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Sample records for radiocarbon 14c observations

  1. Rarotonga Radiocarbon (delta 14C) for 1950 to 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rarotonga coral radiocarbon (14C) timeseries. Coral radiocarbon (Delta-14C) on untreated, low-speed drilled samples. Precision is +/- 4 per mil as documented by an...

  2. Metabolic kinetics and biological effects of radiocarbon (14C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilenko, I.Ya.; Osipov, V.A.; Lyaginskaya, A.M.; Bugryshev, P.F.; Istomina, A.G.; Turova, V.I.; Dement'ev, S.I.; Zhorova, E.S.; Mart'yanov, B.M.; Shal'nova, G.A.; Kuz'mina, T.D.; Shebenko, V.A.; Pomerantseva, M.D.; Ramajya, L.K.

    1988-01-01

    Radiocarbon 14 C is one of the most widespread radionuclides. Increased concentration of anthropogenic 14 C in the biosphere is a problem of considerable hygienic and ecological significance. The paper presents the results of comprehensive studies for years on biokinetics of the main 14 C compounds, inorganic (Na H 14 CO 3 , Na 2 14 CO 3 , K 2 14 CO 3 , Ca 14 CO 3 ) as well as organic ( 14 C-glucose, 14 C-succinic acid, 14 C-glucosamine, 14 C-glycine, 14 C-tryptophane, 14 C-valine, 14 C-palmitic acid, 14 C-stearic acid, 14 C-ethyl alcohol, 14 C-methyl alcohol, 14 C-urea), of 14 C as food constituent and of elementary radiocarbon. The 14 C toxicity is investigated for both acute and chronic small doses received by animals. The nuclide's genetic efficiency is assessed. Based on research evidence, the accumulation multiple and equilibrium time are estimated for long-term 14 C intake by humans. The data may be used for setting genetic standards and estimating an anthropogenic increase of 14 C concentration in the environment. The hazard of anthropogenic radiocarbon is assessed with allowance for further development of nuclear power industry. (author)

  3. Radiocarbon C-14 dating - MINT experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamisah Alias

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of a radiocarbon date is a complex process which involved all the stages from advice given prior to submission of samples right through to reporting of results. The aim of our radiocarbon dating is to determine the residual 14 C content of a sample, the value of which is translated into an age that is an estimate of the time elapsed since the given sample was removed from the environment in which it had formed in equilibrium with respect to 14-C radioactive decay and metabolic assimilation. Carbon is obtained from carbon containing samples in the form of carbon dioxide, which is then reacted with lithium forming lithium carbide. The carbide is then hydrolysed to acetylene before it was polymerised to benzene using a high-efficiency vanadium-alumina-silica catalyst to produce benzene with up to 96% yield. Sample, background and modem standard activities are measured with a coincidence scintillation counter using in glass vials of 21 ml capacity. An improved chemical procedure was used to obtain and purify the benzene from the samples for measurement using a liquid scintillation counter. Radiocarbon dating measurements of samples collected reveal some results. The validity of the data have yet to be confirmed by the results of the measurements on two international control samples. (Author)

  4. Urvina Bay, Galapagos Coral Radiocarbon (delta 14C) Data for 1956 to 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Urvina Bay coral radiocarbon (14C) timeseries. (90 deg W, 0.5 deg S) Coral radiocarbon (Delta-14C) on untreated, low-speed drilled samples. Precision is +/- 4 per...

  5. Improved precision radiocarbon measurements and natural 14C variations around 10.000 cal BP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goslar, T.

    1990-01-01

    The subject of present work, natural radiocarbon variations in the past, is one of the most significant methodological questions of radiocarbon chronology. In the first three chapters, the author discusses problems connected with calibration of conventional radiocarbon dates, and consequences of monitoring the 14 C variations for the research of the changes of geomagnetic field, solar activity and global carbon cycle. Dendrochronological dating, which, in connection with 14 C measurements enables us to reconstruct the radiocarbon variations in the past, is also widely described. Fourth chapter concerns the technical problems of detection 14 C β-activity, especially accounting for proportional counters technique. In the next chapter the author describes results of his own dendrochonological research. Sixth chapter comprises frame discussion of the system for improved precision radiocarbon dating, together with short presentation of equipment, its calibration and analysis of errors. The last chapter gives the reconstruction of the pattern of atmospheric 14 C variations in 300-year period around 10.000 cal BP. It was found that in the last 10.000 years similar pattern repeats periodically. In the end, the author discusses the meaning of negative correlation between 14 C variations and changes of annual tree-ring widths in the oak trunk from Lublinek, for searching the connection between solar activity and climate. (author)

  6. From 14C/12C measurements towards radiocarbon dating of ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Roijen, J.J. van; Raynaud, D.; Borg, K. van der; Jong, A.F.M. de; Lipenkov, V.; Huybrechts, P.

    1994-01-01

    A dry extraction method of CO2 included in glacier ice adds a contamination equivalent to 1.8 μg modern carbon for a 35 μg C sample. This enables radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry of 35 μg C samples to about 25 000 BP. Measured 14C/12C ratios are presented for a part of the Vostok

  7. Contemporary 14C radiocarbon levels of oxygenated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (O-PBDEs) isolated in sponge-cyanobacteria associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guitart, Carlos; Slattery, Marc; Ankisetty, Sridevi; Radwan, Mohamed; Ross, Samir J.; Letcher, Robert J.; Reddy, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → O-PBDEs in the marine environment could have both natural and anthropogenic origin. → Molecular-level 14 C is measured by accelerated mass spectrometry. → Industrial products, derived from fossil sources, are radiocarbon 14 C-free. → O-PBDEs compounds from marine sponges show modern levels of 14 C. → Some species could produce O-PBDEs rather than being biotransformation from industrial PBDEs. - Abstract: Considerable debate surrounds the sources of oxygenated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (O-PBDEs) in wildlife as to whether they are naturally produced or result from anthropogenic industrial activities. Natural radiocarbon ( 14 C) abundance has proven to be a powerful tool to address this problem as recently biosynthesized compounds contain contemporary (i.e. modern) amounts of atmospheric radiocarbon; whereas industrial chemicals, mostly produced from fossil fuels, contain no detectable 14 C. However, few compounds isolated from organisms have been analyzed for their radiocarbon content. To provide a baseline, we analyzed the 14 C content of four O-PBDEs. These compounds, 6-OH-BDE47, 2'-OH-BDE68, 2',6-diOH-BDE159, and a recently identified compound, 2'-MeO-6-OH-BDE120, were isolated from the tropical marine sponges Dysidea granulosa and Lendenfeldia dendyi. The modern radiocarbon content of their chemical structures (i.e. diphenyl ethers, C 12 H 22 O) indicates that they are naturally produced. This adds to a growing baseline on, at least, the sources of these unusual compounds.

  8. Physical Research Laboratory radiocarbon 14C dates : CS-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, D.P.; Krishnamurthy, R.V.; Kusumgar, Sheela; Pant, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    The 14 C dates of archaeological samples measured at the Radiocarbon Laboratory of the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad are presented. Samples were converted into methane and measured in gas proportional counters. Ninety-five percent activity of NBS oxalic acid was used as modern standard. The dates in years B.P. are given for each sample based on the half-life values of 5568 +- 30 years and 5730 +- 40 years, the latter within parenthesis. The dates are not calibrated for 14 C/ 12 C variations. To convert the dates into AD/BC scale, 1950 AD should be used as reference year. A number of 14 C dates (PRL-81, -83, -67, -68) now confirm that the Painted Grey Ware culture extended upto the 3rd century BC. Some of the dates from Barkhera (PRL-113), Bateshwar (PRL-200), Bhimbetka (PRL-17) and Koldihawa (PRL-100, 101) are older than normally expected, probably indicative of some hitherto unknown basal cultures in these regions. 14 C dates on in situ Megalithic materials do not seem to go beyond 200 BC. (author)

  9. Contemporary 14C radiocarbon levels of oxygenated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (O-PBDEs) isolated in sponge–cyanobacteria associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, Carlos; Slattery, Marc; Ankisetty, Sridevi; Radwan, Mohamed; Ross, Samir J.; Letcher, Robert J.; Reddy, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable debate surrounds the sources of oxygenated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (O-PBDEs) in wildlife as to whether they are naturally produced or result from anthropogenic industrial activities. Natural radiocarbon (14C) abundance has proven to be a powerful tool to address this problem as recently biosynthesized compounds contain contemporary (i.e. modern) amounts of atmospheric radiocarbon; whereas industrial chemicals, mostly produced from fossil fuels, contain no detectable 14C. However, few compounds isolated from organisms have been analyzed for their radiocarbon content. To provide a baseline, we analyzed the 14C content of four O-PBDEs. These compounds, 6-OH-BDE47, 2′-OHBDE68, 2′,6-diOH-BDE159, and a recently identified compound, 2′-MeO-6-OH-BDE120, were isolated from the tropical marine sponges Dysidea granulosa and Lendenfeldia dendyi. The modern radiocarbon content of their chemical structures (i.e. diphenyl ethers, C12H22O) indicates that they are naturally produced. This adds to a growing baseline on, at least, the sources of these unusual compounds. PMID:21276990

  10. Towards constraining the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon: strategies of stratospheric 14CO2 measurements using AirCore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huilin; Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro; Miller, John; Kivi, Rigel; Krol, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) plays an important role in the carbon cycle studies to understand both natural and anthropogenic carbon fluxes, but also in atmospheric chemistry to constrain hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in the atmosphere. Apart from the enormous 14C emissions from nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s and 1960s, radiocarbon is primarily produced in the stratosphere due to the cosmogenic production. To this end, better understanding the stratospheric radiocarbon source is very useful to advance the use of radiocarbon for these applications. However, stratospheric 14C observations have been very limited so that there are large uncertainties on the magnitude and the location of the 14C production as well as the transport of radiocarbon from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Recently we have successfully made stratospheric 14C measurements using AirCore samples from Sodankylä, Northern Finland. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which passively collects atmospheric air samples into a long piece of coiled stainless steel tubing during the descent of a balloon flight. Due to the relatively low cost of the consumables, there is a potential to make such AirCore profiling in other parts of the world on a regular basis. In this study, we simulate the 14C in the atmosphere and assess the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon using the TM5 model. The Sodankylä radiocarbon measurements will be used to verify the performance of the model at high latitude. Besides this, we will also evaluate the influence of different cosmogenic 14C production scenarios and the uncertainties in the OH field on the seasonal cycles of radiocarbon and on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and based on the results design a strategy to set up a 14C measurement program using AirCore.

  11. Reassessment of the C-13/C-12 and C-14/C-12 isotopic fractionation ratio and its impact on high-precision radiocarbon dating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahrni, Simon M.; Southon, John R.; Santos, Guaciara M.; Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of radiocarbon measurement results (C-14/C-12 isotopic ratios or sample activities) are corrected for isotopic fractionation processes (measured as C-13/C-12 isotopic ratios) that occur in nature, in sample preparation and measurement. In 1954 Harmon Craig suggested a value of 2.0

  12. Effect of anthropogenic activities on atmospheric 14C content and radiocarbon chronologies of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdas, Irka

    2017-04-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) is a naturally produced radioactive isotope of carbon (T1/2=5700 yrs), which is continuously produced in the atmosphere. This occur in a reaction of thermal neutrons, which are secondary particles, products of cosmic rays reactions with the atmosphere, with nitrogen that is commonly present in the atmosphere. Until the mid 19th century the natural concentration showed temporal variability around the mean value (14C / 12C ratio =1.8 x 10-12). However anthropogenic activity created 2 types effects that are changing the 14C concentration of the atmosphere. Industrial revolution triggered adding 14C free (old) carbon that originates from the burning of fossil fuels (Suess effect). This in the late 19th century and early 20th century atmosphere was becoming older. The nuclear tests in the 1950ties caused additional production of radiocarbon atoms (artificial). The effect has been almost double of the natural production and created an excess 14C activity in the atmosphere and in terrestrial carbon bearing materials. The bomb produced 14C has been identified soon after the tests started but the peak (ca. 100% above the normal levels) reached its maximum in 1963 in the northern Hemisphere where most of the tests took place. In the southern Hemisphere the bomb peak reached lower values (ca. 80 % of normal level) and was delayed by ca. 2 years. After the ban on nuclear tests the atmospheric 14C content began to decrease mainly due to the uptake by the ocean but also due to the above mentioned addition old carbon. Continuous monitoring of the atmospheric 14C ratio during the years that followed the nuclear tests, provide basis for environmental studies. Applications range from studies of ocean circulation, CO2 uptake, carbon storage in soils and peat, root turn over time to the medical, forensic and detection of forgeries. However, the so called ' 14C bomb peak' nearly disappeared due to the combined effect of ocean uptake of CO2 and an input to the

  13. A new graphite preparation line for AMS 14C dating in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcar Bronić, I.; Horvatinčić, N.; Sironić, A.; Obelić, B.; Barešić, J.; Felja, I.

    2010-04-01

    The new line for preparation of graphite samples for 14C dating by AMS has been constructed in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory. The performance of the rig and sample preparation procedure has been validated by preparing graphites from various reference materials of known 14C activity. The yield of the graphitization was good and the measured fraction of modern carbon ( Fm) values have not significantly deviated from the expected ones. Detailed analysis of measured Fm values indicates a slight bias to more positive values and should be carefully investigated.

  14. On the radiocarbon record in banded corals: exchange parameters and net transport of 14CO2 between atmosphere and surface ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druffel, E.M.; Suess, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    We have made radiocarbon measurements of banded hermatypic corals from Florida, Belize, and the Galapagos Islands. Interpretation is presented here of these previously reported results. These measurements represent the 14 C/ 12 C ratios in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIOC) in the surface ocean waters of the Gulf Stream and the Peru Current at the time of coral ring formation. A depletion in radiocarbon concentration was observed incoral rings that grew from A.D. 1900--1952. It was caused by dilution of existing 14 C levels with dead CO 2 from fossil fuel burning (the Suess effect, or S/sub e/). A similar trend was observed in the distribution of bomb-produced 14 C in corals that had grown during the years following A.D. 1952. The concentration of bomb-produced radiocarbon was much higher in corals from temperate regions (Florida, Belize, Hawaiian Islands) than in corals from tropical regions (Galapagos Islands and Canton Island). The apparent radiocarbon ages of the surface waters in temperate and tropical oceans during the preanthropogenic period range from about 280 to 520 years B.P. (-40 to -69%). At all investigated locations, it is likely that waters at subsurface depths have the same apparent radiocarbon age of about 670 years B.P. From the change of oceanic δ 14 C in the surface during post-bomb times, the approximate annual rate of net input of 14 CO 2 to the ocean waters is calculated to be about 8% of the prevailing 14 C difference between atmosphere and ocean. From this input and from preanthropogenic δ 14 C values found at each location, it can be seen that vertical mixing of water in the Peru Current is about 3 times greater than that in the Gulf Stream

  15. 14C Records from Indonesian Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baresic, J.; Fallon, S.; Mazerat, J.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate ocean currents and past climate events affecting the Indonesian throughflow (ITF), a radiocarbon record from a Porites coral collected from Alor Island, Indonesia, was constructed. Porites corals are often used in paleoclimate research and water mass circulation studies in the Tropics because of their abundance in the region and growth rate of 8 - 20 mm/y. These characteristics allow reconstructions of past environmental changes on weekly to annual time scales. At this point radiocarbon coral results from Alor cover approximately 30 years. An age model was constructed using the sea surface temperature proxy δ18O. Alor radiocarbon results were compared with previous measurements obtained from Padang and Langkai corals. a14C values obtained from the Alor coral display a strong seasonal cycle, high values during Australian summer and low values during Australian winter. Higher a 14C summer values indicate inflow of waters enriched by 14C through Makassar Strait from the North Pacific Ocean and Java Sea surface water. Summer a14C values are also enhanced by summer stratification. Winter values indicate upwelling of deep Ocean waters within the research area and transport of 14C-depleted waters from the Banda Sea, which has input from the South Pacific Ocean (lower a14C than North Pacific). Therefore, the a14C coral record reflects the movement of enriched water from North Pacific to Indian Ocean through Makassar Strait during summer and upwelling of depleted surface waters from the Banda Sea during the winter. Lower a14C dips could be attributed to strong El Nino events, which would enhance surface water mixing and upwelling of low radiocarbon deep waters. Water transport from North Pacific Ocean decreases during El Nino events also contributing to lowering of a14C signal.(author)

  16. Local variance of atmospheric 14C concentrations around Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant from 2010 to 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Biying; Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) has been measured in single tree ring samples collected from the southwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. Our data indicate south-westwards dispersion of radiocarbon and the highest 14C activity observed so far in the local environment during the 2011 accident....... The abnormally high 14C activity in the late wood of 2011 ring may imply an unknown source of radiocarbon nearby after the accident. The influence of 14C shrank from 30 km during normal reactor operation to 14 km for the accident in the northwest of FDNPP, but remains unclear in the southwest....

  17. Microgram level radiocarbon (14C) determination on carbonaceous particles in ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenk, Theo Manuel; Szidat, S.; Schwikowski, M.

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry; Organic carbon; Elemental carbon; Radiocarbon dating; Ice cores; Paleo-record Udgivelsesdato: June......Accelerator mass spectrometry; Organic carbon; Elemental carbon; Radiocarbon dating; Ice cores; Paleo-record Udgivelsesdato: June...

  18. Radiocarbon and stable isotopes in Palmyra corals during the past century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druffel-Rodriguez, Kevin C.; Vetter, Desiree; Griffin, Sheila; Druffel, Ellen R. M.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Mucciarone, David A.; Ziolkowski, Lori A.; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert

    2012-04-01

    Annual samples from two Palmyra Atoll corals (Porites lutea) that lived during the past 110 years were analyzed for radiocarbon14C) and δ18O. The Δ14C values decreased 7.6‰ from 1896 to 1953, similar to other coral records from the tropical and subtropical Pacific. Δ14C values rose from ˜-60‰ to ˜+110‰ by 1980 due to the input of bomb radiocarbon from the atmosphere. Elevated Δ14C values were observed for the mid- to late-1950s, suggesting early input of bomb radiocarbon, possibly from the largest Marshall Islands bomb tests in 1954. Secondary aragonite precipitation was identified in a portion of one core using scanning electron microscopy and X-radiography, and was responsible for high δ18O and δ13C values and a correlation between them. The Δ14C results were more resistant to alteration, except when contamination was from the bomb era (>1956).

  19. The ~ 2400-year cycle in atmospheric radiocarbon concentration: bispectrum of 14C data over the last 8000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Vasiliev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out power spectrum, time-spectrum and bispectrum analyses of the long-term series of the radiocarbon concentrations deduced from measurements of the radiocarbon content in tree rings for the last 8000 years. Classical harmonic analysis of this time series shows a number of periods: 2400, 940, 710, 570, 500, 420, 360, 230, 210 and 190 years. A principle feature of the time series is the long period of ~ 2400 years, which is well known. The lines with periods of 710, 420 and 210 years are found to be the primary secular components of power spectrum. The complicated structure of the observed power spectrum is the result of ~ 2400-year modulation of primary secular components. The modulation induces the appearance of two side lines for every primary one, namely lines with periods of 940 and 570 years, of 500 and 360 years, and 230 and 190 years. The bispectral analysis shows that the parameters of carbon exchange system varied with the ~ 2400-year period during the last 8000 years. Variations of these parameters appear to be a climate effect on the rate of transfer of 14C between the atmosphere and the the ocean.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology; ocean-atmosphere interaction; paleoclimatology

  20. Radiocarbon dating and 13 C/12 C ratio of soils under tropical and subtropical climates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia, Edwin P.E.

    1993-01-01

    It was used an association radiocarbon dates with the carbon isotopic composition of soil organic matter, where 14 C dating gives elements of chronology, and δ 13 C is used as indicator of the vegetation types in the environment. The total soil organic matter was dried, floated and sieved. The humin fraction was extracted from the 0,250 mm fraction. Radiocarbon datings were performed by a liquid scintillation method. The carbon of the soil organic matter and humin fraction are transformed into benzene, that was analyzed in low level liquid scintillation spectrometer. Based on results of carbon isotope analysis and Radiocarbon dating of soil samples of Londrina, Piracicaba and Altamira, it is concluded that probable changes of vegetation and climate occurred in the South and Southeast regions of Brazil in the mid-Holocene. (author). 81 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  1. Radiocarbon calibration curves indicate location dependent differences in the C-14 content of wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormac, F.G.; Baillie, M.G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The C-14 chronologies currently used as calibration curves combine results from wood that grew in the western United States, the British Isles and Germany. Recent corrections to the published measurements indicate that data from these long chronologies are no longer entirely consistent, implying either the existence of interlaboratory biases, or C-14 variations in the wood from different species and/or regions. It has long been accepted that wood from the Southern Hemisphere gives radiocarbon dates that are approximately 40 years older than contemporaneous Northern Hemisphere wood. The reasons suggested for the difference are typically that the larger expanse of ocean and the slightly higher average wind speeds result in enhanced CO 2 exchange with the mixed layer of the ocean. measurements presented in a companion paper (Hogg et al) explore the difference between the hemispheres, by re-measurement of a section of the Northern Hemisphere calibration dataset and wood from New Zealand. Only by making careful replicated comparisons of the C-14 content of wood from different regions, over long time scales, can we verify the presence or absence of temporal variations. In this paper we will discuss the Northern Hemisphere calibration dataset and show the importance of experimental design in determining if small, temporally varying offsets exist between regional tree-ring chronologies

  2. Solar flares and radiocarbon abundance in the atmosphere of the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metskhvarishvili, R.Ya.; Imedadze, T.Sh.; Tleugaliev, S.Kh.; Tsinamdzgvrishvili, T.Sh.; Tsereteli, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    The correlation between the radiocarbon ( 14 C) content in the atmosphere of the Earth and the solar activity is studied. Annual measurements of the 14 C content in the tree rings for the last 120 years have been made. Relations of the radiocarbon content in dendrochronologically dated tree rings and the Wolf numbers for the period from 1850 to 1940 are presented. The spectroscopic and Borg methods have been used to ascertain the periodicities in the radiocarbon series. It is shown that well-defined periods of approximately 11 and approximately 65 years are observed in the radiocarbon series. The former is associated with an 11-year and the latter with a secular cycle of the 14 C content in the earth atmosphere. To study the relation of the solar activity to the level of radiocarbon in the earth atmosphere a mutual correlation function was calculated for various values of the time lags of 14 C with respect to the processes on the Sun. It follows from the data obtained that a positive correlation takes place for time lags smaller than three years. The detected positive correlation has revealed that the effect of solar flares in the 11-year cycle is prevalent

  3. Si-Traceable Scale for Measurements of Radiocarbon Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Joseph T.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Liu, Qingnan; Long, David A.

    2017-06-01

    Radiocarbon (^{14}C) dating of organic materials is based on measuring the ^{14}C/^{12}C atomic fraction relative to the nascent value that existed when the material was formed by photosynthetic conversion of carbon dioxide present in the atmosphere. This field of measurement has numerous applications including source apportionment of anthropogenic and biogenic fuels and combustion emissions, carbon cycle dynamics, archaeology, and forensics. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the most widely used method for radiocarbon detection because it can measure extremely small amounts of radiocarbon (background of nominally 1.2 parts-per-trillion) with high relative precision (0.4 %). AMS measurements of radiocarbon are typically calibrated by reference to standard oxalic-acid (C_2H_2O_4) samples of known radiocativity that are derived from plant matter. Specifically, the internationally accepted absolute dating reference for so-called "modern-equivalent" radiocarbon is 95 % of the specific radioactivity in AD 1950 of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) oxalic acid standard reference material and normalized to δ^{13}C_{VPDB} = 19 per mil. With this definition, a "modern-equivalent" corresponds to 1.176(70) parts-per-trillion of ^{14}C relative to total carbon content. As an alternative radiocarbon scale, we propose an SI-traceable method to determine ^{14}C absolute concentration which is based on linear Beer-Lambert-law absorption measurements of selected ^{14}C^{16}O_2 ν_3-band line areas. This approach is attractive because line intensities of chosen radiocarbon dioxide transitions can be determined by ab initio calculations with relative uncertainties below 0.5 %. This assumption is justified by the excellent agreement between theoretical values of line intensities and measurements for stable isotopologues of CO_2. In the case of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) measurements of ^{14}C^{16}O_2 peak areas, we show that absolute, SI-traceable concentrations of

  4. Predicted net efflux of radiocarbon from the ocean and increase in atmospheric radiocarbon content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rau, Greg H.; Duffy, Philip B.

    Prior to changes introduced by man, production of radiocarbon (14C) in the stratosphere nearly balanced the flux of 14C from the atmosphere to the ocean and land biosphere, which in turn nearly balanced radioactive decay in these 14C reservoirs. This balance has been altered by land-use changes, fossil-fuel burning, and atmospheric nuclear detonations. Here, we use a model of the global carbon cycle to quantify these radiocarbon fluxes and make predictions about their magnitude in the future. Atmospheric nuclear detonations increased atmospheric 14C content by about 80% by the mid-1960's. Since that time, the 14C content of the atmosphere has been diminishing as this bomb radiocarbon has been entering the oceans and terrestrial biosphere. However, we predict that atmospheric 14C content will reach a minimum and start to increase within the next few years if fossil-fuel burning continues according to a “business-as-usual” scenario, even though fossil fuels are devoid of 14C. This will happen because fossil-fuel carbon diminishes the net flux of 14C from the atmosphere to the oceans and land biosphere, forcing 14C to accumulate in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the net flux of both bomb and natural 14C into the ocean are predicted to continue to slow and then, in the middle of the next century, to reverse, so that there will be a net flux of 14C from the ocean to the atmosphere. The predicted reversal of net 14C fluxes into the ocean is a further example of human impacts on the global carbon cycle.

  5. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, Heather D

    2015-08-04

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon ((14)C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio (14)C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ(14)CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ(14)CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all (14)C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ(14)CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ(14)CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas "business-as-usual" emissions will reduce Δ(14)CO2 to -250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial "aging" of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old.

  6. Contribution of diet to δ15N, δ13C, and Δ14C values in the Pacific rat (Rattus exulans)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavan, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis is the outcome of a research project undertaken to determine how diet can affect the reliability of rat bone (especially that of Rattus exulans) for accurate radiocarbon analysis. It addresses questions about the reliability of R. exulans bone for radiocarbon dating with respect to the survival of bone in archaeological and natural burial sites, laboratory processing methods, and the extent to which diet influences radiocarbon ages of bone. I have shown that R. exulans bone can return reliable radiocarbon dates, based on bone survival and the efficacy of chemical treatment to remove burial contamination. In three dietary investigations, stable isotope (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) and radiocarbon ( 14 C) analyses of modern populations and archaeological specimens also indicated that Rattus exulans and other omnivorous species can have radiocarbon values influenced by a diet linked to 14 C - depleted reservoirs. Moreover, depleted carbon reservoir effects are localised and variable in their magnitude. Work on modern populations also provided an improved means of isotopic analysis in an ecological study, where bomb-generated radiocarbon14 C) signatures in the natural environment were used as for other 'tracer' studies, in conjunction with stable isotopes (δ 13 C and δ 15 N). Results indicated that the changing atmospheric 14 C signal fixed into the biota in a given year by photosynthesis is transferred from plants through trophic levels to end-members, including rats. The additional isotopic 'clue' about diet given by radiocarbon analysis offered a better understanding of the variation in diets of R. exulans in different habitats. Variation in the isotopic signal among individuals supported other observations that diets of scavenging rats are opportunistic and associated with faunal availability in different habitats. To better understand diet-induced radiocarbon variations, I also examined the carbon contribution to bone protein from essential amino acids

  7. Investigating bomb radiocarbon transport in the southern Pacific Ocean with otolith radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, G. L.; Fallon, S. J.; Izzo, C.; Wood, R.; Gillanders, B. M.

    2015-08-01

    To explore the transport of carbon into water masses from the surface ocean to depths of ∼ 1000 m in the southwest Pacific Ocean, we generated time series of radiocarbon14C) from fish otoliths. Otoliths (carbonate earstones) from long-lived fish provide an indirect method to examine the "bomb pulse" of radiocarbon that originated in the 1950s and 1960s, allowing identification of changes to distributions of 14C that has entered and mixed within the ocean. We micro-sampled ocean perch (Helicolenus barathri) otoliths, collected at ∼ 400- 500 m in the Tasman Sea, to obtain measurements of Δ14C for those depths. We compared our ocean perch Δ14C series to published otolith-based marine surface water Δ14C values (Australasian snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) and nannygai (Centroberyx affinis)) and to published deep-water values (800-1000 m; orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus)) from the southwest Pacific to establish a mid-water Δ14C series. The otolith bomb 14C results from these different depths were consistent with previous water mass results in the upper 1500 m of the southwest Pacific Ocean (e.g. World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Geochemical Ocean Sections Study). A comparison between the initial Δ14C bomb pulse rise at 400-500 m suggested a ventilation lag of 5 to 10 yr, whereas a comparison of the surface and depths of 800-1000 m detailed a 10 to 20 yr lag in the time history of radiocarbon invasion at this depth. Pre-bomb reservoir ages derived from otolith 14C located in Tasman Sea thermocline waters were ∼ 530 yr, while reservoir ages estimated for Tasman Antarctic intermediate water were ∼ 730 yr.

  8. Cosmic ray event in 994 C.E. recorded in radiocarbon from Danish oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogtmann-Schulz, A.; Østbø, S. M.; Nielsen, S. G. B.; Olsen, J.; Karoff, C.; Knudsen, M. F.

    2017-08-01

    We present measurements of radiocarbon in annual tree rings from the time period 980-1006 Common Era (C.E.), hereby covering the cosmic ray event in 994 C.E. The new radiocarbon record from Danish oak is based on both earlywood and latewood fractions of the tree rings, which makes it possible to study seasonal variations in 14C production. The measurements show a rapid increase of ˜10‰ from 993 to 994 C.E. in latewood, followed by a modest decline and relatively high values over the ensuing ˜10 years. This rapid increase occurs from 994 to 995 C.E. in earlywood, suggesting that the cosmic ray event most likely occurred during the period between April and June 994 C.E. Our new record from Danish oak shows strong agreement with existing Δ14C records from Japan, thus supporting the hypothesis that the 994 C.E. cosmic ray event was uniform throughout the Northern Hemisphere and therefore can be used as an astrochronological tie point to anchor floating chronologies of ancient history.

  9. Radiocarbon dating of lake sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Pocevičius, Matas

    2016-01-01

    Matas Pocevičius, Radiocarbon dating of lake sediments, bachelor thesis, Vilnius University, Faculty of Physics, Department of General Physics and Spectroscopy, physics, Vilnius, 45 p., 2016. The aim of this study is to evaluate the possibility of radiocarbon dating application for Tapeliai lake bottom sediments. The literature review discusses topics related to accelerator mass spectrometry, principles of radiocarbon formation, importance of nuclear fallout for 14C, possible applications of ...

  10. Studies on bound residues of 14C-malathion in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Azam, F.; Malik, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The extractability and formation of bound 14 C-labelled residues in clay loam soil under laboratory conditions were investigated with malathion. 14 C-malathion rapidly decomposed to 14 CO 2 . Twelve days after treatment 56% of the applied dose was lost as 14 CO 2 . Methanol gave the highest extraction efficiency; 6% of the applied radiocarbon was extractable while bound residues amounted to 38%. The soil containing 14 C-labelled residues was fractionated into humic acid, fulvic acid and humin fractions. These fractions contained 7.83%, 16.81% and 19.36%, respectively of applied radiocarbon. (author)

  11. Radiocarbon evidence for a smaller oceanic carbon dioxide sink than previously believed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesshaimer, Vago; Heimann, Martin; Levin, Ingeborg

    1994-07-01

    RADIOCARBON produced naturally in the upper atmosphere or arti-ficially during nuclear weapons testing is the main tracer used to validate models of oceanic carbon cycling, in particular the exchange of carbon dioxide with the atmosphere1-3 and the mixing parameters within the ocean itself4-7. Here we test the overall consistency of exchange fluxes between all relevant compartments in a simple model of the global carbon cycle, using measurements of the long-term tropospheric CO2 concentration8 and radiocarbon composition9-12, the bomb 14C inventory in the stratosphere13,14 and a compilation of bomb detonation dates and strengths15. We find that to balance the budget, we must invoke an extra source to account for 25% of the generally accepted uptake of bomb 14C by the oceans3. The strength of this source decreases from 1970 onwards, with a characteristic timescale similar to that of the ocean uptake. Significant radiocarbon transport from the remote high stratosphere and significantly reduced uptake of bomb 14C by the biosphere can both be ruled out by observational constraints. We therefore conclude that the global oceanic bomb 14C inventory should be revised downwards. A smaller oceanic bomb 14C inventory also implies a smaller oceanic radiocarbon penetration depth16, which in turn implies that the oceans take up 25% less anthropogenic CO2 than had previously been believed.

  12. Drivers of soil organic matter vulnerability to climate change, Part II: RothC modelling of carbon dynamics including radiocarbon data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Abiven, Samuel; González Domínguez, Beatriz R.; Hagedorn, Frank; Reisser, Moritz; Walthert, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Stephan; Niklaus, Pascal A.

    2016-04-01

    It is still largely unknown what drives the vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to climate change, i.e. the likelihood of a soil to loose its SOC along with the change in environmental conditions. Our objective is to assess the SOC vulnerability of Swiss forest soils and identify its potential drivers: climate (temperature, soil moisture), soil (clay content, pH) and landscape (slope, aspect) properties. Fifty-four sites were selected for balanced spatial and driver magnitudes distribution. We measured the SOC characteristics (content and radiocarbon) and studied the C decomposition by laboratory soil incubations (details in Part I, abstract by B. González Domínguez). In order to assess the current SOC pool distribution and its radiocarbon signatures, we extended the Rothamsted Carbon (RothC) model with radiocarbon (14C) isotope modelling (RothCiso). The RothC model distinguishes four active SOC pools, decomposable and resistant plant material, microbial biomass and humified organic matter, and an inert SOC pool (Jenkinson 1990). The active pools are decomposed and mineralized to CO2 by first order kinetics. The RothCiso assigns all pools a 14C signature, based on the atmospheric 14C concentrations of the past century (plant C inputs) and their turnover. Currently we constrain the model with 14C signatures measured on the 54 fresh and their corresponding archived bulk soil samples, taken 12-24 years before. We were able to reproduce the measured radiocarbon concentrations of the SOC with the RothCiso and first results indicate, that the assumption of an inert SOC pool, that is radiocarbon dead, is not appropriate. In a second step we will compare the SOC mean residence time assessed by the two methodological approaches - incubation (C efflux based) and modelling (C stock based) - and relate it to the environmental drivers mentioned above. With the combination of the two methodological approaches and 14C analysis we hope to gain more insights into

  13. THEODORE, a two-step heating system for the EC/OC determination of radiocarbon (14C) in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szidat, S.; Jenk, T.M.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Synal, H.-A.; Hajdas, I.; Bonani, G.; Saurer, M.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of 14 C in the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) fractions, respectively, of fine aerosol particles bear the potential to apportion anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources. For this purpose, the system THEODORE (two-step heating system for the EC/OC determination of radiocarbon in the environment) was developed. In this device, OC and EC are transformed into carbon dioxide in a stream of oxygen at 340 and 650 deg. C, respectively, and reduced to filamentous carbon. This is the target material for subsequent accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14 C measurements, which were performed on sub-milligram carbon samples at the PSI/ETH compact 500 kV AMS system. Quality assurance measurements of SRM 1649a, Urban Dust, yielded a fraction of modern f M in total carbon (TC) of 0.522 ± 0.018 (n=5, 95% confidence level) in agreement with reported values. The results for OC and EC are 0.70 ± 0.05 (n=3) and 0.066 ± 0.020 (n=4), respectively

  14. Forensic applications of {sup 14}C at CIRCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzaioli, F., E-mail: fabio.marzaioli@unina2.it [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli and INNOVA, Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Fiumano, V., E-mail: vittoriofiumano85@libero.it [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli and INNOVA, Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Capano, M., E-mail: manuela.capano@unina2.it [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Studio delle Componenti Culturali del Territorio, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli and INNOVA, Piazza S. Francesco, 81055 Santa Maria Capua Vetere, Caserta (Italy); Passariello, I., E-mail: isabella.passariello@unina2.it [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli and INNOVA, Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Cesare, N.De., E-mail: nicola.decesare@unina2.it [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli and INNOVA, Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Terrasi, F., E-mail: filippo.terrasi@unina2.it [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli and INNOVA, Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The decreasing trend of the radiocarbon pulse produced during the atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons (bomb-carbon) coupled with high sensitivity accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements, drastically increased the precision of radiocarbon age determinations since the second part of the sixties, allowing the application of radiocarbon AMS to a wide range of studies previously not directly involving conventional radiocarbon dating (i.e. food authenticity, forensic, biochemistry). In the framework of authenticity evaluation of artworks, high precision radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) AMS measurements ({Delta}R/R < 0.3%) reduce the conventional uncertainty of the dating to few decades, allowing precise age estimation of materials containing carbon (C). The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) during its activity on AMS {sup 14}C dating achieved high precision measurements opening the opportunity to these kinds of applications. This paper presents the main results obtained from radiocarbon measurements on a set of bone samples analyzed for the determination of the post-mortem interval in the framework of an unsolved case investigated by the Rome prosecutor office. The chronological characterization of the wooden support of the 'Acerenza portrait' is also presented with the aim to evaluate its age and to further investigate the possibility to attribute this artwork to Leonardo da Vinci. Bomb-{sup 14}C dating on the lipid and collagen fractions of bones allows the evaluation of the year of the death of the individuals by means of ad hoc calibration data sheet with the typical few years precision and difference between collagen apparent age and the year of death appeared in agreement with the age of one individual estimated by dating of tooth collagen. Conventional radiocarbon dating on both wood and wood extracted cellulose leads to an estimation of the portrait wood board age (2{sigma}) of 1459-1524 AD (57% relative

  15. Investigating the Impact of Past and Future CO2 Emissions on the Distribution of Radiocarbon in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatiwala, S.; Payne, S.; Graven, H. D.; Heimbach, P.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean is a significant sink for carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning, absorbing roughly a third of human CO2 emitted over the industrial period. This has implications not only for climate but also for the chemical and isotopic composition of the ocean. Human activities have increased the ocean radiocarbon content through nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s-60s, which released a large amount of radiocarbon (14C) into the atmosphere, but fossil fuel emissions are decreasing the radiocarbon content through the release of 14C-depleted CO2. Here, we use the ECCO-v4 ocean state estimate to examine the changing nature of the air-sea flux of radiocarbon and its spatial distribution in the ocean in response to past and future CO2 emissions, the latter taken from the the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) database used in IPCC simulations. In line with previous studies we find that the large air-sea gradient of 14C induced by nuclear bomb testing led to rapid accumulation of radiocarbon in the surface ocean. Surface fluxes of 14C have considerably weakened over the past several decades and in some areas 14C is being returned to the atmosphere. As fossil fuel emissions continue to reduce the atmospheric 14C/C ratio (Δ14C), in most RCP scenarios the total ocean 14C inventory starts decreasing by 2030. With strong emissions, the Δ14C of surface waters is driven to increasingly negative values and in RCP 8.5 by 2100 much of the surface ocean has apparent radiocarbon ages in excess of 2000 years, with subtropical gyres more depleted in 14C than the Southern Ocean. Surface waters become significantly more negative in Δ14C than underlying waters. As a result, turning conventional tracer oceanography on its head, recently ventilated waters are characterized by more negative Δ14C values. Similar patterns can be expected for CFCs in the ocean as atmospheric concentrations decrease over the next several decades. Our results have a number of implications, notably for

  16. Accumulation of Sellafield-derived radiocarbon ((14)C) in Irish Sea and West of Scotland intertidal shells and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Kieran M; Muir, Graham K P; Cook, Gordon T; MacKinnon, Gillian; Howe, John A; Heymans, Johanna J; Xu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry produces radioactive waste at various stages of the fuel cycle. In the United Kingdom, spent fuel is reprocessed at the Sellafield facility in Cumbria on the North West coast of England. Waste generated at the site comprises a wide range of radionuclides including radiocarbon ((14)C) which is disposed of in various forms including highly soluble inorganic carbon within the low level liquid radioactive effluent, via pipelines into the Irish Sea. This (14)C is rapidly incorporated into the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) reservoir and marine calcifying organisms, e.g. molluscs, readily utilise DIC for shell formation. This study investigated a number of sites located in Irish Sea and West of Scotland intertidal zones. Results indicate (14)C enrichment above ambient background levels in shell material at least as far as Port Appin, 265 km north of Sellafield. Of the commonly found species (blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and common periwinkle (Littorina littorea)), mussels were found to be the most highly enriched in (14)C due to the surface environment they inhabit and their feeding behaviour. Whole mussel shell activities appear to have been decreasing in response to reduced discharge activities since the early 2000s but in contrast, there is evidence of continuing enrichment of the carbonate sediment component due to in-situ shell erosion, as well as indications of particle transport of fine (14)C-enriched material close to Sellafield. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiocarbon application in environmental science and archaeology in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajcar Bronic, I., E-mail: krajcar@irb.h [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Obelic, B.; Horvatincic, N.; Baresic, J.; Sironic, A. [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Minichreiter, K. [Institute of Archaeology, Ulica grada Vukovara 68, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-07-21

    Radiocarbon is a cosmogenic radioisotope equally distributed throughout the troposphere and biosphere. This fact enables its most common application-radiocarbon dating. Natural equilibrium of radiocarbon has been disturbed by diverse anthropogenic activities during the last {approx}150 years, enabling also the use of {sup 14}C in various environmental applications. Here we present three types of studies by using {sup 14}C that were performed in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory. {sup 14}C in atmospheric CO{sub 2} has been monitored at several sites with various anthropogenic influences and the difference between the clean-air sites, the industrial city and the vicinity of a nuclear power plant has been established. {sup 14}C has been applied in geochronology of karst areas, especially in dating of tufa, speleothems and lake sediments, as well as in studies of geochemical carbon cycle. {sup 14}C has been used in various archaeological studies, among which the dating of the early Neolithic settlements in Croatia is presented. In these studies {sup 14}C was measured by radiometric techniques, i.e., by gas proportional counting and more recently by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Two sample preparation techniques for LSC measurement were used: benzene synthesis for archaeological dating and other applications that require better precision, and direct absorption of CO{sub 2} for monitoring purposes. The presented results show that various studies by using {sup 14}C can be successfully performed by the LSC technique, providing a large enough sample (>1 g of carbon).

  18. Borderline radiocarbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plicht, J.

    Radiocarbon dating of peat has its intrinsic problems. This is often caused by mobile organic fractions. For the Weichselian Pleniglacial, another methodological problem arises: the limit of the C-14 dating method. This is discussed in terms of bulk (i.e. non-selected material, generally dated

  19. Radiocarbon 14C differentiation of sparkling and carbonated wines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.E.; Krueger, H.W.; Burggraff, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Specific 14 C-activities, percent of modern 14 C-activity, and calculated percent of fermentation CO 2 are presented for CO 2 contained in commercial sparkling wines, labeled as champagne or produced by the bulk (charmat) process. These data are given for the production years 1976-1982. The survey encompassed effervescent wines produced in Spain, Italy, West Germany, California, and New York. Addition of synthetic CO 2 to approximately 40 samples represented as sparkling wines was indicated by low 14 C-activities of CO 2 in these wines. Data for 14 C-activity were also presented for the ethanol distilled from sparkling wines for the years 1977-1980. In all cases, the 14 C-activity of ethanol was appropriate to the year of vintage

  20. Optical Measurement of Radiocarbon below Unity Fraction Modern by Linear Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Adam J; Long, David A; Liu, Qingnan; Gameson, Lyn; Hodges, Joseph T

    2017-09-21

    High-precision measurements of radiocarbon ( 14 C) near or below a fraction modern 14 C of 1 (F 14 C ≤ 1) are challenging and costly. An accurate, ultrasensitive linear absorption approach to detecting 14 C would provide a simple and robust benchtop alternative to off-site accelerator mass spectrometry facilities. Here we report the quantitative measurement of 14 C in gas-phase samples of CO 2 with F 14 C radiocarbon measurement science including the study of biofuels and bioplastics, illicitly traded specimens, bomb dating, and atmospheric transport.

  1. Sources and transport of Δ14C in CO2 within the Mexico City Basin and vicinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. B. Singh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon samples taken over Mexico City and the surrounding region during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 exhibited an unexpected distribution: (1 relatively few samples (23% were below the North American free tropospheric background value (57±2‰ despite the fossil fuel emissions from one of the world's most highly polluted environments; and (2 frequent enrichment well above the background value was observed. Correlate source tracer species and air transport characteristics were examined to elucidate influences on the radiocarbon distribution. Our analysis suggests that a combination of radiocarbon sources biased the "regional radiocarbon background" above the North American value thereby decreasing the apparent fossil fuel signature. Likely sources include the release of 14C-enhanced carbon from bomb 14C sequestered in plant carbon pools via the ubiquitous biomass burning in the region as well as the direct release of radiocarbon as CO2 from other "hot" sources. Plausible perturbations from local point "hot" sources include the burning of hazardous waste in cement kilns; medical waste incineration; and emissions from the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. These observations provide insight into the use of Δ14CO2 to constrain fossil fuel emissions in the megacity environment, indicating that underestimation of the fossil fuel contribution to the CO2 flux is likely wherever biomass burning coexists with urban emissions and is unaccounted for as a source of the elevated CO2 observed above local background. Our findings increase the complexity required to quantify fossil fuel-derived CO2 in source-rich environments characteristic of megacities, and have implications for the use of Δ14CO2 observations in evaluating bottom-up emission inventories and their reliability as a tool for validating national emission claims of CO2 within the framework of the Kyoto Protocol.

  2. The degradation of [14C] parathion in two Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, M.M. de; Lord, K.A.; Bromilow, R.H.; Ruegg, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    Loss of [ 14 C] parathion from two Brazilian soils was studied by measuring the parathion which could be extracted by a mixture of hexane and propanol and the 14 CO 2 evolved. Recovery of unchanged parathion decreased faster in the soil richer in organic matter (soil 1) from which more radiocarbon was evolved as CO 2 than from the soil poorerin organic matter (soil 2). Evolution of CO 2 from soil 1 decreased rapidly when the soil dried out but little effect of moisture content was observed in soil 2. Radiocarbon remaining in the soils was assayed by combustion after 234 days and the total recovered in soil 1 was 95.6% and, in soil 2,78.7%, sufficient to give almost complete recovery from both soils. (Author) [pt

  3. Constraint on radiocarbon age correction in Lake Biwa environment from the middle to late Holocene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Y., E-mail: miyata@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); National Museum of Japanese History, Sakura 285-8502 (Japan); Minami, M. [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Onbe, S. [National Museum of Japanese History, Sakura 285-8502 (Japan); Archaeological Heritage Management Office, Tokushima University, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Sakamoto, M. [National Museum of Japanese History, Sakura 285-8502 (Japan); Nakamura, T. [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Imamura, M. [National Museum of Japanese History, Sakura 285-8502 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Using data from previous studies and newly collected data, we compared the measured radiocarbon ages of molluscan shells, common reed (Phragmites australis) and pine needles (Pinus thunbergii) collected in 1966, 1970, 1990 and 2008 at Lake Biwa in Japan, and of archaeological samples, to examine radiocarbon reservoir effects at Lake Biwa. We also tested for differences in the radiocarbon reservoir effect between species and locations in the lake. The effects of nuclear bomb tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s are clear, the offset between atmospheric {sup 14}C and the Lake Biwa freshwater {sup 14}C is larger for this period because the atmospheric {sup 14}C is so high. The semiclosed Lake Biwa system is in dynamic equilibrium with the atmosphere, resulting in the {sup 14}C content of the water following the changes in atmospheric {sup 14}C caused by nuclear testing. The shells collected after 1990 had radiocarbon ages that were 330-450 {sup 14}C years older than those of the coeval atmosphere. The apparent differences in radiocarbon age (about 300 {sup 14}C years) between shell fossils and wood samples excavated from the same layer of the submerged Awazu shell midden at Lake Biwa suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir effect also existed in the middle Holocene (the Middle Jomon period, about 5000 years ago). Because the present-day average residence time of Lake Biwa water is 3-6 years, its direct influence on the radiocarbon reservoir effect is small, which suggests that old carbon has been supplied into Lake Biwa.

  4. Exploring global carbon turnover and radiocarbon cycling in terrestrial biosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Warren, H.

    2017-12-01

    The uptake of carbon into terrestrial ecosystems through net primary productivity (NPP) and the turnover of that carbon through various pathways are the fundamental drivers of changing carbon stocks on land, in addition to human-induced and natural disturbances. Terrestrial biosphere models use different formulations for carbon uptake and release, resulting in a range of values in NPP of 40-70 PgC/yr and biomass turnover times of about 25-40 years for the preindustrial period in current-generation models from CMIP5. Biases in carbon uptake and turnover impact simulated carbon uptake and storage in the historical period and later in the century under changing climate and CO2 concentration, however evaluating global-scale NPP and carbon turnover is challenging. Scaling up of plot-scale measurements involves uncertainty due to the large heterogeneity across ecosystems and biomass types, some of which are not well-observed. We are developing the modelling of radiocarbon in terrestrial biosphere models, with a particular focus on decadal 14C dynamics after the nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s-60s, including the impact of carbon flux trends and variability on 14C cycling. We use an estimate of the total inventory of excess 14C in the biosphere constructed by Naegler and Levin (2009) using a 14C budget approach incorporating estimates of total 14C produced by the weapons tests and atmospheric and oceanic 14C observations. By simulating radiocarbon in simple biosphere box models using carbon fluxes from the CMIP5 models, we find that carbon turnover is too rapid in many of the simple models - the models appear to take up too much 14C and release it too quickly. Therefore many CMIP5 models may also simulate carbon turnover that is too rapid. A caveat is that the simple box models we use may not adequately represent carbon dynamics in the full-scale models. Explicit simulation of radiocarbon in terrestrial biosphere models would allow more robust evaluation of biosphere

  5. Very little in situ produced radiocarbon retained in accumulating Antarctic ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, W.J.M. van der; Alderliesten, C.; Borg, K. van der; Holmlund, P.; Jong, A.F.M. de; Karlöf, L.; Lamers, R.A.N.; Oerlemans, J.; Thomassen, M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de

    2000-01-01

    Ice samples from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, were analyzed for 14CO2 and 14CO by accelerator mass spectrometry. Only a small amount (~2%) of in situ produced radiocarbon was detected. The calibrated radiocarbon ages, corrected for in situ produced 14C, are in fair agreement with age estimates

  6. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  7. Formation and bio release of bound residues of [14 C]-lindane and [14 C]-parathion in two Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, M.M. de.

    1992-01-01

    This work studied the extractable and bound residues formation of 14 C-lindane and 14 C-parathion immediately after application and after 3 months of interaction of the pesticides with the soils. Metabolism, bio release, and the possible bioavailability of bound residues were studied by employing bio meter flasks which allowed a relative comparison of the behaviour of the two different 14 C-pesticides, by a balance of the applied or present radiocarbon in the soils after the bio tests. (author)

  8. Accumulation of Sellafield-derived radiocarbon ("1"4C) in Irish Sea and West of Scotland intertidal shells and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, Kieran M.; Muir, Graham K.P.; Cook, Gordon T.; MacKinnon, Gillian; Howe, John A.; Heymans, Johanna J.; Xu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry produces radioactive waste at various stages of the fuel cycle. In the United Kingdom, spent fuel is reprocessed at the Sellafield facility in Cumbria on the North West coast of England. Waste generated at the site comprises a wide range of radionuclides including radiocarbon ("1"4C) which is disposed of in various forms including highly soluble inorganic carbon within the low level liquid radioactive effluent, via pipelines into the Irish Sea. This "1"4C is rapidly incorporated into the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) reservoir and marine calcifying organisms, e.g. molluscs, readily utilise DIC for shell formation. This study investigated a number of sites located in Irish Sea and West of Scotland intertidal zones. Results indicate "1"4C enrichment above ambient background levels in shell material at least as far as Port Appin, 265 km north of Sellafield. Of the commonly found species (blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and common periwinkle (Littorina littorea)), mussels were found to be the most highly enriched in "1"4C due to the surface environment they inhabit and their feeding behaviour. Whole mussel shell activities appear to have been decreasing in response to reduced discharge activities since the early 2000s but in contrast, there is evidence of continuing enrichment of the carbonate sediment component due to in-situ shell erosion, as well as indications of particle transport of fine "1"4C-enriched material close to Sellafield. - Highlights: • We measure "1"4C activity in shells and sediment at sites on the UK west coast. • Mussel shell activity varies in response to average "1"4C discharges from Sellafield. • Shell activities reflect species feeding habits and ecological niche. • NE Irish Sea inorganic sediment activity will gradually increase. • Increases in sediment activity will occur at remote sites on the Scottish west coast.

  9. Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis - Analytical challenges and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenhauer, G.; Rethemeyer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decades, techniques have become available that allow measurement of isotopic compositions of individual organic compounds (compound-specific isotope measurements). Most often the carbon isotopic composition of these compounds is studied, including stable carbon (δ13C) and radiocarbon14C) measurements. While compound-specific stable carbon isotope measurements are fairly simple, and well-established techniques are widely available, radiocarbon analysis of specific organic compounds is a more challenging method. Analytical challenges include difficulty obtaining adequate quantities of sample, tedious and complicated laboratory separations, the lack of authentic standards for measuring realistic processing blanks, and large uncertainties in values of Δ14C at small sample sizes. The challenges associated with sample preparation for compound-specific Δ14C measurements will be discussed in this contribution. Several years of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis have revealed that in most natural samples, purified organic compounds consist of heterogeneous mixtures of the same compound. These mixtures could derive from multiple sources, each having a different initial reservoir age but mixed in the same terminal reservoir, from a single source but mixed after deposition, or from a prokaryotic organism using variable carbon sources including mobilization of ancient carbon. These processes not only represent challenges to the interpretation of compound-specific radiocarbon data, but provide unique tools for the understanding of biogeochemical and sedimentological processes influencing the preserved organic geochemical records in marine sediments. We will discuss some examples where compound-specific radiocarbon analysis has provided new insights for the understanding of carbon source utilization and carbon cycling.

  10. Bomb pulse radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.; Zoppi, U.; Hotchkis, M.A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Modern forensic science has to deal not only with homicides and other traditional crimes but also with more global threats such as the smuggling of nuclear materials, clandestine production of weapons of mass destruction, stockpiling of illicit drugs by state controlled groups and war crimes. Forensic applications have always benefited from the use of advanced analytical tools that can characterize materials found at crime scenes. In this paper we will discuss the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) as an ultrasensitive tool for the crime laboratories of the third millennium. An important objective in forensic science is to order past events chronologically by analysing materials associated with criminal actions. Radiocarbon dating is known to the general public for its application to historical and prehistorical investigations. Examples of forensic significance include the assassination of the Inca Atahualpa by Francisco Pizarro in the early 1530s, the possible murder of the Tyrolean Ice Man (Oetzi) 5300 years ago and the analysis of the burial cloths allegedly associated with the crucifixion of Jesus Christ . Recent murders, including those associated with war crimes in the Balkans during the 1990s, can be studied using 14 C bomb pulse dating. This method has other forensic applications, including investigation of frauds related to food and wine counterfeiting, dating of opium crops and dating of substances used in biological warfare. AMS extends the applicability of the radiocarbon method, allowing the analysis of 14 C in submilligram organic samples. Specific molecular compounds extracted from bones, hair, skin and other carbon bearing substances of forensic significance can now be dated, enhancing the sensitivity and reliability of chronological determinations. AMS can also be used to analyse rare actinide isotopes released into the environment during the clandestine production of nuclear weapons or associated with the smuggling of nuclear materials. In

  11. Rate of radiocarbon retention onto calcite by isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempinen, Janne; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2016-11-01

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) is a top priority class radionuclide associated with the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Dissolved inorganic radiocarbon can be retained in bedrock via isotope exchange with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) at solubility equilibrium with groundwater. In the present study, the rate of the isotope exchange process was investigated on synthetic calcite using batch experiments. Experiments were performed in solutions with a calcium concentration of 0.0002-0.1 M, including two synthetic reference groundwaters. The radiocarbon activity in the solutions decreased exponentially as a function of time, thus following first-order kinetics. The rate of isotope exchange was quantified from an exponential fit to the activity data over time. The rate of radiocarbon retention increased as a function of the calcium activity. The isotope exchange half-life was only 4.3 days at calcium ion activities over 0.01. This half-life is very much shorter than the half-life of {sup 14}C or the time scale of groundwater movements; consequently calcite can effectively retain radiocarbon from brackish and saline groundwaters.

  12. Rate of radiocarbon retention onto calcite by isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lempinen, Janne; Lehto, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Radiocarbon ( 14 C) is a top priority class radionuclide associated with the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Dissolved inorganic radiocarbon can be retained in bedrock via isotope exchange with calcite (CaCO 3 ) at solubility equilibrium with groundwater. In the present study, the rate of the isotope exchange process was investigated on synthetic calcite using batch experiments. Experiments were performed in solutions with a calcium concentration of 0.0002-0.1 M, including two synthetic reference groundwaters. The radiocarbon activity in the solutions decreased exponentially as a function of time, thus following first-order kinetics. The rate of isotope exchange was quantified from an exponential fit to the activity data over time. The rate of radiocarbon retention increased as a function of the calcium activity. The isotope exchange half-life was only 4.3 days at calcium ion activities over 0.01. This half-life is very much shorter than the half-life of 14 C or the time scale of groundwater movements; consequently calcite can effectively retain radiocarbon from brackish and saline groundwaters.

  13. Fate of [14C]xanthotoxin (8-methoxypsoralen) in a goat and in bovine ruminal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivie, G.W.; Beier, R.C.; Bull, D.L.; Oertli, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    A lactating Nubian goat was treated with [ 14 C]xanthotoxin, a photosensitizing psoralen that occurs naturally in some phototoxic range plants, as a single oral dose equivalent to 10.0 mg of xanthotoxin/kg of body weight. The radiochemical was rapidly absorbed, metabolized, and excreted. Although expired air was not monitored for the presence of volatile radiocarbon, the data indicated that greater than 50% of the administered [ 14 C]xanthotoxin was metabolized by cleavage of the O-[ 14 C]methyl moiety, with subsequent loss of the label as, presumably, [ 14 C]CO 2 . Studies with bovine ruminal fluid in vitro indicated that cleavage of the O-methyl moiety of xanthotoxin could occur rapidly in the rumen. In the goat, nonmetabolized xanthotoxin was not excreted in urine, and of several metabolites in urine extracts, 3 were identified as resulting from opening of the furan or lactone ring. Only about 2% of the dose was recovered in the feces, and this consisted mainly of unmetabolized xanthotoxin. Although appreciable amounts of radiocarbon were secreted into milk, this radiocarbon was not in the form of xanthotoxin or any identifiable metabolites. The radiocarbon in milk likely resulted from the biosynthetic incorporation of [ 14 C]CO 2 into normal milk components

  14. Abundance of 14C in biomass fractions of wastes and solid recovered fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellner, Johann; Rechberger, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    In recent years thermal utilization of mixed wastes and solid recovered fuels has become of increasing importance in European waste management. Since wastes or solid recovered fuels are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, only part of the CO 2 emissions is accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories or emission trading schemes. A promising approach for determining this fraction is the so-called radiocarbon method. It is based on different ratios of the carbon isotopes 14 C and 12 C in fossil and biogenic fuels. Fossil fuels have zero radiocarbon, whereas biogenic materials are enriched in 14 C and reflect the 14 CO 2 abundance of the ambient atmosphere. Due to nuclear weapons tests in the past century, the radiocarbon content in the atmosphere has not been constant, which has resulted in a varying 14 C content of biogenic matter, depending on the period of growth. In the present paper 14 C contents of different biogenic waste fractions (e.g., kitchen waste, paper, wood), as well as mixtures of different wastes (household, bulky waste, and commercial waste), and solid recovered fuels are determined. The calculated 14 C content of the materials investigated ranges between 98 and 135 pMC

  15. Radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazos R, L.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the radiocarbon dating in archaeology has not served only to solve problems related with the establishment of chronologies, but also in the development of archaeological methods of excavation and interpretation. This has been possible because the dating method by radiocarbon provides a common temporary scale that transcends the cultural and regional frontiers. It is even spoken of the revolution that has meant the fact that the application of this method has allowed to the archaeologist to pass from the construction of chronologies until the evaluation and dynamic interpretation of the archaeological data to build theories. This work explains and compares methods for the detection of 14 C, as the gas counting, the liquid scintillation counting and the mass spectrometry with accelerators. (Author)

  16. Santorini eruption radiocarbon dated to 1627-1600 B.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Walter L; Kromer, Bernd; Friedrich, Michael; Heinemeier, Jan; Pfeiffer, Tom; Talamo, Sahra

    2006-04-28

    Precise and direct dating of the Minoan eruption of Santorini (Thera) in Greece, a global Bronze Age time marker, has been made possible by the unique find of an olive tree, buried alive in life position by the tephra (pumice and ashes) on Santorini. We applied so-called radiocarbon wiggle-matching to a carbon-14 sequence of tree-ring segments to constrain the eruption date to the range 1627-1600 B.C. with 95.4% probability. Our result is in the range of previous, less precise, and less direct results of several scientific dating methods, but it is a century earlier than the date derived from traditional Egyptian chronologies.

  17. Ancient dissolved methane in inland waters at low concentrations revealed by a new collection method for radiocarbon (^{14}C) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Joshua F.; Billett, Michael F.; Murray, Callum; Garnett, Mark H.

    2017-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is a powerful greenhouse gas and is released to the atmosphere from freshwater systems in numerous biomes globally. Radiocarbon (14C) analysis of methane can provide unique information about its age, source and rate of cycling in natural environments. Methane is often released from aquatic sediments in bubbles (ebullition), but dissolved methane is also present in lakes and streams at lower concentrations, and may not be of the same age or source. Obtaining sufficient non-ebullitive aquatic methane for 14C analysis remains a major technical challenge. Previous studies have shown that freshwater methane, in both dissolved and ebullitive form, can be significantly older than other forms of aquatic carbon (C), and it is therefore important to characterise this part of the terrestrial C balance. We present a novel method to capture sufficient amounts of dissolved methane from freshwater environments for 14C analysis by circulating water across a hydrophobic, gas-permeable membrane and collecting the methane in a large collapsible vessel. The results of laboratory and field tests show that reliable dissolved δ13CH4 and 14CH4 samples can be readily collected over short time periods (˜4 to 24 hours), at relatively low cost and from a variety of surface water types. The initial results further support previous findings that dissolved methane can be significantly older than other forms of aquatic C, especially in organic-rich catchments, and is currently unaccounted for in many terrestrial C balances and models. This method is suitable for use in remote locations, and could potentially be used to detect the leakage of unique 14CH4 signatures from point sources into waterways, e.g. coal seam gas and landfill gas.

  18. Handlist of radiocarbon laboratories. Appendix III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, T.; Harkness, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    A list is given of radiocarbon laboratories known to be active, and open to archaeologists, at least in some circumstances. It is not claimed to have produced an exhaustive list, which can be found in the journal Radiocarbon. The present list gives (a) some indication to would-be users, of the ability of willingness of laboratories to undertake archaeological dating; (b) a statement from each laboratory concerning the special services it may offer; (c) the likely time taken to obtain a C-14 date; and (d) a scale of charges. (U.K.)

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C dating of lime mortars: Methodological aspects and field study applications at CIRCE (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Passariello, Isabella; Capano, Manuela; Ricci, Paola; Lubritto, Carmine; De Cesare, Nicola; Eramo, Giacomo; Quirós Castillo, Juan Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) has, recently, obtained some promising results in testing the feasibility of mortar radiocarbon dating by means of an ad hoc developed purification procedure (CryoSoniC: Cryobraking, Sonication, Centrifugation) applied to a series of laboratory mortars. Observed results encouraged CryoSoniC accuracy evaluation on genuine mortars sampled from archeological sites of known or independently constrained age (i.e., other 14C dates on different materials). In this study, some 14C measurements performed on genuine mortars will be discussed and compared with independently estimated (i.e., radiocarbon/archaeometrical dating) absolute chronologies of two Spanish sites. Observed results confirm the agreement of the CryoSoniC mortar dates with the archaeological expectations for both examined cases. Several authors reported the possibility of obtaining accurate radiocarbon dates of mortar matrices by analyzing lime lumps: binder-related particles of different sizes exclusively composed of calcium carbonate. In this paper, preliminary data for the absolute chronology reconstruction of the Basilica of the cemetery complex of Ponte della Lama (Canosa di Puglia, Italy) based on lime lumps will also be discussed. Dating accuracy will be quantified by comparing 14C data on mortar lime lumps from a funerary inscription of known age found near the Basilica, in the same study site. For this site, a comparison between absolute chronologies performed by bulk and CryoSoniC purified lime lumps, and charcoal incased in mortars (when found) will also be discussed. Observed results for this site provide evidence of how bulk lime lump dating may introduce systematic overestimations of the analyzed sample while CryoSoniC purification allows accurate dating.

  20. Radiocarbon (14C) Constraints On The Fraction Of Refractory Dissolved Organic Carbon In Primary Marine Aerosol From The Northwest Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupre, S. R.; Kieber, D. J.; Keene, W. C.; Long, M. S.; Frossard, A. A.; Kinsey, J. D.; Duplessis, P.; Chang, R.; Maben, J. R.; Lu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Bisgrove, J.

    2017-12-01

    Nearly all organic carbon in seawater is dissolved (DOC), with more than 95% considered refractory based on modeled average lifetimes ( 16,000 years) and characteristically old bulk radiocarbon (14C) ages (4000 - 6000 years) that exceed the timescales of overturning circulation. Although this refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC) is present throughout the oceans as a major reservoir of the global carbon cycle, its sources and sinks are poorly constrained. Recently, RDOC was proposed to be removed from the oceans through adsorption onto the surfaces of rising bubble plumes produced by breaking waves, ejection into the atmosphere via bubble bursting as a component of primary marine aerosol (PMA), and subsequent oxidation in the atmosphere. To test this mechanism, we used natural abundance 14C (5730 ± 40 yr half-life) to trace the fraction of RDOC in PMA produced in a high capacity generator at two biologically-productive and two oligotrophic hydrographic stations in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean during a research cruise aboard the R/V Endeavor (Sep - Oct 2016). The 14C signatures of PMA separately generated day and night from near-surface (5 m) and deep (2500 m) seawater were compared with corresponding 14C signatures in seawater of near-surface dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, a proxy for recently produced organic matter), bulk deep DOC (a proxy for RDOC), and near-surface bulk DOC. Results constrain the selectivity of PMA formation from RDOC in natural mixtures of recently produced and refractory DOC. The implications of these results for PMA formation and RDOC biogeochemistry will be discussed.

  1. Radiocarbon dating for contributors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, H.S.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the radiocarbon facility at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences, and is written for potential contributors, current users, and for those who advise others. The report briefly outlines the principles and practices of C-14 dating; with emphasis on factors that enable contributors to judge whether C-14 work is appropriate, and to assist them with the procedures to be followed in order to get the best results. Age determinations, being the main requirements by contributors, have been discussed in detail

  2. Atmospheric radiocarbon variations 11,000 years ago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajdas, I.; Bonani, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland); Peteet, D. [LDEO of Columbia Univ. (United States); Boden, P. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1997-09-01

    Records of climate changes were {sup 14}C dated using AMS method. High resolution dating allowed reconstruction of the atmospheric {sup 14}C variations at the time of deglaciation. An abrupt rise of up to 100%o in the atmospheric {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio was found at 11`000 BP (radiocarbon age) which coincides with the limit of an abrupt cooling and a decrease in ocean ventilation. (author) 1 fig., 6 refs.

  3. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity 14 C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate 14 C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect 14 C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible

  4. Fish age validation study with bomb-produced radiocarbon (14C) conducted on yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera) and northern rockfish (Sebastes polyspinis) by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fisheries Monitoring and Analysis division from 1987-01-01 to 2004-01-01 (NCEI Accession 0134853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish age validation with bomb-produced radiocarbon (14C) requires a known-age Delta14C reference chronology spanning the era of a marine increase in bomb-produced...

  5. Radiocarbon-dating of earthenware of the Earliest Jomon period from Obihiro city, in Hokkaido prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigated radiocarbon dating of earthenware of the Earliest Jomon period from Obihiro City, in Hokkaido Prefecture. The authors investigated radiocarbon age differences among charred woods and charred residues on the surface of potteries. Results of radiocarbon dates of URAHORO-type pottery adhesions showed ca. 7560-7987 14 C BP, and that of charcoals were ca. 7180 14 C BP and 7285 14 C BP. The age of charred residues on the inside surface of potteries show 300-800 yrs older than the 14 C age of the charred woods, which corresponded to the actual age of the archaeological site, respectively. It becomes a cause to have cooked the salmon by earthenware and I think that the marine reservoir effect occurred. (author)

  6. Radiocarbon method in environmental monitoring of CO{sub 2} emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z., E-mail: arakowski@leibniz.uni-kiel.de [Leibniz Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University of Kiel, Max Eyth Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Radiocarbon Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Boleslawa Krzywoustego 2, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Nadeau, Marie-Josee [Leibniz Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University of Kiel, Max Eyth Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Nakamura, Toshio [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa-ku, 64-8602 Nagoya (Japan); Pazdur, Anna; Pawelczyk, Slawomira; Piotrowska, Natalia [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Boleslawa Krzywoustego 2, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2013-01-15

    New results of carbon isotopic composition from tree rings have been analyzed. {Delta}{sup 14}C and {delta}{sup 13}C data, representing the isotopic composition of carbon in 'clean air', were obtained from annual rings of a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) taken in the Niepolomice area, 25 km east Krakow, Poland. All samples were processed to extract {alpha}-cellulose, and the radiocarbon concentration in each annual ring was measured using AMS at University of Nagoya. Stable isotopic composition of carbon was determined using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The dataset covers the growth period between 1960 and 2003. The average difference between radiocarbon concentrations in Niepolomice and the North Hemisphere zone 1 (NH zone 1) for the period between 1960 and 1999 is 3.5 {+-} 1.6 Per-Mille-Sign . These data are compared with previously presented results from the city of Krakow, where a local decrease in {sup 14}C concentration was observed due to local CO{sub 2} emission from fossil fuel use. The differences in observed {sup 14}C concentrations were used to estimate a magnitude of the local Suess effect in Krakow. Based on mass balance equations for CO{sub 2}{sup 14}C concentrations, it was possible to calculate the CO{sub 2} concentration associated with fossil fuel emission (C{sub foss}) into the atmosphere. The highest values of C{sub foss} were recorded in the years 1986 (11.9 {+-} 1.4 ppm V) and 1983 (8.1 {+-} 1.3 ppm V), while the lowest value of 0.6 {+-} 1.8 ppm V was recorded in 2001.

  7. Year of birth determination using radiocarbon dating of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2010-05-01

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ((14)C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, (14)C levels in the enamel represent (14)C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  8. Year of Birth Determination Using Radiocarbon Dating of Dental Enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2009-03-10

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, {sup 14}C levels in the enamel represent {sup 14}C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  9. Laboratory Intercomparison of Pleistocene Bone Radiocarbon Dating Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huels, Matthias; van der Plicht, Johannes; Brock, Fiona; Matzerath, Simon; Chivall, David

    2017-01-01

    Since its invention in the late 1940s, radiocarbon (14C) dating has become an important tool for absolute dating. A prerequisite for the acceptance of this method is consistency between, and compatibility of, 14C dates from different laboratories. To meet these requirements, international laboratory

  10. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia L Harvey

    Full Text Available Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N. Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands, chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae, recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP. All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4C analysis.

  11. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Virginia L; Egerton, Victoria M; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Manning, Phillip L; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14)C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14)C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4)C analysis.

  12. Short-term variations of radiocarbon during the last century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchuladze, A.A.; Pagava, S.V.; Jurina, V.; Povinec, P.; Usacev, S.

    1982-01-01

    Radiocarbon variations related to the 11-year solar cycle during the last century are discussed. Previous investigations on short term 14 C variations in tree rings are compared with 14 C measurements in Georgian wine samples. The amplitude of 14 C variations as obtained by various authors ranges from 0.2 to about 1%. (author)

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry {sup 14}C dating of lime mortars: Methodological aspects and field study applications at CIRCE (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzaioli, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.marzaioli@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); Nonni, Sara, E-mail: sara.nonni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, ' Sapienza' Universita di Roma (Italy); Passariello, Isabella, E-mail: isabella.passariello@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); Capano, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.capano@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Dipartimento di Studio delle Componenti Culturali del Territorio, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Santa Maria Capua Vetere, Caserta (Italy); Ricci, Paola, E-mail: paola.ricci@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); Lubritto, Carmine, E-mail: carmine.lubritto@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); De Cesare, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.decesare@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Caserta (Italy); Eramo, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.eramo@uniba.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, Universita degli Studi di Bari ' Aldo Moro' , Bari (Italy); Quiros Castillo, Juan Antonio, E-mail: quiros.castillo@ehu.es [Universidad del Pais Vasco-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Dipartimento di Geografia, Prehistoria y Arqueologia, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); and others

    2013-01-15

    Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) has, recently, obtained some promising results in testing the feasibility of mortar radiocarbon dating by means of an ad hoc developed purification procedure (CryoSoniC: Cryobraking, Sonication, Centrifugation) applied to a series of laboratory mortars. Observed results encouraged CryoSoniC accuracy evaluation on genuine mortars sampled from archeological sites of known or independently constrained age (i.e., other {sup 14}C dates on different materials). In this study, some {sup 14}C measurements performed on genuine mortars will be discussed and compared with independently estimated (i.e., radiocarbon/archaeometrical dating) absolute chronologies of two Spanish sites. Observed results confirm the agreement of the CryoSoniC mortar dates with the archaeological expectations for both examined cases. Several authors reported the possibility of obtaining accurate radiocarbon dates of mortar matrices by analyzing lime lumps: binder-related particles of different sizes exclusively composed of calcium carbonate. In this paper, preliminary data for the absolute chronology reconstruction of the Basilica of the cemetery complex of Ponte della Lama (Canosa di Puglia, Italy) based on lime lumps will also be discussed. Dating accuracy will be quantified by comparing {sup 14}C data on mortar lime lumps from a funerary inscription of known age found near the Basilica, in the same study site. For this site, a comparison between absolute chronologies performed by bulk and CryoSoniC purified lime lumps, and charcoal incased in mortars (when found) will also be discussed. Observed results for this site provide evidence of how bulk lime lump dating may introduce systematic overestimations of the analyzed sample while CryoSoniC purification allows accurate dating.

  14. Forty years of atmospheric radiocarbon monitoring around Bohunice nuclear power plant, Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.; Chudy, M.; Sivo, A.; Simon, J.; Holy, K.; Richtarikova, M.

    2009-01-01

    Radiocarbon variations in the atmospheric CO 2 with attenuating amplitudes and decreasing mean values with typical maxima in summer and minima in winter have been observed since 1967 in two localities of Slovakia, in Bratislava and Zlkovce, situated about 60 km NE from Bratislava, only 5 km from the Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The 14 C record in Bratislava has been influenced mainly by fossil CO 2 emissions, in contrast to the Zlkovce record which has been more variable, as it has clearly been affected by operation of the Bohunice NPP. However, during specific meteorological conditions with NE transport of air masses to Bratislava, the effect of the Bohunice NPP has been visible in Bratislava as well. Maximum 14 C concentrations (up to 120% above a natural background) were observed around A1 NPP which used CO 2 with admixture of air as a cooling agent. The 14 C concentrations around four pressurized light water reactors were up to 30% above the background. The Δ 14 C values in the heavily polluted atmosphere of Bratislava were up to 10% and at Zlkovce up to 5% lower than the European clean air represented by the Jungfraujoch Δ 14 C data. Later the Δ 14 C values were similar at both sites, and from 2003 they were close to the European clean air levels. The observed Δ 14 C behaviour in the atmosphere provides a unique evidence of decreased fossil fuel CO 2 emissions in the region, as well as the long-term effect of the Bohunice NPP on the Bratislava and Zlkovce stations. The estimated annual radiation doses to the local public due to digestion of radiocarbon contaminated food have been estimated to be around 3 μSv

  15. Annual variability in the radiocarbon age and source of dissolved CO2 in a peatland stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, Mark H.; Dinsmore, Kerry J.; Billett, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating has the capacity to significantly improve our understanding of the aquatic carbon cycle. In this study we used a new passive sampler to measure the radiocarbon ( 14 C) and stable carbon (δ 13 C) isotopic composition of dissolved CO 2 for the first time in a peatland stream throughout a complete year (May 2010–June 2011). The in-stream sampling system collected time-integrated samples of CO 2 continuously over approximately 1 month periods. The rate of CO 2 trapping was proportional to independently measured streamwater CO 2 concentrations, demonstrating that passive samplers can be used to estimate the time-averaged dissolved CO 2 concentration of streamwater. While there was little variation and no clear trend in δ 13 CO 2 values (suggesting a consistent CO 2 source), we found a clear temporal pattern in the 14 C concentration of dissolved CO 2 . The 14 C age of CO 2 varied from 707 ± 35 to 1210 ± 39 years BP, with the youngest CO 2 in the autumn and oldest in spring/early summer. Mean stream discharge and 14 C content of dissolved CO 2 were positively correlated. We suggest that the observed pattern in the 14 C content of dissolved CO 2 reflects changes in its origin, with older carbon derived from deeper parts of the peat profile contributing proportionally more gaseous carbon during periods of low stream flow. - Highlights: ► Dissolved CO 2 was sampled from a peatland stream and radiocarbon dated. ► Samples collected using new passive sampler are suitable for integrated monthly samples. ► Age of CO 2 ranged from 707 to 1210 years old and seasonal pattern is observed. ► Age correlated with discharge and reflected source of dissolved CO 2 . ► Study highlights the value of 14 C analysis and potential of new method.

  16. ZAGRADA - A New Radiocarbon Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portner, A.; Obelic, B.; Krajcar Bornic, I.

    2008-01-01

    In the Radiocarbon and Tritium Laboratory at the Rudjer Boskovic Institute three different techniques for 14C dating have been used: Gas Proportional Counting (GPC), Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC) and preparation of milligram-sized samples for AMS dating (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry). The use of several measurement techniques has initiated a need for development of a new relational database ZAGRADA (Zagreb Radiocarbon Database) since the existing software package CARBO could not satisfy the requirements for parallel processing/using of several techniques. Using the SQL procedures, and constraints defined by primary and foreign keys, ZAGRADA enforces high data integrity and provides better performances in data filtering and sorting. Additionally, the new database for 14C samples is a multi-user oriented application that can be accessed from remote computers in the work group providing thus better efficiency of laboratory activities. In order to facilitate data handling and processing in ZAGRADA, the graphical user interface is designed to be user-friendly and to perform various actions on data like input, corrections, searching, sorting and output to printer. All invalid actions performed in user interface are registered with short textual description of an error occurred and appearing on screen in message boxes. Unauthorized access is also prevented by login control and each application window has implemented support to track last changes made by the user. The implementation of a new database for 14C samples has significant contribution to scientific research performed in the Radiocarbon and Tritium Laboratory and will provide better and easier communication with customers.(author)

  17. Very little in situ produced radiocarbon retained in accumulating Antarctic ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, W.J.M. van der; Alderliesten, C.; Borg, K. van der; Holmlund, P.; Jong, A.F.M. de; Karloef, L.; Lamers, R.A.N.; Oerlemans, J.; Thomassen, M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de

    2000-01-01

    Ice samples from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, were analyzed for 14 CO 2 and 14 CO by accelerator mass spectrometry. Only a small amount (∼2%) of in situ produced radiocarbon was detected. The calibrated radiocarbon ages, corrected for in situ produced 14 C, are in fair agreement with age estimates obtained from stratigraphical methods added to a gas inclusion model. The ages of the entrapped air range from recent to ca. 1200 AD

  18. 14C uncovers the past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Radio-carbon dating, a method of dating prehistoric remains that has been developed since the Second World War, is based on the fact that all organic matter contains a radioactive isotope of carbon - 14 C- which, because it decays at a fixed rate, gives a good indication of the age of the substance. The CSIR's National Physical Research Laboratory entered the field of radio-carbon dating in 1967, when the Nature Isotopes Division was established. The division has become a world centre of excellence and much has been done to clear up the chronology of southern African prehistory. It has been found, for instance, that anatomically modern man appeared in southern Africa some 40000 years earlier than in Europe, and that the Zimbabwe ruins were built mainly around the year 1350 AD. The radio-carbon method can also be used to determine the age and flow rate of underground water and the rate at which tracer gases dissolve in the oceans, i.e. the efficiency with which the oceans cleanse the atmosphere from pollutants

  19. Accurate dating with radiocarbon from the atom bomb tests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vogel

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The artificial radiocarbon produced by the thermonuclear bomb tests in the 1950s and 1960s significantly increased the level of C-14 in the environment. A detailed record of the subsequent changes in the C-14 concentration of the atmosphere can...

  20. Radiocarbon in dissolved organic matter in the central North Pacific Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.M.; Druffel, E.R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present the first detailed profile of radiocarbon measured in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the oligotrophic gyre of the central North Pacific. Δ 14 C of DOC ranged from -150 per mille (1,310 yr BP) in surface waters to -540 per mille (6,240 yr BP) at 5,710 m, 40 m off the bottom. The surprising similarity in the shapes of the profiles of Δ 14 C in the DOC and DIC pools suggest that similar processes are controlling the radiocarbon distribution in each of the two reservoirs and that bomb-produced radiocarbon has penetrated the DOC + DIC pools to a depth of ∼ 900 m. The depletion of the Δ 14 Csub(DOC) values by 300 per mille with respect to the Δ 14 Csub(DIC) values suggests that a certain fraction of the DOC is recycled within the ocean on longer time-scales than DIC. (author)

  1. Surface water processes in the Indonesian throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral Δ14C record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Stewart J.; Guilderson, Thomas P.

    2008-09-01

    To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian throughflow, we have generated a 115-year bimonthly coral-based radiocarbon time series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15‰). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric 14C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60‰ and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through the South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant 14C peak in 1955 due to the bomb-14C water advected into this region from nuclear weapons tests in the Marshall Islands in 1954.

  2. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synal, H.-A., E-mail: synal@phys.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Building HPK, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Schulze-Koenig, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L. [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Building HPK, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV {sup 14}C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  3. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synal, H.-A.; Schulze-König, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV 14 C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  4. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synal, H.-A.; Schulze-König, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV 14C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  5. 14C Analysis of protein extracts from Bacillus spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Jenny A; Falso, Miranda J Sarachine; Kashgarian, Michaele; Buchholz, Bruce A

    2014-07-01

    Investigators of bioagent incidents or interdicted materials need validated, independent analytical methods that will allow them to distinguish between recently made bioagent samples versus material drawn from the archives of a historical program. Heterotrophic bacteria convert the carbon in their food sources, growth substrate or culture media, into the biomolecules they need. The F(14)C (fraction modern radiocarbon) of a variety of media, Bacillus spores, and separated proteins from Bacillus spores was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS precisely measures F(14)C values of biological materials and has been used to date the synthesis of biomaterials over the bomb pulse era (1955 to present). The F(14)C of Bacillus spores reflects the radiocarbon content of the media in which they were grown. In a survey of commercial media we found that the F(14)C value indicated that carbon sources for the media were alive within about a year of the date of manufacture and generally of terrestrial origin. Hence, bacteria and their products can be dated using their (14)C signature. Bacillus spore samples were generated onsite with defined media and carbon free purification and also obtained from archived material. Using mechanical lysis and a variety of washes with carbon free acids and bases, contaminant carbon was removed from soluble proteins to enable accurate (14)C bomb-pulse dating. Since media is contemporary, (14)C bomb-pulse dating of isolated soluble proteins can be used to distinguish between historical archives of bioagents and those produced from recent media. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimal model of radiocarbon residence time in exchange reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dergachev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Radiocarbon content variations in the earth atmosphere were studied using a mathematical model. The so-called exchange reservoir was considered consisting of layers, and the radiocarbon exchange rate at the interfaces between these layers was supposed to be constant. The process of 14 C mixing and exchange in a dynamic system is described by a system of nonhomogeneous 1st order differential equations. The model also accounts for the change in rate of radiocarbon formation in the earth atmosphere due to cosmic and geophysical effects (solar activity, solar cycle, etc.). (J.P.)

  7. Making a date with radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribbin, J.

    1979-01-01

    The use of 14 C dating techniques for samples of organic materials up to 50,000 years old is discussed with especial reference to adjustment necessary to take account of both the most recent figure for the 14 C half-life and also the natural fluctuations in the production of 14 C over 50,000 years. Methods of detection and the accuracy of the measurements are considered. It is hoped that future developments including both the possibility of counting 14 C ions directly using an accelerator as a mass spectrometer, and also the use of laser enrichment techniques will not only push back the radiocarbon calendar to 100,000 years but will also allow the use of much smaller samples than before. (U.K.)

  8. Radiocarbon dating at sub MeV energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synal, H.A.; Jacob, S.; Suter, M.

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is currently the leading technique for the detection of long-lived radionuclides, such as 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 41 Ca, 53 Mn, 59 Ni, 60 Fe and 129 I at natural isotopic concentrations. However, radiocarbon plays the primary role and 14 C AMS systems, which are able to provide high precision measurements, are nowadays commercially available

  9. Synthetic Constraint of Ecosystem C Models Using Radiocarbon and Net Primary Production (NPP) in New Zealand Grazing Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisden, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Time-series radiocarbon measurements have substantial ability to constrain the size and residence time of the soil C pools commonly represented in ecosystem models. Radiocarbon remains unique in the ability to constrain the large stabilized C pool with decadal residence times. Radiocarbon also contributes usefully to constraining the size and turnover rate of the passive pool, but typically struggles to constrain pools with residence times less than a few years. Overall, the number of pools and associated turnover rates that can be constrained depends upon the number of time-series samples available, the appropriateness of chemical or physical fractions to isolate unequivocal pools, and the utility of additional C flux data to provide additional constraints. In New Zealand pasture soils, we demonstrate the ability to constrain decadal turnover times with in a few years for the stabilized pool and reasonably constrain the passive fraction. Good constraint is obtained with two time-series samples spaced 10 or more years apart after 1970. Three or more time-series samples further improve the level of constraint. Work within this context shows that a two-pool model does explain soil radiocarbon data for the most detailed profiles available (11 time-series samples), and identifies clear and consistent differences in rates of C turnover and passive fraction in Andisols vs Non-Andisols. Furthermore, samples from multiple horizons can commonly be combined, yielding consistent residence times and passive fraction estimates that are stable with, or increase with, depth in different sites. Radiocarbon generally fails to quantify rapid C turnover, however. Given that the strength of radiocarbon is estimating the size and turnover of the stabilized (decadal) and passive (millennial) pools, the magnitude of fast cycling pool(s) can be estimated by subtracting the radiocarbon-based estimates of turnover within stabilized and passive pools from total estimates of NPP. In grazing

  10. Rapid increase in cosmogenic 14C in AD 775 measured in New Zealand kauri trees indicates short-lived increase in 14C production spanning both hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güttler, D.; Adolphi, F.; Beer, J.; Bleicher, N.; Boswijk, G.; Christl, M.; Hogg, A.; Palmer, J.; Vockenhuber, C.; Wacker, L.; Wunder, J.

    2015-02-01

    In 2012, Miyake et al. reported a sudden and strong increase of the atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) content in Japanese cedar trees of 1.2% between AD 774 and 775. While their findings were quickly confirmed by a German oak chronology for the Northern Hemisphere (NH), the question remained if the effect was seen in both hemispheres. Here we present the first annually resolved Southern Hemisphere (SH) 14C record spanning the interval AD 760-787, using New Zealand kauri (Agathis australis) chronology wood. An almost identical distinct increase compared to Northern Hemisphere data was observed, suggesting a cosmic event with globally uniform impact as a potential cause for the increase. Deploying a carbon cycle box model a worldwide averaged net 14C production of 2.2 ×108 14C atoms cm-2 was estimated, which is 3.7 times higher than the average annual 14C production. The immediate appearance of the event in tree rings on both hemispheres suggests a short duration event of significantly less than 1 yr.

  11. Application of radiocarbon analysis and receptor modeling to the source apportionment of PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    The radiocarbon tracer technique was used to demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be used for quantitative receptor modeling of air pollution. Fine-particle samples were collected during December, 1985, in Albuquerque, NM. Motor vehicles (fossil) and residential wood combustion (RWC, modern) were the major PAH-sources. For each sample, the PAH-fraction was solvent-extracted, isolated by liquid chromatography, and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The PAH-fractions from sixteen samples were analyzed for 14 C by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Radiocarbon data were used to calculate the relative RWC contribution (f RWC ) for samples analyzed for 14 C. Normalized concentrations of a prospective motor vehicle tracer, benzo(ghi)perylene (BGP) had a strong, negative correlation with f RWC . Normalized BGP concentrations were used to apportion sources for samples not analyzed for 14 C. Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) vs. ADCS and BGP was used to estimate source profiles for use in Target Factor Analysis (TFA). Profiles predicted by TFA were used in Chemical Mass Balances (CMBs). For non-volatile, stable PAHs, agreement between observed and predicted concentrations was excellent. The worst fits were observed for the most volatile PAHs and for coronene. The total RWC contributions predicted by CMBs correlated well with the radiocarbon data

  12. Tissue distribution of a leukotriene antagonist 14C-LY170680, following inhalation exposure in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohland, R.C.; Beck, J.M.; Carlson, K.H.; Herman, D.R.; Hoppes, J.L.; Vavrek, M.T.; Wolff, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Dissection and whole-body autoradiographic techniques were used to determine the tissue distribution profile of a leukotriene antagonist, 14 C-LY170680, following nose-only inhalation exposure in the rat. Liquid scintillation spectrometry and whole-body autoradiography indicated that highest concentrations of radiocarbon were present in stomach and small intestine at all time points. Radiocarbon reached maximum levels in stomach (2,259 ng-eq/g) and small intestine (2,399 ng-eq/g) 2 to 4 hours postexposure, respectively, and declined with time. In contrast, maximum radiocarbon concentrations in the head (146 ng-eq/g), trachea (408 ng-eq/g), and lung (534 ng-eq/g) occurred at 0 hours postexposure and steadily declined with time. Low concentrations of radiocarbon were detected in the liver ( 14 C-LY170680 were deposited in the head and within the lung following inhalation exposure. However, higher levels of radiocarbon present in the stomach and small intestine suggested significant nasal deposition followed by rapid clearance and ingestion of inhaled radioactive material. Distribution of radiocarbon limited to the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts demonstrated minimal systemic absorption and exposure over the time course of this study

  13. /sup 14/C uncovers the past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating, a method of dating prehistoric remains that has been developed since the Second World War, is based on the fact that all organic matter contains a radioactive isotope of carbon -/sup 14/C- which, because it decays at a fixed rate, gives a good indication of the age of the substance. The CSIR's National Physical Research Laboratory entered the field of radio-carbon dating in 1967, when the Nature Isotopes Division was established. The division has become a world center of excellence and much has been done to clear up the chronology of southern African prehistory. It has been found, for instance, that anatomically modern man appeared in southern Africa some 40000 years earlier than in Europe, and that the Zimbabwe ruins were built mainly around the year 1350 AD. The radio-carbon method can also be used to determine the age and flow rate of underground water and the rate at which tracer gases dissolve in the oceans, i.e. the efficiency with which the oceans cleanse the atmosphere from pollutants.

  14. Radiocarbon dating in near-Eastern contexts : Confusion and quality control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plicht, J; Bruins, HJ; Bruins, Hendrik J.; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    Near-Eastern archaeology has long remained oblivious to radiocarbon dating as unique historical calendars brought about a perception that C-14 dating is superfluous. Circular chronological reasoning may occur as a result. There is now strong C-14 evidence that the early part of Egyptian history

  15. Effects of Nutrient Deficiencies in Corn Plants on the In Vivo and In Vitro Metabolism of [14C] Diazinon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunstman, J.L.; Lichtenstein, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    Full text: The effects of calcium, nitrogen, and magnesium deficiencies on the penetration, translocation, and the in vivo and in vitro metabolism of the insecticide [ 14 C] diazinon (diethyl-2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl) in corn plants were investigated. On a per gram fresh weight basis only roots from nitrogen-deficient solutions contained less C while tops from plants grown in calcium-deficient solutions contained nearly four times more radiocarbon than those from complete nutrient solutions. Due to calcium or nitrogen deficiencies a reduced degradation occurred in roots as indicated by the relatively higher recoveries of diazinon and the lower recoveries of an unidentified, more polar 14 C-ring compound. No differencies in [ 14 C] diazinon degradation due to nutrient deficiencies were noticeable with corn tops. The metabolic activity of corn roots was due to a soluble enzyme. In studies with subcellular components from roots, specific activities increased from the homogenate (4.09%/mg of protein) to the 105000 g supernatant (7.77%/mg of protein). Subcellular components from calcium-deficient roots produced significantly less water-soluble radiocarbon (sp act., 0.60) than did control roots (sp act., 1.60), results similar to those observed with in vivo experiments. However, the 10000 g supernatant from root material deficient in nitrogen produced significantly more water—soluble radiocarbon (sp act., 2.85) than subcellular fractions from control roots. (author)

  16. Gas chromatographic isolation technique for compound-specific radiocarbon analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, M.; Kumamoto, Y.; Shibata, Y.; Yoneda, M.; Morita, M.; Kawamura, K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: We present here a gas chromatographic isolation technique for the compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of biomarkers from the marine sediments. The biomarkers of fatty acids, hydrocarbon and sterols were isolated with enough amount for radiocarbon analysis using a preparative capillary gas chromatograph (PCGC) system. The PCGC systems used here is composed of an HP 6890 GC with FID, a cooled injection system (CIS, Gerstel, Germany), a zero-dead-volume effluent splitter, and a cryogenic preparative collection device (PFC, Gerstel). For AMS analysis, we need to separate and recover sufficient quantity of target individual compounds (>50 μgC). Yields of target compounds from C 14 n-alkanes to C 40 to C 30 n-alkanes and approximately that of 80% for higher molecular weights compounds more than C 30 n-alkanes. Compound specific radiocarbon analysis of organic compounds, as well as compound-specific stable isotope analysis, provide valuable information on the origins and carbon cycling in marine system. Above PCGC conditions, we applied compound-specific radiocarbon analysis to the marine sediments from western north Pacific, which showed the possibility of a useful chronology tool for estimating the age of sediment using organic matter in paleoceanographic study, in the area where enough amounts of planktonic foraminifera for radiocarbon analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are difficult to obtain due to dissolution of calcium carbonate. (author)

  17. Abraham Reef Stable Isotope Data (delta 13C, delta 18O, delta 14C) for 1635-1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site: Abraham Reef, 22ó 06'S, 153ó 00'E, Porites australiensus, Radiocarbon (delta 14C) and Stable Isotope (del 18O and del 13C) results from bi-annual samples from...

  18. Millennium scale radiocarbon variations in Eastern North Atlantic thermocline waters: 0-7000 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, N.; Tisnerat-Laborde, N.; Hatte, C. [LSCE, F-91190 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Colin, C. [Univ Paris 11, IDES, Orsay, (France); Dottori, M.; Reverdin, G. [Univ Paris 06, LOCEAN, F-75252 Paris, (France)

    2009-07-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Deep water corals are exceptional archives of modern and past ocean circulation as combined U-series and radiocarbon dating allows to reconstruct seawater radiocarbon. Here we present thermocline water radiocarbon concentrations that have been reconstructed for the past {approx} 7000 years for the eastern north Atlantic, based on deep-water corals from Rockall Bank and Porcupine Seabight. We find that thermocline water radiocarbon values follow overall the mean atmospheric long term trend with an average offset of {Delta}{sup 14}C between intermediate water and atmosphere of -55{+-}5 per thousand until 1960 AD. Residual variations are strong ({+-}25 per thousand) over the past 7000 years and there is first evidence that those are synchronous to millennium scale climate variability. Over the past 60 years thermocline water radiocarbon values increase due to the penetration of bomb-radiocarbon into the upper intermediate ocean. Radiocarbon increases by {Delta}{sup 14}C of +95 per thousand compared to +210 per thousand for eastern North Atlantic surface waters. Moreover, bomb-radiocarbon penetration to thermocline depth occurs with a delay of {approx} 10-15 years. Based on high resolution ocean circulation models we suggest that radiocarbon changes at upper intermediate depth are today barely affected by vertical mixing and represent more likely variable advection and mixing of water masses from the Labrador Sea and the temperate Atlantic (including Mediterranean outflow water). Consequently, we assume that residual radiocarbon variations over the past 7000 years reflect millennium scale variability of the Atlantic sub-polar and sub-tropical gyres

  19. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron; Kueffner, Markus; Ferreira, Ester S.B.; Scherrer, Nadim C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. 14 C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the 14 C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated. (orig.)

  20. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron [ETH Zurich, Ion Beam Physics, Zurich (Switzerland); Kueffner, Markus; Ferreira, Ester S.B. [SIK-ISEA, Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Scherrer, Nadim C. [Bern University of Applied Sciences, HKB, Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. {sup 14}C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the {sup 14}C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated. (orig.)

  1. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-01-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa...

  2. The effect of water content on the persistence of 14C- lindane in Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, R.; Mesquita, T.B.; Ruegg, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    The effect to the water content on the behaviour of 14 C-lindane was determined under laboratory conditions in two soil samples from the state of Parana, differing in organic matter and clay content. In Brunizem soil, richer in organic matter, the rate of degradation of 14 C-lindane, as measured by 14 CO 2 evolution, was twice under 3/3 field capacity and flooded condition as compared with 2/3 field capacity. The percentage of 14 CO 2 envolved from the Dark Red Latosol soil practically the same for the three levels of moisture content and about equal to the Brunizem soil at 2/3 field capacity. Although after 240 days of incubation with 14 C-lindane about 5% of the applied activity could be extracted from both soils, between 20 to 36% of the parent radiocarbon was yet bound to the soils. The degradation of 14 C-lindage into 14 CO 2 , the volatization of 14 C-lindage, and the radiocarbon probably lost as volatile metabolites were the main routes of dissipation of the insecticide from both soils. (Author) [pt

  3. Radiocarbon measurements on submerged forest floating chronologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Baxter, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    It is stated that the submerged forests along the west coast of England and Wales provide a unique source of wood for radiocarbon/ dendrochronological studies. 14 C age determinations are reported on sequential growth increments from three 'gloating' chronologies. A sampling frequency of approximately 10 samples per century was used. Fluctuations in atmospheric 14 C levels of 2 to 3% over several decades can occur, these variations being superimposed on a smoothly changing trend. (author)

  4. Radiocarbon mass balance for a Magnox nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, M.P.; Mills, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First comprehensive assessment of C-14 arisings in a Magnox nuclear power station. • C-14 production in graphite and coolant gas quantified by activation modelling. • Principal C-14 production pathway is via C-13 with a small contribution from N-14. • C-14 mass balance model provides a basis for analyses on other reactors. - Abstract: Nuclear power generation in the United Kingdom is based principally on graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors. The mass of irradiated graphite associated with these reactors, including material from associated experimental, prototype and plutonium production reactors, exceeds 96,000 tonnes. One of the principal long-lived radionuclides produced during graphite irradiation is radiocarbon (C-14). Its potential as a hazard must be taken into account in decommissioning and graphite waste management strategies. While C-14 production processes are well-understood, radionuclide distributions and concentrations need to be characterised. A common misconception is that generic statements can be made about C-14 precursors and their location. In fact, the composition of the original manufactured material, the chemical environment of the graphite during service and its irradiation history will all influence C-14 levels. The analysis presented here provides the first assessment of the principal C-14 activation pathways for a UK Magnox reactor. Activation modelling has been used to predict C-14 production rates in both the graphite core and the carbon dioxide coolant over a selected period of operation and the results compared with monitored site C-14 discharges. Principal activation routes have been identified, which should inform future graphite waste management strategies relating to radiocarbon

  5. Constructing deposition chronologies for peat deposits using radiocarbon dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Piotrowska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon dating is one of the main methods used to establish peat chronologies. This article reviews the basis of the method and its application to dating of peat deposits. Important steps in the radiocarbon dating procedure are described, including selection and extraction of material (and fractions for dating, chemical and physical preparation of media suitable for measurements, measurements of 14C activity or concentration, calculations, calibration of results and age-depth modelling.

  6. Preparation of 2-(. alpha. -(2-ethoxyphenoxy)benzyl)-(5- sup 14 C)morpholine methanesulfonate (( sup 14 C)reboxetine):a new antidepressant agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angiuli, P.; Fontana, E.; Vicario, G.P. (Farmitalia Carlo Erba s.r.l., Milan (Italy))

    1991-05-01

    The labelling with radiocarbon of the new antidepressant agent Reboxetine is described. The preparation has been carried out in a two step procedure using 2-chloro-N-(3-(2-ethoxyphenoxy)-2-hydroxy-3-phenyl)propyl-(1-{sup 14}C)acetamide as starting material. The expected compound was prepared by cyclization of the above halogenoacylamido alcohol to the corresponding morpholone ring followed by reduction to the final (5-{sup 14}C)morpholine derivative 4, 98% radiochemically pure and with specific radioactivity of 988 MBq/mmol. An overall radiochemical yield of 57.5% was achieved. (author).

  7. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ( 14 C) and radiocalcium ( 41 Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS 14 C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO 2 to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high 13 C - ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, 14 C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP

  8. Cold Reversal on Kodiak Island, Alaska, Correlated with the European Younger Dryas by Using Variations of Atmospheric C-14 Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdas, Irka; Bonani, Georges; Boden, Per; Peteet, Dorothy M.; Mann, Daniel H.

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution AMS (accelerator-mass-spectrometer) radiocarbon dating was performed on late-glacial macrofossils in lake sediments from Kodiak Island, Alaska, and on shells in marine sediments from southwest Sweden. In both records, a dramatic drop in radiocarbon ages equivalent to a rise in the atmospheric C-14 by approximately 70%. coincides with the beginning of the cold period at 11000 yr B.P. (C-14 age). Thus our results show that a close correlation between climatic records around the globe is possible by using a global signature of changes in atmospheric C-14 content.

  9. Radiocarbon concentration in modern tree rings from Valladolid, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z.; Nakamura, Toshio; Pazdur, Anna; Charro, Elena; Villanueva, Jose Luis Gutierrez; Piotrowska, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    New results of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from the City of Valladolid (Spain) covering a growth period of 22 year have been measured using an AMS. Samples were taken using a hollow drill from a living tree, and α-cellulose was extracted from each of annual rings (early and late wood separately). The set of data shows lower radiocarbon concentration than that reported for 'clean air' at the reference station, indicating a remarkable input of 'dead' CO 2 of fossil fuel origin. Using data of carbon dioxide and 14 C concentrations from Schauinsland, the corresponding summer and winter values of the fossil component (c f ) in carbon dioxide were calculated for the City of Valladolid. By fitting exponential and linear functions to the experimental data, the exchange time was calculated, and the expected future 14 C concentration in the atmosphere was estimated.

  10. Radiocarbon dating of VIRI bone samples using ultrafiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Masayo, E-mail: minami@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamazaki, Kana [Faculty of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Omori, Takayuki [University Museum, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakamura, Toshio [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Ultrafiltration can effectively remove low-molecular-weight (LMW) contaminants from bone gelatin to extract high-molecular-weight (HMW) proteins that are derived from original bone collagen, though it cannot remove HMW collagen crosslinked with humic acids. Therefore, ultrafiltration is often used to obtain more accurate {sup 14}C dates of bones. However, ultrafiltration may introduce new contaminants to bone gelatins, mainly from ultrafilters used. To study the effects of ultrafiltration on {sup 14}C age, we analyzed the C/N ratio, {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} and {delta}{sup 15}N{sub AIR} values, and {sup 14}C ages of acid-soluble bone collagen obtained by decalcification, gelatin extracted from acid-insoluble bone collagen, and the HMW gelatin and LMW fractions produced during ultrafiltration of the extracted gelatin. Bone samples from the Fifth International Radiocarbon Intercomparison (VIRI) were used: VIRI-E (mammoth), -F (horse), -G (human), and -I (whale). In this study, carbon and nitrogen content and gelatin yields were used to evaluate collagen preservation in the VIRI bone samples. Radiocarbon ages, {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} and {delta}{sup 15}N{sub AIR} values of unfiltered and HMW gelatins were obtained and compared with the published consensus values. The LMW fraction was found to exhibit different values from those of the other fractions, indicating the possible presence of extraneous contamination. The Vivaspin Trade-Mark-Sign 6 ultrafilters used in this study were analyzed and radiocarbon dated both before and after cleaning. We present evidence to suggest that LMW fraction contaminants could be derived from the ultrafilters rather than humic substances. Excessively long ultrafiltration time was suspected to have contaminated the bone samples with material from the ultrafilter, because those samples exhibited older {sup 14}C ages than did those filtered for shorter durations. The results in this study indicate that {sup 14}C ages of unfiltered

  11. Optimization of Sealed Tube Graphitization Method for Environmental C-14 Studies Using MICADAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinyu, Laszlo, E-mail: rinyu@atomki.hu [Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies, Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Isotoptech Zrt., H-4025 Debrecen (Hungary); Molnar, Mihaly [Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies, Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Major, Istvan [Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies, Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Nagy, Tamas; Veres, Mihaly [Isotoptech Zrt., H-4025 Debrecen (Hungary); Kimak, Adam [University of Debrecen, H-4032 Debrecen (Hungary); Wacker, Lukas; Synal, Hans-Arno [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The original sealed tube zinc reduction graphitization process was first developed for rapid low-precision measurements of biomedical tracer samples and later also applied for high precision measurements of not too old samples. In this study we tested the MICADAS (mini radiocarbon dating system [1]) radiocarbon measurements of targets prepared by sealed tube graphitization process. We found the optimal iron catalyst and reagents (TiH{sub 2} and Zn) amount whereby we can reach a relatively low background level, and minimized the overall {delta}{sup 13}C fractionation during the graphitization. Repeated measurements of normalization standards and real samples with known {sup 14}C activities were very well reproduced. Finally, we demonstrated the applicability of the sealed tube graphitization on real environmental samples covering a wide range of {sup 14}C concentrations.

  12. Strategy of valid 14C dates choice in syngenetic permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'chuk, Y. K.; Vasil'chuk, A. C.

    2014-11-01

    The main problem of radiocarbon dating within permafrost is the uncertain reliability of the 14C dates. Syngenetic sediments contain allochthonous organic deposit that originated at a distance from its present position. Due to the very good preservation of organic materials in permafrost conditions and numerous re-burials of the fossils from ancient deposits into younger ones the dates could be both younger and older than the true age of dated material. The strategy for the most authentic radiocarbon date selection for dating of syncryogenic sediments is considered taking into account the fluvial origin of the syngenetic sediments. The re-deposition of organic material is discussed in terms of cyclic syncryogenic sedimentation and also the possible re-deposition of organic material in subaerial-subaqueous conditions. The advantages and the complications of dating organic micro-inclusions from ice wedges by the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) method are discussed applying to true age of dated material search. Radiocarbon dates of different organic materials from the same samples are compared. The younger age of the yedoma from cross-sections of Duvanny Yar in Kolyma River and Mamontova Khayata in the mouth of Lena River is substantiated due to the principle of the choice of the youngest 14C date from the set.

  13. Benzene Synthesis for 14C Measurements and Evaluation of Uncertainty in Mollusk Shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero del Hombrebueno, B.; Simon, M. A.; Larena, P.

    2002-01-01

    This work describes the method and Instrumentation used by Environmental Isotopes laboratory of the CIEMAT Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (DIAE) for the synthesis of benzene from carbonates of mollusk shells and the liquid scintillation counting of 14 C for radiocarbon dating in these samples. The usefulness of mollusk shells for 14 C dating are considered. (Author) 15 refs

  14. Radiocarbon and stable-isotope geochemistry of organic and inorganic carbon in Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigah, Prosper K.; Minor, Elizabeth C.; Werne, Josef P.

    2012-03-01

    We present a lake-wide investigation of Lake Superior carbon and organic matter biogeochemistry using radiocarbon, stable isotope, and carbon concentrations. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) abundance in the lake was 121-122 Tg C, with offshore concentration andδ13C values being laterally homogenous and tightly coupled to the physical and thermal regime and biochemical processes. Offshore Δ14C of DIC (50-65‰) exhibited lateral homogeneity and was more 14C enriched than co-occurring atmospheric CO2 (˜38‰); nearshore Δ14C of DIC (36-38‰) was similar to atmospheric CO2. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) abundance was 14.2-16.4 Tg C. DOC's concentration and δ13C were homogenous in June (mixed lake), but varied laterally during August (stratification) possibly due to spatial differences in lake productivity. Throughout sampling, DOC had modern radiocarbon values (14-58‰) indicating a semilabile nature with a turnover time of ≤60 years. Lake particulate organic carbon (POC, 0.9-1.3 Tg C) was consistently 13C depleted relative to DOC. The δ15N of epilimnetic particulate organic nitrogen shifted to more negative values during stratification possibly indicating greater use of nitrate (rather than ammonium) by phytoplankton in August. POC's radiocarbon was spatially heterogeneous (Δ14C range: 58‰ to -303‰), and generally 14C depleted relative to DOC and DIC. POC 14C depletion could not be accounted for by black carbon in the lake but, because of its spatial and temporal distribution, is attributed to sediment resuspension. The presence of old POC within the epilimnion of the open lake indicates possible benthic-pelagic coupling in the lake's organic carbon cycle; the ultimate fate of this old POC bears further investigation.

  15. Assessing Soil Organic C Stability at the Continental Scale: An Analysis of Soil C and Radiocarbon Profiles Across the NEON Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, K. A.; Gallo, A.; Hatten, J. A.; Swanston, C.; McKnight, D. M.; Strahm, B. D.; Sanclements, M.

    2017-12-01

    Soil carbon stocks have become recognized as increasingly important in the context of climate change and global C cycle modeling. As modelers seek to identify key parameters affecting the size and stability of belowground C stocks, attention has been drawn to the mineral matrix and the soil physiochemical factors influenced by it. Though clay content has often been utilized as a convenient and key explanatory variable for soil C dynamics, its utility has recently come under scrutiny as new paradigms of soil organic matter stabilization have been developed. We utilized soil cores from a range of National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) experimental plots to examine the influence of physicochemical parameters on soil C stocks and turnover, and their relative importance in comparison to climatic variables. Soils were cored at NEON sites, sampled by genetic horizon, and density separated into light fractions (particulate organics neither occluded within aggregates nor associated with mineral surfaces), occluded fractions (particulate organics occluded within aggregates), and heavy fractions (organics associated with mineral surfaces). Bulk soils and density fractions were measured for % C and radiocarbon abundance (as a measure of C stability). Carbon and radiocarbon abundances were examined among fractions and in the context of climatic variables (temperature, precipitation, elevation) and soil physiochemical variables (% clay and pH). No direct relationships between temperature and soil C or radiocarbon abundances were found. As a whole, soil radiocarbon abundance in density fractions decreased in the order of light>heavy>occluded, highlighting the importance of both surface sorption and aggregation to the preservation of organics. Radiocarbon abundance was correlated with pH, with variance also grouping by dominate vegetation type. Soil order was also identified as an important proxy variable for C and radiocarbon abundance. Preliminary results suggest that

  16. Standard reference materials analysis for MINT Radiocarbon Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noraishah Othman; Kamisah Alias; Nasasni Nasrul

    2004-01-01

    As a follow-up to the setting up of the MINT Radiocarbon Dating facility. an exercise on the IAEA standard reference materials was carried out. Radiocarbon laboratories frequently used these 8 natural samples to verify their systems. The materials were either pretreated or analysed directly to determine the activity of 14 C isotopes of the five samples expressed in % Modern (pMC) terms and to make recommendations on further use of these materials. We present the results of the five materials and discuss the analyses that were undertaken. (Author)

  17. 14C studies in the vicinity of the Czech NPPs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Světlík, Ivo; Fejgl, M.; Turek, Karel; Michálek, V.; Tomášková, Lenka

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 2 (2012), s. 689-695 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radiocarbon in biota * nuclear power plants * C-14 monitoring * sampling material selection Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 1.467, year: 2012

  18. Radiocarbon (14C) Concentration of Local Pollution in Street Trees Located at Intersections

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Daisuke

    2018-01-01

    At large intersections, vehicles consume and generate a large amount of fossil fuel. Carbon derived from fossil fuels that do not contain radioactive carbon (14C), i.e., dead carbon, is released in large amounts in the roadside air environment. By means of photosynthesis, street trees along the roadside assimilate both dead carbon, not containing radioactive carbon (14C), and contemporary carbon, which includes radioactive carbon (14C). Therefore, the concentration of radioactive carbon (14C)...

  19. Status of mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection at ETHZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Martin; Maxeiner, Sascha; Wacker, Lukas; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-15

    A prototype of a mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection instrument without accelerator stage was built for the first time and set into operation at ETH Zurich. The system is designed as an experimental platform to optimize performance of {sup 14}C detection at low ion energies and to study the most relevant processes that may limit system performance. The optimized stripper unit incorporates differential pumping to maintain a low gas outflow and a revised tube design to better match the phase space volume of the ion beam at low energies. The system is fully operational and has demonstrated true radiocarbon dating capabilities. The overall beam transmission through the stripper tube is about 40% for the 1{sup +} charge state. Radiocarbon analyses with an overall precision of 0.6% were obtained on a single sample under regular measurement conditions. By analyzing multiple targets of the same sample material an uncertainty level of 0.3% has been reached. The background level corresponds to a radiocarbon age of 40,000 years.

  20. Incorporation of U-/sup 14/C-glucose into the lipids U-/sup 14/C and sugars of Culex pipiens fatigans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggal, Rita Nanda; Subrahmanyam, D

    1983-11-01

    The role of U-/sup 14/C-glucose as a lipogenic precursor was examined in larvae and adults of C. pipiens fatigans. The pattern of incorporation of the radiocarbon was also examined in the sugars of these insects. It was found that on feeding of larvae and adults with /sup 14/C-glucose, the phospholipid fraction of the insects was associated with more than 70 per cent of the total lipid radiolabel. However, the percentage distribution of the phospholipid label in the different phospholipid fractions of the larvae and adults was different. Among the neutral lipids, a low but significant label in cholesterol was of considerable interest. The /sup 14/C-glucose was also converted to trehalose in both larvae and adults. However, the two stages differed in the utilization of glucose and trehalose. 5 figures, 16 refs.

  1. Gas chromatographic isolation of individual compounds from complex matrices for radiocarbon dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglinton, T I; Aluwihare, L I; Bauer, J E; Druffel, E R; McNichol, A P

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the application of a novel, practical approach for isolation of individual compounds from complex organic matrices for natural abundance radiocarbon measurement. This is achieved through the use of automated preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) to separate and recover sufficient quantities of individual target compounds for (14)C analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We developed and tested this approach using a suite of samples (plant lipids, petroleums) whose ages spanned the (14)C time scale and which contained a variety of compound types (fatty acids, sterols, hydrocarbons). Comparison of individual compound and bulk radiocarbon signatures for the isotopically homogeneous samples studied revealed that Δ(14)C values generally agreed well (±10%). Background contamination was assessed at each stage of the isolation procedure, and incomplete solvent removal prior to combustion was the only significant source of additional carbon. Isotope fractionation was addressed through compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analyses. Fractionation of isotopes during isolation of individual compounds was minimal (radiocarbon measurements. The addition of carbon accompanying derivatization of functionalized compounds (e.g., fatty acids and sterols) prior to chromatographic separation represents a further source of potential error. This contribution can be removed using a simple isotopic mass balance approach. Based on these preliminary results, the PCGC-based approach holds promise for accurately determining (14)C ages on compounds specific to a given source within complex, heterogeneous samples.

  2. Simulation of influence of some climatic factors on radiocarbon concentration in the Earth atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmetkereev, S.Kh.; Dergachev, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of different climatic factors on radiocarbon concentration in the Earth atmosphere is analyzed by modelling the exchange radiocarbon system. It is supposed that the exchange system consists of four reservoirs: long-lived surface vegetation and its remnants, the atmosphere, surface layer of the World ocean. It is shown that the variations of the ocean temperature and the variations in CO 2 amount in the atmosphere connected with it do not affect the atmosphere radiocarbon concentration. Variations in the square of sea ice on the time scale of >=1000 years could bring about variations in the 14 C concentration with the amplitude up to 1%. 14 C concentration in the atmosphere in the icing maximum 18 thousands of years ago was 7% higher than present concentration [ru

  3. Tips and traps in the 14C bio-AMS preparation laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, Bruce A.; Freeman, Stewart P.H.T.; Haack, Kurt W.; Vogel, John S.

    2000-01-01

    Maintaining a contamination free sample preparation lab for biological 14 C AMS requires the same or more diligence as a radiocarbon dating prep lab. Isotope ratios of materials routinely range over 4-8 orders of magnitude in a single experiment, dosing solutions contain thousands of DPM and gels used to separate proteins possess 14 C ratios of 1 amol 14 C/mg C. Radiocarbon contamination is a legacy of earlier tracer work in most biological laboratories, even if they were never hot labs. Removable surface contamination can be found and monitored using swipes. Contamination can be found on any surface routinely touched: door knobs, light switches, drawer handles, water faucets. In general, all surfaces routinely touched need to be covered with paper, foil or plastic that can be changed frequently. Shared air supplies can also present problems by distributing hot aerosols throughout a building. Aerosols can be monitored for 14 C content using graphitized coal or fullerene soot mixed with metal powder as an absorber. The monitors can be set out in work spaces for 1-2 weeks and measured by AMS with regular samples. Frequent air changes help minimize aerosol contamination in many cases. Cross-contamination of samples can be minimized by using disposable plastic or glassware in the prep lab, isolating samples from the air when possible and using positive displacement pipettors

  4. Forensic applications of 14C bomb-pulse dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoppi, U.; Skopec, Z.; Skopec, J.; Jones, G.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.; Tuniz, C.; Williams, A.

    2004-01-01

    After a brief review of the basics of 14 C bomb-pulse dating, this paper presents two unique forensic applications. Particular attention is dedicated to the use of the 14 C bomb-pulse to establish the time of harvest of illicit drugs such as heroin and opium. Preliminary measurements of 14 C concentrations in milligram samples taken from seized drugs are presented. 14 C bomb-pulse dating can determine whether drug distribution originates from stockpiles or recent manufacture, and support the action of law enforcement authorities against criminal organisations involved in drug trafficking. In addition, we describe the dating of wine vintages for a number of authenticated single label vintage red wines from the Barossa Valley - South Australia. Our results show that radiocarbon dating can be used to accurately determine wine vintages and therefore reveal the addition of unrelated materials of natural and synthetic origin

  5. Forensic applications of 14C bomb-pulse dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppi, U.; Skopec, Z.; Skopec, J.; Jones, G.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.; Tuniz, C.; Williams, A.

    2004-08-01

    After a brief review of the basics of 14C bomb-pulse dating, this paper presents two unique forensic applications. Particular attention is dedicated to the use of the 14C bomb-pulse to establish the time of harvest of illicit drugs such as heroin and opium. Preliminary measurements of 14C concentrations in milligram samples taken from seized drugs are presented. 14C bomb-pulse dating can determine whether drug distribution originates from stockpiles or recent manufacture, and support the action of law enforcement authorities against criminal organisations involved in drug trafficking. In addition, we describe the dating of wine vintages for a number of authenticated single label vintage red wines from the Barossa Valley - South Australia. Our results show that radiocarbon dating can be used to accurately determine wine vintages and therefore reveal the addition of unrelated materials of natural and synthetic origin.

  6. Radiocarbon measurements of tree-ring samples from Japanese woods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Hiromasa; Sakamoto, Minoru; Imamura, Mineo; Mitsutani, Takumi

    2008-01-01

    Since radiocarbon age is a model age based on constancy of atmospheric radiocarbon concentration and a provisional value of 5568 years for the 14 C half-life, calibration to calendar age is required for practical dating. The dataset, called IntCal, used for the calibration has been constructed by international consortium. Most parts of the IntCal have been based on the measurement of radiocarbon in dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples from woods in Europe and North America. Regional offsets, which are designed as differences of local atmospheric radiocarbon from IntCal, have been pointed out based on recent radiocarbon measurements for tree-ring samples from a few regions. We have also measured radiocarbon of tree-ring samples from Japanese woods in order to investigate regional offsets in Japan. In this study, radiocarbon measurements for tree-ring samples from three different Japanese woods at around AD500 were carried out. Consequently, differences from IntCal04 at around AD500 were confirmed, although no systematic offset are found. However, the results obtained in this study agree with the raw data used for construction of IntCal04. This could pose a question to calculation method of IntCal04. (author)

  7. Atmospheric 14C variations derived from tree rings during the early Younger Dryas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Quan; Barbetti, Mike; Fink, David; Kaiser, Klaus Felix; Friedrich, Michael; Kromer, Bernd; Levchenko, Vladimir A.; Zoppi, Ugo; Smith, Andrew M.; Bertuch, Fiona

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric radiocarbon variations over the Younger Dryas interval, from ˜13,000 to 11,600 cal yr BP, are of immense scientific interest because they reveal crucial information about the linkages between climate, ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. However, no direct and reliable atmospheric 14C records based on tree rings for the entire Younger Dryas have been available. In this paper, we present (1) high-precision 14C measurements on the extension of absolute tree-ring chronology from 12,400 to 12,560 cal yr BP and (2) high-precision, high-resolution atmospheric 14C record derived from a 617-yr-long tree-ring chronology of Huon pine from Tasmania, Australia, spanning the early Younger Dryas. The new tree-ring 14C records bridge the current gap in European tree-ring radiocarbon chronologies during the early Younger Dryas, linking the floating Lateglacial Pine record to the absolute tree-ring timescale. A continuous and reliable atmospheric 14C record for the past 14,000 cal yr BP including the Younger Dryas is now available. The new records indicate that the abrupt rise in atmospheric Δ 14C associated with the Younger Dryas onset occurs at ˜12,760 cal yr BP, ˜240 yrs later than that recorded in Cariaco varves, with a smaller magnitude of ˜40‰ followed by several centennial Δ 14C variations of 20-25‰. Comparing the tree-ring Δ 14C to marine-derived Δ 14C and modelled Δ 14C based on ice-core 10Be fluxes, we conclude that changes in ocean circulation were mainly responsible for the Younger Dryas onset, while a combination of changes in ocean circulation and 14C production rate were responsible for atmospheric Δ 14C variations for the remainder of the Younger Dryas.

  8. Perspectives in radiocarbon dating by radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polach, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Opportunities for individual contributions to the technology of radiocarbon dating over the past 40 years have been large. Meaningful developments are traced in this review of C-14 dating by gas proportional (GP) and liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry. The performance of characteristic as well as state of the art GP and LS systems is tabulated and their merit for low-level counting of C-14 is evaluated. Future developments in radiometry will lie in the updating of existing systems to incorporate new technologies and the refinement of resolution and identification of extreme low-level signals. Parallel development with AMS, sharing on merit the ever widening applied C-14 research field, and enhanced interdisciplinary collaboration are foreseen as the scenario leading to the year 2000

  9. Perspectives in radiocarbon dating by radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polach, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Opportunities for individual contributions to the technology of radiocarbon dating over the past 40 years have been large. Meaningful developments are traced in this review of C-14 dating by gas proportional (GP) and liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry. The performance of characteristic as well as state of the art GP and LS systems is tabulated and their merit for low-level counting of C-14 is evaluated. Future developments in radiometry will lie in the updating of existing systems to incorporate new technologies and the refinement of resolution and identification of extreme low-level signals. Parallel development with AMS, sharing on merit the ever widening applied C-14 research field, and enhanced interdisciplinary collaboration are foreseen as the scenario leading to the year 2000. (orig.)

  10. Distribution of 14C in soil and rice plants following application of 14C - parathion to soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, M.M. de; Ruegg, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    Amount of residues of 14 C-parathion in soil rice plants after application of the insecticide to soil were determined in four systems studied during five weeks: pots of soil with and without plants and open or enclosed by a transparent cover. Measurements of amounts volatilized and 14 CO 2 evolution from the pesticide were made in closed system without plants. The bound residues in soil and plants were also determined. Results indicated that parathion half life in a Gley Humic soil was about two weeks. Very little radiocarbon was taken up by rice plants; of this, more was found in shoots of plants enclosed, probably by collection of the volatilized material by plants. About 6% and 4% of the 14 C-parathion were found as volatilized material and 14 CO 2 , respectively after five weeks. Bound residues varied very little and reached a maximum of 22% in soil and in plants amounted to less than 2% at the final of the experiment. (Author) [pt

  11. Radiocarbon clock strikes the glacial period pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebryannyj, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    Discussed are some aspects of the theory of radiocarbon dating in application to the study of the history of the Earth. The accumulation and the decay of C 14 and methods for its recording are desribed. Presented is a block diagram of a scintillation counter for recording C 14 . The chronology of the last glaciation of Europe has been determined: the Interglacial period (between 50 and 40 thousand years) a prolonged preglacil period (between 40 and 25 thousand years), the last glaciation (between 25 and 10 thousand years ago)

  12. Radiocarbon dating of the human eye lens crystallines reveal proteins without carbon turnover throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heegaard, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    , there is no subsequent remodelling of these fibers, nor removal of degraded lens fibers. Human tissue ultimately derives its (14)C content from the atmospheric carbon dioxide. The (14)C content of the lens proteins thus reflects the atmospheric content of (14)C when the lens crystallines were formed. Precise radiocarbon...

  13. Monitoring of atmospheric excess 14C around Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, M.; Bujtás, T.; Svingor, E.; Futó, I.; Světlík, Ivo

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2007), s. 1031-1043 ISSN 0033-8222 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radiocarbon * monitoring * atmospheric excess 14C Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 1.164, year: 2007

  14. Impacts of C-uptake by plants on the spatial distribution of 14C accumulated in vegetation around a nuclear facility-Application of a sophisticated land surface 14C model to the Rokkasho reprocessing plant, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Masakazu; Katata, Genki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Terada, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    The impacts of carbon uptake by plants on the spatial distribution of radiocarbon ( 14 C) accumulated in vegetation around a nuclear facility were investigated by numerical simulations using a sophisticated land surface 14 C model (SOLVEG-II). In the simulation, SOLVEG-II was combined with a mesoscale meteorological model and an atmospheric dispersion model. The model combination was applied to simulate the transfer of 14 CO 2 and to assess the radiological impact of 14 C accumulation in rice grains during test operations of the Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP), Japan, in 2007. The calculated 14 C-specific activities in rice grains agreed with the observed activities in paddy fields around the RRP within a factor of four. The annual effective dose delivered from 14 C in the rice grain was estimated to be less than 0.7 μSv, only 0.07% of the annual effective dose limit of 1 mSv for the public. Numerical experiments of hypothetical continuous atmospheric 14 CO 2 release from the RRP showed that the 14 C-specific activities of rice plants at harvest differed from the annual mean activities in the air. The difference was attributed to seasonal variations in the atmospheric 14 CO 2 concentration and the growth of the rice plant. Accumulation of 14 C in the rice plant significantly increased when 14 CO 2 releases were limited during daytime hours, compared with the results observed during the nighttime. These results indicated that plant growth stages and diurnal photosynthesis should be considered in predictions of the ingestion dose of 14 C for long-term chronic releases and short-term diurnal releases of 14 CO 2 , respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of Bomb Radiocarbon Chronologies to Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardizzone, D; Cailliet, G M; Natanson, L J; Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Brown, T A

    2007-07-16

    and the number of samples for MIA analysis was insufficient for some months. Hence, unequivocal validation of shortfin mako age estimates has yet to be accomplished. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s effectively doubled the natural atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C). The elevated {sup 14}C levels were first recorded in 1957-58, with a peak around 1963. As a consequence, {sup 14}C entered the ocean through gas exchange with the atmosphere at the ocean surface and in terrestrial runoff. Despite variable oceanographic conditions, a worldwide rise of the bomb {sup 14}C signal entered the ocean mixed layer as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in 1957-58. The large amounts of {sup 14}C released from the bomb tests produced a signature that can be followed through time, throughout the marine food web, and into deeper waters. The marked increase of radiocarbon levels was first measured in the DIC of seawater and in biogenic marine carbonates of hermatypic corals in Florida. Subsequently, this record was documented in corals from other regions and in the thallus of rhodoliths. The accumulation of radiocarbon in the hard parts of most marine organisms in the mixed layer (such as fish otoliths and bivalves) was synchronous with the coral time-series. This technique has been used to validate age estimates and longevity of numerous bony fishes to date, as well as to establish bomb radiocarbon chronologies from different oceans. In the first application of this technique to lamnoid sharks, validated annual band-pair deposition in vertebral growth bands for the porbeagle (Lamna nasus) aged up to 26 years. Radiocarbon values from samples obtained from 15 porbeagle caught in the western North Atlantic Ocean (some of which were known-age) produced a chronology similar in magnitude to the reference carbonate chronology for that region. The observed phase shift of about 3 years was attributed to different sources of carbon between vertebrae and those for

  16. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, M.; Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G.; Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A.

    2016-03-01

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV 14,13,12C3+ ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the 14C/12C and the 13C/12C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  17. How accurate is the 14C method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nydal, R.

    1979-01-01

    Radiocarbon daters have in recent years focussed their interest on accuracy and reliability of 14 C dates. The use of dates for resolving fine chronological structures that are not dateable otherwise has stressed this point. The total uncertainty in dating an event is composed of errors relating to dating of the sample, i.e. uncertainty in measured quantities, deviations from assumed content of 14 C in material when alive; and errors related to quality of sample material, i.e. contamination from carbon of different age, diffuse context between sample and event. Statistical variability in counting of 14 C activity gives the most important contribution to measurement uncertainty - increasing with age and shortage of sample material. Corrections for isotopic fractionation and reservoir effects must be performed, and - most important when dates are compared with historical ages - the dendrochronological calibration will correct for past variations in the atmospheric 14 C content. Future improvement of dating precision can however only be obtained by the combined efforts of both daters and submitters of samples, thus minimizing errors related to selection and handling of sample material as well as those related to the 14 C method and measurements. (Auth.)

  18. Decadal- to interannual-scale source water variations in the Caribbean Sea recorded by Puerto Rican coral radiocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourne, K H; Quinn, T M; Guilderson, T P; Webb, R S; Taylor, F W

    2006-12-05

    Water that forms the Florida Current, and eventually the Gulf Stream, coalesces in the Caribbean from both subtropical and equatorial sources. The equatorial sources are made up of, in part, South Atlantic water moving northward and compensating for southward flow at depth related to meridional overturning circulation. Subtropical surface water contains relatively high amounts of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), whereas equatorial waters are influenced by the upwelling of low {sup 14}C water and have relatively low concentrations of {sup 14}C. We use a 250-year record of {Delta}{sup 14}C in a coral from southwestern Puerto Rico along with previously published coral {Delta}{sup 14}C records as tracers of subtropical and equatorial water mixing in the northern Caribbean. Data generated in this study and from other studies indicate that the influence of either of the two water masses can change considerably on interannual to interdecadal time scales. Variability due to ocean dynamics in this region is large relative to variability caused by atmospheric {sup 14}C changes, thus masking the Suess effect at this site. A mixing model produced using coral {Delta}{sup 14}C illustrates the time varying proportion of equatorial versus subtropical waters in the northern Caribbean between 1963 and 1983. The results of the model are consistent with linkages between multidecadal thermal variability in the North Atlantic and meridional overturning circulation. Ekman transport changes related to tradewind variability are proposed as a possible mechanism to explain the observed switches between relatively low and relatively high {Delta}{sup 14}C values in the coral radiocarbon records.

  19. Radiocarbon signal of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility in nearby trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovics, R; Kelemen, D I; Kern, Z; Kapitány, S; Veres, M; Jull, A J T; Molnár, M

    2016-03-01

    Tree ring series were collected from the vicinity of a Hungarian radioactive waste treatment and disposal facility and from a distant control background site, which is not influenced by the radiocarbon discharge of the disposal facility but it represents the natural regional (14)C level. The (14)C concentration of the cellulose content of tree rings was measured by AMS. Data of the tree ring series from the disposal facility was compared to the control site for each year. The results were also compared to the (14)C data of the atmospheric (14)C monitoring stations at the disposal facility and to international background measurements. On the basis of the results, the excess radiocarbon of the disposal facility can unambiguously be detected in the tree from the repository site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Re-Development of Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norfaizal Mohamed; Nita Salina Abu Bakar; Phillip, E.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Dating Laboratory, formerly known as Radiocarbon Laboratory was established in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) since 1983. A benzene synthesis line for radiocarbon (carbon-14) dating was installed in this laboratory by Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) under the Hydrology Isotope Project, a collaboration project between IAEA, AAEC and PUSPATI (former name for Nuclear Malaysia). Determining the age of samples could be performed using this facility throughout two main processes, namely the production of benzene containing C-14 isotopes and activity determination of C-14 using Liquid Scintillation Counter. Realizing the need and importance of Nuclear Dating Laboratory for the nations science and technology development, the Top Management of Nuclear Malaysia was agreed to hand over this laboratory and its facilities to Waste Technology and Environmental Division (BAS) started in June 2013 for the redevelopment. Hence, this paper will highlight the weaknesses and problems that need to be addressed and improved to enable it to be used in providing a good service. (author)

  1. Identification and synchronization of the common cosmic-ray signal in the IntCal13 14C calibration and the Greenland ice-core 10Be records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscheler, Raimund; Adolphi, Florian; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Rasmussen, Sune; Hughen, Konrad; Cooper, Alan; Turney, Chris

    2017-04-01

    The production rates of cosmogenic radionuclides (such as 10Be and 14C) are modulated by the solar and geomagnetic shielding of galactic cosmic rays. In addition, 14C and 10Be are influenced by the carbon cycle and the atmospheric transport and deposition, respectively. Isolating and identifying the common production signal allows us to synchronize ice core 10Be and tree ring 14C records during the Holocene (Adolphi and Muscheler, 2016), thereby connecting ice core climate records with 14C-dated records. Extending this comparison further back in time is challenging due to deteriorating quality of the 14C calibration record, IntCal13, (Reimer et al., 2013) and possible unidentified climate influences on the ice-core 10Be records. Nevertheless, by focusing on the most prominent production-rate features this comparison can be extended far back into the last glacial where, for example, the linkage of tree-ring based Kauri 14C data and the Greenland ice-core time scale (GICC05) suggested unresolved data and/or time scale differences around the period of the Laschamp geomagnetic field minimum at about 42000 yrs BP (Muscheler et al., 2014). Here we show that the data underlying the IntCal13 14C record and the ice-core 10Be records exhibit common variability that allows us to tentatively link the ice core GICC05 time scale to the radiocarbon time scale for almost the complete radiocarbon dating range. The observed time scale differences could be related to uncertainties in both the U/Th-based dating of the IntCal13 calibration data set and the GICC05 time scale, and we show that the two can be reconciled within the uncertainties of the ice-core layer counting. This direct comparison between IntCal13 and 10Be also suggests that the 14C differences shown in (Muscheler et al., 2014) around the Laschamp geomagnetic field minimum can be reduced by moderate adjustments to the GICC05 time scale. References: Adolphi, F., and Muscheler, R., 2016, Synchronizing the Greenland ice

  2. Benzene Synthesis for ''14C Measurements and Evaluation of Uncertainty in Mollusk Shells; Sintesis de Benceno para la Determinacion de C''14 y Evaluacion de su Incertidumbre en Conchas de Moluscos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero del Hombrebueno, B.; Simon, M. A.; Larena, P.

    2002-07-01

    This work describes the method and instrumentation used by Environmental Isotopes laboratory of the CIEMAT Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (DIAE) for the synthesis of benzene from carbonates of mollusk shells and the liquid scintillation counting of ''14C for radiocarbon dating in these samples. The usefulness of mollusk shells for ''14 C dating are considered. (Author)

  3. Detection of radiocarbon in the cyclotrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsche, K.J.; Karadi, C.A.; Muller, R.A.; Paulson, G.C.

    1990-04-01

    A small low energy cyclotron (the ''cyclotrino''), which was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980, has now detected radiocarbon at natural abundance. This device combines the suppression of background through the use of negative ions with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-gated output. Data is presented showing resolution of radiocarbon at natural abundance. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting 14 C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 10 4 . Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes are discussed. 16 refs., 7 figs

  4. The remarkable metrological history of 14C dating: from ancient Egyptian artifacts to particles of soot and grains of pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating would not have been possible if 14 C had not had the 'wrong' half-life, a fact that delayed its discovery. Following the discovery of this 5730 year radionuclide in laboratory experiments by Ruben and Kamen, it became clear to Willard Libby that 14 C should exist in nature, and that it could serve as a quantitative means for dating artifacts and events marking the history of civilization. The search for natural radiocarbon was a metrological challenge; the level in the living biosphere [ca. 230 Bq/kg] lay far beyond the then current state of the measurement art. The metrological history of radiocarbon was traced from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that brought 14 C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for 'molecular dating' at the 10-100 μg level. The first metrological revolution resulted from a combination of a major improvement in the 14 C beta particle detection efficiency and consequent improvement in precision, and the new science of dendrochronology which extended the radiocarbon dating calibration curve to some 8000 years before present (BP). The fine structure of the calibration function revealed natural and anthropogenic variations in the 14 C content of living matter, contrary to one of the basic assumptions of radiocarbon dating. This 'failure' of radiocarbon dating, however, spawned new multidisciplinary areas of environmental and geoscience. The most notable of the anthropogenic variations was that induced by atmospheric nuclear testing. The 'bomb pulse' of the mid-1960s gave rise to a global atmospheric and marine tracer experiment, and its by-product was an additional, short-term 14 C 'decay curve' that has allowed the dating of late 20th Century artifacts to the nearest year or two. The second major advance came in 1977-78 when 'atom counting' of 14 C was developed

  5. Forensic applications of {sup 14}C bomb-pulse dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoppi, U. E-mail: ugo@ansto.gov.au; Skopec, Z.; Skopec, J.; Jones, G.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.; Tuniz, C.; Williams, A

    2004-08-01

    After a brief review of the basics of {sup 14}C bomb-pulse dating, this paper presents two unique forensic applications. Particular attention is dedicated to the use of the {sup 14}C bomb-pulse to establish the time of harvest of illicit drugs such as heroin and opium. Preliminary measurements of {sup 14}C concentrations in milligram samples taken from seized drugs are presented. {sup 14}C bomb-pulse dating can determine whether drug distribution originates from stockpiles or recent manufacture, and support the action of law enforcement authorities against criminal organisations involved in drug trafficking. In addition, we describe the dating of wine vintages for a number of authenticated single label vintage red wines from the Barossa Valley - South Australia. Our results show that radiocarbon dating can be used to accurately determine wine vintages and therefore reveal the addition of unrelated materials of natural and synthetic origin.

  6. Carbon isotopes: variations of their natural abundance. Application to correction of radiocarbon dates, to the study of plant metabolism and to paleoclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    The radiocarbon activity of contemporaneous samples shows: i) variations in the specific activity of the atmospheric C14, which varies with time and locality. ii) variations due to isotope discrimination, or fractionation, of the carbon isotope ratio during the fixation of carbon by organic or inorganic matter. The variation in the atmospheric concentration of carbon 14 as observed in tree rings are synchronous and of the same amplitude for both hemispheres (southern and northern). A curve for correction of radiocarbon dates of the southern hemisphere is given for the last 500 years. The activity of atmospheric radiocarbon as measured in tree rings varies with latitude, showing a difference of (4.5+-1) per mille between the northern and southern hemispheres, the latter having lower concentration of radiocarbon, equivalent to an age difference of about 35 years. This variation can be explained by a larger exchange of carbon 14 between the atmosphere and the sea in the southern hemisphere to a larger free ocean surface (40%) and a higher agitation by winds. The main differences of the isotope fractionation by different types of plants are correlated to their photosynthetic pathways and thus to the enzyme which effects the primary fixation of carbon. The delta C13 values can be used as basis of a paleoclimate indicator [fr

  7. Radiocarbon dating of mortars from ancient Greek palaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouridakis, N.; Saliege, J.F.; Person, A.; Filippakis, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    The study deals with radiocarbon dating of lime mortars which were used as supports for Mycenaean and Minoan paintings. The 14 C dates are, on the whole, compatible with the historical data, and thus show that a large proportion of the Mycenaean surficial coatings can be dated by the radiocarbon method. However, in order to determine the age of the mortars accurately, it is necessary to evaluate the amount of sedimentary carbonate which may have been added to them. It is shown here that the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of lime mortars are significant indicators that such a mixing actually took place. (author)

  8. Radiocarbon dating of mortars from ancient Greek palaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zouridakis, N.; Saliege, J.F.; Person, A.; Filippakis, S.E.

    1987-02-01

    The study deals with radiocarbon dating of lime mortars which were used as supports for Mycenaean and Minoan paintings. The /sup 14/C dates are, on the whole, compatible with the historical data, and thus show that a large proportion of the Mycenaean surficial coatings can be dated by the radiocarbon method. However, in order to determine the age of the mortars accurately, it is necessary to evaluate the amount of sedimentary carbonate which may have been added to them. It is shown here that the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of lime mortars are significant indicators that such a mixing actually took place.

  9. Mineralization of 14C-Pirimiphos-Methyl in Soil Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Farghly, M.; El-Maghrby, S.

    2006-01-01

    The mineralization of 14 C-ring labelled pirimiphos-methyl in clay loam soil was determined in a three months laboratory incubation period under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Evolution of 14 CO2 increased with time and reached 9.2% and 12 %, of the initial 14 C-concentration , within 90 days in case of anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively, at that time, soil contained about 61.5% of the applied dose as extractable residues under anaerobic conditions and 59% under aerobic conditions. the unextractable pesticide residues gradually increased with time and the highest binding capacity of about 11%-13% was observed after 90 days of incubation. the total 14 C-activity recovered from soil was generally between 82% and 92% of the applied radiocarbon. the nature of methanolic 14 C-residues was determined by chromatographic analysis and the results revealed the presence of pirimiphos- methyl as a main product together with its phenol. the principle of radio-respirometry has been used for evaluating the effect of different application rates of pirimiphos-methyl on soil microbial activity using U- 14 C-glucose as a substrate. At two concentrations used, pirimiphos-methyl showed an inhibition in the rate of 14 Co2 evolution over 14 days of incubation as a result of oxidation of 14 C-glucose by microorganisms especially in case of high concentration

  10. Late-Glacial radiocarbon- and palynostratigraphy in the Swiss Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammann, B.; Lotter, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed Late-Glacial radiocarbon stratigraphy for the Swiss Plateau has been established on the basis of over 90 accelerator 14 C dates on terrestrial plant macrofossils. A comparison of the radiocarbon ages derived from terrestrial, telmatic and limnic material at different sites on the Swiss Plateau yields a proposal for modifying the zonation system of Welten for the Late-Glacial. By retaining the limits of chronozones and by refining the palynostratigraphic criteria for the limits of biozones, a separation between chrono- and biozonation at the beginning of the Boelling and the Younger Dryas becomes obvious. 54 refs

  11. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-01-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ≥2). 14 N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (C n+ → C - ) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14 N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14 C in enriched samples of CO 2 gas with 14 C/ 12 C isotopic ratio down to the 10 -9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14 C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development

  12. Correction procedures for C-14 dates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKerrell, H.

    1975-01-01

    There are two quite separate criteria to satisfy before accepting as valid the corrections to C-14 dates which have been indicated for some years now by the bristlecone pine calibration. Firstly the correction figures have to be based upon all the available tree-ring data and derived in a manner that is mathematically sound, and secondly the correction figures have to produce accurate results on C-14 dates from archaeological test samples of known historical date, these covering as wide a period as possible. Neither of these basic prerequisites has yet been fully met. Thus the two-fold purpose of this paper is to bring together, and to compare with an independently based procedure, the various correction curves or tables that have been published up to Spring 1974, as well as to detail the correction results on reliable, historically dated Egyptian, Helladic and Minoan test samples from 3100 B.C. The nomenclature followed is strictly that adopted by the primary dating journal Radiocarbon, all C-14 dates quoted thus relate to the 5568 year half-life and the standard AD/BC system. (author)

  13. Biogenic Carbon Fraction of Biogas and Natural Gas Fuel Mixtures Determined with 14C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the accuracy of the radiocarbon-based calculation of the biogenic carbon fraction for different biogas and biofossil gas mixtures. The focus is on the uncertainty in the C-14 reference values for 100% biogenic carbon and on the C-13-based isotope fractionation correction of

  14. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehpour, M., E-mail: mehran.salehpour@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, Applied Nuclear Physics Division, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, Applied Nuclear Physics Division, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A. [Ion Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV {sup 14,13,12}C{sup 3+} ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C and the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  15. Quantity of dates trumps quality of dates for dense Bayesian radiocarbon sediment chronologies - Gas ion source 14C dating instructed by simultaneous Bayesian accumulation rate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheim, B. E.; Firesinger, D.; Roberts, M. L.; Burton, J. R.; Khan, N.; Moyer, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) sediment core chronologies benefit from a high density of dates, even when precision of individual dates is sacrificed. This is demonstrated by a combined approach of rapid 14C analysis of CO2 gas generated from carbonates and organic material coupled with Bayesian statistical modeling. Analysis of 14C is facilitated by the gas ion source on the Continuous Flow Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CFAMS) system at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility. This instrument is capable of producing a 14C determination of +/- 100 14C y precision every 4-5 minutes, with limited sample handling (dissolution of carbonates and/or combustion of organic carbon in evacuated containers). Rapid analysis allows over-preparation of samples to include replicates at each depth and/or comparison of different sample types at particular depths in a sediment or peat core. Analysis priority is given to depths that have the least chronologic precision as determined by Bayesian modeling of the chronology of calibrated ages. Use of such a statistical approach to determine the order in which samples are run ensures that the chronology constantly improves so long as material is available for the analysis of chronologic weak points. Ultimately, accuracy of the chronology is determined by the material that is actually being dated, and our combined approach allows testing of different constituents of the organic carbon pool and the carbonate minerals within a core. We will present preliminary results from a deep-sea sediment core abundant in deep-sea foraminifera as well as coastal wetland peat cores to demonstrate statistical improvements in sediment- and peat-core chronologies obtained by increasing the quantity and decreasing the quality of individual dates.

  16. Tritium and radiocarbon in the western North Pacific waters: post-Fukushima situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizer, Jakub; Aoyama, Michio; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Molnár, Mihály; Palcsu, László; Povinec, Pavel P

    2018-04-01

    Impact of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) accident on tritium ( 3 H) and radiocarbon ( 14 C) levels in the water column of the western North Pacific Ocean in winter 2012 is evaluated and compared with radiocesium ( 134,137 Cs) data collected for the same region. Tritium concentrations in surface seawater, varying between 0.4 and 2.0 TU (47.2-236 Bq m -3 ), follow the Fukushima radiocesium trend, however, some differences in the vertical profiles were observed, namely in depths of 50-400 m. No correlation was visible in the case of 14 C, whose surface Δ 14 C levels raised from negative values (about -40‰) in the northern part of transect, to positive values (∼68‰) near the equator. Homogenously mixed 14 C levels in the subsurface layers were observed at all stations. Sixteen surface (from 30 in total) and 6 water profile (from 7) stations were affected by the Fukushima tritium. Surface and vertical profile data together with the calculated water column inventories indicate that the total amount of the FNPP1-derived tritium deposited to the western North Pacific Ocean was 0.7 ± 0.3 PBq. No clear impact of the Fukushima accident on 14 C levels in the western North Pacific was observed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of a connection of variations of atmospheric radiocarbon activity with some geophysical and astrophysical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocharov, G.E.; Chernov, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Relation of the radiocarbon concentration is dendrochronologically dated wood samples to solar activity, geomagnetic field variations and changes of global temperature near the earth surface for the last 500 years is studied. It is found that averaged 10-year Δ 14 C fluctuations of radiocarbon content in annual rings of trees experience noticeable variations with the 0.5% amplitude. To reveal the effect in the best way the Δ 14 C values averaged in the intervals equal to 11-year solar activity cycles and with a 4-year shift in relation to the latter, are obtained. It is shown that in the 1700-1805 period of time the Δ 14 C averaged values corresponding to peak values of the even 11-year solar activity cycles are mainly lower than the Δ 14 C averaged values corresponding to the odd cycle maximum values. In the 1835-1900 period the 14 C averaged values corresponding to the odd solar cycle maximum values are lesser than the Δ 14 C averaged values corresponding to the even cycle peaks [ru

  18. Radiocarbon dating in the quarternary geology and archaeology of Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilves, Eh.; Liiva, A.; Punning, Ya.M.

    1974-01-01

    Work of the Tartusk radiocarbon laboratory for the last 15 years is presented. Methodological problems of the radiocarbon method are discussed. The geochemistry of carbon isotopes, principles of radiocarbon dating, and areas of its application are considered. Methods of recording natural radiocarbon and materials used for radiocarbon dating are discussed. Preliminary treatment of the samples and synthesis of the radioactive carbon carrier are presented. The preparation of the counter compound in the form of a liquid scintillator from the synthesized natural radiocarbon carrier is described. The scintillator efficiencies of different scintillators are compared. Data are given on the development of criteria for selecting the photoelectron multiplier. Construction of alumina cuvettes used for scintillation counting is described. It is noted that, in the counter apparatus system, amplitude analyzers with two differential discriminators are used, which allows directing the recording of activity to two 14 C regions. The results of using the radiocarbon method for different aspects of natural science and archeology are considered. Problems of geology of the late Pleistocene and the Pre-Baltic Holocene are considered: base of the mid-Valdaisk Karukyulask interglacier, history of deterioration of the final glacial mantle, development of a drainage system and late glacier, development and paleography of the Holocene, and others. New material on the chronology of primeval cultures in the Estonia region and on growth of meteoric craters are presented

  19. Radiocarbon dating development and practices at MINT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamisah Alias; Bashillah Baharuddin; Juhari Mohd Yusof; Ahmad Raduan Ujang

    2002-01-01

    The MINT radiocarbon dating technique was introduced and a very well-designed vacuum line was developed to generate benzene from samples containing carbon. A liquid scintillation counter provides a very good prerequisite for precise measurement of the C-14 activity in the benzene. From time to time, assessment on the status of the analytical capabilities of the system and advice on improvement and upgrading required was made. For routine analysis, standard sampling, pretreatment, carbon dioxide conversion and measurement procedures were adopted. Radiocarbon dating is now, one of the most important developments of the twenties century in the comprehension of the history of human development, a quick, easy, reliable and scientifically acceptable method to determine the age of historical artefacts and archaeological samples. (Author)

  20. 14C analysis via intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murnick, Daniel; Dogru, Ozgur; Ilkmen, Erhan

    2010-01-01

    A new ultra sensitive laser-based analytical technique, intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy (ICOGS), allowing extremely high sensitivity for detection of 14 C-labeled carbon dioxide has recently been demonstrated. Capable of replacing accelerator mass spectrometers (AMS) for many applications, the technique quantifies zeptomoles of 14 C in sub micromole CO 2 samples. Based on the specificity of narrow laser resonances coupled with the sensitivity provided by standing waves in an optical cavity, and detection via impedance variations, limits of detection near 10 -1514 C/ 12 C ratios have been obtained with theoretical limits much lower. Using a 15 W 14 CO 2 laser, a linear calibration with samples from 5 x 10 -15 to >1.5 x 10 -12 in 14 C/ 12 C ratios, as determined by AMS, was demonstrated. Calibration becomes non-linear over larger concentration ranges due to interactions between CO 2 and buffer gas, laser saturation effects and changes in equilibration time constants. The instrument is small (table top), low maintenance and can be coupled to GC or LC input. The method can also be applied to detection of other trace entities. Possible applications include microdosing studies in drug development, individualized sub-therapeutic tests of drug metabolism, carbon dating and real time monitoring of atmospheric radiocarbon.

  1. Atmospheric radiocarbon as a Southern Ocean wind proxy over the last 1000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, K. B.; Mikaloff Fletcher, S.; Galbraith, E.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Slater, R. D.; Naegler, T.

    2009-04-01

    Measurements of radiocarbon in tree rings over the last 1000 years indicate that there was a pre-industrial latitudinal gradient of atmospheric radiocarbon of 3.9-4.5 per mail and that this gradient had temporal variability of order 6 per mil. Here we test the idea that the mean gradient as well as variability in he gradient is dominated by the strength of the winds over the Southern Ocean. This is done using an ocean model and an atmospheric transport model. The ocean model is used to derive fluxes of 12CO2 and 14CO2 at the sea surface, and these fluxes are used as a lower boundary condition for the transport model. For the mean state, strong winds in the Southern Ocean drive significant upwelling of radiocarbon-depleted Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW), leading to a net flux of 14CO2 relative to 12CO2 into the ocean. This serves to maintain a hemispheric gradient in pre-anthropogenic atmospheric delta-c14. For perturbations, increased/decreased Southern Ocean winds drive increased/decreased uptake of 14CO2 relative to 12CO2, thus increasing/decreasing the hemispheric gradient in atmospheric delta-c14. The tree ring data is interpreted to reveal a decrease in the strength of the Southern Ocean winds at the transition between the Little Ice Age and the Medieval Warm Period.

  2. Radiocarbon Mass Balance for a Magnox Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, M.P.; Mills, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear power generation in the United Kingdom is based principally on graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors. The mass of irradiated graphite associated with these reactors, including material from associated experimental, prototype and production reactors, exceeds 96,000 tonnes. One of the principal long-lived radionuclides produced during graphite irradiation is radiocarbon (C-14), which has a half-life of 5730 ± 40 years. Decommissioning and graphite waste management strategies must take account of this radionuclide. In order to identify appropriate options for addressing the potential hazard of C-14, it is important that the production processes are understood and the distributions and concentrations of C-14 are characterised. In fact, C-14 precursors and their activation processes are well-known. However, there is ongoing debate over the relative importance of different C-14 precursors, which will determine the location of C-14 within graphite components and hence its mobility/response to treatment. A generally held misconception concerning C-14 in irradiated graphite is that generic statements can be made about its precursors and their location. C-14 location and activities will depend upon the composition of the original manufactured graphite (raw materials, impurities), the chemical environment of the graphite during service and the irradiation history of the graphite. So, while there may be some similarities across, for example, carbon dioxide cooled graphite moderated designs (Magnox, AGR, UNGG), any informed assessment of a core’s C-14 inventory would require more-precise characterisation. The analysis presented here focuses on a UK Magnox reactor core, Reactor 1 at Wylfa Nuclear Power Station. The objective of the analysis is to present a full C-14 mass balance over a selected period of operation for which there are accurate C-14 discharge records. The analysis presented here provides the first assessment of the principal C-14 activation pathways

  3. Increase of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from Kujawy (SE Poland) around AD 774-775

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z.; Krąpiec, Marek; Huels, Mathias; Pawlyta, Jacek; Dreves, Alexander; Meadows, John

    2015-10-01

    Evidence of a rapid increase in atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) content in AD 774-775 was presented by Miyake et al. (2012), who observed an increase of about 12‰ in the 14C content in annual tree rings from Japanese cedar. Usoskin et al. (2013) report a similar 14C spike in German oak, and attribute it to exceptional solar activity. If this phenomenon is global in character, such rapid changes in 14C concentration may affect the accuracy of calibrated dates, as the existing calibration curve is composed mainly of decadal samples. Single-year samples of dendro-chronologically dated tree rings of deciduous oak (Quercus robur) from Kujawy, a village near Krakow (SE Poland), spanning the years AD 765-796, were collected and their 14C content was measured using the AMS system in the Leibniz Laboratory. The results clearly show a rapid increase of 9.2 ± 2.1‰ in the 14C concentration in tree rings between AD 774 and AD 775, with maximum Δ14C = 4.1 ± 2.3‰ noted in AD 776.

  4. Lichens as indicators of tritium and radiocarbon contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daillant, Olivier; Kirchner, Gerald; Pigree, Gilbert; Porstendorfer, Justin

    2004-01-01

    Lichens were collected in France in the surroundings of a military nuclear facility in Burgundy, near the la Hague reprocessing plant and in an area away from any direct source of contamination. Organically bound tritium (OBT) has been analysed on 18 samples and radiocarbon on 11. It appeared that on the most contaminated spots, the OBT activity in lichens was higher than the background by a factor of 1000 and was still a factor 10-100 at a distance of 20 km from the source. Radiocarbon from la Hague could be traced by lichens. The slow metabolism of lichens makes them suitable for the follow-up of 3 H and 14 C, which have been incorporated by photosynthesis

  5. May 14C be used to date contemporary art?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedi, M.E.; Caforio, L.; Mandò, P.A.; Petrucci, F.; Taccetti, F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiocarbon in forensics is by now widespread, thanks to the so-called bomb peak, which makes it possible to perform high-precision dating. Since 1955, 14 C concentration in the atmosphere had strongly increased due to nuclear explosions, reaching its maximum value in 1963–1965. After the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 14 C started to decrease as a consequence of the exchanges between atmosphere and the other natural carbon reservoirs. Nowadays, it is still slightly above the pre-bomb value. The work presented in this paper is based on the idea of exploiting the bomb peak to “precisely” date works of contemporary art, with the aim at identifying possible fakes. We analysed two kinds of materials from the 20th century: newspapers and painting canvases. Newspaper samples were taken because they might in principle be considered to represent dated samples (considering the date on the issues). Our data (28 samples) show a trend similar to atmospheric data in the literature, although with some differences; the paper peak is flatter and shifted towards more recent years (about five years) with respect to the atmospheric data. This can be explained by taking paper manufacturing processes into account. As to the canvas samples, the measured 14 C concentrations were generally reasonably consistent with the expected concentrations (based on the year on the paintings). However, this does not indicate that the interpretation of the results is simpler and more straightforward. Obviously, we only measure the 14 C concentration of the fibre used for the canvas, which does not necessarily measure the date the painting was manufactured. In this paper, sample preparation and experimental results will be discussed, in order to show the potential as well as the limitations of radiocarbon to date contemporary art.

  6. Monitoring of the 14C activity in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svingor, E.; Molnar, M.; Futo, I.; Rinyu, L.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The distribution of atmospheric radiocarbon has been extensively investigated both in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere as well as in the Tropics for a number of decades. Systematic global observations of 14 CO 2 in the troposphere were made during and after atmospheric nuclear weapon tests in the 1950s and 1960s by several laboratories. Nowadays the monitoring of 14 C in regions adjacent to nuclear power plants (NPP) or sites of land-filled radioactive wastes has growing importance in determining the frequency and activity of anthropogenic 14 C released to the environment. On the other hand, the depletion of 14 C in the atmosphere gives information about the regional fossil fuel CO 2 contributions (Figure 1., Prague-Bulovka). The 14 C activity of the atmosphere has been monitored in the vicinity of Paks NPP by sampling environmental air monthly since 1994. Four differential sampling units collect air samples less than 2 km away from the 100- m-high stacks of Paks NPP (A-type stations), and for reference a sampler is operated at a station (B24) ca. 30 km away from Paks NPP. The highest 14 C values were measured at the site located less than 1km away from Paks NPP. The influence of the 14 C discharge in the environment decreases rapidly with the distance from the source and under normal operating conditions the effect of Paks NPP is negligible at a distance of 2.5km. In Figure 1. we have compared our data for Paks NPP measured during the time span of 2000 - 2005 with data from different European monitoring stations. (The 14 C activities are given in Δ values: Δ 14 C(% (A sample /A standard -1) x 1000.) In 2000-2001 the excess 14 C at Paks NPP compared to the B24 was 5-10 (per mille) but its Δ value didn't exceed the tropospheric background (1). With the growing traffic the inactive CO 2 emission (Suess effect) exceeded the influence of the NPP (2). After a cleaning tank incident at unit 2 of Paks NPP in April 2003 a 5

  7. Fate and persistence of 14C pesticide residues in different soils: effects of 14C pesticide contaminated run-off soil water on biological systems. Part of a coordinated programme on isotopic-tracer-aided studies of agrochemical residue - soil biota interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenstein, E.

    1982-09-01

    The interaction of selected fungicides, herbicides and N-fertilizers with microorganisms in cranberry soils and their effects on the degradation of 14 C-phenyl-parathion were investigated. Incubation of soils with parathion of p-nitrophenol for 4 days, followed by the addition of 14 C-parathion resulted after 24 h in an enhanced degradation of the insecticide to 14 CO 2 (34-39% of the applied radiocarbon as opposed to 2% in controls) and also in an increased binding of 14 C to the soil. The fungicide captafol inhibited the degradation of soil-applied 14 C-parathion as evidenced by a reduction of both 14 CO 2 evolution and 14 C-bound residues. Maneb and benomyl suppressed the degradation of 14 C-parathion to 14 CO 2 but not the formation of bound residues. Addition of 2,4-D to 14 C-parathion treated soil also resulted in an increased persistence of the insecticide. Studies conducted with the insecticide and (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , NH 4 NO 3 , KNO 3 or urea showed that under all experimental conditions the total amounts of 14 C recovered were similar, yet the distribution of 14 C-compounds into benzene-soluble, water-soluble and bound residues was not. This possibly indicated a change in the pathway of 14 C-parathion degradation. The insecticide was most persistent in soils containing (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , as demonstrated by a recovery of 29% of the applied radiocarbon in benzene-soluble form. Analyses by TIC of this benzene extraction phase revealed the presence of 14 C-parathion, 14 C-p-aminophenol and 14 C-aminoparathion

  8. Constraining the sources and cycling of dissolved organic carbon in a large oligotrophic lake using radiocarbon analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigah, Prosper K.; Minor, Elizabeth C.; McNichol, Ann P.; Xu, Li; Werne, Josef P.

    2017-07-01

    We measured the concentrations and isotopic compositions of solid phase extracted (SPE) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and high molecular weight (HMW) DOC and their constituent organic components in order to better constrain the sources and cycling of DOC in a large oligotrophic lacustrine system (Lake Superior, North America). SPE DOC constituted a significant proportion (41-71%) of the lake DOC relative to HMW DOC (10-13%). Substantial contribution of 14C-depleted components to both SPE DOC (Δ14C = 25-43‰) and HMW DOC (Δ14C = 22-32‰) was evident during spring mixing, and depressed their radiocarbon values relative to the lake dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; Δ14C ∼ 59‰). There was preferential removal of 14C-depleted (older) and thermally recalcitrant components from HMW DOC and SPE DOC in the summer. Contemporary photoautotrophic addition to HMW DOC was observed during summer stratification in contrast to SPE DOC, which decreased in concentration during stratification. Serial thermal oxidation radiocarbon analysis revealed a diversity of sources (both contemporary and older) within the SPE DOC, and also showed distinct components within the HMW DOC. The thermally labile components of HMW DOC were 14C-enriched and are attributed to heteropolysaccharides (HPS), peptides/amide and amino sugars (AMS) relative to the thermally recalcitrant components reflecting the presence of older material, perhaps carboxylic-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM). The solvent extractable lipid-like fraction of HMW DOC was very 14C-depleted (as old as 1270-2320 14C years) relative to the carbohydrate-like and protein-like substances isolated by acid hydrolysis of HMW DOC. Our data constrain relative influences of contemporary DOC and old DOC, and DOC cycling in a modern freshwater ecosystem.

  9. A novel tertiary prep-HPLC method for the isolation of single amino acids for AMS-radiocarbon measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ricardo; Koudelka, Tomas; Tholey, Andreas; Dreves, Alexander

    2017-07-15

    AMS-radiocarbon measurements of amino acids can potentially provide more reliable radiocarbon dates than bulk collagen analysis. Nonetheless, the applicability of such an approach is often limited by the low-throughput of existing isolation methods and difficulties in determining the contamination introduced during the separation process. A novel tertiary prep-HPLC amino acid isolation method was developed that relies on the combustion of eluted material without requiring any additional chemical steps. Amino acid separation was carried out using a gradient mix of pure water and phosphoric acid with an acetonitrile step in-between runs to remove hydrophobic molecules from the separation column. The amount of contaminant carbon and its 14 C content were determined from two-point measurements of collagen samples of known 14 C content. The amount of foreign carbon due to the isolation process was estimated at 4±1μg and its 14 C content was 0.43±0.01 F 14 C. Radiocarbon values corrected for carbon contamination have only a minor increase in uncertainties. For Holocene samples, this corresponds to an added uncertainty typically smaller than 10 14 Cyears. The developed method can be added to routine AMS measurements without implying significant operational changes and offers a level of measurement uncertainty that is suitable for many archaeological, ecological, environmental, and biological applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Influence of pesticide applications on degradation of the herbicide 14C - 2,4-D in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcondes, Marcilio Amaral

    2001-01-01

    Despite the importance of pesticide usage for the food production, its indiscriminate use may cause changes in the soil fertility, because pesticides influence soil microorganisms which are important for the biogeochemical cycles. The influence of applications of several pesticides, as recommended for cotton culture, was studied on the bioactivity of different soils (from Sao Paulo and Tatui, SP) by using radiometric techniques and a closed system for detection of bio mineralization of ''1 4 C-2,4-D ( 14 C-2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) and production of 14 C-volatile compounds. The 14 C-2,4-D dissipation under influence of other pesticide applications was also studied by determination of 14 C-extractable residues, 14 C-bound residues and qualitative and quantitative analysis of the 14 C-extractable residues by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). 14 C-volatile compounds were never detected but increases and decreases of bio mineralization were detected in both soils after different treatments. The mixture of deltamethrin + methyl parathion increased significantly the bioactivity in both soils; nevertheless, monocrotophos did not have any influence. The applications of different pesticides have also influenced the 14 C-2,4-D dissipation, because the radiocarbon recovered as 14 C-extractable residues differed between the treated and untreated samples of both soils. On the other hand, the pesticide applications did not influence the production of 14 C-bound residues. This 14 C-residue was produced in larger amounts by the richest in organic matter soil (Sao Paulo). Although radiocarbon had been detected not only as 14 'C-2,4-D but also as a 14 C-metabolite, in both soils and treatments, results indicate that the ' 14 C-2,4-D dissipation varied in the two studied soils and was influenced by treatments with others pesticides. (author)

  11. Radiocarbon calibration - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plicht, J. van der

    2004-01-01

    Calibration of the Radiocarbon timescale is traditionally based on tree-rings dated by dendrochronology. At present, the tree-ring curve dates back to about 9900 BC. Beyond this limit, marine datasets extend the present calibration curve INTCAL98 to about 15 600 years ago. Since 1998, a wealth of AMS measurements became available, covering the complete 14 C dating range. No calibration curve can presently be recommended for the older part of the dating range until discrepancies are resolved

  12. Radiocarbon dating of Irish Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, P. J.

    1986-09-01

    Radiocarbon dating has been carried out on three cores from areas of muddy sediments in the N. Irish Sea to estimate rates of sediment accumulation. 14C age profiles of the two eastern basin cores revealed a near-constant age from the sediment surface to the base of the core (12 500±1000 years bp). The 14C age profile of the western basin core revealed a zone of apparent mixing to a depth of 55 cm, underlain by a zone of constant sedimentation rate (0·018 cm y -1) to 160 cm. These data are discussed in relation both to previously reported sedimentological studies of the area and to the authorised discharges of low-level radioactive waste from the Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing plant.

  13. Radiocarbon dating of soils, a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpenseel, H.W.; Schiffmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    The application of radiocarbon dating techniques for pedological purposes is reviewed in chronological sequence of its phases of introduction. Initially dating of charcoal and buried paleosols was dominating and accompanied by few soil dating attempts of recent soil formations on the basis of extracted humic acid-C. The following controversy regarding the potentialities and limitations of recent soil dating, still being involved in the intact turnover processes of modern biodynamics, led to intensive search for the relatively oldest, most favorable C-fraction, particularly a biologically inert C-fraction of the organic C-pool. Inclusion of C-14 dating in pedogenetic working concepts required soil profile date-scanning in order to reveal the age versus depth interdependence. (orig./HK) [de

  14. Radiocarbon dating of lake sediments and peats by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The small sample size requirement of accelerator mass spectrometry has allowed the measurement of the 14C/12C ratio for components of various lake sediment and peat samples, with a view to gaining greater understanding of sedimentary processes and to overcome some of the problems associated with conventional radiocarbon dating of sediments, where the 14C/12C ratio of the whole sample, less carbonate, is measured. Some of the fractions of sedimentary organic matter are amenable to analysis. Different molecules are specific to higher plants, algae and bacteria, so estimates of the major sources of input to the sediment can be made. The lipid fraction, though a small component (1%) of the total organic matter, yields most source information. Analyses of n-fatty acids and n-alkanes by capillary gas chromatography are used to interpret the radiocarbon result for the total crude lipid samples in the light of the environmental information so gained. Comparison of the various radiocarbon results for different components of the sediment has provided evidence for the importance of the amount of organic carbon in the samples, microbial attack during storage, the presence of mineral carbon, mixing, hard-water effects and the influence of terrestrial material on lake sediments. A regime has been proposed for the routine preparation of samples at an accelerator mass spectrometry facility in order to provide maximum useful information on a sediment sample. (author)

  15. Vertebral bomb radiocarbon suggests extreme longevity in white sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamady, Li Ling; Natanson, Lisa J; Skomal, Gregory B; Thorrold, Simon R

    2014-01-01

    Conservation and management efforts for white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) remain hampered by a lack of basic demographic information including age and growth rates. Sharks are typically aged by counting growth bands sequentially deposited in their vertebrae, but the assumption of annual deposition of these band pairs requires testing. We compared radiocarbon (Δ(14)C) values in vertebrae from four female and four male white sharks from the northwestern Atlantic Ocean (NWA) with reference chronologies documenting the marine uptake of (14)C produced by atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices to generate the first radiocarbon age estimates for adult white sharks. Age estimates were up to 40 years old for the largest female (fork length [FL]: 526 cm) and 73 years old for the largest male (FL: 493 cm). Our results dramatically extend the maximum age and longevity of white sharks compared to earlier studies, hint at possible sexual dimorphism in growth rates, and raise concerns that white shark populations are considerably more sensitive to human-induced mortality than previously thought.

  16. Radiocarbon dispersion around Canadian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, G.M.; Kramer, S.J.; Brown, R.M.; Repta, C.J.W.; King, K.J.; Rao, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) pressurized heavy-water reactors produce 14 C by neutron activation of trace quantities of nitrogen in annular gas and reactor components ( 14 N(n,p) 14 C), and from 17 O in the heavy water moderator by ( 17 O(n,α) 14 C). The radiocarbon produced in the moderator is removed on ion exchange resins incorporated in the water purification systems; however, a much smaller gaseous portion is vented from reactor stacks at activity levels considerably below 1% of permissible derived emission limits. Early measurements of the carbon speciation indicated that >90% of the 14 C emitted was in the form of CO 2 .We conducted surveys of the atmospheric dispersion of 14 CO 2 at the Chalk River Laboratories and at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. We analyzed air, vegetation, soils and tree rings to add to the historical record of 14 C emissions at these sites, and to gain an understanding of the relative importance of the various carbon pools that act as sources/sinks within the total 14 C budget. Better model parameters than those currently available for calculating the dose to the critical group can be obtained in this manner. Global dose estimates may require the development of techniques for estimating emissions occurring outside the growing season. (author)

  17. From scrolls to Picasso: AMS radiocarbon dating applied to textiles, art works and artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jull, A.J.T.; Donahue, D.J.; Beck, J.W.; Burr, G.S.; O`Malley, J.; Hewitt, L.; Biddulph, D.; Hatheway, A.L.; Lange, T.E.; Toolin, J. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Arizona Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility

    1997-12-31

    Full text: The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for radiocarbon dating allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating which were difficult to do before AMS, due to sample size limitations of decay counting. We have successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory and bone. For many of these types of samples, the results are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. This has encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt and Picasso. Most recently, we have also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document which shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages. An important issue in such studies is also the radiocarbon calibration curve. For some periods, most notably 1700-1950 AD we know that several changes in the {sup 14}C composition of the atmosphere make it almost impossible to date a sample during this period more precisely than the entire range. However, before this period, we have successfully dated materials to high precision. We have also studied the use of the period l900-1950 AD for {sup 14}C measurements and will present some examples where the rapid decline in {Delta} {sup 14}C can be used to date art works. The period after 1950AD also allows us to identify works fabricated from recent materials using the `spike` in {sup 14}C due to atmospheric nuclear testing. This bomb {sup 14}C has also been successfully used to identify originals from copies of works purporting to be the originals. We will discuss some artifacts, art works and forgeries, where {sup 14}C can resolve problems of authenticity (authors).

  18. Radiocarbon: nature's tracer for carbonaceous pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.; Klouda, G.A.; Gerlach, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Recent developments in radiocarbon dating techniques have made it feasible to determine 14 C/ 12 C ratios in samples containing milligram or even microgram quantities of carbon. As a result, it has become practicable to apply these techniques to the study of trace gases and particles in the atmosphere, as a means of resolving anthropogenic from natural source components. Interpretation of 14 C data is straightforward: biospheric carbon (such as vegetation) is alive with a 14 C/ 12 C ratio of about 1.5 x 10 -12 , whereas fossil carbon is dead. Beyond this dichotomous classification it becomes very interesting to combine the isotopic data with concurrent chemical data, as well as spatial and temporal distributions, in order to infer the strengths of specific sources of carbonaceous pollutants. A brief review will be presented of our program on atmospheric gases and carbonaceous particles. For the latter, we have assayed individual chemical and size fractions, and samples collected in urban, rural, and remote locales. The biogenic carbon fraction - presumably from wood-burning - ranged from 10% to 100% for the urban samples analyzed

  19. The 14C record in bristlecone pine wood of the past 8000 years based on the dendrochronology of the late C.W. Ferguson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, H.E.; Linick, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    When, in 1950, Willard Libby and his coworkers obtained their first radiocarbon ( 14 C) dates, C W Ferguson at the University of Arizona Tree Ring Laboratory was working on establishing a continuous tree ring series for the newly discovered bristlecone pine Pinus aristata. Before his untimely death in 1986, he had extended the series nearly 8000 years into the past. From the Ferguson series I obtained for 14 C determinations wood samples grown at various times. Also, two other laboratories obtained such samples. For B.C. times in particular, our measured 14 C-values that deviated consistently from those calculated from tree rings, and the deviations increased with age. This general trend was observed by other laboratories, but the presence of deviations from these trends, of the so-called 'wiggles', was questioned by other workers. To me these wiggles indicated the existence of a most interesting geophysical parameter valid for the whole terrestrial atmosphere. Fourier spectra obtained at my request by Kruse in 1972, and by Neftel, demonstrated the consistency of the results, and supported my contention that the secular variations of 14 C in atmospheric CO 2 are related to variations of solar activity. (author)

  20. Radiocarbon intercomparison program for Chauvet Cave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzange, M.T.; Delque-Kolic, E.; Oberlin, C.; Goslar, T.; Grootes, P.M.; Nadeau, M.J.; Higham, T.; Ramsey, C.B.; Kaltnecker, E.; Paterne, M.; Valladas, H.; Van der Plicht, J.; Van der Plicht, J.; Clottes, J.; Geneste, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first results of an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon intercomparison program on 3 different charcoal samples collected in one of the hearths of the Megaceros gallery of Chauvet Cave (Ardeche, France). This cave, rich in parietal decoration, is important for the study of the appearance and evolution of prehistoric art because certain drawings have been 14 C dated to the Aurignacian period at the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic. The new dates indicate an age of about 32,000 BP, which is consistent with this attribution and in agreement with the results from the same sector of the cave measured previously at the Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE). Six laboratories were involved in the intercomparison. Samples were measured in 4 AMS facilities: Center for Isotope Research, Groningen University, the Netherlands; the Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, UK; the Centre de datation par le carbone 14, Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1, France (measured by AMS facilities of Poznan University, Poland); and the LSCE, UMR CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, France (measured by the Leibniz-Labor of Christian-Albrechts-Universitat Kiel, Germany). (authors)

  1. May {sup 14}C be used to date contemporary art?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedi, M.E., E-mail: fedi@fi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Caforio, L. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Mando, P.A. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Petrucci, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Taccetti, F. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    The use of radiocarbon in forensics is by now widespread, thanks to the so-called bomb peak, which makes it possible to perform high-precision dating. Since 1955, {sup 14}C concentration in the atmosphere had strongly increased due to nuclear explosions, reaching its maximum value in 1963-1965. After the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, {sup 14}C started to decrease as a consequence of the exchanges between atmosphere and the other natural carbon reservoirs. Nowadays, it is still slightly above the pre-bomb value. The work presented in this paper is based on the idea of exploiting the bomb peak to 'precisely' date works of contemporary art, with the aim at identifying possible fakes. We analysed two kinds of materials from the 20th century: newspapers and painting canvases. Newspaper samples were taken because they might in principle be considered to represent dated samples (considering the date on the issues). Our data (28 samples) show a trend similar to atmospheric data in the literature, although with some differences; the paper peak is flatter and shifted towards more recent years (about five years) with respect to the atmospheric data. This can be explained by taking paper manufacturing processes into account. As to the canvas samples, the measured {sup 14}C concentrations were generally reasonably consistent with the expected concentrations (based on the year on the paintings). However, this does not indicate that the interpretation of the results is simpler and more straightforward. Obviously, we only measure the {sup 14}C concentration of the fibre used for the canvas, which does not necessarily measure the date the painting was manufactured. In this paper, sample preparation and experimental results will be discussed, in order to show the potential as well as the limitations of radiocarbon to date contemporary art.

  2. Radiocarbon calibration - past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plicht, J. van der E-mail: plicht@phys.rug.nl

    2004-08-01

    Calibration of the Radiocarbon timescale is traditionally based on tree-rings dated by dendrochronology. At present, the tree-ring curve dates back to about 9900 BC. Beyond this limit, marine datasets extend the present calibration curve INTCAL98 to about 15 600 years ago. Since 1998, a wealth of AMS measurements became available, covering the complete {sup 14}C dating range. No calibration curve can presently be recommended for the older part of the dating range until discrepancies are resolved.

  3. Applications, development, and control of methods for the determination of 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetlik, Ivo; Tomaskova, Lenka; Dreslerova, Dagmar; Michalek, Vaclav

    2010-01-01

    The methods of determination of 14 C are outlined, and a comparison between the conventional methods and the processing of microsamples with measurement by accelerator mass spectrometry is presented. The assets of the processing of microsamples are highlighted and some applications are described. The development potential of the conventional method which is based on the synthesis of benzene and measurement by LSC at our laboratory is discussed. Currently, our radiocarbon laboratory performs experiments aimed at the processing of microsamples and preparation of graphitized targets. As to the control of the analytical methods, radiocarbon dating using existing dated material for repeated analyses and comparison of dating results with those obtained by other laboratories is a convenient approach

  4. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-12-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg for radiocarbon dating in contrast to earlier counting techniques. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating that was difficult to do before AMS because of sample size limitations of decay counting. Some of the many applications of AMS include paleoclimatic studies, archaeological research and the age of first settlement of North America by man, dating of art works and artifacts, fall times and terrestrial residence ages of meteorites, production of {sup 14}C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ {sup 14}C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of {sup 14}C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages.

  5. Anomalous elevated radiocarbon measurements of PM2.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, Bruce A.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Zermeño, Paula; Bench, Graham; Schichtel, Bret A.

    2013-01-01

    Two-component models are often used to determine the contributions made by fossil fuel and natural sources of carbon in airborne particulate matter (PM). The models reduce thousands of actual sources to two end members based on isotopic signature. Combustion of fossil fuels produces PM free of carbon-14 ( 14 C). Wood or charcoal smoke, restaurant fryer emissions, and natural emissions from plants produce PM with the contemporary concentration of 14 C approximately 1.2 × 10 −1214 C/C. Such data can be used to estimate the relative contributions of fossil fuels and biogenic aerosols to the total aerosol loading and radiocarbon analysis is becoming a popular source apportionment method. Emissions from incinerators combusting medical or biological wastes containing tracer 14 C can skew the 14 C/C ratio of PM, however, so critical analysis of sampling sites for possible sources of elevated PM needs to be completed prior to embarking on sampling campaigns. Results are presented for two ambient monitoring sites in different areas of the United States where 14 C contamination is apparent. Our experience suggests that such contamination is uncommon but is also not rare (∼10%) for PM sampling sites.

  6. Wine ethanol C-14 as a tracer for fossil fuel CO2 emissions in Europe : Measurements and model comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Karstens, Ute; Streurman, Harm-Jan; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2008-01-01

    C-14 (radiocarbon) in atmospheric CO2 is the most direct tracer for the presence of fossil-fuel-derived CO2 (CO2-ff). We demonstrate the C-14 measurement of wine ethanol as a way to determine the relative regional atmospheric CO2-ff concentration compared to a background site ("regional CO2-ff

  7. 14C concentrations in the old woods at 6000yrBP and the variations of cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Taiichi; Sakurai, Hirohisa; Tokanai, Huyuki

    2008-01-01

    A large quantity of old woods was recently excavated with the Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in the bottom of the sea of near the Izumozaki-oki Nigata Prefecture. First of all, we have measured the radiocarbon ages for the three samples to identify the calendar ages of the woods. The radiocarbon ages were 5357±45 yrBP, 4573±52 yrBP, and 4812±52 yrBP, respectively. Using the OXCAL program, the calendar ages were calculated in the range from 6300 yrBP to 5100 yrBP. The IntCal04 data shows that the 14 C concentrations with the era are very variable with 20 per mille variations. We show a plan to investigate 14 C concentrations of the old tree rings around 6000 yrBP. (author)

  8. Towards a global understanding of vertical soil carbon dynamics: meta-analysis of soil 14C data

    Science.gov (United States)

    hatte, C.; Balesdent, J.; Guiot, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil represents the largest terrestrial storage mechanism for atmospheric carbon from photosynthesis, with estimates ranging from 1600 Pg C within the top 1 meter to 2350 Pg C for the top 3 meters. These values are at least 2.5 times greater than atmospheric C pools. Small changes in soil organic carbon storage could result in feedback to atmospheric CO2 and the sensitivity of soil organic matter to changes in temperature, and precipitation remains a critical area of research with respect to the global carbon cycle. As an intermediate storage mechanism for organic material through time, the vertical profile of carbon generally shows an age continuum with depth. Radiocarbon provides critical information for understanding carbon exchanges between soils and atmosphere, and within soil layers. Natural and "bomb" radiocarbon has been used to demonstrate the importance and nature of the soil carbon response to climatic and human impacts on decadal to millennial timescales. Radiocarbon signatures of bulk, or chemically or physically fractionated soil, or even of specific organic compounds, offer one of the only ways to infer terrestrial carbon turnover times or test ecosystem carbon models. We compiled data from the literature on radiocarbon distribution on soil profiles and characterized each study according to the following categories: soil type, analyzed organic fraction, location (latitude, longitude, elevation), climate (temperature, precipitation), land use and sampling year. Based on the compiled data, soil carbon 14C profiles were reconstructed for each of the 226 sites. We report here partial results obtained by statistical analyses of portion of this database, i.e. bulk and bulk-like organic matter and sampling year posterior to 1980. We highlight here 14C vertical pattern in relationship with external parameters (climate, location and land use).

  9. Evidence for Biomass Burning from 14C and 13C/12C Measurements at T-0 and T-1 during MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Tackett, M. J.; Sturchio, N. C.; Heraty, L. J.; Martinez, N.; Hardy, K.; Guilderson, T.

    2007-12-01

    Both stable carbon isotopic and radiocarbon characterizations of aerosols can yield important information regarding the sources of carbonaceous aerosols in urban and regional environments. Biomass derived materials are labeled due to their recent photochemical activity in radiocarbon and vary depending upon the photochemical pathway (either C-4 or C-3) in stable carbon-13 content. C-4 being enriched over C-3. During the MILAGRO campaign, quartz filter samples were taken at 12 hour intervals from 5 am to 5 pm (day) and from 5 pm to 5 am (night) during the month of March 2006. These samples were taken at the two super-sites, T-0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) and T-1 (Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, State of Mexico). The total carbon content was analyzed for stable carbon isotopic composition as well as for radiocarbon. Stable isotope mass spectroscopy was used to determine the carbon-13 to carbon-12 isotopic ratios on carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide was then converted to graphite for analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Results are presented for the carbon-13 content relative to the PDB standard and radiocarbon is given relative to recent carbon. The results for total radiocarbon content show that the carbonaceous aerosol content in Mexico City has more than half of the carbon coming from biomass derived sources. These can include inflow of biomass burning aerosols into the T-0 site as well as the input from local burning of biofuels and trash containing biomass derived materials (paper, boxes, etc.). Data also indicate that at the T-1 site biomass burning of C-4 grasses appears to be significant in that the carbon-13 values observed are enriched. Also at T-1 the radiocarbon levels are also found to be slightly higher indicating regional biomass burning as a significant contributor to aerosol carbon in the 0.1 to 1.0 micron size fraction. Some day

  10. Summary findings of the fourth international radiocarbon intercomparison (FIRI) (1998–2001)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boaretto, Elisabetta; Bryant, Charlotte; Carmi, Israel; Cook, Gordon; Gulliksen, Steinar; Harkness, Doug; Heinemeier, Jan; McClure, John; McGee, Edward; Naysmith, Philip; Possnert, Goran; Scott, Marian; Plicht, Hans van der; Strydonck, Mark van

    2002-01-01

    Interlaboratory comparisons have been widely used in applied radiocarbon science. These are an important part of ongoing quality assurance (QA) programmes, which are vital to the appropriate interpretation of the evidence provided by the 14C record in Quaternary applications (including climate

  11. Intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy. An analytical technique for 14C analysis with subattomole sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnick, Daniel E; Dogru, Ozgur; Ilkmen, Erhan

    2008-07-01

    We show a new ultrasensitive laser-based analytical technique, intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy, allowing extremely high sensitivity for detection of (14)C-labeled carbon dioxide. Capable of replacing large accelerator mass spectrometers, the technique quantifies attomoles of (14)C in submicrogram samples. Based on the specificity of narrow laser resonances coupled with the sensitivity provided by standing waves in an optical cavity and detection via impedance variations, limits of detection near 10(-15) (14)C/(12)C ratios are obtained. Using a 15-W (14)CO2 laser, a linear calibration with samples from 10(-15) to >1.5 x 10(-12) in (14)C/(12)C ratios, as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry, is demonstrated. Possible applications include microdosing studies in drug development, individualized subtherapeutic tests of drug metabolism, carbon dating and real time monitoring of atmospheric radiocarbon. The method can also be applied to detection of other trace entities.

  12. Towards radiocarbon dating of single foraminifera with a gas ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, L.; Lippold, J.; Molnár, M.; Schulz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate shells from foraminifera are often analysed for radiocarbon to determine the age of deep-sea sediments or to assess radiocarbon reservoir ages. However, a single foraminiferal test typically contains only a few micrograms of carbon, while most laboratories require more than 100 μg for radiocarbon dating with an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The collection of the required amount of foraminifera for a single analyses is therefore time consuming and not always possible. Here, we present a convenient method to measure the radiocarbon content of foraminifera using an AMS system fitted with a gas ion source. CO2 is liberated from 150 to 1150 μg of carbonate in septum sealed vials by acid decomposition of the carbonate. The CO2 is collected on a zeolite trap and subsequently transferred to a syringe from where it is delivered to the ion source. A sample of 400 μg (50 μg C) typically gives a 12C- ion source current of 10-15 μA over 20 min, yielding a measurement precision of less than 7 per mil for a modern sample. Using this method, we were able to date a single 560 μg Cibicides pseudoungerianus test at 14,030 ± 160 radiocarbon years. Only a minor modification to our existing gas handling system was required and the system is fully automatable to further reduce the effort involved for sample preparation.

  13. Towards radiocarbon dating of single foraminifera with a gas ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, L.; Lippold, J.; Molnár, M.; Schulz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate shells from foraminifera are often analysed for radiocarbon to determine the age of deep-sea sediments or to assess radiocarbon reservoir ages. However, a single foraminiferal test typically contains only a few micrograms of carbon, while most laboratories require more than 100 μg for radiocarbon dating with an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The collection of the required amount of foraminifera for a single analyses is therefore time consuming and not always possible. Here, we present a convenient method to measure the radiocarbon content of foraminifera using an AMS system fitted with a gas ion source. CO 2 is liberated from 150 to 1150 μg of carbonate in septum sealed vials by acid decomposition of the carbonate. The CO 2 is collected on a zeolite trap and subsequently transferred to a syringe from where it is delivered to the ion source. A sample of 400 μg (50 μg C) typically gives a 12 C − ion source current of 10–15 μA over 20 min, yielding a measurement precision of less than 7 per mil for a modern sample. Using this method, we were able to date a single 560 μg Cibicides pseudoungerianus test at 14,030 ± 160 radiocarbon years. Only a minor modification to our existing gas handling system was required and the system is fully automatable to further reduce the effort involved for sample preparation.

  14. Towards radiocarbon dating of single foraminifera with a gas ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, L., E-mail: wacker@phys.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Lippold, J. [Heidelberg Academy of Sciences, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Molnar, M. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Schulz, H. [Institute for Geosciencies, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Carbonate shells from foraminifera are often analysed for radiocarbon to determine the age of deep-sea sediments or to assess radiocarbon reservoir ages. However, a single foraminiferal test typically contains only a few micrograms of carbon, while most laboratories require more than 100 {mu}g for radiocarbon dating with an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The collection of the required amount of foraminifera for a single analyses is therefore time consuming and not always possible. Here, we present a convenient method to measure the radiocarbon content of foraminifera using an AMS system fitted with a gas ion source. CO{sub 2} is liberated from 150 to 1150 {mu}g of carbonate in septum sealed vials by acid decomposition of the carbonate. The CO{sub 2} is collected on a zeolite trap and subsequently transferred to a syringe from where it is delivered to the ion source. A sample of 400 {mu}g (50 {mu}g C) typically gives a {sup 12}C{sup -} ion source current of 10-15 {mu}A over 20 min, yielding a measurement precision of less than 7 per mil for a modern sample. Using this method, we were able to date a single 560 {mu}g Cibicides pseudoungerianus test at 14,030 {+-} 160 radiocarbon years. Only a minor modification to our existing gas handling system was required and the system is fully automatable to further reduce the effort involved for sample preparation.

  15. State of the Art of the all-Optical Radiocarbon Detection (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio Pastor, P.; Mazzotti, D.; Galli, I.; Giusfredi, G.; Bartalini, S.; Cappelli, F.; De Natale, P.

    2013-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C), the 'natural clock' for dating organic matter, is a very elusive atom. Its present concentration is about one part per trillion. For the past 30 years, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been adopted as the standard method for detecting such carbon isotope at concentrations well below its natural abundance (3 parts per quadrillion). AMS requires a smaller carbon mass and shorter measurement times than the old standard method of liquid scintillation counting. However, AMS requires huge, expensive and high-maintenance experimental facilities. We have developed a laser spectroscopy technique that is sensitive enough to detect the radiocarbon dioxide molecules at very low concentrations with an all-optical setup that is orders of magnitude more compact and less expensive than AMS [1]. The optical spectroscopy approach is based in the detection of very weak absorption of IR laser light by a 14C-containing molecule as 14C-Carbon Dioxide. Spectroscopic techniques as Cavity Ring Down (CRD) spectroscopy that uses the kilometric absorption paths provided by high-Finesse Fabry-Perot cavities have revolutionized the trace gas detection of molecular species in terms of ultimate sensitivity. Nevertheless CRD has been not capable to detect very elusive molecules as radiocarbon Dioxide. The new developed technique, named SCAR (saturated-absorption cavity ring-down), makes use of molecular absorption saturation to enhance resolution and sensitivity with respect to conventional CRD [2]. By combining SCAR with a frequency-comb-linked CW coherent source, which delivers tunable radiation (around 4.5-μm wavelength) [3], we could set an unprecedented limit in trace gas detection, accessing the part-per-quadrillion concentration range. Comparison between AMS and SCAR techniques to detect 14C by measuring the same carbon samples shows SCAR-based results are currently one order of magnitude shy of challenging AMS, but there is still room for improvement [4

  16. Sedimentological time-averaging and 14C dating of marine shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Osamu; Kamataki, Takanobu; Masuda, Fujio

    2004-01-01

    The radiocarbon dating of sediments using marine shells involves uncertainties due to the mixed ages of the shells mainly attributed to depositional processes also known as 'sedimentological time-averaging'. This stratigraphic disorder can be removed by selecting the well-preserved indigenous shells based on ecological and taphonomic criteria. These criteria on sample selection are recommended for accurate estimation of the depositional age of geologic strata from 14 C dating of marine shells

  17. Calibration of C-14 dates: some remaining uncertainties and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burleigh, R.

    1975-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the interpretation of radiocarbon dates in terms of calendar years. An outline is given of the factors that make such correlations necessary and of the work that has so far been done to make them possible. The calibration of the C-14 timescale very largely depends at present on the bristlecone pine chronology, but it is clear that many detailed uncertainties still remain. These are discussed. (U.K.)

  18. Is Comparability of 14C Dates an Issue?: A Status Report on the Fourth International Radiocarbon Intercomparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bryant, C.; Carmi, I.; Cook, G.T.; Gulliksen, S.; Harkness, D.D.; Heinemeier, J.; McGee, E.; Naysmith, P.; Possnert, G.; Scott, E.M.; Plicht, J. van der; Strydonck, M. van

    2001-01-01

    For more than 15 years, the radiocarbon community has participated in a series of laboratory intercomparisons in response to the issue of comparability of measurements as perceived within the wider user communities (Scott et al. 1990; Rozanski et al. 1992; Guiliksen and Scott 1995; Scott et al.

  19. Development of a preparation system for the radiocarbon analysis of organic carbon in carbonaceous aerosols in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.L.; Liu, D.; Shen, C.D.; Ding, P.; Zhang, G.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols comprising a large fraction of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) are considered to affect both global climate and human health. Radiocarbon measurements have been proved to be a useful isotopic tracer for distinguishing contemporary and fossil emissions. An optimized system of a two-step thermal preparation system for radiocarbon ( 14 C) measurement of OC/TC is firstly established in China. In this system, OC/TC are converted into carbon dioxide under a pure oxygen flow at 340 o C/650 o C and then reduced to graphite for AMS target using the method of zinc reduction. Afterwards, radiocarbon measurements of the targets performed by the NEC Compact AMS System at the Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The measured results for estimated reference martial including HOx I, HOx II and IAEA-C6 are consistent with internationally accepted values. The radiocarbon-based source appointment of carbonaceous aerosols in China would be much more convenient and faster with the preparation system developed in this work.

  20. Radiocarbon Content of Dissolved Organic Carbon in the South Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, S. K.; McNichol, A. P.; Xu, L.; Hansell, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    We report four profiles of the radiocarbon content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) spanning the South Indian Ocean (SIO), ranging from the Polar Front (56°S) to the subtropics (29°S). Surface waters held mean DOC Δ14C values of -426 ± 6‰ ( 4,400 14C years) at the Polar Front and DOC Δ14C values of -252 ± 22‰ ( 2,000 14C years) in the subtropics. At depth, Circumpolar Deep Waters held DOC Δ14C values of -491 ± 13‰ ( 5,400 years), while values in Indian Deep Water were more depleted, holding DOC Δ14C values of -503 ± 8‰ ( 5,600 14C years). High-salinity North Atlantic Deep Water intruding into the deep SIO had a distinctly less depleted DOC Δ14C value of -481 ± 8‰ ( 5,100 14C years). We use multiple linear regression to assess the dynamics of DOC Δ14C values in the deep Indian Ocean, finding that their distribution is characteristic of water masses in that region.

  1. Sources and formation mechanisms of carbonaceous aerosol at a regional background site in the Netherlands : insights from a year-long radiocarbon study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dusek, Ulrike; Hitzenberger, Regina; Kasper-Giebl, Anne; Kistler, Magdalena; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Szidat, Sonke; Wacker, Lukas; Holzinger, Rupert; Rockmann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We measured the radioactive carbon isotope C-14 (radiocarbon) in various fractions of the carbonaceous aerosol sampled between February 2011 and March 2012 at the Cesar Observatory in the Netherlands. Based on the radiocarbon content in total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), water-insoluble organic

  2. Analysis of 14C-bearing compounds released by the corrosion of irradiated steel using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, B Z; Salazar, G; Kunz, D; Szidat, S; Wieland, E

    2018-06-25

    The combination of ion chromatography (IC) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was developed to determine the speciation of 14C-(radiocarbon) bearing organic compounds in the femto to pico molar concentration range. The development of this compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of carboxylic acids is reported and the application of the method on a leaching solution from neutron-irradiated steel is demonstrated. The background and the dynamic range of the AMS-based method were quantified. On using 14C-labelled standards, the measurements demonstrate the repeatability of the analytical method and the reproducible recovery of the main target carboxylic acids (i.e., acetate, formate, malonate, and oxalate). The detection limit was determined to be in the mid fmol 14C per L level while the dynamic range of the analytical method covers three orders of magnitude from the low fmol to the mid pmol 14C per L level. Cross contamination was found to be negligible during IC fractionation and was accounted for during eluate processing and 14C detection by AMS. The 14C-bearing carboxylates released from an irradiated steel nut into an alkaline leaching solution were analysed using the CSRA-based analytical method with the aim to check the applicability of the approach and develop appropriate sample preparation. The concentrations of 14C-bearing formate and acetate, the main organic corrosion products, were at a low pmol 14C per L level for convenient dimensions of the alkaline leaching experiment which demonstrates that compound-specific 14C AMS is an extremely sensitive analytical method for analysing 14C-bearing compounds. The content of total organic 14C in solution (TO14C) determined by the direct measurement of an aliquot of the leaching solution agrees well with the sum of the 14C concentrations of the individual carboxylates within the uncertainty of the data. Furthermore, the TO14C content is in good agreement with the calculated value using the corrosion rate

  3. The remarkable metrological history of 14C dating: From ancient Egyptian artifacts to particles of soot and grains of pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating would not have been possible if 14C had not had the “wrong” half-life—a fact that delayed its discovery [1]. Following the discovery of this 5730 year radionuclide in laboratory experiments by Ruben and Kamen, it became clear to W. F. Libby that 14C should exist in nature, and that it could serve as a quantitative means for dating artifacts and events marking the history of civilization. The search for natural radiocarbon was a metrological challenge; the level in the living biosphere [ca. 230 Bq/kg] lay far beyond the then current state of the measurement art. This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought 14C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for “molecular dating” at the 10 μg to 100 μg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the “bomb effect,” that spawned new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from cosmic ray physics to oceanography to the reconstruction of environmental history.

  4. The remarkable metrological history of 14C dating: from ancient Egyptian artifacts to particles of soot and grains of pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating would not have been possible if 14 C had not had the 'wrong' half-life - a fact that delayed its discovery. Following the discovery of this 5730 year radionuclide in laboratory experiments by Ruben and Kamen, it became clear to W. F. Libby that 14 C should exist in nature, and that it could serve as a quantitative means for dating artifacts and events marking the history of civilization. The search for natural radiocarbon was a metrological challenge; the level in the living biosphere (ca. 230 Bq/kg) lay far beyond the then current state of the measurement art. This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought 14 C measurement from a crude, bulk (8 g carbon) dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for 'molecular dating' at the 10 μg to 100 mg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the 'bomb effect', that spawned new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from cosmic ray physics to oceanography to the reconstruction of environmental history. (author)

  5. Increase of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from Kujawy (SE Poland) around AD 774–775

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z.; Krąpiec, Marek; Huels, Mathias; Pawlyta, Jacek; Dreves, Alexander; Meadows, John

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of a rapid increase in atmospheric radiocarbon ( 14 C) content in AD 774–775 was presented by Miyake et al. (2012), who observed an increase of about 12‰ in the 14 C content in annual tree rings from Japanese cedar. Usoskin et al. (2013) report a similar 14 C spike in German oak, and attribute it to exceptional solar activity. If this phenomenon is global in character, such rapid changes in 14 C concentration may affect the accuracy of calibrated dates, as the existing calibration curve is composed mainly of decadal samples. Single-year samples of dendro-chronologically dated tree rings of deciduous oak (Quercus robur) from Kujawy, a village near Krakow (SE Poland), spanning the years AD 765–796, were collected and their 14 C content was measured using the AMS system in the Leibniz Laboratory. The results clearly show a rapid increase of 9.2 ± 2.1‰ in the 14 C concentration in tree rings between AD 774 and AD 775, with maximum Δ 14 C = 4.1 ± 2.3‰ noted in AD 776.

  6. Increase of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from Kujawy (SE Poland) around AD 774–775

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z., E-mail: arakowski@polsl.pl [Leibniz-Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Institute of Physics – Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego Str. 22B, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Krąpiec, Marek [AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza Av. 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Huels, Mathias [Leibniz-Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Pawlyta, Jacek [Institute of Physics – Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego Str. 22B, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Dreves, Alexander [Leibniz-Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Meadows, John [Leibniz-Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Isotope Research, University Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Centre for Baltic and Scandinavian Archaeology, Schleswig-Holstein State Museums Foundation, Schloss Gottorf, Schloßinsel, 24837 Schleswig (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Evidence of a rapid increase in atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) content in AD 774–775 was presented by Miyake et al. (2012), who observed an increase of about 12‰ in the {sup 14}C content in annual tree rings from Japanese cedar. Usoskin et al. (2013) report a similar {sup 14}C spike in German oak, and attribute it to exceptional solar activity. If this phenomenon is global in character, such rapid changes in {sup 14}C concentration may affect the accuracy of calibrated dates, as the existing calibration curve is composed mainly of decadal samples. Single-year samples of dendro-chronologically dated tree rings of deciduous oak (Quercus robur) from Kujawy, a village near Krakow (SE Poland), spanning the years AD 765–796, were collected and their {sup 14}C content was measured using the AMS system in the Leibniz Laboratory. The results clearly show a rapid increase of 9.2 ± 2.1‰ in the {sup 14}C concentration in tree rings between AD 774 and AD 775, with maximum Δ{sup 14}C = 4.1 ± 2.3‰ noted in AD 776.

  7. The role of the archaeologist in C-14 age measurement. Appendix II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    A C-14 date may be considered to exist in two forms: (a) the 'conventional age' as reported by C-14 laboratories and/or published in the journal Radiocarbon, and (b) the so-called 'corrected age' derived after recourse to half-life changes and calibration curves or tables. While a great deal of advice has been presented to the archaeologist on how he should best correct and interpret the basic conventional C-14 date the importance of his role in ensuring its validity has been largely neglected. This article would hope to clarify where and why the archaeologist can assist in the practical aspects of dating and in so doing also answer such familiar questions as: which sample material is most suited to the production of a valid C-14 date; how much material is required; how are samples best collected, recorded, stored and transported. (author)

  8. The study of variations and environmental applications 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of the presented thesis is to explain experimentally observed 14 C variations in the outer atmosphere. Physical models have been developed to quantify directly immeasurable phenomena relevant in the field of radiocarbon dynamics. Namely atmospheric stability, 14 C transport from the stratosphere to the lower troposphere and fossil carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. Finally these models have been used as the pillars of the united theory of Δ 14 C dynamics. Besides the presented main theoretical outputs, this thesis also provides couple of potentially implementable by-products. First of them is a method to evaluate so called 'equivalent mixing height' and turbulent diffusion coefficient using temporal changes of 222 Rn concentration in the boundary layer of the atmosphere. The elaborated mathematical apparatus for the evaluation of aerosol scavenging by raindrops can be utilized in the models of pollutant dispersion. Information on turbulent diffusion coefficient at higher atmospheric levels is important for the models of stratospheric and ozonospheric dynamics. Nowadays, when one can measure and even feel the greenhouse effect consequences, the importance of an independent method for carbon dioxide fossil emissions assessment is obvious. Besides theoretical outcome, the thesis also presents experimental results. A network of CO 2 sampling sites has been established in Bratislava and the outskirts in the vicinity of the town. Together with mountain site Chopok the network brought a unique information on 14 C distribution. Atmospheric measurements of 7 Be and 222 Rn activity are also presented here. Finally the PC codes have been developed to bridge a gap between experimental and theoretical results. (author)

  9. Radiocarbon Records of Fossil Fuel Emissions From Urban Trees in the Greater Salt Lake Valley From Mid-Century to Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chritz, K.; Buchert, M.; Walker, J. C.; Mendoza, D.; Pataki, D. E.; Xu, X.; Lin, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Generating long term records of fossil fuel emissions of urban environments is complicated by the fact that direct observations of emissions and urban atmospheric CO2 concentrations were only collected in the recent past. Radiocarbon (14C) in tree rings from urban trees can provide archives of fossil fuel emissions that may track population growth over time, as higher population density is typically correlated with increased vehicular traffic and associated CO2 emissions, which are radiocarbon dead. We present radiocarbon measurements (n=125) from five roadside green ash trees (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) located in three cities of northern Utah - Salt Lake City (urban, 2016 population: 193,744), Logan City (agricultural, 2016 population: 49,110) and Heber (rural, 2016 population: 14,969). Urban trees were cored in four cardinal directions and ring widths were measured and counted to establish a chronology. One ring from every third year in a single core from each tree was removed and holocellulose was extracted from bulk wood of individual rings for 14C analysis. Fraction CO2 from fossil fuel burning (CO2-ff) was calculated using a simple mass-balance calculation from measured 14C values and remote background atmospheric 14CO2 values for NH Zone 2. The data from all three cities indicate a general trend of increasing CO2-ff uptake by the trees from 1980s to present, as expected with increased population growth and vehicular traffic. However, records in all three cities show unique elevated CO2-ff prior to the 1980s, assuming similar climate patterns through time, diverging from historic population size. We employed atmospheric simulations from the STILT (Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) models for each of these trees to create footprints to determine source areas for CO2. These footprints reveal that atmospheric sampling areas can be large for certain trees, and other sources of 14C dead carbon, such as coal and natural gas from industrial emissions

  10. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    of magnitude and degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants, and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 14C years can occur within one river. The freshwater reservoir effect has also implications......The freshwater reservoir effect can result in anomalously old radiocarbon ages of samples from lakes and rivers. This includes the bones of people whose subsistence was based on freshwater fish, and pottery in which fish was cooked. Water rich in dissolved ancient calcium carbonates, commonly known...... as hard water, is the most common reason for the freshwater reservoir effect. It is therefore also called hardwater effect. Although it has been known for more than 60 years, it is still less well-recognized by archaeologists than the marine reservoir effect. The aim of this study is to examine the order...

  11. AMS radiocarbon dating of mortar: The case study of the medieval UNESCO site of Modena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmine, Lubritto [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali, Biologiche e Farmaceutiche & CIRCE lab, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, I-81100 Caserta (Italy); Caroselli, Marta; Lugli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Marzaioli, Fabio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica & CIRCE lab, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, I-81100 Caserta (Italy); Nonni, Sara [Università degli Studi “Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Marchetti Dori, S. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Terrasi, Filippo [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica & CIRCE lab, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, I-81100 Caserta (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The carbon dioxide contributing to binder formation during the set of a lime mortar reflects the atmospheric {sup 14}C content at the time of construction of a building. For this reason, the {sup 14}C dating of mortars is used with increasing frequencies in archaeological and architectural research. Mortars, however, may also contain carbonaceous contaminants potentially affecting radiocarbon dating. The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of the Second University of Naples (SUN) has recently obtained some promising results in mortar radiocarbon dating thanks to the development of a procedure (i.e. CryoSoniC/Cryo2SoniC) aiming to eliminate exogenous C contamination that may occur in a mortar. The construction history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Modena (Italy) is still controversial and represents a challenging case study for the application of absolute dating methodologies for different reasons. From the point of view of {sup 14}C dating, for example, given the high percentage of carbonate aggregates composing these samples, Modena mortars represent an experimental test particularly indicative of exogenous carbon sources suppression ensuring methodology accuracy. In this paper several AMS Radiocarbon dates were carried out on lime lumps with the aim to: (i) verify procedure accuracy by a comparison of the results obtainable from lime lumps dated after different treatments (i.e. bulk lime lumps vs. CryoSoniC purified lime lumps); (ii) compare different building phases absolute chronology for the medieval UNESCO site of Modena, with that assumed by historical sources in order to assess preliminary the {sup 14}C dating feasibility for of the site. Historical temporal constraints and mortar clustering, based on petrography, have been applied to define a temporal framework of the analyzed structure. Moreover, a detailed petrographic characterization of mortars was used both as a preliminary tool for the choice of samples

  12. AMS radiocarbon dating of mortar: The case study of the medieval UNESCO site of Modena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmine, Lubritto; Caroselli, Marta; Lugli, Stefano; Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Marchetti Dori, S.; Terrasi, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    The carbon dioxide contributing to binder formation during the set of a lime mortar reflects the atmospheric "1"4C content at the time of construction of a building. For this reason, the "1"4C dating of mortars is used with increasing frequencies in archaeological and architectural research. Mortars, however, may also contain carbonaceous contaminants potentially affecting radiocarbon dating. The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of the Second University of Naples (SUN) has recently obtained some promising results in mortar radiocarbon dating thanks to the development of a procedure (i.e. CryoSoniC/Cryo2SoniC) aiming to eliminate exogenous C contamination that may occur in a mortar. The construction history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Modena (Italy) is still controversial and represents a challenging case study for the application of absolute dating methodologies for different reasons. From the point of view of "1"4C dating, for example, given the high percentage of carbonate aggregates composing these samples, Modena mortars represent an experimental test particularly indicative of exogenous carbon sources suppression ensuring methodology accuracy. In this paper several AMS Radiocarbon dates were carried out on lime lumps with the aim to: (i) verify procedure accuracy by a comparison of the results obtainable from lime lumps dated after different treatments (i.e. bulk lime lumps vs. CryoSoniC purified lime lumps); (ii) compare different building phases absolute chronology for the medieval UNESCO site of Modena, with that assumed by historical sources in order to assess preliminary the "1"4C dating feasibility for of the site. Historical temporal constraints and mortar clustering, based on petrography, have been applied to define a temporal framework of the analyzed structure. Moreover, a detailed petrographic characterization of mortars was used both as a preliminary tool for the choice of samples and to infer

  13. Tips and traps in the 14C Bio-AMS preparation laboratory (WSam 7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, B A; Haack, K W; Stewart, P H; Vogel, J S

    1999-01-01

    Maintaining a contamination free sample preparation lab for biological 14 C AMS requires the same or more diligence as a radiocarbon dating prep lab. Isotope ratios of materials routinely range over 4-8 orders of magnitude in a single experiment, dosing solutions contain thousands of DPM and gels used to separate proteins possess 14 C ratios of 1pMC. Radiocarbon contamination is a legacy of earlier tracer work in most biological laboratories, even if they were never hot labs. Removable surface contamination can be found and monitored using swipes. Contamination can be found on any surface routinely touched: door knobs, light switches, drawer handles, water faucets. In general, all surfaces routinely touched need to be covered with paper, foil, or plastic that can be changed frequently. Shared air supplies can also present problems by distributing hot aerosols throughout a building. Aerosols can be monitored for 14 C content using graphitized coal or fullerene soot mixed with metal powder as an absorber. The monitors can be set out in work spaces for 1-2 weeks and measured by AMS with regular samples. Frequent air changes help minimize aerosol contamination in many cases. Cross contamination of samples can be minimized by using disposable plastic or glassware in the prep lab, isolating samples from the air when possible and using positive displacement pipetters

  14. LBA-ECO CD-08 Radiocarbon Dates for Large Trees from a Forest near Manaus, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports the ages and growth rates of trees as determined by radiocarbon dating (14C), selected from a logging operation near the city of Itacoatiara,...

  15. LBA-ECO CD-08 Radiocarbon Dates for Large Trees from a Forest near Manaus, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports the ages and growth rates of trees as determined by radiocarbon dating (14C), selected from a logging operation near the city of...

  16. High resolution 14C dating of surface peat using the AMS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolonen, K.; Possnert, G.; Jungner, H.; Sonninen, E.; Alm, J.

    1992-01-01

    In an AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometric) determination of 14 C from moss-increment dated samples from a Sphagnum fuscum hummock, a clear peak representing the time of high 14 C activity in the atmosphere due to nuclear bomb tests was found. The C-14 activities in the peat profile at deeper levels, corresponding to the period down to 1600 Bp, showed similar variations as the atmospheric values. The time scale obtained from radiocarbon dating fitted well with results from moss-increment counting, pollen analysis and dendrochronological dating of a fire horizon. Using the bomb layers and refixing into growing peat was estimated. The fraction of soil carbon dioxide taken up by the contemporary Sphagnum Sward was thus found to be in the order of 20 %. (orig.). (15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.)

  17. Detection of 14C in natural trace organics recovered from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.; Long, A.; Davis, S.N.; Donahue, D.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocarbon measurements on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in groundwater have given the authors insight into chemical and hydrological processes occurring in aquifers. Carbon-14 analyses on various dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fractions from groundwater are only starting, but, as is true for DIC 14 C measurements, their significance reaches beyond dating of water and into chemical processes in the aquifer and recharge zone. When combined with information on the chemical character of the DOC, 14 C data may clarify the origin and diagenesis of organic carbon in groundwater. In the past, research into the 14 C has been discouraged by the low concentrations of DOC in groundwater, typically in the μg/l range. The tandem accelerator at the University of Arizona can analyze 14 C in as little as 1 mg of carbon, thus requiring isolation of the DOC from 200 l or less of groundwater. This paper describes the techniques bring used for separation of the DOC in groundwater, some of the data collected, and the significance of these data

  18. Climatic events and Upper Paleolithic chronology in the Dniester basin : New C-14 results from Cosautsi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haesaerts, P; Borziak, [No Value; Van Der Plicht, J; Damblon, F; Borziak, Ilic; Mook, W.G.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the radiocarbon chronology of the loess deposited during the Upper Pleniglacial (Isotope Stage II) for the key site of Cosautsi (Republic of Moldova), which presents some major problems in C-14 dating. Special care was paid to accurate microstratigraphic positioning of samples, collection

  19. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-07-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3-1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. 14C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. 14C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve 14C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts.

  20. An update on in situ cosmogenic {sup 14}C analysis at ETH Zuerich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippe, K., E-mail: hippe@erdw.ethz.ch [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Kober, F. [Institute of Geology, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Wacker, L. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Fahrni, S.M. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Bern CH-3012 (Switzerland); Ivy-Ochs, S. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Akcar, N.; Schluechter, C. [Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern CH-3012 (Switzerland); Wieler, R. [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8092 (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    We present the improved performance of the modified in situ cosmogenic {sup 14}C extraction system at ETH Zuerich. Samples are now processed faster (2 days in total) and are measured with a high analytical precision of usually <2% using the gas ion source of the MICADAS AMS facility. Measurements of the PP-4 standard sample show a good reproducibility and consistency with published values. Procedural blanks are very low at currently {approx}4.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 414}C atoms. Analyses of samples from a {approx}300 year old rock avalanche prove that we can successfully apply in situ{sup 14}C exposure dating to very young surfaces. Additionally, we present a modified calculation scheme for in situ{sup 14}C concentrations which differs from that used for conventional radiocarbon dating. This new approach explicitly accounts for the characteristics of in situ{sup 14}C production.

  1. New radiocarbon measurement methods in the Hertelendi Laboratory, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovics, Róbert; Major, István; Rinyu, László; Veres, Mihály; Molnár, Mihály

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we present two very different and novel methods for C-14 measurement from dissolved inorganic carbonate (DIC) of water samples. A new LSC sample preparation method for liquid scintillation C-14 measurements was implemented in the ATOMKI. The first method uses direct absorption into a special absorbent (Carbosorb E®) and a following liquid scintillation measurement. Typical sample size is 20-40 litre of water. The developed CO2 absorption method is fast, and simple. The C-14 activities is measured by an ultra low background LSC (TRI-CARB 3170 TR/SL, Perkin Elmer) including quenching parameter (tSIE).The corresponding limit of C-14 dating is 31200 year. Several tests were executed with old borehole CO2 gas without significant content of C-14 and also performed on samples of known C-14 activities between 29 and 7000 pMC, previously measured by GPC. The combined uncertainty of the described determination is about 2 % in the case of recent carbon. It is a very cost-effective and easy to use method based on a novel and simple static absorption process for the CO2 extracted from groundwater. The other very sensitive method is based on accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) using gas ion source. This method does not require graphite generation and a small volume of water sample (1-20mL) is enough for the radiocarbon measurement. The procedure is very similar to pre-treatment of carbonate contained sample preparation for stable isotope measurement with gasbench technique. We applied a MICADAS type accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) with gas ion source for C-14 analysis. The radiocarbon content of water was sat free with phosphoric acid and then the headspace gas was rinsed vials. The whole measurement needs only 20 min of each sample. The precision of measurement is better than 1% for modern samples. The preparation is vastly reduced compared to the other AMS methods and principally allows fully automated measurements of groundwater samples with an auto

  2. Reconciling radiocarbon and ice core timescales over the Holocene - Cosmogenic radionuclides as synchronization tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscheler, R.; Adolphi, F.; Mekhaldi, F.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric production rates of cosmogenic radionuclides, such as 14C and 10Be, vary globally due to external processes, namely the solar and geomagnetic modulation of the galactic cosmic ray flux as well as solar proton events. This signature is recorded in various archives such as ice cores (10Be) and tree-rings (14C). Hence, cosmogenic radionuclides offer a means to continuously assess timescale differences between two of the most widely used timescales in paleoclimatology - the radiocarbon and the ice core timescales. Short lived solar proton events additionally provide distinct marker horizons that allow synchronization of discrete horizons at annual precision. We will present a cosmogenic radionuclide based synchronization of the Greenland ice core timescale (GICC05, Svensson et al., 2008) and the radiocarbon timescale (IntCal13, Reimer et al., 2013) over the Holocene. This synchronization allows radiocarbon dated and ice core paleoclimate records to be compared on a common timescale at down to sub-decadal precision. We will compare these results to independent discrete isochrones obtained from tephrochronology and solar proton events. In addition, we will discuss implications for the accuracy and uncertainty estimates of GICC05 over the Holocene. Reimer, P. J., Bard, E., Bayliss, A., Beck, J. W., Blackwell, P. G., Bronk Ramsey, C., Buck, C. E., Cheng, H., Edwards, R. L., Friedrich, M., Grootes, P. M., Guilderson, T. P., Haflidason, H., Hajdas, I., Hatté, C., Heaton, T. J., Hoffmann, D. L., Hogg, A. G., Hughen, K. A., Kaiser, K. F., Kromer, B., Manning, S. W., Niu, M., Reimer, R. W., Richards, D. A., Scott, E. M., Southon, J. R., Staff, R. A., Turney, C. S. M., and van der Plicht, J.: IntCal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0-50,000 Years cal BP, Radiocarbon, 55, 1869-1887, 10.2458/azu_js_rc.55.16947, 2013. Svensson, A., Andersen, K. K., Bigler, M., Clausen, H. B., Dahl-Jensen, D., Davies, S. M., Johnsen, S. J., Muscheler, R., Parrenin

  3. Measurement of biocarbon in flue gases using 14C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemaelaeinen, K.M.; Jungner, H.; Antson, O.; Rasanen, J.; Tormonen, K.; Roine, J. [University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland). Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory

    2007-07-01

    A preliminary investigation of the biocarbon fraction in carbon dioxide emissions of power plants using both fossil- and biobased fuels is presented. Calculation of the biocarbon fraction is based on radiocarbon content measured in power plant flue gases. Samples were collected directly from the chimneys into plastic sampling bags. The C-14 content in CO{sub 2} was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Flue gases from power plants that use natural gas, coal, wood chips, bark, plywood residue, sludge from the pulp factory, peat, and recovered fuel were measured. Among the selected plants, there was one that used only fossil fuel and one that used only biofuel; the other investigated plants burned mixtures of fuels. The results show that C-14 measurement provides the possibility to determine the ratio of bio and fossil fuel burned in power plants.

  4. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Davisson, M. Lee; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    We used radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to resolve sources of riverine carbon within agriculturally dominated landscapes in California. During 2003 and 2004, average Δ14C for DOC was −254‰ in agricultural drains in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, −218‰ in the San Joaquin River, −175‰ in the California State Water Project and −152‰ in the Sacramento River. The age of bulk DOC transiting the rivers of California’s Central Valley is the oldest reported for large rivers and suggests wide-spread loss of soil organic matter caused by agriculture and urbanization. Using DAX 8 adsorbent, we isolated and measured 14C concentrations in hydrophobic acid fractions (HPOA); river samples showed evidence of bomb-pulse carbon with average Δ14C of 91 and 76‰ for the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers, respectively, with older HPOA, −204‰, observed in agricultural drains. An operationally defined non-HPOA fraction of DOC was observed in the San Joaquin River with seasonally computed Δ14C values of between −275 and −687‰; the source of this aged material was hypothesized to be physically protected organic-matter in high clay-content soils and agrochemicals (i.e., radiocarbon-dead material) applied to farmlands. Mixing models suggest that the Sacramento River contributes about 50% of the DOC load in the California State Water Project, and agricultural drains contribute approximately one-third of the load. In contrast to studies showing stabilization of soil carbon pools within one or two decades following land conversion, sustained loss of soil organic matter, occurring many decades after the initial agricultural-land conversion, was observed in California’s Central Valley.

  5. Results of radiocarbon dating of Holocene fluvial sediments from Northeastern Bohemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silar, J.; Zeman, A.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of wood and charcoal from the latest Holocene fluvial sediments under the lowest surface of alluvial plains were dated by radiocarbon in order to check paleomagnetic data at four sites in northeastern Bohemia. The results are presented as funcorrected 14 C ages and dendrochronologically corrected ages. Two samples were recent. 4 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs

  6. Insights into soil carbon dynamics across climatic and geologic gradients from temporally-resolved radiocarbon measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, T. S.; Hagedorn, F.; Mannu, U.; Walthert, L.; McIntyre, C.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2016-12-01

    Soil carbon constitutes the largest terrestrial reservoir of organic carbon, and therefore quantifying soil organic matter dynamics (carbon turnover, stocks and fluxes) across spatial gradients is essential for an understanding of the carbon cycle and the impacts of global change. In particular, links between soil carbon dynamics and different climatic and compositional factors remains poorly understood. Radiocarbon constitutes a powerful tool for unraveling soil carbon dynamics. Temporally-resolved radiocarbon measurements, which take advantage of "bomb-radiocarbon"-driven changes in atmospheric 14C, enable further constraints to be placed on C turnover times. These in turn can yield more precise flux estimates for both upper and deeper soil horizons. This project combines bulk radiocarbon measurements on a suite of soil profiles spanning strong climatic (MAT 1.3-9.2°C, MAP 600 to 2100 mm m-2y-1) and geologic gradients with a more in-depth approach for a subset of locations. For this subset, temporal and carbon-fraction specific radiocarbon data has been acquired for both topsoil and deeper soils. These well-studied sites are part of the Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) program of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape research (WSL). Resulting temporally-resolved turnover estimates are coupled to carbon stocks, fluxes across this wide range of forest ecosystems and are examined in the context of environmental drivers (temperature, precipitation, primary production and soil moisture) as well as composition (sand, silt and clay content). Statistical analysis on the region-scale - correlating radiocarbon signature with climatic variables such as temperature, precipitation, primary production and elevation - indicates that composition rather than climate is a key driver of ­­Δ14C signatures. Estimates of carbon turnover, stocks and fluxes derived from temporally-resolved measurements highlight the pivotal role of soil moisture as a

  7. Comparative radiocarbon dating of terrestrial plant macrofossils and aquatic moss from the ice-free corridor of western Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, G.M.; Beukens, R.P.; Kieser, W.E.; Vitt, D.H.

    1987-09-01

    In order to assess the reliability of aquatic moss for radiocarbon dating, /sup 14/C analyses were performed on a stratigraphic series of terrestrial plant macrofossils and samples of Drepanocladus crassicostatus from a small, hard-water lake (pH = 8.2) in the ice-free corridor of Alberta. All /sup 14/C dating was done by using accelerator mass spectrometry. Mazama Ash provided an independent chronological control. The aquatic bryophyte samples consistently produced /sup 14/C ages significantly older than the terrestrial macrofossils. The relation between the radiocarbon dates from the macrofossils and the moss was not linear, and age differences ranged from approximately 1400 to 6400 yr. The /sup 14/C content of D. crassicostatus growing in the lake at present was less than 85% modern. Despite the apparent inability to take up /sup 14/C-deficient carbon by the direct incorporation of bicarbonate, the bryophytes clearly do not provide reliable material /sup 14/C dating. The /sup 14/C deficiency of aquatic mosses may be explained by the generation of /sup 14/C-deficient CO/sub 2/ through isotopic exchange, the formation of CO/sub 2/ from bicarbonate by chemical processes, and metabolic CO/sub 2/ production. These results demonstrate the potential unreliability of /sup 14/C dates from aquatic mosses and raise serious concerns about the deglaciation dates from the ice-free corridor that were obtained from aquatic Drepanocladus.

  8. An assessment of variability in radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, E.M.; Baxter, M.S.; Aitchison, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    A series of replicate experiments, involving analysis of homogenized wood and identical tree-ring sections, suggests that the 14 C counting error in radiocarbon dating quantifies only part of the total variability of measurement. Statistical modelling implies that a more realistic assessment of error is provided by a value approximately three times the counting error. The incorporation of this more realistic measure of variability into an appropriate procedure for calibrating a single date and for matching a floating chronology to a master chronology is described. (author)

  9. Radiocarbon dating and compositional analysis of pre-Columbian human bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E.; Solís, C.; Canto, C. E.; de Lucio, O. G.; Chavez, E.; Rocha, M. F.; Villanueva, O.; Torreblanca, C. A.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of ancient human bones found in "El Cóporo", an archaeological site in Guanajuato, Mexico; were performed using a multi techniques scheme: 14C radiocarbon dating, IBA (Ion Beam Analysis), SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). We measured the elemental composition of the bones, especially some with a superficial black pigmentation. Soil samples collected from the burial place were also analyzed. The 14C dating was performed with a new High Voltage Europe 1 MV Tandentron Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) recently installed in the IFUNAM (Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). The radiocarbon dating allowed us to determine the date of death of the individual in a period between the year 890 and 975 AD, which is consistent with the late period of the Cóporo civilization. The element sample analysis of bones with the surface black pigmentation show higher levels of Fe, Mn and Ba compared when bone's black surface was mechanically removed. These three elements were found in soil samples from the skeleton burial place. These results indicate more likely that the bone black coloration is due to a postmortem alteration occurring in the burial environment.

  10. Application of AMS radiocarbon in earth system science studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Jin; Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Kyung Ryul

    2001-01-01

    Radiocarbon, a cosmic ray-produced isotope, is one of the most important tracers in Earth system sciences. The strong involvement of carbon in the biosphere and its half life of 5720 years are reflected in appropriate applications in archeology, as well as in the Earth system sciences. Radiocarbon dating had an important turning point in 1977 with the discovery that mass spectrometry with tandem acceleration could be used to measure C-14. This new technique, known as AMS or accelerator mass spectrometry reduced the required sample size to the order of mg, three orders of magnitude smaller than for conventional techniques, thus opening the range of applicability of C-14 studies to a much wider range of samples. However, the application has been complicated by two major activities of human beings on a global scale: the extensive usage of fossil fuel since the industrial revolution and nuclear testing in the atmosphere, which have influenced the natural balance of radiocarbon in the atmosphere. However, the separation of bomb-produced carbon from natural background carbon has produced a very fruitful understanding of the global carbon cycle and the conveyor belt system in the ocean, which will be essential for understanding global environmental problems, such as global warming, in the coming century. Carbon cycle studies in Korea have been made since the early 1990s. The studies include monitoring of CO 2 concentrations in the atmosphere, stable isotope studies, and carbon cycle studies in the sea around Korea. The opening of ths AMS facility at Seoul National University (SNU) will enhance carbon studies in Earth system sciences greatly in the future

  11. Changes in solar activity and Holocene climatic shifts derived from C-14 wiggle-match dated peat deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauquoy, D; van Geel, B; Speranza, A; van der Plicht, J; Blaauw, Maarten

    Closely spaced sequences of accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) C-14 dates of peat deposits display century-scale wiggles which can be fitted to the radiocarbon calibration curve. By wiggle-matching such sequences, high-precision calendar age chronologies can be generated which show that changes in

  12. Changes in solar activity and Holocene climatic shifts derived from 14C wiggle-match dated peat deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauquoy, Dmitri; Geel, Bas van; Blaauw, Maarten; Speranza, Alessandra; Plicht, Johannes van der

    2004-01-01

    Closely spaced sequences of accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) 14C dates of peat deposits display century-scale wiggles which can be fitted to the radiocarbon calibration curve. By wiggle-matching such sequences, high-precision calendar age chronologies can be generated which show that changes in

  13. Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) sample preparation laboratory in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macario, Kita D.; Gomes, Paulo R. S.; Anjos, Roberto M. dos; Linares, Roberto; Queiroz, Eduardo; Oliveira, Fabiana M. de; Cardozo, Laio; Carvalho, Carla R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: For decades Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been widely used for radiocarbon measurements all over the world with application in several fields of science from archaeology to geosciences. This technique provides ultrasensitive analysis of reduced size samples or even specific compounds since sample atoms are accelerated to high energies and measured using nuclear particle detectors. Sample preparation is extremely important for accurate radiocarbon measurement and includes chemical pre-treatment to remove all possible contaminants. For beam extraction in the accelerator ion source, samples are usually converted to graphite. In this work we report a new radiocarbon sample preparation facility installed at the Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are chemically treated and converted to carbon dioxide by hydrolysis or combustion. A stainless steel based vacuum line was constructed for carbon dioxide separation and graphitization is performed in sealed quartz tubes in a muffle oven. Successful graphite production is important to provide stable beam currents and to minimize isotopic fractionation. Performance tests for graphite production are currently under way and isotopic analysis will soon be possible with the acquisition of a Single Stage AMS System by our group. The Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation is a 250 kV air insulated accelerator especially constructed to measure the amount of 14 C in small modern graphite samples to a precision of 0.3 % or better. With the installation of such equipment in the first half of 2012, UFF will be ready to perform the 14C -AMS technique. (author)

  14. Radiocarbon variability of fatty acids in semi-urban aerosol samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kohei; Uchida, Masao; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Morita, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed radiocarbon and the stable carbon isotope ratio for individual monocarboxylic (fatty) acids in an aerosol sample (QFF 2138) and compared the results with data of the aerosol sample taken in another year. The fatty acid concentration distribution of aerosol sample QFF 2138 showed a bimodal pattern with maxima at C 16 and C 26 . Stable carbon isotope ratios of the fatty acids ranged from -30.8 per mille to -23.0 per mille which indicates the animal and/or marine algae origins for C 16 -C 19 fatty acids and mainly terrestrial C 3 plant origins for C >20 fatty acids. Δ 14 C values for fatty acids ranged from -89.7 per mille to +83.5 per mille. Compared with QFF1969, we found that the Δ 14 C values of fatty acids exhibited a wide diversity and Δ 14 C values for each fatty acid in QFF 2138 were largely different from those of QFF 1969

  15. C-14 bomb peak dating of human DNA samples at the microgram level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebl, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon (14C, t 1/2 = 5700 ± 30 years) is probably the radionuclide with the most versatile applications, spanning from archaeology to geoscience and medicine. Many of these applications are finally limited by the minimum amount of carbon in which the isotopic ratio 14C/12C can be measured. The required carbon sample size has dramatically decreased with the development of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), typically from gram amounts for the classical beta counting method to about 1 milligram for AMS. The current work presents a further reduction into the few-μg carbon range. This means a decrease by a factor of one million compared to classical beta counting and is essential for the field of retrospective birth dating of human cells by means of radiocarbon from above-ground nuclear weapons testing between 1955 and 1963. The determination of 14C levels in genomic DNA can be used to retrospectively establish the birth date of cells in the human body. The main motive of the current work was to reduce the amount of carbon required for reliable 14C measurements to such an extent that investigations of neurons of particularly interesting small sections of the human brain (e.g. the olfactory bulb, bulbus olfactorius) were possible. In-depth investigations and development of 14C AMS sample preparation and measurement methods for μg-size DNA samples were carried out in close collaboration with the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. As the most significant result, 14C measurements of 4.6 μg carbon DNA samples were performed with an overall precision of 2.3%. This allowed to study neurogenesis in the human olfactory bulb, which turned out to take place primarily at birth. Assuming throughout life a constant annual renewal rate of neurons in the human olfactory bulb, an upper limit of 0.34% for the renewal rate (95% confidence) was determined. At the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) the μg carbon

  16. Radiocarbon measurements at LAC-UFF: Recent performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, Roberto, E-mail: rlinares@if.uff.br [Laboratório de Radiocarbono, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Niterói 24230-346 (Brazil); Macario, Kita D. [Laboratório de Radiocarbono, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Niterói 24230-346 (Brazil); Santos, Guaciara M. [Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, B321 Croul Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-3100 (United States); Carvalho, Carla [Laboratório de Radiocarbono, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Niterói 24230-346 (Brazil); Departamento de Geoquímica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro São João Batista, s/n, Niterói 24020-141 (Brazil); Santos, Hellen C. dos; Gomes, Paulo R.S.; Castro, Maikel D.; Oliveira, Fabiana M.; Alves, Eduardo Q. [Laboratório de Radiocarbono, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Niterói 24230-346 (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    In 2012 a single stage accelerator mass spectrometer from NEC was installed at the Radiocarbon Laboratory of Universidade Federal Fluminense (LAC-UFF), Niterói, Brazil. Here, we present a status report of our facility. We discuss some modifications applied to our combustion protocol in an attempt to reduce our procedural blank, mostly to processed organic samples. Measurements of reference materials indicate low precision and accuracy that are partially related to beam optics through the acceleration tube. We observed that once the beam current intensity increases the measured {sup 13}C{sup +}/{sup 12}C{sup +} becomes erratic. Therefore, in order to maintain the AMS-δ{sup 13}C values within reasonable values, so that fractionation corrections using the spectrometer {sup 13}C{sup +}/{sup 12}C{sup +} values does not affect the final {sup 14}C results, we are forced to limit the {sup 12}C{sup −} beam intensity to ⩽30 μA. This requirement was confirmed during our accuracy tests, when measuring selected annual tree-rings wood samples from a Parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia) between 1927 and 1997 previously measured at the Keck Carbon Cycle AMS Facility (KCCAMS), at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). At the LAC-UFF tree-ring wood samples were processed and measured in 4 different batches during a period of about 5 months. The {sup 14}C results were later compared to the high-precision data obtained at KCCAMS/UCI and reached a good agreement. Recently a problem associated with graphitization yield were finally identified and new measurements with secondary standards are promising.

  17. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-01-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3–1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. 14C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. 14C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve 14C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts. PMID:23818577

  18. The study of variations and environmental applications "1"4C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of the presented thesis is to explain experimentally observed "1"4C variations in the outer atmosphere. Physical models have been developed to quantify directly immeasurable phenomena relevant in the field of radiocarbon dynamics. Namely atmospheric stability, "1"4C transport from the stratosphere to the lower troposphere and fossil carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. Finally these models have been used as the pillars of the united theory of Δ"1"4C dynamics. Besides the presented main theoretical outputs, this thesis also provides couple of potentially implementable by-products. First of them is a method to evaluate so called 'equivalent mixing height' and turbulent diffusion coefficient using temporal changes of "2"2"2Rn concentration in the boundary layer of the atmosphere. The elaborated mathematical apparatus for the evaluation of aerosol scavenging by raindrops can be utilized in the models of pollutant dispersion. Information on turbulent diffusion coefficient at higher atmospheric levels is important for the models of stratospheric and ozonospheric dynamics. Nowadays, when one can measure and even feel the greenhouse effect consequences, the importance of an independent method for carbon dioxide fossil emissions assessment is obvious. Besides theoretical outcome, the thesis also presents experimental results. A network of CO_2 sampling sites has been established in Bratislava and the outskirts in the vicinity of the town. Together with mountain site Chopok the network brought a unique information on "1"4C distribution. Atmospheric measurements of "7Be and "2"2"2Rn activity are also presented here. Finally the PC codes have been developed to bridge a gap between experimental and theoretical results. (author)

  19. Interactions Between Agricultural Chemicals and the Soil Microflora and Their Effects on {sup 14}C-Parathion Metabolism in Cranberry Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, I. G.; Lichtenstein, E. P. [Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    1981-05-15

    Full text: The fate of {sup 14}C-parathion in a loam and ''cranberry soil'' was investigated utilizing a closed system to enable monitoring of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution, and to obtain a total {sup 14}C balance. Soils were treated with {sup 14}C-parathion at rates equivalent to about 3 ppm and incubated at 23 ± 2°C. After 3 weeks of soil incubation differences in the persistence of {sup 14}C-parathion were evident: 76% of applied radiocarbon remained as unchanged parathion in loam soil compared with only 4% in a cranberry soil; conversely, {sup 14}C-degradation products amounted to 26% and 91% of applied radiocarbon, respectively. Interactions were found to occur between fungicides and the biodegradation of {sup 14}C-(ring)-parathion in cranberry soil. Captafol (Difolatan® inhibited the metabolism of {sup 14}C-parathion. The inhibition was a linear function of the applied captafol concentration with a no effect concentration of 1 ppm. On the other hand, 100 ppm of Manzate®(maneb) or Benlate® (benomyl) altered the pathway of {sup 14}C-parathion degradation in favour of bound {sup 14}C-residues. In soil-free medium inoculated with cranberry soil microorganisms {sup 14}C-(ring)- parathion was degraded within 4 days principally to volatile {sup 14}C-compounds (presumably {sup 14}CO{sub 2}). On the -contrary, no degradation of {sup 14}C-parathion occurred in an inoculated medium that also contained a 100-ppm benomyl suspension, apparently benomyl inhibited the hydrolysis/oxidation of {sup 14}C-parathion. Soil amendments of 100 ppm nitrogen (N) as (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, or to a lesser extent KNO{sub 3}, inhibited the metabolism of {sup 14}C-( ring)-parathion to {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. In summary, some agricultural chemicals have an effect on parathiondegrading microorganisms resulting in an increase in bound {sup 14}C-residues and an increased persistence of toxic parathion residues.

  20. Anomalous elevated radiocarbon measurements of PM{sub 2.5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Bruce A., E-mail: buchholz2@llnl.gov [Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Mail Stop L-397, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808 Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Fallon, Stewart J. [Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Mail Stop L-397, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808 Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory, Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Zermeno, Paula; Bench, Graham [Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Mail Stop L-397, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808 Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Schichtel, Bret A. [Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University, 1375 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Two-component models are often used to determine the contributions made by fossil fuel and natural sources of carbon in airborne particulate matter (PM). The models reduce thousands of actual sources to two end members based on isotopic signature. Combustion of fossil fuels produces PM free of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). Wood or charcoal smoke, restaurant fryer emissions, and natural emissions from plants produce PM with the contemporary concentration of {sup 14}C approximately 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -1214}C/C. Such data can be used to estimate the relative contributions of fossil fuels and biogenic aerosols to the total aerosol loading and radiocarbon analysis is becoming a popular source apportionment method. Emissions from incinerators combusting medical or biological wastes containing tracer {sup 14}C can skew the {sup 14}C/C ratio of PM, however, so critical analysis of sampling sites for possible sources of elevated PM needs to be completed prior to embarking on sampling campaigns. Results are presented for two ambient monitoring sites in different areas of the United States where {sup 14}C contamination is apparent. Our experience suggests that such contamination is uncommon but is also not rare ({approx}10%) for PM sampling sites.

  1. Persistence and distribution of [14C]-lindane residues in coffee plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores-Rueegg, E.; Mesquita, T.B.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on weathering, volatilization, absorption, translocation and accumulation of [ 14 C]-lindane (γ-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane) in coffee (Coffeea arabica L. var. Bourbon) plants are reported. Ten days after topical application to the leaf surface the insecticide can be absorbed and translocated to different parts of the plant. It accumulates mainly in the roots and appears in other leaves. In these experiments, when plants are cultivated in nutrient solution, release of radiocarbon through roots could be detected, indicating exchange of labelled material between plant and surrounding media. When the insecticide is supplied to coffee plants through the roots immersed in nutrient solution containing [ 14 C]-lindane, the labelled material is absorbed and, after 24 hours, radioactive material can be detected in young leaves of the upper parts of the plant. Loss of [ 14 C]-lindane by volatilization, evaporation and co-distillation with water is apparently continuous and represents a significant proportion of that applied. (author)

  2. {sup 14}C determination in different bio-based products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Arévalo, Francisco-Javier, E-mail: fj.santos@csic.es [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (Universidad de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Junta de Andalucía), Thomas Alva Edison 7, 41092 Seville (Spain); Gómez Martínez, Isabel; Agulló García, Lidia; Reina Maldonado, María-Teresa [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (Universidad de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Junta de Andalucía), Thomas Alva Edison 7, 41092 Seville (Spain); García León, Manuel [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (Universidad de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Junta de Andalucía), Thomas Alva Edison 7, 41092 Seville (Spain); Dpto. de Física Atómica Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Radiocarbon determination can be used as a tool to investigate the presence of biological elements in different bio-based products, such as biodiesel blends. These products may also be produced from fossil materials obtaining the same final molecules, so that composition is chemically indistinguishable. The amount of radiocarbon in these products can reveal how much of these biological elements have been used, usually mixed with petrol derived components, free of {sup 14}C. Some of these products are liquid and thus the handling at the laboratory is not as straightforward as with solid samples. At Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) we have tested the viability of these samples using a graphitization system coupled to an elemental analyzer used for combustion of the samples, thus avoiding any vacuum process. Samples do not follow any chemical pre-treatment procedure and are directly graphitized. Specific equipment for liquid samples related to the elemental analyzer was tested. Measurement of samples was performed by low-energy AMS at the 1 MV HVEE facility at CNA, paying special attention to background limits and reproducibility during sample preparation.

  3. Applications of radiocarbon measurements in environmental studies at INFN-LABEC, Florence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiari M.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon is one of the most widespread radionuclides in nature. Although it is probably best known for dating in archaeology, in the case of the general public, it represents a useful tracer to study our environment, both in the past and nowadays. For instance, carbonaceous particles, which are in many cases the most abundant among aerosols constituents, are believed to play a major role in both health and climatic effects of aerosols. In particular, measurement of radiocarbon concentration in particulate matter samples can give information on the contributions of the fossil fuels combustion and of natural sources to the carbonaceous fraction in aerosols. These measurements are especially effective when separately performed on different carbonaceous fractions, like elemental and organic carbon (EC and OC, respectively. Past climate is also studied thanks to old archives, as e.g. marine sediments can be. In this case, instead of radiocarbon dating the bulk sediment, a reliable method to fix chronological markers is represented by dating foraminifera tests of CaCO3 picked from different layers in the sediment. Both the aforementioned applications are characterized by the fact that the samples that can be collected for 14C measurements are typically very small, i.e. few mg or less (before any treatment. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS is thus the only technique that can be applied to measure radiocarbon in such samples. Anyway, measurements cannot be so straightforward. In the case of the measurement of radiocarbon concentration in aerosol samples, a preparation line especially dedicated to the extraction of only the carbonaceous fraction of interest is mandatory. Actually, this line should include a combustion oven, from which either total carbon or EC and OC can separately evolve, and a system of traps to purify and collect the CO2. In the case of foraminifera tests (inorganic carbon, special care must be taken in the pre-treatment phase

  4. Radiocarbon dating uncertainties and their effects on studies of the past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappell, J.

    1982-01-01

    The handling of sets of age results and their errors for hypothesis testing is discussed. The paper focusses on radiocarbon dating but most of the principles apply to other dating methods, although some formulae will be different. One conclusion is that the conventional age error should be enlarged to allow for past variations of 14 C level in the atmosphere

  5. A review of single-sample-based models and other approaches for radiocarbon dating of dissolved inorganic carbon in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, L. F; Plummer, Niel

    2016-01-01

    Numerous methods have been proposed to estimate the pre-nuclear-detonation 14C content of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) recharged to groundwater that has been corrected/adjusted for geochemical processes in the absence of radioactive decay (14C0) - a quantity that is essential for estimation of radiocarbon age of DIC in groundwater. The models/approaches most commonly used are grouped as follows: (1) single-sample-based models, (2) a statistical approach based on the observed (curved) relationship between 14C and δ13C data for the aquifer, and (3) the geochemical mass-balance approach that constructs adjustment models accounting for all the geochemical reactions known to occur along a groundwater flow path. This review discusses first the geochemical processes behind each of the single-sample-based models, followed by discussions of the statistical approach and the geochemical mass-balance approach. Finally, the applications, advantages and limitations of the three groups of models/approaches are discussed.The single-sample-based models constitute the prevailing use of 14C data in hydrogeology and hydrological studies. This is in part because the models are applied to an individual water sample to estimate the 14C age, therefore the measurement data are easily available. These models have been shown to provide realistic radiocarbon ages in many studies. However, they usually are limited to simple carbonate aquifers and selection of model may have significant effects on 14C0 often resulting in a wide range of estimates of 14C ages.Of the single-sample-based models, four are recommended for the estimation of 14C0 of DIC in groundwater: Pearson's model, (Ingerson and Pearson, 1964; Pearson and White, 1967), Han & Plummer's model (Han and Plummer, 2013), the IAEA model (Gonfiantini, 1972; Salem et al., 1980), and Oeschger's model (Geyh, 2000). These four models include all processes considered in single-sample-based models, and can be used in different ranges of

  6. Observation of 23 supernovae that exploded <300 pc from Earth during the past 300 kyr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R. B., E-mail: rbfirestone@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Four supernovae (SNe), exploding ≤300 pc from Earth, were recorded 44, 37, 32, and 22 kyr ago in the radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) record during the past 50 kyr. Each SN left a nearly identical signature in the record, beginning with an initial sudden increase in atmospheric radiocarbon, when the SN exploded, followed by a hiatus of 1500 yr, and concluding with a sustained 2000 yr increase in global radiocarbon due to γ-rays produced by diffusive shock in the SN remnant (SNR). For the past 18 kyr excess radiocarbon has decayed with the {sup 14}C half-life. SN22kyrBP, is identified as the Vela SN that exploded 250 ± 30 pc from Earth. These SN are confirmed in the {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and NO{sub 3}{sup −} geologic records. The rate of near-Earth SNe is consistent with the observed rate of historical SNe giving a galactic rate of 14 ± 3 kyr{sup –1} assuming the Chandra Galactic Catalog SNR distribution. The Earth has been used as a calorimeter to determine that ≈2 × 10{sup 49} erg were released as γ-rays at the time of each SN explosion and ≈10{sup 50} erg in γ-rays following each SN. The background rate of {sup 14}C production by cosmic rays has been determined as 1.61 atoms cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}. Approximately 1/3 of the cosmic ray energy produced by diffusive shock in the SNR was observed to be emitted as high-energy γ-rays. Analysis of the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio in marine sediment identified 19 additional near-Earth SNe that exploded 50-300 kyr ago. Comparison of the radiocarbon record with global temperature variations indicated that each SN explosion is correlated with a concurrent global warming of ≈3°C-4°C.

  7. The marine radiocarbon bomb pulse across the temperate North Atlantic: a compilation of Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scourse, J.D.; Wanamaker jr., A.D.; Weidman, C.; Heinemeier, J.; Reimer, P.J.; Butler, P.G.; Witbaard, R.; Richardson, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Marine radiocarbon bomb-pulse time histories of annually resolved archives from temperate regions have been underexploited. We present here series of Delta C-14 excess from known-age annual increments of the long-lived bivalve mollusk Arctica islandica from 4 sites across the coastal North Atlantic

  8. Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C determination in CO2 produced from laser decomposition of aragonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheim, Brad E; Thorrold, Simon R; Roberts, Mark L

    2008-11-01

    The determination of (14)C in aragonite (CaCO(3)) decomposed thermally to CO(2) using an yttrium-aluminum-garnet doped neodymium laser is reported. Laser decomposition accelerator mass spectrometry (LD-AMS) measurements reproduce AMS determinations of (14)C from the conventional reaction of aragonite with concentrated phosphoric acid. The lack of significant differences between these sets of measurements indicates that LD-AMS radiocarbon dating can overcome the significant fractionation that has been observed during stable isotope (C and O) laser decomposition analysis of different carbonate minerals. The laser regularly converted nearly 30% of material removed into CO(2) despite it being optimized for ablation, where laser energy breaks material apart rather than chemically altering it. These results illustrate promise for using laser decomposition on the front-end of AMS systems that directly measure CO(2) gas. The feasibility of such measurements depends on (1) the improvement of material removal and/or CO(2) generation efficiency of the laser decomposition system and (2) the ionization efficiency of AMS systems measuring continuously flowing CO(2).

  9. Historical 14C measurements from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairhall, A.W.; Young, A.W.

    Atmospheric nuclear testing produced a dramatic increase in the level of 14 C in atmospheric CO 2 . Since the tropospheric residence time of 14 C is on the order of a few years before being transferred to the sea, it appeared that a study of the distribution of the excess 14 C in the sea and its change with time would give valuable insight into such problems as the rate of CO 2 exchange between the atmosphere and the sea and its dependence on wind speed over the sea surface; the rate of transfer by oceanic mixing processes of contaminants, including fallout radionuclides introduced initially into the mixed surface layer of the sea, into the deep sea; the rate of bottom water formation at high latitudes and subsequent advective transport from these source regions into the deep sea. Therefore a 14 C sampling program was initiated. A method was developed for stripping CO 2 from sea water on board ship. The assay for 14 C was performed by a radiocarbon gas proportional counter. Information on temperature and salinity at the various sampling depths as well as total CO 2 and absolute concentration of 14 C is tabulated

  10. Determination of radiocarbon content in young stalagmites of Baradla cave and its interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, M.; Futo, I.; Rinyu, L.; Svingor, E.; Dezso, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. It was demonstrated by international references that 14 C dating with dead carbon corrections (dcp) of stalagmites could be used as a substantive, inexpensive and efficient absolute dating method [1]. Detecting of varying of specific dcp for different regions or different time periods could provide substantial information about the regional climatic changes or about the variations of carbon-dynamic conditions in the karstic systems. Up to the present 14 C dating was not applied sufficiently in the study of stalagmites in Hungary. Radiocarbon content of four different young stalagmites (S-1 to S-4, see numbers in Figure 1.) from Baradla cave, Aggtelek (Hungary) was measured in the Laboratory of Environmental Studies at the ATOMKI. Samples were formed on artificial surfaces between 1991 and 2004. Using 14 C data of the young stalagmites and that of the atmospheric CO 2 in this period, dead carbon portion (dcp) has been calculated for each sample. Typical dcp values were between 5 and 7 % for three samples (S1, S2 and S4). The outlier fourth result (S3) showed that if the dissolved carbonate had to seep through a long way in a karstic system before reaching the cave and in this period the radiocarbon concentration of the atmosphere is significantly changing, then comparison of the 14 C content of a stalagmite and the atmosphere at the time of its formation is not realistic. (author)

  11. From scrolls to Picasso: AMS radiocarbon dating applied to textiles, art works and artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jull, A.J.T.; Donahue, D.J.; Beck, J.W.; Burr, G.S.; O'Malley, J.; Hewitt, L.; Biddulph, D.; Hatheway, A.L.; Lange, T.E.; Toolin, J.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for radiocarbon dating allows us to use very small samples of carbon, 14 C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory and bone. For many of these types of samples, the results are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. This has encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt and Picasso. Most recently, we have also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document which shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages. An important issue in such studies is also the radiocarbon calibration curve. For some periods, most notably 1700-1950 AD we know that several changes in the 14 C composition of the atmosphere make it almost impossible to date a sample during this period more precisely than the entire range. However, before this period, we have successfully dated materials to high precision. We have also studied the use of the period l900-1950 AD for 14 C measurements and will present some examples where the rapid decline in Δ 14 C can be used to date art works. The period after 1950AD also allows us to identify works fabricated from recent materials using the 'spike' in 14 C due to atmospheric nuclear testing. This bomb 14 C has also been successfully used to identify originals from copies of works purporting to be the originals. We will discuss some artifacts, art works and forgeries, where 14 C can resolve problems of authenticity (authors)

  12. AMS 14C measurements for tree-ring samples from Japanese woods from 4c AD to 8c AD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Hiromasa; Sakamoto, Minoru; Imamura, Mineo; Mitsutani, Takumi

    2010-01-01

    Regional offsets of atmospheric 14 C concentration, as represented by differences from IntCal calibration datasets, are discussed at times in relation to universal use of international radiocarbon calibration curve. In the construction of IntCal, 14 C contents of contemporaneous tree-ring samples from different regions in the northern hemisphere have been used, because the regional differences were indistinguishable from errors of measurements. Nowadays, high-precision 14 C results can be obtained much more easily than before, so more attention should be paid to the possible regional offsets. Most parts of IntCal has been constructed by using 14 C contents of tree-ring samples from woods in high latitude of Europe and North America, which are farthest from Japan in the northern hemisphere. So far, we have measured 14 C contents of tree-ring samples from Japanese wood samples dendrochronologically dated from 11th century BC to 4th century AD in order to investigate regional offset in Japan. Although the obtained results agreed well with IntCal in general, there were some periods when the 14 C contents differ significantly from IntCal. In this paper, we report the new results of AMS 14 C measurement for Japanese tree-ring samples ranging from 4th century AD to 8th century AD. The results show a significant disagreement with IntCal at around 630 AD. Similar difference was indicated by 14 C contents of tree-ring samples from other Japanese woods (Imamura et al., 2007). So it is certain that the regional offset in Japan exists at around 630 AD. (author)

  13. No evidence for a deglacial intermediate water Δ14C anomaly in the SW Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sortor, R. N.; Lund, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Reconstructions of Δ14C from the eastern tropical Pacific show that severe depletions in 14C occurred at intermediate depths during the last deglaciation (Marchitto et al. 2007; Stott et al. 2009). Marchitto et al. (2007) suggested that old radiocarbon from an isolated abyssal reservoir was injected via the Southern Ocean, and that this anomaly was then carried by Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) to the tropical Pacific. However, a core from the southeastern Pacific Ocean near Chile, which is in the direct path of modern-day AAIW, does not exhibit the excursion and therefore casts doubts upon the AAIW mechanism (De Pol-Holz et al. 2010). Here we evaluate whether or not a deglacial 14C anomaly similar to that in the eastern tropical Pacific occurred at intermediate depths in the South Atlantic. We reconstructed Δ14C using planktonic and benthic foraminifera from core KNR159-5-36GGC on the Brazil Margin (27○31’S and 46○28’W, 1268 m depth). In the modern ocean, the hydrography near this core site is heavily influenced by AAIW (Oppo & Horowitz, 2000). Benthic Δ14C values were determined using raw benthic 14C ages and calendar-calibrated planktonic ages. The deglacial benthic Δ14C trend at this site is similar to the atmospheric Δ14C trend, and is consistent with U/Th-dated corals from intermediate depths on the Brazil Margin (Mangini et al. 2010). The amplitude and timing of Δ14C changes in the foraminiferal and coral records are especially congruous during the Mystery Interval. We find no evidence in the southwestern Atlantic of a ~300‰ decrease in intermediate water Δ14C beginning at 18 kyr BP. Changes in reservoir age of ~1000 years are required to create a Baja-like Δ14C anomaly off Brazil, an implausible increase for a subtropical gyre location. Furthermore, the resulting sedimentation rates would be up to ~145 cm/kyr during the deglaciation, an order of magnitude higher than the average sedimentation rate for 36GGC. When our results are

  14. Autoradiographic studies with the 14C-IAA in relation to synergism between auxin and non-auxin chemicals in the rooting of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cuttings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhury, K.G.; Basu, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    Indole and α-naphthol significantly synergized the IAA-induced rooting of P. vulqaris cuttings. The pattern of incorporation of radiocarbon of IAA-I- 14 C and IAA-2- 14 C supplied to the base of the cuttings was, however, not altered by the synergists and the same radioactive metabolites were located on the radioautograms of ethanolic extracts of the hypocotyls of cuttings under the different treatments. The results thereby discount the possibility of formation of bioactive complexes between auxins and synergists as the mechanism of synergism in rooting. The synergists, however, influenced the extent of incorporation of radiocarbon of the labelled auxin molecules into some of the radioactive metabolites. (auth.)

  15. Compound specific radiocarbon content of lignin oxidation products from the Altamaha river and Coastal Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a powerful tool in organic geochemistry by providing detailed information about an individual organic compound’s history with regard to its source and process of formation. Most CSIA involves measurement of the stable isotope ratio of carbon ( 13 C/ 12 C) and hydrogen (D/H) following separation by gas or liquid chromatography. New applications are being developed using compound-specific radiocarbon ( 14 C) content for delineating age of materials, rates of decomposition and residence time in various environments. This paper details the isotopic work on specific lignin monomers derived from terrestrial plants transported and deposited within the Altamaha River, estuary and off-shore Georgia in the Atlantic Ocean. By using gas chromatographic separation and identification of selected lignin oxidation products (LOP), the harvesting of these compounds using preparative fraction collection, and measurement of their 14 C content using accelerator mass spectrometry, details of the age and presence of specific biomarkers unique to a given terrestrial source are revealed. Radiocarbon ages determined from water-column particulate organic carbon and sediment LOPs indicate a range of ages from modern to well over 5,000 years for the former and latter respectively. Transport mechanisms and particle size associations on mineral grains may play a significant role in 14 C distribution in estuary and near-shore coastal environments. This data indicates higher than modern 14 C activities in large particle-size sediment fractions in contrast to older LOP 14 C ages found associated with the same coarse grain sediments. Individual LOP ages substantiate older terrestrial materials persist in the off-shore environment even though in the presence of modern marine 14 C sources.

  16. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  17. Predicting decadal trends and transient responses of radiocarbon storage and fluxes in a temperate forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Representing the response of soil carbon dynamics to global environmental change requires the incorporation of multiple tools in the development of predictive models. An important tool to construct and test models is the incorporation of bomb radiocarbon in soil organic matter during the past decades. In this manuscript, we combined radiocarbon data and a previously developed empirical model to explore decade-scale soil carbon dynamics in a temperate forest ecosystem at the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA. We evaluated the contribution of different soil C fractions to both total soil CO2 efflux and microbially respired C. We tested the performance of the model based on measurable soil organic matter fractions against a decade of radiocarbon measurements. The model was then challenged with radiocarbon measurements from a warming and N addition experiment to test multiple hypotheses about the different response of soil C fractions to the experimental manipulations. Our results showed that the empirical model satisfactorily predicts the trends of radiocarbon in litter, density fractions, and respired CO2 observed over a decade in the soils not subjected to manipulation. However, the model, modified with prescribed relationships for temperature and decomposition rates, predicted most but not all the observations from the field experiment where soil temperatures and nitrogen levels were increased, suggesting that a larger degree of complexity and mechanistic relations need to be added to the model to predict short-term responses and transient dynamics.

  18. Radiocarbon dating of bone samples by liquid scintillation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisi, C.S.; Pessenda, L.C.R.; Cruz, M.V.; Pessin, G.; Pazdur, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    It is developed and adapted methodology for radiocarbon dating of bone samples. The collagen, the most representative fraction of age of bone samples, was extracted by Login method. To eliminate/minimize the contamination of gaseous compounds (nitrogen oxides) produced during the collagen combustion, two methods were used: CO 2 precipitation as Ba CO 3 and Sr CO 3 with subsequent acid hydrolysis. It was determined the efficiency of combustion of collagen sample, the performance of methods in the CO 2 purification and the effect of atmospheric 14 CO 2 contamination and radioactivity of reagents in the determination of 14 C activity. To verify the accuracy of the method, it was realized a laboratory intercomparison, analysing bone and collagen samples also dated by 14 C laboratories of Gliwice, Poland and Groningen, the Netherlands. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  19. Age estimation in forensic sciences: Application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Ohtani, S; Yamamoto, T; Druid, H; Spalding, S L

    2009-11-02

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster, since the age at death, birth date and year of death, as well as gender, can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this paper we analyze teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that above-ground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) which have been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel and ten of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R2=0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 0.6 {+-} 04 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 {+-} 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  20. Spatial and temporal variation of radiocarbon in tree rings - some preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higham, T.F.G.; Hogg, A.G.; McCormac, F.G.; Baillie, M.G.L.; Brown, D.; Palmer, J.G.; Xiong, L.

    1997-01-01

    A number of researchers have identified a measurable difference between the 14 C activities of tree rings of identical dendochronological age between the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres. It is also acknowledged that there is an urgent need for new high precision Δ 14 C data from tree rings in both Hemispheres to help resolve the questions relating to the magnitude and cause of the locality and temporal dependence of the Δ 14 C record, to provide a reliable Southern Hemisphere calibration curve and to throw light upon the 1986 and 1993 Calibration data set discrepancies. In this paper, the authors present the research design of a project to investigate these critical issues in radiocarbon age calibration and describe the preliminary results

  1. Radiocarbon dating and compositional analysis of pre-Columbian human bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, E., E-mail: andrade@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México D.F. (Mexico); Solís, C.; Canto, C.E.; Lucio, O.G. de [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México D.F. (Mexico); Chavez, E. [ESIME-Z, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ALM Zacatenco, 07738 México D.F. (Mexico); Rocha, M.F.; Villanueva, O.; Torreblanca, C.A. [Centro INAH Zacatecas, Miguel Auza No. 205, Col. Centro, Zacatecas/Zacatecas CP 98000 (Mexico)

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of ancient human bones found in “El Cóporo”, an archaeological site in Guanajuato, Mexico; were performed using a multi techniques scheme: {sup 14}C radiocarbon dating, IBA (Ion Beam Analysis), SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). We measured the elemental composition of the bones, especially some with a superficial black pigmentation. Soil samples collected from the burial place were also analyzed. The {sup 14}C dating was performed with a new High Voltage Europe 1 MV Tandentron Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) recently installed in the IFUNAM (Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). The radiocarbon dating allowed us to determine the date of death of the individual in a period between the year 890 and 975 AD, which is consistent with the late period of the Cóporo civilization. The element sample analysis of bones with the surface black pigmentation show higher levels of Fe, Mn and Ba compared when bone’s black surface was mechanically removed. These three elements were found in soil samples from the skeleton burial place. These results indicate more likely that the bone black coloration is due to a postmortem alteration occurring in the burial environment.

  2. Radiocarbon dating and compositional analysis of pre-Columbian human bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, E.; Solís, C.; Canto, C.E.; Lucio, O.G. de; Chavez, E.; Rocha, M.F.; Villanueva, O.; Torreblanca, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of ancient human bones found in “El Cóporo”, an archaeological site in Guanajuato, Mexico; were performed using a multi techniques scheme: 14 C radiocarbon dating, IBA (Ion Beam Analysis), SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). We measured the elemental composition of the bones, especially some with a superficial black pigmentation. Soil samples collected from the burial place were also analyzed. The 14 C dating was performed with a new High Voltage Europe 1 MV Tandentron Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) recently installed in the IFUNAM (Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). The radiocarbon dating allowed us to determine the date of death of the individual in a period between the year 890 and 975 AD, which is consistent with the late period of the Cóporo civilization. The element sample analysis of bones with the surface black pigmentation show higher levels of Fe, Mn and Ba compared when bone’s black surface was mechanically removed. These three elements were found in soil samples from the skeleton burial place. These results indicate more likely that the bone black coloration is due to a postmortem alteration occurring in the burial environment

  3. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF DATA FOR RADIOCARBON CALIBRATION : AN UPDATE TO THE INTERNATIONAL CALIBRATION (INTCAL) CRITERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, Paula J.; Bard, Edouard; Bayliss, Alex; Beck, J. Warren; Blackwell, Paul G.; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Brown, David M.; Buck, Caitlin E.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Friedrich, Michael; Grootes, Pieter M.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Haflidason, Haflidi; Hajdas, Irka; Hatte, Christine; Heaton, Timothy J.; Hogg, Alan G.; Hughen, Konrad A.; Kaiser, K. Felix; Kromer, Bernd; Manning, Sturt W.; Reimer, Ron W.; Richards, David A.; Scott, E. Marian; Southon, John R.; Turney, Christian S. M.; van der Plicht, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    High-quality data from appropriate archives are needed for the continuing improvement of radiocarbon calibration curves. We discuss here the basic assumptions behind C-14 dating that necessitate calibration and the relative strengths and weaknesses of archives from which calibration data are

  4. Deep water ventilation in the northwestern North Pacific during the last deglaciation and the early Holocene (15-5 cal. kyr B.P.) based on AMS 14C dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoshima, Kayo; Kawahata, Hodaka; Irino, Tomohisa; Ikehara, Ken; Aoki, Kaori; Uchida, Masao; Yoneda, Minoru; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The difference between benthic and planktonic foraminifera radiocarbon (B-P 14 C) age differences in core PC6 (40 o 23.89' N, 143 o 29.87' E) retrieved from the northwestern North Pacific provide a clue to the reconstruction of deep water circulation during the last deglaciation and the early Holocene (15-5 cal. kyr B.P.). The observed B-P 14 C age differences ranged from 1030 to 1630 years, which are comparable to the present-day apparent ventilation age. It suggested that the ventilation generally remained similar during 15-5 cal. kyr B.P. However, B-P 14 C age difference slightly reduced at 14.6 cal. kyr B.P., indicating that the higher ventilation temporality could have occurred in the northwestern North Pacific (∼2200 m water depth)

  5. Radiocarbon implications in the problem of nuclear fuel cycle radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenchenko, A.F.; Mironov, V.P.

    1979-01-01

    The review is given of data on formation rate, environmental distribution and biological effects of natural and artificial carbon-14. 14 C release power is in the range from 20 to 2000 Ci/GW (el.) per year for operative and projected NPP and from 10 to 10 4 Ci/GW (el.) per year from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants depending upon the nitrogen content in a coolant and in fuel elements. Taking into account such injection into biosphere, 14 C is considered to be the main factor in radiation situation for the pupulation of the Northern hemisphere for the nearest decades. With regard for natural regularities revealed, the criteria have been formulated for the prediction of maximum permissible releases of radiocarbon from nuclear fuel plants

  6. Changes in groundwater reserves and radiocarbon and chloride content due to a wet period intercalated in an arid climate sequence in a large unconfined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, E.; Jódar, J.; Herrera, C.; Custodio-Ayala, J.; Medina, A.

    2018-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric tracers in groundwater samples collected from springs and deep wells is, in most cases, the result of a mixture of waters with a wide range of residence times in the ground. Such is the case of an unconfined aquifer recharged over all its surface area. Concentrations greatly differ from the homogeneous residence time case. Data interpretation relies on knowledge of the groundwater flow pattern. To study relatively large systems, the conservative ion chloride and the decaying radiocarbon (14C) are considered. Radiocarbon (14C) activity in groundwater, after correction to discount the non-biogenic contribution, is often taken as an indication of water age, while chloride can be used to quantify recharge. In both cases, the observed tracer content in groundwater is an average value over a wide range which is related to water renewal time in the ground. This is shown considering an unconfined aquifer recharged all over its area under arid conditions, in which a period of greater recharge happened some millennia ago. The mathematical solution is given. As the solution cannot be made general, to show and discuss the changes in water reserve and in chloride and radiocarbon concentration (apparent ages), two scenarios are worked out, which are loosely related to current conditions in Northern Chile. It is shown that tracer concentration and the estimated water age are not directly related to the time since recharge took place. The existence of a previous wetter-than-present period has an important and lasting effect on current aquifer water reserves and chloride concentration, although the effect on radiocarbon activity is less pronounced. Chloride concentrations are smaller than in current recharge and apparent 14C ages do not coincide with the timing, duration and characteristics of the wet period, except in the case in which recharge before and after the wet period is negligible and dead aquifer reserves are non-significant. The use of

  7. 14C Accelerator mass spectrometry in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macario, K.D.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, Roberto M.; Linares, R.; Queiroz, E.A.; Oliveira, F.M.; Cardozo, L.; Carvalho, C.R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive technique that enables the direct measurement of carbon isotopes in samples as small as a few milligrams. The possibility of dating or tracing rare or even compound specific carbon samples has application in many fields of science such as Archaeology, Geosciences and Biomedicine. Several kinds of material such as wood, charcoal, carbonate and bone can be chemically treated and converted to graphite to be measured in the accelerator system. The Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil will soon be able to perform the complete 14 C-AMS measurement of samples. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are prepared and converted to carbon dioxide. A stainless steel vacuum system was constructed for carbon dioxide purification and graphitization is performed in sealed tubes in a muffle oven. Graphite samples will be analyzed in a 250 kV Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation which will be installed in the beginning of 2012. With the sample preparation laboratory at LACRON and the SSAMS system, the Physics Institute of UFF will be the first 14 C-AMS facility in Latin America. (author)

  8. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii.

    OpenAIRE

    James, H F; Stafford, T W; Steadman, D W; Olson, S L; Martin, P S; Jull, A J; McCoy, P C

    1987-01-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The 14C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame...

  9. THE IRON AGE AROUND THE MEDITERRANEAN : A HIGH CHRONOLOGY PERSPECTIVE FROM THE GRONINGEN RADIOCARBON DATABASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plicht, J.; Bruins, H.J.; Nijboer, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of radiocarbon dating contributions from Groningen, concerning 9 sites from around the Mediterranean region: Israel, Sinai (Egypt), Jordan, Spain, Tunisia, and Italy. Full date lists of the 9 sites are presented. Our (14)C dates are discussed in terms of present

  10. A shell-derived time history of bomb 14C on Georges Bank and its Labrador Sea implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidman, C.R.; Jones, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Bomb-produced radiocarbon has been used in the past as an important tracer of ocean circulation and as a valuable tool for calculating CO 2 air-sea exchange. However, previous studies of the ocean's time-varying bomb 14 C record have been confined exclusively to analyzing banded corals, and thus their application has been limited to the lower latitudes. The first time history of bomb 14 C from the high-latitude North Atlantic Ocean is obtained from a 54-year-old mollusc specimen, (Bivalvia) Arctica islandica, which was collected live from Georges Bank (41 degrees N) in 1990. The annual growth bands of its shell were analyzed for Δ 14 C using accelerator mass spectrometry, producing a Δ 14 C time history from 1939 to 1990. The depleted condition of the Georges Bank bomb 14 C signal relative to two coral-derived North Atlantic Δ 14 C time histories suggests a significant deepwater source for the waters on Georges Bank. Supported by previous work linking the origin of waters on Georges Bank to the Labrador Sea, the Δ 14 C budget on Georges Bank is modeled as Labrador Sea water, which largely becomes confined to the shelf and partially equilibrates with the atmosphere during a 1-year transit time from the Labrador Sea to Georges Bank. This model is also used to estimate a time history of bomb 14 C for the Labrador Sea. Prebomb Δ 14 C values calculated for the surface Labrador Sea suggest that a greater inventory of bomb 14 C has accumulated here than has previously been reported. Deduced variations in the ventilation and/or 14 CO 2 uptake rates in the Labrador Sea correspond with observed changes in surface salinity of the Labrador Sea, suggesting a reduction in deepwater formation during the late 1960s and 1970s. 59 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Spatial and temporal distribution of 14C in cellulose in tree rings in Central and Eastern Canada: comparison with long-term atmospheric and environmental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotzer, T.G.; Watson, W.L.

    1999-05-01

    Dendrochronologically characterized tree rings from several different species across Central and Eastern Canada and spanning a time range of several decades have been analysed for their 14 C specific activities using oxygen combustion - direct liquid scintillation counting techniques. Carbon-14 specific activities varied between 218 and 439 Bq·kg -1 (±5 to 10%) and yielded a good correlation with the 14 C measured in long-term records of 14 C-in-air values, although 14 C levels in Canada are slightly higher (10 to 20 per mil). An average pre-bomb 14 C value of 225 Bq·kg -1 was obtained from tree rings between 1910 and 1945 which agrees with the value for NBS oxalic acid standard for 'modern' 14 C at 226 Bq·kg -1 . Present-day levels of 14 C in the tree rings are on the order of 250 Bq·kg -1 , indicating that they, like 14 C0 2 -in-air values, have yet to reach 'pre-nuclear testing' levels. Specific activities of 14 C in tree rings from several sites in Canada show no systematic changes with respect to their distance from CANDU heavy-water nuclear power generating stations, suggesting that these stations have had negligible effects on the atmospheric radiocarbon budget for mid-latitudinal North America. The radiocarbon data from the tree rings indicate that atmospheric 14 C has an atmospheric half-time on the order of approximately 15 years, similar to that from other data sets. (author)

  12. Compound specific radiocarbon content of lignin oxidation products from the Altamaha river and Coastal Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, Randy, E-mail: rculp@uga.edu [Center for Applied Isotope Studies, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a powerful tool in organic geochemistry by providing detailed information about an individual organic compound's history with regard to its source and process of formation. Most CSIA involves measurement of the stable isotope ratio of carbon ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) and hydrogen (D/H) following separation by gas or liquid chromatography. New applications are being developed using compound-specific radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) content for delineating age of materials, rates of decomposition and residence time in various environments. This paper details the isotopic work on specific lignin monomers derived from terrestrial plants transported and deposited within the Altamaha River, estuary and off-shore Georgia in the Atlantic Ocean. By using gas chromatographic separation and identification of selected lignin oxidation products (LOP), the harvesting of these compounds using preparative fraction collection, and measurement of their {sup 14}C content using accelerator mass spectrometry, details of the age and presence of specific biomarkers unique to a given terrestrial source are revealed. Radiocarbon ages determined from water-column particulate organic carbon and sediment LOPs indicate a range of ages from modern to well over 5,000 years for the former and latter respectively. Transport mechanisms and particle size associations on mineral grains may play a significant role in {sup 14}C distribution in estuary and near-shore coastal environments. This data indicates higher than modern {sup 14}C activities in large particle-size sediment fractions in contrast to older LOP {sup 14}C ages found associated with the same coarse grain sediments. Individual LOP ages substantiate older terrestrial materials persist in the off-shore environment even though in the presence of modern marine {sup 14}C sources.

  13. Spatial and temporal variation of radiocarbon in tree rings - some preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higham, T.F.G.; Hogg, A.G. [Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand); McCormac, F.G.; Baillie, M.G.L.; Brown, D. [Queens`s University, Belfast, (Ireland). School of Geosciences; Palmer, J.G.; Xiong, L. [Lincoln University, Canterbury (New Zealand). Department of Plant Science

    1997-12-31

    A number of researchers have identified a measurable difference between the {sup 14}C activities of tree rings of identical dendochronological age between the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres. It is also acknowledged that there is an urgent need for new high precision {Delta}{sup 14}C data from tree rings in both Hemispheres to help resolve the questions relating to the magnitude and cause of the locality and temporal dependence of the {Delta}{sup 14}C record, to provide a reliable Southern Hemisphere calibration curve and to throw light upon the 1986 and 1993 Calibration data set discrepancies. In this paper, the authors present the research design of a project to investigate these critical issues in radiocarbon age calibration and describe the preliminary results. Paper no. 30; Extended abstract; 12 refs.

  14. Apportioning bacterial carbon source utilization in soil using 14 C isotope analysis of FISH-targeted bacterial populations sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS): 14 C-FISH-FACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougoulias, Christos; Meade, Andrew; Shaw, Liz J

    2018-02-19

    An unresolved need in microbial ecology is methodology to enable quantitative analysis of in situ microbial substrate carbon use at the population level. Here, we evaluated if a novel combination of radiocarbon-labelled substrate tracing, fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort the FISH-targeted population for quantification of incorporated radioactivity ( 14 C-FISH-FACS) can address this need. Our test scenario used FISH probe PSE1284 targeting Pseudomonas spp. (and some Burkholderia spp.) and salicylic acid added to rhizosphere soil. We examined salicylic acid- 14 C fate (mineralized, cell-incorporated, extractable and non-extractable) and mass balance (0-24 h) and show that the PSE1284 population captured ∼ 50% of the Nycodenz extracted biomass 14 C. Analysis of the taxonomic distribution of the salicylic acid biodegradation trait suggested that PSE1284 population success was not due to conservation of this trait but due to competitiveness for the added carbon. Adding 50KBq of 14 C sample -1 enabled detection of 14 C in the sorted population at ∼ 60-600 times background; a sensitivity which demonstrates potential extension to analysis of rarer/less active populations. Given its sensitivity and compatibility with obtaining a C mass balance, 14 C-FISH-FACS allows quantitative dissection of C flow within the microbial biomass that has hitherto not been achieved. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating based chronology of a polycyclic driftsand sequence at Weerterbergen (SE Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mourik, J.M.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Vandenberghe, D.A.G.

    2010-01-01

    The chronology of polycyclic driftsand sequences in cultural landscapes has mainly been based on the combination of radiocarbon (14C) dating of intercalated organic horizons and pollen analysis. This approach, however, yields indirect age information for the sediment units. Also, as soils are

  16. Determination of chemical forms of 14C in liquid discharges from nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlik, I; Fejgl, M; Povinec, P P; Kořínková, T; Tomášková, L; Pospíchal, J; Kurfiřt, M; Striegler, R; Kaufmanová, M

    2017-10-01

    Developments of radioanalytical methods for determination of radiocarbon in wastewaters from nuclear power plants (NPP) with pressurized light water reactors, which would distinguish between the dissolved organic and inorganic forms have been carried out. After preliminary tests, the method was used to process pilot samples from wastewater outlets from the Temelín and Dukovany NPPs (Czech Republic). The results of analysis of pilot water samples collected in 2015 indicate that the instantaneous 14 C releases into the water streams would be about 7.10 -5 (Temelín) and 4.10 -6 (Dukovany) of the total quantity of the 14 C liberated into the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reservoir effects in radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The radiocarbon dating technique depends essentially on the assumption that atmospheric carbon dioxide containing the cosmogenic radioisotope 14 C enters into a state of equilibrium with all living material (plants and animals) as part of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Terrestrial reservoir effects occur when the atmospheric 14 C signal is diluted by local effects where systems depleted in 14 C mix with systems that are in equilibrium with the atmosphere. Naturally, this can occur with plant material growing close to an active volcano adding very old CO 2 to the atmosphere (the original 14 C has completely decayed). It can also occur in highly industrialised areas where fossil fuel derived CO 2 dilutes the atmospheric signal. A terrestrial reservoir effect can occur in the case of fresh water shells living in rivers or lakes where there is an input of ground water from springs or a raising of the water table. Soluble bicarbonate derived from the dissolution of very old limestone produces a 14 C dilution effect. Land snail shells and stream carbonate depositions (tufas and travertines) can be affected by a similar mechanism. Alternatively, in specific cases, these reservoir effects may not occur. This means that general interpretations assuming quantitative values for these terrestrial effects are not possible. Each microenvironment associated with samples being analysed needs to be evaluated independently. Similarly, the marine environment produces reservoir effects. With respect to marine shells and corals, the water depth at which carbonate growth occurs can significantly affect quantitative 14 C dilution, especially in areas where very old water is uplifted, mixing with top layers of water that undergo significant exchange with atmospheric CO 2 . Hence, generalisations with respect to the marine reservoir effect also pose problems. These can be exacerbated by the mixing of sea water with either terrestrial water in estuaries, or ground water where

  18. Carbon 14 dating method; Methode de datation par le carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Ph

    2000-07-01

    This document gives a first introduction to {sup 14}C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the {sup 14}C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of {sup 14}C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  19. Formation of 14C-asparagine from 14C-precursor in mulberry leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Tadaaki

    1981-01-01

    Since a remarkable accumulation of asparagine in the young leaves of mulberry has been observed, the formation of 14 C-asparagine from 14 C-labeled substrates in young leaves was examined in comparison with that in the mature leaves. 14 C-aspartic acid and 14 C-succinic acid expected as active precursors for asparagine biosynthesis, and 14 C-sucrose as respiratory substrates were fed respectively to the disks of young or mature leaves of mulberry. Although 14 C-succinic acid was actively converted to 14 C-asparagine, no significant amount of 14 C-asparagine was formed from 14 C-aspartic acid in two hours of feeding period. The rate of formation of 14 C-asparagine from 14 C-succinic acid in the mature leaves was slightly higher than that in the young leaves. Amino acids other than asparagine acquired 14 C from 14 C-labeled substrates were mainly aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine and ν-amino butyric acid in both of the leaves. Intending to accelerate the formation of asparagine in the leaves, ammonium ion was supplied to culturing solution as only source of nitrogen and plants were grown for two weeks in that solution before 14 C-labeled substrates feeding experiments. Supplying of ammonium ion brought about enhanced accumulation of asparagine in the young leaves, and caused remarkable formation of 14 C-asparagine from 14 C-aspartic acid in both of the leaves. However, the rate of 14 C-asparagine formation from 14 C-aspartic acid in the young leaves did not exceed that in the mature leaves. (author)

  20. Degradation of 14C - DDT in soils under moist and flooded conditions with rice straw and green manure amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, S.; Dubey, P.S.; Kale, S.P.; Murthy, N.B.K.

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of 14 C - DDT in moist and flooded soils was studied with rice straw and green manure amendments for 100 days. The mineralization of DDT was not significantly influenced by any of the treatments. Rice straw and green manure in flooded soil brought about decrease in extractable 14 C - residues with concomitant increase in soil bound residues. DDT has a very short residence in flooded soils though radiocarbon was more in extractable residues. DDD is the major degradation product in flooded soils. (author)

  1. Seawater movement in the Japan Sea inferred from 14C measurement in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Tanaka, Takayuki; Togawa, Orihiko; Amano, Hikaru; Aramaki, Takafumi

    2008-01-01

    Research Group for Environmental Science, JAEA has carried out oceanographic observations in the Japan Sea since 1997 to clarify the biogeochemical cycle in the Japan Sea. More than 3,000 seawater samples for measurement of radiocarbon were collected during the observations, and radiocarbon in the seawater samples was measured at AMS facility in JAEA Mutsu. In this paper, formation and circulation of water mass in the northern Japan Sea were discussed using analysis of radiocarbon and hydrographic data (e.g. salinity, temperature, nutrients). (author)

  2. New and revised 14C dates for Hawaiian surface lava flows: Paleomagnetic and geomagnetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressline, N.; Trusdell, F.A.; Gubbins, David

    2009-01-01

    Radiocarbon dates have been obtained for 30 charcoal samples corresponding to 27 surface lava flows from the Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. The submitted charcoal was a mixture of fresh and archived material. Preparation and analysis was undertaken at the NERC Radiocarbon Laboratory in Glasgow, Scotland, and the associated SUERC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility. The resulting dates range from 390 years B.P. to 12,910 years B.P. with corresponding error bars an order of magnitude smaller than previously obtained using the gas-counting method. The new and revised 14C data set can aid hazard and risk assessment on the island. The data presented here also have implications for geomagnetic modelling, which at present is limited by large dating errors. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Uptake and distribution of 14C during and following exposure to [14C]methyl isocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.S.; Kennedy, A.L.; Stock, M.F.; Brown, W.E.; Alarie, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Guinea pigs were exposed to [ 14 C]methyl isocyanate ( 14 CH 3 -NCO, 14 C MIC) for periods of 1 to 6 hr at concentrations of 0.5 to 15 ppm. Arterial blood samples taken during exposure revealed immediate and rapid uptake of 14 C. Clearance of 14 C was then gradual over a period of 3 days. Similarly 14 C was present in urine and bile immediately following exposure, and clearance paralleled that observed in blood. Guinea pigs fitted with a tracheal cannula and exposed while under anesthesia showed a reduced 14 C uptake in blood indicating that most of the 14 C MIC uptake in normal guinea pigs occurred from retention of this agent in the upper respiratory tract passages. In exposed guinea pigs 14 C was distributed to all examined tissues. In pregnant female mice similarly exposed to 14 C MIC, 14 C was observed in all tissues examined following exposure including the uterus, placenta, and fetus. While the form of 14 C distributed in blood and tissues has not yet been identified, these findings may help to explain the toxicity of MIC or MIC reaction products on organs other than the respiratory tract, as noted by several investigators

  4. Carbon 14 dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    This document gives a first introduction to 14 C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the 14 C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of 14 C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  5. IntCal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0–50,000 Years cal BP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, Paula J.; Bard, Edouard; Bayliss, Alex; Beck, J. Warren; Blackwell, Paul G.; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Buck, Caitlin E.; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Friedrich, Michael; Grootes, Pieter M.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Haflidason, Haflidi; Hajdas, Irka; Hatté, Christine; Heaton, Timothy J.; Hoffmann, Dirk L.; Hogg, Alan G.; Hughen, Konrad A.; Kaiser, K. Felix; Kromer, Bernd; Manning, Sturt W.; Niu, Mu; Reimer, Ron W.; Richards, David A.; Scott, E. Marian; Southon, John R.; Staff, Richard A.; Turney, Christian S.M.; Plicht, Johannes van der; Reimer, Paula J.

    2013-01-01

    The IntCal09 and Marine09 radiocarbon calibration curves have been revised utilizing newly available and updated data sets from C-14 measurements on tree rings, plant macrofossils, speleothems, corals, and foraminifera. The calibration curves were derived from the data using the random walk model

  6. Radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope compositions of chemically fractionated soil organic matter in a temperate-zone forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koarashi, Jun; Iida, Takao; Asano, Tomohiro

    2005-01-01

    To better understand the role of soil organic matter in terrestrial carbon cycle, carbon isotope compositions in soil samples from a temperate-zone forest were measured for bulk, acid-insoluble and base-insoluble organic matter fractions separated by a chemical fractionation method. The measurements also made it possible to estimate indirectly radiocarbon ( 14 C) abundances of acid- and base-soluble organic matter fractions, through a mass balance of carbon among the fractions. The depth profiles of 14 C abundances showed that (1) bomb-derived 14 C has penetrated the first 16 cm mineral soil at least; (2) Δ 14 C values of acid-soluble organic matter fraction are considerably higher than those of other fractions; and (3) a significant amount of the bomb-derived 14 C has been preserved as the base-soluble organic matter around litter-mineral soil boundary. In contrast, no or little bomb-derived 14 C was observed for the base-insoluble fraction in all sampling depths, indicating that this recalcitrant fraction, accounting for approximately 15% of total carbon in this temperate-zone forest soil, plays a role as a long-term sink in the carbon cycle. These results suggest that bulk soil organic matter cannot provide a representative indicator as a source or a sink of carbon in soil, particularly on annual to decadal timescales

  7. Status report on the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory - AMS and LSC results of VIRI intercomparison samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironić, Andreja; Krajcar Bronić, Ines; Horvatinčić, Nada; Barešić, Jadranka; Obelić, Bogomil; Felja, Igor

    2013-01-01

    A new line for preparation of the graphite samples for 14C dating by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory has been validated by preparing graphite from various materials distributed within the Fifth International Radiocarbon Intercomparison (VIRI) study. 14C activity of prepared graphite was measured at the SUERC AMS facility. The results are statistically evaluated by means of the z-score and u-score values. The mean z-score value of 28 prepared VIRI samples is (0.06 ± 0.23) showing excellent agreement with the consensus VIRI values. Only one sample resulted in the u-score value above the limit of acceptability (defined for the confidence interval of 99%) and this was probably caused by a random contamination of the graphitization rig. After the rig had been moved to the new adapted and isolated room, all u-score values laid within the acceptable limits. Our LSC results of VIRI intercomparison samples are also presented and they are all accepted according to the u-score values.

  8. Status report on the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory - AMS and LSC results of VIRI intercomparison samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sironic, Andreja [Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Krajcar Bronic, Ines, E-mail: krajcar@irb.hr [Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Horvatincic, Nada; Baresic, Jadranka; Obelic, Bogomil; Felja, Igor [Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2013-01-15

    A new line for preparation of the graphite samples for {sup 14}C dating by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory has been validated by preparing graphite from various materials distributed within the Fifth International Radiocarbon Intercomparison (VIRI) study. {sup 14}C activity of prepared graphite was measured at the SUERC AMS facility. The results are statistically evaluated by means of the z-score and u-score values. The mean z-score value of 28 prepared VIRI samples is (0.06 {+-} 0.23) showing excellent agreement with the consensus VIRI values. Only one sample resulted in the u-score value above the limit of acceptability (defined for the confidence interval of 99%) and this was probably caused by a random contamination of the graphitization rig. After the rig had been moved to the new adapted and isolated room, all u-score values laid within the acceptable limits. Our LSC results of VIRI intercomparison samples are also presented and they are all accepted according to the u-score values.

  9. Radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon in sewage-treatment-plant effluent and domestic sewage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Fumiko Watanabe; Imai, Akio; Matsushige, Kazuo; Komatsu, Kazuhiro; Kawasaki, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-01-01

    In an attempt to better characterize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in several specific sources to Lake Kasumigaura, such as sewage-treatment-plant effluent (STPE), domestic sewage (DS) and forest stream (FS), we analyzed radiocarbon ( 14 C) and stable carbon isotopic compositions ( 13 C) of the DOCs. The measurements of 14 C for DOC were performed by an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES-TERRA) in Japan. The Δ 14 C and δ 13 C values of the DOCs in several sources to Lake Kasumigaura, have low carbon isotopic values, ranging from -470 per mille to -79 per mille and from -27.9 per mille to -24.2 per mille , respectively. These carbon isotopic values are substantially different from those of Lake Kasumigaura. These results imply different origins for the DOC in Lake Kasumigaura. The 14 C and 13 C analyses of DOC led to a useful classification for DOCs in Lake Kasumigaura, Japan.

  10. Applications of 14C - AMS on Archaeology, Climate, Environment, Geology, Oceanography and Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, P. R. S.; Macario, K. D.; Anjos, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution we describe several experiments on 14 C-AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) related to historical, ecological and environmental questions. We discuss the chronology of prehistoric settlements of the central-south Brazilian coast. The unexpected result pulls back by some two thousand years the antiquity consensually accepted for the settlement of that region. We performed an experiment concerning the isotopic signature of the local waters of an important Brazilian coastal upwelling. The results of 14 C-AMS measurements in seaweed tissue show differences in the isotopic signature of the water sources. The present results contribute to opening new perspectives for the use of 14 C as a tracer of the biological production in upwelling areas all over the world. We performed experiments on climate at the Amazon region. At remote lakes of the Amazon region, the Hg accumulation rate archived in sediment cores is a powerful tool for the interpretation of the paleoclimatology and paleoecology of the region. Different sedimentation regimes are observed from ∼41500 yr. BP to the present. The understanding of sea-level fluctuations are fundamental for human occupation of littoral areas and hydrocarbon industry on offshore exploration. We performed radiocarbon dating of foraminifera shell samples, collected in upper slope of Campos Basin, in Southern Brazil. The mean accumulation ratio for the whole column is 6.17 cm/1000 years. Fluctuations in this mean values indicate that the ocean bottom dynamics has some variation during the period. (Author)

  11. Penetration of bomb radiocarbon in the tropical Indian Ocean measured by means of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, E.; Arnold, M.; Maurice, P.; Monfray, P.; Duplessy, J.C.; Oestlund, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Radiocarbon measurements performed on seawater samples by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enable to reduce by a factor of 2000 the water sample size needed for the 14 C measurements. Therefore no chemical treatment on board the oceanographic vessel is required. Seventy-four AMS 14 C determinations on samples collected in the tropical-equatorial Indian Ocean during the second leg of the INDIGO program (1986) are presented and compared with the β-counting results obtained during the same campaign and the GEOSECS program (1978). A pronounced reduction of the equatorial 14 C deficit suggests that substantial amounts of bomb- 14 C are associated with the westward flowing Pacific water which enters the Indian Ocean via passages through the Indonesia Archipelago and/or to meridional mixing with 14 C-rich water of the southern subtropical gyre. (orig.)

  12. New accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon ages for the Mazama tephra layer from Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallett, D.J.; Hills, L.V.; Clague, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Charcoal fragments recovered from the Mazama air-fall tephra layer in cores from Dog and Cobb lakes, Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, yielded accelerator mass spectrometry ages of 6720 ± 70 and 6760 ± 70 14 C years BP, respectively. These two new ages, together with other previously published radiocarbon ages on charcoal and twig fragments from Mazama air-fall deposits, indicate that the climatic eruption of Mount Mazama occurred 6730 ± 40 14 C years BP. (author)

  13. Radiocarbon dating with the Chalk River MP Tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, G.C.; Andrews, H.R.; Brown, R.M.; Burn, N.; Davies, W.G.; Imahori, Y.; Milton, J.C.D.

    1981-01-01

    During the past three years an automated radiocarbon dating system based on the MP Tandem accelerator has been developed for the analysis of 14 C in groundwater samples from the nuclear waste disposal research program and other small samples of scientific interest. At the present time 14 C/ 12 C ratio measurements can be determined with an accuracy of about 5% and the system background levels (approx. 35000 to 45000 years) are totally determined by sample and/or ion source contamination. Our goal has been to develop a dedicated reliable system for routine analysis that will produce accurate results with a minimum expenditure of human resources and accelerator beam time. Improvements required to operate the tandem accelerator as a quantitative tool have also benefited the rest of the experimental nuclear physics program. The early evolution of the dating facility was described previously. This paper is a brief report of the current status at Chalk River

  14. Myo-inositol-14C, phytic acid-14C and ferric phytate-14C metabolism through microbian action in an andosol soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez I, J.

    1977-01-01

    The myo-inositol- 14 C, phytic acid- 14 C and ferric phytate- 14 C compounds were incubated in an andosol soil at 70% of the field capacity and at 36.5 deg C during twelve days. These compounds suffered a microbian oxidation at 14 CO 2 of 61.0, 1.9 and 0% respectively. The fixation of the phytic acid- 14 C was observed through the fast decrease in the metabolism, due to the formation of complexes with the Fe and Al (phytates). The myo-inositol- 14 C metabolism was reduced by a factor of nine at the second incubation day. The following mechanisms were observed in the myo-inositol metabolism: (i) adsorption of the inositol by the soil minerals, (ii) adsorption by humic acids, (iii) myo-inositol phosphorylation and (iv) epimerization of myo-inositol to chiro-inositol. It was found that the (i) and (ii) formation depends on the soil microbian activity. The (i), (ii) and (iii) interactions were considered as possible mechanisms for the inhibition of the myo-inositol microbian oxidation. The inhibition of the myo-inositol oxidation through adsorption or phosphorylation is considered as a chemical blockade for the hydroaxial group, avoiding this way a microbian oxidation stereospecific of this hydroxil group. (author)

  15. Determination of 14C age of inorganic and organic carbon in ancient Siberian permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, T. C.; Liang, R.; Lau, M.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Lloyd, K. G.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Hodgins, G.; Rivkina, E.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost represents a large reservoir of ancient carbon that could have an important impact on the global carbon budget during climate warming. Due to the low turnover rate of carbon by microorganisms at subzero temperatures, the persistence of ancient carbon in younger permafrost deposits could also pose challenges for radiocarbon dating of permafrost sediment. We utilized Accelerator Mass Spectrometry to determine the 14C age of inorganic carbon, labile and recalcitrant organic carbon in Siberian permafrost sediment sampled at various depths from 2.9 to 5.6m. The fraction of inorganic carbon (CO2) was collected after acidification using phosphoric acid. The labile (younger) and recalcitrant (old) organic carbon in the subsequent residues were collected after combustion at 400 ºC and 800 ºC, respectively. The percentages of inorganic carbon increased from the youngest (2.9m) to the oldest (5.6m), whereas the fractions for organic carbon varied significantly at different depths. The 14C age determined in the inorganic fraction in the top sample (2.9 m) was 21,760 yr BP and gradually increased to 33,900 yr BP in the relative deeper sediment (3.5 and 5.6 m). Surprisingly, the fraction of "younger" carbon liberated at 400 oC was older than the more recalcitrant and presumably older organic carbon liberated at 800 oC in all cases. Moreover, the 14C age of the younger and older organic carbon fractions did not increase with depth as observed in the carbonate fraction. In particular, the 14C age of the organic carbon in the top sample (38,590-41,700 yr BP) was much older than the deeper samples at depth of 3.5m (18,228-20,158 yr BP) and 5.6m (29,040-38,020 yr BP). It should be noticed that the metabolism of ancient carbon in frozen permafrost may vary at different depths due to the different proportion of necromass and metabolically active microbes. Therefore, additional knowledge about the carbon dynamics of permafrost and more investigation would be required to

  16. Source apportionment of elevated wintertime PAHs by compound-specific radiocarbon analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Sheesley

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural abundance radiocarbon analysis facilitates distinct source apportionment between contemporary biomass/biofuel (14C "alive" versus fossil fuel (14C "dead" combustion. Here, the first compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs was demonstrated for a set of samples collected in Lycksele, Sweden a small town with frequent episodes of severe atmospheric pollution in the winter. Renewed interest in using residential wood combustion (RWC means that this type of seasonal pollution is of increasing concern in many areas. Five individual/paired PAH isolates from three pooled fortnight-long filter collections were analyzed by CSRA: phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[b+k]fluoranthene and indeno[cd]pyrene plus benzo[ghi]perylene; phenanthrene was the only compound also analyzed in the gas phase. The measured Δ14C for PAHs spanned from −138.3‰ to 58.0‰. A simple isotopic mass balance model was applied to estimate the fraction biomass (fbiomass contribution, which was constrained to 71–87% for the individual PAHs. Indeno[cd]pyrene plus benzo[ghi]perylene had an fbiomass of 71%, while fluoranthene and phenanthrene (gas phase had the highest biomass contribution at 87%. The total organic carbon (TOC, defined as carbon remaining after removal of inorganic carbon fbiomass was estimated to be 77%, which falls within the range for PAHs. This CSRA data of atmospheric PAHs established that RWC is the dominating source of atmospheric PAHs to this region of the boreal zone with some variations among RWC contributions to specific PAHs.

  17. Radiocarbon evidence that carbon from the Deepwater Horizon spill entered the planktonic food web of the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanton, J P; Wilson, R M; Mickle, A; Cherrier, J; Sarkodee-Adoo, J; Bosman, S; Graham, W M

    2012-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (Macondo) oil spill released large volumes of oil and gas of distinct carbon isotopic composition to the northern Gulf of Mexico, allowing Graham et al (2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 045301) to use stable carbon isotopes (δ 13 C) to infer the introduction of spilled oil into the planktonic food web. Surface ocean organic production and measured oil are separated by 5–7‰ in stable carbon isotope (δ 13 C) space, while in radiocarbon14 C) space these two potential sources are separated by more than 1000‰. Thus radiocarbon isotopes provide a more sensitive tracer by which to infer possible introduction of Macondo oil into the food web. We measured Δ 14 C and δ 13 C in plankton collected from within 100 km of the spill site as well as in coastal and offshore DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon or ΣCO 2 ) to constrain surface production values. On average, plankton values were depleted in 14 C relative to surface DIC, and we found a significant linear correlation between Δ 14 C and δ 13 C in plankton. Cumulatively, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that carbon released from the Deepwater Horizon spill contributed to the offshore planktonic food web. Our results support the findings of Graham et al (2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 045301), but we infer that methane input may be important. (letter)

  18. Sun, Ocean, Nuclear Bombs, and Fossil Fuels: Radiocarbon Variations and Implications for High-Resolution Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Koushik

    2016-06-01

    Radiocarbon, or 14C, is a radiometric dating method ideally suited for providing a chronological framework in archaeology and geosciences for timescales spanning the last 50,000 years. 14C is easily detectable in most common natural organic materials and has a half-life (5,730±40 years) relevant to these timescales. 14C produced from large-scale detonations of nuclear bombs between the 1950s and the early 1960s can be used for dating modern organic materials formed after the 1950s. Often these studies demand high-resolution chronology to resolve ages within a few decades to less than a few years. Despite developments in modern, high-precision 14C analytical methods, the applicability of 14C in high-resolution chronology is limited by short-term variations in atmospheric 14C in the past. This article reviews the roles of the principal natural drivers (e.g., solar magnetic activity and ocean circulation) and the anthropogenic perturbations (e.g., fossil fuel CO2 and 14C from nuclear and thermonuclear bombs) that are responsible for short-term 14C variations in the environment. Methods and challenges of high-resolution 14C dating are discussed.

  19. Adsorption of carbon-14 on mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka; Muraoka, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    The sorption experiments of carbon-14 on the mortar grain (grain size: 0.50--1.0 mm) focused on the chemical form of the carbon-14 were carried out by the batch method. Three kinds of carbon-14 chemical form were used for the experiments: sodium carbonate (Na 2 14 CO 3 ) as the inorganic radiocarbon, and sodium acetate (CH 3 14 COONa) and acetaldehyde ( 14 CH 3 14 CHO) as the organic radiocarbons. 0.30 gram samples of mortar were soaked in the solution with carbon-14 at 15 C for periods of up to 160 days. At the end of each run, carbon-14 concentrations in the supernatants were determined before and after centrifugation (3,500 rpm., 1 hr). In the mortar-sodium carbonate system, the retention process of carbon-14 related to reaction on the surface of the mortar was speculated as follows. First, 3CaO-SiO 2 and 2CaO-SiO 2 of the mortar components contact with water and produce Ca(OH) 2 . Ca(OH) 2 produces Ca 2+ and OH - in the solution. Then, calcite forms from Ca 2+ and CO 3 2- in the solution. Thus, the sorption ratio of carbon-14 onto mortar will be high until mortar has been completely carbonated because Ca 2+ is rich in the mortar and the solubility of calcite is low. In the mortar-organic carbon system, the soluble organic carbon-14 is hardly sorbed on the surface of the mortar. Therefore, the cementitious materials may not inhibit the release of organic radiocarbons from the low-level radioactive wastes, contrary to the case of inorganic radiocarbon

  20. An effective method of UV-oxidation of dissolved organic carbon in natural waters for radiocarbon analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuejun; Ge, Tiantian; Wang, Xuchen

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurement of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a very powerful tool to study the sources, transformation and cycling of carbon in the ocean. The technique, however, remains great challenges for complete and successful oxidation of sufficient DOC with low blanks for high precision carbon isotopic ratio analysis, largely due to the overwhelming proportion of salts and low DOC concentrations in the ocean. In this paper, we report an effective UV-Oxidation method for oxidizing DOC in natural waters for radiocarbon analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The UV-oxidation system and method show 95%±4% oxidation efficiency and high reproducibility for DOC in both river and seawater samples. The blanks associated with the method was also low (about 3 µg C) that is critical for 14C analysis. As a great advantage of the method, multiple water samples can be oxidized at the same time so it reduces the sample processing time substantially compared with other UV-oxidation method currently being used in other laboratories. We have used the system and method for 14C studies of DOC in rivers, estuaries, and oceanic environments and have received promise results.

  1. Radiocarbon determination of particulate organic carbon in glacier ice from the Grenzgletscher (Monte Rosa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steier, P.; Drosg, R.; Kutschera, W.; Wild, E.M.; Fedi, M.; Schock, M.; Wagenbach, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Dating ice cores from cold glaciers via radiocarbon is still an unsolved problem. This work describes our approach towards extraction and AMS radiocarbon dating of the particulate organic carbon (POC) fraction in ice samples at VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator). First measurements were performed on 1 snow and 11 ice samples from Gorner Glacier and Colle Gnifetti in the Monte Rosa Mountain region (Swiss Alps). The sample masses used were between 0.3 kg and 1.4 kg ice yielding between 18 μg and 307 μg carbon as POC. The carbon contamination introduced during the sample processing varied between 9 μg and 33 μg C and originates mainly from the quartz filters and the rinsing liquids used. Minimum sample sizes for successful graphitization of carbon dioxide in our laboratory have been reduced to less than 10 μg carbon. The background in the graphitization process is approximately 0.5 μg carbon of 40 pMC. Scatter and outliers in the radiocarbon data suggest that presently a single radiocarbon date of glacial POC has limited significance. For the set of 11 ice samples, a calibrated age of 2100 BC to 900 AD (95% confidence level) is obtained. (author)

  2. Single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon-interference identification and positive-ionisation characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcken, K.M., E-mail: klaus.wilcken@ansto.gov.au [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom); Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Xu, S.; Dougans, A. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-15

    A single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) is a good alternative to conventional spectrometers based on tandem electrostatic acceleration for radiocarbon measurement and permits experimentation with both negative and positive carbon ions. However, such {sup 14}C AMS of either polarity ions is limited by an interference. In the case of anion acceleration we have newly determined this to be summed {sup 13}C and {sup 16}O by improvising an additional Wien filter on our SSAMS deck. Also, {sup 14}C AMS might be improved by removing its dependency on negative-ionisation in a sputter ion source. This requires negative-ionisation of sample atoms elsewhere to suppress the {sup 14}N interference, which we accomplish by transmitting initially positive ions through a thin membrane. The ionisation dependence on ion-energy is found to be consistent with previous experimentation with vapours and thicker foils.

  3. Radiocarbon Based Ages and Growth Rates: Hawaiian Deep Sea Corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L

    2006-01-13

    The radial growth rates and ages of three different groups of Hawaiian deep-sea 'corals' were determined using radiocarbon measurements. Specimens of Corallium secundum, Gerardia sp., and Leiopathes glaberrima, were collected from 450 {+-} 40 m at the Makapuu deep-sea coral bed using a submersible (PISCES V). Specimens of Antipathes dichotoma were collected at 50 m off Lahaina, Maui. The primary source of carbon to the calcitic C. secundum skeleton is in situ dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Using bomb {sup 14}C time markers we calculate radial growth rates of {approx} 170 {micro}m y{sup -1} and ages of 68-75 years on specimens as tall as 28 cm of C. secundum. Gerardia sp., A. dichotoma, and L. glaberrima have proteinaceous skeletons and labile particulate organic carbon (POC) is their primary source of architectural carbon. Using {sup 14}C we calculate a radial growth rate of 15 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of 807 {+-} 30 years for a live collected Gerardia sp., showing that these organisms are extremely long lived. Inner and outer {sup 14}C measurements on four sub-fossil Gerardia spp. samples produce similar growth rate estimates (range 14-45 {micro}m y{sup -1}) and ages (range 450-2742 years) as observed for the live collected sample. Similarly, with a growth rate of < 10 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of {approx}2377 years, L. glaberrima at the Makapuu coral bed, is also extremely long lived. In contrast, the shallow-collected A. dichotoma samples yield growth rates ranging from 130 to 1,140 {micro}m y{sup -1}. These results show that Hawaiian deep-sea corals grow more slowly and are older than previously thought.

  4. Status report on the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory – AMS and LSC results of VIRI intercomparison samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sironić, Andreja; Krajcar Bronić, Ines; Horvatinčić, Nada; Barešić, Jadranka; Obelić, Bogomil; Felja, Igor

    2013-01-01

    A new line for preparation of the graphite samples for 14 C dating by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory has been validated by preparing graphite from various materials distributed within the Fifth International Radiocarbon Intercomparison (VIRI) study. 14 C activity of prepared graphite was measured at the SUERC AMS facility. The results are statistically evaluated by means of the z-score and u-score values. The mean z-score value of 28 prepared VIRI samples is (0.06 ± 0.23) showing excellent agreement with the consensus VIRI values. Only one sample resulted in the u-score value above the limit of acceptability (defined for the confidence interval of 99%) and this was probably caused by a random contamination of the graphitization rig. After the rig had been moved to the new adapted and isolated room, all u-score values laid within the acceptable limits. Our LSC results of VIRI intercomparison samples are also presented and they are all accepted according to the u-score values.

  5. Small-mass AMS radiocarbon analysis at Nagoya University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Masayo, E-mail: minami@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kato, Tomomi [Faculty of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Miyata, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Toshio [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Hua Quan [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    As part of the ongoing development at the AMS facility of the Center for Chronological Research at Nagoya University to radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) analyze samples smaller than 0.5 mg carbon (mgC), a compact graphitization manifold has been built. Tests with various reference materials show it performs well for samples as small as 0.1 mgC. Preparation with this new system is compared with the performance of the older protocol for regular-sized samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the addition of Cu and Ag before and stepwise heating during sealed-tube combustion of samples with high S content improve the degree of conversion to CO{sub 2} without having to resort to special purification measures such as the use of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} + Ag reagent and an n-pentane/LN{sub 2} trap before graphitization.

  6. Do site-specific radiocarbon measurements reflect localized distributions of 14C in biota inhabiting a wetland with point contamination sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, T; King-Sharp, K J; Benz, M L; Carr, J; Killey, R W D; Beresford, N A; Wood, M D

    2013-12-01

    Duke Swamp is a wetland ecosystem that receives (14)C via a groundwater pathway originating from a waste management area on Atomic Energy Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories site. This groundwater reaches the surface of the swamp, resulting in relatively high (14)C levels over an area of 146 m(2). The objective of this study was to quantify (14)C concentrations in flora and fauna inhabiting areas of Duke Swamp over the gradient of (14)C activity concentrations in moss to determine whether (14)C specific activities in receptor biota reflect the localized nature of the groundwater source in the swamp. Representative receptor plants and animals, and corresponding air and soil samples were collected at six sites in Duke Swamp with (14)C specific activities in air that ranged from 1140 to 45,900 Bq/kg C. In general, it was found that specific activities of (14)C in biota tissues reflected those measured in environmental media collected from the same sampling site. The findings demonstrate that mosses could be used in monitoring programs to ensure protection of biota in areas with elevated (14)C, negating the need to capture and euthanize higher organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiocarbon constraints on the glacial ocean circulation and its impact on atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, L. C.; Primeau, F.; Freeman, E.; de la Fuente, M.; Goodwin, P. A.; Gottschalk, J.; Huang, E.; McCave, I. N.; Noble, T. L.; Scrivner, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    While the ocean’s large-scale overturning circulation is thought to have been significantly different under the climatic conditions of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the exact nature of the glacial circulation and its implications for global carbon cycling continue to be debated. Here we use a global array of ocean–atmosphere radiocarbon disequilibrium estimates to demonstrate a ∼689±53 14C-yr increase in the average residence time of carbon in the deep ocean at the LGM. A predominantly southern-sourced abyssal overturning limb that was more isolated from its shallower northern counterparts is interpreted to have extended from the Southern Ocean, producing a widespread radiocarbon age maximum at mid-depths and depriving the deep ocean of a fast escape route for accumulating respired carbon. While the exact magnitude of the resulting carbon cycle impacts remains to be confirmed, the radiocarbon data suggest an increase in the efficiency of the biological carbon pump that could have accounted for as much as half of the glacial–interglacial CO2 change. PMID:28703126

  8. Direct dating of archaeological pottery by compound-specific 14C analysis of preserved lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Andrew W; Berstan, Robert; Evershed, Richard P; Bronk-Ramsey, Christopher; Hedges, Robert E M; Humm, Martin J

    2003-10-01

    A methodology is described demonstrating the utility of the compound-specific 14C technique as a direct means of dating archaeological pottery. The method uses automated preparative capillary gas chromatography employing wide-bore capillary columns to isolate individual compounds from lipid extracts of archaeological potsherds in high purity (>95%) and amounts (>200 microg) sufficient for radiocarbon dating using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). A protocol was developed and tested on n-alkanes and n-carboxylic acids possessing a broad range of 14C ages. Analytical blanks and controls allowed background 14C measurements to be assessed and potential sources of errors to be detected, i.e., contamination with modern or dead 14C, isotopic fraction effects, etc. A "Russian doll" method was developed to transfer isolated target compounds onto tin powder/capsules prior to combustion and AMS analyses. The major advantage of the compound-specific technique is that 14C dates obtained for individual compounds can be directly linked to the commodities processed in the vessels during their use, e.g., animal fats. The compound-specific 14C dating protocol was validated on a suite of ancient pottery whose predicted ages spanned a 5000-year date range. Initial results indicate that meaningful correlations can be obtained between the predicted date of pottery and that of the preserved lipids. These findings constitute an important step forward to the direct dating of archaeological pottery.

  9. Decomposition of 14C - malathion in three Brazilian soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helene, C.G.; Ruegg, E.F.

    1982-01-01

    The degradation of 14 C-malathion in soil was examined using gas chromatography and radiotracer techniques. About half of the malathion added was degraded within a day in soil from three regions of Brazil. Almost all the radiolabelled material extracted from the Red Latosol (Londrina, PR) was malathion, but metabolites were extracted from the 'Sandy' cerrado soil (Planaltina, DF) and Dark-Red Latosol (Passo Fundo, RS). The proportion of metabolites in the extracts increased until most of the malathion was degraded, after four days. Radiocarbon dioxide was liberated from all three soils at similar rates. When about half of the label had been recovered as carbon dioxide after eight weeks, the rate of evolution diminished. (Author) [pt

  10. Indian Ocean radiocarbon: Data from the INDIGO 1, 2, and 3 cruises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepanski, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This document presents 14 C activities (expressed in the internationally adopted Δ 14 C scale) from water samples taken at various locations and depths in the Indian and Southern oceans through the Indien Gaz Ocean (INDIGO) project. These data were collected as part of the INDIGO 1, INDIGO 2, and INDIGO 3 cruises, which took place during the years 1985, 1986, and 1987, respectively. These data have been used to estimate the penetration of anthropogenic CO 2 in the Indian and Southern oceans. The document also presents supporting data for potential temperature, salinity, density (sigma-theta), δ 13 C, and total CO 2 . All radiocarbon measurements have been examined statistically for quality of sample counts and stability of counting efficiency and background. In addition, all data have been reviewed by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and assessed for gross accuracy and consistency (absence of obvious outliers and other anomalous values). These data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP consists of this document and a magnetic tape containing machine-readable files. This document provides sample listing of the Indian Ocean radiocarbon data as they appear on the magnetic tape, as well as a complete listing of these data in tabular form. This document also offers retrieval program listings, furnishes information on sampling methods and data selection, defines limitations and restrictions of the data, and provides reprints of pertinent literature. 13 refs., 4 tabs

  11. The Geological Survey of Canada Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdon, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory of the Geological Survey of Canada began routine 14 C age determinations in 1961 using a 2 litre copper, proportional counter and CO 2 as the counting gas. This counter is operated routinely at a pressure of 2 atmospheres where the maximum dating limit is approximately 40 000 years using the 4σ criterion. In 1964 a 5 litre counter was put into operation. Routinely this counter is operated at a pressure of 1 atmosphere where its dating limit is approximately 40 000 years. When operated at 4 atmospheres its age limit increases to about 54 000 years. Organic samples are burned in a stream of oxygen and the CO 2 released is purified on passage through a series of chemicals and traps. Inorganic samples are dissolved in phosphoric acid. Up to the end of 1983 more than 3700 age determinations have been carried out on various types of sample material. Since 1963 twenty-three Geological Survey of Canada Date Lists have been published. The Laboratory also carries out a program of 14 C determinations of samples of known age for the purpose of assessing the accuracy of the method and learning more about the natural and man-made 14 C distribution and circulation in nature

  12. Radiocarbon dating of ancient Japanese documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, H.

    2001-01-01

    History is a reconstruction of past human activity, evidence of which is remained in the form of documents or relics. For the reconstruction of historic period, the radiocarbon dating of ancient documents provides important information. Although radiocarbon age is converted into calendar age with the calibration curve, the calibrated radiocarbon age is still different from the historical age when the document was written. The difference is known as 'old wood effect' for wooden cultural property. The discrepancy becomes more serious problem for recent sample which requires more accurate age determination. Using Tandetron accelerator mass spectrometer at Nagoya University, we have measured radiocarbon ages of Japanese ancient documents, sutras and printed books written dates of which are clarified from the paleographic standpoint. The purpose is to clarify the relation between calibrated radiocarbon age and historical age of ancient Japanese document by AMS radiocarbon dating. This paper reports 23 radiocarbon ages of ancient Japanese documents, sutras and printed books. The calibrated radiocarbon ages are in good agreement with the corresponding historical ages. It was shown by radiocarbon dating of the ancient documents that Japanese paper has little gap by 'old wood effect'; accordingly, ancient Japanese paper is a suitable sample for radiocarbon dating of recent historic period. (author)

  13. Carbon-14 in tree rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, W.F.; Suess, H.E.

    1976-01-01

    In order to investigate how reliably the carbon 14 content of tree rings reflects that of atmospheric carbon dioxide, two types of determinations were carried out: (1) carbon 14 determinations in annual rings from the beginning of this century until 1974 and (2) carbon 14 determinations in synchronous wood from the North American bristlecone pine and from European oak trees, dendrochronologically dated to have grown in the third and fourth century B.C. The first series of measurements showed that bomb-produced radiocarbon was incorporated in wood at a time when it was converted from sapwood to heartwood, whenever radiocarbon from bomb testing was present in the atmosphere. The second series showed that wood more than 2000 years old and grown on two different continents at different altitudes had, within the limits of experimental error, the same radiocarbon content. This work and other experimental evidence, obtained in part by other laboratories, show that tree rings reflect the average radiocarbon content of global atmospheric carbon dioxide accurately within several parts per mil. In rare cases, deviations of up to 10 parts per thousand may be possible. This means that a typical single radiocarbon date for wood or charcoal possesses an intrinsic uncertainty (viz., an estimated ''one-sigma error'' in addition to all the other errors) of the order of +-50 years. This intrinsic uncertainty is independent of the absolute age of the sample. More accurate dates can, in principle, be obtained by the so-called method of ''wiggle matching.''

  14. Sophistication of 14C measurement at JAEA-AMS-MUTSU. Attempt on a small quantity of sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Kabuto, Shoji; Kinoshita, Naoki; Yamamoto, Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    In the investigations on substance dynamics using the molecular weight and chemical fractionation, the utilization of 14 C measurement by an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) have started. As a result of the fractionation, sample contents required for AMS measurement have been downsized. We expect that this trend toward a small quantity of sample will be steadily accelerated in the future. As 14 C measurement by AMS established at Mutsu office require about 2 mg of sample content at present, our AMS lags behind the others in the trend. We try to downsize the needed sample content for 14 C measurement by our AMS. In this study, we modified the shape of the target-piece in which the sample is packed and which is regularly needed to radiocarbon measurement by our AMS. Moreover, we improved on the apparatus needed to pack the sample. As a result of the improvement, we revealed that it is possible to measure the 14 C using our AMS even by the amount of the sample of about 0.5 mg. (author)

  15. Investigation into feed utilisation by fore-aged silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) using double-marked algae (14C and 51Cr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, B.; Spittler, P.; Heerkloss, R.

    1982-01-01

    The blue-green alga Microcystis firma and two green algae, Dunaliella viridis and Chlorella vulgaris, were double-marked with 14 C and 51 Cr. The 51 Cr was used as an indicator to measure the assimilation efficiency of fore-aged silver carp for radiocarbon. The assimilation efficiency values obtained were 89.0 +- 5.43% for M. firma, 61.3 +- 15.28% for D. viridis and 91.3 +- 2.22% for C. vulgaris. (author)

  16. Precision and reproducibility in AMS radiocarbon measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkis, M.A.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.E.; Lawson, E. M.; Smith, A.M.; Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a technique by which rare radioisotopes such as {sup 14}C can be measured at environmental levels with high efficiency. Instead of detecting radioactivity, which is very weak for long-lived environmental radioisotopes, atoms are counted directly. The sample is placed in an ion source, from which a negative ion beam of the atoms of interest is extracted, mass analysed, and injected into a tandem accelerator. After stripping to positive charge states in the accelerator HV terminal, the ions are further accelerated, analysed with magnetic and electrostatic devices and counted in a detector. An isotopic ratio is derived from the number of radioisotope atoms counted in a given time and the beam current of a stable isotope of the same element, measured after the accelerator. For radiocarbon, {sup 14}C/{sup 13}C ratios are usually measured, and the ratio of an unknown sample is compared to that of a standard. The achievable precision for such ratio measurements is limited primarily by {sup 14}C counting statistics and also by a variety of factors related to accelerator and ion source stability. At the ANTARES AMS facility at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories we are currently able to measure {sup 14}C with 0.5% precision. In the two years since becoming operational, more than 1000 {sup 14}C samples have been measured. Recent improvements in precision for {sup 14}C have been achieved with the commissioning of a 59 sample ion source. The measurement system, from sample changing to data acquisition, is under common computer control. These developments have allowed a new regime of automated multi-sample processing which has impacted both on the system throughput and the measurement precision. We have developed data evaluation methods at ANTARES which cross-check the self-consistency of the statistical analysis of our data. Rigorous data evaluation is invaluable in assessing the true reproducibility of the measurement system and aids in

  17. Precision and reproducibility in AMS radiocarbon measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkis, M A; Fink, D; Hua, Q; Jacobsen, G E; Lawson, E M; Smith, A M; Tuniz, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a technique by which rare radioisotopes such as {sup 14}C can be measured at environmental levels with high efficiency. Instead of detecting radioactivity, which is very weak for long-lived environmental radioisotopes, atoms are counted directly. The sample is placed in an ion source, from which a negative ion beam of the atoms of interest is extracted, mass analysed, and injected into a tandem accelerator. After stripping to positive charge states in the accelerator HV terminal, the ions are further accelerated, analysed with magnetic and electrostatic devices and counted in a detector. An isotopic ratio is derived from the number of radioisotope atoms counted in a given time and the beam current of a stable isotope of the same element, measured after the accelerator. For radiocarbon, {sup 14}C/{sup 13}C ratios are usually measured, and the ratio of an unknown sample is compared to that of a standard. The achievable precision for such ratio measurements is limited primarily by {sup 14}C counting statistics and also by a variety of factors related to accelerator and ion source stability. At the ANTARES AMS facility at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories we are currently able to measure {sup 14}C with 0.5% precision. In the two years since becoming operational, more than 1000 {sup 14}C samples have been measured. Recent improvements in precision for {sup 14}C have been achieved with the commissioning of a 59 sample ion source. The measurement system, from sample changing to data acquisition, is under common computer control. These developments have allowed a new regime of automated multi-sample processing which has impacted both on the system throughput and the measurement precision. We have developed data evaluation methods at ANTARES which cross-check the self-consistency of the statistical analysis of our data. Rigorous data evaluation is invaluable in assessing the true reproducibility of the measurement system and aids in

  18. Extraction of in situ cosmogenic 14C from olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Chemical pretreatment and extraction techniques have been developed previously to extract in situ cosmogenic radiocarbon (in situ 14C) from quartz and carbonate. These minerals can be found in most environments on Earth, but are usually absent from mafic terrains. To fill this gap, we conducted numerous experiments aimed at extracting in situ 14C from olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4). We were able to extract a stable and reproducible in situ 14C component from olivine using stepped heating and a lithium metaborate (LiBO2) flux, following treatment with dilute HNO3 over a variety of experimental conditions. However, measured concentrations for samples from the Tabernacle Hill basalt flow (17.3 ?? 0.3 ka4) in central Utah and the McCarty's basalt flow (3.0 ?? 0.2 ka) in western New Mexico were significantly lower than expected based on exposure of olivine in our samples to cosmic rays at each site. The source of the discrepancy is not clear. We speculate that in situ 14C atoms may not have been released from Mg-rich crystal lattices (the olivine composition at both sites was ~Fo65Fa35). Alternatively, a portion of the 14C atoms released from the olivine grains may have become trapped in synthetic spinel-like minerals that were created in the olivine-flux mixture during the extraction process, or were simply retained in the mixture itself. Regardless, the magnitude of the discrepancy appears to be inversely proportional to the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio of the olivine separates. If we apply a simple correction factor based on the chemical composition of the separates, then corrected in situ 14C concentrations are similar to theoretical values at both sites. At this time, we do not know if this agreement is fortuitous or real. Future research should include measurement of in situ 14C concentrations in olivine from known-age basalt flows with different chemical compositions (i.e. more Fe-rich) to determine if this correction is robust for all olivine-bearing rocks. ?? 2010 by the Arizona

  19. Influence of thermal treatments on radiocarbon dating of groundwater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Iuliana Madalina; Sava, Tiberiu Bogdan; Pacesila, Doru Gheorghe; Gaza, Oana; Simion, Corina Anca; Stefan, Bianca Maria; Sava, Gabriela Odilia; Ghita, Dan Gabriel; Mosu, Vasile

    2017-06-01

    Radiocarbon measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in water provides information about the formation of oceanic circulation of the water volumes, the hydrogeological systems, and also valuable information can be gained about the aquifer storage and the degree of containment relative to the surface waters. Radiocarbon dating refers to the determination of small quantities of the naturally occurring carbon 14 in the water, which can be integrated in the groundwater mass through the gaseous CO2, carbonaceous deposits dissolved by water and organic remains. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the temperature and pressure over the amount of each isotope of carbon during the sample preparation stage. The first step was to evaporate several underground water samples at 65°C under different conditions until the carbonates were obtained, then the CO2 was extracted with orto-phosphoric acid and transformed to graphite. The second step was to obtain graphite from an untreated water sample. Finally, the samples were measured with the 1MV Cockcroft-Walton Tandetron Accelerator by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

  20. Opportunities in low-level radiocarbon microtracing: applications and new technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Le Thuy; Song, Qi; Lee, Hee Joo; Roffel, Ad F; Shin, Seok-Ho; Shin, Young G; Dueker, Stephen R

    2016-03-01

    14 C-radiolabeled (radiocarbon) drug studies are central to defining the disposition of therapeutics in clinical development. Concerns over radiation, however, have dissuaded investigators from conducting these studies as often as their utility may merit. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), originally designed for carbon dating and geochronology, has changed the outlook for in-human radiolabeled testing. The high sensitivity of AMS affords human clinical testing with vastly reduced radiative (microtracing) and chemical exposures (microdosing). Early iterations of AMS were unsuitable for routine biomedical use due to the instruments' large size and associated per sample costs. The situation is changing with advances in the core and peripheral instrumentation. We review the important milestones in applied AMS research and recent advances in the core technology platform. We also look ahead to an entirely new class of 14 C detection systems that use lasers to measure carbon dioxide in small gas cells.

  1. Analysis of radiocarbon dates of an archaeological site in the Russian Far East: The marine reservoir effect as seen on charred remains on pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunikita, Dai; Yoshida, Kunio; Miyazaki, Yumiko; Saito, Keita; Endo, Aya; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Ito, Shinji; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Fujimoto, Tsuyoshi; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Krupyanko, A.A.; Tabarev, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain precise and accurate calibrated radiocarbon chronologies for archaeological sites, it is necessary to determine the provenance of the carbon material being dated. Of particular note is determining the provenance and radiocarbon age of charcoal remains on pottery. In this context, we discuss the decipherment of dates on the Ustinovka-8 site in the Russian Far East. Using δ 13 C, δ 15 N and C:N it is possible to ascribe charcoal provenance to terrestrial and marine origins. Our data show radiocarbon age difference that are clearly associated with carbon origin, and a maximum estimated ΔR of approximately 400 years during the Zaisanovskaya culture, 4400 cal BP. A combination of pottery analysis and 14 C dating at this site determined the Zaisanovskaya cultural period to be 4000-5000 cal BP, the Boismanskaya and the Late Rudninskaya cultural period 5800-6500 cal BP, and the Early Rudninskaya cultural period of 6800-7100 cal BP

  2. The Remarkable Metrological History of Radiocarbon Dating [II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Lloyd A

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought (14)C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for "molecular dating" at the 10 µg to 100 µg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the "bomb effect," that gave rise to new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from archaeology and anthropology to cosmic ray physics to oceanography to apportionment of anthropogenic pollutants to the reconstruction of environmental history. Beyond the specific topic of natural (14)C, it is hoped that this account may serve as a metaphor for young scientists, illustrating that just when a scientific discipline may appear to be approaching maturity, unanticipated metrological advances in their own chosen fields, and unanticipated anthropogenic or natural chemical events in the environment, can spawn new areas of research having exciting theoretical and practical implications.

  3. New observations on the stratigraphy and radiocarbon dates at the Cross Creek site, Opito, Coromandel Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furey, L.; Petchey, F.; Sewell, B.; Green, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper re-examines stratigraphy and radiocarbon dates at Cross Creek in Sarah's Gully. Three new radiocarbon dates are presented for Layer 9, the earliest, and previously undated, occupation. This investigation is part of a programme of archaeological work being carried out on the Coromandel Peninsula. (author). 51 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Environmental 14C and 3H activities: global trends and local contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajcar Bronic, I.; Obelic, B.; Horvatincic, N.

    2000-01-01

    The anthropogenic disturbance of natural distributions of radiocarbon ( 14 C) and tritium ( 3 H) due to the release of bomb-produced isotopes occurred after the World War II and at the same time the monitoring of these isotopes started at several stations in the world. Radioactive isotopes 14 C and 3 H, together with the stable isotopes 2 H and 18 O, are very important tracers in environmental, climatological and hydrological studies. Monitoring of environmental levels of 14 C and 3 H in Croatia started more then 20 years ago, while that of the stable isotopes somewhat later. The monitoring was performed at the three types of stations: a) 'clean-air' sites, which are supposed to reflect only the global disturbance of the atmospheric isotope concentrations, b) in a densely populated industrial center, where the effect of intense fossil-fuel combustion is expected, and local contamination from institutions using radioactive-labeled material is also possible, and c) at locations around the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko. The mean yearly 3 H activities in precipitation continuously decrease since the beginning of monitoring approaching slowly the natural equilibrium. The monthly 3 H activities show seasonal variations, with maximum in early summer and minimum in early winter. Both seasonal variations and the decrease of the mean yearly values are typical for continental stations of the Northern Hemisphere. At the sampling site located at the Institute, several periods of higher 3 H activities were observed, due to the local contamination with the tritium-labeled material. The 14 C concentration in the atmosphere shows also the continuous decrease of the mean yearly values and superposed seasonal fluctuations, with higher activity during summer. Seasonal peak-to-peak variations are higher in the area of the city of Zagreb than at the clean-air site on the mountain (about 1000 m a.s.l.). This difference is caused by the introduction of CO 2 (containing no 14 C isotope

  5. Studies on the radiocarbon sample from the shroud of turin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Raymond N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of California, 1961 Cumbres Patio, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)]. E-mail: rnrogers@att.net

    2005-01-20

    In 1988, radiocarbon laboratories at Arizona, Cambridge, and Zurich determined the age of a sample from the Shroud of Turin. They reported that the date of the cloth's production lay between A.D. 1260 and 1390 with 95% confidence. This came as a surprise in view of the technology used to produce the cloth, its chemical composition, and the lack of vanillin in its lignin. The results prompted questions about the validity of the sample. Preliminary estimates of the kinetics constants for the loss of vanillin from lignin indicate a much older age for the cloth than the radiocarbon analyses. The radiocarbon sampling area is uniquely coated with a yellow-brown plant gum containing dye lakes. Pyrolysis-mass-spectrometry results from the sample area coupled with microscopic and microchemical observations prove that the radiocarbon sample was not part of the original cloth of the Shroud of Turin. The radiocarbon date was thus not valid for determining the true age of the shroud.

  6. Studies on the radiocarbon sample from the shroud of turin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Raymond N.

    2005-01-01

    In 1988, radiocarbon laboratories at Arizona, Cambridge, and Zurich determined the age of a sample from the Shroud of Turin. They reported that the date of the cloth's production lay between A.D. 1260 and 1390 with 95% confidence. This came as a surprise in view of the technology used to produce the cloth, its chemical composition, and the lack of vanillin in its lignin. The results prompted questions about the validity of the sample. Preliminary estimates of the kinetics constants for the loss of vanillin from lignin indicate a much older age for the cloth than the radiocarbon analyses. The radiocarbon sampling area is uniquely coated with a yellow-brown plant gum containing dye lakes. Pyrolysis-mass-spectrometry results from the sample area coupled with microscopic and microchemical observations prove that the radiocarbon sample was not part of the original cloth of the Shroud of Turin. The radiocarbon date was thus not valid for determining the true age of the shroud

  7. Cosmogonic radiocarbon in the Earth atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dergachev, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The state and prospects of studying some processes in nature (cosmic ray intensity variations on a long time scale, mainly) using radiocarbon methods are discussed. The problem of radiocarbon preparation in exchange geochemical tanks is considered. It is noted that a set of dendrochronological and nuclear methods for analyzing tree rings is a powerful instrument for studying different processes in nature. The measurement results of radiocarbon concentration in dated wood samples for the last approximately 8000 years are presented. The relation between different indices of solar activity and the rate of radiocarbon production for separate solar cycles is investigated. The production rate variation both for separate cycles and long periods is estimated. The results of investigations lead to the conclusion that 11-year, secular, more durable peculiarities in the run of radiocarbon activity variations in the atmospheric reservoir can be explained by solar origin. The analysis of the experimental data on radiocarbon permit to compare the radiocarbon concentration variations with magnetic or solar activity [ru

  8. Atmospherically dispersed radiocarbon at the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, G.M.; Brown, R.M.; Repta, C.J.W.; Selkirk, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    A small percentage of the total radiocarbon produced by the NRX and NRU experimental reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories has been vented from the main reactor stack and atmospherically dispersed across the site. Surveys conducted in 1982-83 and 1993-94 have shown that atmospheric levels more than 50 m from the stack are never greater than 600 Bq.kg -1 carbon above the natural background level, falling to near-global atmospheric levels at the site boundaries roughly 7 km away. A dispersion factor > 1.2 x 10 6 m 3 .s -1 at ∼ 0.75 km distance from the point of emission is calculated on the basis of recent in-stack monitoring. Analysis of growth rings in on-site trees has provided an opportunity to search for correlations of 14 C output summer power production and/or moderator losses. (author). 16 refs., 14 tabs., 11 figs

  9. Stratospheric contribution to the global bomb radiocarbon inventory: Model versus observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broecker, W.S.; Peng, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    An attempt is made, through modeling, to account for the decline in the 14 C/C ratio in atmospheric CO 2 after its bomb-test induced peak in 1963. The model suggests that as of 1964 about one third of the bomb 14 C remained in the stratosphere and that it was released to the troposphere with an e-folding time of about seven years. By contrast, measurements carried out in the stratosphere suggest that at that time the excess was closer to one quarter of the total and that e-folding time for its decline was 3±1 years. The anomaly between model and observation cannot be attributed solely to an inadequacy in the representation of the terrestrial biosphere. Rather, it must reflect either an inadequacy in the ocean model or in the measured stratospheric inventories. 24 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  10. 13C and 14C measurements on lake sediments of the Grosser Ploener See

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlenkeuser, H.; Willkomm, H.

    1979-01-01

    Radiocarbon age and 13 C content of organic and inorganic carbon fractions were measured for two sediment cores from the Grosser Ploener See (N-Germany), comprising the whole post-glacial. As compared to the age of the pollen stages, the 14 C age of the organic fraction is seen to show a hard-water effect of about 1000 years throughout the sediment column, indicating a constant recent activity of the lake bicarbonate of about 92% of the standard recent activity during the history of the lake. From the age of sediment samples corrected for hard water effect and for 14 C variations of the atmosphere the sedimentation rate is found to increase from 0.4 to 0.8 mm/year in the pre-Christian era to as high as 10 mm/year during the last 7 centuries. In the lower layers of the sediment, the 14 C content of the marl fraction corresponds to that of the organic component, indicating the autochthonous origin of these carbonates. During the last 2 1 /2 millenia, however, its 14 C content is too small by 10 to 30%, probably reflecting an allochthonous admixture. Increasing rate of sedimentation along with the growing accumulation of allochthonous minerals probably reflect the agricultural activity of man. It is associated with an increasing supply of nutrients to the lake particularly since a man-made rise of the water level at A.D. 1256, resulting in an enhanced rate of primary production which could be recognized from the stable carbon isotope ratios of both the sedimentary organic carbon and carbonate fraction. According to these results, the contribution of planktogenic organic matter to the sediments as compared to the supply of plant litter from the litoral zones is steadily increasing during the history of the lake and becomes the dominating part since the lake level risc in the Middle Ages. According to the 13 C/ 12 C-ratios, the carbonates of the sediment appear to have been precipitated preferentially in the litoral zones. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Authentication of Chinese vintage liquors using bomb-pulse 14C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Peng; Zhou, Weijian; Burr, G. S.; Fu, Yunchong; Fan, Yukun; Wu, Shugang

    2016-12-01

    The older a bottle of Chinese vintage liquor is, the higher the price it commands. Driven by the potential for higher profits, some newly-founded distilleries openly sell liquor whose storage ages are exaggerated. In China, the market for vintage liquor has become fraught with uncertainty and a pressing need has arisen to establish an effective method to authenticate the age of vintage liquors. A radiocarbon (14C) dating method is described here that can verify cellar-stored years of Chinese liquors distilled within the last fifty years. Two different flavored Chinese liquors produced in “the golden triangular region” in the Upper Yangtze River region in southwest China, with known cellar-stored years, were analyzed to benchmark the technique. Strong flavored liquors are found to be consistent with local atmospheric Δ14C values. A small offset of 2-3 years between predicted vintage years of soy-sauce flavored liquors and strong flavored liquors is found to be associated with the fermentation cycle of certain varieties. The technique can measure cellar-stored years of a wide range of liquors including those with fundamentally different aromas. This demonstrates the strength of our method in identifying suspect Chinese vintage liquors.

  12. Radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry: some recent results and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, R.E.M.

    1987-01-01

    14 C differs from other nuclides measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in that an extensive database of dates already exists. AMS dates should therefore have comparable accuracy, and the measurement of isotopic ratios to better than 1%, which was an important technical goal, has been reached. The main advantage of being able to date samples 1000 times smaller than previously lies in the extra selectivity that can be employed. This is reflected in the results and applications. Selection can apply at several levels; from objects that formerly contained too little carbon, to the choice of archaeological material, to the extraction of specific chemical compounds from a complex environmental sample. This is particularly useful in removing uncertainty regarding the validity of a date, since a given sample may comprise carbon atoms from different sources each with their own 14 C 'age'. Examples from archaeological and environmental research illustrating these points are given. 14 C dating by AMS differs from conventional radiocarbon dating by having the potential to measure much lower levels of 14 C, and therefore should double the time span of the method. This potential has not yet been realized because of sample contamination effects, and work in progress to reduce these is described. (author)

  13. Maximum possible age of a petrel breeding colony near Punakaiki (South Island, New Zealand) from radiocarbon and stable isotope analysis of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The lifetime of individual petrel colonies is poorly known. This study used radiocarbon, 13 C, and 15 N analysis of soil to determine the maximum possible age of a colony presently occupied by Westland petrels. A sample of Ap horizon soil in lithic contact was selected for analysis, as soil least likely to have been redistributed by petrel burrowing. Chemical removal of mobile organic matter decreased δ 15 N from 14.0 permille (typical of breeding colony soils) to 6.1 permille (within the range of temperate forest soils without sea-bird breeding). δ 13 C values changed little, from -27.1 permille (untreated soil) to -28.4 permille (treated soil), and were typical of forest soil with with C 3 vegetation and no incorporation of marine C. Duplicate AMS radiocarbon analysis of treated sample yielded a combined conventional radiocarbon age of 864 ± 32 BP, indicating that sea-bird breeding could not have occurred at the site for more than 740-960 calendar years. Initial colony occupation may have occurred much later than this, and not been continuous. Sea bird species other than Westland petrels may also have used the site. (author). 30 refs., 2 figs

  14. Radiocarbon Evidence That Millennial and Fast-Cycling Soil Carbon are Equally Sensitive to Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, L. S.; Torn, M. S.; Porras, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Within the century, the Arctic is expected to shift from a sink to a source of atmospheric CO2 due to climate-induced increases in soil carbon mineralization. The magnitude of this effect remains uncertain, due in large part to unknown temperature sensitivities of organic matter decomposition. In particular, the distribution of temperature sensitivities across soil carbon pools remains unknown. New experimental approaches are needed, because studies that fit multi-pool models to CO2 flux measurements may be sensitive to model assumptions, statistical effects, and non-steady-state changes in substrate availability or microbial activity. In this study, we developed a new methodology using natural abundance radiocarbon to evaluate temperature sensitivities across soil carbon pools. In two incubation experiments with soils from Barrow, AK, we (1) evaluated soil carbon age and decomposability, (2) disentangled the effects of temperature and substrate depletion on carbon mineralization, and (3) compared the temperature sensitivities of fast- and slow-cycling soil carbon pools. From a long-term incubation, both respired CO2 and the remaining soil organic matter were highly depleted in radiocarbon. At 20 cm depth, median Δ14C values were -167‰ in respired CO2 and -377‰ in soil organic matter, corresponding to turnover times of 1800 and 4800 years, respectively. Such negative Δ14C values indicate both storage and decomposition of old, stabilized carbon, while radiocarbon differences between the mineralized and non-mineralized fractions suggest that decomposability varies along a turnover time gradient. Applying a new analytical method combining CO2 flux and Δ14C, we found that fast- and slow-cycling carbon pools were equally sensitive to temperature, with a Q10 of 2 irrespective of turnover time. We conclude that in these Arctic soils, ancient soil carbon is vulnerable to warming under thawed, aerobic conditions. In contrast to many previous studies, we found no

  15. Synthesis of disodium [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-(4-chlorophenylthio)methylenediphosphonate, [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-tiludronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, Alain; Ellames, G.J. [Alnwick Research Centre (United Kingdom). Dept. of Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics

    1995-12-31

    Disodium [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-(4-chlorophenylithio)methylenediphosphonate, [benzene-{sup 14}C]-Tiludronate, 2, has been prepared in six steps from [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-acetanilide in an overall radiochemical yield of 41%. A key step in this transformation was the efficient conversion of [U-{sup 14}C]-4-chloroaniline to [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-4-chlorophenylthiocyanate, 5, in 83% yield by treatment of the corresponding diazonium salt, 9 with iron(111) thiocyanate. It should be noted that formation of the isomeric [benzene-U-{sup 14}C]-4-chlorophenylisothiocyanate, 11, as a byproduct, was observed in only {approx} 1% yield. (author).

  16. 50 Years And 400 Radiocarbon Measurements Since 1959: What Has The “Bomb Spike” Taught Us About Soil C Dynamics In New Zealand Soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisden, W. T.; Parfitt, R. L.; Ross, C.

    2009-12-01

    In 1959, Athol Rafter began a substantial programme of monitoring the flow of 14C produced by atmospheric thermonuclear tests through New Zealand’s atmosphere, biosphere and soil. The programme produced important publications, but also leaves a legacy of unpublished data critical for understanding soil C dynamics. A database of ~400 soil radiocarbon measurements spanning 50 years has now been compiled. Among the most compelling data is a comparison of soil carbon dynamics in deforested dairy pastures under similar climate in the Tokomaru silt loam (non-Andisol) versus the Egmont black loam (Andisol), originally sampled in 1962-3, 1965 and 1969. After adding soil profiles sampled to similar depths in 2008, we can use a relatively simple 2-box model to calculate that the residence time of soil C (upper ~8 cm) in the Tokomaru soil is ~9 years compared to ~15 years for the Egmont soil. This difference represents nearly a doubling of soil C residence time, and roughly explains the doubling of the soil C stock. With three measurements in the 1960s, the data is of sufficient resolution to estimate the parameters for an “inert” or “passive pool” comprising approximately 15% of soil C, and having a residence time of 600 years in the Tokomaru soil versus 3000 years in the Egmont surface soil. The Tokomaru/Egmont comparison is necessarily illustrative since the 1960s samplings were not replicated extensively, but provides globally unique data illustrating the nature of C movement through soil. Moreover, the Tokomaru/Egmont comparison supports evidence that C dynamics does differ in Andisols versus other soils. Additional lines of evidence include emerging theories of soil organic matter stabilisation processes, rates of soil organic matter change following land-use change, and chemistry data. The contrasting soil C dynamics in these different soils appear to have implications for land-use change and management schemes that could be eligible for “C credits”. More

  17. Dietary reconstruction and reservoir correction of 14C dates on bones from pagan and early Christian graves in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árný E; Heinemeier, Jan; Arneborg, Jette

    2010-01-01

    between the excavation site and the seashore. We have radiocarbon dated 47 of these skeletons and used the carbon isotopic composition (?13C) to estimate and correct for the marine reservoir effect (the 14C difference between terrestrial and mixed marine organisms). The reservoir-corrected ages lie...... in the range of AD 780?1270 (68.2% probability). Reservoir age corrections were checked by comparing 14C dates of a horse (terrestrial diet), a dog (highly marine diet), and a human (mixed diet) from the same burial. The range in measured marine protein percentage in individual diet is from about 10% up to 55...... in AD 1211. Using our dietary reconstruction, his bones were about 17% marine, which is within the range of human skeletons from the same area, and the reservoir-corrected calibrated 14C age of the skeleton is in accord with the historical date....

  18. Status report on sample preparation facilities for 14C analysis at the new CologneAMS center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethemeyer, J.; Fülöp, R.-H.; Höfle, S.; Wacker, L.; Heinze, S.; Hajdas, I.; Patt, U.; König, S.; Stapper, B.; Dewald, A.

    2013-01-01

    The new AMS facility at University of Cologne (CologneAMS), Germany, was established in 2010 with the delivery of the HVE 6 MV Tandetron AMS, which will be used for 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 41 Ca, 129 I, 239 U and 244 Pu analyses. Parallel to the AMS installation the radiocarbon group has started to set up and test sample preparation methods and instruments for different materials. We present first results of reference and standard materials that have been processed and graphitized in our lab and measured at the ETH and CologneAMS facilities. The graphitization blank and its influence on small samples sizes processed with an automated graphitization system have been determined. Work on isolation of individual organic compounds with a preparative gas chromatography system has been started. The focus of our future work will be on reducing process blank levels and sample sizes as well as on the application of compound-specific radiocarbon analyses in (paleo-) environmental research.

  19. Multimolecular tracers of terrestrial carbon transfer across the pan-Arctic: 14C characteristics of sedimentary carbon components and their environmental controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Gustafsson, Örjan; Holmes, R. Max; Vonk, Jorien E.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Yunker, Mark B.; Macdonald, Robie W.; Wacker, Lukas; Montluçon, Daniel B.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2015-11-01

    Distinguishing the sources, ages, and fate of various terrestrial organic carbon (OC) pools mobilized from heterogeneous Arctic landscapes is key to assessing climatic impacts on the fluvial release of carbon from permafrost. Through molecular 14C measurements, including novel analyses of suberin- and/or cutin-derived diacids (DAs) and hydroxy fatty acids (FAs), we compared the radiocarbon characteristics of a comprehensive suite of terrestrial markers (including plant wax lipids, cutin, suberin, lignin, and hydroxy phenols) in the sedimentary particles from nine major arctic and subarctic rivers in order to establish a benchmark assessment of the mobilization patterns of terrestrial OC pools across the pan-Arctic. Terrestrial lipids, including suberin-derived longer-chain DAs (C24,26,28), plant wax FAs (C24,26,28), and n-alkanes (C27,29,31), incorporated significant inputs of aged carbon, presumably from deeper soil horizons. Mobilization and translocation of these "old" terrestrial carbon components was dependent on nonlinear processes associated with permafrost distributions. By contrast, shorter-chain (C16,18) DAs and lignin phenols (as well as hydroxy phenols in rivers outside eastern Eurasian Arctic) were much more enriched in 14C, suggesting incorporation of relatively young carbon supplied by runoff processes from recent vegetation debris and surface layers. Furthermore, the radiocarbon content of terrestrial markers is heavily influenced by specific OC sources and degradation status. Overall, multitracer molecular 14C analysis sheds new light on the mobilization of terrestrial OC from arctic watersheds. Our findings of distinct ages for various terrestrial carbon components may aid in elucidating fate of different terrestrial OC pools in the face of increasing arctic permafrost thaw.

  20. Behaviors of 14C-butachlor, 14C-chlorpyrifos and 14C-DDT in Rana japonica japonica Guenther

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yiqiang; Zhong Chuangguang; Zhao Xiaokui; Chen Shunhua

    2002-01-01

    The research on the behaviors of 14 C-butachlor, 14 C-chlorpyrifos and 14 C-DDT in the frog Rana japonica japonica Guenther was carried out. After administrated per os to the frogs in doses of 380, 347, 363 Bq/g, 14 C-butachlor, 14 C-chlorpyrifos and 14 C-DDT, were distributed respectively to various organs within 24 h with specific accumulating organs as gallbladder, intestine and intestine, relevantly to the pesticides described. Compared to that in gallbladder and intestine, the radioactivity of many organs was extremely low, and this might due to the characters of the pesticides. Analysis of the metabolites of 14 C-DDT in frog at 24 th hr demonstrated that DDT was difficult to be degraded. Most 14 C-butachlor, 14 C-chlorpyrifos 14 C-DDT in liver and fat or ovary of frog was extractable with acetone. However, there were some differences between the pesticides, and the organs as well. And 14 C-butachlor, 14 C-chlorpyrifos or 14 C-DDT were better bound in liver than in fat

  1. Effect of pesticide applications on soil microbial activity and on 14C-methyl parathion dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, Terezinha Bonanho

    2000-01-01

    Some crops, as cotton, need different pesticide application to control pests and diseases. These compounds reach soil and may affect the soil microbial activity. As the microorganisms play important role on the nutrient cycling, changes in their activities may affect the soil fertility. The influence of several pesticides on soil microbial activity of the 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depth of the soil profile, and the 14 C-methyl parathion dissipation was studied under influence of other pesticide applications. The influence of pesticides on the microorganisms was followed in an experimental area of the Instituto Biologico, that was divided in two subareas, both under cotton crop. Columns of PVC was buried in both subareas and a solution of 14 C-methyl parathion diluted in the technical compound was applied on the soil surface of each column. One subarea received all the recommended pesticides for the cotton crop besides the 14 C-methyl parathion. The other subarea received only 14 C-methyl parathion solution on the columns soil surface. The soil microbial activity of both subareas was estimated by measurements of dehydrogenase, arylsulfatase and arginine deaminase enzymes. Further, the availability of total nitrogen in the soil was also measured. The dissipation of 14 C-methyl parathion was studied by radiocarbon recovery in soil extracts and combustion of extracted soil and quantification by radiometric techniques. (author)

  2. Tell es-Sultan (Jericho) : Radiocarbon results of short-lived cereal and multiyear charcoal samples from the end of the Middle Bronze Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, HJ; VanDerPlicht, J; Bruins, Hendrik J.; Cook, G.T.; Harkness, D.D.; Miller, B.F.; Scott, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Samples from Tell es-Sultan, Jericho, were selected for high-precision C-14 dating as a contribution toward the establishment of an independent radiocarbon chronology of Near Eastern archaeology. The material derives from archaeological excavations conducted by K. M. Kenyon in the 1950s. We present

  3. Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Yoshiki; Minami, Masayo; Onbe, Shin; Sakamoto, Minoru; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Toshio; Imamura, Mineo

    2011-01-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 (14)C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis.

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency consultants' group meeting on C-14 reference materials for radiocarbon laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanski, K.

    2001-01-01

    This publication describes the 14 C intercomparison study co-ordinated by the IAEA. Five intercomparison materials have been prepared and distributed among 137 participating laboratories. By February 20, 1991, results have been received from 69 laboratories (39 of them representing liquid scintillation counting, 25 - gas counting, and 6 - accelerator mass spectrometry). This publication presents measurement results and their discussion along with description of the materials and methodology

  5. An analysis of carbon and radiocarbon profiles across a range ecosystems types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, K. A.; Gallo, A.; Hatten, J. A.; Swanston, C.; Strahm, B. D.; Sanclements, M.

    2016-12-01

    Soil carbon stocks have become recognized as increasingly important in the context of climate change and global C cycle modeling. As modelers seek to identify key parameters affecting the size and stability of belowground C stocks, attention has been drawn to the mineral matrix and the soil physiochemical factors influenced by it. Though clay content has often been utilized as a convenient and key explanatory variable for soil C dynamics, its utility has recently come under scrutiny as new paradigms of soil organic matter stabilization have been developed. We utilized soil cores from a range of National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) experimental plots to examine the influence of mineralogical parameters on soil C stocks and turnover and their relative importance in comparison to climatic variables. Results are presented for a total of 11 NEON sites, spanning Alfisols, Entisols, Mollisols and Spodosols. Soils were sampled by genetic horizon, density separated according to density fractionation: light fractions (particulate organics neither occluded within aggregates nor associated with mineral surfaces), occluded fractions (particulate organics occluded within aggregates), and heavy fractions (organics associated with mineral surfaces). Bulk soils and density fractions were measured for % C and radiocarbon abundance (as a measure of C stability). Carbon and radiocarbon abundances were examined among fractions and in the context of climatic variables (temperature, precipitation, elevation) and soil physiochemical variables (% clay and pH). No direct relationships between temperature and soil C or radiocarbon abundances were found. As a whole, soil radiocarbon abundance in density fractions decreased in the order of light>heavy>occluded, highlighting the importance of both surface sorption and aggregation to the preservation of organics. Radiocarbon concentrations of the heavy fraction (mineral adsorbed) were significantly, though weakly, correlated with pH (r

  6. Influence of marine sources on 14C ages : isotopic data from Watom Island, Papua New Guinea inhumations and pig teeth in light of new dietary standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavan Athfield, N.R.; Green, R.C.; Craig, J.; McFadgen, B.; Bickler, S.

    2008-01-01

    Gauging the effect of 14 C-depleted marine foods on radiocarbon ages requires an accurate assessment of the likely proportion of marine foods in the diet. Several factors must be considered, including region-specific δ 13 C, δ 15 N and δ 34 S data values (regional stable isotope values can differ from global averages), temporal variations in δ 13 C which offset values in modern dietary standards by up to 1.5 permille, and that modelling which considers only 13 C may overestimate the contribution of various dietary sources. Here, we compare previous calculations by linear interpolation of δ 13 C and a complex computer simulation of marine contribution to the diet of inhumations from the SAC archaeological site Watom Island, Papua New Guinea, with the ISOSOURCE mixing model and a revised database of regional dietary sources and their isotopic values, to estimate marine diet contributions and radiocarbon offsets for burials from the SAC site. Though different estimates of marine contribution to diet do not significantly alter previous calibrations of radiocarbon ages for the inhumations, the new ISOSOURCE calculations challenge the idea of excessive exploitation of marine resources and support evidence for arboriculture and horticulture being a major component in Lapita diet. (author). 87 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs

  7. Use of miniature C-14 counters in dating and authentication in the museum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbottle, G.; Sayre, E.V.; Stoenner, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Curators often do not understand the basis for the C-14 method of age determination and its limitations. Purpose of this paper is to describe the underlying principles, and how these must influence the interpretation of the radiocarbon measurement of a museum specimen in terms of age. Several techniques for that measurement are described briefly, focussing on the miniature proportional counters that were developed for the Smithsonian Institution, and three museum problems are described which were attacked, and some interesting further research on museum objects that has been proposed. Finally some projections on the future applications of the different methods are made, in the context of museum work

  8. Δ14CO2 from dark respiration in plants and its impact on the estimation of atmospheric fossil fuel CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaohu; Zhou, Weijian; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Shugang; Niu, Zhenchuan; Du, Hua; Lu, Xuefeng; Fu, Yunchong; Burr, George S

    2017-04-01

    Radiocarbon ( 14 C) has been widely used for quantification of fossil fuel CO 2 (CO 2ff ) in the atmosphere and for ecosystem source partitioning studies. The strength of the technique lies in the intrinsic differences between the 14 C signature of fossil fuels and other sources. In past studies, the 14 C content of CO 2 derived from plants has been equated with the 14 C content of the atmosphere. Carbon isotopic fractionation mechanisms vary among plants however, and experimental study on fractionation associated with dark respiration is lacking. Here we present accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon results of CO 2 respired from 21 plants using a lab-incubation method and associated bulk organic matter. From the respired CO 2 we determine Δ 14 C res values, and from the bulk organic matter we determine Δ 14 C bom values. A significant difference between Δ 14 C res and Δ 14 C bom (P < 0.01) was observed for all investigated plants, ranging from -42.3‰ to 10.1‰. The results show that Δ 14 C res values are in agreement with mean atmospheric Δ 14 CO 2 for several days leading up to the sampling date, but are significantly different from corresponding bulk organic Δ 14 C values. We find that although dark respiration is unlikely to significantly influence the estimation of CO 2ff , an additional bias associated with the respiration rate during a plant's growth period should be considered when using Δ 14 C in plants to quantify atmospheric CO 2ff . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Secular variation of cosmic ray intensity recorded in the radiocarbon concentration of tree rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kigoshi, K.

    1978-01-01

    Study of the secular variations of cosmic ray intensity on the basis of the secular variations of atmospheric radiocarbon concentration in 8000 years is considered. The data on the radiocarbon concentration is received by three laboratories using the dendrochronologically dated tree ring samples. In order to use the data the variations due to geochemical process must be eliminated. From this point of view the climatic effect on the atmospheric radiocarbon concenttration is estimated using the data on sunspot number and global surface temperature during 1650-1800 y. The barge influence of climate on the atmospheric radiocarbon concentration syggests the small contribution of change of radiocarbon production rate to the short-period fluctuations in the atmospheric radiocarbon concentration. Elimination of variations caused by climate and sunspot activities from the variations in atmospheric radiocarbon concentration gives a long-term scale of its concentration which agrees well to the observed paleo-geomagnetic data

  10. Radiocarbon dates from the Oxford AMS system: Archaeometry datelist 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, R.E.M.; Housley, R.A.; Ramsey, C.B.; Van Klinken, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    This seventeenth list of accelerator dates consists mainly of material dated since the beginning of 1991, but includes a number of measurements made earlier in the dating programme. In accordance with international radiocarbon convention all dates are expressed in radiocarbon years before AD 1950 (years BP) using the half-life of 5568 years, this convention having been reaffirmed at the Trondheim Radiocarbon Conference 1985. Errors are quoted as one standard deviation and are based on an assessment of all the contributions to the error in the laboratory isotope ratio measurement. Natural fractionation of carbon isotopes is accounted for by estimating δ 13 C values except for more recent dates where δ 13 C have been measured relative to PDB (only to within ± 0.5-1.0%). All combining procedures and significance tests are based on Ward and Wilson (1978). Comments composed by the Laboratory on the basis of information supplied by submitters are given without attribution. (author)

  11. Modelling the biological half-life and seasonality of 14C in Fucus vesiculosus from the east coast of Ireland: Implications for the estimation of future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keogh, S.M.; Cournane, S.; Leon Vintro, L.; McGee, E.J.; Mitchell, P.I.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Carbon-14 levels measured in Fucus vesiculosus collected on the east coast of Ireland. → Numerical model applied to estimate transit times from Sellafield source. → Mean availability time of 14 C in seaweed also calculated. → Inclusion of model parameter accounts for potential seasonal variability of C-14. → Levels reduced to background within 2.5 years of discharges being set to zero. - Abstract: Radiocarbon levels were recorded in Fucus vesiculosus samples collected on a monthly basis over a three-year period at a site on the east coast of Ireland. The resulting data was analysed using a numerical model which estimates the transit times from the Sellafield plant to the sampling location, and the mean availability time of 14 C in seaweed. With the inclusion of a model parameter allowing for seasonal variability in uptake by the Fucus, good correlation was observed between the predicted and measured concentrations. Future temporal trends of 14 C Fucus concentrations along the eastern Irish coastline were modelled with the application of three possible prospective discharge scenarios, predicting 14 C Fucus concentrations to reduce to ambient background levels within 2.5-years of discharges being set to zero. Such projections may prove helpful in assessing the consequences of discharge management and policy making in the context of the OSPAR convention.

  12. Optimizing sampling strategy for radiocarbon dating of Holocene fluvial systems in a vertically aggrading setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toernqvist, T.E.; Dijk, G.J. Van

    1993-01-01

    The authors address the question of how to determine the period of activity (sedimentation) of fossil (Holocene) fluvial systems in vertically aggrading environments. The available data base consists of almost 100 14 C ages from the Rhine-Meuse delta. Radiocarbon samples from the tops of lithostratigraphically correlative organic beds underneath overbank deposits (sample type 1) yield consistent ages, indicating a synchronous onset of overbank deposition over distances of at least up to 20 km along channel belts. Similarly, 14 C ages from the base of organic residual channel fills (sample type 3) generally indicate a clear termination of within-channel sedimentation. In contrast, 14 C ages from the base of organic beds overlying overbank deposits (sample type 2), commonly assumed to represent the end of fluvial sedimentation, show a large scatter reaching up to 1000 14 C years. It is concluded that a combination of sample types 1 and 3 generally yields a satisfactory delimitation of the period of activity of a fossil fluvial system. 30 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Estimates of upwelling rates in the Arabian Sea and the equatorial Indian Ocean based on bomb radiocarbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, R; Dutta, K; Somayajulu, B L K

    2008-10-01

    Radiocarbon measurements were made in the water column of the Arabian Sea and the equatorial Indian Ocean during 1994, 1995 and 1997 to assess the temporal variations in bomb 14C distribution and its inventory in the region with respect to GEOSECS measurements made during 1977-1978. Four GEOSECS stations were reoccupied (three in the Arabian Sea and one in the equatorial Indian Ocean) during this study, with all of them showing increased penetration of bomb 14C along with decrease in its surface water activity. The upwelling rates derived by model simulation of bomb 14C depth profile using the calculated exchange rates ranged from 3 to 9 m a(-1). The western region of the Arabian Sea experiencing high wind-induced upwelling has higher estimated upwelling rates. However, lower upwelling rates obtained for the stations occupied during this study could be due to reduced 14C gradient compared to that during GEOSECS.

  14. Development of a sample preparation system for AMS radiocarbon dating at CRICH, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung-Jin; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Lim, Eun-Soo [Cultural Research Institute of Chungcheong Heritage, Gongju (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Duk-Geun [Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soon-Bal [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Min-Young [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    We developed a sample preparation system for radiocarbon dating by using AMS measurement at Cultural Research Institute of Chungcheong Heritage, Korea. From the investigation of the reduction process, the optimum graphitization temperature was chosen as 625 .deg. C. Using Aldrich graphite powder of 0.75 {+-} 0.023 pMC, the background value of our preparation system was controlled at a low level. The robustness against chemical treatment and contamination was also observed from samples of Oxalic acid II and IAEA-C4. The resultant values, 134.04 {+-} 0.99 pMC and 0.38 {+-} 0.043 pMC, were in good agreement with the consensus values. Based on comparison, our conventional ages agreed very well with those of Beta Analytic Co. and SNU-AMS. No memory effect existed in the preparation system. Therefore, we concluded that the sample preparation system was operated in a stable manner and that the basic radiocarbon dating procedures were completely verified.

  15. Dating the humans by radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedi, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon has become a very powerful tool used for dating. This paper deals with a specific application of 1 4C i.e. dating of humans. Attention is focused on those aspects that, if neglected, might lead to a misinterpretation of the results or to an unsatisfying accuracy of the measurement. After a brief description of the main principles on which the radiocarbon method is based and of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, examples taken from the research activity of INFN-LABEC (Laboratorio di Tecniche Nucleari per I Beni Culturali) in Florence are presented. The case of the relic of St. Francis represents an example of dating not directly human remains but other objects that can be associated to them. The case of two burials from the archaeological area of Baratti-Populonia, in Tuscany, gives the possibility to show the importance of estimating the human palaeodiet when dating bone samples.

  16. Synthesis of [5,6-13C2, 1-14C]olivetolic acid, methyl [1'-13C]olivetolate and [5,6-13C2, 1-14C]cannabigerolic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porwoll, J.P.; Leete, E.

    1985-01-01

    Potential advanced intermediates in the biosynthesis of delta 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol, the major psychoactive principle of marijuana, have been synthesized labeled with two contiguous 13 C atoms and 14 C. Methyl [5,6- 13 C 2 , 1- 14 C]olivetolate was prepared from lithium [ 13 C 2 ]acetylide and dimethyl [2- 14 C]malonate. Reaction with geranyl bromide afforded methyl [5,6- 13 C 2 , 1- 14 C]cannabigerolate, and hydrolysis of these methyl esters with lithium propyl mercaptide yielded the corresponding labeled acids. The 13 C- 13 C couplings observable in the 13 C NMR spectra of these 13 C-enriched compounds and their synthetic precursors are recorded. Methyl [1'- 14 C]olivetolate was prepared from 13 CO 2 to confirm assignments of the 13 C chemical shifts in the pentyl side chain of these compounds. (author)

  17. Studies on the environmental chemistry and dissipation of 14C-labelled Deltamethrin and Amitraz in model dips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, M.R.; Coelho, P.V.; Luchini, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    The degradation of 14 C-labelled deltamethrin under variable conditions of pH and temperature, leaching of 14 C-labelled amitraz in soil columns and dissipation of these insecticides in model dipping vat was studied. Deltamethrin was stable for 28 d in buffer solutions at pH 4,7 and 8 and at temperature of 14, 28 and 35 deg. C, but degraded in a solution at pH 9. Metabolites identified by TLC corresponded to 3-phenoxybenzoic acid and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol. After 75 days of standing in a model dip, about 60% of the total radioactivity was found in the sediment and corresponded mainly to deltamethrin. When 14 C-Amitraz was applied to soil columns, placed under outdoor conditions, 4 months later all of the radiocarbon was found in the upper 10 cm section and about 90% of the recovered radioactivity corresponded with amitraz. A study of the dissipation of amitraz in a field vat showed that after 20 d of use the concentration of amitraz in a field dip decreased from 210 μg/mL to 155 μg/mL. (author)

  18. AMS Radiocarbon Dating at Notre Dame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Sean

    2014-09-01

    Current development of a local radiocarbon dating method using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Notre Dame seeks to provide sensitive, reproducible, and accurate measurements for future interdisciplinary projects. While AMS has been the premier radiocarbon dating method for a few decades, repurposing Notre Dame's FN Tandem accelerator for radiocarbon dating has provided many unique challenges. Experiments have shown radiocarbon dating possible and reproducible using the FN Tandem accelerator, found optimal settings for said accelerator, and established sensitivity limits comparable to dedicated radiocarbon dating facilities. In addition, there is ongoing work to create a local chemistry lab to convert organic artifacts into graphite samples to be dated locally. Once the chemistry side has been completed, several artifacts from the IAEA's radiocarbon intercomparison have been procured. Dating these previously studied artifacts will provide an additional measure on the accuracy and repeatability of both the accelerator and chemical treatment. Provided that these IAEA artifacts are dated successfully, exciting projects will ensue, such as the authentication of artwork and dating of anthropological samples.

  19. 14C accelerator mass spectrometry - applications in archaeology, biomedicine and in the atmospheric sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rom, W.

    1990-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is superior to all other analytical techniques in its detection sensitivity of radiocarbon ( 14 C). It has therefore influenced or even laid down the foundations for applications in many fields of science. In the current work, various applications of 14 C AMS are presented through published articles for which the measurements were performed at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). These articles are embedded into an in-depth discussion about characteristic features of the respective fields, emphasizing the broad range of issues which need to be considered in interdisciplinary research. In archaeology new 14 C dates on equipment of the Iceman ('Oetzi'), the world's oldest intact mummy, show reasonable agreement with dates previously obtained on the Iceman himself (3360-3100 BC). However, several botanical remains from the finding place clearly belong to other time periods, indicating that the discovery site of Oetzi has been used as a mountain pass 1500 yr earlier and also 2000 yr later. Dating on spruce logs from the world's oldest salt mines at Hallstatt, Austria provide evidence that salt mining started 1-2 centuries earlier than previously supposed, i.e. in the 14th to the 13th century BC. Recently, Bayesian mathematics is a frequently used tool in calibrating radiocarbon data. So-called vague or non-informative priors employed in this method may cause severe problems as shown by extensive computer simulations. In biomedicine problems in toxicology and in forensic medicine were investigated. Heterocyclic amines (HAs) are probably the epidemiologically most relevant class of mutagenic and carcinogenic substances since they are produced naturally in cooking protein-rich food. A study of 14 C labeled HAs (MeIQx and PhIP) in rodents and humans, one of the first studies using 14 C-labeled mutagens also in healthy human volunteers, severely calls in question the validity of animal models for assessing heterocyclic

  20. 14C as a tool for evaluating riverine POC sources and erosion of the Zhujiang (Pearl River) drainage basin, South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Xiuguo; Yi Weixi; Shen Chengde; Yechieli, Yoseph; Li Ningli; Ding Ping; Wang Ning; Liu Kexin

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon can serve as a powerful tool for identifying sources of organic carbon and evaluating the erosion intensity in river drainage basins. In this paper we present 14 C-AMS measurements of particulate organic carbon (POC) collected from the three major tributaries of the Zhujiang (Pearl River) system: the Xijiang (Western River), Beijiang (Northern River) and Dongjiang (Eastern River) rivers. Furthermore, we discuss the distribution of POC 14 C apparent ages and the related watersheds erosion of these rivers. Results yield Δ 14 C values of -425 per mille to -65 per mille which indicate that the 14 C apparent ages of suspended POC in the entire area are in the range of 540-4445 years. The POC apparent ages from Xijiang are mostly between 2000 and 4000 years, while in Dongjiang they mostly range from 540 to 1010 years. These 14 C apparent ages indicate that the watershed erosion of the Xijiang is more severe than that of the Dongjiang. This is in agreement with other data showing deeper erosion in Xijiang due to human activities.

  1. Titan's Radioactive Haze : Production and Fate of Radiocarbon On Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Jull, A. J. T.; Swindle, T. D.; Lunine, J. I.

    Just as cosmic rays interact with nitrogen atoms in the atmosphere of Earth to gener- ate radiocarbon (14C), the same process should occur in Titan`s nitrogen-rich atmo- sphere. Titan`s atmosphere is thick enough that cosmic ray flux, rather than nitrogen column depth, limits the production of 14 C. Absence of a strong magnetic field and the increased distance from the sun suggest production rates of 9 atom/cm2/s, approx- imately 4 times higher than Earth. On Earth the carbon is rapidly oxidised into CO2. The fate and detectability of 14C on Titan depends on the chemical species into which it is incorporated in Titan's reducing atmosphere : as methane it would be hopelessly diluted even in only the atmosphere (ignoring the other, much more massive carbon reservoirs likely to be present on Titan, like hydrocarbon lakes.) However, in the more likely case that the 14C attaches to the haze that rains out onto the surface (as tholin, HCN or acetylene and their polymers - a much smaller carbon reservoir) , haze in the atmosphere or recently deposited on the surface would therefore be quite intrinsically radioactive. Such activity may modify the haze electrical charging and hence its coag- ulation. Measurements with compact instrumentation on future in-situ missions could place useful constraints on the mass deposition rates of photochemical material on the surface and identify locations where surface deposits of such material are `freshest`.

  2. Synthesis of [3-14C]- and [phenyl-U-14C] olaquindox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, W.; Scherling, D.; Seng, F.

    1981-01-01

    Olaquindox is a new feed additive. [ 14 C]Olaquindox, labelled in different positions, was needed for tracer-studies of pharmacokinetics, biotransformation and residues in several species of animals. 2-[N-(2-hydroxethyl)-carbamoyl]-3-methyl-[3- 14 C]quinoxaline-1,4-dioxide([3- 14 C]Olaquindox) was synthesized from barium[ 14 C]carbonate (22 mmoles; 1.15 Ci) via [1- 14 C]acetic acid, sodium[1- 14 C]acetate, [1- 14 C]acetylchloride, ethyl[3- 14 C]acetoacetate and 2-carbethoxy-3-methyl-[3- 14 C]quinoxaline-1,4-dioxide with an overall yield of 10%, based on barium[ 14 C]carbonate. The radiochemical purity was better than 98% (tlc). The specific activities of three preparations were 10.5, 8.4 and 5.45 μCi/mg respectively. [phenyl-U- 14 C]Olaquindox was synthesized starting from [U- 14 C]aniline (19.8 mmoles; 284.4 mCi). Intermediate products were N-acetyl[U- 14 C]aniline, 2-nitro-N-acetyl[U- 14 C]aniline, 2-nitro[U- 14 C]aniline and [U- 14 C]benzofurazanoxide. The total yield was 50% as calculated for [U- 14 C]aniline. At calibration samples of two preparations showed specific activities of 49.5 and 11.1 μCi/mg respectively. The radiochemical purity was checked by tlc and exceeded 98%. (author)

  3. Acceptance Tests for AMS Radiocarbon Measurements at iThemba LABS, Gauteng, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbele, Vela L.; Mullins, Simon M.; Winkler, Stephan R.; Woodborne, Stephan

    The accelerator mass spectrometer was commissioned recently at the iThemba LABS 6 MV tandem accelerator. Improvements in the vacuum system, requiring procurement of cryo-pumps and the reducing the tank pressure of the N2 + CO2 insulation gas mixture below the level used for IBA measurements, were necessary. This resulted in the reduction of the nitrogen background and improved the resolution of 14C from 14N background in the ionisation chamber. The nitrogen was leaking to the stripping canal because of inadequate sealing. The analysing magnet was scaled to detect C3+ ions, at 3 MV terminal potential. The first sensible spectra allowed for the pin-pointing of many persistent issues. This resulted in measurements with a precision better than 1 pMC, and current blank levels correspond to 12 half-lives of 14C or ∼68000 years. The radiocarbon sample preparation laboratory has reached production status. A brief outlook of the work towards the implementation of the measurement and chemical preparation protocols for radionuclides 10Be and 26Al is also summarised in the conclusion

  4. Progress in radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, R.E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The article concerns radiocarbon dating, the most important method for dating in archaeology. The principles and practice of the dating method are described. Recent developments in radiocarbon dating due to technical advances, are discussed, and include radiometric counting of small samples and accelerator mass spectrometry. Carbon isotopes and the environment are also discussed. (U.K.)

  5. The comparison of absolute dating (Radiocarbon dating) and relative dating of Pringapus and Gondosuli temples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, W; Arumbinang, H; Taftazani, A; Widayati, S; Sumiyatno; Suhardi

    1996-01-01

    The absolute dating (radiocarbon, 14 C dating) and relative dating of Pringapus and Gondosuli temples in Temanggung regency (district) of Central Java Province have been carried out. The field sampling was done especially with the purpose to obtain vertical data, so that excavation method was adopted in the case. The main data were the ecofacts of organic habitation such as bones, woods, charcoals, shells, and paper artefacts. The artefacts data were used as a comparison. The comparative data analysis were conducted at Yogyakarta archaeological Department Laboratory, thus included dating of artefacts which were performed according to archaeological analysis procedures, generally based on the attributes attached to the artefacts, whereas the absolute dating of charcoal samples were performed in the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory at Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre. Based on the relative dating of epigraphy content on the andesit rock from Gondosuli Temple which showed the year of 754 Saka or 832 AD, the Pringapus Temple was estimated to be built in the 850 AD. According to the absolute dating (Radiocarbon Dating with delta 13 C and tree ring corrections) the age for Gondosuli temple based on GDS/LU-2/Spit-7 samples is (384 -602) AD and from GDS/LU-2/Spit-8 = (452 - 652) AD. With these significant differences in the results obtained, it can be concluded that culture environment where the sample were collected already existed before the temple was built. Further investigation is still required

  6. Studies on 14C-extractable residue, 14C-bound residue and mineralization of 14C-labeled chlorsulfuron in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Qingfu; Sun Jinhe; Qi Wenyuan; Wu Jianmin

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate 14 C-extractable residue ( 14 C-ER), 14 C-bound residue ( 14 C-BR) and mineralization of 14 C-labeled chlorsulfuron in soils by using isotope technique. The main factors affecting 14 C-BR formation and the distribution pattern of 14 C-BR in humus were also discussed in details. The results were as follows: (1) The 14 C-ER content of 14 C-chlorsulfuron in seven kinds of soil was positively related to soil pH and negatively related to clay content and organic matter content significantly. Moreover. the decrease rate of 14 C-chlorsulfuron parent compound derived from 14 C-ER in soils followed the first order rate reaction, the half-life in Soil 1-Soil 7 were 13.0, 13.1, 17.7, 133.3, 21.8, 22.1, 33.2 days, respectively. It was concluded that soil pH was the main factor affecting the degradation of 14 C-chlorsulfuron. (2) The 14 C-BR content of 14 C-chlorsulfuron in soils increased sharply with the incubation time during the initial 20 days, then changed slowly with time. However, 14 C-BR content during the whole incubation depended on soil types. The order of 14 C-BR content followed Soil 1 > Soil 2, Soil 5 and Soil 6 > Soil 3 > Soil 7 > Soil 4. The maximum values of 14 C-BR content of 14 C-chlorsulfuron in Soil 1-Soil 7 were 53.3%, 40.9%, 37.8%, 16.4%, 42.5%, 41.0% and 31.3% of applied amount. In addition, the 14 C-BR content of 14 C-chlorsulfuron in soils was negatively related to soil pH significantly, and positively related to the clay content. The soil pH was found to be the main factor affecting BR formation of 14 C-chlorsulfuron among the basic properties of soil. (3) During the whole periods of the incubation, the 14 C-BR of 14 C-chlorsulfuron in soils was mainly distributed in fulvic acid and humin. The relative percent of 14 C-BR in fulvic acid was higher than in humin. While the relative percentage of the 14 C-BR in humic acid only account for 2%. It was suggested that fulvic acid played an important role

  7. Carbonates in leaching reactions in context of {sup 14}C dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalska, Danuta, E-mail: danamich@amu.edu.pl [Institute of Geology, Faculty of Geographical and Geological Sciences, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Makow Polnych 16, 61-606 Poznan (Poland); Czernik, Justyna, E-mail: justyna.czernik@gmail.com [Poznań Radiocarbon Laboratory, ul. Rubież 46, 61-612 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    Lime mortars as a mixture of binder and aggregate may contain carbon of various origins. If the mortars are made of totally burnt lime, radiocarbon dating of binder yields the real age of building construction. The presence of carbonaceous aggregate has a significant influence on the {sup 14}C measurements results and depending on the type of aggregate and fraction they may cause overaging. Another problem, especially in case of hydraulic mortars that continue to be chemically active for a very long time, is the recrystallization usually connected with rejuvenation of the results but also, depending on local geological structures, with so called reservoir effect yielding apparent ages. An attempt in separating the binder from other carbonaceous components successfully was made for samples from Israel by Nawrocka-Michalska et al. (2007). The same preparation procedure, after taking into account the petrographic composition, was used for samples coming from Poland, Nawrocka et al. (2009). To verify the procedure used previously for non-hydraulic samples determination an experimental tests on carbonaceous mortars with crushed bricks from Novae in Bulgaria were made. Additionally, to identify different carbonaceous structures and their morphology, a cathodoluminescence and scanning electron microscope with electron dispersive spectrometer were applied. The crushed bricks and brick dust used in mortars production process have been interpreted as an alternative use to other pozzolanic materials. The reaction between lime and pozzolanic additives take place easily and affects the rate and course of carbonates decomposition in orthophosphric acid, during the samples pretreatment for dating. The composition of the Bulgarian samples together with influence of climate conditions on mortar carbonates do not allow for making straightforward conclusions in chronology context, but gives some new guidelines in terms of hydraulic mortars application for dating. This work has mainly

  8. Carbonates in leaching reactions in context of "1"4C dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalska, Danuta; Czernik, Justyna

    2015-01-01

    Lime mortars as a mixture of binder and aggregate may contain carbon of various origins. If the mortars are made of totally burnt lime, radiocarbon dating of binder yields the real age of building construction. The presence of carbonaceous aggregate has a significant influence on the "1"4C measurements results and depending on the type of aggregate and fraction they may cause overaging. Another problem, especially in case of hydraulic mortars that continue to be chemically active for a very long time, is the recrystallization usually connected with rejuvenation of the results but also, depending on local geological structures, with so called reservoir effect yielding apparent ages. An attempt in separating the binder from other carbonaceous components successfully was made for samples from Israel by Nawrocka-Michalska et al. (2007). The same preparation procedure, after taking into account the petrographic composition, was used for samples coming from Poland, Nawrocka et al. (2009). To verify the procedure used previously for non-hydraulic samples determination an experimental tests on carbonaceous mortars with crushed bricks from Novae in Bulgaria were made. Additionally, to identify different carbonaceous structures and their morphology, a cathodoluminescence and scanning electron microscope with electron dispersive spectrometer were applied. The crushed bricks and brick dust used in mortars production process have been interpreted as an alternative use to other pozzolanic materials. The reaction between lime and pozzolanic additives take place easily and affects the rate and course of carbonates decomposition in orthophosphric acid, during the samples pretreatment for dating. The composition of the Bulgarian samples together with influence of climate conditions on mortar carbonates do not allow for making straightforward conclusions in chronology context, but gives some new guidelines in terms of hydraulic mortars application for dating. This work has mainly

  9. A 3500 14C yr High-Resolution Record of Water-Level Changes in Lake Titicaca, Bolivia/Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Mark B.; Binford, Michael W.; Brenner, Mark; Kelts, Kerry R.

    1997-03-01

    Sediment cores collected from the southern basin of Lake Titicaca (Bolivia/Peru) on a transect from 4.6 m above overflow level to 15.1 m below overflow level are used to identify a new century-scale chronology of Holocene lake-level variations. The results indicate that lithologic and geochemical analyses on a transect of cores can be used to identify and date century-scale lake-level changes. Detailed sedimentary analyses of subfacies and radiocarbon dating were conducted on four representative cores. A chronology based on 60 accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurements constrains the timing of water-level fluctuations. Two methods were used to estimate the 14C reservoir age. Both indicate that it has remained nearly constant at ˜250 14C yr during the late Holocene. Core studies based on lithology and geochemistry establish the timing and magnitude of five periods of low lake level, implying negative moisture balance for the northern Andean altiplano over the last 3500 cal yr. Between 3500 and 3350 cal yr B.P., a transition from massive, inorganic-clay facies to laminated organic-matter-rich silts in each of the four cores signals a water-level rise after a prolonged mid-Holocene dry phase. Evidence of other significant low lake levels occurs 2900-2800, 2400-2200, 2000-1700, and 900-500 cal yr B.P. Several of the low lake levels coincided with cultural changes in the region, including the collapse of the Tiwanaku civilization.

  10. Radiocarbon-based impact assessment of open biomass burning on regional carbonaceous aerosols in North China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zong, Zheng [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Chen, Yingjun, E-mail: yjchen@yic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Tian, Chongguo, E-mail: cgtian@yic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Fang, Yin [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Wang, Xiaoping [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Huang, Guopei; Zhang, Fan [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Samples of total suspended particulates (TSPs) and fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) were collected from 29th May to 1st July, 2013 at a regional background site in Bohai Rim, North China. Mass concentrations of particulate matter and carbonaceous species showed a total of 50% and 97% of the measured TSP and PM{sub 2.5} levels exceeded the first grade national standard of China, respectively. Daily concentrations of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were detected 7.3 and 2.5 μg m{sup −3} in TSP and 5.2 and 2.0 μg m{sup −3} in PM{sub 2.5}, which accounted 5.8% and 2.0% of TSP while 5.6% and 2.2% for PM{sub 2.5}, respectively. The concentrations of OC, EC, TSP and PM{sub 2.5} were observed higher in the day time than those in the night time. The observations were associated with the emission variations from anthropogenic activities. Two merged samples representing from south and north source areas were selected for radiocarbon analysis. The radiocarbon measurements showed 74% of water-insoluble OC (WINSOC) and 59% of EC in PM{sub 2.5} derived from biomass burning and biogenic sources when the air masses were from south region, and 63% and 48% for the air masses from north, respectively. Combined with backward trajectories and daily burned area, open burning of agricultural wastes was found to be predominating, which was confirmed by the potential source contribution function (PSCF). - Highlights: • PM{sub 2.5} and TSP samples collected at Yellow River Delta were analyzed for OC and EC. • OC, EC, TSP and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations were higher in daytime than in nighttime. • Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) tracer, backward trajectories, and fire counts were used for the analysis. • Agricultural waste open burning was a main contributor to summer PM{sub 2.5}, OC and EC.

  11. Distributions and Transformations of Natural Abundance 14C and 13C in Dissolved and Particulate Lipids in a Major Temperate Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J. E.; Canuel, E. A.; McIntosh, H.; Barrett, A.; Ferer, E.; Hossler, K.

    2013-12-01

    Limited previous studies have shown major differences in the natural 14C and 13C isotopic signatures and radiocarbon ages of different biochemical classes (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, lipid, etc.) in river, estuarine and marine dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM, respectively). Of particular note are the much greater radiocarbon ages of lipophilic materials than other compound classes. Possible explanations for these findings include greater-than-expected inputs of fossil and highly aged lipid-containing organic matter to rivers and estuaries, extended sorptive-protection of lipophilic materials from degradation and/or lower overall reactivities of lipids vs. other major biochemical classes. We measured the Delta 14C and del 13C signatures and 14C ages of lipid classes in DOM and POM in a major temperate estuary, Delaware Bay (USA) over two years. Changes in DOM were also followed during large volume dark and light incubations to assess the microbial and photochemical reactivity and processing of DOM and lipids. Neutral lipids in DOM were among the most highly aged (> 30,000 yrs BP) of any materials measured in natural waters to date, and were significantly older than co-occurring polar lipids (~4,000-5,000 yrs BP). In general, DOM lipid ages were significantly greater than POM lipid ages across the river-estuary transect, arguing against sorptive protection as the major factor explaining greater ages of lipid than those of other compound classes. Both dark and light incubations of DOM resulted in losses of very highly aged material (30-50,000 y BP), with the remnant exported lipids being correspondingly younger. The microbial and photochemical alterations were most pronounced for lipids from freshwater reaches of the system (i.e., the Delaware River). These findings suggest that a) dissolved vs. particulate lipids have fundamentally different sources and/or physico-chemical partitioning, b) different lipid classes (e.g., neutral vs. polar

  12. Time in tortoiseshell: a bomb radiocarbon-validated chronology in sea turtle scutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtan, Kyle S; Andrews, Allen H; Jones, T Todd; Murakawa, Shawn K K; Hagemann, Molly E

    2016-01-13

    Some of the most basic questions of sea turtle life history are also the most elusive. Many uncertainties surround lifespan, growth rates, maturity and spatial structure, yet these are critical factors in assessing population status. Here we examine the keratinized hard tissues of the hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) carapace and use bomb radiocarbon dating to estimate growth and maturity. Scutes have an established dietary record, yet the large keratin deposits of hawksbills evoke a reliable chronology. We sectioned, polished and imaged posterior marginal scutes from 36 individual hawksbills representing all life stages, several Pacific populations and spanning eight decades. We counted the apparent growth lines, microsampled along growth contours and calibrated Δ(14)C values to reference coral series. We fit von Bertalanffy growth function (VBGF) models to the results, producing a range of age estimates for each turtle. We find Hawaii hawksbills deposit eight growth lines annually (range 5-14), with model ensembles producing a somatic growth parameter (k) of 0.13 (range 0.1-0.2) and first breeding at 29 years (range 23-36). Recent bomb radiocarbon values also suggest declining trophic status. Together, our results may reflect long-term changes in the benthic community structure of Hawaii reefs, and possibly shed light on the critical population status for Hawaii hawksbills. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. One Isotope, Two Tales: using plant and cosmogenic 14C to constrain Holocene glacier activity on Baffin Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, S.; Miller, G. H.; Lifton, N. A.; Young, N. E.

    2017-12-01

    As the cryosphere continues to undergo rapid and accelerating change, it is more important than ever to understand past glacier activity to predict the future of the cryosphere. However, continuous Holocene glacier records are notoriously difficult to reconstruct because an advancing glacier will re-incorporate previous deposits so that moraines typically only record the farthest downvalley glacier expansion. Here we combine dates of ice margin advance from in situ dead vegetation with in situ cosmogenic 14C (in situ 14C) from preserved bedrock surfaces at the same locations to further constrain the timing of ice-free episodes during the Holocene following deglaciation on southern Baffin Island. Radiocarbon ages from recently exposed in situ plants suggest that ice last advanced over sample locations at 9.4, 9.2, 9.0, and 3.7 ka and that they remained ice covered until modern times. Associated in situ 14C inventories are variable, but well above background levels, suggesting some amount of Holocene in situ 14C production. Using plant 14C ages representing the beginning of ice coverage and in situ 14C inventories representative of exposure prior to ice coverage, a simple model of cosmogenic in situ 14C production (accounting for muon production through ice) provides constraints timing and duration of ice-free times at sample locations prior to their most recent burial. Using conservative Holocene ice thicknesses, the locations buried at 9.4, 9.2, and 9.0 ka require, at minimum, 1000 years of pre-burial exposure to match the observed in situ 14C inventory. This suggests these locations were ice free by at least 10 ka and likely earlier. The in situ 14C inventory at the location buried at 3.7 ka limits prior exposure to 2000 years, suggesting that this location experienced more complex Holocene ice cover/burial history. These pilot data show that valuable information regarding periods of exposure is contained within in situ 14C inventories. Additional paired plant and

  14. Application of the bomb radiocarbon chronometer to the validation of redfish Centroberyx affinis age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Validation of methods used to estimate fish age is a critical element of the fish stock assessment process. Despite the importance of validation, few procedures are available that provide unbiased estimates of true fish age and those methods that are available are seldom used. The majority of these methods are unlikely to provide an indication of the true age of individual fish, data that are best suited to the validation process. Accelerator mass spectrometry analyses of radiocarbon in selected regions of Centroberyx affinis otoliths were used to validate the age estimation method for this species. Radiocarbon data from the otoliths of C. affinis with presumed birth dates between 1955 and 1985 described the increase in ocean radiocarbon attributable to the atmospheric detonation of nuclear weapons in the 1950s and 1960s. The results confirm the longevity of C. affinis and demonstrate the effectiveness of the bomb radiocarbon chronometer for the validation of age-estimation methods. (author). 31 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Calibration of the 14C timescale over the past 30,000 years using mass spectrometric U-Th ages from Barbados corals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, E.; Hamelin, B.; Fairbanks, R.G.; Zindler, A.

    1990-01-01

    Uranium-thorium ages obtained by mass spectrometry from corals raised off the island of Barbados confirm the high precision of this technique over at least the past 30,000 years. Comparison of the U-Th ages with 14 C ages obtained on the Holocene samples shows that the U-Th ages are accurate, because they accord with the dendrochronological calibration. Before 9,000 yr BP the 14 C ages are systematically younger than the U-Th ages, with a maximum difference of ∼3,500 yr at ∼20,000 yr BP. The U-Th technique thus provides a way of calibrating the radiocarbon timescale beyond the range of dendrochronological calibration. (author)

  16. Radiocarbon dating of American pika fecal pellets provides insights into population extirpations and climate refugia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Constance I; Heckman, Katherine; Swanston, Christopher; Schmidt, Karena; Westfall, Robert D; Delany, Diane L

    The American pika (Ochotona princeps) has become a species of concern for its sensitivity to warm temperatures and potential vulnerability to global warming. We explored the value of radiocarbon dating of fecal pellets to address questions of population persistence and timing of site extirpation. Carbon was extracted from pellets collected at 43 locations in the western Great Basin, USA, including three known occupied sites and 40 sites of uncertain status at range margins or where previous studies indicated the species is vulnerable. We resolved calibrated dates with high precision (within several years), most of which fell in the period of the mid-late 20th century bomb curve. The two-sided nature of the bomb curve renders far- and near-side dates of equal probability, which are separated by one to four decades. We document methods for narrowing resolution to one age range, including stratigraphic analysis of vegetation collected from pika haypiles. No evidence was found for biases in atmospheric 14C levels due to fossil-derived or industrial CO2 contamination. Radiocarbon dating indicated that pellets can persist for >59 years; known occupied sites resolved contemporary dates. Using combined evidence from field observations and radiocarbon dating, and the Bodie Mountains as an example, we propose a historical biogeographic scenario for pikas in minor Great Basin mountain ranges adjacent to major cordillera, wherein historical climate variability led to cycles of extirpation and recolonization during alternating cool and warm centuries. Using this model to inform future dynamics for small ranges in biogeographic settings similar to the Bodie Mountains in California, extirpation of pikas appears highly likely under directional warming trends projected for the next century, even while populations in extensive cordillera (e.g., Sierra Nevada, Rocky Mountains, Cascade Range) are likely to remain viable due to extensive, diverse habitat and high connectivity.

  17. Observation of non-statistical structures in the excitation function of the reaction 10B(14N,12C)12C under extreme forward angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klauss, E.U.

    1984-01-01

    In the present thesis the excitation functions of the reaction 10 B( 14 N, 12 C) 12 C to the ground states, the first excited state at 4.43 MeV (Jsup(π) = 2 1 + ) of a 12 C residual nucleus, and to the double excitation of ejectile and residue nucleus to the 4.43 state are studied. The measurements were performed in an energy range 13MeV 14 N) 0 (in the c.m. system). By a fitting to elastic scattering data the optical potential for 10 B+ 14 N was determined. With this potential it was tried by means of Hauser-Feshbach calculations to calculate the cross sections of the reaction 10 B( 14 N, 12 C) 12 C. The strong 16 + resonance and indications of 18 + in the excitation function of the reaction 10 B( 14 N, 12 Csub(g.s.)) 12 Csub(g.s.) should be pronounced. An unexpected large cross section was observed in the reaction 10 B( 14 N, 12 Csub(g.s.)) 12 C(4 1 + ). This is considered as a further indication to the strong contribution of a direct process. (orig./HSI) [de

  18. Biodegradation of14 C-lindane by some soil fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaby, H.S.H.; Adam, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    In a culture medium incorporated with 14 C-labelled lindane, the 3 soil fungi helminthosporium sp., alternaria brassicola, and verticillium agaricinum were incubated for 10 days. Most of the recovered radioactivity was found to be maintained mainly in the medium of helminthosporium and alternaria but in case of verticillium the majority was associated with the mat. The 3 fungal species showed degradation capacity of 6.1, 5.1 and 3.2% of the total recovered radioactivity radioactivity as hydrolytic products. TLC chromatographic analysis of chloroform fractions revealed the presence of only unchanged lindane either in medium of mat. The aqueous fractions of the 3 fungal species, demonstrated three degraded products (unknown ι,π and tri) having Rf values of 0.40 - 0.47, 0.66 - 0.73, and 0.87 in addition to a polar compound (Rf = 0.07) with the major radioactivity. A certain percentage of radiocarbon 6.7, 5.7 and 30.3% of the mats of helminthosporium, alternria and verticillium, respectively.2 tab

  19. Accessing the application of in situ cosmogenic 14C to surface exposure dating of amorphous SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesta, J. M.; Goehring, B. M.; Ward, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    We assess the feasibility and utility of in situ cosmogenic 14C as a geochronometer for landforms composed of amorphous SiO2 through the comparison of 14C surface exposure ages to independently determined eruption ages on Obsidian Dome, California. Landforms composed of amorphous SiO2 phases are difficult to date by conventional cosmogenic nuclide methods due to several complications that may arise (e.g., inability to remove meteoric contamination). The onset of an increased understanding of production rates and analytical measurement of in situ 14C in SiO2 provides an opportunity to address this limitation. Obsidian Dome is a 600-year-old phreatomagmatic dome of the Mono-Inyo Craters located in Inyo County, California, and consists of vesicular pumice, obsidian, and rhyolite. Exposure ages from eight obsidian and banded pumice and obsidian surface samples range from 3947 ± 678 to 914 ± 134 years, all significantly older than the accepted radiocarbon age of 650-550 years. δ13C values for the samples range between +2.65‰ and +1.34‰ and show a negative correlation with CO2 yield. The `too old' exposure ages coupled with this negative correlation between δ13C and CO2 yield suggests the incorporation of an atmospheric component of 14C. Measurement of 14C concentrations in shielded, subsurface samples will assist in isolating the atmospheric 14C component and aid in correcting the surface exposure ages.

  20. Marine radiocarbon reservoir age variation in Donax obesulus shells from northern Peru: late Holocene evidence for extended El Niño

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etayo-Cadavid, Miguel F.; Andrus, C. Fred T.; Jones, Kevin B.; Hodgins, Gregory W. L.; Sandweiss, Daniel H.; Uceda-Castillo, Sandiago; Quilter, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    For at least 6 m.y., El Niño events have posed the greatest environmental risk on the Peruvian coast. A better understanding of El Niño is essential for predicting future risk and growth in this tropical desert. To achieve this we analyzed archaeological and modern pre-bomb shells from the surf clam Donax for the radiocarbon reservoir effect (ΔR) to characterize late Holocene coastal upwelling conditions in northern Peru (8°14′S). Mean ΔR values from these shells suggest that modern upwelling conditions in this region were likely established between A.D. 539 and A.D. 1578. Our radiocarbon data suggest that upwelling conditions ca. A.D. 539 were less intense than those in modern times. The observed coastal water enrichment in 14C may be consequence of frequent strong El Niño events or extended El Niño–like conditions. These ΔR-inferred marine conditions are in agreement with proposed extended El Niño activity in proxy and archaeological records of ca. A.D. 475–530. Extended El Niño conditions have been linked to political destabilization, societal transformation, and collapse of the Moche civilization in northern Peru. A return to such conditions would have significant impacts on the dense population of this region today and in the near future.

  1. NERC radiocarbon dating: 1975-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, D.Q.; Harkness, D.D.

    1986-06-01

    The paper reviews the work of the Natural Environment Research Council Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory in connection with Quaternary research, over the last decade. A description is given of the development of the dating service and in-house research. Quaternary research investigations aided by radiocarbon dating are described under the topic headings: The late Devensian glacial maximum, late glacial, middle Devensian, palaeomagnetic secular variation in lake sediments, vegetational history, faunal history, palaeolimnology, ground water, volcanology, periglacial research, palaoeohydrology, geomorphology, quaternary events in low-latitudes, environmental archaeology, archaeology, deep sea sediments, continental shelf, coastal geomorphology, and radiocarbon dating in Antarctica. (U.K.)

  2. Analysis of 14C and 13C in teeth provides precise birth dating and clues to geographical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Druid, H; Spalding, K L

    2011-06-15

    The identification of human bodies in situations when there are no clues as to the person's identity from circumstantial data, poses a difficult problem to the investigators. The determination of age and sex of the body can be crucial in order to limit the search to individuals that are a possible match. We analyzed the proportion of bomb pulse derived carbon-14 ((14)C) incorporated in the enamel of teeth from individuals from different geographical locations. The 'bomb pulse' refers to a significant increase in (14)C levels in the atmosphere caused by above ground test detonations of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963). By comparing (14)C levels in enamel with (14)C atmospheric levels systematically recorded over time, high precision birth dating of modern biological material is possible. Above ground nuclear bomb testing was largely restricted to a couple of locations in the northern hemisphere, producing differences in atmospheric (14)C levels at various geographical regions, particularly in the early phase. Therefore, we examined the precision of (14)C birth dating of enamel as a function of time of formation and geographical location. We also investigated the use of the stable isotope (13)C as an indicator of geographical origin of an individual. Dental enamel was isolated from 95 teeth extracted from 84 individuals to study the precision of the (14)C method along the bomb spike. For teeth formed before 1955 (N=17), all but one tooth showed negative Δ(14)C values. Analysis of enamel from teeth formed during the rising part of the bomb-spike (1955-1963, N=12) and after the peak (>1963, N=66) resulted in an average absolute date of birth estimation error of 1.9±1.4 and 1.3±1.0 years, respectively. Geographical location of an individual had no adverse effect on the precision of year of birth estimation using radiocarbon dating. In 46 teeth, measurement of (13)C was also performed. Scandinavian teeth showed a substantially greater depression in

  3. Wine ethanol 14C as a tracer for fossil fuel CO2 emissions in Europe: Measurements and model comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Karstens, Ute; Streurman, Harm-Jan; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2008-11-01

    14C (radiocarbon) in atmospheric CO2 is the most direct tracer for the presence of fossil-fuel-derived CO2 (CO2-ff). We demonstrate the 14C measurement of wine ethanol as a way to determine the relative regional atmospheric CO2-ff concentration compared to a background site ("regional CO2-ff excess") for specific harvest years. The carbon in wine ethanol is directly back traceable to the atmospheric CO2 that the plants assimilate. An important advantage of using wine is that the atmosphere can be monitored annually back in time. We have analyzed a total of 165 wines, mainly from harvest years 1990-1993 and 2003-2004, among which is a semicontinuous series (1973-2004) of wines from one vineyard in southwest Germany. The results show clear spatial and temporal variations in the regional CO2-ff excess values. We have compared our measured regional CO2-ff excess values of 2003 and 2004 with those simulated by the REgional MOdel (REMO). The model results show a bias of almost +3 parts per million (ppm) CO2-ff compared with those of the observations. The modeled differences between 2003 and 2004, however, which can be used as a measure for the variability in atmospheric mixing and transport processes, show good agreement with those of the observations all over Europe. Correcting for interannual variations using modeled data produces a regional CO2-ff excess signal that is potentially useful for the verification of trends in regional fossil fuel consumption. In this fashion, analyzing 14C from wine ethanol offers the possibility to observe fossil fuel emissions back in time on many places in Europe and elsewhere.

  4. Radiocarbon Dating on Jabung Temple Sites one of the Temples in East Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F, Wisjachudin; Rosyidin; Sumiyatno; Siswanto; Siregar, DarwinA.

    2000-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of organic materials (charcoal) around Jabung templein Jabung temple village, Paiton, Probolinggo district, East Java provincehas been carried out. Excavation archaeologically in different location incertain distance has been done which is considered relevant to the temple'sage and the location of the excavation boxes are the test holes (TH=LU) i.e :LU 1, LU 2, LU 3, LU 4, LU 5, LU 6, LU 7, and LU 8. From those test holes wecan find out that only LU 4 and LU 3 which contain significant charcoal. Thepretreatment (acid, base, acid washing) followed by continued preparationwith carbon contained charcoal burning process, burn to be acetylene gas (C 2 H 2 ). 14 C contained in acetylene is counted by gas proportional counter.After being processed charcoal from LU 3 is not qualified in volumerequirement which is needed for the next analysis. The result for 3000minutes, for background counting = 1.1 ± 0.21 cpm, counting of standard14.51 ± 0.52 cpm, while counting from charcoal sample only from LU 4location is 13.51 ± 0.12 cpm. From data of LU 4 charcoal counting above,we can count the date (age) of the sample that is 510 ± 80 BP. If we usetree ring correction for the data, result will be between 1306-1456 AD onlevel of confidence 68.3% while on level of confidence 95.4% result will bebetween 1281-1624 AD. Relative dating base on ancient inscription show 1354AD. From the data, relative dating is in the range of to absolute dating(radiocarbon dating). (author)

  5. Prehistoric peyote use: alkaloid analysis and radiocarbon dating of archaeological specimens of Lophophora from Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Seedi, Hesham R; De Smet, Peter A G M; Beck, Olof; Possnert, Göran; Bruhn, Jan G

    2005-10-03

    Two archaeological specimens of peyote buttons, i.e. dried tops of the cactus Lophophora williamsii (Lem.) Coulter, from the collection of the Witte Museum in San Antonio, was subjected to radiocarbon dating and alkaloid analysis. The samples were presumably found in Shumla Cave No. 5 on the Rio Grande, Texas. Radiocarbon dating shows that the calibrated 14C age of the weighted mean of the two individual dated samples corresponds to the calendric time interval 3780-3660 BC (one sigma significance). Alkaloid extraction yielded approximately 2% of alkaloids. Analysis with thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) led to the identification of mescaline in both samples. No other peyote alkaloids could be identified. The two peyote samples appear to be the oldest plant drug ever to yield a major bioactive compound upon chemical analysis. The identification of mescaline strengthens the evidence that native North Americans recognized the psychotropic properties of peyote as long as 5700 years ago.

  6. History of radiocarbon dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, W F [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Geophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1967-08-15

    The development is traced of radiocarbon dating from its birth in curiosity regarding the effects of cosmic radiation on Earth. Discussed in historical perspective are: the significance of the initial measurements in determining the course of developments; the advent of the low-level counting technique; attempts to avoid low-level counting by the use of isotopic enrichment; the gradual appearance of the environmental effect due to the combustion of fossil fuel (Suess effect); recognition of the atmosphere ocean barrier for carbon dioxide exchange; detailed understanding of the mixing mechanism from the study of fallout radiocarbon; determination of the new half-life; indexing and the assimilation problem for the massive accumulation of dates; and the proliferation of measurement techniques and the impact of archaeological insight on the validity of radiocarbon dates. (author)

  7. Large-scale Patterns of 14C Age of Bulk Organic Carbon and Various Molecular Components in Grassland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, J.; Liu, Z.; Cao, Z.; Chen, L.; He, J. S.; Haghipour, N.; Wacker, L.; Eglinton, T. I.; Feng, X.

    2017-12-01

    Unraveling the fate of organic carbon (OC) in soils is essential to understanding the impact of global changes on the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have shown that while various soil OC components have different decomposability, chemically labile OC can have old 14C ages. However, few studies have compared the 14C age of various soil OC components on a large scale, which may provide important information on the link between the age or turnover of soil OC components to their sources, molecular structures as well as environmental variables. In this project, a suite of soil profiles were sampled along a large-scale transect of temperate and alpine grasslands across the Tibetan and Mongolian Plateaus in China with contrasting climatic, vegetation and soil properties. Bulk OC and source-specific compounds (including fatty acids (FAs), diacids (DAs) and lignin phenols) were radiocarbon-dated to investigate the age and turnover dynamics of different OC pools and the mechanisms controlling their stability. Our results show that lignin phenols displayed a large 14C variability. Short-chain (C16, 18) FAs sourced from vascular plants as well as microorganisms were younger than plant-derived long-chain FAs and DAs, indicating that short-chain FAs were easier to be decomposed or newly synthesized. In the temperate grasslands, long-chain DAs were younger than FAs, while the opposite trend was observed in the alpine grasslands. Preliminary correlation analysis suggests that the age of short-chain FAs were mainly influenced by clay contents and climate, while reactive minerals, clay or silt particles were important factors in the stabilization of long-chain FAs, DAs and lignin phenols. Overall, our study provided a unique 14 C dataset of soil OC components in grasslands, which will provide important constraints on soil carbon turnover in future investigations.

  8. NON-DESTRUCTIVE RADIOCARBON DATING: NATURALLY MUMMIFIED INFANT BUNDLE FROM SW TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steelman, K L; Rowe, M W; Turpin, S A; Guilderson, T P; Nightengale, L

    2004-09-07

    Plasma oxidation was used to obtain radiocarbon dates on six different materials from a naturally mummified baby bundle from the Lower Pecos River region of southwest Texas. This bundle was selected because it was thought to represent a single event and would illustrate the accuracy and precision of the plasma oxidation method. Five of the materials were clearly components of the original bundle with 13 dates combined to yield a weighted average of 2135 {+-} 11 B.P. Six dates from a wooden stick of Desert Ash averaged 939 {+-} 14 B.P., indicating that this artifact was not part of the original burial. Plasma oxidation is shown to be a virtually non-destructive alternative to combustion. Because only sub-milligram amounts of material are removed from an artifact over its exposed surface, no visible change in fragile materials has been observed, even under magnification. The method is best applied when natural organic contamination is unlikely and serious consideration of this issue is needed in all cases. If organic contamination is present, it will have to be removed before plasma oxidation to obtain accurate radiocarbon dates.

  9. Bioconversion of α-[14C]Zearalenol and β-[14C]Zearalenol into [14C]Zearalenone by Fusarium roseum Gibbosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, K.E.; Hagler, W.M. Jr.; Hamilton, P.B.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of Fusarium roseum Gibbosum on rice were treated with [ 14 C]zearalenone, α-[ 14 C]zearalenol, or β-[ 14 C]zearalenol to determine whether a precursor-product relationship exists among these closely related fungal metabolites. Culture extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and fractionated by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and the level of radioactivity was determined. Within 7 days, the β-[ 14 C]zearalenol was converted to zearalenone, and no residual β-[ 14 C]zearalenol was detectable. Most of the α-[ 14 C]zearalenol added was also converted into zearalenone within 14 days. In cultures treated with [ 14 C]zearalenone, no radioactivity was noted in any other components

  10. Status report on sample preparation facilities for {sup 14}C analysis at the new CologneAMS center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rethemeyer, J., E-mail: janet.rethemeyer@uni-koeln.de [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Fueloep, R.-H.; Hoefle, S. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Wacker, L. [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Heinze, S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Hajdas, I. [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Patt, U.; Koenig, S.; Stapper, B. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Dewald, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    The new AMS facility at University of Cologne (CologneAMS), Germany, was established in 2010 with the delivery of the HVE 6 MV Tandetron AMS, which will be used for {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 129}I, {sup 239}U and {sup 244}Pu analyses. Parallel to the AMS installation the radiocarbon group has started to set up and test sample preparation methods and instruments for different materials. We present first results of reference and standard materials that have been processed and graphitized in our lab and measured at the ETH and CologneAMS facilities. The graphitization blank and its influence on small samples sizes processed with an automated graphitization system have been determined. Work on isolation of individual organic compounds with a preparative gas chromatography system has been started. The focus of our future work will be on reducing process blank levels and sample sizes as well as on the application of compound-specific radiocarbon analyses in (paleo-) environmental research.

  11. Immission measurements of tritium and radiocarbon in Switzerland; Immissions-Messungen von Tritium und Radiokarbon in der Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikenberg, J.; Beer, H.; Jaeggi, M.; Parussudis, C.; Ruethi, M.; Zumsteg, I. [Paul-Scherrer-Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    Monitoring of specific radioisotopes, i.e. actinides or pure beta emitters such as H-3 and C-14, is routinely integrated into the Swiss program for radioisotopes immission surveillance. Those measurements are performed besides dose rate readings and in-situ gamma spectrometry. Both, the air and water pathways are monitored by sampling at fixed locations and over defined time intervals. For monitoring of the water path in surface aquifers and rivers, water is continuously diffusing via capillary tubes into water samplers. Ground water samples are taken as well and rain is collected in precipitation samplers. In addition, in the vicinity of nuclear power plants and some chemical facilities, tree leaves (beech tree) are collected and analyzed for radiocarbon (C-14). Preparation of the samples for high precision C-14 determination is carried out via oxidation and catalytic polymerization to benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}). The isotopes H-3 and C-14 are measured by means of low level LS spectrometers that are equipped with coincidence and anti-coincidence units. Long term measurements of 12 h per sample result in detection limits of 1 Bq/l for H-3 and yield measurement uncertainties of only 0.5 % for the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of recent biological material. (orig.)

  12. Computer processing of 14C data; statistical tests and corrections of data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obelic, B.; Planinic, J.

    1977-01-01

    The described computer program calculates the age of samples and performs statistical tests and corrections of data. Data are obtained from the proportional counter that measures anticoincident pulses per 20 minute intervals. After every 9th interval the counter measures total number of counts per interval. Input data are punched on cards. The output list contains input data schedule and the following results: mean CPM value, correction of CPM for normal pressure and temperature (NTP), sample age calculation based on 14 C half life of 5570 and 5730 years, age correction for NTP, dendrochronological corrections and the relative radiocarbon concentration. All results are given with one standard deviation. Input data test (Chauvenet's criterion), gas purity test, standard deviation test and test of the data processor are also included in the program. (author)

  13. 14C ages of Omuroyama volcano, Izu Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Toshihito; Takahashi, Shuichi; Wada, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    A partly carbonized wood trunk was discovered below the Omuroyama tephra covered by a lava, and it was dated to be 3,700±100 y. B.P., by the benzene liquid scintillation method for radiocarbon age determination. We have investigated the circumstance of the discovery of the wood sample based on an interview of the person who collected the sample during his operation of building construction. According to him, the wood specimen was found at 1.5-2 m depth beneath the ground level when the operator removed the massive blackish lava block. This specimen was laid down covered by black sandy pebbles. The size of the wood trunk was 105 cm long and 45 cm and 35 cm along wide and short diameter, respectively. We also revealed the burial environment of the wood to be related with the Omuroyama tephras and lava flow, based on our volcanostratigraphic observation of the surrounding area. The tephras covering the trunk were identified as the Omuroyama tephra B, C, and D, which were defined by Koyano et al. (1996) around this area, and these tephras were covered by the Omuroyama lava flow II (Koyano et al., 1996). The wood trunk was mostly fresh and only its branch was burned. It can be estimated that the trunk has been preserved surrounded by ground water, since several tons of ground water gushed out when the aquifer was opened for construction. On this context, this trunk was buried at the early stage of the volcanism of Omuroyama volcano covered by the tephras, and later also covered by the Omuroyama lava II. We can not conclude that the burned branch is ascribed to direct burning by the Omuroyama lava flow II but this 14 C dating resultant is also concordant all archaeological evidences reported. (author)

  14. TL and radiocarbon dating of neolithic sepultures from Sudan: intercomparison of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibert, P.; Ney, C.; Bechtel, F.; Schvoerer, M.; Geus, F.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoluminescence dating of a set of 29 pottery sherds excavated at the neolithic sites of El Kadada and El Ghaba (near Shendi, Central Sudan) was carried out at Bordeaux University. The archaeological dose was measured using the fine grain technique. The annual dose was determined by analytical techniques (neutron activation analysis, ICP spectrometry, XRF, low background gamma spectrometry) and by ''on-site'' measurements of the environmental radioactivity (gammametry). The crystalline inclusions of the samples were characterized by optical microscopy and cathodoluminescence: the TL minerals mainly consist of quartz and K-feldspar crystals. In some cases, radioactive inclusions of zircons and monazites are observed. The TL and the radiocarbon dates show a good agreement, verifying the validity of the radiocarbon ages which were suspected to be too old because of the nature of the dated material (shells). Taking into account all the chronological data, it is shown that El Ghaba and El Ghaba necropolis were used respectively within the 4800-3300 B.C. and 4200-3000 B.C. date-ranges for neolithic cultures, the occupation of El Kadada starting five or six centuries later than El Ghaba. (Author)

  15. Study of the reaction 14 C (p,p) 14 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo, G.; Ramirez, J.; Avila, O.; Fernandez, M.; Darden, S.E.; Prior, R.P.; Sen, S.

    1991-04-01

    The study of the elastic scattering of polarized protons in 14 C, it has been very limited. Some angular distributions exists to low energy, as well as measures of excitation functions to several angles for the differential section and the vectorial analyzer power. A detailed study of the elastic scattering of protons by 14 C, it give us experimental information of the excited states in 15 N. The study of these states, is since of considerable interest it is not very easy to obtain a target of 14 C also in a reaction 14 C (p,p) 14 C is possible to obtain information of levels in 15 N to an excitation energy E X >14.95 MeV. (Author)

  16. Further observations on incorporation of the 14C-leucine into proteins by freshly secreted milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, L.N.

    1976-01-01

    Using freshly secreted bovine milk, no incorporation of DL (1- 14 C)-leucine was observed in the total milk proteins and acid precipitated casein, when these protein fractions were isolated from skim milk. A significant portion of the radioactivity however, remained associated with the heat coagulable whey proteins and proteose-peptone fractions. This association was shown to be due to non enzymatic physical sequestering of the radioactive amino acid or its metabolites with these proteins. Most of the radioactivity was associated with the cream layer proteins and the cellular fraction. The results obtained using filtered milk, incubated milk and certain antibiotics also indicated that the incorporation of 14 C leucine into proteins by freshly secreted milk may be a purely microbial process and physical sequestering of an amino acids with milk proteins. (author)

  17. Radiocarbon in the air of central Europe: long-term investigations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Světlík, Ivo; Povinec, P. P.; Molnár, M.; Váňa, M.; Šivo, A.; Bujtás, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2010), s. 823-834 ISSN 0033-8222. [International Radiocarbon Conference /20./. Big Island, Hawai, 31.05.2009-05.06.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : 14CO2 * troposphere * Suess effect * fossil fuel combustion Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.703, year: 2010

  18. Nuclear Bombs and Coral: Guam Coral Core Reveals Operation-Specific Radiocarbon Signals from the Pacific Proving Grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) analyses on a coral core extracted from the western Central Pacific (Guam) has revealed a series of early peaks in the marine bomb 14C record. The typical marine bomb 14C signal, one that is phase lagged and attenuated relative to atmospheric bomb 14C, is present in the coral core and is consistent with other North Pacific records. However, 14C levels that are well above what can be explained by air-sea diffusion alone punctuate this pattern. This anomaly has been demonstrated to a limited extent in other coral cores of the Indo-Pacific region, but is unmatched relative to the magnitude and temporal resolution recorded in the Guam coral core. Other records have shown an early Δ14C rise on the order of 40-50‰ above pre-bomb levels, with a subsequent decline before continuing the gradual Δ14C rise that is indicative of air-sea diffusion of 14CO2. The Guam coral Δ14C record provided three strong pulses in 1954-55, 1956-57, and 1958-59 that are superimposed on the pre-bomb to initial Δ14C rise from atmospheric bomb 14C. Each of these peaks can be directly linked to testing of thermonuclear devices in the Pacific Proving Grounds at Eniwetok and Bikini Atoll of the Marshall Islands. The measurable lag in reaching Guam can be tied to ocean surface currents and can be traced to other regional Δ14C records from corals, providing a transport timeline to places as distant as the Indonesian throughflow, Okinawa and Palmyra.

  19. Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, W.J.; Hsueh, D.Y.; Randerson, J.T.; Fischer, M.L.; Hatch, J.G.; Pataki, D.E.; Wang, W.; Goulden, M.L.

    2008-05-01

    Characterizing flow patterns and mixing of fossil fuel-derived CO{sub 2} is important for effectively using atmospheric measurements to constrain emissions inventories. Here we used measurements and a model of atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) to investigate the distribution and fluxes of atmospheric fossil fuel CO{sub 2} across the state of California. We sampled {sup 14}C in annual C{sub 3} grasses at 128 sites and used these measurements to test a regional model that simulated anthropogenic and ecosystem CO{sub 2} fluxes, transport in the atmosphere, and the resulting {sup 14}C of annual grasses ({Delta}{sub g}). Average measured {Delta}{sub g} in Los Angeles, San Francisco, the Central Valley, and the North Coast were 27.7 {+-} 20.0, 44.0 {+-} 10.9, 48.7 {+-} 1.9, and 59.9 {+-} 2.5{per_thousand}, respectively, during the 2004-2005 growing season. Model predictions reproduced regional patterns reasonably well, with estimates of 27.6 {+-} 2.4, 39.4 {+-} 3.9, 46.8 {+-} 3.0, and 59.3 {+-} 0.2{per_thousand} for these same regions and corresponding to fossil fuel CO{sub 2} mixing ratios (Cf) of 13.7, 6.1, 4.8, and 0.3 ppm. {Delta}{sub g} spatial heterogeneity in Los Angeles and San Francisco was higher in the measurements than in the predictions, probably from insufficient spatial resolution in the fossil fuel inventories (e.g., freeways are not explicitly included) and transport (e.g., within valleys). We used the model to predict monthly and annual transport patterns of fossil fuel-derived CO{sub 2} within and out of California. Fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emitted in Los Angeles and San Francisco was predicted to move into the Central Valley, raising Cf above that expected from local emissions alone. Annually, about 21, 39, 35, and 5% of fossil fuel emissions leave the California airspace to the north, east, south, and west, respectively, with large seasonal variations in the proportions. Positive correlations between westward fluxes and Santa Ana wind conditions were

  20. Radiocarbon Analysis to Calculate New End-Member Values for Biomass Burning Source Samples Specific to the Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.; Fairley, D.; Sheesley, R. J.; Tang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental carbon (EC), also known as black carbon or soot, is an important particulate air pollutant that contributes to climate forcing through absorption of solar radiation and to adverse human health impacts through inhalation. Both fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, via residential firewood burning, agricultural burning, wild fires, and controlled burns, are significant sources of EC. Our ability to successfully control ambient EC concentrations requires understanding the contribution of these different emission sources. Radiocarbon (14C) analysis has been increasingly used as an apportionment tool to distinguish between EC from fossil fuel and biomass combustion sources. However, there are uncertainties associated with this method including: 1) uncertainty associated with the isolation of EC to be used for radiocarbon analysis (e.g., inclusion of organic carbon, blank contamination, recovery of EC, etc.) 2) uncertainty associated with the radiocarbon signature of the end member. The objective of this research project is to utilize laboratory experiments to evaluate some of these uncertainties, particularly for EC sources that significantly impact the San Francisco Bay Area. Source samples of EC only and a mix of EC and organic carbon (OC) were produced for this study to represent known emission sources and to approximate the mixing of EC and OC that would be present in the atmosphere. These samples include a combination of methane flame soot, various wood smoke samples (i.e. cedar, oak, sugar pine, pine at various ages, etc.), meat cooking, and smoldering cellulose smoke. EC fractions were isolated using a Sunset Laboratory's thermal optical transmittance carbon analyzer. For 14C analysis, samples were sent to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for isotope analysis using an accelerated mass spectrometry. End member values and uncertainties for the EC isolation utilizing this method will be reported.

  1. Simulations of radiocarbon in a coarse-resolution world ocean model 2. Distributions of bomb-produced Carbon 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toggweiler, J.R.; Dixon, K.; Bryan, K.

    1989-01-01

    Part 1 of this study examined the ability of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) primitive equation ocean general circulation model to simulate the steady state distribution of naturally produced 14 C in the ocean prior to the nuclear bomb tests of the 1950's and early 1960's. In part 2 begin with the steady state distributions of part 1 and subject the model to the pulse of elevated atmospheric 14 C concentrations observed since the 1950's

  2. Convenient synthesis of [2-14C]-methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), [14C]-mitoguazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgos, A.; Ellames, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    [2- 14 C]-Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) dihydrochloride, [ 14 C]-mitoguazone has been prepared in three steps from potassium[1- 14 C]-acetate in an overall radiochemical yield of 16%. The key steps in this procedure are the formation of the sodium salt of[acetone-2- 14 C]-methylsulfinylacetone, and Pummerer rearrangement to the [ 14 C] labelled hermithioacetal, which is trapped with two equivalents of aminoguanidine to afford the desired [ 14 C]-mitoguazone. (Author)

  3. Investigations of (Delta)14C, (delta)13C, and (delta)15N in vertebrae of white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) from the eastern North Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, L A; Andrews, A H; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A; Coale, K H

    2006-06-08

    The white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) has a complex life history that is characterized by large scale movements and a highly variable diet. Estimates of age and growth for the white shark from the eastern North Pacific Ocean indicate they have a slow growth rate and a relatively high longevity. Age, growth, and longevity estimates useful for stock assessment and fishery models, however, require some form of validation. By counting vertebral growth band pairs, ages can be estimated, but because not all sharks deposit annual growth bands and many are not easily discernable, it is necessary to validate growth band periodicity with an independent method. Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) age validation uses the discrete {sup 14}C signal produced from thermonuclear testing in the 1950s and 1960s that is retained in skeletal structures as a time-specific marker. Growth band pairs in vertebrae, estimated as annual and spanning the 1930s to 1990s, were analyzed for {Delta}{sup 14}C and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N). The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of {sup 14}C age validation for a wide-ranging species with a complex life history and to use stable isotope measurements in vertebrae as a means of resolving complexity introduced into the {sup 14}C chronology by ontogenetic shifts in diet and habitat. Stable isotopes provided useful trophic position information; however, validation of age estimates was confounded by what may have been some combination of the dietary source of carbon to the vertebrae, large-scale movement patterns, and steep {sup 14}C gradients with depth in the eastern North Pacific Ocean.

  4. Dating of archaeological objects using Carbon-14 facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamisah Hj Alias; Noraishah Othman; Nasasni Nasrol

    2004-01-01

    Dating is the key to organising all archaeological evidence. Furthermore, the development of dating methods, whether traditional or scientific, illustrates the ingenuity and lateral thinking that make archaeological problem-solving such a fascinating exercise. The development of MINT radiocarbon dating procedures is reviewed. Basic principles and counting techniques are discussed. A sample is converted by chemical methods into a suitable form, such as carbon dioxide followed by the acetylene gas, and the benzene end-product is placed inside a proportional counter to measure the radioactivity of 14 C. Not until some years ago did absolute dates by radiocarbon dating become a reality for prehistoric archaeology in Malaysia where thermoluminescence and fission-track dating had begun to provide a locally applicable dating method some decades earlier. Applications of radiocarbon dating procedures in the fields of archaeology are also discussed. (Author)

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronk, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been used routinely for radiocarbon measurements for several years. This thesis describes theoretical work to understand the reasons for low accuracy and range and offers practical solutions. The production and transport of the ions used in the measurements are found to be the most crucial stages in the process. The theories behind ion production by sputtering are discussed and applied to the specific case of carbon sputtered by caesium. Experimental evidence is also examined in relation to the theories. The phenomena of space charge and lens aberrations are discussed along with the interaction between ion beams and gas molecules in the vacuum. Computer programs for calculating phase space transformations are then described; these are designed to help investigations of the effects of space charge and aberrations on AMS measurements. Calculations using these programs are discussed in relation both to measured ion beam profiles in phase space and to the current dependent transmission of ions through the Oxford radiocarbon accelerator. Improvements have been made to this accelerator and these are discussed in the context of the calculations. C - ions are produced directly from carbon dioxide at the Middleton High Intensity Sputter Source. Experiments to evaluate the performance of such a source are described and detailed design criteria established. An ion source designed and built specifically for radiocarbon measurements using carbon dioxide is described. Experiments to evaluate its performance and investigate the underlying physical processes are discussed. (author)

  6. Effect of level of dietary protein on the distribution of 14C-activity from exogenous 14C-inosine in chicks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masushige, Shoichi; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Takao; Nakajima, Hisao.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of dietary protein level on the metabolic fate of intraperitoneally administered (exogeneous) 8- 14 C-inosine in chicks was studied. Three different protein level diets (low, standard and high) were prepared. Chicks were fed on these diets for 10 days, respectively and the following results were found: (1) RNA content of liver, small intestine and muscle in chicks fed on a low protein diet was decreased as compared to other diet groups, but no difference was observed in kidney or pancreas. (2) 14 C uptake by organs from exogeneous 8- 14 C-inosine was determined. The uptake of 14 C in kidney, pancreas and small intestine was higher than that in liver and muscle. Moreover, the uptake by tissues in the low protein groups was significantly higher than that in either the standard or high protein groups, but no difference was observed between these latter two groups. (3) The rate of incorporation of 14 C labelled purine by acid soluble materials and RNA was higher in kidney, pancreas and small intestine than in liver and muscle, and also higher in chicks fed on a low protein diet than in either the standard or high protein groups. (4) It was revealed that the 14 C-labelled purine rings from 8- 14 C-inosine were incorporated into AMP and GMP as constituents of RNA. (author)

  7. Bomb radiocarbon: imbalance in the budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joos, Fortunat

    1994-01-01

    An improved understanding of the global carbon cycle is crucial to global climate change research. The uncertainties surrounding the level of oceanic carbon uptake are discussed. A revision downwards of 25% in the currently accepted figure is suggested by authors who base their estimates on a new analysis of the oceanic uptake of radiocarbon released in the atomic bomb tests of the late 1950s and early 1960s. The reduction in uptake level is required to take account of a global imbalance in the bomb-radiocarbon budget in the post test-ban period which emerges from recent carbon-cycle models. Large uncertainties exist in the estimate of the imbalance, however, and bomb-radiocarbon and anthropogenic CO 2 do not behave identically. Any revision of CO 2 uptake estimates may be substantially smaller than the 25% put forward for the bomb-radiocarbon inventory. (UK)

  8. Considerations on the modelling of environmental radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, E.M.; McCartney, M.

    1991-01-01

    Modelling radionuclide transfer within the natural environment involves three general steps: model formulation, its fitting using appropriate experimental data and model validation. The last process typically involves a sensitivity analysis and is used to modify model formulation and to direct future experimental effort. A wide variety of models exists appropriate to a number of different applications. Recently, attention has been directed to the development of principles for establishing local, regional and global upper bounds to doses. Here important considerations in model choice are the spatial detail required within the model, the links between models of differing resolution and the availability of suitable experimental data. We illustrate the model-building stages and discuss the above considerations in transfer modelling using radiocarbon which is produced and released as part of the nuclear fuel cycle. Its long half life of 5730 years, its mobility in the environment and its incorporation into man via the food chain make it of some considerable radiological significance. We consider local modelling of 14 C transfer using a Gaussian plume model, while its global dispersal is modelled using a large globally-averaged compartmental model. The global analysis is used to make short term predictions of 14 C specific activities to 2050 and longer-term predictions over a period of 10,000 years. We discuss the validation of these models and attempt to quantify the sources and magnitudes of the uncertainties in the model predictions. (26 refs., 2 figs.)

  9. AMS radiocarbon dating of ancient Japanese sutras

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, K

    2000-01-01

    Radiocarbon ages of ancient Japanese sutras whose historical ages were known paleographically were measured by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Calibrated radiocarbon ages of five samples were consistent with the corresponding historical ages; the 'old wood effect' is negligible for ancient Japanese sutras. Japanese paper has been made from fresh branches grown within a few years and the interval from trimming off the branches to writing sutra on the paper is within one year. The good agreement between the calibrated radiocarbon ages and the historical ages is supported by such characteristics of Japanese paper. It is indicated in this study that Japanese sutra is a suitable sample for radiocarbon dating in the historic period because of little gap by 'old wood effect'.

  10. AMS radiocarbon dating of ancient Japanese sutras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Hirotaka; Yoshizawa, Yasukazu; Nakamura, Toshio; Fujita, Keiko

    2000-01-01

    Radiocarbon ages of ancient Japanese sutras whose historical ages were known paleographically were measured by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Calibrated radiocarbon ages of five samples were consistent with the corresponding historical ages; the 'old wood effect' is negligible for ancient Japanese sutras. Japanese paper has been made from fresh branches grown within a few years and the interval from trimming off the branches to writing sutra on the paper is within one year. The good agreement between the calibrated radiocarbon ages and the historical ages is supported by such characteristics of Japanese paper. It is indicated in this study that Japanese sutra is a suitable sample for radiocarbon dating in the historic period because of little gap by 'old wood effect'

  11. 87Sr/86Sr as a quantitative geochemical proxy for 14C reservoir age in dynamic, brackish waters: assessing applicability and quantifying uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougheed, Bryan; van der Lubbe, Jeroen; Davies, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    Accurate geochronologies are crucial for reconstructing the sensitivity of brackish and estuarine environments to rapidly changing past external impacts. A common geochronological method used for such studies is radiocarbon (14C) dating, but its application in brackish environments is severely limited by an inability to quantify spatiotemporal variations in 14C reservoir age, or R(t), due to dynamic interplay between river runoff and marine water. Additionally, old carbon effects and species-specific behavioural processes also influence 14C ages. Using the world's largest brackish water body (the estuarine Baltic Sea) as a test-bed, combined with a comprehensive approach that objectively excludes both old carbon and species-specific effects, we demonstrate that it is possible to use 87Sr/86Sr ratios to quantify R(t) in ubiquitous mollusc shell material, leading to almost one order of magnitude increase in Baltic Sea 14C geochronological precision over the current state-of-the-art. We propose that this novel proxy method can be developed for other brackish water bodies worldwide, thereby improving geochronological control in these climate sensitive, near-coastal environments.

  12. {sup 14}C AMS measurements in tree rings to estimate local fossil CO{sub 2} in Bosco Fontana forest (Mantova, Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capano, Manuela, E-mail: capanomanuela@tiscali.i [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita di Napoli, and INNOVA, Via Vivaldi, 43 81100 Caserta (Italy); Marzaioli, Fabio; Sirignano, Carmina; Altieri, Simona; Lubritto, Carmine; D' Onofrio, Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita di Napoli, and INNOVA, Via Vivaldi, 43 81100 Caserta (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Radiocarbon concentration in atmosphere changes overtime due to anthropogenic and natural factors. Species growth preserves the local atmospheric radiocarbon signature over their life span in the annual tree rings and make it possible to use tree rings for the monitoring of changes in fossil-fuel emissions due to an increase of traffic exhaust, during the last decades. In this paper, the CIRCE AMS system has been used to measure the {sup 14}C concentration in tree rings of plants grown near an industrial area and a very busy State Road, in a forest in north Italy. Preliminary results related to tree rings of several years of plants respectively near and far the emitting sources are displayed, in order to estimate the local pollution effect. It is possible to find a dilution in years 2000 and 2006 in both the trees analysed, but not enough data have been analysed yet in order to distinguish the fossil dilution derived from the street vehicular traffic or that from the industries.

  13. The bomb 14C transient in the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Keith B.; Schrag, Daniel P.; Cane, Mark A.; Naik, Naomi H.

    2000-04-01

    A modeling study of the bomb 14C transient is presented for the Pacific Ocean. A primitive equation ocean circulation model has been configured for a high-resolution domain that accounts for the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). Four separate runs were performed: (1) seasonal forcing with 20 Sv of ITF transport, (2) seasonal forcing with 10 Sv of ITF transport, (3) seasonal forcing with no ITF transport, and (4) interannual forcing with 15 Sv of ITF transport. This study has two main objectives. First, it is intended to describe the time evolution of the bomb 14C transient. This serves as a tool with which one can identify the physical processes controlling the evolving bomb 14C distribution in the Pacific thermocline and thus provides an interpretive framework for the database of Δ14C measurements in the Pacific. Second, transient tracers are applied to the physical oceanographic problem of intergyre exchange. This is of importance in furthering our understanding of the potential role of the upper Pacific Ocean in climate variability. We use bomb 14C as a dye tracer of intergyre exchange between the subtropical gyres and the equatorial upwelling regions of the equatorial Pacific. Observations show that while the atmospheric Δ14C signal peaked in the early to mid-1960s, the Δ14C levels in the surface water waters of the subtropical gyres peaked near 1970, and the Δ14C of surface waters in the equatorial Pacific continued to rise through the 1980s. It is shown that the model exhibits skill in representing the large-scale observed features observed for the bomb 14C transient in the Pacific Ocean. The model successfully captures the basin-scale inventories of bomb 14C in the tropics as well as in the extratropics of the North Pacific. For the equatorial Pacific this is attributed to the model's high meridional resolution. The discrepancies in the three-dimensional distribution of bomb 14C between the model and data are discussed within the context of the dynamical

  14. Annually resolved atmospheric radiocarbon records reconstructed from tree-rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Lukas; Bleicher, Niels; Büntgen, Ulf; Friedrich, Michael; Friedrich, Ronny; Diego Galván, Juan; Hajdas, Irka; Jull, Anthony John; Kromer, Bernd; Miyake, Fusa; Nievergelt, Daniel; Reinig, Frederick; Sookdeo, Adam; Synal, Hans-Arno; Tegel, Willy; Wesphal, Torsten

    2017-04-01

    The IntCal13 calibration curve is mainly based on data measured by decay counting with a resolution of 10 years. Thus high frequency changes like the 11-year solar cycles or cosmic ray events [1] are not visible, or at least not to their full extent. New accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) systems today are capable of measuring at least as precisely as decay counters [2], with the advantage of using 1000 times less material. The low amount of material required enables more efficient sample preparation. Thus, an annually resolved re-measurement of the tree-ring based calibration curve can now be envisioned. We will demonstrate with several examples the multitude of benefits resulting from annually resolved radiocarbon records from tree-rings. They will not only allow for more precise radiocarbon dating but also contain valuable new astrophysical information. The examples shown will additionally indicate that it can be critical to compare AMS measurements with a calibration curve that is mainly based on decay counting. We often see small offsets between the two measurement techniques, while the reason is yet unknown. [1] Miyake F, Nagaya K, Masuda K, Nakamura T. 2012. A signature of cosmic-ray increase in AD 774-775 from tree rings in Japan. Nature 486(7402):240-2. [2] Wacker L, Bonani G, Friedrich M, Hajdas I, Kromer B, Nemec M, Ruff M, Suter M, Synal H-A, Vockenhuber C. 2010. MICADAS: Routine and high-precision radiocarbon dating. Radiocarbon 52(2):252-62.

  15. Chemical techniques to extract organic fractions from fossil bones for accurate 14C dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Masayo; Muto, Hiroo; Nakamura, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    We examined different concentrations of HCl, such as 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 M, for decalcification of fossil bones and different times of 0.1 M NaOH treatment on collagens to determine the best conditions for purifying collagen through extraction of humic contaminants, and compared the alkali treatment method with the XAD-2 treatment method for several types of fossils. The yield of acid-insoluble bone fractions did not change over the range from 0.4 to 1.0 M HCl and decreased suddenly with 1.2 M HCl on decalcification, and the 14 C ages of the extracted gelatins from the five decalcified fractions were unchanged, suggesting that 14 C ages as those of the XAD-purified hydrolysates. The NaOH-treatment time should be less than several hours to avoid a loss of collagen. The fossil bones used are relatively well-preserved, but the alkali treatment could bring about a lot of loss of organic bone proteins for poorly-preserved bones. The XAD-2 treatment method is effective for accurate radiocarbon dating of fossil bones, if the XAD-2 resin is completely pre-cleaned

  16. The feasibility of bomb radiocarbon analysis to support an age-at-length relationship for red abalone, Haliotis rufescens Swainson in northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leaf, R T; Andrews, A H; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A

    2009-01-07

    Analysis of bomb generated radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) changes in a red abalone, Haliotis rufescens Swainson shell was used to investigate age-at-length relationships derived from data from a previous multi-year, multi-site tag-recapture study. Shell carbonate was extracted from four successive growth trajectory locations in a single shell with a length of 251 mm MSL. Extraction locations were based on VBGF predictions and chosen to span the initial rise of the {sup 14}C-bomb pulse that is known to have occurred in surface ocean waters during 1958 {+-} 1 y in the northeast Pacific. The close temporal correspondence of the red abalone sample series to regional {Delta}{sup 14}C records demonstrated the utility of the technique for validating age-at-length relationships for the red abalone. The findings provided support for a mean VBGF derived age of 32 y (range 30 to 33 y) for the specimen; however, the analysis of {sup 14}C data indicated that the specimen could be older.

  17. Recharge quantification with radiocarbon: Independent corroboration in three Karoo aquifer studies in Botswana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhagen, B.Th.; Bredenkamp, D.B.; Janse van Rensburg, H.; Farr, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Environmental isotope data from a 'snapshot' sampling hold out the promise of producing acceptable estimates of ground water recharge for resource management purposes. In three major ground water developments in Botswana, estimates of recharge to the Karoo aquifers in the Kalahari, were based on residence times derived from radiocarbon data. In the assessment, three factors needed to be considered: 1) the model leading to acceptable values of residence times 2) the initial, or recharge, radiocarbon value and 3) appropriate values of aquifer porosity. In the three studies, porosity had been measured on numerous drill cores obtained from the principal fractured sandstone aquifers. The resulting isotope-based recharge values correspond reasonably with independent recharge assessments using the equal volume method to analyse long-term rest level observations in two cases; in the third, recharge was independently assessed on the basis of chloride balance in both unsaturated and saturated zones. It is concluded that a) the isotope snapshot approach can give acceptable values for recharge in the development of ground water resources, providing rational management information early in the life of a ground water supply scheme; b) the exponential model and an initial radiocarbon values of 85% atmospheric are realistic in this environment and c) the total porosity appears to be the appropriate parameter in the calculation of recharge. This also provides an insight into the behaviour of the aquifers. (author)

  18. Radiocarbon dates XXI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdon, J.A.; Blake, W. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This list includes 105 radiocarbon age determinations on 104 geological samples made by the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory. They are on samples from various areas as follows: Labrador Shelf (2); Newfoundland (12); Nova Scotia (2); New Brunswick (1); Quebec (3); Ontario (1); Manitoba (1); Alberta (2); British Columbia (15); Yukon Territory (35); Northwest Territories, Mainland (10); Northwest Territories, Arctic Archipelago (21). Details of background and standard for the 2 L and 5 L counters during the period from November 4, 1980 to October 31, 1981 are summarized in Tables 1 and 2; Table 3 gives the number of counts used to determine the average background and standard counting rates; and Table 4 lists the number of different background and standard gas preparations used for counting

  19. Optimization of simultaneous tritium–radiocarbon internal gas proportional counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonicalzi, R.M. [Seattle Central College, 1701 Broadway, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Aalseth, C.E.; Day, A.R.; Hoppe, E.W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Mace, E.K., E-mail: Emily.Mace@pnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Moran, J.J.; Overman, C.T.; Panisko, M.E.; Seifert, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Specific environmental applications can benefit from dual tritium and radiocarbon measurements in a single compound. Assuming typical environmental levels, it is often the low tritium activity relative to the higher radiocarbon activity that limits the dual measurement. In this paper, we explore the parameter space for a combined tritium and radiocarbon measurement using a natural methane sample mixed with an argon fill gas in low-background proportional counters of a specific design. We present an optimized methane percentage, detector fill pressure, and analysis energy windows to maximize measurement sensitivity while minimizing count time. The final optimized method uses a 9-atm fill of P35 (35% methane, 65% argon), and a tritium analysis window from 1.5 to 10.3 keV, which stops short of the tritium beta decay endpoint energy of 18.6 keV. This method optimizes tritium-counting efficiency while minimizing radiocarbon beta-decay interference. - Highlights: • Use of a single compound (methane) for dual tritium and radiocarbon measurements. • Optimized analysis window for simultaneous tritium and radiocarbon measurement. • Allows for optimization of tritium counting in the presence of radiocarbon.

  20. The early Lateglacial re-colonization of Britain: new radiocarbon evidence from Gough's Cave, southwest England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, R. M.; Higham, T. F. G.

    2009-09-01

    Gough's Cave is still Britain's most significant Later Upper Palaeolithic site. New ultrafiltered radiocarbon determinations on bone change our understanding of its occupation, by demonstrating that this lasted for only a very short span of time, at the beginning of the Lateglacial Interstadial (Greenland Interstadial 1 (GI-1: Bølling and Allerød)). The application of Bayesian modelling to the radiocarbon dates from this, and other sites from the period in southwest England, suggests that re-colonization after the Last Glacial Maximum took place only after 14,700 cal BP, and is, therefore, more recent than that of the Paris Basin and the Belgian Ardennes. On their own, the radiocarbon determinations cannot tell us whether re-colonization was synchronous with, just prior to, or after, Lateglacial warming. Isotopic studies of humanly-modified mammalian tooth enamel may be one way forward.

  1. Radiocarbon dating of silica sinter deposits in shallow drill cores from the Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Hurwitz, Shaul; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the timing of hydrothermal activity at the Upper Geyser Basin (UGB) in Yellowstone National Park, we obtained seven new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon 14C ages of carbonaceous material trapped within siliceous sinter. Five samples came from depths of 15-152 cm within the Y-1 well, and two samples were from well Y-7 (depths of 24 cm and 122 cm). These two wells, at Black Sand and Biscuit Basins, respectively, were drilled in 1967 as part of a scientific drilling program by the U.S. Geological Survey (White et al., 1975). Even with samples as small as 15 g, we obtained sufficient carbonaceous material (a mixture of thermophilic mats, pollen, and charcoal) for the 14C analyses. Apparent time of deposition ranged from 3775 ± 25 and 2910 ± 30 14C years BP at the top of the cores to about 8000 years BP at the bottom. The dates are consistent with variable rates of sinter formation at individual sites within the UGB over the Holocene. On a basin-wide scale, though, these and other existing 14C dates hint that hydrothermal activity at the UGB may have been continuous throughout the Holocene.

  2. New biomedical applications of radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.C.

    1990-12-01

    The potential of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and radiocarbon in biomedical applications is being investigated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A measurement of the dose-response curve for DNA damage caused by a carcinogen in mouse liver cells was an initial experiment. This demonstrated the sensitivity and utility of AMS for detecting radiocarbon tags and led to numerous follow-on experiments. The initial experiment and follow-on experiments are discussed in this report. 12 refs., 4 figs. (SM)

  3. Radiocarbon dating of iron artefacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cresswell, R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1997-12-31

    Iron artefacts are generally dated by association or on stylistic grounds. This may not give a true indication of the date of manufacture, or may not be possible if the piece is out of context, ambiguous in style, or a copy. Obtaining a direct date on the artefact would be preferable. During the processes of manufacture, carbon is incorporated into the iron from the fuel source. If the fuel is of a material containing contemporaneous carbon, i.e. has an ambient radiocarbon signature, e.g. charcoal, then we may reliably radiocarbon date the artefact by extracting this carbon. Care must be taken, however, to ensure that re-working has not introduced multiple sources of carbon that would give an erroneous date. Detailed chemical analysis must precede radiocarbon analysis. Sample size is determined by carbon content, and before the advent of accelerator mass spectrometry, several tens of grams of carbon were required for radiocarbon dating (van der Merwe, 1969), prohibiting this method except for high-carbon cast-irons and bulk samples, e.g. caches of nails. AMS permits the analysis of sub-gram pieces of iron (Cresswell, 1991), thereby permitting the analysis of museum pieces with only minimal loss of material, and small fragments of iron recovered from archaeological sites. A few examples are given to illustrate these points. Paper no. 41; Extended abstract. 6 refs.

  4. Radiocarbon dating of iron artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cresswell, R.

    1997-01-01

    Iron artefacts are generally dated by association or on stylistic grounds. This may not give a true indication of the date of manufacture, or may not be possible if the piece is out of context, ambiguous in style, or a copy. Obtaining a direct date on the artefact would be preferable. During the processes of manufacture, carbon is incorporated into the iron from the fuel source. If the fuel is of a material containing contemporaneous carbon, i.e. has an ambient radiocarbon signature, e.g. charcoal, then we may reliably radiocarbon date the artefact by extracting this carbon. Care must be taken, however, to ensure that re-working has not introduced multiple sources of carbon that would give an erroneous date. Detailed chemical analysis must precede radiocarbon analysis. Sample size is determined by carbon content, and before the advent of accelerator mass spectrometry, several tens of grams of carbon were required for radiocarbon dating (van der Merwe, 1969), prohibiting this method except for high-carbon cast-irons and bulk samples, e.g. caches of nails. AMS permits the analysis of sub-gram pieces of iron (Cresswell, 1991), thereby permitting the analysis of museum pieces with only minimal loss of material, and small fragments of iron recovered from archaeological sites. A few examples are given to illustrate these points

  5. A convenient synthesis of sup 14 C-cotinine from sup 14 C-nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, D.H.; Djordjevic, M.V.; Amin, S. (American Health Foundation, Valhalla, NY (USA). Naylor Dana Inst. for Disease Prevention)

    1991-03-01

    A convenient synthesis with analytical monitoring of {sup 14}C-cotinine is reported. {sup 14}C-Nicotine was converted into {sup 14}C-dibromocotinine hydrobromide perbromide. Debromination, achieved by using Zn dust/acetic acid, resulted in high yields (71%) of {sup 14}C-cotinine. (author).

  6. Syntheses of [6-14C] and [5-carboxy, 6-14C2]nitrendipine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, N.; Scherling, D.

    1989-01-01

    [6- 14 C]Nitrendipine synthesis started from barium[ 14 ]carbonate, which was converted to [1- 14 C]acetyl chloride. The acid chloride was condensed with Meldrum's acid (2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione). The resulting intermediate was treated with boiling methanol to give methyl [3- 14 C]acetoacetate. The reaction with gaseous ammonia in toluene yielded the corresponding methyl 3-amino[3- 14 C]crotonate which was condensed with ethyl 2-(3-nitro-benzylidene) acetoacetate to obtain [6- 14 C]nitrendipine. (author)

  7. Determination of 14CO2 in breath and 14C in stool after oral administration of cholyl-1-[14C]glycine: clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roda, A.; Roda, E.; Aldini, R.; Mazzella, G.; Festi, D.; Sama, C.; Barbara, L.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty patients with intestinal bacterial overgrowth and 20 control subjects were investigated for bile acid deconjugation, by measuring 14 CO 2 in the breath after cholyl-1-[ 14 C]glycine administration. 14 CO 2 output/24 h was 11.0 +- 5.2% (mean +- SD) in controls and 54.2 +- 14.0% (mean +- SD) in bacterial-overgrowth patients (P 14 CO 2 excretion rate in 12 h, when normalized to 100% of the dose at the 12th hour, gave an even finer discrimination between the two groups (no false responses). 14 C in stool, analyzed in 20 malabsorption patients and 20 controls by two different techniques, was 6.6 +- 4% and 31.38 +- 20.7% (mean +- SD), respectively. Results by the two different techniques described here correlated well (r = 0.99). Bile acid malabsorption was in reasonable agreement (r = 0.67) with percentage of ''chenoid'' (chenodeoxycholic acid plus ursodeoxycholic acid) in the stool by gas-liquid chromatography; a poorer correlation was observed when ''choloid'' (cholic acid plus its epimers) were plotted vs. 14 C in stool

  8. Bayesian re-evaluation of Lapita settlement in Fiji : radiocarbon analysis of the Lapita occupation at Bourewa and nearby sites on the Rove Peninsula, Viti Levu Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunn, P.D.; Petchey, F.

    2013-01-01

    80 radiocarbon dates are presented for Lapita-era sites on the Rove Peninsula, southwest Viti Levu Island, Fiji. Of these, 67 are from the Bourewa site which is the largest and probably the earliest in the area. Of these, 10 are rejected as not being demonstrably associated with its Lapita occupation. Constraints on date interpretation arising from sample materials are highlighted. In particular, charcoals that have not been identified to short-lived tree species, twigs or seeds are evaluated according to observed contextual associations and established understanding of inbuilt age offsets using Bayesian outlier analysis. It is concluded that many of the dates on charcoal are imprecise indicators of settlement age and have an average offset of 149 years. Shell radiocarbon results are similarly evaluated and it is concluded that the majority have 14 C values that are in equilibrium with the marine radiocarbon reservoir and therefore yield ages that are accurate indicators of Lapita occupation of Bourewa. Results suggest that initial occupation at Bourewa occurred 2816 ± 25 cal BP (2838-2787 cal BP [68.2% prob.]; 2866-2771 cal BP [95.4% prob.]) and ended 2654 ± 21 cal BP (2675-2640 cal BP [68.2% prob.]; 2689-2613 cal BP [95.4% prob.]). Similar analyses applied to other dated Lapita sites in Fiji shows that, while Bourewa is among the earliest, the Matanamuani (VL 21/5) site on Naigani Island remains the earliest to be securely dated. (author)

  9. 14C dating of freshwater carbonate sediments with special reference to calcareous tufas and laminated lake sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazdur, M.F.

    1992-09-01

    The sequence of laminated sediment of the lake Gosciaz, Poland, covers more than 13,000 years and is actually the longest sequence known so far. Besides of reconstructing past environmental changes, this sequence offers an excellent possibility for studying natural C-14 variations and calibrating the C-14 time scale in a range beyond 6,000 years B.P. The floating varve chronology based on previously taken sediment cores which cover a period of 9,682 years, has been improved by this study. Relative water level changes of the lake during the past 11,500 years have been reconstructed by means of C-14 and C-13 measurements carried out on carbonate fractions of the lake sediments. Periodical variations in the width of annual layers were found. The periods identified are 11 years and 22 years (solar cycle), 35 years (Bruckner cycle), and 200 years. The ratio of summer layer width and the total width of the annual layer shows secular changes which correlate with paleotemperature records. The duration of the Younger Dryas period was determined by combining the floating varve chronology with isotope and pollen analyses of the sediment material. A value of 1,500 years was found. The study also included radiocarbon dating of calcareous tufa taken from different study areas. 26 refs, 26 figs, 6 tabs

  10. Synthesis of (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)olivetolic acid, methyl (1'-/sup 13/C)olivetolate and (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)cannabigerolic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porwoll, J P; Leete, E [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1985-03-01

    Potential advanced intermediates in the biosynthesis of delta/sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol, the major psychoactive principle of marijuana, have been synthesized labeled with two contiguous /sup 13/C atoms and /sup 14/C. Methyl (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)olivetolate was prepared from lithium (/sup 13/C/sub 2/)acetylide and dimethyl (2-/sup 14/C)malonate. Reaction with geranyl bromide afforded methyl (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)cannabigerolate, and hydrolysis of these methyl esters with lithium propyl mercaptide yielded the corresponding labeled acids. The /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C couplings observable in the /sup 13/C NMR spectra of these /sup 13/C-enriched compounds and their synthetic precursors are recorded. Methyl (1'-/sup 14/C)olivetolate was prepared from /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ to confirm assignments of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts in the pentyl side chain of these compounds.

  11. Accuracy of radiocarbon analyses at ANTARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, E.M.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.; Smith, A.M.; Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accuracy in Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) measurements, as distinct from precision, requires the application of a number of corrections. Most of these are well known except in extreme circumstances and AMS can deliver radiocarbon results which are both precise and accurate in the 0.5 to 1.0% range. The corrections involved in obtaining final radiocarbon ages are discussed. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Accuracy of radiocarbon analyses at ANTARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, E M; Fink, D; Hotchkis, M; Hua, Q; Jacobsen, G; Smith, A M; Tuniz, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Accuracy in Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) measurements, as distinct from precision, requires the application of a number of corrections. Most of these are well known except in extreme circumstances and AMS can deliver radiocarbon results which are both precise and accurate in the 0.5 to 1.0% range. The corrections involved in obtaining final radiocarbon ages are discussed. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Development of BASIC program for radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Kunio

    1982-01-01

    The continuous improvement of the system and the needs have produced the successful radiocarbon dating system of today to detect very low energy β-radioactivity. However, it still takes longer than 1,000 minutes for a sample counting. In a gas counting system, it is very difficult to keep the drift of impressed high voltage for a proportional counter less than 5 volts throughout the counting time. The temperature and the characteristics of gas itself also change during experiment. The accumulation of the above drift and errors are closely concerned with the accuracy and reliability of the radiocarbon date. The detection and reduction of the errors are only possible by using a ''fully automatic radiocarbon dating system'' linked to a personal computer system. In this paper, the author presents the BASIC (Beginners All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) program for a fully automatic radiocarbon dating system. In this paper, the outline of the system and software development are described. The details of the program include the description for gas-collection, gas-enclosing, plateau counting, β-ray counting, age calculation and data file maintenance. The author wrote numerous remark statements into the program so that it can be understood by users without detailed knowledge of the operation of a personal computer system or of the radiocarbon dating. Using this system, the author found that the radiocarbon dating has greatly progressed in speed and labour-saving, and that the accuracy and reliability of the date itself has also improved much than former manual systems. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Emission of 14C by the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant 1 and 2 and their local effects on the environmental levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Cintia Melazo

    2006-01-01

    14 C is a is a long-lived beta-emitting nuclide (T 1/2 = 5730 years) produced naturally in the upper atmosphere as a result of reactions between neutrons and stable 14 N( 14 N(n,p) 14 C). Although in a lesser extent, nuclear power plants produce 14 C as well during their routine operation. Since it is converted in 14 CO 2 and mixed throughout the atmosphere, it is incorporated into plant tissues, via photosynthesis process, and hence in food chain. Because of the biological importance of 14 C and long half-life, it is of interest to quantify the amounts released by nuclear industry. The Brazilian nuclear central named Nuclear Central Admiral Alvaro Alberto (CNAAA) has two nuclear reactors of PWR type in operation, Angra I (657 MWe) and Angra II (1350 MWe), and one under construction, Angra III (1309 MWe PWR). The aim of this study was to determine the strength of the sources and the 14 C content in the environment through analyses of air, vegetation and soils taken within 5 km (the influenced area) of CNAAA. The thesis consists of an extensive review about the subject (part one) and of four papers (part two). The first paper is about the determination of 14 C concentrations released by reactors (source strength). For Angra I, a device was developed in order to sample the gaseous effluents and for Angra II, a commercial monitoring system had already been implemented since its initial operation (2001). The 14 C can be emitted as hydrocarbons, CO or CO 2 , depending on the type of reactor. For PWRs, the main chemical form released is hydrocarbons (80 %). The monitoring system of Angra I was planned to determine both CO 2 and hydrocarbon fractions but in Angra II, all hydrocarbons are converted to CO 2 by using a Pd/Al 2 O 3 catalyst at 450 deg C. The liquid scintillation was the method employed to measure the samples. The second one concerns the atmospheric dispersion of the released radiocarbon through measurements of air samples taken with 3 km from power plants, in

  15. Methane sources in gas hydrate-bearing cold seeps: Evidence from radiocarbon and stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Bauer, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Grabowski, K.S.; Knies, D.L.; Mitchell, C.S.; Whiticar, Michael J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Fossil methane from the large and dynamic marine gas hydrate reservoir has the potential to influence oceanic and atmospheric carbon pools. However, natural radiocarbon (14C) measurements of gas hydrate methane have been extremely limited, and their use as a source and process indicator has not yet been systematically established. In this study, gas hydrate-bound and dissolved methane recovered from six geologically and geographically distinct high-gas-flux cold seeps was found to be 98 to 100% fossil based on its 14C content. Given this prevalence of fossil methane and the small contribution of gas hydrate (??? 1%) to the present-day atmospheric methane flux, non-fossil contributions of gas hydrate methane to the atmosphere are not likely to be quantitatively significant. This conclusion is consistent with contemporary atmospheric methane budget calculations. In combination with ??13C- and ??D-methane measurements, we also determine the extent to which the low, but detectable, amounts of 14C (~ 1-2% modern carbon, pMC) in methane from two cold seeps might reflect in situ production from near-seafloor sediment organic carbon (SOC). A 14C mass balance approach using fossil methane and 14C-enriched SOC suggests that as much as 8 to 29% of hydrate-associated methane carbon may originate from SOC contained within the upper 6??m of sediment. These findings validate the assumption of a predominantly fossil carbon source for marine gas hydrate, but also indicate that structural gas hydrate from at least certain cold seeps contains a component of methane produced during decomposition of non-fossil organic matter in near-surface sediment.

  16. On the interpretation of the 14C fine structure observed in the 223Ra decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussonnois, M.; Le Du, J.F.; Brillard, L.

    1989-01-01

    The low hindrance factors observed in the 14 C decay of 223 Ra to the 209 Pb excited states at 779 and 1423 KeV are interpreted as a consequence of the similitude of the wave functions describing the uncoupled neutron in 223 Ra, Ω = 3/2 (3/2 [631] x3/2 [761], and in the two first excited states of 209 Pb, namely the 1i 11/2 and 1j 15/2 shell model orbits

  17. Genetic consequences of the 14C-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracheva, L.M.; Korolev, V.G.

    1978-03-01

    There are only few investigations on the biological and genetic consequences of 14 C decay especially due to the long half-life of 14 C. Naturally, the consequences of the decay of 14 C incorperated in DNA is of particular interest. Due to the thus occuring conversion into nitrogen, either opening of the ribose residue ring and base occurs or conversion into base analogue. The present work gives a survey on the investigational results on this topic which were obtained by various authors on phages, bacteria, algae and animal cells, as well as on molecular level. It was shown that the transmutation for the occurence of a lethal effect is many times more effective than β-radiation. Investigations of the mutagenic effects and other genetic effects of the 14 C decay were carried out on micro-organisms, however also on higher forms of life, plants, insects and mice. An analysis of the mutations showed that transitions as well as transversions occur. As example for genetic effects of 14 C decay, the two following are named. In the case of mice which were exposed to 14 CO 2 atmosphere, it was seen that the number of polyptoidal chromosome sets in the first spermotacytes increased considerably, an increase of the chromosome conversion rate was however not observed. When treating gryllus larvae with 14 C, it was interesting to note that the crossing of 14 C-contained females with normal males produced viable eggs, whereas normal females after crossing with 14 C contained males, laid no more eggs. (MG) 891 MG [de

  18. Revised age of deglaciation of Lake Emma based on new radiocarbon and macrofossil analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, S.A.; Carrara, P.E.; Toolin, L.J.; Jull, A.J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Previous radiocarbon ages of detrital moss fragments in basal organic sediments of Lake Emma indicated that extensive deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains occurred prior to 14,900 yr B.P. (Carrara et al., 1984). Paleoecological analyses of insect and plant macrofossils from these basal sediments cast doubt on the reliability of the radiocarbon ages. Subsequent accelerator radiocarbon dates of insect fossils and wood fragments indicate an early Holocene age, rather than a late Pleistocene age, for the basal sediments of Lake Emma. These new radiocarbon ages suggest that by at least 10,000 yr B.P. deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains was complete. The insect and plant macrofossils from the basal organic sediments indicate a higher-than-present treeline during the early Holocene. The insect assemblages consisted of about 30% bark beetles, which contrasts markedly with the composition of insects from modern lake sediments and modern specimens collected in the Lake Emma cirque, in which bark beetles comprise only about 3% of the assemblages. In addition, in the fossil assemblages there were a number of flightless insect species (not subject to upslope transport by wind) indicative of coniferous forest environments. These insects were likewise absent in the modern assemblage. ?? 1991.

  19. Effect of aldicarb on growth and radio-carbon (14C) and radio-phosphorus (32P) assimilation by Rhizobium japonicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, A.; Nilakantan, Gita

    1976-01-01

    In vitro studies on the effect of aldicarb (2-methyl-2-(methyl thio) propionaldehde-o-methyl carbamoyl oxime), a soil applied systemic insecticide, on Rhizobium japonicum revealed that the chemical (at 1,2 and 5 ppm levels) stimulated the growth of the organism initially upto 48 hr which declined thereafter upto 72 hr. The incorporation of 14 C-glucose by the cells considerably reduced due to the insecticide treatment. The production of extracellular, water-soluble slime (polysacchardes) was also reduced considerably with increased concentrations of the chemical. However, the incorporation of 14 C-radio-activity in the extracellular slime generally enhanced due to the treatment, upto 6 hr after injection of the radioactivity, which declined significantly later at 15 hr, indicating a qualitative difference in the extracellular polysaccharides produced by the insecticide treated cells. The insecticide treatment drastically reduced the incorporation of 32 P-disodium hydrogen phosphate into Rhizobium cells, but enhanced the specific activity of the extracellular polysacchrides. (author)

  20. Emission of {sup 14}C by the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant 1 and 2 and their local effects on the environmental levels; Emissao de {sup 14}C pelas unidades 1 e 2 da Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto (CNAAA) e seu efeito local nos niveis ambientais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Cintia Melazo

    2006-07-01

    radiocarbon through measurements of air samples taken with 3 km from power plants, in five different wind directions. The sampling system consisted of a pump connected to a trapping column filled with 3 M NaOH solution. The trapped CO{sub 2} was, then, precipitated as BaCO{sub 3} using a BaCl{sub 2} solution. For the measurements, the single stage accelerator mass spectrometry system (SSAMS) was used. This system belongs to the Radiocarbon Laboratory located in Geology Department of Lund University, in Sweden. The third paper is the investigation of {sup 14}C content in vegetation samples. Since food chain starts with plants, these measurements are useful to estimate radiation exposure to local population. Grass samples were taken up to five km from power plants, in seven different wind directions. The SSAMS was employed for the analyses. The last paper involves the study of soils taken just close to power plants (within 1 km) and at 50 km far from them, in a reference area. Not only {sup 14}C content was determined but analyzes of {delta}{sup 13}C, total C and {sup 137}Cs were also made. SSAMS was used for the {sup 14}C measurements. (author)

  1. Seasonal variations and sources of ambient fossil and biogenic-derived carbonaceous aerosols based on 14C measurements in Lhasa, Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Shen, Chengde; Cong, Zhiyuan; Liu, Kexin; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lichao

    2010-06-01

    A total of 30 samples of total suspended particles were collected at an urban site in Lhasa, Tibet from August 2006 to July 2007 for investigating carbonaceous aerosol features. The fractions of contemporary carbon ( fc) in total carbon (TC) of ambient aerosols are presented using radiocarbon ( 14C) measurements. The value of fc represents the biogenic contribution to TC, as the biosphere releases organic compounds with the present 14C/ 12C level ( fc = 1), whereas 14C has become extinct in anthropogenic emissions of fossil carbon ( fc = 0). The fc values in Lhasa ranging from 0.357 to 0.702, are higher than Beijing and Tokyo, but clearly lower than the rural region of Launceston, which indicates a major biogenic influence in Lhasa. Seasonal variations of fc values corresponded well with variations of pollutants concentrations (e.g. NO 2). Higher fc values appeared in winter indicating carbonaceous aerosol is more dominated by wood burning and incineration of agricultural wastes within this season. The lower fc values in summer and autumn may be caused by increased diesel and petroleum emissions related to tourism in Lhasa. δ13C values ranged from - 26.40‰ to - 25.10‰, with relative higher values in spring and summer, reflecting the increment of fossil carbon emissions.

  2. Convenient synthesis of [2-{sup 14}C]-methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), [{sup 14}C]-mitoguazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, A.; Ellames, G.J. [Sterling Winthrop Research Centre, Alnwick (United Kingdom). Pharmaceuticals Research Div.

    1995-01-01

    [2-{sup 14}C]-Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) dihydrochloride, [{sup 14}C]-mitoguazone has been prepared in three steps from potassium[1-{sup 14}C]-acetate in an overall radiochemical yield of 16%. The key steps in this procedure are the formation of the sodium salt of[acetone-2-{sup 14}C]-methylsulfinylacetone, and Pummerer rearrangement to the [{sup 14}C] labelled hermithioacetal, which is trapped with two equivalents of aminoguanidine to afford the desired [{sup 14}C]-mitoguazone. (Author).

  3. Synthesis of (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)olivetolic acid, methyl (1'-/sup 13/C)olivetolate and (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)cannabigerolic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porwoll, J.P.; Leete, E. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1985-03-01

    Potential advanced intermediates in the biosynthesis of delta/sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol, the major psychoactive principle of marijuana, have been synthesized labeled with two contiguous /sup 13/C atoms and /sup 14/C. Methyl (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)olivetolate was prepared from lithium (/sup 13/C/sub 2/)acetylide and dimethyl (2-/sup 14/C)malonate. Reaction with geranyl bromide afforded methyl (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)cannabigerolate, and hydrolysis of these methyl esters with lithium propyl mercaptide yielded the corresponding labeled acids. The /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C couplings observable in the /sup 13/C NMR spectra of these /sup 13/C-enriched compounds and their synthetic precursors are recorded. Methyl (1'-/sup 14/C)olivetolate was prepared from /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ to confirm assignments of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts in the pentyl side chain of these compounds.

  4. Studies on 129I and 14C in environmental samples by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki

    2010-01-01

    and 127 I in soil were also studied. In order to know the secular variation of 14 C concentrations in the atmosphere, we have determined 14 C/ 12 C ratios in a Yaku cedar (age: 1632 year-old) from Yaku-Island (Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan), where there are many old cedar trees. Selected annual tree ring samples during 560-800 A.D. were used. In this period, there is very little data about secular variation of radiocarbon contents measured for Japanese samples. In the analysis, we have developed an apparatus (glass vacuum line) for purifying carbon from samples of single rings to make graphite targets for AMS. Using a small sample size (about 0.03g of cellulose sample), we could measure 14 C/ 12 C ratios with reasonable precision and accuracy by AMS at MALT, University of Tokyo. Results obtained in this study agreed with a 14 C pattern reported by IntCal04. However, if we see details, our data showed a wide range and a short term trend of the variation. This is because resolution of our data (single tree ring measurement) is higher than those of IntCal04 in which tree rings of ten years were combined. Around 700 A.D., Δ 14 C maximum is observed. It is interesting to note that there was a cold period around this age, suggesting possible relationships between the solar activity and the climate. Our data should also be useful in Japanese calibration data for the dating of archaeological findings in the above mentioned period. (author)

  5. Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments from an urban reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanke, Hirohide; Uchida, Masao; Okuda, Tomoaki; Yoneda, Minoru; Takada, Hideshige; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Morita, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) derived from fossil fuel combustion ( 14 C-free) and biomass burning (contemporary 14 C) was carried out using a recently developed compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) method for a sediment core from an urban reservoir located in the central Tokyo metropolitan area, Japan. The 14 C abundance of PAHs in the sediments was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) after extraction and purification by three types of column chromatography, by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and, subsequently, by a preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) system. This method yielded a sufficient quantity of pure compounds and allowed a high degree of confidence in the determination of 14 C. The fraction modern values (f M ) of individual PAHs (phenanthrene, alkylphenanthrenes, fluoranthene, pyrene and benz[a]anthracene) in the sediments ranged from 0.06 to 0.21. These results suggest that sedimentary PAHs (those compounds mentioned above) were derived mostly from fossil fuel combustion. Three sectioned-downcore profiles (∼40 cm) of the 14 C abundance in phenanthrene and alkylphenanthrenes showed a decreasing trend with depth, that was anti-correlated with the trend of ΣPAHs concentration. The f M values of phenanthrene were also larger than those of alkylphenanthrenes in each section of the core. This result indicates that phenanthrene received a greater contribution from biomass burning than alkylphenanthrenes throughout the core. This finding highlights the method used here as an useful approach to elucidate the source and origin of PAHs in the environment

  6. Biomarker and carbon isotope constraints (δ13C, Δ14C) on sources and cycling of particulate organic matter discharged by large Siberian rivers draining permafrost areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterfeld, Maria

    2014-08-01

    consistent with inputs of OM from non-woody angiosperm sources mixed with organic matter derived from woody gymnosperm sources. A simple linear mixing model based on the lignin phenol distributions indicates organic matter in TSM samples from the delta and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contain comparable contributions from gymnosperm sources, which are primarily from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small area covered by tundra (∝12% of total catchment), the input of tundra-derived OM input is substantial and likely to increase in a warming Arctic. Radiocarbon compositions (Δ 14 C) of bulk OM in Lena River TSM samples varied from -55 to -391 permille, translating into 14 C ages of 395 to 3920 years BP. Using δ 13 C compositions to estimate the fraction of phytoplankton-derived OM and assuming that this material has a modern 14 C signature, we inferred the Δ 14 C compositions of terrigenous OM in TSM exported by the Lena River to range between -190 and -700 permille. Such variability in the ages of terrigenous OM (i.e. 1640 to 9720 14 C years BP) reflects the heterogeneous composition and residence time of OM in the Lena River catchment soils (Holocene to Pleistocene ages). Lignin phenol and Δ 14 C compositions of surface sediments from the adjacent Buor Khaya Bay suggest that terrestrial OM deposited there is older and more degraded than materials present in river particles and catchment soils. Stronger diagenetic alteration in Lena Delta TSM and marine sediments relative to soils may reflect degradation of more labile components during permafrost thawing and transport. Despite the high natural heterogeneity in catchment soils, the lignin biomarker compositions and radiocarbon ages of terrestrial OM exported by the Lena River reflect catchment characteristics such as vegetation and soil type. Climate warming related changes in the Lena River catchment may be detectable in changing lignin

  7. C14-Crash. The C14-method and dendrochronology, unveiling the illusion. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloess, C.; Niemitz, H.U.

    2000-01-01

    In this second edition of the book, which was published almost three years after the first edition, the authors reiterate and substantiate their doubts as to the basic theories underlying the radiocarbon dating method and the applicability of dendrochronology. (orig/CB) [de

  8. Characterization of a new protocol for mortar dating: 13C and 14C evidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzaioli, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the present knowledge about the analysis of mortars in the framework of artworks absolute chronology determination with the aim to formulate a new methodology capable of systematically and accurately estimating the age of these constructive and/or art materials. The core of the proposed methodology is represented by a physical procedure (ultrasonication) selecting only carbonaceous materials represented by carbonates formed after the absorption of atmospheric Co2 (carbonatation) by mortars (binder) during their setting. With the aim to evaluate the procedure efficiency in the isolation of binder signal from the most important source of carbonates, the proposed procedure was tested on a series of laboratory mortars produced, in a simplified version, in the laboratory environment. Mortar production was characterized by means of a series of measurements allowing to draw important indications about the applied procedure. The radiocarbon value of isolated binder carbonates was compared with the Co2 signal sampled form laboratory air during mortar setting. The observed results confirmed preliminarily the good protocol accuracy for radiocarbon dating suggesting its capability for the application to real study cases.

  9. Radial ooids from Great Salt Lake (Utah) as paleoenvironmental archives: Insights from radiocarbon chronology and stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, O. P.; Corsetti, F. A.; Bardsley, A.; Hammond, D. E.; Xu, X.; Walker, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Ooids (laminated, carbonate coated grains) are ubiquitous in the geologic record in marine and lacustrine settings, and thus remain a common target for geochemical analysis to understand modern and ancient aqueous environments. However, the processes governing ooid formation remain unclear. Recently, radiocarbon dating has revealed that modern marine ooids grow slowly (Beaupre et al. 2015), and laboratory experiments have highlighted the importance of sediment transport and abrasion on net growth rates and ooid size (Trower et al. 2017). Ooid cortex structure includes micritic, tangential and/or radially oriented fabrics. Most modern marine ooids have tangential or micritic cortices, whereas many ancient ooids have radial cortices—thus, there is a need to understand how radial ooids in ancient rocks might inform us about their depositional environment. The Great Salt Lake (GSL), Utah, provides a unique environment to assess the growth rate of primary radial aragonitic ooids. Ooids collected near Antelope Island in the south arm of GSL were sieved, the 355-500 µm fraction was sequentially leached, and 14C of the evolved gas was analyzed to provide a time series of growth. The oldest inorganic carbon of this size fraction has an apparent 14C age of 6600 yr BP, with subsequent growth spanning over 6,000 years. Closed-basin lakes are particularly susceptible to a "reservoir effect" which results in anomalously old apparent radiocarbon ages. The 14C age of the modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the south arm was measured to be 295 yr BP, a reservoir age comparable to estimates from lacustrine cave carbonates (McGee et al. 2012). Net growth rate of south arm ooids ranges between 0.01-0.025 µm per year. The δ13C of the outermost cortex suggests that the ooids resemble the modern DIC in the south arm water, suggesting ooids precipitate in equilibrium with lake water. Finer-scale structure in the δ13C of the ooid cortex through time suggests lake level changed

  10. Mass Spectrometric C-14 Detection Techniques: Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synal, H.

    2013-12-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has been established as the best-suited radiocarbon detection technique. In the past years, significant progress with AMS instrumentation has been made resulting in a boom of new AMS facilities around the World. Today, carbon only AMS systems predominantly utilize 1+ charge state and molecule destruction in multiple ion gas collisions in stripper gas cell. This has made possible a significant simplification of the instruments, a reduction of ion energies and related to this less required space of the installations. However, state-of-the-art AMS instruments have still not reached a development stage where they can be regarded as table-top systems. In this respect, more development is needed to further advance the applicability of radiocarbon not only in the traditional fields of dating but also in biomedical research and new fields in Earth and environmental sciences. In a the proof-of-principle experiment the feasibility of radiocarbon detection over the entire range of dating applications was demonstrated using a pure mass spectrometer and ion energies below 50 keV. Now an experimental platform has been completed to test performance and to explore operation and measurement conditions of pure mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection. This contribution will overview the physical principles, which make this development possible and discuss key parameters of the instrumental design and performance of such an instrument.

  11. Radiocarbon dating of archaeological geological and groundwater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinh, N.K.; Dung, H.H.; Quan, H.M.; Thuy, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    In the context of the project VIE/8/003 sponsored by the IAEA, a regular and complete C 1 4 laboratory was installed at the Centre of the Nuclear Techniques in 1986. In this paper the authors present the procedure of sample treatment and saple activity measurement of the radiocarbon method and some preliminary results obtained after more than one year of operation of the laboratory

  12. Synthesis of 11-14C-quetiapine, 11-14C-isoclotiapine and 10-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)pyrido[4,3-b][1,4]benzothiazepine[10-14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghi Saadatjoo; Mohsen Javaheri; Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran; Nader Saemian; Mohsen Amini

    2016-01-01

    Quetiapine is one of the most widely used antipsychotic drug which acts as an antagonist for multiple neurotransmitter receptor sites. 2-[2-(4-(Dibenzo[b,f][1,4]thiazepin-11-yl)piperazin-1-yl)ethoxy]ethanol (quetiapine) labeled with carbon-14 in 11-position has been synthesized as part of a 5-step sequence from anthranilic acid-[carboxy- 14 C]. We have presented a convenient synthetic pathway for labeling of quetiapine with carbon-14 by using one-pot procedures from a key thiazepin-11(10H)-one-[11- 14 C] by good radiochemical yield. And also isoclotiapine[11- 14 C], and 10-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)pyrido[4,3-b][1,4]benzothiazepine[10- 14 C], synthesized according to this route. (author)

  13. Uptake by the Atlantic Ocean of excess atmospheric carbon dioxide and radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolin, B.; Bjorkstrom, A.

    1989-01-01

    Inverse methods have been used to deduce water circulation, spatial patterns of turbulent exchange and biological activity in the Atlantic Ocean, by using a set of stationary tracers and a condition of quasi-geostrophic flow. The solution yields a direct meridional circulation cell with descending motion in the northern Atlantic with an intensity of 20-25 Sverdrup, a reasonable distribution of vertical turbulent transfer in the uppermost ocean layers and comparatively large rates of detritus formation, about 4.5 Pg