases of radionuclides to the marine environment (au)

  4. Radioecological condition assessment and remediation criteria for sites of spent fuel and radioactive waste storage in the russian northwest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandala, Nataliya; Titov, Alex; Novikova, Natalia; Kiselev, Mikhail; Romanov, Vladimir; Sneve, Malgorzata; Smith, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation have a regulatory cooperation programme which is concerned with management of the nuclear legacy in northwest Russia, and, in particular, the remediation of facilities for spent fuel and radioactive waste management at the former Shore Technical Bases at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha Village. New regulatory guidance documents have been developed, necessary because of the special abnormal situation at these sites, now designated as Sites of Temporary Storage, but also because of the transition from military to civilian regulatory supervision and the evolving regulatory system in the Russian Federation. This paper presents the progress made and on-going projects in 2008 which involve development of the radio-ecological basis for identifying radiation supervision area boundaries and a system of recommended dose constraints and derived control levels for protection of workers and the public. Unconditional guarantee of long-term radioecological protection serves as the basis for criteria development. Non-exceedance of these dose constraints and control levels implies compliance with radiological protection objectives related to the residual contamination. Dose reduction below proposed dose constraint values must also be carried out according to the optimization principle. A number of remediation strategies are considered, corresponding to different future land use assumptions, including interim continued use in a nuclear context. The developed criteria relate to conditions of facilities and surrounding areas at the sites of temporary storage after completion of their remediation, and during the interim stages of remediation, depending upon the remediation strategy adopted. (author)

  5. Accumulation of main radionuclides that participate in exposure dose formation in liver of wild ungulate animals on the territory of the Palesse state radioecological reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korol', R.A.; Nikitin, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    The dose of internal exposure of liver of wild ungulate animals (deer, elk, boar) mainly determined by Cs 137 at present time. The dose from Cs 137 is decrease in line wild boar - deer - elk and variate from 0.3 to 104.8 mSv/y. Other 'Chernobyl' radionuclides about equally contribute in the dose. The relative role of transuranium elements are increasing and will be equal to Cs 137 after about 250 years. The role of Sr 90 will minor all time. (authors)

  6. Radioprotection of the environment: Towards the coming of age of radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, F.; Howard, B.; Copplestone, D.

    2004-01-01

    towards a more explicit protection of the environment is prompting a readjustment of radioecology from an anthropocentric to a more ecocentric approach. It drives to shift from a prior focus on transfer of radionuclides (to humans through the environment) to an additional consideration of transfer to other biota, and to effects (of low doses in chronic exposure) not only on man, but also on biota and their complex interactions within ecosystems. It is therefore of much interest, and perhaps a necessity, to review the current practical approach suggested by ICRP against the scientific state of the art that currently exists at a relevant crossroad of ecology, environmental toxicology and radiobiology. Initial questions that can be put forward include: 1) Is the current scientific foundation relevant and appropriate to allow for the construction of a sound regulatory framework, that could meet its protection goals and be understood, accepted and endorsed by users and stakeholders ? 2) Currently, the protection of the environment is tackled with a conceptual approach that mimics that in use for the protection of man. Whilst exploiting similarities between man and biota, is this parallel fully justified and adequately responding to the goals of environment protection? 3) Extrapolating dose-effects knowledge across levels of biological organisation, from individuals to ecosystem: rule of thumb (empirical safety factors) or sounder science? and 4) For the purpose of ecological impact assessment, are the chemical and radiological aspects sufficiently integrated ? (Author)

  7. Radioecological zoning of territories of carrying out of underground nuclear explosions in conditions of Yakutia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovleva, V.D.; Stepanov, V.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In territory of Yakutia on period 1974 - 1987 years in the industrial purposes 12 peace underground nuclear explosions (UNE) have been made seven from which is carried out on Average-Botuobinsk a deposit with the purpose of an intensification of an oil recovery and inflow of gas (a chink No. 42, 43, 47, 66, 61, 68) and one (No. 101) - for creation of underground capacity - storehouses of the oil, four explosions - for seismic sounding an earth's crust ('Kimberlit', 'Horizon - 4', 'Kraton-4', 'Kraton-3'), and one 'Crystal' - for creation of a dam by loosening of breeds. From them 'Crystal' and 'Kraton-3' are emergency where the dead woods forming impact zones were formed. Impact zones are the sites dated for places with attributes of changes of an environment from influence of radiation. Differently, impact zone can be characterized as a zone of shock influence of the radiating factor on an environment allocated on the basis of seen damages of a vegetative cover. On Average-Botuobinsk 'air-blast cleaning' a deposit are available local radioactive a stain, formed (educated) at 'air-blast cleaning' chinks 42, 43, 47, 68 after end of chisel works and opening potted component which is taking place under the cement bridge. As a result of it has taken place teknogen change of a radiating background as a local stain the area approximately from 4 up to 25 m 2 , adjoining to mouth blowing lines (in approximately 100 m from a mouth of chinks). As a result of radioecological researches on vicinities of objects UNE conclusions which further can be a basis of the concept are received. 1. radioactive pollution of objects UNE have spotty character, are found out: on emergency UNE - a) cesium - 137, americium - 241, cobalt - 60; 6) cesium - 134, antimony - 125, europium - 155; a) objects kamuflet cesium - 137 and americium -241. 2. Definition impact zones on objects UNE is based on attributes- a) the vegetative cover is damaged; the level of a scale - background is

  8. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  9. Geoinformation technology for radioecological monitoring and rehabilitation of the agricultural territories on the late stage of the Chernobyl accident in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, T.D.; Garger, E.; Tabachny, L.

    2002-01-01

    The complex analysis of the radioecological situation on the polluted agricultural territories of Ukrainian Polissya was carried out on the data of the Radiation Monitoring System during 1996-1999 using GIS technologies. The critical territories for implementation of countermeasures and conservative measures for reduction of product level contamination by radionuclides are selected. The results of the statistical and spatial analysis of the data on product contamination have allowed to elaborate the schedule of the products monitoring. (author)

  10. Skyline Reservation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Flight reservation application used for in-country flights by USAID and DoS staff in Afghanistan. The application is managed and maintained by the vendor and USAID...

  11. Management of liquid radioactive waste from research and training laboratories of radiochemistry and radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnopyorova, A.P.; Yuhno, G.D.; Sytnik, O.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Liquid radioactive waste (LRW), that is formed in research and training cycle of radiochemistry and radioecology laboratories of Kharkov National University, corresponds to medium active one (10 5 -10 7 Bq/l). Since the great number of different radioactive isotopes is involved in research conducted by the laboratories, liquid waste contains various radioactive contaminations. As a rule these are the water solutions of salts with concentration of 0.8-1.0 gm/l, containing mixture of 45 Ca, 65 Zn, 90 Sr, 173 Cs radionuclides. Accumulation of liquid waste from the laboratories is comparatively small, approximately 20-30 I per month. A great while LRW from the laboratories had been accumulated in special protective containers and delivered to the central waste disposal. Numerous studies has shown that LRW storage in special containers may only be temporal, since durable holding of waste necessarily gives rise to corrosion of the facing materials, and therefore diffusion of radioactive substances into environment. In addition long-term LRW storage is disadvantageous from economic point of view. Only conversion of LWR into solid state provides safe protection of environment and decreases volumes of waste. At present LRW from the laboratories is necessarily decontaminated and concentrated before being disposed.To that end the sorption methods are used, in which radionuclides from solution are concentrated in solid phase. Since small volumes of LRW are accumulated in the laboratories, the simple scheme of LRW treatment and conversion into solid residual has been designed. It comprises two steps. At the first stage consists in combining of lime-soda-ash softening with the ion-exchange sorption on the finely divided solid sorbent. Natural zeolite, clinoptilolite from Sokimitsk deposit of Ukraine, is used as the sorbent. Usage of clinoptilolite is justified by its high selectivity and sorption power in regard to 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 65 Zn radionuclides. Both low cost and

  12. US uranium reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, M.V.

    1981-01-01

    The current low level of demand, compounded by rapidly rising costs and low prices, has caused a significant reduction in drilling for uranium in the United States, and the trend is likely to continue for a few more years. The effect on uranium reserves will be fewer additions to reserves because less exploration is being done. Further reductions will occur, especially in low-cost reserves, because of increasing costs, continuing depletion through production, and erosion through the high grading of deposits to fulfill previous contractual commitments. During the past several years, it has been necessary to increase the upper reserve cost level twice to compensate for rising costs. Rising costs are reducing the $15 reserves, the cost category corresponding most closely to the present market price, to an insignificant level. An encouraging factor related to US uranium reserves is that the US position internationally, as far as quantity is concerned, is not bad for the longer term. Also, there is a general opinion that US consumers would rather contract for domestic uranium than for foreign because of greater assurance of supply. Still another factor, nearly impossible to assess, is what effect rising costs in other countries will have on their uranium reserves. The annual conferences between the Grand Junction Area Office staff and major uranium companies provide a broad overview of the industry's perception of the future. It is not optimistic for the short term. Many companies are reducing their exploration and mining programs; some are switching to other more marketable mineral commodities, and a few are investing more heavily in foreign ventures. However, there is general optimism for the long term, and many predict a growth in demand in the mid-1980s. If the industry can survive the few lean years ahead, rising prices may restore its viability to former levels

  13. Handbook on loss reserving

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Klaus; Schnaus, Anja

    2016-01-01

    This handbook presents the basic aspects of actuarial loss reserving. Besides the traditional methods, it also includes a description of more recent ones and a discussion of certain problems occurring in actuarial practice, like inflation, scarce data, large claims, slow loss development, the use of market statistics, the need for simulation techniques and the task of calculating best estimates and ranges of future losses. In property and casualty insurance the provisions for payment obligations from losses that have occurred but have not yet been settled usually constitute the largest item on the liabilities side of an insurer's balance sheet. For this reason, the determination and evaluation of these loss reserves is of considerable economic importance for every property and casualty insurer. Actuarial students, academics as well as practicing actuaries will benefit from this overview of the most important actuarial methods of loss reserving by developing an understanding of the underlying stochastic models...

  14. Lithium reserves and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    As a result of accelerating research efforts in the fields of secondary batteries and thermonuclear power generation, concern has been expressed in certain quarters regarding the availability, in sufficient quantities, of lithium. As part of a recent study by the National Research Council on behalf of the Energy Research and Development Administration, a subpanel was formed to consider the outlook for lithium. Principal areas of concern were reserves, resources and the 'surplus' available for energy applications after allowing for the growth in current lithium applications. Reserves and resources were categorized into four classes ranging from fully proved reserves to resources which are probably dependent upon the marketing of co-products to become economically attractive. Because of the proprietary nature of data on beneficiation and processing recoveries, the tonnages of available lithium are expressed in terms of plant feed. However, highly conservative assumptions have been made concerning mining recoveries and these go a considerable way to accounting for total losses. Western World reserves and resources of all classes are estimated at 10.6 million tonnes Li of which 3.5 million tonnes Li are located in the United States. Current United States capacity, virtually equivalent to Western World capacity, is 4700 tonnes Li and production in 1976 approximated to 3500 tonnes Li. Production for current applications is expected to grow to approx. 10,000 tonnes in year 2000 and 13,000 tonnes a decade later. The massive excess of reserves and resources over that necessary to support conventional requirements has limited the amount of justifiable exploration expenditures; on the last occasion, there was a a major increase in demand (by the USAEA) reserves and capacity were increased rapidly. There are no foreseeable reasons why this shouldn't happen again when the need is clear. (author)

  15. Brazilian uranium reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.P.M.

    1981-01-01

    Due to a growing demand of electric power to support Brasil's development, the use of nuclear energy will be indispensable. The nuclear fuel cycle for the production of energy, starts with the uranium exploration. The work performed in this field led to the discovery of several deposits in the country, which to-date totalize a reserve of 236,300t of U 308 , ranking Brazil in the 6th place among the nations of the western world holding uranium reserves. (Author) [pt

  16. Session 7: Reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, R.; Crockford, G.

    2001-01-01

    The reserve session was devoted to some issues that came up through the workshop, which were grouped into three main areas: The Global Accelerator Network, Problems of stress and how to get organized to minimize them, What should an operations group be responsible for? This paper summarizes the discussions that took place. (author)

  17. SUIKERBOSRAND NATURE RESERVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reserve, the total length being 66 km with six overnight huts. There are also the BokmakiePie. Nature Troil. and the Cheetah Interpretive Troil. which can be used by day visitors. The former has two loops, one of 10 km and another of 17 km. The. Cheetah Troil. is much shorter and various points of interest are interpreted en ...

  18. School Shootings Stun Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.; Cavanagh, Sean

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the impact brought by the school shootings at Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota to the school community. A deeply troubled 16-year-old student shot and killed seven other people and himself at a high school. The nation's deadliest school attack since the 1999 slayings at Colorado's suburban Columbine High School took…

  19. Uranium reserves fall: AAEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Figures released by the AAEC show that Australia's reasonably assured resources of uranium recoverable at US$80 a kg fell by 5,000 tonnes during 1980-81. Reserves at 30 June 1981 totalled 294,000 tonnes. This represented 17 per cent of the Western World's low cost reasonably assured resources

  20. US Subseabed Disposal Program radioecological data base: summaries of available radionuclide concentration factors and biological half-lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, L.S.; Marietta, M.G.; Jackson, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    The US Subseabed Disposal Program has compiled an extensive objective concentration factor and biological half-life data base from the international marine radioecological literature. A microcomputer-based data management system has been implemented to provide statistical and graphical summaries of these data. The data base is constructed in a manner which allows subsets to be sorted using a number of inter-study variables such as organism category, tissue/organ category, geographic location (for in situ studies), and several laboratory-related conditions (e.g., exposure time and exposure concentration). We discuss concentration factor data summaries for many elements. We also discuss summary material for biological half-life data. We discuss the results of our review with the estimates of mean concentration factors provided by the IAEA. It is proposed that this presentation scheme will enable those concerned with predictive assessment of radiation dose in the marine environment to make a more judicious selection of data for a given application. 7 references

  1. The environment protection at the 21. century: radiological protection of the biosphere including man. Declaration of International union of radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, F.; Polikarpov, G.; Oughton, D.H.; Hunter, G.; Alexakhin, R.; Zhu, Y.G.; Hilton, J.; Strand, P.

    2003-01-01

    The International union of radioecology has been created in 1970 as an international scientific organisation to develop, inform and advise on every aspect in relation with radioactivity in environment. It advises to fill the gaps of knowledge in order to develop strong scientific bases on which found the environmental protection. Seven points of knowledge are to improve: the understanding of transfer, bio accumulating and metabolism of radionuclides in ecosystems (specially the non human food chains), understanding of low dose radiation effects on fauna, flora in chronic exposure on several generations, identification of criteria and targets of effects to allow comparisons in term of impact, effects coming from several pollutions, radioactive or non radioactive ones, extrapolation between the biological organisation levels, analysis of simultaneous effects for man and other living organisms, harmonization of a radiation protection system and a protection system against chemical toxicity, development of quantities and units allowing to qualify the noxious effects of radiations and chemical pollutants on living beings. (N.C.)

  2. Radioecological investigations of uranium mill tailings systems: Final report for the period September 1, 1979 through April 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.; Ibrahim, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    This document is the final report on studies of the integrity and transport of uranium and radioactive progeny in active and reclaimed uranium mill tailings. The overall program was designed to provide basic information on the radioecology of 238 U, 230 Th, 226 Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Po, responses of plants and animals to the landscape disruptions associated with uranium production, and guidance for impact analysis, mitigation and regulation of the uranium industry. The studies reported were conducted at the Shirley Basin Uranium Mine, which is operated by the Pathfinder Mines Corporation. The mine/mill operation, located in southeastern Wyoming, is typical in terms of the ore body, mill process, and ecological setting of many uranium production centers in the western United States. The research was motivated originally by the general lack of knowledge on the transport of uranium and its radioactive daughter products through the environment, particularly through food chains in the immediate environs of uranium production operations. The work was also motivated by the relatively high contribution of uranium mining and milling to the radiation exposure of the general population from the nuclear fuel cycle

  3. Radioecological investigations of uranium mill tailing systems. Sixth technical progress report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.; Ibrahim, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a status report on studies of the integrity and transport of several radionuclides in active and reclaimed uranium mill tailings. The program is designed to provide basic information on the radioecology of uranium and progeny, responses of native biota to the landscape disruptions associated with uranium production, and guidance for impact analysis, mitigation and regulation of the uranium industry. The studies reported are being conducted at the Shirley Basin Uranium Mine, which is operated by the Pathfinder Mines Corporation. The mine/mill operation, located in southeastern Wyoming, is typical in terms of the ore body, mill process, and ecological setting of many uranium production centers in the western United States. The intent has been to quantitatively evaluate the release of important radionuclides from active and reclaimed uranium mill tailings and their entry into the food chain. An experimental plot was developed in which a uniform slab of tailings was covered with various depths of earthen materials and seeded with native range vegetation. Performance of this vegetation is monitored annually. The ability of roots to function in or near buried tailings is under long-term study as well. Experiments on radon flux versus overburden depth have been conducted and these are continuing with emphasis on understanding the role of soil moisture and climatic variables. Experimental colonies of prairie dogs were introduced to the tailings reclamation plot. The resulting disruptive effects in terms of soil movement, transport of radionuclides and the impact on radon emanation have been studied and reported

  4. Fractional Reserve Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Niels; Bjerregaard, Mads; Lund, Jonas; Olsen, Ove Bitsch; Rasmussen, Andreas Dalgas

    2012-01-01

    Projektet er bygget op omkring kritisk realisme, som er det gennemgående videnskabelige fundament til undersøgelsen af hvilke strukturelle grunde der er til finansiel ustabilitet i Danmark. Projektet går i dybden med Fractional Reserve Banking og incitamentsstrukturen i banksystemet. Vi bevæger os både på det makro- og mikroøkonomiske niveau i analysen. På makro niveau bruger vi den østrigske skole om konjunktur teori (The Positive Theory of the Cycle). På mikro niveau arbejder vi med princip...

  5. Risk considerations for a long-term open-state of the radioactive waste storage facility Schacht Asse II. Variation of the parameter sets for radio-ecological modeling using the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueppers, Christian; Ustohalova, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    The risk considerations for a long-term open-state of the radioactive waste storage facility Schacht Asse II include the following issues: description of radio-ecological models for the radionuclide transport in the covering rock formations and determination of the radiation exposure, parameters of the radio-ecological and their variability, Monte-Carlo method application. The results of the modeling calculations include the group short-living radionuclides, long-living radionuclides, radionuclides in the frame of decay chains and sensitivity analyses with respect to the correlation of input data and results.

  6. Questions of the clinical estimation of bronchopulmonary system status of the personnel which will participate in works on transformation 'Shelter object' in radioecologically safe condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushko, V.A.; Shvajko, L.I.

    2002-01-01

    The given data indicate that for victims of the ChNPP accident (primarily clean-up workers) presence of bronchological pathology in the form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with some special clinical, endoscopes, pathomorphological and immunological features appeared typical. That requires the adequate methodology elaboration of diagnostics and treatment of bronchopulmonary diseases for the given contingent. Thus, the personnel directed on works, connected with transformation 'Shelter Object' (ShO) in radioecologically safe condition should have complex pulmonological maintenance at all stages of medicosanitary support

  7. Dose conversion factors for radiation doses at normal operation discharges. E. Exposure pathways and radioecological data; Dosomraekningsfaktorer foer normaldriftutslaepp. C. Exponeringsvaegar och radioekologiska data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Sara; Aquilonius, Karin

    2001-10-01

    A study has been performed in order to develop and extend existing models for dose estimations at emissions of radioactive substances from nuclear facilities in Sweden. This report presents a review of all exposure pathways in the project, in order to secure that no important contributions have been omitted. The radioecological data that should be used in calculating conversion factors for air and water emissions are also reviewed. Nuclid-specific conversion factors have been calculated for radiation doses from inhalation and intake for children in different age groups.

  8. Radio-ecological characterization and radiological assessment in support of regulatory supervision of legacy sites in northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, M.K.; Kiselev, M.; Shandala, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has been implementing a regulatory cooperation program in the Russian Federation for over 10 years, as part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action for enhancing nuclear and radiation safety in northwest Russia. The overall long-term objective has been the enhancement of safety culture and includes a special focus on regulatory supervision of nuclear legacy sites. The initial project outputs included appropriate regulatory threat assessments, to determine the hazardous situations and activities which are most in need of enhanced regulatory supervision. In turn, this has led to the development of new and updated norms and standards, and related regulatory procedures, necessary to address the often abnormal conditions at legacy sites. This paper presents the experience gained within the above program with regard to radio-ecological characterization of Sites of Temporary Storage for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha in the Kola Peninsula in northwest Russia. Such characterization is necessary to support assessments of the current radiological situation and to support prospective assessments of its evolution. Both types of assessments contribute to regulatory supervision of the sites. Accordingly, they include assessments to support development of regulatory standards and guidance concerning: control of radiation exposures to workers during remediation operations; emergency preparedness and response; planned radionuclide releases to the environment; development of site restoration plans, and waste treatment and disposal. Examples of characterization work are presented which relate to terrestrial and marine environments at Andreeva Bay. The use of this data in assessments is illustrated by means of the visualization and assessment tool (DATAMAP) developed as part of the regulatory cooperation program, specifically to help control radiation exposure in operations and to support

  9. The concept of Dessak: development of environmental decision support for radio-ecologically sensitive areas in Kuwait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuhaibar, B.; Jakes, J. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait); Semioshkina, N. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Muenchen - HMGU (Germany); Voigt, G. [International Atomic Energy Agency (International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA))

    2014-07-01

    The Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR) is implementing the 'Nuclear Program for Peaceful Applications (NPPA)', a research program focused on supporting the promotion of applications in nuclear techniques and methods in various sectors and industries of Kuwait. One of the components of this program is the establishment of research and training facilities to support the protection of the population and the environment and to reduce the risk of harmful exposures. One major component of the NPPA it the development of an environmental decision support system (EDSS) for radio-ecologically sensitive areas in Kuwait (DESSAK). The aim of this project is to be able to integrate information in a spatial and temporal resolution which will then be combined with radioecological transfer models. This allows for the identification of critical pathways to protect the environment and humans from unexpectedly elevated and routine releases of radioactivity during the operation of a nuclear power plant, research reactor or any other nuclear application. The sensitivity of the Arabian Gulf region, with its very special marine and terrestrial environmental conditions, is a driving force to keep balance between the industrial use and the preservation of nature for a sustainable development and exploitation of natural resources. This specifically applies to regions where in the past no nuclear activities have been conducted e.g. Kuwait, and which are now considered for any activity involving the nuclear fuel cycle. The situation in Kuwait specifically is to be considered as challenging: with the introduction of nuclear activities which might include the building of a Neutron Generating Facility (NGF), the necessary measures need to be established e.g. the legal and administrative formalities for nuclear safety and security, the human and administrative capabilities and capacities, and so on. In addition, a number of neighbouring or regional countries have already

  10. Design of an environmental site assessment template for open radioactive site contamination : a radioecological risk approach and case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.

    2004-01-01

    To reduce redundancy, cost, and time, while at the same time ultimately increasing the effectiveness of the radioactive risk management process, a logical framework incorporating risk assessments (human cancer and environmental risks) into the environmental site assessment process was designed for radioactive open site contamination. Risk-based corrective action is becoming an increasingly more acceptable approach for the remediation of contaminated sites. In the past, cleanup goals were usually established without any regard to the risk involved, by mandating remediation goals based solely on maximum contamination levels. Now, a multi-stage environmental site assessment template has been developed on a radioecological approach. The template gives a framework for making environmentally sound decisions based on relevant regulations and guidelines. The first stage involves the comparison of the background screening activity level to the regulated activity level, the second stage involves the use of site-specific information to determine the risk involved with the contamination, and the third stage provides a remediation decision matrix based on results from the first two stages. This environmental site assessment template is unique because it incorporates the modified Canadian National Classification System for radioactive contaminated sites and two different types of risk assessments (human cancer risks and the newly designed ecological risk) into the decision making process. The template was used to assess a radiologically contaminated site at the Canadian Forces Base at Suffield (Alberta) as a case study, and it reaffirms the Department of National Defence's action as appropriate. This particular site is a Class 3, has an overall insignificant human cancer risk ( -6 ) and a low environmental risk, and conforms to all regulated guidelines. Currently, it is restricted and should be left as is, provided that the subsurface is not disturbed. (author)

  11. Studies on radioecological concentration processes in the aquatic environments -Uptake and retention of Am-241 by fish-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Honda, Y.; Sakanoue, M.; Kobayashi, A.

    1977-01-01

    To elucidate radioecological concentration processes of Am by aquatic organisms, uptake and retention of Am-241 by fingerlings of rainbow trout were investigated under laboratory conditions using natural river water and with aeration. The results were compared with those of some other radionuclides such as Co-60, Ru-106, I-131, Cs-137 and Ce-144. The fractionation of the radionuclides in rearing waters using 0.45μm membrane filters showed that about 90% of Am as well as Ce were retained on the filters at apparent equilibrium states, while about 20% for RuNO-nitrato and less than 10% for nitro, oxygen-bridged binuclear Ru-complexes, Co, I and Cs, respectively. The pattern of whole-body uptake of Am was similar to that of Ce and the radioactivities in fish reached apparent equilibrium in about 10 days, whereas several days for the other radionuclides. The average concentration factor for Am was 1.8 and 6.5 for Co, 0.8 for Ru-chloro, 1.7 for Ru-nitro, 3.5 for Ru-nitrato, 0.9 for Ru-binuclear complexes, 1.9 for I, 1.3 for Cs, 1.8 for Ce, respectively. The tissue uptakes of Am as well as the other radionuclides except for I were the highest in visceral mass including digestive tracts and followed by gills. The alpha-track autoradiograms of frozen section of fish also demonstrated the occurrences of agglutinated Am in the digestive tracts. The initial whole-body retention of Am was about 85% in 10 days and thereafter gradually decreased. The elimination of Am from the tissues was the highest in gills and only about 9% of whole-body retention was observed in 20 days, whereas about 63% in visceral mass including digestive tracts

  12. A case against bio markers as they are currently used in radioecological risk analyses: a problem of linkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, T.G.; Brechignac, F.

    2005-01-01

    Bio-markers are successfully used in human risk analyses as early indicators of contaminant exposure and predictors of deleterious effects. This has boosted the search for bio-markers in determining ecological risks to non-human biota, and particularly for assessments related to radioactive contaminants. There are difficulties, however, that prevent an easy transfer of the bio-marker concept from humans to non-human biota, as there are significant differences in endpoints of concern, units of observation and dose response relationships between human and ecological risk analyses. The use of bio-markers in ecological risk analyses currently lacks a linkage between molecular-level effects and quantifiable impacts observed in individuals and populations. This is important because ecological risk analyses generally target the population level of biological organisation. We highlight various examples that demonstrate the difficulties of linking individual responses to population-level impacts, such as indirect effects and compensatory interactions. Eco-toxicologists cope with such difficulties through the use of uncertainty or extrapolation factors. Extrapolation factors (EF) typically range from 1 to 1000 when linking effects observed in individuals to those predicted to occur in populations. We question what magnitude of EF will be required when going from a molecular level effect, measured by a bio-marker, all the way up to the population level of biological organisation. Particularly, we stress that a successful application of bio-markers to radioecological risk assessment can only be achieved once the connection has been made between changes in individual resource allocation-based life histories and population dynamics. This clearly emphasises the need to quantify the propagation of molecular and cellular level effects to higher levels of biological organisation, especially in the long-term via several generations of exposure. Finally, we identify pertinent research

  13. Geographical-radioecological aspects of nuclear energy exploitation and environment contamination by man-made radionuclides in Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurucova, S.; Blazik, T.; Kuruc, J.

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of the environment is one of the most dangerous forms of environmental pollution in Russian Federation. The aim of this work was to localize and analyse places of nuclear energy exploitation for peaceful and military purposes in Russian Federation, in aim to find out whether observed places are potential or real sources of contamination of Russian environment by man-made radionuclides. Nuclear activities in nuclear industry enterprises and research organizations, in Russian Northern fleet, Russian Pacific Fleet, Russian civilian nuclear fleet and in nuclear power plants were analysed and the places where the nuclear explosions were carried out were localized. In contaminated regions the goal was to analyse geographical and some radioecological aspects of contamination of environment. Great part of Russian territory has been subjected to some form of radioactive contamination, mainly because of large radiation accidents in Mayak Production Association (PA) in the Urals (1949-1956, 1957 and 1967) and in Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (1986). The largest region in Russian Federation with environment contaminated by man-made radionuclides is region of Chernobyl NPP accident influence, which is situated in central, densely populated and economically relatively good developed part of Russian Federation where the agriculture has an important role. The most contaminated administrative units in region are Bryansk Region, Kaluga Region, Oryol Region and Tula Region where high soil density of cesium-137 are observed. Present radioecological situation in this region is analysed. By analysing of dynamics of demographic indicators in four most contaminated regions authors found out similar trends with Russian nationwide indicators and with indicators for Central Federal District but much more unfavourable values were observed in four regions, particularly in Tula Region. Health situation of liquidators and of affected population who live in contaminated

  14. Are uranium reserves adequate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    Against a backdrop of growing concerns about global warming and geopolitical pressures on fossil energies, especially natural gas and oil, interest in nuclear power has revived considerably. Conscious of its addiction to oil and reeling from a series of gigantic blackouts, the United States, in the words of its president, must 'aggressively move forward with the construction of nuclear power plants'. Some European countries have approved new power plant construction (Finland and France), while the more reserved ones (Belgium, Germany and Sweden) have begun to show a change in attitude. Asia, meanwhile, is host to the planet's largest number of potential nuclear construction projects in this first half of the 21. century. All these signs point to a sharp rise in uranium consumption, the basic fuel for these plants. But are there enough resources to support a nuclear revival on a planetary scale? The publication of the Red Book on uranium in late May 2006 was an opportunity for Thierry Dujardin, Deputy Director of Science and Development at the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency, to take stock of resources. He gives his opinion in this paper

  15. Is ecological food also radioecological? - 210Po and 210Pb studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara; Olszewski, Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    Presented are results of a study on accumulation of naturally occurring 210 Po and 210 Pb in ecological and conventional farming food products in Poland: fruits, vegetables and cereals. The main idea behind this research was to determine the activity concentrations of 210 Po and 210 Pb in ecological and commercial food as well as calculate and compare the effective dose (radiation) connected to different origin of analyzed food products consumption. The studies showed the majority of all compared food samples contained similar 210 Po and 210 Pb activities and statistically, the consumption of organic and commercial food would give similar annual effective dose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. YoungRad-seminar. Proceedings. Seminar for young scientists in the fields of radiophysics, radiochemistry, radioecology, radiation protection and related fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straelberg, E.; Sidhu, R.; Petersen, R.; Salminen, S.

    2007-09-01

    To provide an inspiring working environment for young students and scientists, it is important that they at an early stage can take part in a network of scientists working in their fields of interest. However, within each of the five Nordic countries the network of people involved in the fields of radiophysics, radiochemistry, radioecology, radiation protection and other related fields is rather small. Educational networking is a key factor in keeping young researchers motivated to continue working within these fields, and to recruit new students. For that reason the first YoungRad-seminar was held in Helsinki 14-15 December 2006. 43 young participants including MSc and PhD students at universities, researchers at different institutes and personnel from Nordic authorities took part in the seminar. All Nordic countries except Iceland were represented. The seminar was divided into four sessions including oral and poster presentations. In addition two senior researchers were invited to speak about Nordic radioecology and NKS. This report contains the abstracts and presentations made at the seminar. (au)

  17. Elaboration of methods for assessment of radio-ecological safety state of objects, situated on the territories contaminated with Chernobyl radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltanov, Eugene; Saltanova, Irina

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of assessment of radio-ecological state of object is to elaborate recommendations to reduce both radiation dose and negative action of other contaminators on human organism. The basis of objects' ecological safety assessment is considering complex influence of multiple negative factors, such as radioactive contamination, firstly, and air, water, soil and noise pollution, secondly. The objects of assessments are social, industrial, rural enterprises and their production: school buildings and territories, all kinds of recreational institutions, civil buildings, etc. The described method is embodied in a computer program, which enables calculation of integral indicator of contamination and gives information about object's safety state. The results of the work may be proposed to the corresponding supervisor institutions as a prototype of practical guidance to control ecological state of the objects and territories. Particularly, the proposed methods are necessary to determine the order of measures, normally undertaken to deactivate objects, and to provide unified approach to radio-ecological safety assessment of objects, situated in the territories contaminated with Chernobyl radionuclides. (author)

  18. Four decades of radioecological research on the Danube river: a reliable basis for protecting the freshwater resources of central Europe of tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper gives a comprehensive review on the radioecological work which has been carried out in the freshwater ecosystem of the Danube by numerous research groups in Central Europe within the last four decades. The review focuses on the essential results and guiding conclusions up to date to support a reliable overview and improved knowledge for solving freshwater radiation protection problems in the future. The atmospheric nuclear weapons testperiod starting in the late fifties brought a large amount of artificial radionuclides in the global water cycle. Since then many radioecological studies and environmental monitoring programs have been performed in the Danube basin. The main objective of all the research and monitoring programs was to assess possible health effects in exposed groups. The second significant contamination of the northern hemisphere, in addition to the relatively insignificant contribution due to the normal operation of nuclear facilities in Central Europe, was the large-scale contamination by the fallout from the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Although the accident brought about a setback for the peaceful use of nuclear energy it increased the knowledge about the radiological impact of radioactive point emissions, meteorological transport phenomena and long-term behaviour of radionuclides in the freshwater environment. In this paper the most important facts for environmental radiation protection problems of large freshwater systems are discussed. Based on this present review an outlook of the most applicable methods and models for environmental monitoring programs, radioanalytical procedures and dose assessments are presented. (author)

  19. YoungRad-seminar. Proceedings. Seminar for young scientists in the fields of radiophysics, radiochemistry, radioecology, radiation protection and related fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straelberg, E; Sidhu, R [Institute for Energy Technology (Norway); Petersen, R [Technological Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Salminen, S [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2007-09-15

    To provide an inspiring working environment for young students and scientists, it is important that they at an early stage can take part in a network of scientists working in their fields of interest. However, within each of the five Nordic countries the network of people involved in the fields of radiophysics, radiochemistry, radioecology, radiation protection and other related fields is rather small. Educational networking is a key factor in keeping young researchers motivated to continue working within these fields, and to recruit new students. For that reason the first YoungRad-seminar was held in Helsinki 14-15 December 2006. 43 young participants including MSc and PhD students at universities, researchers at different institutes and personnel from Nordic authorities took part in the seminar. All Nordic countries except Iceland were represented. The seminar was divided into four sessions including oral and poster presentations. In addition two senior researchers were invited to speak about Nordic radioecology and NKS. This report contains the abstracts and presentations made at the seminar. (au)

  20. Abstracts of papers of international scientific conference 'Fundamental and applied aspects of radiobiology: Biological effects of low doses and radioactive contamination of environment (Radioecological and medical biological consequences of the Chernobyl NPP accident)'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplya, E.F.; Astakhov, A.I.; Bogdevich, I.M.; Borisevich, N.Ya.; Zubovich, V.K.; Knat'ko, V.A.; Lobanok, L.M.; Matsko, V.P.; Mrochek, A.G.

    1998-05-01

    The results of research works executed in Belarus, as well as in Ukraine and Russia, on various aspects of the Chernobyl problematic are given: radiation medicine and risks, radiobiological effects and their forecasting, radioecology and agricultural radiology, decontamination and radioactive wastes management, socio economic and psychological problems caused by the Chernobyl NPP accident

  1. 77 FR 21846 - Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions: Reserves Simplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... Requirements of Depository Institutions: Reserves Simplification AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Board is amending Regulation D, Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions, to simplify the administration of reserve requirements. The final rule creates a...

  2. Radioecological modelling of Polonium-210 and Caesium-137 in lichen-reindeer-man and top predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Bertil R R; Gjelsvik, Runhild; Holm, Elis

    2018-06-01

    This work deals with analysis and modelling of the radionuclides 210 Pb and 210 Po in the food-chain lichen-reindeer-man in addition to 210 Po and 137 Cs in top predators. By using the methods of Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) the atmospheric deposition of 210 Pb and 210 Po is predicted at the sample locations. Dynamic modelling of the activity concentration with differential equations is fitted to the sample data. Reindeer lichen consumption, gastrointestinal absorption, organ distribution and elimination is derived from information in the literature. Dynamic modelling of transfer of 210 Pb and 210 Po to reindeer meat, liver and bone from lichen consumption, fitted well with data from Sweden and Finland from 1966 to 1971. The activity concentration of 210 Pb in the skeleton in man is modelled by using the results of studying the kinetics of lead in skeleton and blood in lead-workers after end of occupational exposure. The result of modelling 210 Pb and 210 Po activity in skeleton matched well with concentrations of 210 Pb and 210 Po in teeth from reindeer-breeders and autopsy bone samples in Finland. The results of 210 Po and 137 Cs in different tissues of wolf, wolverine and lynx previously published, are analysed with multivariate data processing methods such as Principal Component Analysis PCA, and modelled with the method of Projection to Latent Structures, PLS, or Partial Least Square Regression PLSR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The state control of radioecological danger of the sunken and scuttled nuclear objects on the sea bottom in Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovsky, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    At the bottom of World ocean there is the significant number of underwater potentially dangerous objects (PDO): nuclear submarines; diesel submarines with nuclear weapon; solid radioactive waste; chemical weapon; petroleum and gas pipelines (including perspective); sunken ships with petroleum and other dangerous loads. For nuclear objects is developed a model for estimating the radioecological consequences of the release of radionuclides to the marine environment. The model is practically used at fulfilment of the program of researches on the sunken nuclear submarine Komsomolets'. Under orders of Ministry of extreme situations of Russia the experts from naval research institutes have carried out the analysis and expert estimation of potentially dangerous objects, being at the sea bottom and belonging to Russian Federation. The first turn of a databank about PDO is created. Classification of PDO on a degree of danger on three categories is developed: 1-(extremely dangerous), 11-(highly dangerous), 111-(middle dangerous). Offers on priorities of work on underwater potentially dangerous objects are reasonable. Is shown, that forwarding inspections of places of probable radioactive pollution in the Arctic seas and places of wreck of nuclear submarines 'K-8'(1960), 'K-219'(1986), 'K-27'(1968) are first of all expedient. Received data have allowed to prove necessity of development of the federal law about safety underwater potentially dangerous objects in the seas, international agreements concerning the control for similar objects. Is reasonable is necessary development the bills of Government of Russian Federation, in particular about the status about declaration of safety of underwater potentially dangerous objects and about the responsibility for these objects. The Ministry of extreme situations of Russia in 1999 has organized special commission with the representatives of all interested ministries for development of the coordinated approach to creation of the state

  4. Status of fossil fuel reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laherrere, J.

    2005-01-01

    Reserves represent the sum of past and future productions up to the end of production. In most countries the reserve data of fields are confidential. Therefore, fossil fuel reserves are badly known because the published data are more political than technical and many countries make a confusion between resources and reserves. The cumulated production of fossil fuels represents only between a third and a fifth of the ultimate reserves. The production peak will take place between 2020 and 2050. In the ultimate reserves, which extrapolate the past, the fossil fuels represent three thirds of the overall energy. This document analyses the uncertainties linked with fossil fuel reserves: reliability of published data, modeling of future production, comparison with other energy sources, energy consumption forecasts, reserves/production ratio, exploitation of non-conventional hydrocarbons (tar sands, extra-heavy oils, bituminous shales, coal gas, gas shales, methane in overpressure aquifers, methane hydrates), technology impacts, prices impact, and reserves growth. (J.S.)

  5. 77 FR 66361 - Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions: Reserves Simplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... Requirements of Depository Institutions: Reserves Simplification AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal... (Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions) published in the Federal Register on April 12, 2012. The... simplifications related to the administration of reserve requirements: 1. Create a common two-week maintenance...

  6. Fractional Reserve in Banking System

    OpenAIRE

    Valkonen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is aimed to provide understanding of the role of the fractional reserve in the mod-ern banking system worldwide and particularly in Finland. The fractional reserve banking is used worldwide, but the benefits of this system are very disputable. On the one hand, experts say that the fractional reserve is a necessary instrument for the normal business and profit making. On the other hand, sceptics openly criticize the fractional reserve system and blame it for fiat money (money n...

  7. Radioecological studies of 137Cs in limnological ecosystems. 137Cs concentrations in water, sediment and biota at the lower region of the famous river in Saitama Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Sadaaki; Motegi, Misako; Oosawa, Takashi; Nakazawa, Kiyoaki; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Izumo, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Fumio.

    1996-01-01

    The concentrations of 137 Cs in water, sediment and biota at the lower region of the famous river in Saitama prefecture were determined in order to elucidate the radioecology of 137 Cs in limnological ecosystems. 137 Cs concentration in water was 0.10 mBq/l. 137 Cs concentrations in sediment, shellfish, Sinotaia quadratus historica (mean for 2 detectable samples), and fish, Carassius auratus cuvieri (mean for 2 detectable samples), were about 6200, 840 and 320 times higher than the concentration of the water, respectively. But 137 Cs radioactivity in the crustacea, Procambarus clarki, was significantly not detected. So, 137 Cs transfer mechanism in the limnological ecosystems was indicated in part. (author)

  8. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-52, 146-FR Radioecology and Aquatic Biology Laboratory Soil. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-022

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capron, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The 100-F-52 waste site consisted of the soil under and around the former 146-FR Radioecology and Aquatic Biology Laboratory. The laboratory was used for studies of the effects of pre-reactor and post-reactor process water on fish eggs, young fish, and other small river creatures of interest. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  9. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-52, 146-FR Radioecology and Aquatic Biology Laboratory Soil, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-022

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-06-27

    The 100-F-52 waste site consisted of the soil under and around the former 146-FR Radioecology and Aquatic Biology Laboratory. The laboratory was used for studies of the effects of pre-reactor and post-reactor process water on fish eggs, young fish, and other small river creatures of interest. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  10. Integrated assessment of radio-ecological situation using Gis-technology and spatial data bank of environment of NPP 30-km area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, T.D.; Tishchenko, O.G.; Piskun, V.N.

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the requirements of IAEA on providing information-analytical and cartographic materials for NPP emergency systems Institute for safety problems of NPP is creating the spatial data bank taking into account geographical features, socio-economic indexes and information of monitoring of NPP environment. Based on analysis of connection between ecological parameters and geographical features of locality the specific of radio-ecological conditions of territories of NPP 30-m area is exposed by the example of Rivne and Khmel'nickiy NPP. Determination on critical territories maximally influencing on forming of the radiation dose for a population will allow to develop in good time preventive and protective measures for a population at the different scenarios of accident situation.

  11. Prospective study of intellectual development, mental and behavioral disorders in children in uteroexposed to radioecological and psychosocial factors associated with the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igumnov, S.A.; Drozdovich, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Prospective study of the parameters characterizing the mental status of children in utero exposed to radioecological factors associated with the Chernobyl accident. 197 children born from May 1986 to February 1987 whose mothers lived in the period of pregnancy at contaminated territory were examined. Control group was formed by random sampling. It is shown that the children of the group under study aged 6-7 years were characterized by relative predominance of cases with border-line level of intellectual functioning (13.2 % vs. 9.2 % in the control group). By 10-12 years this difference practically smoothed over. Average group intellectual parameters of children aged 6-7 and 10-12 years in the main group were similar and did not depend on pregnancy term at the moment of exposure. Unfavorable physiological and social-demographic factors were mainly responsible for the intellectual development and emotional disordered in prenatally exposed children [ru

  12. Nord-Cotentin radioecology group: an innovative experiment in pluralist expertise; Le groupe Radioecologie Nord-Cotentin: une experience originale d'expertise pluraliste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochard, J.; Schneider, T.; Crouail, P. [Centre d' Etude sur l' Evaluation de la Protection dans le Domaine Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heriard-Dubreuil, G.; Gadbois, S. [Mutadis, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Oudiz, A. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    2000-11-01

    This report gives a synthetic overview of the procedure and the main results of the GRNC (Nord-Cotentin Radioecology Group), and lessons that can be drawn from it. In particular, it is intended to demonstrate the innovation of the pluralist approach adopted by summarizing its historic context and differences with the similar experiment carried out in the United Kingdom for the Sellafield nuclear site 1. It also presents the different steps in the evaluation of exposures and risks associated with ionising radiation. Finally, it emphasizes prospects opened as a result of the Group's experiment on the involvement of stakeholders in the evaluation and management of radiological risk. This final aspect could open up new means of ''preventively'' dealing with questions related to risks to health and the environment inherent to industrial activities. (A.L.B.)

  13. Technical, socio-economic, radioecological and medical aspects of works in the World during 1986-1997 which are connected with the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimenko, A.P.; Pisanko, Zh.I.; Kuprava, O.M.

    1999-01-01

    Technical, social, radioecological and medical aspects of works in the World during the years 1986-1997 in which causes and different aspects of Chernobyl accident were studied, are considered. Main directions of these works were found and the role each of them was quantitatively evaluated. A new method of INIS database analysis was used for this purpose. It permits to find subject fields of research and to give their general characteristics. An analysis of the topical content of some publications permitted to describe qualitatively their results. The obtained information can be used by the specialists who are dealing with the problems of Chernobyl accident mitigation, in finding the most important directions of work in this field, and in planning and realization of new research. 10 refs., 9 tab

  14. Environmental characterization and radio-ecological impacts of non-nuclear industries on the Red Sea coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mamoney, M.H.; Khater, Ashraf E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Red Sea is a deep semi-enclosed and narrow basin connected to the Indian Ocean by a narrow sill in the south and to the Suez Canal in the north. Oil industries in the Gulf of Suez, phosphate ore mining activities in Safaga-Quseir region and intensified navigation activities are non-nuclear pollution sources that could have serious radiological impacts on the marine environment and the coastal ecosystems of the Red Sea. It is essential to establish the radiological base-line data, which does not exist yet, and to investigate the present radio-ecological impact of the non-nuclear industries to preserve and protect the coastal environment of the Red Sea. Some natural and man-made radionuclides have been measured in shore sediment samples collected from the Egyptian coast of the Red Sea. The specific activities of 226 Ra and 210 Pb ( 238 U) series, 232 Th series, 40 K and 137 Cs (Bq/kg dry weight) were measured using gamma ray spectrometers based on hyper-pure germanium detectors. The specific activities of 210 Po ( 210 Pb) and uranium isotopes ( 238 U, 235 U and 234 U) (Bq/kg dry weight) were measured using alpha spectrometers based on surface barrier (PIPS) detectors after radiochemical separation. The absorbed radiation dose rates in air (nGy/h) due to natural radionuclides in shore sediment and radium equivalent activity index (Bq/kg) were calculated. The specific activity ratios of 228 Ra/ 226 Ra, 210 Pb/ 226 Ra, 226 Ra/ 238 U and 234 U/ 238 U were calculated for evaluation of the geo-chemical behaviour of these radionuclides. The average specific activity of 226 Ra ( 238 U) series, 232 Th series, 40 K and 210 Pb were 24.7, 31.4, 427.5 and 25.6 Bq/kg, respectively. The concentration of 137 Cs in the sediment samples was less than the lower limit of detection. The Red Sea coast is an arid region with very low rainfall and the sediment is mainly composed of sand. The specific activity of 238 U, 235 U and 234 U were 25.3, 2.9 and 25.0 Bq/kg. The average specific

  15. Biosphere reserves: Attributes for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cuong, Chu; Dart, Peter; Hockings, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Biosphere reserves established under the UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Program aim to harmonise biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. Concerns over the extent to which the reserve network was living up to this ideal led to the development of a new strategy in 1995 (the Seville Strategy) to enhance the operation of the network of reserves. An evaluation of effectiveness of management of the biosphere reserve network was called for as part of this strategy. Expert opinion was assembled through a Delphi Process to identify successful and less successful reserves and investigate common factors influencing success or failure. Ninety biosphere reserves including sixty successful and thirty less successful reserves in 42 countries across all five Man and the Biosphere Program regions were identified. Most successful sites are the post-Seville generation while the majority of unsuccessful sites are pre-Seville that are managed as national parks and have not been amended to conform to the characteristics that are meant to define a biosphere reserve. Stakeholder participation and collaboration, governance, finance and resources, management, and awareness and communication are the most influential factors in the success or failure of the biosphere reserves. For success, the biosphere reserve concept needs to be clearly understood and applied through landscape zoning. Designated reserves then need a management system with inclusive good governance, strong participation and collaboration, adequate finance and human resource allocation and stable and responsible management and implementation. All rather obvious but it is difficult to achieve without commitment to the biosphere reserve concept by the governance authorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radioecological challenges for mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesterbacka, P.; Ikaeheimonen, T.K.; Solatie, D. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    In Finland, mining became popular in the mid-1990's when the mining amendments to the law made the mining activities easier for foreign companies. Also the price of the minerals rose and mining in Finland became economically profitable. Expanding mining industry brought new challenges to radiation safety aspect since radioactive substances occur in nearly all minerals. In Finnish soil and bedrock the average crystal abundance of uranium and thorium are 2.8 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. It cannot be predicted beforehand how radionuclides behave in the mining processes which why they need to be taken into account in mining activities. Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) has given a national guide ST 12.1 based on the Finnish Radiation Act. The guide sets the limits for radiation doses to the public also from mining activities. In general, no measures to limit the radiation exposure are needed, if the dose from the operation liable to cause exposure to natural radiation is no greater than 0.1 mSv per year above the natural background radiation dose. If the exposure of the public may be higher than 0.1 mSv per year, the responsible party must provide STUK a plan describing the measures by which the radiation exposure is to be kept as low as is reasonably achievable. In that case the mining company responsible company has to make a radiological baseline study. The baseline study must focus on the environment that the mining activities may impact. The study describes the occurrence of natural radioactivity in the environment before any mining activities are started. The baseline study lasts usually for two to three years in natural circumstances. Based on the baseline study measurements, detailed information of the existing levels of radioactivity in the environment can be attained. Once the mining activities begin, it is important that the limits are set for the wastewater discharges to the environment and environmental surveillance in the vicinity of mine is arranged, if needed. The environmental conditions of the mine and sensitivity of the nature around the mine must be taken into account when setting the limits for wastewater discharges. Due to this, wastewater discharge limits may vary from mine to mine. Environmental surveillance must be regular and well-defined, including the same measurements as in the baseline study. Basic Safety Standard (BSS) points out that measurements are also needed to avoid the environmental consequences of an accidental release and to monitor the existing levels of radioactivity in the environment, from the perspectives of both environmental protection and human health. This paper demonstrates the importance of radiological baseline study and continuous monitoring, when needed, in the vicinities of mines. It also shows and the need for wastewater limits in order to estimate the effects of mining activities on the environmental radioactivity in the future. A few examples from Finland are also presented. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  17. Radioecological problems of oncogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolevich, I.V.; Levdanskaya, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    Influence on oncogenes and key metabolic processes of an organism of a complex of factors (low-level radiation, cadmium) really influencing health of people, living in conditions of the increased radiating background is investigated. (authors)

  18. Radio-ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    The radioactive contamination of the environment and of food stuffs due to the Chernobyl reactor accident lead to the hitherto highest radiation exposure of the general public by radionuclides from nuclear facilities in large areas of the Federal Republic of Germany. Nevertheless, this additional contribution will be significantly smaller than the normal natural radiation exposure even in the first year after the accident and, time integrated over a human life, this severe accident will increasee our natural radiation exposure by about 1% only. Therefore, there will be definitely no measurable influence on the vital statistics in Germany due to this event. (orig.) [de

  19. Radioecology. Transfers of radioelements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulquier, L.

    2002-01-01

    The study of the cycle of radioelements in the environment requires the measurement of the radionuclides present in all parts of the ecosystems. The knowledge of the mechanisms of radioactive pollutant transfers and of the kinetics of the exchanges between a source term, the vectors and the constituents of the biosphere represents heart of the work of radio-ecologists. This article describes briefly the techniques used for the measurement of radionuclides in the environment and for the study of their physical dispersion mechanisms. Then, it treats more carefully of the transfer mechanisms in different environments: 1 - tools for the evaluation of transfers: metrology, atmospheric and liquid dispersion phenomena; 2 - processes of radioelement transfers: transfers in aquatic ecosystems, transfers in terrestrial environment. (J.S.)

  20. Radioecology, emissions and immissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.

    1988-01-01

    7 contributions are presented on radionuclide emissions from particular nuclear installations, on radionuclide migration and measurements in the environment, on the equipment of a particular laboratory and on setting limiting values. All of them are in INIS scope and are treated separately. (qui)

  1. Reserves Represented by Random Walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipe, J A; Ferreira, M A M; Andrade, M

    2012-01-01

    The reserves problem is studied through models based on Random Walks. Random walks are a classical particular case in the analysis of stochastic processes. They do not appear only to study reserves evolution models. They are also used to build more complex systems and as analysis instruments, in a theoretical feature, of other kind of systems. In this work by studying the reserves, the main objective is to see and guarantee that pensions funds get sustainable. Being the use of these models considering this goal a classical approach in the study of pensions funds, this work concluded about the problematic of reserves. A concrete example is presented.

  2. Opinion on the radio-ecological monitoring of waters around nuclear installations and on the management of old nuclear waste warehousing sites: 18 recommendations to improve information, transparency and dialogue with involved parties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    After a presentation of the different actors (agencies, institutions, companies) involved in the activities of the various French nuclear installations (base nuclear installations and those concerning the national defence), this report describes the radio-ecological monitoring performed around these nuclear sites: water surveillance on these sites and within their environment, regulatory requirements on effluents and surveillance, information provided by operators and by institutional organisations, assessment of the radio-ecological status of nuclear sites and of potential environmental and health impacts. It describes regulatory obligation in terms of public information, information and communication actions, and gives an assessment of the High committee about public information quality. It discusses ways to improve this quality for a higher transparency, to reinforce the role of local information commissions (CLI), and improve site monitoring. All these aspects are grouped in 18 recommendations

  3. Reservation wages and starting wages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ophem, H.; Hartog, J.; Berkhout, P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse a unique data set that combines reservation wage and actually paid wage for a large sample of Dutch recent higher education graduates. On average, accepted wages are almost 8% higher than reservation wages, but there is no fixed proportionality. We find that the difference between

  4. Can Creativity Predict Cognitive Reserve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive reserve relies on the ability to effectively cope with aging and brain damage by using alternate processes to approach tasks when standard approaches are no longer available. In this study, the issue if creativity can predict cognitive reserve has been explored. Forty participants (mean age: 61 years) filled out: the Cognitive Reserve…

  5. Integrating environment protection, a new challenge: strategy of the International Union of Radioecology; Protection de l'environnement, un nouveau chantier: strategie de l'Union internationale de radioecologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechignac, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Serete Nucleaire (IRSN), Dir. Scientifique, Centre de Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Alexakhin, R. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology (RIARAE), Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Godoy, J.M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao, Comissao National de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, (Brazil); Oughton, D. [Norvegian Univ. of Life Sciences, Dpt. of Plant Environmental Sciences, As (Norway); Sheppard, S. [ECO Matters Incorporation., Pinawa, MB (Canada); Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Osteraas (Norway)

    2008-07-15

    Born in the fifties together with the emergence of the nuclear technologies, radioecology is a scientific discipline that primarily addresses environmental issues relevant to radioprotection. With a current membership of nearly 600 worldwide, the International Union of Radioecology was founded in the seventies as a non-governmental knowing society dedicated to the development and the promotion of this discipline. The scientific directions taken in Radioecology have been drastically influenced in the past by the Chernobyl accident, which forced a focus on environmental transfers through the environment to feed human radioprotection needs. Currently, a profound evolution is underway towards more ecological effects research and studies, under the driving pressure of the raise of society concern on environmental issues and the concomitant re-boost of nuclear industry to face global warming and the future energetic demands. The I.U.R. plays a central role within this evolution which is described here in more details along a description of its four major tools of action: dedicated task groups; workshops, seminars and conferences; training courses; web site tool for information and communication. Finally, together with the recent election of a new Board of Council to manage the Union, the main lines of the new strategic plan for the coming years are given. (author)

  6. Securities issues in reserves reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legg, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    Securities issues in oil and gas reserves reporting were discussed. Alberta requires specific information regarding important oil and gas properties, plants, facilities and installations. When preparing the reserves report, the following elements are important to consider: (1) the author of the report must be a registered professional engineer or registered professional geologist, (2) the report itself must be an engineering document, (3) the content of the report must be extensive, (4) it should be prepared in accordance with petroleum engineering and evaluation practices, and must include a summary of estimated net reserves

  7. Estimating Foreign Exchange Reserve Adequacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hakim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating foreign exchange reserves, despite their cost and their impacts on other macroeconomics variables, provides some benefits. This paper models such foreign exchange reserves. To measure the adequacy of foreign exchange reserves for import, it uses total reserves-to-import ratio (TRM. The chosen independent variables are gross domestic product growth, exchange rates, opportunity cost, and a dummy variable separating the pre and post 1997 Asian financial crisis. To estimate the risky TRM value, this paper uses conditional Value-at-Risk (VaR, with the help of Glosten-Jagannathan-Runkle (GJR model to estimate the conditional volatility. The results suggest that all independent variables significantly influence TRM. They also suggest that the short and long run volatilities are evident, with the additional evidence of asymmetric effects of negative and positive past shocks. The VaR, which are calculated assuming both normal and t distributions, provide similar results, namely violations in 2005 and 2008.

  8. Shell trips over its reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemain, A.

    2004-01-01

    Some mistakes in the evaluation of the proven reserves of Royal Dutch Shell group, the second world petroleum leader, will oblige the other oil and gas companies to be more transparent and vigilant in the future. The proven reserves ('P90' in petroleum professionals' language) are the most important indicators of the mining patrimony of companies. These strategic data are reported each year in the annual reports of the companies and are examined by the security exchange commission. The evaluation of reserves is perfectly codified by the US energy policy and conservation act and its accountable translation using the FAS 69 standard allows to establish long-term cash-flow forecasts. The revision announced by Shell on January 9 leads to a 20% reduction of its proven reserves. Short paper. (J.S.)

  9. Cognitive Reserve Scale and ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene León

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construct of cognitive reserve attempts to explain why some individuals with brain impairment, and some people during normal ageing, can solve cognitive tasks better than expected. This study aimed to estimate cognitive reserve in a healthy sample of people aged 65 years and over, with special attention to its influence on cognitive performance. For this purpose, it used the Cognitive Reserve Scale (CRS and a neuropsychological battery that included tests of attention and memory. The results revealed that women obtained higher total CRS raw scores than men. Moreover, the CRS predicted the learning curve, short-term and long-term memory, but not attentional and working memory performance. Thus, the CRS offers a new proxy of cognitive reserve based on cognitively stimulating activities performed by healthy elderly people. Following an active lifestyle throughout life was associated with better intellectual performance and positive effects on relevant aspects of quality of life.

  10. Professionalizing the Estonian Reserve Component

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Everett, William

    1998-01-01

    .... In particular, citizen-soldier reserves can allow nations that do not face immediate external threats, such as Estonia, to meet their security requirements for less money than required by standing forces...

  11. Fractional Reserve Banking: Some Quibbles

    OpenAIRE

    Bagus, Philipp; Howden, David

    2010-01-01

    We explore several unaddressed issues in George Selgin’s (1988) claim that the best monetary system to maintain monetary equilibrium is a fractional reserve free banking one. The claim that adverse clearing balances would limit credit expansion in a fractional reserve free banking system is more troublesome than previously reckoned. Both lengthened clearing periods and interbank agreements render credit expansion unrestrained. “The theory of free banking” confuses increases in money held with...

  12. Demand as frequency controlled reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.; Togeby, M.; OEstergaard, J.

    2008-09-15

    Using demand as frequency controlled reserve (DFR) is an emerging technology which allow demand to participate actively in maintaining the system operation without reducing the energy service delivered to the customer and without need of user interaction. The basic premise is that traditional frequency controlled reserves from power plants and interconnections with neighbouring systems can be costly, slow and not fulfil the need for future power grids with a high share of wind power and fewer central power plants, and an intention to perform flexible operation such as is landing. Electricity demands, on the other hand, have advantages as frequency reserve including fast activation speed, smooth linear activation, low expected costs, and well-dispersed in the distribution grid. The main challenge of DFR is new methods for monitoring the available capacity. This project has investigated the technology of using electricity demands for providing frequency reserve to power systems. Within the project the potential and economy of DFR compatible loads in Denmark has been investigated, control logic has been designed, power system impact has been investigated, potential business models has been evaluated and an implementation strategy has been suggested. The tasks and goals of the project have been successfully accomplished based on which the conclusion and future recommendation are made. This project has developed the DFR technology that enables electricity demands to autonomously disconnect or reconnect to the grid in response to system frequency variations. The developed DFR technology is proved to be a promising technology from several perspectives. Technically, using DFR is feasible to provide reserves and enhance power system frequency control, while fulfilling technical requirements such as linear activation (or reconnection) according to frequency (or time). Environmentally, the DFR technology is pollution free in contrast to traditional reserves from generation

  13. Improved Effectiveness of Reserve Forces During Reserve Duty Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadaway, Harry H.

    The problem areas of motivation, job enrichment, recruiting, and retention are addressed from the viewpoint of the behavioral scientist. Special attention is given to relating job enrichment and motivation techniques, as successfully demonstrated in industry, to the United State Army Reserve. Research method utilized was a literature review…

  14. Extractive reserves in Brazilian Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fearnside, P.M (National Institute for Research in the Amazon, Manaus-Amazonas (Brazil))

    1989-06-01

    In 1985 an opportunity arose for maintaining tracts of Amazonian forest under sustainable use. Brazil's National Council of Rubber Tappers and the Rural Worker's Union proposed the creation of a set of reserves of a new type, called extractive reserves. The first six are being established in one of the Brazilian states most threatened by deforestatation. The creation of extractive reserves grants legal protection to forest land traditionally used by rubber tappers, Brazil-nut gatherers, and other extractivists. The term extrativismo (extractivism) in Brazil refers to removing nontimber forest products, such as latex, resins, and nuts, without felling the trees. Approximately 30 products are collected for commercial sale. Many more types of forest materials are gathered, for example as food and medicines, for the extractivists' own use. The reserve proposal is attractive for several reasons related to social problems. It allows the rubber tappers to continue their livelihood rather than be expelled by deforestation. However, it is unlikely that sufficient land will be set aside as extractive reserves to employ all the tappers. Displaced rubber tappers already swell the ranks of urban slum dwellers in Brazil's Amazonian cities, and they have become refugees to continue their profession in the forests of neighboring countries, such as Bolivia.

  15. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  16. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  17. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  18. Demand as Frequency Controlled Reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhao; Østergaard, Jacob; Togeby, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Relying on generation side alone is deemed insufficient to fulfill the system balancing needs for future Danish power system, where a 50% wind penetration is outlined by the government for year 2025. This paper investigates using the electricity demand as frequency controlled reserve (DFR) as a new...... balancing measure, which has a high potential and can provide many advantages. Firstly, the background of the research is reviewed, including conventional power system reserves and the electricity demand side potentials. Subsequently, the control logics and corresponding design considerations for the DFR...

  19. Demand as Frequency Controlled Reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhao; Togeby, Mikael; Østergaard, Jacob

    This report summaries the research outcomes of the project ‘Demand as Frequency Controlled Reserve (DFR)’, which has received the support from Energinet.dk’s PSO program, Grant no. 2005-2-6380. The objective of this project is to investigate the technology of using electricity demands for providing...

  20. Radioecological transfer of {sup 137}Cs from ground deposition to man from Chernobyl debris and from nuclear weapons fallout in different Swedish populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C.L. [Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    A comparison of the estimated committed effective dose per unit activity deposition on ground was made between different critical groups in Sweden. The time-integrated aggregate transfer of {sup 137}Cs for the global fallout was 2-3 times higher than from Chernobyl debris for Swedish urban populations. For reindeer herders this difference is even more marked, with a factor of three to four higher time-integrated transfer factor of nuclear weapons fallout. Considering the transfer of Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs debris the time-integrated transfer factor appears to be more than 25 times higher for reindeer herders in Sweden than for the urban reference groups. An even more pronounced relative difference between the time integrated aggregate transfer was observed between reindeer herders and urban reference populations for the pre-Chernobyl fallout (a factor of 30). The projected committed effective dose from internal contamination of Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs per unit activity deposition is observed to be 2030 {mu}Sv/kBq m{sup -2}. The highest values in Sweden are obtained for reindeer herders with an estimated radioecological transfer of 0.5 mSv/kBq m{sup -2}. (au)

  1. Radioecological transfer of 137Cs from ground deposition to man from Chernobyl debris and from nuclear weapons fallout in different Swedish populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeaef, C.L.

    2005-01-01

    A comparison of the estimated committed effective dose per unit activity deposition on ground was made between different critical groups in Sweden. The time-integrated aggregate transfer of 137 Cs for the global fallout was 2-3 times higher than from Chernobyl debris for Swedish urban populations. For reindeer herders this difference is even more marked, with a factor of three to four higher time-integrated transfer factor of nuclear weapons fallout. Considering the transfer of Chernobyl 137 Cs debris the time-integrated transfer factor appears to be more than 25 times higher for reindeer herders in Sweden than for the urban reference groups. An even more pronounced relative difference between the time integrated aggregate transfer was observed between reindeer herders and urban reference populations for the pre-Chernobyl fallout (a factor of 30). The projected committed effective dose from internal contamination of Chernobyl 137 Cs per unit activity deposition is observed to be 2030 μSv/kBq m -2 . The highest values in Sweden are obtained for reindeer herders with an estimated radioecological transfer of 0.5 mSv/kBq m -2 . (au)

  2. PRIME: research project on radioecological sensitivity indicators and on multi-criteria methods applied to the environment of an industrial area. Scientific report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Successive studies conducted on the management of nuclear post-accidental circumstances have shown that it must be based on an anticipated characterisation of the radiological vulnerability of the environment, using an overall approach and according ta a strategy that takes inhabitants and their living conditions into account. The PRIME project has investigated and implemented a pilot method for characterising contaminated areas and usable by risk managers dealing with industrial accidents - notably involving radioactive substances - in relationship with a panel of stakeholders: experts, decision-makers and local elected officials, citizens. The method is based on Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA). It aims at modelling the different and sometimes contradicting opinions and at ranking the radio-ecological and socio-economical sensitivity factors of a region towards radioactive pollution, in the order of assisting decision making, These factors are defined by the environmental and anthropic parameters that may aggravate or limit the consequences of radioactive pollution. As the PRIME project was a partnership between scientific laboratories, representatives of public institutions and of civil society, it led to explore innovative forms of cooperation and to develop a tool combining MCA and GIS mapping. (authors)

  3. Radioecological studies of 137Cs in limnological ecosystems. 137Cs concentrations in water, sediment and fishes at the pond in Saitama prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Sadaaki; Motegi, Misako; Oosawa, Takashi; Nakazawa, Kiyoaki; Izumo, Yoshiro

    1998-01-01

    The concentrations of 137 Cs in water, sediment and fishes at the pond in Saitama prefecture were determined in order to elucidate the radioecology of 137 Cs in limnological ecosystems. 137 Cs concentration in water was 0.31±0.002 mBq/l (mean±standard error), and so indicated about 3 times higher than that (0.10 mBq/l) for the river in our previous report. 137 Cs concentrations in sediment, carp, Cyprinus carpio, crucian carp, Carassius auratus cuvieri, and Hakuren, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, were about 20000, 1200, 2400 and 3100 times higher than that of the water, respectively. These concentrations were higher than those of each sample for the river in our previous report. It was so suggested that 137 Cs tended to be accumulated in these samples at the pond more than the nuclide in the river. Moreover, concentration ratios, concentration of 137 Cs in sediment, crucian carp and Hakuren to that of the water, were about 30, 2 and 3 times higher than these of 40 K, respectively, except for carp of which 137 Cs and 40 K concentration ratios were almost same. These results showed difference in accumulation mechanism between 137 Cs and 40 K in these samples, as well as 137 Cs transfer mechanism in the limnological ecosystems in part. (author)

  4. Indicator value of certain aquatic organisms for radioactive substances in the sea areas off the Loviisa and Ilkiluoto nuclear power plants (Finland)[Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilus, E.; Klemola, S.; Ikaeheimonen, T.K.; Vartti, V.P.; Mattila, J. [STUK - radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    The results of the marine radioecology studies carried out in 2000-2001 in the sea areas off the Loviisa and Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plants (South and West coast of Finland) are reported. Extensive regular monitoring programmes of environmental radioactivity have been carried out already for about 30 years in these areas. The aim of the present study was to compare the indicator value of the various members of the aquatic ecosystem with respect to environmental monitoring. Samples were taken from 27 species including phytoplankton (9 samples), zooplankton (9 samples), periphyton (12 samples), macroalgae and vascular plants (16 samples), benthic animals (8 samples), fish (20 samples) and birds (6). Special attention was paid to different tissues and organs of fish and birds, such as flesh, liver, entrails, bones, milt, spawn, eggs, egg shells etc. (in total 64 samples), because there has been a lot of debate among the opponents of nuclear power in the course of time about the role these objects in the environmental monitoring of the power plants. The samples were taken from relatively small areas both in Loviisa and Olkiluoto, which makes the results well comparable inside each of the sites. (au)

  5. Indicator value of certain aquatic organisms for radioactive substances in the sea areas off the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants (Finland)[Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilus, E.; Klemola, S.; Ikaeheimonen, T.K.; Vartti, V.P.; Mattila, J. [STUK - radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    The results of the marine radioecology studies carried out in 2000-2001 in the sea areas off the Loviisa and Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plants (South and West coast of Finland) are reported. Extensive regular monitoring programmes of environmental radioactivity have been carried out already for about 30 years in these areas. The aim of the present study was to compare the indicator value of the various members of the aquatic ecosystem with respect to environmental monitoring. Samples were taken from 27 species including phytoplankton (9 samples), zooplankton (9 samples), periphyton (12 samples), macroalgae and vascular plants (16 samples), benthic animals (8 samples), fish (20 samples) and birds (6). Special attention was paid to different tissues and organs of fish and birds, such as flesh, liver, entrails, bones, milt, spawn, eggs, egg shells etc. (in total 64 samples), because there has been a lot of debate among the opponents of nuclear power in the course of time about the role these objects in the environmental monitoring of the power plants. The samples were taken from relatively small areas both in Loviisa and Olkiluoto, which makes the results well comparable inside each of the sites. (au)

  6. Application of radiochemical method under radioecological situation study in locations of radioactive wastes damping in shallow gulfs of the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanets, O.V.; Borisov, A.P.; Komarevskij, V.M.; Ligachev, A.N.; Solov'eva

    2005-01-01

    Results of works carried out on the 'Boris Petrov Academician' research ship on burial locations examination of submarine potential hazardous objects in the Kara Sea and in the Stepovoj, Abrosimov and Stivol'ka gulfs are cited. Comprehensive radioecological studies in the damping locations of solid radioactive wastes in the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago conducted in 2002-2004 with application of radio-chemical methods for certain radionuclides determination in the samples of bottom sediments and water in the immediate vicinity from the submerged objects are allowing to revealing the objective picture of man-caused contamination of water environment near submerged objects and by the gulfs water area. The studies uniting instrumental tools of acoustic search and visual objects inspection, opportunity of sampling of bottom sediments and near bottom water in the object vicinity and away from it with subsequent analysis of selected samples by the method of direct gamma-spectroscopy and radio-chemical concentration of certain radionuclides are permitting to obtain the statistically assisted data set on special concentrations of cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium radionuclides in a water layer and bottom sediments. Obtained results with taking into account of hydrological conditions allow to explain the peculiarities of radioactivity distribution in separate water areas

  7. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

    2007-05-01

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

  8. Gas reserves, discoveries and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saniere, A.

    2006-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2004, new discoveries, located mostly in the Asia/Pacific region, permitted a 71% produced reserve replacement rate. The Middle East and the offshore sector represent a growing proportion of world gas production Non-conventional gas resources are substantial but are not exploited to any significant extent, except in the United States, where they account for 30% of U.S. gas production. (author)

  9. Uranium reserves and exploration activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meehan, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The strategy that ERDA plans to employ regarding resource appraisal is outlined. All types of uranium occurrences will be evaluated as sources of domestic ore reserves. Industry's exploration efforts will be compiled. These data will include information on land acquisition and costs, footage drilled and costs, estimates of exploration activities and expenditures, exploration for non-sandstone deposits, exploration in non-established areas, and foreign exploration plans and costs. Typical data in each of these areas are given

  10. Federal reservation of geothermal resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Union Oil had developed or was seeking to develop wells on the land in Sonoma County, California in order to produce geothermal steam for generating electricity. The US Attorney General brought a quiet title action pursuant to 21(b) of the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 to determine whether geothermal resources are included in the mineral reservation under the Homestead Act. The US District Court granted Union Oil's motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim upon which relief may be granted. On appeal, the Ninth Circuit reversed and remanded. In summary, the court concluded on the basis of the legislative history of the Stock-Raising Homestead Act that sources of energy are intended to remain in the government's possession, and the purposes of the Act will be best served by including geothermal resources in the reservation of mineral interests. Noting the strictly agricultural purpose of the Act, the subsurface estate reservation was broadly interpreted, even though title passed to all rights that were not expressly reserved. The court left open on remand the question of estoppel of the government from interfering with private lessees by developing subsurface resources compensation.This is a unique and intriguing decision, as it opens wide the definition of ''mineral interest,'' construing it in the timely terms of a valuable natural resource that may be in great demand for future energy needs. The decision is being appealed to the United States Supreme Court, and it will be interesting to observe whether this liberal interpretation of mineral interests will be upheld.

  11. Ultrasound in evaluating ovarian reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Ahmaed Shawky Sabek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of transvaginal ultrasound (TVS, as a less invasive technique instead of hormonal assay to evaluate the ovarian reserve. This study included fifty-five females with breast cancer and we compared the ovarian reserve for these patients by hormonal assay through measuring the serum AntiMullerian Hormone (AMH level and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH level before and after chemotherapy, and by transvaginal ultrasound through the ovarian volume (OV calculation and counting the Antral follicles (AFC before and after chemotherapy treatment. There was decline in the AntiMullerian Hormone level after chemotherapy by 27 ± 11.19% and decrease in the Antral follicle counts by 21 ± 13.43%. In conclusion there was strong relation between AMH level and AFC which makes the use of transvaginal ultrasound is a reliable alternative method to the hormonal assay to detect the ovarian reserve.

  12. Foreign Exchange Reserves: Bangladesh Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zahangir Alam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is about foreign exchangereserves of Bangladesh. The mainpurpose of this study is to the influence of exchange rates on foreign exchangereserves to the Bangladesh context.  Both the primary and secondary data has been used inthis study. The primary data has been collected through a structuredquestionnaire from 50 respondents. The secondary data, namely Bangladeshforeign exchange reserves (FER, Bangladesh current account balance (CAB,Bangladesh capital andfinancial account balance (CFAB, and BDT/USD exchange rates (ER.  This study covers yearly data from July 01,1996 to June 30, 2005 and quarterly data from July 01, 2005 to June 30, 2012. Findingsof this study shows that out of the selected 16 factors affecting foreignexchange reserves, exchange rates occupy the first position, weighted averagescore (WAS being 4.56. Foreign exchange reserves (FER and current accountbalance (CAB have increased by 502.9087% and 1451.218%,whereas capital and financial account (CFAB has decreased by -649.024% on June30, 2012 compared to June 30, 1997. The influence of other factors heldconstant, as ER changes by 285.6894 units due to one unit change in FER, onaverage in the same direction which represents that ER has positive effect on theFER and this relationship is statistically significant.  62.1526 percentof the variation in FER is explained by ER. The outcomes of Breusch-Godfrey test (LM test, ARCHtest, and the Normality test are that there is a serial correlation among residuals, the variance of residuals is notconstant, and the residuals are not normally distributed.

  13. Naval Reserve Annual Operating Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-29

    C. c ) CPi i 0 0 00 0 le C C.C~r In 1]1 In 00 It .- I to C-38 ’U2 WIX ’W~ - m u. -C-LC m4 C v , v ul FA ?w % -D 1 o r cl jc j, II t %c oK W)i Ir of... platform programs, while Program 11 contains 26 sub-programs each having a separate Reserve program sponsor. The distribution of Program 11 resources is...a mix of specific skills required to bring an active Navy oper-Iating platform to organizational manning. Each SRU is tailored to a specific ship

  14. EC Contribution to the evolution of the objectives of radioecological research in relation to the radioactive deposition and its impact on land use and environmental management after the nuclear accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmet, G.

    1996-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of radionuclides coming up after the Chernobyl accident has led to a large number of scientific and political activities to assessing the contamination of the environment and the consequences for the population. A large scale of measures were deployed attempting to mitigate the consequences and initiatives were launched to follow the fate of the radionuclides in and around the Chernobyl area. Some of these efforts are described in this paper. It summarizes which way radioecologists had chosen to evaluate the problem, to compare the scientific culture existing in East and West, to sharpen their views on the fundamentals of radioecology and to test their knowledge in the real field

  15. A Century in Reserve and Beyond

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monagle, James P

    2008-01-01

    ... Reserve, this Strategy Research Project (SRP) describes the role of the Army Reserve from its beginning as a reserve corps of medical doctors to that of a strategic reserve force, and then to its current operational role...

  16. Radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France; Consequences radioecologiques et dosimetriques de l'accident de Tchernobyl en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, Ph; Beaugelin, K; Maubert, H; Ledenvic, Ph [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, CEA Centre d' Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1997-11-01

    This study has as objective a survey of the radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France, as well as a prognosis for the years to come. It was requested by the Direction of Nuclear Installation Safety (DSIN) in relation to different organisms which effected measurements after this accident. It is based on the use of combined results of measurements and modelling by means of the code ASTRAL developed at IPSN. Various measurements obtained from five authorities and institutions, were made available, such as: activity of air and water, soil, processed food, agricultural and natural products. However, to achieve the survey still a modelling is needed. ASTRAL is a code for evaluating the ecological consequences of an accident. It allows establishing the correspondence between the soil Remnant Surface Activities (RSA, in Bq.m{sup -2}), the activity concentration of the agricultural production and the individual and collective doses resulting from external and internal exposures (due to inhalation and ingestion of contaminated nurture). The results of principal synthesis documents on the Chernobyl accident and its consequences were also used. The report is structured in nine sections, as follows: 1.Introduction; 2.Objective and methodology; 3.Characterization of radioactive depositions; 4;Remnant surface activities; 5.Contamination of agricultural products and foods; 6.Contamination of natural, semi-natural products and of drinking water; 7.Dosimetric evaluations; 8.Proposals for the environmental surveillance; 9.Conclusion. Finally, after ten years, one concludes that at presentthe dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France were rather limited. For the period 1986-2046 the average individual effective dose estimated for the most struck zone is lower than 1500 {mu}Sv, which represents almost 1% of the average natural exposure for the same period. At present, the cesium 137 levels are at often inferior to those recorded

  17. System of accounting and control of nuclear materials (MCA) relative to IAEA safeguards and improvement of radioecological situation of the Joint Stock Company ULBA Metallurgical Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, B.; Khadeev, V.; Antonov, N.; Gradelnikov, K.

    1996-01-01

    Following goals must be accomplished following this Project : - Develop computerized and automated MCA data system; - Provide up-to-date and reliable accounting and control of availability and transfer of nuclear materials, detect loss or theft of nuclear materials; - Improve book keeping of nuclear materials, provide paperwork for raw materials and finished products sales and purchase control, process nuclear materials shipment data; - Reduce sampling error and to obtain precise measure of nuclear materials to obtain ESADRA target values; - Thorium concentrates transfer preliminary released from raw Beryllium to the new storage to prevent environment radiation pollution and obvious fire accidents; - Improve radioecological situation of the territory caused by old storage dismantling and decontamination of site; - Improve accounting, storing and Physical Protection of Thorium Following is the proposal to obtain goals of the Project : - Develop accounting and control systems - Develop basic standards and procedures for MCA system - Develop users specifications of MCA data system - Develop software of MCA data system - Assembly and adjustment of local network at the production facilities - Automated MCA data system personnel training - Develop measurement system - Determination of the mistakes in sampling and measurement of Uranium and isotopes content - Develop the procedures of sampling and measurement of Uranium and isotopes content providing ESADRA target values - Develop measure control program covering scales and analytical equipment and measuring methods - Develop software for measure control program support - Thorium shipment, decontamination and improvement of Physical Protection of Thorium storage - Accounting of Thorium containing materials when transferring to the new storage - Arrange storage decontamination - Develop new systems of Thorium Containment/Surveillance and Physical Protection

  18. Radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France; Consequences radioecologiques et dosimetriques de l'accident de Tchernobyl en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, Ph.; Beaugelin, K.; Maubert, H.; Ledenvic, Ph. [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, CEA Centre d' Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1997-11-01

    This study has as objective a survey of the radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France, as well as a prognosis for the years to come. It was requested by the Direction of Nuclear Installation Safety (DSIN) in relation to different organisms which effected measurements after this accident. It is based on the use of combined results of measurements and modelling by means of the code ASTRAL developed at IPSN. Various measurements obtained from five authorities and institutions, were made available, such as: activity of air and water, soil, processed food, agricultural and natural products. However, to achieve the survey still a modelling is needed. ASTRAL is a code for evaluating the ecological consequences of an accident. It allows establishing the correspondence between the soil Remnant Surface Activities (RSA, in Bq.m{sup -2}), the activity concentration of the agricultural production and the individual and collective doses resulting from external and internal exposures (due to inhalation and ingestion of contaminated nurture). The results of principal synthesis documents on the Chernobyl accident and its consequences were also used. The report is structured in nine sections, as follows: 1.Introduction; 2.Objective and methodology; 3.Characterization of radioactive depositions; 4;Remnant surface activities; 5.Contamination of agricultural products and foods; 6.Contamination of natural, semi-natural products and of drinking water; 7.Dosimetric evaluations; 8.Proposals for the environmental surveillance; 9.Conclusion. Finally, after ten years, one concludes that at presentthe dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France were rather limited. For the period 1986-2046 the average individual effective dose estimated for the most struck zone is lower than 1500 {mu}Sv, which represents almost 1% of the average natural exposure for the same period. At present, the cesium 137 levels are at often inferior to those recorded

  19. Derivation of radioecological parameters from the long-term emission of iodine-129. Final report; Ableitung von radiooekologischen Parametern aus dem langfristigen Eintrag von Iod-129. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, R.; Klipsch, K.; Ernst, T.; Gorny, M.; Jakob, D.; Vahlbruch, J. [Zentrum fuer Strahlenschutz und Radiooekologie (ZSR), Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Synal, H.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst., ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schnabel, C. [Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    In this project, the distribution and behaviour of {sup 129}I and {sup 127}I in the environment and its pathways through the environment to man were comprehensively investigated in order to provide a basis for estimating the radiation exposure to man due to releases of {sup 129}I. To this end, the actual situation in Lower Saxony, Germany, was studied for exemplary regions near to and far from the coast of the North Sea. Accelerator mass spectrometry, radiochemical neutron activation analysis, ion chromatography, and ICP-MS were applied to measure the iodine isotopes, {sup 129}I and P{sup 127}I, in sea-water, air, precipitation, surface and ground waters, soils, plants, animals, foodstuffs, total diet, and human and animal thyroid glands. For air-borne iodine, the speciation as well as the particle size distribution of aerosols was determined. Soil depth profiles were investigated down to depths of 2.5 m in order to study the iodine migration as well as individual surface soil samples to allow for the determination of transfer factors of the iodine isotopes into plants. From the analytical results radioecological parameters for the long-term behaviour of {sup 129}I in the pedo- and biosphere were derived. The iodine isotopes are in severe disequilibrium in the different environmental compartments. The pre-nuclear equilibrium {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio in the biosphere was determined to be 2.0 x 10{sup -13} with a geometric standard deviation of 1.39. Today, the environmental isotopic ratios in Northern Germany range from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -10}. The highest ratios are found in North Sea water, the lowest in deep soil samples and ground water. The North Sea appears as the dominant source of air-borne iodine in Northern Germany due to the emissions of European reprocessing plants. The results are discussed with respect to their radiological relevance and in view of the general protection of the environment, i.e. air, water, soil and the biosphere. (orig.)

  20. 24 CFR 891.605 - Replacement reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Replacement reserve. 891.605... 8 Assistance § 891.605 Replacement reserve. (a) Establishment of reserve. The Borrower shall establish and maintain a replacement reserve to aid in funding extraordinary maintenance, and repair and...

  1. 24 CFR 891.405 - Replacement reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Replacement reserve. 891.405....405 Replacement reserve. (a) Establishment of reserve. The Owner shall establish and maintain a replacement reserve to aid in funding extraordinary maintenance and repair and replacement of capital items...

  2. Veterinary Science Students, Center Changing a Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwater, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Kayenta is a rural community located in northeastern Arizona on a Navajo reservation. On the reservation, many families rely on their livestock for income, and as a result, many reservation high school students show a great interest in agricultural education. Having livestock on the reservation is not just a source of income, but also part of a…

  3. Calculation program development for spinning reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This study is about optimal holding of spinning reserve and optimal operation for it. It deals with the purpose and contents of the study, introduction of the spinning reserve electricity, speciality of the spinning reserve power, the result of calculation, analysis for limited method of optimum load, calculation of requirement for spinning reserve, analysis on measurement of system stability with summary, purpose of the analysis, cause of impact of the accident, basics on measurement of spinning reserve and conclusion. It has the reference on explanation for design of spinning reserve power program and using and trend about spinning reserve power in Korea.

  4. Introducing optional reserve ratios in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Lóránt Varga

    2010-01-01

    As of the reserve maintenance period commencing in November 2010, Hungarian credit institutions will be free to decide whether to apply the previously valid 2% reserve ratio, or to apply a higher mandatory reserve ratio. Credit institutions required to hold reserves may select from reserve ratios of 2, 3, 4 and 5%, and may change their decision on a semi-annual basis. In line with the international best practice, the purpose of the MNB’s reserve requirement system is to support credit institu...

  5. Radioecological studies of {sup 137}Cs in limnological ecosystems. {sup 137}Cs concentrations in water, sediment and biota at the lower region of the famous river in Saitama Prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Sadaaki; Motegi, Misako; Oosawa, Takashi; Nakazawa, Kiyoaki [Saitama Inst. of Public Health, Urawa (Japan); Ogata, Hiromitsu; Izumo, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Fumio

    1996-02-01

    The concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in water, sediment and biota at the lower region of the famous river in Saitama prefecture were determined in order to elucidate the radioecology of {sup 137}Cs in limnological ecosystems. {sup 137}Cs concentration in water was 0.10 mBq/l. {sup 137}Cs concentrations in sediment, shellfish, Sinotaia quadratus historica (mean for 2 detectable samples), and fish, Carassius auratus cuvieri (mean for 2 detectable samples), were about 6200, 840 and 320 times higher than the concentration of the water, respectively. But {sup 137}Cs radioactivity in the crustacea, Procambarus clarki, was significantly not detected. So, {sup 137}Cs transfer mechanism in the limnological ecosystems was indicated in part. (author).

  6. Reservation wages, expected wages and unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, S; Taylor, K

    2013-01-01

    We model unemployment duration, reservation and expected wages simultaneously for individuals not in work, where wage expectations are identified via an exogenous policy shock. The policy shock increased expected wages, which were found to be positively associated with reservation wages.

  7. Transforming the Reserve Component: Four Essays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binnendijk, Hans; Baranick, Michael J; Bell, Raymond E., Jr; Cordero, Gina; Duncan, Stephen M; Holshek, Christopher; Wentz, Larry

    2005-01-01

    This volume contains four essays on various aspects of the Reserve Component. We publish it at a time when Reserves are serving overseas at historically high rates and when new missions like homeland security demand their attention...

  8. 47 CFR 25.219 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 25.219 Section 25.219 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.219 [Reserved] ...

  9. 47 CFR 25.402 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 25.402 Section 25.402 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.402 [Reserved] ...

  10. Reservation system with graphical user interface

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Mahmoud A. Abdelhamid; Jamjoom, Hani T.; Podlaseck, Mark E.; Qu, Huiming; Shae, Zon-Yin; Sheopuri, Anshul

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for providing a reservation system are provided. The techniques include displaying a scalable visualization object, wherein the scalable visualization object comprises an expanded view element of the reservation system depicting

  11. 47 CFR 80.146 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.146 [Reserved] ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 80.146 Section 80.146...

  12. 47 CFR 80.145 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Ship Stations § 80.145 [Reserved] Shipboard General Purpose Watches ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 80.145 Section 80.145...

  13. 5 CFR 330.610 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 330.610 Section 330.610 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND... Employees § 330.610 [Reserved] ...

  14. 5 CFR 330.603 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 330.603 Section 330.603 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND... Employees § 330.603 [Reserved] ...

  15. 40 CFR 405.73 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true [Reserved] 405.73 Section 405.73 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS DAIRY... § 405.73 [Reserved] ...

  16. 40 CFR 408.73 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true [Reserved] 408.73 Section 408.73 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS... Processing Subcategory § 408.73 [Reserved] ...

  17. 40 CFR 407.73 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true [Reserved] 407.73 Section 407.73 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS... Vegetables Subcategory § 407.73 [Reserved] ...

  18. Reserving by detailed conditioning on individual claim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartikasari, Mujiati Dwi; Effendie, Adhitya Ronnie; Wilandari, Yuciana

    2017-03-01

    The estimation of claim reserves is an important activity in insurance companies to fulfill their liabilities. Recently, reserving method of individual claim have attracted a lot of interest in the actuarial science, which overcome some deficiency of aggregated claim method. This paper explores the Reserving by Detailed Conditioning (RDC) method using all of claim information for reserving with individual claim of liability insurance from an Indonesian general insurance company. Furthermore, we compare it to Chain Ladder and Bornhuetter-Ferguson method.

  19. Reserve evaluation of minerals at NUCLEBRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.P.M.; Guerra, P.A.G.; Vinha, C.A.G. da

    1980-10-01

    The method used for the reserve evaluation of minerals, particularly of uranium, as used worldwide, and specially at NUCLEBRAS is described. This is done through a series of procedures envolving basic definitions, reserve evaluation methods (conventional, statistical and geoestatistical), data management, use of computer systems, classification and evaluation of reserves. (Author) [pt

  20. 24 CFR 880.602 - Replacement reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Replacement reserve. 880.602... Replacement reserve. (a) A replacement reserve must be established and maintained in an interest-bearing account to aid in funding extraordinary maintenance and repair and replacement of capital items. (1) Part...

  1. 24 CFR 891.745 - Replacement reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Replacement reserve. 891.745... and Individuals-Section 162 Assistance § 891.745 Replacement reserve. The general requirements for the replacement reserve are provided in § 891.605. For projects funded under §§ 891.655 through 891.790, the...

  2. Poverty and corruption compromise tropical forest reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S Joseph; Sanchez-Azofeifa, G Arturo; Portillo-Quintero, Carlos; Davies, Diane

    2007-07-01

    We used the global fire detection record provided by the satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to determine the number of fires detected inside 823 tropical and subtropical moist forest reserves and for contiguous buffer areas 5, 10, and 15 km wide. The ratio of fire detection densities (detections per square kilometer) inside reserves to their contiguous buffer areas provided an index of reserve effectiveness. Fire detection density was significantly lower inside reserves than in paired, contiguous buffer areas but varied by five orders of magnitude among reserves. The buffer: reserve detection ratio varied by up to four orders of magnitude among reserves within a single country, and median values varied by three orders of magnitude among countries. Reserves tended to be least effective at reducing fire frequency in many poorer countries and in countries beset by corruption. Countries with the most successful reserves include Costa Rica, Jamaica, Malaysia, and Taiwan and the Indonesian island of Java. Countries with the most problematic reserves include Cambodia, Guatemala, Paraguay, and Sierra Leone and the Indonesian portion of Borneo. We provide fire detection density for 3964 tropical and subtropical reserves and their buffer areas in the hope that these data will expedite further analyses that might lead to improved management of tropical reserves.

  3. Assessment of secondary aluminum reserves of nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maung, Kyaw Nyunt; Yoshida, Tomoharu; Liu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    aluminum resources are accumulated in landfill sites. Understanding the sizes of primary and secondary aluminum reserves enables us to extend knowledge of efficient raw material sourcing from a narrow perspective of primary reserves alone to a broader perspective of both primary and secondary reserves...

  4. 24 CFR 572.125 - Replacement reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Homeownership Program Requirements-Implementation Grants § 572.125 Replacement reserves. (a) Purpose. A single replacement reserve may be established for the homeownership program only if HUD determines it is necessary to... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Replacement reserves. 572.125...

  5. Micro-level stochastic loss reserving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonio, K.; Plat, R.

    2010-01-01

    To meet future liabilities general insurance companies will set-up reserves. Predicting future cash-flows is essential in this process. Actuarial loss reserving methods will help them to do this in a sound way. The last decennium a vast literature about stochastic loss reserving for the general

  6. Evaluation system of minerals reserve at Nuclebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.P.M.; Guerra, P.A.G.; Vinha, C.A.G. da.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the methodology used for the reserve evaluation of minerals, particularly of uranium, as used world wide, and specially at Nuclebras. The paper discusses a series of procedures envolving basic definitions, reserve evaluation methods (Conventional, Statistical and Geoestatistical), data management, use of computer systems, classification of reserves as well as the results achieved [pt

  7. Reserve Requirements and Monetary Management; An Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1993-01-01

    Reserve requirements are widely used by central banks as a means to improve monetary control, an instrument for policy implementation, a source of revenue, and a safeguard of bank liquidity. The effectiveness of reserve requirements in fulfilling these functions is reviewed, and the detailed modalities of their use are examined. Reserve requirements in a sample of developing countries are described.

  8. 42 CFR 417.934 - Reserve requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reserve requirement. 417.934 Section 417.934 Public... PLANS Administration of Outstanding Loans and Loan Guarantees § 417.934 Reserve requirement. (a) Timing... section 1305 of the PHS Act was required to establish a restricted reserve account on the earlier of the...

  9. Radioecological impact of Saharan dusts fallout. Case study of a major event on the 21. of february 2004 in south part of France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, O.; Pourcelot, L.; Gurriaran, R.; Paulat, P.

    2005-01-01

    Lithometeors, Sirocco or more commonly 'red mud' are all in fact related to a single phenomenon which affects France every year: the wind transport and deposit of desert particles from the Sahara. On the 21. of February 2004, the southern part of France is swept by a weather event of wind transport of Saharan particles. The recordings of atmospheric dust contamination and the deposit of dust, which results from it, make an episode of exceptional width. In a few hours, the thickness of the deposit exceeds 1 mm (up to 4 mm in Corsica) with a maximum density of surface charge of 50 g.m -2 (50 tons per km 2 ). The loads of the PM 10 type particles in the air, recorded by associations of monitoring of the quality of the air, indicate concentrations multiplied to the maximum by 10 and an influence on the ground of the plume ranging between 300 000 and 350 000 km 2 . To the end, 2 million tons are deposited on a portion of the territory located at the south of a line from Nantes to Besancon. This event also had a significant radio-ecological impact, leading to significant 137 Cs, (239+240) Pu, 241 Am, activity levels of 38 Bq. kg -1 sec, 1 Bq. kg -1 sec and 0,46 Bq. kg -1 sec, respectively. Quality of air monitoring organisations recorded 10-fold increases in the concentration of charged PM 10 2 type particles within the cloud; ground coverage stretched over a 300 000 km 2 surface area. Across this whole area, the artificial radioactivity deposits are estimated to 37.10 10 Bq. In term of flow of deposit, this episode represents, with him only, i.e. in a few hours, a 137 Cs deposition equivalent to that recorded on average in a cumulated time of one year. Data from this study show that these weather-climatic episodes generate today, environmental samples which on average, present the highest levels and flux of artificial radioactivities, more than those in the sediments of the Rhone river deposited by flood events, for example. Changes in artificial radionuclide activity

  10. Reserve selection with land market feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsic, Van; Lewis, David J; Radeloff, Volker C

    2013-01-15

    How to best site reserves is a leading question for conservation biologists. Recently, reserve selection has emphasized efficient conservation: maximizing conservation goals given the reality of limited conservation budgets, and this work indicates that land market can potentially undermine the conservation benefits of reserves by increasing property values and development probabilities near reserves. Here we propose a reserve selection methodology which optimizes conservation given both a budget constraint and land market feedbacks by using a combination of econometric models along with stochastic dynamic programming. We show that amenity based feedbacks can be accounted for in optimal reserve selection by choosing property price and land development models which exogenously estimate the effects of reserve establishment. In our empirical example, we use previously estimated models of land development and property prices to select parcels to maximize coarse woody debris along 16 lakes in Vilas County, WI, USA. Using each lake as an independent experiment, we find that including land market feedbacks in the reserve selection algorithm has only small effects on conservation efficacy. Likewise, we find that in our setting heuristic (minloss and maxgain) algorithms perform nearly as well as the optimal selection strategy. We emphasize that land market feedbacks can be included in optimal reserve selection; the extent to which this improves reserve placement will likely vary across landscapes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Uncertainties in radioecological assessment models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, F.O.; Miller, C.W.; Ng, Y.C.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental radiological assessments rely heavily on the use of mathematical models. The predictions of these models are inherently uncertain because models are inexact representations of real systems. The major sources of this uncertainty are related to bias in model formulation and imprecision in parameter estimation. The magnitude of uncertainty is a function of the questions asked of the model and the specific radionuclides and exposure pathways of dominant importance. It is concluded that models developed as research tools should be distinguished from models developed for assessment applications. Furthermore, increased model complexity does not necessarily guarantee increased accuracy. To improve the realism of assessment modeling, stochastic procedures are recommended that translate uncertain parameter estimates into a distribution of predicted values. These procedures also permit the importance of model parameters to be ranked according to their relative contribution to the overall predicted uncertainty. Although confidence in model predictions can be improved through site-specific parameter estimation and increased model validation, health risk factors and internal dosimetry models will probably remain important contributors to the amount of uncertainty that is irreducible. 41 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  12. Radioecological restoration by natural effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muck, K.

    2002-01-01

    A number of proposals have been put forward to reduce the long-term exposure of the population in areas contaminated after an accident in a nuclear power plant, a reprocessing plant or other accidental releases of activity to the environment, in particular with regard to long-lived radionuclides such as 9 0S r and 1 37C s. Each of these countermeasures incorporates a more or less significant negative impact on the population. Probably the most detrimental impact results from the resettlement of the population from a contaminated territory, both because of the social and psychological problems and the economic detriment involved. But also other countermeasures proposed to reduce the internal dose such as soil top layer removal, deep plowing or chemical treatment of the soil may have a significant, negative impact on the land. If they can be avoided, the impact on the population and the land would certainly be less. In that respect, it is well known that the bio-availability of both 9 0S r and 1 37C s for uptake by plants and thus in foodstuffs is reduced by natural effects far quicker than the corresponding half-life of these radionuclides would imply. These natural effects which are basically due to the increasing fixation of 9 0S r and 1 37C s in the soil, penetration into deeper soil layers and activity removal processes from bio-mass, show no influence or harm to the soil as they are occurring without any artificial measures to remediate the soil

  13. Radioecology of the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiard-Triquet, C.; Amiard, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    This book is divided into nine parts as follows: origin of radionuclides in the aquatic environment; assessment of radioactive contamination of the aquatic environment; evolution of radionuclides in waters; behaviour of radionuclides in sediments; quantitative data on accumulation, distribution and biological release of radioactive pollutants; mechanisms of the biological accumulation; influence of ecological factors on radioactive contamination of ecosystems; effects of irradiation on aquatic organisms. The last part is devoted to general conclusions on sanitary and ecological consequences of radioactive pollution of the aquatic environment [fr

  14. Radioecological studies on the Elbe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, W.; Kanisch, G.; Kellermann, H.J.; Nagel, G.; Vobach, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effluents from nuclear power plants situated on the banks of the Elbe (Stade, Brokdorf, Kruemmel) has not contributed to any measurable degree to an increase in the environmental radioactivity. In the upper Elbe regions, such incrases have chiefly been attributable to fallout from nuclear weapons and, in recent years, radioactive fallout of the Chernobyl power plant. In the lower Elbe, brackish waters and estuary, however, the effect of added radioactivity from the nuclear reprocessing plants of Sellafield and La Hague is making itself evident. This was confirmed by large-scale studies using water, fish, sestone and sediment samples that were examined for their individual contents of radioactivity. If one considers the degree of exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity, radioactive exposure of the population on account of nuclear power stations must be judged as being within the negligible range. (DG) [de

  15. Radioecological studies in marine ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellermann, H.J.; Kanisch, G.

    1999-01-01

    The bioconcentration factor shows the ratio between concentration of a substance in water or in fish. It is a calculation quantity, used for assessing the possible concentration in fish in proportion to the known concentration in water. Although the element cesium discussed in this report is primarily ingested via the food chain (biomagnification) and not via direct uptake through the gills, but the bioconcentration factor model is nevertheless applicable, because there is a relation between the element's concentration in water and in food. One has to consider, however, the influence on cesium uptake through the quantity of food and species-dependent accumulation. Experimental results obtained for various ecosystems are reported and illustrate the mechanisms involved. (orig./CB) [de

  16. Uranium industry vs radioecological risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonchev, L.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium industry development on a worldwide scale accounts for a technological increase in the natural radiation background as a result of human activity. The higher radionuclide concentration leads to an increase of the radiological risk which is a basic criterion for environmental and human protection. Therefore its determination with regard to the uranium industry and particularly to the process of its closure is mandatory. Restoration and control of the environment is closely linked to a system of criteria and levels for assessment of the radionuclide contamination hazards. Annual individual effective dose of 2.3 mSv is accepted as anormal average level for radiation exposure of the Bulgarian population from the natural radiation background. The value of 3.5 mSv/y is accepted as the uppermost limit of the normal background exposure level. According to ICRP recommendations the additional overbackground exposure of the population should not exceed 1.0 mSv/y towards the background level for the region. This holds true also for areas neighbouring to the uranium mining sites

  17. Radioecology of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1982-01-01

    This study provides information to help assess the environmental impacts and certain potential human hazards associated with nuclear fuel cycles. A data base is being developed to define and quantify biological transport routes, which will permit credible predictions and assessment of routine and potential large-scale releases of radionuclides and other toxic materials. These data, used in assessment models, will increase the accuracy of estimating radiation doses to man and other life forms. Results will provide information to determine if waste management procedures on the Hanford site have caused ecological perturbations, and, if so, to determine the source, nature and magnitude of such disturbances

  18. Radioecological sensitivity of permanent grasslands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    The project 'SENSIB' of the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) aims at characterizing and classifying parameters with significant impact on the transfer of radioactive contaminants in the environment. This thesis is focused on permanent grassland areas. Its objectives are the analysis of the activity variations of two artificial radionuclides ( 137 Cs and 90 Sr) in the chain from soil to dairy products as well as the categorization of ecological and anthropogenic parameters, which determine the sensitivity of the studied area. For this study, in situ sampling is carried out in 15 farms in 3 different French regions (Charente, Puy-de-Dome and Jura). The sampling sites are chosen according to their natural variations (geology, altitude and climate) and the soil types. Additionally to the radiologic measurements, geographic, soil and vegetation data as well as data concerning cattle-rearing and cheese manufacturing processes are gathered. From the soil to the grass vegetation, 137 Cs transfer factors vary between 3 x 10-3 and 148 x 10-3 Bq kg-1 (dry weight) per Bq kg-1 (dry weight) (N = 73). Theses transfer factors are significantly higher in the Puy-de-Dome region than in the Jura region. The 137 Cs transfer factor from cattle feed to milk varies from 5.9 x 10-3 to 258 x 10-3 Bq kg-1 (fresh weight) per Bq kg-1 (dry weight) (N = 28). Statistically, it is higher in the Charente region. Finally, the 90 Sr transfer factor from milk to cheese ranges from 3.9 to 12.1. The studied site with the highest factor is the Jura (N = 25). The link between milk and dairy products is the stage with the most 137 Cs and 90 Sr transfers. A nonlinear approach based on a discretization method of the transfer factor with multiple comparison tests admits a classification of the sensitivity factors from soil to grass vegetation. We can determine 20 factors interfering in the 137 Cs transfer into the vegetation, for instance, the clay rate of the soils or a marker for soil particles adhered on vegetation. 137 Cs transfers into milk depend on the clay rate of the vegetation sample and on the cattle feed. Finally, during the cheese manufacturing process, 90 Sr acts like the calcium, its chemical analogue, what explains the increase of 90 Sr transfer in calcium enriched cheeses, like Comte cheese. Based on the classification of these factors, a method is proposed to evaluate the 137 Cs transfer sensitivity from soil to dairy product. (author)

  19. Radioecological aspects of nuclear warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edvardson, Kay

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive fallout, one of the major effects of nuclear warfare, will cause acute radiation sickness within the close-in or intermediate areas downwind from surface bursts. Global fallout from high yield explosions will be fairly evenly distributed in the hemisphere where the explosions occur, and will cause irradiation from ground deposit, inhaled material and contaminated food. Estimates of collective doses and the approximate number of late casualties from the global contamination are presented for a given total explosion yield. (author)

  20. Radioecological aspects of nuclear warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edvarson, K.

    1975-01-01

    The radioactive fallout from nuclear explosions is one of the major effects of nuclear warfare. Those levels causing acute radiation sickness are to be expected only within the close-in or intermediate areas downwind from surface bursts. Global fallout from high yield explosions will be fairly evenly distributed in the hemisphere where the explosions occurred and cause irradiation from ground deposit, inhaled material and contaminated food. The collective doses and the order of magnitude of late casualties from this global contamination are estimated for a given total explosion yield. (auth)

  1. Radioecological studies in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danali-Cotsaki, Suzana; Florou-Gazi, Helen.

    1982-12-01

    The concentrations of mixed fission products in sea water and of 137 Cs in fish and sea plants are different from samples collected from different sampling areas. This difference is more remarkable the year where the level of the worldwide fall-out is higher, especially with regards to M.F.P. concentrations in sea water samples. Increases or decreases of M.F.P. concentrations in sea water samples result to increases or decreases of 137 Cs in fish and sea plants. (author)

  2. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    During fiscal year 1992, the reserves generated $473 million in revenues, a $181 million decrease from the fiscal year 1991 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $273 million, compared with $454 million in fiscal year 1991. From 1976 through fiscal year 1992, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated more than $15 billion in revenues and a net operating income after costs of $12.5 billion. In fiscal year 1992, production at the Naval Petroleum Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 26 million barrels of crude oil, 119 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 164 million gallons of natural gas liquids. From April to November 1992, senior managers from the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves held a series of three workshops in Boulder, Colorado, in order to build a comprehensive Strategic Plan as required by Secretary of Energy Notice 25A-91. Other highlights are presented for the following: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1--production achievements, crude oil shipments to the strategic petroleum reserve, horizontal drilling, shallow oil zone gas injection project, environment and safety, and vanpool program; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2--new management and operating contractor and exploration drilling; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3--steamflood; Naval Oil Shale Reserves--protection program; and Tiger Team environmental assessment of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

  3. A General Business Model for Marine Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Enric; Costello, Christopher; Dougherty, Dawn; Heal, Geoffrey; Kelleher, Kieran; Murray, Jason H.; Rosenberg, Andrew A.; Sumaila, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Marine reserves are an effective tool for protecting biodiversity locally, with potential economic benefits including enhancement of local fisheries, increased tourism, and maintenance of ecosystem services. However, fishing communities often fear short-term income losses associated with closures, and thus may oppose marine reserves. Here we review empirical data and develop bioeconomic models to show that the value of marine reserves (enhanced adjacent fishing + tourism) may often exceed the pre-reserve value, and that economic benefits can offset the costs in as little as five years. These results suggest the need for a new business model for creating and managing reserves, which could pay for themselves and turn a profit for stakeholder groups. Our model could be expanded to include ecosystem services and other benefits, and it provides a general framework to estimate costs and benefits of reserves and to develop such business models. PMID:23573192

  4. Substantiating the Incurred but not Reported Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Vintilã

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to handle past and future liability taken by insurance contracts concluded, any insurance company must constitute and maintain technical reserves. Substantiating technical reserves is done through actuarial methods and its over-evaluation or under-evaluation influence solvency and financial performance of the insurance companies, in the sense of reducing solvency through over-evaluating reserves and, respectively, influencing profit (hence of outstanding tax through under-evaluating reserves. An important reserve for insurance companies is represented by the incurred but not reported reserve, as it allows the estimation of the liability the company may confront in the future, generated by events occurred in the past, which are not currently known in the present but will be reported in the future.

  5. Reserve valuation in electric power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Pablo Ariel

    Operational reliability is provided in part by scheduling capacity in excess of the load forecast. This reserve capacity balances the uncertain power demand with the supply in real time and provides for equipment outages. Traditionally, reserve scheduling has been ensured by enforcing reserve requirements in the operations planning. An alternate approach is to employ a stochastic formulation, which allows the explicit modeling of the sources of uncertainty. This thesis compares stochastic and reserve methods and evaluates the benefits of a combined approach for the efficient management of uncertainty in the unit commitment problem. Numerical studies show that the unit commitment solutions obtained for the combined approach are robust and superior with respect to the traditional approach. These robust solutions are especially valuable in areas with a high proportion of wind power, as their built-in flexibility allows the dispatch of practically all the available wind power while minimizing the costs of operation. The scheduled reserve has an economic value since it reduces the outage costs. In several electricity markets, reserve demand functions have been implemented to take into account the value of reserve in the market clearing process. These often take the form of a step-down function at the reserve requirement level, and as such they may not appropriately represent the reserve value. The value of reserve is impacted by the reliability, dynamic and stochastic characteristics of system components, the system operation policies, and the economic aspects such as the risk preferences of the demand. In this thesis, these aspects are taken into account to approximate the reserve value and construct reserve demand functions. Illustrative examples show that the demand functions constructed have similarities with those implemented in some markets.

  6. The energy reserves of our planet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischoff, G.

    1977-01-01

    Starting from a prognosis for the development of the world energy consumption, the situation of special primary energy sources (reserves, potential) is briefly described. According to the amount and location of the reserves - 90% of the fossil energy reserves are in industrialized countries -, coal will play a leading role in meeting the energy demands of the future. Without breeder reactors, the role of nuclear energy will be limited in time. (UA) [de

  7. Reserve reporting from a banker's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.O.

    1996-01-01

    A banker's perspective of oil and gas reserve reporting was presented. Topics chosen for discussion emphasized oil and gas lending, and the type of capital which is most relevant to the oil and gas industry. The concept of capital differentiation, potential worst case, and least specialization, were explained. An explanation of the reasons for the lender's different perspective on reserves was given. Methods that banks use to limit risk, and the role that reserve reports play in loan approvals were also reviewed

  8. IGT calculates world reserves of fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology has published the IGT World Reserves Survey, giving their latest tabulation of world reserves of fossil fuels and uranium. The report contains 120 Tables and 41 Figures. Estimates are provided for proved reserves, resources, current production, and life indexes of the non-renewable energy sources of the US and of the world as a whole. World regional data are also provided in many cases. The data are summarized here. 2 figures, 5 tables

  9. Reserve requirement systems in OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Yueh-Yun C. O’Brien

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares the reserve requirements of OECD countries. Reserve requirements are the minimum percentages or amounts of liabilities that depository institutions are required to keep in cash or as deposits with their central banks. To facilitate monetary policy implementation, twenty-four of the thirty OECD countries impose reserve requirements to influence their banking systems’ demand for liquidity. These include twelve OECD countries that are also members of the European Economic and...

  10. When will fossil fuel reserves be diminished?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiee, Shahriar; Topal, Erkan

    2009-01-01

    Crude oil, coal and gas are the main resources for world energy supply. The size of fossil fuel reserves and the dilemma that 'when non-renewable energy will be diminished' is a fundamental and doubtful question that needs to be answered. This paper presents a new formula for calculating when fossil fuel reserves are likely to be depleted and develops an econometrics model to demonstrate the relationship between fossil fuel reserves and some main variables. The new formula is modified from the Klass model and thus assumes a continuous compound rate and computes fossil fuel reserve depletion times for oil, coal and gas of approximately 35, 107 and 37 years, respectively. This means that coal reserves are available up to 2112, and will be the only fossil fuel remaining after 2042. In the Econometrics model, the main exogenous variables affecting oil, coal and gas reserve trends are their consumption and respective prices between 1980 and 2006. The models for oil and gas reserves unexpectedly show a positive and significant relationship with consumption, while presenting a negative and significant relationship with price. The econometrics model for coal reserves, however, expectedly illustrates a negative and significant relationship with consumption and a positive and significant relationship with price. Consequently, huge reserves of coal and low-level coal prices in comparison to oil and gas make coal one of the main energy substitutions for oil and gas in the future, under the assumption of coal as a clean energy source

  11. Reservation system with graphical user interface

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Mahmoud A. Abdelhamid

    2012-01-05

    Techniques for providing a reservation system are provided. The techniques include displaying a scalable visualization object, wherein the scalable visualization object comprises an expanded view element of the reservation system depicting information in connection with a selected interval of time and a compressed view element of the reservation system depicting information in connection with one or more additional intervals of time, maintaining a visual context between the expanded view and the compressed view within the visualization object, and enabling a user to switch between the expanded view and the compressed view to facilitate use of the reservation system.

  12. Radiation physics of non-metallic crystals. Volume III, No. 3. Radiatsionnaya fizika nemetallicheskikh kristallov. Tom III, Chast 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konozenko, I D [ed.

    1971-01-01

    Separate articles are presented on studies concerned with radiation phenomena in ionic crystals and dielectrics. Topics include energy losses and electron escape in monocrystals, non-stationary acoustic absorption in monocrystals, charge behavior in radioactive dielectrics, the effects of electron radiation on the electroconductivity of organic dielectrics, adsorption of polyatomic gases in adsorbents, catalysis and inhibition of solid inorganic salt radiolysis, and the formation of additive paramagnetic centers in gamma radiated salts of alkaline earth metals. 253 references.

  13. 7 CFR 1221.114 - Operating reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Board § 1221.114 Operating reserve. The Board may establish an operating monetary reserve and may...

  14. 24 CFR 891.855 - Replacement reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Replacement reserves. 891.855... § 891.855 Replacement reserves. (a) The mixed-finance owner shall establish and maintain a replacement... the funds will be used to pay for capital replacement costs for the Section 202 or 811 supportive...

  15. 40 CFR 406.43 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true [Reserved] 406.43 Section 406.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GRAIN MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Bulgur Wheat Flour Milling Subcategory § 406.43 [Reserved] ...

  16. 40 CFR 406.23 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true [Reserved] 406.23 Section 406.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GRAIN MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Corn Dry Milling Subcategory § 406.23 [Reserved] ...

  17. 40 CFR 406.13 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true [Reserved] 406.13 Section 406.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GRAIN MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Corn Wet Milling Subcategory § 406.13 [Reserved] ...

  18. 41 CFR 101-39.205 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.2-GSA Interagency Fleet Management System Services § 101-39.205 [Reserved] ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true [Reserved] 101-39.205...

  19. 22 CFR 99.3 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false [Reserved] 99.3 Section 99.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES REPORTING ON CONVENTION AND NON-CONVENTION ADOPTIONS OF EMIGRATING CHILDREN § 99.3 [Reserved] ...

  20. 14 CFR 99.12 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 99.12 Section 99.12 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC General § 99.12 [Reserved] ...

  1. 26 CFR 1.46-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true [Reserved] 1.46-10 Section 1.46-10 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.46-10 [Reserved] ...

  2. 26 CFR 48.4161(b) - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true [Reserved] 48.4161(b) Section 48.4161(b) Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Sporting Goods § 48.4161(b) [Reserved] ...

  3. 26 CFR 48.4161(a) - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true [Reserved] 48.4161(a) Section 48.4161(a) Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Sporting Goods § 48.4161(a) [Reserved] ...

  4. 20 CFR 410.394 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false [Reserved] 410.394 Section 410.394 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship and Dependency § 410.394 [Reserved] ...

  5. 7 CFR 1900.57 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 1900.57 Section 1900.57 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... GENERAL Adverse Decisions and Administrative Appeals § 1900.57 [Reserved] ...

  6. 39 CFR 111.5 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 111.5 Section 111.5 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE POST OFFICE SERVICES [DOMESTIC MAIL] GENERAL INFORMATION ON POSTAL SERVICE § 111.5 [Reserved] ...

  7. 29 CFR 579.4 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 579.4 Section 579.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR VIOLATIONS-CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES § 579.4 [Reserved] ...

  8. 19 CFR 210.22 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false [Reserved] 210.22 Section 210.22 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Motions § 210.22 [Reserved] ...

  9. 12 CFR 614.4710 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 614.4710 Section 614.4710 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS Banks for Cooperatives and Agricultural Credit Banks Financing International Trade § 614.4710 [Reserved] ...

  10. 12 CFR 996.1 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 996.1 Section 996.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NON-BANK SYSTEM ENTITIES AUTHORITY FOR BANK ASSISTANCE OF THE RESOLUTION FUNDING CORPORATION § 996.1 [Reserved] ...

  11. 29 CFR 4.106 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true [Reserved] 4.106 Section 4.106 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor LABOR STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Application of the McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Introductory § 4.106 [Reserved] Agencies Whose Contracts May Be Covered ...

  12. 46 CFR 308.301 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 308.301 Section 308.301 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.301 [Reserved] ...

  13. 46 CFR 308.305 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 308.305 Section 308.305 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.305 [Reserved] ...

  14. 7 CFR 1709.2 Policy. - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 1709.2 Policy. Section 1709.2 Policy. Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ASSISTANCE TO HIGH ENERGY COST COMMUNITIES General Requirements § 1709.2 Policy. [Reserved] ...

  15. 7 CFR 1709.202 Policy. - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 1709.202 Policy. Section 1709.202 Policy... AGRICULTURE ASSISTANCE TO HIGH ENERGY COST COMMUNITIES Bulk Fuel Revolving Fund Grant Program § 1709.202 Policy. [Reserved] ...

  16. 15 CFR 2003.3 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 2003.3 Section 2003.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS OF TRADE POLICY STAFF COMMITTEE § 2003.3 [Reserved] ...

  17. Price, technology, and ore reserves, ch. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAllister, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    Factors determining ore reserves in view of future uses are investigated: existing mining technologies, new techniques, price-technology relationship, effects of the use of different energy sources, exploration techniques, and price change are discussed. The effect of price and technology on reserves of specific commodities is dealth with. A section is also devoted to uranium

  18. 21 CFR 211.170 - Reserve samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reserve samples. 211.170 Section 211.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL... of deterioration unless visual examination would affect the integrity of the reserve sample. Any...

  19. 48 CFR 4.501 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 4.501 Section 4.501 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 4.501 [Reserved] ...

  20. 5 CFR 9901.513 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 9901.513 Section 9901.513 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND LABOR RELATIONS SYSTEMS (DEPARTMENT... (NSPS) Staffing and Employment External Recruitment and Internal Placement § 9901.513 [Reserved] ...

  1. 31 CFR 281.2 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 281.2 Section 281.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FOREIGN EXCHANGE OPERATIONS § 281.2 [Reserved] ...

  2. 7 CFR 1776.4 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 1776.4 Section 1776.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) HOUSEHOLD WATER WELL SYSTEM GRANT PROGRAM General § 1776.4 [Reserved] ...

  3. 49 CFR 17.4 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 17.4 Section 17.4 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 17.4 [Reserved] ...

  4. 7 CFR 1962.5 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true [Reserved] 1962.5 Section 1962.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PERSONAL PROPERTY Servicing and Liquidation of Chattel Security § 1962.5 [Reserved] ...

  5. 18 CFR 284.125 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false [Reserved] 284.125 Section 284.125 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT... Certain Transportation by Intrastate Pipelines § 284.125 [Reserved] ...

  6. 40 CFR 73.32 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 73.32 Section 73.32 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Tracking System § 73.32 [Reserved] ...

  7. 40 CFR 73.51 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 73.51 Section 73.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Transfers § 73.51 [Reserved] ...

  8. 40 CFR 73.11 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 73.11 Section 73.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Allocations § 73.11 [Reserved] ...

  9. 7 CFR 801.10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 801.10 Section 801.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD... FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.10 [Reserved] ...

  10. 40 CFR 26.1124 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 26.1124 Section 26.1124 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic Ethical...-nursing Adults § 26.1124 [Reserved] ...

  11. The Economics of NASA Mission Cost Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Sally; Shinn, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Increases in NASA mission costs are well-noted but not well-understood, and there is little evidence that they are decreasing in frequency or amount over time. The need to control spending has led to analysis of the causes and magnitude of historical mission overruns, and many program control efforts are being implemented to attempt to prevent or mitigate the problem (NPR 7120). However, cost overruns have not abated, and while some direct causes of increased spending may be obvious (requirements creep, launch delays, directed changes, etc.), the underlying impetus to spend past the original budget may be more subtle. Gaining better insight into the causes of cost overruns will help NASA and its contracting organizations to avoid .them. This paper hypothesizes that one cause of NASA mission cost overruns is that the availability of reserves gives project team members an incentive to make decisions and behave in ways that increase costs. We theorize that the presence of reserves is a contributing factor to cost overruns because it causes organizations to use their funds less efficiently or to control spending less effectively. We draw a comparison to the insurance industry concept of moral hazard, the phenomenon that the presence of insurance causes insureds to have more frequent and higher insurance losses, and we attempt to apply actuarial techniques to quantifY the increase in the expected cost of a mission due to the availability of reserves. We create a theoretical model of reserve spending motivation by defining a variable ReserveSpending as a function of total reserves. This function has a positive slope; for every dollar of reserves available, there is a positive probability of spending it. Finally, the function should be concave down; the probability of spending each incremental dollar of reserves decreases progressively. We test the model against available NASA CADRe data by examining missions with reserve dollars initially available and testing whether

  12. Disclosure of oil and gas reserve information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emsile, B.H.

    1998-01-01

    The current regulations regarding disclosure of oil and gas reserve information in Canada are described. These regulations have been in place since the early 1980s and have generally worked well, but there are some issues that need to be updated. The Alberta Securities Commission Oil and Gas Securities Task Force was established to review the regulations and the major issues that need to be addressed. The issues under consideration are: (1) reserve definitions and price assumptions, (2) use of deterministic or probabilistic reserve calculation methods, (3) use of audits in reserve reporting, (4) abandonment costs, (5) calculation of barrels of oil equivalents, and (6) the calculation of various performance indicators such as finding and development costs and reserve replacement ratios

  13. The Economics of NASA Mission Cost Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Sally; Shinn, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Increases in NASA mission costs have led to analysis of the causes and magnitude of historical mission overruns as well as mitigation and prevention attempts. This paper hypothesizes that one cause is that the availability of reserves may reduce incentives to control costs. We draw a comparison to the insurance concept of moral hazard, and we use actuarial techniques to better understand the increase in mission costs due to the availability of reserves. NASA's CADRe database provided the data against which we tested our hypothesis and discovered that there is correlation between the amount of available reserves and project overruns, particularly for mission hardware cost increases. We address the question of how to prevent reserves from increasing mission spending without increasing cost risk to projects.

  14. Transforming the Reserve Component: Four Essays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binnendijk, Hans; Baranick, Michael J; Bell, Raymond E., Jr; Cordero, Gina; Duncan, Stephen M; Holshek, Christopher; Wentz, Larry

    2005-01-01

    .... The first essay calls for a fundamental restructuring of the Reserve Component in light of the largest mobilization since the Korean War, which has been fraught with problems in terms of combat...

  15. Phytosociological classification of the Nylsvley nature reserve

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzee, BJ

    1977-12-01

    Full Text Available The vegetation of the Nylsvley Nature Reserve in the Transvaal Mixed Bushveld is classified hierarchically by the Braun-Blanquet method of vegetation survey. The vegetation is seasonal grassland and deciduous savanna with four floristically distinct...

  16. 24 CFR 266.110 - Reserve requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY RISK-SHARING PROGRAM FOR INSURED AFFORDABLE MULTIFAMILY PROJECT LOANS Housing Finance Agency Requirements § 266.110 Reserve requirements. (a) HFAs with top-tier designation or overall...

  17. 49 CFR 392.15 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Driving of Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.15 [Reserved] ...

  18. 49 CFR 392.18 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Driving of Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.18 [Reserved] ...

  19. 45 CFR 400.6 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT, ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Grants to States for Refugee Resettlement The State Plan § 400.6 [Reserved] ...

  20. 49 CFR 192.57 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.57 [Reserved] ...

  1. 49 CFR 192.61 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.61 [Reserved] ...

  2. Uniform Reserve Training and Retirement Category Administration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kohner, D

    1997-01-01

    This Instruction implement policy as provided in DoD Directive 1215.6, assigns responsibilities and prescribes procedures that pertain to the designation and use of uniform Reserve component (RC) categories (RCCs...

  3. U.S. Federal Reserve Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset is comprised of forty-five entities that are part of the United States Federal Reserve System according to the United States Department of Treasury. The...

  4. 48 CFR 9904.405-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.405-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.405-10 [Reserved] ...

  5. 48 CFR 9904.402-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.402-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.402-10 [Reserved] ...

  6. 48 CFR 9904.409-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.409-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.409-10 [Reserved] ...

  7. 48 CFR 9904.408-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.408-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.408-10 [Reserved] ...

  8. 48 CFR 9904.401-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.401-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.401-10 [Reserved] ...

  9. 48 CFR 9904.403-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.403-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.403-10 [Reserved] ...

  10. 48 CFR 9904.406-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.406-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.406-10 [Reserved] ...

  11. 48 CFR 9904.404-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.404-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.404-10 [Reserved] ...

  12. 48 CFR 9904.400 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.400 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.400 [Reserved] ...

  13. 48 CFR 9904.410-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.410-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.410-10 [Reserved] ...

  14. 48 CFR 9904.407-10 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.407-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.407-10 [Reserved] ...

  15. Communicating marine reserve science to diverse audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grorud-Colvert, Kirsten; Lester, Sarah E.; Airamé, Satie; Neeley, Elizabeth; Gaines, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    As human impacts cause ecosystem-wide changes in the oceans, the need to protect and restore marine resources has led to increasing calls for and establishment of marine reserves. Scientific information about marine reserves has multiplied over the last decade, providing useful knowledge about this tool for resource users, managers, policy makers, and the general public. This information must be conveyed to nonscientists in a nontechnical, credible, and neutral format, but most scientists are not trained to communicate in this style or to develop effective strategies for sharing their scientific knowledge. Here, we present a case study from California, in which communicating scientific information during the process to establish marine reserves in the Channel Islands and along the California mainland coast expanded into an international communication effort. We discuss how to develop a strategy for communicating marine reserve science to diverse audiences and highlight the influence that effective science communication can have in discussions about marine management. PMID:20427745

  16. 24 CFR 206.115 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES HOME EQUITY CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums § 206.115 [Reserved] ...

  17. Army Reserve Military Intelligence: Time for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    Miramax Books, 2002. Goleman , Daniel . Emotional Intelligence . New York: Bantam Books, 1997. Goleman , Daniel , Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee...or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. ARMY RESERVE MILITARY INTELLIGENCE : TIME FOR CHANGE...Research Project 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Army Reserve Military Intelligence : Time for Change 5a

  18. Leadership Stability in Army Reserve Component Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Leadership Stability in...standards for research quality and objectivity. Leadership Stability in Army Reserve Component Units Thomas F. Lippiatt, J. Michael Polich NATIONAL SECURITY...RESEARCH DIVISION Leadership Stability in Army Reserve Component Units Thomas F. Lippiatt, J. Michael Polich Prepared for the Office of the

  19. Exploration report in mining reserve XIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoturno Pioppo, J.; Lara Vigil, P.

    1991-01-01

    This report has been referred to the antecedents and works developed in the mining Reservation XIV. This Reservation, covered a 1900 km2 surface, involving the aerial photography Valentines Cerro Chato, Chileno, Rossel y Rius, Sarandi del Yi and Cuchilla del Pescado. It has been reduced this area to western part of the aerial phothograpy Pavas, releasing other areas such as Chileno, Rossel y Rius, Cuchilla del Pescado y Cerro Chato. Finally, gold, sulphures, pirite and carbonates iron oxides findings have been found.

  20. Unanswered Quibbles with Fractional Reserve Free Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Bagus, Philipp; Howden, David

    2011-01-01

    In this article we reply to George Selgin’s counterarguments to our article “Fractional Reserve Free Banking: Some Quibbles”. Selgin regards holding cash as saving while we focus on the real savings necessary to maintain investment projects. Real savings are unconsumed real income. Variations in real savings are not necessarily equal to variations in cash holdings. We show that a coordinated credit expansion in a fractional reserve free banking (FRFB) system is possible and that precautionary...

  1. Required reserves as a credit policy tool

    OpenAIRE

    Mimir, Yasin; Sunel, Enes; Taskin, Temel

    2012-01-01

    This paper conducts a quantitative investigation of the role of reserve requirements as a macroprudential policy tool. We build a monetary DSGE model with a banking sector in which (i) an agency problem between households and banks leads to endogenous capital constraints for banks in obtaining funds from households, (ii) banks are subject to time-varying reserve requirements that countercyclically respond to expected credit growth, (iii) households face cash-in-advance constraints, requiring ...

  2. Status of fossil fuel reserves; Etat des reserves des combustibles fossiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laherrere, J

    2005-07-01

    Reserves represent the sum of past and future productions up to the end of production. In most countries the reserve data of fields are confidential. Therefore, fossil fuel reserves are badly known because the published data are more political than technical and many countries make a confusion between resources and reserves. The cumulated production of fossil fuels represents only between a third and a fifth of the ultimate reserves. The production peak will take place between 2020 and 2050. In the ultimate reserves, which extrapolate the past, the fossil fuels represent three thirds of the overall energy. This document analyses the uncertainties linked with fossil fuel reserves: reliability of published data, modeling of future production, comparison with other energy sources, energy consumption forecasts, reserves/production ratio, exploitation of non-conventional hydrocarbons (tar sands, extra-heavy oils, bituminous shales, coal gas, gas shales, methane in overpressure aquifers, methane hydrates), technology impacts, prices impact, and reserves growth. (J.S.)

  3. Selling the SPR [Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurney, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) in the USA was created in 1975, in conjunction with the wider reserve programme of the International Energy Agency, following the 1973/74 Arab oil embargo. The only source of funding for the SPR has been annual appropriations bills from Congress. In 1994, however, Congress, seeking ways to balance the nation's budget and given the perception by many free market economists that the danger of serious oils supply disruption has passed, refused to allocate funds for SPR oil purchases. No crude oil stocks have been added to the reserve since then. In 1996, congress took the further step of requiring sales of oil from the reserve in order to pay for the programme's running costs and to meet the costs of maintaining the reserve's storage facilities. The reserve oil is stored in caverns under salt domes in the coastal regions of the Gulf of Mexico and some of these are beginning to fracture to the extent that they are having to be decommissioned. The SPR has been investigating ways of raising money in order to lessen its dependence on Congress. These include leasing pipelines and a marine terminal, and allowing the storage of foreign owned oil in underused caverns. (author)

  4. Environmental and developmental origins of ovarian reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M C; Guo, M; Fauser, B C J M; Macklon, N S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Oocyte number is established early in life before a gradual loss of this ovarian reserve during reproductive life until oocyte availability becomes limiting at the menopause. Although there is a large genetic component to the ovarian reserve achieved before birth, other influences including the maternal endocrine and nutritional milieu, and environmental factors may represent important developmental determinants. Environmental and nutritional factors may also modify the downward trajectory of ovarian reserve in adult life. The combination of these early and later life influences has the potential to lead to diminished ovarian reserve, compromising fertility in later reproductive years and altering age at natural menopause. METHODS Literature searches of the ISI Web of Knowledge database were carried out using the main terms 'ovarian reserve' and 'menopause AND age' in conjunction with a range of other terms encompassing a variety of factors with potential effects on ovarian reserve. The various searches were inspected manually and the relevant papers selected for critical analysis and interpretation. RESULTS Evidence was identified supporting the view that elevated prenatal androgens have an adverse effect on the early establishment of ovarian reserve, although the implications for ovarian reserve in the polycystic ovary syndrome (which may also be programmed through prenatal androgen exposure) remain uncertain. Recent evidence is cited suggesting that effects of maternal nutrient restriction on ovarian reserve may also involve changes in prenatal androgen exposure. A general rationale is developed through examination of evidence which emphasizes the roles of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) systems in ovarian reserve modulation. Because of their similarity to the natural ligands, many environmental compounds have the ability to bind to these receptors (albeit at lower affinities) and thereby have the potential to

  5. Contemporary state of plutonium and americium in the soils of Palesse state radiation-ecological reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papenia, M.V.; Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsiannikova, S.V.; Voinikava, E.V.; Svirschevsky, S.F.; Brown, J.; Skipperud, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: At present, the most important alpha-emitting radionuclides of Chernobyl origin are Pu 238, Pu 239, Pu 240 and Am 241. They are classified as the most dangerous group of radionuclides in view of the long half-lives and high radiotoxicity. The main part of alpha-emitted radionuclides is located within the Palesse State Radiation-Ecological Reserve. One of the most important factors determining the radioecological situation in the contaminated ecosystems is the physicochemical forms of radionuclides in a soil medium. Radionuclide species determine the radionuclide entrance into the soil solutions, their redistribution in soil profiles and the 'soil - plant' and the 'soil - surface, ground or underground water' systems as well as spreading beyond the contaminated area. The present work is devoted to investigation of state and migration ability of plutonium and americium in soils of the Palesse state radiation-ecological reserve after more than 20 years from the Chernobyl accident. The objects of investigation were mineral and organic soils sampled in 2008 with the step of 5 cm to the depth of 25-30 cm. The forms of plutonium and americium distinguishing by association with the different components of soil and by potential for migration in the soil medium were studied using the method of sequential selective extraction according to the modified Tessier scheme. Activities of Pu 238, Pu 239, Pu 240 and Am 241 in the samples were determined by the method of radiochemical analysis with alpha-spectrometer radionuclide identification. The dominant part of plutonium and americium in the soils is in immobile forms. Nowadays, radionuclide portions in water soluble and reversibly bound forms do not exceed 9.4 % of radionuclide content in the soil. In mineral soil samples, the radionuclide portions in these fractions exceed the corresponding portions in organic ones. In both mineral and organic soils, the portions of mobile americium are higher than plutonium. The

  6. OPINIONS ON INTERNATIONAL RESERVES MANAGEMENT - POST CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MERCEA (HANDRO PATRICIA AMALIA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent crisis demonstrated once again the importance of maintaining an adequate level of the international reserves as part of the defense of a country against the shocks internationally transmitted. Liquidity buffers aided the good functioning of financial systems, and allowed countries to cope with sudden foreign capital stops or to manage massive outflows without facing a costly crisis. This logic has been strengthened in the context of the crisis from 2008, when countries with lots of reserves, such as China or Brazil, came through better than those with lower liquid assets. Economists have argued that developing countries need reserves mainly to cover urgent imports and short-term debts. The current level of global reserves far exceeds this traditional postulate. In this context, it is necessary to rethink the adequacy of the level of constituting the reserves portfolio. The dominance of the dollar as a reserve currency, another important feature of the current reserves portfolio, makes the holders become vulnerable to the monetary policy of FED. A greater flexibility of the currency will also be needed. The often called the “trilemma” of international economics dictates: when capital is mobile, countries must choose between fixing their currencies and controlling their domestic monetary conditions. They cannot do both. The domestic currency inflexibility will ultimately lead to asset bubbles and inflation. The pressure of capital flows will depend on the prospects of rich economies, especially America’s. The increment of emerging economies availability to allow the exchange rate to move will depend on what China does - and China may remain forever linked to the dollar. The emergence of a global currency that constitute a genuine means of exchange or the use of cross-border multifaceted cash pools common to IMF members would reduce systemic risks. International regulations for countries with persistent trade surpluses could be a

  7. Pricing of reserves. Valuing system reserve capacity against spot prices in electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, Sebastian; Weber, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    This paper models the interdependencies between markets for secondary reserve capacity and spot electricity to derive the pricing of reserves under equilibrium conditions. Starting with the indifference condition between offering in both markets, the reservation price is derived from the opportunity cost consideration and the unit commitment conditions in a fundamental interrelated market framework. The reserve market examined compares widely to the German market for secondary reserves, but the general approach may also be used to investigate other reserve markets. The approach explores and formalizes the influence of reserve capacity on the spot market supply function. A numerical solution procedure is provided to this non-trivial case of market interaction. The model is used to estimate the expected reservation price development over the last years in Germany. (author)

  8. Design and implementation of land reservation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yurong; Gao, Qingqiang

    2009-10-01

    Land reservation is defined as a land management policy for insuring the government to control primary land market. It requires the government to obtain the land first, according to plan, by purchase, confiscation and exchanging, and then exploit and consolidate the land for reservation. Underlying this policy, it is possible for the government to satisfy and manipulate the needs of land for urban development. The author designs and develops "Land Reservation System for Eastern Lake Development District" (LRSELDD), which deals with the realistic land requirement problems in Wuhan Eastern Lake Development Districts. The LRSELDD utilizes modern technologies and solutions of computer science and GIS to process multiple source data related with land. Based on experiments on the system, this paper will first analyze workflow land reservation system and design the system structure based on its principles, then illustrate the approach of organization and management of spatial data, describe the system functions according to the characteristics of land reservation and consolidation finally. The system is running to serve for current work in Eastern Lake Development Districts. It is able to scientifically manage both current and planning land information, as well as the information about land supplying. We use the LRSELDD in our routine work, and with such information, decisions on land confiscation and allocation will be made wisely and scientifically.

  9. Natural gas reserve growth in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woronuk, R. [Canadian Gas Potential Committee, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[GasEnergy Strategies Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    An appreciation study of a natural gas reservoir is a component of assessing its ultimate reserve potential. The Canadian Gas Potential Committee (CGPC) defines appreciation as the change in a reserve estimate from a previously booked pool or basin. Basins cannot appreciate through the addition of new pools. Ultimate potential includes all of the following: cumulative production; remaining discovered reserves; adjustments to remaining discovered reserves; and, full appreciated undiscovered reserves. This presentation outlined the procedures used by the CGPC in its appreciation studies. It also reviewed data supplier issues, regulatory practices, and booking issues. A series of graphs were also included depicting pools discovered in 1993 and the average pool gas in place. Reservoir loss from 1993 to 1998 was attributed to the fact that enhanced recovery technology cannot keep pace with the degradation in pool quality. It was noted that beyond 1998, significant increases in gas prices should increase recovery factors. Special studies by the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board have included the depreciation of unconnected gas pools and the appreciation of sheet sands. The challenge of tracking pool appreciation was discussed with reference to estimating new pool discoveries in established fields. 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  10. Pricing the Ramping Reserve and Capacity Reserve in Real Time Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Hongxing; Li, Zuyi

    2015-01-01

    The increasing penetration of renewable energy in recent years has led to more uncertainties in power systems. In order to maintain system reliability and security, electricity market operators need to keep certain reserves in the Security-Constrained Economic Dispatch (SCED) problems. A new concept, deliverable generation ramping reserve, is proposed in this paper. The prices of generation ramping reserves and generation capacity reserves are derived in the Affine Adjustable Robust Optimizat...

  11. Foreign Exchange Reserves and the Reserve Bank’s Balance Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Vallence

    2012-01-01

    The Reserve Bank of Australia holds and manages the nation’s foreign exchange reserve assets in order to meet its policy objectives. While Australia’s foreign exchange reserves are relatively modest by international standards, they nonetheless constitute a sizeable portion of the Bank’s balance sheet, and variations in the Australian dollar value of these reserves are usually the most volatile component of the Bank’s profit and loss statement. This article discusses some of the key decisions ...

  12. RESTAURANT RESERVATION MANAGEMENT CONSIDERING TABLE COMBINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Miao

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper presents a case study of table reservation practice for restaurant business within Walt Disney World. A unique feature here is to consider table combination to capture revenue potentials from different party sizes and at different time periods. For example, a party of large size can be served by combining two or more small tables. A mixed integer programming (MIP model is developed to make the reservation recommendation. We propose a rolling horizon reservation policy such that the value of a particular table is periodically evaluated and updated. This is a typical revenue management method in the airlines and other industries, the essence of which is to compare the future expected revenue with a currently offered price. Using historical data, numerical test shows a significant revenue improvement potential from our proposed model.

  13. Uranium - raw material reserves for coming generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keutner, H.

    1981-01-01

    Large uranium occurences have been discovered in the South of Mexico. The deposits are situated in the Sierra Mixteca. Reserves of 9.400 tons had been at Mexico's disposal even before these new discoveries. The quantitiy discovered recentyl amounts to 20.000 tons. The uranium reserves available apart from those in centrally controlled economic systems are presently estimated at five million tons. Meanwhile American scientists have found out that all the rivers of the world transport about 16.000 tons of uranium from the continents into the oceans per annum. The energy value of this washed out amount of uranium corresponds to the 25-fold world power demand of today. US scientists have discovered that the oceans can provide uranium for about seven million years of the present world energy demand. While the petroleum reserves decrease worldwide it seems that the exploration of uranium has just been started. (orig.) [de

  14. Wind offering in energy and reserve markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, Tiago; Pinson, Pierre; Morais, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The increasing penetration of wind generation in power systems to fulfil the ambitious European targets will make wind power producers to play an even more important role in the future power system. Wind power producers are being incentivized to participate in reserve markets to increase...... their revenue, since currently wind turbine/farm technologies allow them to provide ancillary services. Thus, wind power producers are to develop offering strategies for participation in both energy and reserve markets, accounting for market rules, while ensuring optimal revenue. We consider a proportional...... offering strategy to optimally decide upon participation in both markets by maximizing expected revenue from day-ahead decisions while accounting for estimated regulation costs for failing to provide the services. An evaluation of considering the same proportional splitting of energy and reserve in both...

  15. Risk spreading, connectivity, and optimal reserve spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowes, Shane A; Connolly, Sean R

    2012-01-01

    Two important processes determining the dynamics of spatially structured populations are dispersal and the spatial covariance of demographic fluctuations. Spatially explicit approaches to conservation, such as reserve networks, must consider the tension between these two processes and reach a balance between distances near enough to maintain connectivity, but far enough to benefit from risk spreading. Here, we model this trade-off. We show how two measures of metapopulation persistence depend on the shape of the dispersal kernel and the shape of the distance decay in demographic covariance, and we consider the implications of this trade-off for reserve spacing. The relative rates of distance decay in dispersal and demographic covariance determine whether the long-run metapopulation growth rate, and quasi-extinction risk, peak for adjacent patches or intermediately spaced patches; two local maxima in metapopulation persistence are also possible. When dispersal itself fluctuates over time, the trade-off changes. Temporal variation in mean distance that propagules are dispersed (i.e., propagule advection) decreases metapopulation persistence and decreases the likelihood that persistence will peak for adjacent patches. Conversely, variation in diffusion (the extent of random spread around mean dispersal) increases metapopulation persistence overall and causes it to peak at shorter inter-patch distances. Thus, failure to consider temporal variation in dispersal processes increases the risk that reserve spacings will fail to meet the objective of ensuring metapopulation persistence. This study identifies two phenomena that receive relatively little attention in empirical work on reserve spacing, but that can qualitatively change the effectiveness of reserve spacing strategies: (1) the functional form of the distance decay in covariance among patch-specific demographic rates and (2) temporal variation in the shape of the dispersal kernel. The sensitivity of metapopulation

  16. Transformation of Taiwan’s Reserve Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    benefited tremen- dously from their deep knowledge across the range of issues associated with reserve force reforms generally, and reserve force...Penghu Wude Joint Counter Amphibious Exercise [澎湖五德聯信聯合反登陸操演],” 2013. 18 For details on Taiwan’s short-range air defense capabilities, see Kuo Wen ...opinion/national-service-for-the-21st-century Kuo Wen -liang, National Defense Education: Defense Science and Technology [全民國防教育國防科技], Taipei: NWCD

  17. Optimal drawdown patterns for strategic petroleum reserves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuenne, R E; Blankenship, J W; McCoy, P F

    1979-01-01

    An optimization model is described for determining optimal drawdown trajectories for strategic petroleum reserves during an embargo. Development of the model includes the derivation of a GNP response function which relates GNP (used as a measure of social welfare) and crude oil supply reductions. Two alternative forms of this function are used with the model. Simple algorithms are presented which give rapid solutions for the model. The pattern is one of saving some of the reserve to protect against a possible second embargo occurring beforee refill, and of allocating the remainder during the first embargo subperiod so as to equalize monthly marginal benefits. 6 references.

  18. Estimating Quartz Reserves Using Compositional Kriging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Taboada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine spatial distribution and volume of four commercial quartz grades, namely, silicon metal, ferrosilicon, aggregate, and kaolin (depending on content in impurities in a quartz seam. The chemical and mineralogical composition of the reserves in the seam were determined from samples collected from outcrops, blasting operations, and exploratory drilling, and compositional kriging was used to calculate the volume and distribution of the reserves. A more accurate knowledge of the deposit ensures better mine planning, leading to higher profitability and an improved relationship with the environment.

  19. 40 CFR 80.605 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 80.605 Section 80.605 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA...

  20. 40 CFR 80.609 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 80.609 Section 80.609 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA...