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Sample records for radiobiological optimized imrt

  1. Treatment plan comparison between helical tomotherapy and MLC-based IMRT using radiobiological measures

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    Mavroidis, Panayiotis [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Ferreira, Brigida Costa [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Shi, Chengyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Lind, Bengt K [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2007-07-07

    The rapid implementation of advanced treatment planning and delivery technologies for radiation therapy has brought new challenges in evaluating the most effective treatment modality. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using multi-leaf collimators (MLC) and helical tomotherapy (HT) are becoming popular modes of treatment delivery and their application and effectiveness continues to be investigated. Presently, there are several treatment planning systems (TPS) that can generate and optimize IMRT plans based on user-defined objective functions for the internal target volume (ITV) and organs at risk (OAR). However, the radiobiological parameters of the different tumours and normal tissues are typically not taken into account during dose prescription and optimization of a treatment plan or during plan evaluation. The suitability of a treatment plan is typically decided based on dosimetric criteria such as dose-volume histograms (DVH), maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviation of the dose distribution. For a more comprehensive treatment plan evaluation, the biologically effective uniform dose D-bar is applied together with the complication-free tumour control probability (P{sub +}). Its utilization is demonstrated using three clinical cases that were planned with two different forms of IMRT. In this study, three different cancer types at different anatomical sites were investigated: head and neck, lung and prostate cancers. For each cancer type, a linac MLC-based step-and-shoot IMRT plan and a HT plan were developed. The MLC-based IMRT treatment plans were developed on the Philips treatment-planning platform, using the Pinnacle 7.6 software release. For the tomotherapy HiArt plans, the dedicated tomotherapy treatment planning station was used, running version 2.1.2. By using D-bar as the common prescription point of the treatment plans and plotting the tissue response probabilities versus D-bar for a range of prescription doses, a number of plan trials can be

  2. Radiobiological evaluation of prostate cancer IMRT and conformal-RT plans using different treatment protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Komisopoulos, Georgios; Buckey, Courtney; Mavroeidi, Margarita; Swanson, Gregory P; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of both step-and-shoot IMRT and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy modalities (CRT) in treating prostate cancer using radiobiological measures. Another aim was to estimate the risks for developing secondary malignancies in bladder and rectum due to radiotherapy from the corresponding modalities. The treatment plans of ten prostate cancer patients were developed using IMRT and CRT. For the IMRT plans, two beam energies and two treatment protocols were used (the RTOG 0415 and a most restrictive one proposed by Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC)). For the evaluation of these plans, the complication-free tumor control probability, the total probability of injury, the total probability of control/benefit, and the biologically effective uniform dose were employed. Furthermore, based on the dosimetric data of IMRT and CRT, the risk for secondary malignancies was calculated for bladder and rectum. The average risk for secondary malignancy was lower for the bladder (0.37%) compared to the rectum (0.81%) based on all the treatment plans of the ten prostate cancer patients. The highest average risk for secondary malignancy for bladder and rectum was for the CRT-6X modality (0.46% and 1.12%, respectively) and the lowest was for the IMRT RTOG-18X modality (0.33% and 0.56%, respectively). The ≥ Grade 2 LENT/SOMA response probability was lower for the bladder than for the rectum in all the plans. For the bladder the highest average value was for the IMRT RTOG-18X (0.9%) and the lowest was for the CRT-18X modality (0.1%). For the rectum, the highest average value was for the IMRT RTOG-6X (11.9%) and the lowest was for the IMRT FCCC-18X modality (2.2%). By using radiobiological measures it is shown that the IMRT FCCC plans had the lowest risks for normal tissue complications, whereas the IMRT RTOG had the highest. Regarding the risk for secondary malignancies, the CRT plans showed the highest values for both bladder and

  3. (RadioBiological Optimization of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E. Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available “Biological optimization” (BIOP means planning treatments using (radiobiological criteria and models, that is, tumour control probability and normal-tissue complication probability. Four different levels of BIOP are identified: Level I is “isotoxic” individualization of prescription dose at fixed fraction number. is varied to keep the NTCP of the organ at risk constant. Significant improvements in local control are expected for non-small-cell lung tumours. Level II involves the determination of an individualized isotoxic combination of and fractionation scheme. This approach is appropriate for “parallel” OARs (lung, parotids. Examples are given using our BioSuite software. Hypofractionated SABR for early-stage NSCLC is effectively Level-II BIOP. Level-III BIOP uses radiobiological functions as part of the inverse planning of IMRT, for example, maximizing TCP whilst not exceeding a given NTCP. This results in non-uniform target doses. The NTCP model parameters (reflecting tissue “architecture” drive the optimizer to emphasize different regions of the DVH, for example, penalising high doses for quasi-serial OARs such as rectum. Level-IV BIOP adds functional imaging information, for example, hypoxia or clonogen location, to Level III; examples are given of our prostate “dose painting” protocol, BioProp. The limitations of and uncertainties inherent in the radiobiological models are emphasized.

  4. GPU-based ultrafast IMRT plan optimization

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    Men, Chunhua; Gu, Xuejun; Choi, Dongju; Majumdar, Amitava; Zheng, Ziyi; Mueller, Klaus; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    The widespread adoption of on-board volumetric imaging in cancer radiotherapy has stimulated research efforts to develop online adaptive radiotherapy techniques to handle the inter-fraction variation of the patient's geometry. Such efforts face major technical challenges to perform treatment planning in real time. To overcome this challenge, we are developing a supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). As part of the SCORE project, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization algorithm on graphics processing units (GPUs). We adopt a penalty-based quadratic optimization model, which is solved by using a gradient projection method with Armijo's line search rule. Our optimization algorithm has been implemented in CUDA for parallel GPU computing as well as in C for serial CPU computing for comparison purpose. A prostate IMRT case with various beamlet and voxel sizes was used to evaluate our implementation. On an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card, we have achieved speedup factors of 20-40 without losing accuracy, compared to the results from an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz CPU. For a specific nine-field prostate IMRT case with 5 × 5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5 × 2.5 × 2.5 mm3 voxel size, our GPU implementation takes only 2.8 s to generate an optimal IMRT plan. Our work has therefore solved a major problem in developing online re-planning technologies for adaptive radiotherapy.

  5. A Hierachical Evolutionary Algorithm for Multiobjective Optimization in IMRT

    CERN Document Server

    Holdsworth, Clay; Liao, Jay; Phillips, Mark H

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current inverse planning methods for IMRT are limited because they are not designed to explore the trade-offs between the competing objectives between the tumor and normal tissues. Our goal was to develop an efficient multiobjective optimization algorithm that was flexible enough to handle any form of objective function and that resulted in a set of Pareto optimal plans. Methods: We developed a hierarchical evolutionary multiobjective algorithm designed to quickly generate a diverse Pareto optimal set of IMRT plans that meet all clinical constraints and reflect the trade-offs in the plans. The top level of the hierarchical algorithm is a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA). The genes of the individuals generated in the MOEA are the parameters that define the penalty function minimized during an accelerated deterministic IMRT optimization that represents the bottom level of the hierarchy. The MOEA incorporates clinical criteria to restrict the search space through protocol objectives and then...

  6. GPU-based ultra fast IMRT plan optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Men, Chunhua; Choi, Dongju; Majumdar, Amitava; Zheng, Ziyi; Mueller, Klaus; Jiang, Steve B

    2009-01-01

    The widespread adoption of on-board volumetric imaging in cancer radiotherapy has stimulated research efforts to develop online adaptive radiotherapy techniques to handle the inter-fraction variation of the patient's geometry. Such efforts face major technical challenges to perform treatment planning in real-time. To overcome this challenge, we are developing a supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) at the University of California San Diego (UCSD). As part of the SCORE project, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization algorithm on graphics processing units (GPUs). We adopt a penalty-based quadratic optimization model, which is solved by using a gradient projection method with Armijo's line search rule. Our optimization algorithm has been implemented in CUDA for parallel GPU computing as well as in C for serial CPU computing for comparison purpose. A prostate IMRT case with various beamlet and voxel sizes was used to evalu...

  7. GPU-Monte Carlo based fast IMRT plan optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbao Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT plan optimization needs pre-calculated beamlet dose distribution. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of high computation speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions, particularly in cases with high levels of inhomogeneity, may mislead optimization, hindering the resulting plan quality. It is desire to use Monte Carlo (MC methods for beamlet dose calculations. Yet, the long computational time from repeated dose calculations for a number of beamlets prevents this application. It is our objective to integrate a GPU-based MC dose engine in lung IMRT optimization using a novel two-steps workflow.Methods: A GPU-based MC code gDPM is used. Each particle is tagged with an index of a beamlet where the source particle is from. Deposit dose are stored separately for beamlets based on the index. Due to limited GPU memory size, a pyramid space is allocated for each beamlet, and dose outside the space is neglected. A two-steps optimization workflow is proposed for fast MC-based optimization. At first step, a rough dose calculation is conducted with only a few number of particle per beamlet. Plan optimization is followed to get an approximated fluence map. In the second step, more accurate beamlet doses are calculated, where sampled number of particles for a beamlet is proportional to the intensity determined previously. A second-round optimization is conducted, yielding the final result.Results: For a lung case with 5317 beamlets, 105 particles per beamlet in the first round, and 108 particles per beam in the second round are enough to get a good plan quality. The total simulation time is 96.4 sec.Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel two-step optimization workflow are developed. The high efficiency allows the use of MC for IMRT optimizations.--------------------------------Cite this article as: Li Y, Tian Z

  8. Direct aperture optimization for IMRT using Monte Carlo generated beamlets.

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    Bergman, Alanah M; Bush, Karl; Milette, Marie-Pierre; Popescu, I Antoniu; Otto, Karl; Duzenli, Cheryl

    2006-10-01

    This work introduces an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo (MC) beamlet does distribution matrix into a direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm for IMRT inverse planning. The technique is referred to as Monte Carlo-direct aperture optimization (MC-DAO). The goal is to assess if the combination of accurate Monte Carlo tissue inhomogeneity modeling and DAO inverse planning will improve the dose accuracy and treatment efficiency for treatment planning. Several authors have shown that the presence of small fields and/or inhomogeneous materials in IMRT treatment fields can cause dose calculation errors for algorithms that are unable to accurately model electronic disequilibrium. This issue may also affect the IMRT optimization process because the dose calculation algorithm may not properly model difficult geometries such as targets close to low-density regions (lung, air etc.). A clinical linear accelerator head is simulated using BEAMnrc (NRC, Canada). A novel in-house algorithm subdivides the resulting phase space into 2.5 X 5.0 mm2 beamlets. Each beamlet is projected onto a patient-specific phantom. The beamlet dose contribution to each voxel in a structure-of-interest is calculated using DOSXYZnrc. The multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions are linked to the location of the beamlet does distributions. The MLC shapes are optimized using direct aperture optimization (DAO). A final Monte Carlo calculation with MLC modeling is used to compute the final dose distribution. Monte Carlo simulation can generate accurate beamlet dose distributions for traditionally difficult-to-calculate geometries, particularly for small fields crossing regions of tissue inhomogeneity. The introduction of DAO results in an additional improvement by increasing the treatment delivery efficiency. For the examples presented in this paper the reduction in the total number of monitor units to deliver is approximately 33% compared to fluence-based optimization methods.

  9. Investigating multi-objective fluence and beam orientation IMRT optimization

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    Potrebko, Peter S.; Fiege, Jason; Biagioli, Matthew; Poleszczuk, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Radiation Oncology treatment planning requires compromises to be made between clinical objectives that are invariably in conflict. It would be beneficial to have a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ perspective of the full spectrum of treatment plans that represent the possible trade-offs between delivering the intended dose to the planning target volume (PTV) while optimally sparing the organs-at-risk (OARs). In this work, the authors demonstrate Pareto-aware radiotherapy evolutionary treatment optimization (PARETO), a multi-objective tool featuring such bird’s-eye-view functionality, which optimizes fluence patterns and beam angles for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. The problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization is managed as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. To achieve this, PARETO is built around a powerful multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called Ferret, which simultaneously optimizes multiple fitness functions that encode the attributes of the desired dose distribution for the PTV and OARs. The graphical interfaces within PARETO provide useful information such as: the convergence behavior during optimization, trade-off plots between the competing objectives, and a graphical representation of the optimal solution database allowing for the rapid exploration of treatment plan quality through the evaluation of dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions. PARETO was evaluated for two relatively complex clinical cases, a paranasal sinus and a pancreas case. The end result of each PARETO run was a database of optimal (non-dominated) treatment plans that demonstrated trade-offs between the OAR and PTV fitness functions, which were all equally good in the Pareto-optimal sense (where no one objective can be improved without worsening at least one other). Ferret was able to produce high quality solutions even though a large number of parameters

  10. PARETO: A novel evolutionary optimization approach to multiobjective IMRT planning.

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    Fiege, Jason; McCurdy, Boyd; Potrebko, Peter; Champion, Heather; Cull, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    In radiation therapy treatment planning, the clinical objectives of uniform high dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and low dose to the organs-at-risk (OARs) are invariably in conflict, often requiring compromises to be made between them when selecting the best treatment plan for a particular patient. In this work, the authors introduce Pareto-Aware Radiotherapy Evolutionary Treatment Optimization (pareto), a multiobjective optimization tool to solve for beam angles and fluence patterns in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. pareto is built around a powerful multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA), which allows us to treat the problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. We have employed a simple parameterized beam fluence representation with a realistic dose calculation approach, incorporating patient scatter effects, to demonstrate feasibility of the proposed approach on two phantoms. The first phantom is a simple cylindrical phantom containing a target surrounded by three OARs, while the second phantom is more complex and represents a paraspinal patient. pareto results in a large database of Pareto nondominated solutions that represent the necessary trade-offs between objectives. The solution quality was examined for several PTV and OAR fitness functions. The combination of a conformity-based PTV fitness function and a dose-volume histogram (DVH) or equivalent uniform dose (EUD) -based fitness function for the OAR produced relatively uniform and conformal PTV doses, with well-spaced beams. A penalty function added to the fitness functions eliminates hotspots. Comparison of resulting DVHs to those from treatment plans developed with a single-objective fluence optimizer (from a commercial treatment planning system) showed good correlation. Results also indicated that pareto shows promise in optimizing the number

  11. First application of quantum annealing to IMRT beamlet intensity optimization

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    Nazareth, Daryl P.; Spaans, Jason D.

    2015-05-01

    Optimization methods are critical to radiation therapy. A new technology, quantum annealing (QA), employs novel hardware and software techniques to address various discrete optimization problems in many fields. We report on the first application of quantum annealing to the process of beamlet intensity optimization for IMRT. We apply recently-developed hardware which natively exploits quantum mechanical effects for improved optimization. The new algorithm, called QA, is most similar to simulated annealing, but relies on natural processes to directly minimize a system’s free energy. A simple quantum system is slowly evolved into a classical system representing the objective function. If the evolution is sufficiently slow, there are probabilistic guarantees that a global minimum will be located. To apply QA to IMRT-type optimization, two prostate cases were considered. A reduced number of beamlets were employed, due to the current QA hardware limitations. The beamlet dose matrices were computed using CERR and an objective function was defined based on typical clinical constraints, including dose-volume objectives, which result in a complex non-convex search space. The objective function was discretized and the QA method was compared to two standard optimization methods, simulated annealing and Tabu search, run on a conventional computing cluster. Based on several runs, the average final objective function value achieved by the QA was 16.9 for the first patient, compared with 10.0 for Tabu and 6.7 for the simulated annealing (SA) method. For the second patient, the values were 70.7 for the QA, 120.0 for Tabu and 22.9 for the SA. The QA algorithm required 27-38% of the time required by the other two methods. In this first application of hardware-enabled QA to IMRT optimization, its performance is comparable to Tabu search, but less effective than the SA in terms of final objective function values. However, its speed was 3-4 times faster than the other two methods

  12. Efficiency gains for Spinal Radiosurgery using Multi-criteria optimization IMRT guided VMAT planning

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    Chen, Huixiao; Winey, Brian A; Daartz, Juliane; Oh, Kevin S; Shin, John H; Gierga, David P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate plan quality and delivery efficiency gains of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) versus a Multi-Criteria Optimization based IMRT (MCO-IMRT) for stereotactic radiosurgery of spinal metastases. Methods and Materials MCO-IMRT plans (RayStation V2.5, RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden) of ten spinal radiosurgery cases using 7–9 beams were developed for clinical delivery, and patients were replanned using VMAT with partial arcs. The prescribed dose was 18 Gy, and target coverage was maximized such that the maximum dose to the planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) of the spinal cord was 10 or 12 Gy. DVH constraints from the clinically acceptable MCO-IMRT plans were utilized for VMAT optimization. Plan quality and delivery efficiency with and without collimator rotation for MCO-IMRT and VMAT were compared and analyzed based upon DVH, PTV coverage, homogeneity index, conformity number, cord PRV sparing, total MU and delivery time. Results VMAT plans were capable of matching most DVH constraints from the MCO-IMRT plans. The ranges of MUs were 4808–7193 for MCO-IMRT without collimator rotation, 3509–5907 for MCO-IMRT with collimator rotation, 4444–7309 for VMAT without collimator rotation and 3277–5643 for VMAT with collimator of 90 degrees. MU for the VMAT plans were similar to their corresponding MCO-IMRT plans, depending upon the complexity of the target and PRV geometries, but had a larger range. The delivery times of the MCO-IMRT and VMAT plans, both with collimator rotation, were 18.3 ± 2.5 minutes and 14.2 ± 2.0 minutes, respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusion MCO-IMRT and VMAT can create clinically acceptable plans for spinal radiosurgery. The MU for MCO-IMRT and VMAT can be reduced significantly by utilizing a collimator rotation following the orientation of the spinal cord. Plan quality for VMAT is similar to MCO-IMRT, with similar MU for both modalities. Delivery times can be reduced by nominally 25% with VMAT. PMID:25413420

  13. IMRT treatment planning for prostate cancer using prioritized prescription optimization and mean-tail-dose functions

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Treatment planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is challenging due to both the size of the computational problems (thousands of variables and constraints) and the multi-objective, imprecise nature of the goals. We apply hierarchical programming to IMRT treatment planning. In this formulation, treatment planning goals/objectives are ordered in an absolute hierarchy, and the problem is solved from the top-down such that more important goals are optimized in turn. After each ...

  14. Derivative-free generation and interpolation of convex Pareto optimal IMRT plans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, A.L.; Siem, A.Y.; Hertog, D. den; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Huizenga, H.

    2006-01-01

    In inverse treatment planning for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), beamlet intensity levels in fluence maps of high-energy photon beams are optimized. Treatment plan evaluation criteria are used as objective functions to steer the optimization process. Fluence map optimization can be co

  15. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yimei, E-mail: yhuang2@hfhs.org; Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 W Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  16. Algorithm and performance of a clinical IMRT beam-angle optimization system.

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    Djajaputra, David; Wu, Qiuwen; Wu, Yan; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-10-07

    This paper describes the algorithm and examines the performance of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beam-angle optimization (BAO) system. In this algorithm successive sets of beam angles are selected from a set of predefined directions using a fast simulated annealing (FSA) algorithm. An IMRT beam-profile optimization is performed on each generated set of beams. The IMRT optimization is accelerated by using a fast dose calculation method that utilizes a precomputed dose kernel. A compact kernel is constructed for each of the predefined beams prior to starting the FSA algorithm. The IMRT optimizations during the BAO are then performed using these kernels in a fast dose calculation engine. This technique allows the IMRT optimization to be performed more than two orders of magnitude faster than a similar optimization that uses a convolution dose calculation engine. Any type of optimization criterion present in the IMRT system can be used in this BAO system. An objective function based on clinically-relevant dose-volume (DV) criteria is used in this study. This facilitates the comparison between a BAO plan and the corresponding plan produced by a planner since the latter is usually optimized using a DV-based objective function. A simple prostate case and a complex head-and-neck (HN) case were used to evaluate the usefulness and performance of this BAO method. For the prostate case we compared the BAO results for three, five and seven coplanar beams with those of the same number of equispaced coplanar beams. For the HN case we compare the BAO results for seven and nine non-coplanar beams with that for nine equispaced coplanar beams. In each case the BAO algorithm was allowed to search up to 1000 different sets of beams. The BAO for the prostate cases were finished in about 1-2 h on a moderate 400 MHz workstation while that for the head-and-neck cases were completed in 13-17 h on a 750 MHz machine. No a priori beam-selection criteria have been used in

  17. Optimization in brachytherapy with the implementation of Radiobiology; Optimizacion en Braquiterapia con la implementacion de la Radiobiologia

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    Duran, M.P.; Bourel, V.J.; Rodriguez, I.; Torre, M. de la; Caneva, S. [Braqui S.R.L. Viamonte 1861, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1998-12-31

    In the brachytherapy planning treatments with High dose rates (HDR), the optimization algorithms used are based in dosimetric considerations and/or geometric ones, ignoring the radiobiological response of the tissue treated. In this work we wish to show the implementation of radiobiological concepts in the optimization. Assuming that the subtiles differences that result in the dose distribution among the different optimization models which are not visible in an isodose plane, it is studied how is classically make it , the quality implant through natural histograms about dose volumes and the resulting parameters. Also is studied the necrosis probability which may be caused by the choice of some optimization model, allowing with this the choice of the best implant. (Author)

  18. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of Forward Tangent Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (FT-IMRT) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for early stage whole breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri Sedeh, Nader

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a well-known type of external beam radiation therapy. The advancement in technology has had an inevitable influence in radiation oncology as well that has led to a newer and faster dose delivery technique called Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). Since the presence of the VMAT modality in clinics in the late 2000, there have been many studies in order to compare the results of the VMAT modality with the current popular modality IMRT for various tumor sites in the body such as brain, prostate, head and neck, cervix and anal carcinoma. This is the first study to compare VMAT with IMRT for breast cancer. The results show that the RapidArc technique in Eclipse version 11 does not improve all aspects of the treatment plans for the breast cases automatically and easily, but it needs to be manipulated by extra techniques to create acceptable plans thus further research is needed.

  19. Improving IMRT-plan quality with MLC leaf position refinement post plan optimization.

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    Niu, Ying; Zhang, Guowei; Berman, Barry L; Parke, William C; Yi, Byongyong; Yu, Cedric X

    2012-08-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning, reducing the pencil-beam size may lead to a significant improvement in dose conformity, but also increase the time needed for the dose calculation and plan optimization. The authors develop and evaluate a postoptimization refinement (POpR) method, which makes fine adjustments to the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions after plan optimization, enhancing the spatial precision and improving the plan quality without a significant impact on the computational burden. The authors' POpR method is implemented using a commercial treatment planning system based on direct aperture optimization. After an IMRT plan is optimized using pencil beams with regular pencil-beam step size, a greedy search is conducted by looping through all of the involved MLC leaves to see if moving the MLC leaf in or out by half of a pencil-beam step size will improve the objective function value. The half-sized pencil beams, which are used for updating dose distribution in the greedy search, are derived from the existing full-sized pencil beams without need for further pencil-beam dose calculations. A benchmark phantom case and a head-and-neck (HN) case are studied for testing the authors' POpR method. Using a benchmark phantom and a HN case, the authors have verified that their POpR method can be an efficient technique in the IMRT planning process. Effectiveness of POpR is confirmed by noting significant improvements in objective function values. Dosimetric benefits of POpR are comparable to those of using a finer pencil-beam size from the optimization start, but with far less computation and time. The POpR is a feasible and practical method to significantly improve IMRT-plan quality without compromising the planning efficiency.

  20. On-line re-optimization of prostate IMRT plans for adaptive radiation therapy.

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    Wu, Q Jackie; Thongphiew, Danthai; Wang, Zhiheng; Mathayomchan, Boonyanit; Chankong, Vira; Yoo, Sua; Lee, W Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-02-01

    For intermediate and high risk prostate cancer, both the prostate gland and seminal vesicles are included in the clinical target volume. Internal motion patterns of these two organs vary, presenting a challenge for adaptive treatment. Adaptive techniques such as isocenter repositioning and soft tissue alignment are effective when tumor volumes only exhibit translational shift, while direct re-optimization of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan maybe more desirable when extreme deformation or differential positioning changes of the organs occur. Currently, direct re-optimization of the IMRT plan using beamlet (or fluence map) has not been reported. In this study, we report a novel on-line re-optimization technique that can accomplish plan adjustment on-line. Deformable image registration is used to provide position variation information on each voxel along the three dimensions. The original planned dose distribution is used as the 'goal' dose distribution for adaptation and to ensure planning quality. Fluence maps are re-optimized via linear programming, and a plan solution can be achieved within 2 min. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated with a clinical case with large deformation. Such on-line ART process can be highly valuable with hypo-fractionated prostate IMRT treatment.

  1. On-line re-optimization of prostate IMRT plans for adaptive radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q Jackie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Thongphiew, Danthai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Wang, Zhiheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Mathayomchan, Boonyanit [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH (United States); Chankong, Vira [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH (United States); Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Lee, W Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States)

    2008-02-07

    For intermediate and high risk prostate cancer, both the prostate gland and seminal vesicles are included in the clinical target volume. Internal motion patterns of these two organs vary, presenting a challenge for adaptive treatment. Adaptive techniques such as isocenter repositioning and soft tissue alignment are effective when tumor volumes only exhibit translational shift, while direct re-optimization of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan maybe more desirable when extreme deformation or differential positioning changes of the organs occur. Currently, direct re-optimization of the IMRT plan using beamlet (or fluence map) has not been reported. In this study, we report a novel on-line re-optimization technique that can accomplish plan adjustment on-line. Deformable image registration is used to provide position variation information on each voxel along the three dimensions. The original planned dose distribution is used as the 'goal' dose distribution for adaptation and to ensure planning quality. Fluence maps are re-optimized via linear programming, and a plan solution can be achieved within 2 min. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated with a clinical case with large deformation. Such on-line ART process can be highly valuable with hypo-fractionated prostate IMRT treatment.

  2. On-line re-optimization of prostate IMRT plans for adaptive radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Thongphiew, Danthai; Wang, Zhiheng; Mathayomchan, Boonyanit; Chankong, Vira; Yoo, Sua; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-02-01

    For intermediate and high risk prostate cancer, both the prostate gland and seminal vesicles are included in the clinical target volume. Internal motion patterns of these two organs vary, presenting a challenge for adaptive treatment. Adaptive techniques such as isocenter repositioning and soft tissue alignment are effective when tumor volumes only exhibit translational shift, while direct re-optimization of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan maybe more desirable when extreme deformation or differential positioning changes of the organs occur. Currently, direct re-optimization of the IMRT plan using beamlet (or fluence map) has not been reported. In this study, we report a novel on-line re-optimization technique that can accomplish plan adjustment on-line. Deformable image registration is used to provide position variation information on each voxel along the three dimensions. The original planned dose distribution is used as the 'goal' dose distribution for adaptation and to ensure planning quality. Fluence maps are re-optimized via linear programming, and a plan solution can be achieved within 2 min. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated with a clinical case with large deformation. Such on-line ART process can be highly valuable with hypo-fractionated prostate IMRT treatment. Abstract and preliminary data presented at 49th AAPM Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN, USA, July 2007.

  3. Radiobiological evaluation of the influence of dwell time modulation restriction in HIPO optimized HDR prostate brachytherapy implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimos Baltas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: One of the issues that a planner is often facing in HDR brachytherapy is the selective existence of high dose volumes around some few dominating dwell positions. If there is no information available about its necessity (e.g. location of a GTV, then it is reasonable to investigate whether this can be avoided. This effect can be eliminated by limiting the free modulation of the dwell times. HIPO, an inverse treatment plan optimization algorithm, offers this option.In treatment plan optimization there are various methods that try to regularize the variation of dose non-uniformity using purely dosimetric measures. However, although these methods can help in finding a good dose distribution they do not provide any information regarding the expected treatment outcome as described by radiobiology based indices.Material and methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO and modulation restriction (MR has been compared to alternative plans with HIPO and free modulation (without MR.All common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk have been considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by calculating the response probabilities of the tumors and organs-at-risk (OARs involved in these prostate cancer cases. The radiobiological models used are the Poisson and the relative seriality models. Furthermore, the complication-free tumor control probability, P+ and the biologically effective uniform dose (D = were used for treatment plan evaluation and comparison.Results: Our results demonstrate that HIPO with a modulation restriction value of 0.1-0.2 delivers high quality plans which are practically equivalent to those achieved with free modulation regarding the clinically used dosimetric indices.In the comparison, many of the dosimetric and radiobiological indices showed significantly different results. The

  4. Dosimetric comparison between 3DCRT and IMRT using different multileaf collimators in the treatment of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meisong; Newman, Francis; Chen, Changhu; Stuhr, Kelly; Gaspar, Laurie E

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the differences between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the impact of collimator leaf-width on IMRT plans for the treatment of nonspherical brain tumors. Eight patients treated by 3DCRT with Novalis were selected. We developed 3 IMRT plans with different multileaf collimators (Novalis m3, Varian MLC-120, and Varian MLC-80) with the same treatment margins, number of beams, and gantry positions as in the 3DCRT treatment plans. Treatment planning utilized the BrainLAB treatment planning system. For each patient, the dose constraints and optimization parameters remained identical for all plans. The heterogeneity index, the percentage target coverage, critical structures, and normal tissue volumes receiving 50% of the prescription dose were calculated to compare the dosimetric difference. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were also introduced to evaluate the radiobiological effect for different plans. We found that IMRT significantly improved the target dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT. However, IMRT showed the same radiobiological effect as 3DCRT. For the brain tumors adjacent to (or partially overlapping with) critical structures, IMRT dramatically spared the volume of the critical structures to be irradiated. In IMRT plans, the smaller collimator leaf width could reduce the volume of critical structures irradiated to the 50% level for those partially overlapping with the brain tumors. For relatively large and spherical brain tumors, the smaller collimator leaf widths give no significant benefit.

  5. Maximizing dosimetric benefits of IMRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer through multicriteria optimization planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Craft, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Paly, Jon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason, E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We examine the quality of plans created using multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Nine random cases of patients receiving IMRT to the prostate were selected. Each case was associated with a clinically approved plan created using Corvus. The cases were replanned using MCO-based planning in RayStation. Dose-volume histogram data from both planning systems were presented to 2 radiation oncologists in a blinded evaluation, and were compared at a number of dose-volume points. Both physicians rated all 9 MCO plans as superior to the clinically approved plans (p<10{sup −5}). Target coverage was equivalent (p = 0.81). Maximum doses to the prostate and bladder and the V50 and V70 to the anterior rectum were reduced in all MCO plans (p<0.05). Treatment planning time with MCO took approximately 60 minutes per case. MCO-based planning for prostate IMRT is efficient and produces high-quality plans with good target homogeneity and sparing of the anterior rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, without sacrificing target coverage.

  6. Impact of dose calculation accuracy during optimization on lung IMRT plan quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Rodrigues, Anna; Li, Taoran; Yuan, Lulin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q Jackie

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dose calculation accuracy and the use of an intermediate dose calculation step during the optimization of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning on the final plan quality for lung cancer patients. This study included replanning for 11 randomly selected free-breathing lung IMRT plans. The original plans were optimized using a fast pencil beam convolution algorithm. After optimization, the final dose calculation was performed using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA). The Varian Treatment Planning System (TPS) Eclipse v11, includes an option to perform intermediate dose calculation during optimization using the AAA. The new plans were created using this intermediate dose calculation during optimization with the same planning objectives and dose constraints as in the original plan. Differences in dosimetric parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage, organs-at-risk (OARs) dose sparing, and the number of monitor units (MU) between the original and new plans were analyzed. Statistical significance was determined with a p-value of less than 0.05. All plans were normalized to cover 95% of the PTV with the prescription dose. Compared with the original plans, the PTV in the new plans had on average a lower maximum dose (69.45 vs. 71.96Gy, p = 0.005), a better homogeneity index (HI) (0.08 vs. 0.12, p = 0.002), and a better conformity index (CI) (0.69 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). In the new plans, lung sparing was increased as the volumes receiving 5, 10, and 30 Gy were reduced when compared to the original plans (40.39% vs. 42.73%, p = 0.005; 28.93% vs. 30.40%, p = 0.001; 14.11%vs. 14.84%, p = 0.031). The volume receiving 20 Gy was not significantly lower (19.60% vs. 20.38%, p = 0.052). Further, the mean dose to the lung was reduced in the new plans (11.55 vs. 12.12 Gy, p = 0.024). For the esophagus, the mean dose, the maximum dose, and the volumes receiving 20 and 60 Gy were lower in

  7. Derivative-free generation and interpolation of convex Pareto optimal IMRT plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; Siem, Alex Y D; den Hertog, Dick; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Huizenga, Henk

    2006-12-21

    In inverse treatment planning for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), beamlet intensity levels in fluence maps of high-energy photon beams are optimized. Treatment plan evaluation criteria are used as objective functions to steer the optimization process. Fluence map optimization can be considered a multi-objective optimization problem, for which a set of Pareto optimal solutions exists: the Pareto efficient frontier (PEF). In this paper, a constrained optimization method is pursued to iteratively estimate the PEF up to some predefined error. We use the property that the PEF is convex for a convex optimization problem to construct piecewise-linear upper and lower bounds to approximate the PEF from a small initial set of Pareto optimal plans. A derivative-free Sandwich algorithm is presented in which these bounds are used with three strategies to determine the location of the next Pareto optimal solution such that the uncertainty in the estimated PEF is maximally reduced. We show that an intelligent initial solution for a new Pareto optimal plan can be obtained by interpolation of fluence maps from neighbouring Pareto optimal plans. The method has been applied to a simplified clinical test case using two convex objective functions to map the trade-off between tumour dose heterogeneity and critical organ sparing. All three strategies produce representative estimates of the PEF. The new algorithm is particularly suitable for dynamic generation of Pareto optimal plans in interactive treatment planning.

  8. [Impact of optimization algorithms on the intensity map in IMRT treatment planning.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Mari; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Teshima, Teruki; Narita, Yuichiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    In inverse planning of IMRT, optimum intensity maps are generated using an optimization algorithm. In this paper, impacts of two different optimization algorithms on the intensity map in IMRT treatment planning were evaluated. These were from the steepest descent (SD) and simulated annealing (SA) methods. The following five patterns were compared: [1] SD with calculation time of 5 min; [2] SD with the terminal criterion based on cost function; [3] SA with calculation time of 5 min; [4] SA with the terminal criterion; and [5] SA with the terminal criterion using a smoothing filter. Differences of D(95%) for the planning target volume, V(70Gy) for the rectum wall and the bladder wall were up to 0.5, 1.8 and 3.2 %, respectively in all patterns. The dosimetric impact was negligible. In contrast, generated intensity maps were sensitive to the algorithms. Intensity maps generated by SA tended to have much fluctuation due to numerical artifacts compared to those generated by SD. The difference in the profile was over 7 % between the algorithms. The smoothing filter decreased the fluctuation in intensity maps of SA. In conclusion, it is important to understand impacts of optimization algorithms on the intensity map and the dose distribution.

  9. 3D conformal planning using low segment multi-criteria IMRT optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Fazal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate automated multicriteria optimization (MCO)-- designed for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), but invoked with limited segmentation -- to efficiently produce high quality 3D conformal treatment (3D-CRT) plans. Methods: Ten patients previously planned with 3D-CRT were replanned with a low-segment inverse multicriteria optimized technique. The MCO-3D plans used the same number of beams, beam geometry and machine parameters of the corresponding 3D plans, but were limited to an energy of 6 MV. The MCO-3D plans were optimized using a fluence-based MCO IMRT algorithm and then, after MCO navigation, segmented with a low number of segments. The 3D and MCO-3D plans were compared by evaluating mean doses to individual organs at risk (OARs), mean doses to combined OARs, homogeneity indexes (HI), monitor units (MUs), physician preference, and qualitative assessments of planning time and plan customizability. Results: The MCO-3D plans significantly reduced the OAR mean doses and monitor unit...

  10. SU-E-T-21: A Novel Sampling Algorithm to Reduce Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Optimization Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, P; Xie, Y; Chen, Y [Washington University in Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The IMRT optimization problem requires substantial computer time to find optimal dose distributions because of the large number of variables and constraints. Voxel sampling reduces the number of constraints and accelerates the optimization process, but usually deteriorates the quality of the dose distributions to the organs. We propose a novel sampling algorithm that accelerates the IMRT optimization process without significantly deteriorating the quality of the dose distribution. Methods: We included all boundary voxels, as well as a sampled fraction of interior voxels of organs in the optimization. We selected a fraction of interior voxels using a clustering algorithm, that creates clusters of voxels that have similar influence matrix signatures. A few voxels are selected from each cluster based on the pre-set sampling rate. Results: We ran sampling and no-sampling IMRT plans for de-identified head and neck treatment plans. Testing with the different sampling rates, we found that including 10% of inner voxels produced the good dose distributions. For this optimal sampling rate, the algorithm accelerated IMRT optimization by a factor of 2–3 times with a negligible loss of accuracy that was, on average, 0.3% for common dosimetric planning criteria. Conclusion: We demonstrated that a sampling could be developed that reduces optimization time by more than a factor of 2, without significantly degrading the dose quality.

  11. The fixed-point iteration method for IMRT optimization with truncated dose deposition coefficient matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix is often pre-computed to parameterize the dose contribution to each voxel in the volume of interest from each beamlet of unit intensity. However, due to the limitation of computer memory and the requirement on computational efficiency, in practice matrix elements of small values are usually truncated, which inevitably compromises the quality of the resulting plan. A fixed-point iteration scheme has been applied in IMRT optimization to solve this problem, which has been reported to be effective and efficient based on the observations of the numerical experiments. In this paper, we aim to point out the mathematics behind this scheme and to answer the following three questions: 1) whether the fixed-point iteration algorithm converges or not? 2) when it converges, whether the fixed point solution is same as the original solution obtained with the complete DDC matrix? 3) if not the same, wh...

  12. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  13. Virtual couch shift (VCS): accounting for patient translation and rotation by online IMRT re-optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, G H; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-05-07

    When delivering conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), discrepancies between the pre-treatment CT/MRI/PET based patient geometry and the daily patient geometry are minimized by performing couch translations and/or small rotations. However, full compensation of, in particular, rotations is usually not possible. In this paper, we introduce an online 'virtual couch shift (VCS)': we translate and/or rotate the pre-treatment dose distribution to compensate for the changes in patient anatomy and generate a new plan which delivers the transformed dose distribution automatically. We show for a phantom and a cervical cancer patient case that VCS accounts for both translations and large rotations equally well in terms of DVH results and 2%/2 mm γ analyses and when the various aspects of the clinical workflow can be implemented successfully, VCS can potentially outperform physical couch translations and/or rotations. This work is performed in the context of our hybrid 1.5 T MRI linear accelerator, which can provide translations and rotations but also deformations of the anatomy. The VCS is the first step toward compensating all of these anatomical changes by online re-optimization of the IMRT dose distribution.

  14. IMRT of prostate cancer. A comparison of fluence optimization with sequential segmentation and direct step-and-shoot optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treutwein, Marius; Hipp, Matthias; Koelbl, Oliver; Bogner, Ludwig [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg Univ. Medical Center (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background and purpose: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has shown its superiority to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Different optimization algorithms are available: algorithms which first optimize the fluence followed by a sequencing (IM), and algorithms which involve the machine parameters directly in the optimization process (DSS). The aim of this treatment-planning study is to compare both of them regarding dose distribution and treatment time. Patients and methods: ten consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled for the planning study. The planning target volume and the rectum volume, urinary bladder and femoral heads as organs at risk were delineated. Average doses, the target dose homogeneity H, D{sub 5}, D{sub 95}, monitor units per fraction, and the number of segments were evaluated. Results: while there is only a small difference in the mean doses at rectum and bladder, there is a significant advantage for the target dose homogeneity in the DSS-optimized plans compared to the IM-optimized ones. Differences in the monitor units (nearly 10% less for DSS) and the number of segments are also statistically significant and reduce the treatment time. Conclusion: particularly with regard to the tumor control probability, the better homogeneity of the DSS-optimized plans is more profitable. The shorter treatment time is an improvement regarding intrafractional organ motion. The DSS optimizer results in a higher target dose homogeneity and, simultaneously, in a lower number of monitor units. Therefore, it should be preferred for IMRT of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  15. TH-A-9A-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - 4D IMRT Planning Using Highly- Parallelizable Particle Swarm Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modiri, A; Gu, X; Sawant, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We present a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based 4D IMRT planning technique designed for dynamic MLC tracking delivery to lung tumors. The key idea is to utilize the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom rather than a constraint in order to achieve improved sparing of organs at risk (OARs). Methods: The target and normal structures were manually contoured on each of the ten phases of a 4DCT scan acquired from a lung SBRT patient who exhibited 1.5cm tumor motion despite the use of abdominal compression. Corresponding ten IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. These plans served as initial guess solutions for the PSO algorithm. Fluence weights were optimized over the entire solution space i.e., 10 phases × 12 beams × 166 control points. The size of the solution space motivated our choice of PSO, which is a highly parallelizable stochastic global optimization technique that is well-suited for such large problems. A summed fluence map was created using an in-house B-spline deformable image registration. Each plan was compared with a corresponding, internal target volume (ITV)-based IMRT plan. Results: The PSO 4D IMRT plan yielded comparable PTV coverage and significantly higher dose—sparing for parallel and serial OARs compared to the ITV-based plan. The dose-sparing achieved via PSO-4DIMRT was: lung Dmean = 28%; lung V20 = 90%; spinal cord Dmax = 23%; esophagus Dmax = 31%; heart Dmax = 51%; heart Dmean = 64%. Conclusion: Truly 4D IMRT that uses the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom can achieve significant dose sparing of serial and parallel OARs. Given the large solution space, PSO represents an attractive, parallelizable tool to achieve globally optimal solutions for such problems. This work was supported through funding from the National Institutes of Health and Varian Medical Systems. Amit Sawant has research funding from Varian Medical Systems, VisionRT Ltd. and Elekta.

  16. Comparison of treatment plans: a retrospective study by the method of radiobiological evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzhakkal, Niyas; Kallikuzhiyil Kochunny, Abdullah; Manthala Padannayil, Noufal; Singh, Navin; Elavan Chalil, Jumanath; Kulangarakath Umer, Jamshad

    2016-09-01

    There are many situations in radiotherapy where multiple treatment plans need to be compared for selection of an optimal plan. In this study we performed the radiobiological method of plan evaluation to verify the treatment plan comparison procedure of our clinical practice. We estimated and correlated various radiobiological dose indices with physical dose metrics for a total of 30 patients representing typical cases of head and neck, prostate and brain tumors. Three sets of plans along with a clinically approved plan (final plan) treated by either Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or Rapid Arc (RA) techniques were considered. The study yielded improved target coverage for final plans, however, no appreciable differences in doses and the complication probabilities of organs at risk were noticed. Even though all four plans showed adequate dose distributions, from dosimetric point of view, the final plan had more acceptable dose distribution. The estimated biological outcome and dose volume histogram data showed least differences between plans for IMRT when compared to RA. Our retrospective study based on 120 plans, validated the radiobiological method of plan evaluation. The tumor cure or normal tissue complication probabilities were found to be correlated with the corresponding physical dose indices.

  17. Role of the parameters involved in the plan optimization based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose and radiobiological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widesott, L.; Strigari, L.; Pressello, M. C.; Benassi, M.; Landoni, V.

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the role and the weight of the parameters involved in the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) method, for prostate and head-and-neck plans. We systematically varied the parameters (gEUDmax and weight) involved in the gEUD-based optimization of rectal wall and parotid glands. We found that the proper value of weight factor, still guaranteeing planning treatment volumes coverage, produced similar organs at risks dose-volume (DV) histograms for different gEUDmax with fixed a = 1. Most of all, we formulated a simple relation that links the reference gEUDmax and the associated weight factor. As secondary objective, we evaluated plans obtained with the gEUD-based optimization and ones based on DV criteria, using the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. gEUD criteria seemed to improve sparing of rectum and parotid glands with respect to DV-based optimization: the mean dose, the V40 and V50 values to the rectal wall were decreased of about 10%, the mean dose to parotids decreased of about 20-30%. But more than the OARs sparing, we underlined the halving of the OARs optimization time with the implementation of the gEUD-based cost function. Using NTCP models we enhanced differences between the two optimization criteria for parotid glands, but no for rectum wall.

  18. SU-E-T-617: A Feasibility Study of Navigation Based Multi Criteria Optimization for Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study aims to validate multi-criteria optimization (MCO) against standard intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization for advanced cervical cancer in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden). Methods: 10 advanced cervical cancer patients IMRT plans were randomly selected, these plans were designed with step and shoot optimization, new plans were then designed with MCO based on these plans,while keeping optimization conditions unchanged,comparison was made between both kinds of plans including the dose volume histogram parameters of PTV and OAR,and were analysed by pairing-t test. Results: We normalize the plan so that 95% volume of PTV achieved the prescribed dose(50Gy). The volume of radiation 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy of the rectum were reduced by 14.7%,26.8%,21.1%,10.5% respectively(P≥0.05). The mean dose of rectum were reduced by 7.2Gy(P≤0.05). There were no significant differences for the dosimetric parameters for the bladder. Conclusion: In comparision with standard IMRT optimization, MCO reduces the dose of organs at risk with the same PTV coverage,but the result needs further clinical evalution.

  19. SU-E-T-593: Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization in Head/Neck and Prostate IMRT Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosini, M [King Saud University Hospitals, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); GALAL, M [Hermitage Medical Clinic, Dublin (Ireland); Emam, I [Ain Shams University, Cairo (France); Kamal, G; Algohary, M [Al Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the planning and dosimetric advantages of direct aperture optimization (DAO) over beam-let optimization in IMRT treatment of head and neck (H/N) and prostate cancers. Methods: Five Head and Neck as well as five prostate patients were planned using the beamlet optimizer in Elekta-Xio ver 4.6 IMRT treatment planning system. Based on our experience in beamlet IMRT optimization, PTVs in H/N plans were prescribed to 70 Gy delivered by 7 fields. While prostate PTVs were prescribed to 76 Gy with 9 fields. In all plans, fields were set to be equally spaced. All cases were re-planed using Direct Aperture optimizer in Prowess Panther ver 5.01 IMRT planning system at same configurations and dose constraints. Plans were evaluated according to ICRU criteria, number of segments, number of monitor units and planning time. Results: For H/N plans, the near maximum dose (D2) and the dose that covers 95% D95 of PTV has improved by 4% in DAO. For organs at risk (OAR), DAO reduced the volume covered by 30% (V30) in spinal cord, right parotid, and left parotid by 60%, 54%, and 53% respectively. This considerable dosimetric quality improvement achieved using 25% less planning time and lower number of segments and monitor units by 46% and 51% respectively. In DAO prostate plans, Both D2 and D95 for the PTV were improved by only 2%. The V30 of the right femur, left femur and bladder were improved by 35%, 15% and 3% respectively. On the contrary, the rectum V30 got even worse by 9%. However, number of monitor units, and number of segments decreased by 20% and 25% respectively. Moreover the planning time reduced significantly too. Conclusion: DAO introduces considerable advantages over the beamlet optimization in regards to organs at risk sparing. However, no significant improvement occurred in most studied PTVs.

  20. Radiobiology of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: what are the optimal fractionation schedules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Miyakawa, Akifumi; Otsuka, Shinya; Iwata, Hiromitsu

    2016-01-01

    In hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), high doses per fraction are usually used and the dose delivery pattern is different from that of conventional radiation. The daily dose is usually given intermittently over a longer time compared with conventional radiotherapy. During prolonged radiation delivery, sublethal damage repair takes place, leading to the decreased effect of radiation. In in vivo tumors, however, this decrease in effect may be counterbalanced by rapid reoxygenation. Another issue related to hypofractionated SRT is the mathematical model for dose evaluation and conversion. The linear–quadratic (LQ) model and biologically effective dose (BED) have been suggested to be incorrect when used for hypofractionation. The LQ model overestimates the effect of high fractional doses of radiation. BED is particularly incorrect when used for tumor responses in vivo, since it does not take reoxygenation into account. Correction of the errors, estimated at 5–20%, associated with the use of BED is necessary when it is used for SRT. High fractional doses have been reported to exhibit effects against tumor vasculature and enhance host immunity, leading to increased antitumor effects. This may be an interesting topic that should be further investigated. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is more problematic in hypofractionated SRT, so trials of hypoxia-targeted agents are encouraged in the future. In this review, the radiobiological characteristics of hypofractionated SRT are summarized, and based on the considerations, we would like to recommend 60 Gy in eight fractions delivered three times a week for lung tumors larger than 2 cm in diameter. PMID:27006380

  1. TU-F-BRF-08: Intensity Modulation Expanded to Spatio-Temporal Space; IMRT Combined with Optimal Fractionation Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M; Saberian, F; Ghate, A [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Past efforts to improve the therapeutic ratio have focused on a spatial approach where highly conformal radiation dose is given to tumors while minimizing dose to normal tissues, e.g., IMRT, VMAT, and IGRT. However, the fractionation schedule, i.e., a temporal approach to radiotherapy, has been largely overlooked so far in maximizing the therapeutic ratio. We establish a rigorous mathematical spatio-temporal approach to systematically investigate the feasibility and potential benefits of simultaneously optimizing radiation dose distribution in space and time. Methods: Stochastic control formalism is constructed to maximize the average tumor BED by choosing an optimal radiation dose distribution for an optimal number of fractions subject to normal tissue BED constraints. Three separate simulations are run on two groups of phantom cases; 5 cases with prostate cancer and 5 cases with head-and-neck cancer. (1) Conventional IMRT with 70Gy/35fx for head-and-neck, and 81Gy/45fx for prostate, (2) IMRT is done independently from the fractionation schedule optimization (S-model), (3) integrated spatio-temporal approach (I-model) where radiation intensities are simultaneously optimized for the first time ever in space and time. Final tumor BEDs from the three trials are compared in prostate and head-and-neck cases. Results: Numerical simulations show that final tumor BED from I-model is 20–90% larger than conventional IMRT, and 20-50% larger than S-model for head-and-neck cancer with α/β=10 and Tdouble=2–50 days. Final tumor BED from I-model is also 90–140% larger than conventional IMRT, and 20–30% larger than S-model for prostate cancer with α/β=2 and Tdouble=5–80 days. Conclusion: Our spatio-temporal optimization of radiotherapy allows an expansion of search space for the optimal treatment plans to include the temporal distribution of radiation dose in addition to the spatial distribution. Such spatio-temporal approach shows great potential to improve

  2. From analytic inversion to contemporary IMRT optimization: radiation therapy planning revisited from a mathematical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censor, Yair; Unkelbach, Jan

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we look at the development of radiation therapy treatment planning from a mathematical point of view. Historically, planning for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) has been considered as an inverse problem. We discuss first the two fundamental approaches that have been investigated to solve this inverse problem: Continuous analytic inversion techniques on one hand, and fully-discretized algebraic methods on the other hand. In the second part of the paper, we review another fundamental question which has been subject to debate from the beginning of IMRT until the present day: The rotation therapy approach versus fixed angle IMRT. This builds a bridge from historic work on IMRT planning to contemporary research in the context of Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy (IMAT).

  3. A decision support tool to optimize IMRT QA workflow in a multi-vendor equipment environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Vial, Philip; Holloway, Lois

    2014-03-01

    Development of a software tool to ease the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) pre-treatment Quality Assurance process is presented in this study. The delivery of IMRT involves equipment from multiple vendors. The limitations of the equipment involved in this chain will impact on the best choice of equipment. This often results in the user needing to use multiple pieces of equipment before determining the most appropriate choices to optimise the QA work flow. This is a time consuming process and potentially delays the start of patient treatment. Software was developed in-house to assist the decision making process, validating deliverability of beam delivery parameters and selecting appropriate detector systems and configuration for QA of IMRT plans. The software has been demonstrated to be accurate and improves efficiency of IMRT pre-treatment QA.

  4. SU-E-T-583: Optimizing the MLC Model Parameters for IMRT in the RayStation Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S; Yi, B; Xu, H; Yang, X; Prado, K; D' Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To optimize the MLC model parameters for IMRT in the RayStation v.4.0 planning system and for a Varian C-series Linac with a 120-leaf Millennium MLC. Methods: The RayStation treatment planning system models rounded leaf-end MLC with the following parameters: average transmission, leaf-tip width, tongue-and-groove, and position offset. The position offset was provided by Varian. The leaf-tip width was iteratively evaluated by comparing computed and measured transverse dose profiles of MLC-defined fields at dmax in water. The profile comparison was also used to verify the MLC position offset. The transmission factor and leaf tongue width were derived iteratively by optimizing five clinical patient IMRT QA Results: brain, lung, pancreas, head-and-neck (HN), and prostate. The HN and prostate cases involved splitting fields. Verifications were performed with Mapcheck2 measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Finally, the MLC model was validated using five test IMRT cases from the AAPM TG119 report. Absolute gamma analyses (3mm/3% and 2mm/2%) were applied. In addition, computed output factors for MLC-defined small fields (2×2, 3×3, 4×4, 6×6cm) of both 6MV and 18MV were compared to those measured by the Radiological Physics Center (RPC). Results: Both 6MV and 18MV models were determined to have the same MLC parameters: 2.5% transmission, tongue-and-groove 0.05cm, and leaftip 0.3cm. IMRT QA analysis for five cases in TG119 resulted in a 100% passing rate with 3mm/3% gamma analysis for 6MV, and >97.5% for 18MV. With 2mm/2% gamma analysis, the passing rate was >94.6% for 6MV and >90.9% for 18MV. The difference between computed output factors in RayStation and RPC measurements was less than 2% for all MLCdefined fields, which meets the RPC's acceptance criterion. Conclusion: The rounded leaf-end MLC model in RayStation 4.0 planning system was verified and IMRT commissioning was clinically acceptable. The IMRT commissioning was well validated using guidance

  5. An exact approach to direct aperture optimization in IMRT treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men Chunhua [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6595 (United States); Romeijn, H Edwin [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6595 (United States); Taskin, Z Caner [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6595 (United States); Dempsey, James F [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States)

    2007-12-21

    We consider the problem of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning using direct aperture optimization. While this problem has been relatively well studied in recent years, most approaches employ a heuristic approach to the generation of apertures. In contrast, we use an exact approach that explicitly formulates the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem as a convex optimization problem in terms of all multileaf collimator (MLC) deliverable apertures and their associated intensities. However, the number of deliverable apertures, and therefore the number of decision variables and constraints in the new problem formulation, is typically enormous. To overcome this, we use an iterative approach that employs a subproblem whose optimal solution either provides a suitable aperture to add to a given pool of allowable apertures or concludes that the current solution is optimal. We are able to handle standard consecutiveness, interdigitation and connectedness constraints that may be imposed by the particular MLC system used, as well as jaws-only delivery. Our approach has the additional advantage that it can explicitly account for transmission of dose through the part of an aperture that is blocked by the MLC system, yielding a more precise assessment of the treatment plan than what is possible using a traditional beamlet-based FMO problem. Finally, we develop and test two stopping rules that can be used to identify treatment plans of high clinical quality that are deliverable very efficiently. Tests on clinical head-and-neck cancer cases showed the efficacy of our approach, yielding treatment plans comparable in quality to plans obtained by the traditional method with a reduction of more than 75% in the number of apertures and a reduction of more than 50% in beam-on time, with only a modest increase in computational effort. The results also show that delivery efficiency is very insensitive to the addition of traditional MLC constraints; however, jaws

  6. Comparison of direct machine parameter optimization versus fluence optimization with sequential sequencing in IMRT of hypopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogner Ludwig

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effects of direct machine parameter optimization in the treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for hypopharyngeal cancer as compared to subsequent leaf sequencing in Oncentra Masterplan v1.5. Methods For 10 hypopharyngeal cancer patients IMRT plans were generated in Oncentra Masterplan v1.5 (Nucletron BV, Veenendal, the Netherlands for a Siemens Primus linear accelerator. For optimization the dose volume objectives (DVO for the planning target volume (PTV were set to 53 Gy minimum dose and 59 Gy maximum dose, in order to reach a dose of 56 Gy to the average of the PTV. For the parotids a median dose of 22 Gy was allowed and for the spinal cord a maximum dose of 35 Gy. The maximum DVO to the external contour of the patient was set to 59 Gy. The treatment plans were optimized with the direct machine parameter optimization ("Direct Step & Shoot", DSS, Raysearch Laboratories, Sweden newly implemented in Masterplan v1.5 and the fluence modulation technique ("Intensity Modulation", IM which was available in previous versions of Masterplan already. The two techniques were compared with regard to compliance to the DVO, plan quality, and number of monitor units (MU required per fraction dose. Results The plans optimized with the DSS technique met the DVO for the PTV significantly better than the plans optimized with IM (p = 0.007 for the min DVO and p 0.05. Plan quality, target coverage and dose homogeneity inside the PTV were superior for the plans optimized with DSS for similar dose to the spinal cord and lower dose to the normal tissue. The mean dose to the parotids was lower for the plans optimized with IM. Treatment plan efficiency was higher for the DSS plans with (901 ± 160 MU compared to (1151 ± 157 MU for IM (p-value Renormalization of the IM plans to the mean of the dose to 95% of the PTV (D95 of the DSS plans, resulted in similar target coverage and dose to the parotids for both

  7. iCycle: Integrated, multicriterial beam angle, and profile optimization for generation of coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Storchi, Pascal R. M.; Voet, Peter W. J.; Heijmen, Ben J. M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To introduce iCycle, a novel algorithm for integrated, multicriterial optimization of beam angles, and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) profiles. Methods: A multicriterial plan optimization with iCycle is based on a prescription called wish-list, containing hard constraints and objectives with ascribed priorities. Priorities are ordinal parameters used for relative importance ranking of the objectives. The higher an objective priority is, the higher the probability that the corresponding objective will be met. Beam directions are selected from an input set of candidate directions. Input sets can be restricted, e.g., to allow only generation of coplanar plans, or to avoid collisions between patient/couch and the gantry in a noncoplanar setup. Obtaining clinically feasible calculation times was an important design criterium for development of iCycle. This could be realized by sequentially adding beams to the treatment plan in an iterative procedure. Each iteration loop starts with selection of the optimal direction to be added. Then, a Pareto-optimal IMRT plan is generated for the (fixed) beam setup that includes all so far selected directions, using a previously published algorithm for multicriterial optimization of fluence profiles for a fixed beam arrangement Breedveld et al.[Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 7199-7209 (2009)]. To select the next direction, each not yet selected candidate direction is temporarily added to the plan and an optimization problem, derived from the Lagrangian obtained from the just performed optimization for establishing the Pareto-optimal plan, is solved. For each patient, a single one-beam, two-beam, three-beam, etc. Pareto-optimal plan is generated until addition of beams does no longer result in significant plan quality improvement. Plan generation with iCycle is fully automated. Results: Performance and characteristics of iCycle are demonstrated by generating plans for a maxillary sinus case, a cervical cancer patient, and a

  8. Virtual couch shift (VCS) : accounting for patient translation and rotation by online IMRT re-optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, G.H.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-01-01

    When delivering conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), discrepancies between the pre-treatment CT/MRI/PET based patient geometry and the daily patient geometry are minimized by performing couch translations and/or small rotations. However, full compensation of, in particular, rotation

  9. Radiobiological effect based treatment plan optimization with the linear quadratic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology

    2010-07-01

    As an approach towards more biology-oriented treatment planning for external beam radiation therapy, we present the incorporation of local radiation damage models into three dimensional treatment planning. This allows effect based instead of dose based plan optimization which could potentially better match the biologically relevant tradeoff between target and normal tissues. In particular, our approach facilitates an effective comparison of different fractionation schemes. It is based on the linear quadratic model to describe the biological radiation effect. Effect based optimization was integrated into our inverse treatment planning software KonRad, and we demonstrate the resulting differences between conventional and biological treatment planning. Radiation damage can be analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively in dependence of the fractionation scheme and tissue specific parameters in a three dimensional voxel based system. As an example the potential advantages as well as the associated risks of hypofractionation for prostate cancer are analyzed and visualized with the help of effective dose volume histograms. Our results suggest a very conservative view regarding alternative fractionation schemes since uncertainties in biological parameters are still too big to make reliable clinical predictions. (orig.)

  10. The impact of direct aperture optimization on plan quality and efficiency in complex head and neck IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabatino Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional step&shoot intensity modulated radio therapy (IMRT approaches potentially lead to treatment plans with high numbers of segments and monitor units (MU and, therefore, could be time consuming at the linear accelerator. Direct optimization methods are able to reduce the complexity without degrading the quality of the plan. The aim of this study is the evaluation of different IMRT approaches at standardized conditions for head and neck tumors. Method For 27 patients with carcinomas in the head and neck region a planning study with a 2-step-IMRT system (KonRad, a direct optimization system (Panther DAO and a mixture of both approaches (MasterPlan DSS was created. In order to avoid different prescription doses for boost volumes a simple standardization was realized. The dose was downscaled to 50 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV which included the primary tumor as well as the bilateral lymphatic drainage (cervical and supraclavicular. Dose restrictions for the organs at risk (OAR were downscaled to this prescription from high dose concepts up to 72 Gy. Those limits were defined as planning objectives while reaching definable PTV coverage with a standardized field setup. The parameters were evaluated from the corresponding dose volume histogram (DVH. Special attention was paid to the efficiency of the method, measured by means of calculated MU and required segments. Statistical tests of significance were applied to quantify the differences between the evaluated systems. Results PTV coverage for all systems in terms of V90% and V95% fell short of the requested 100% and 95%, respectively, but were still acceptable (range: 98.7% to 99.1% and 94.2% to 94.7%. Overall for OAR sparing and the burden of healthy tissue with low doses no technique was superior for all evaluated parameters. Differences were found for the number of segments where the direct optimization systems generated less segments. Lowest average numbers of

  11. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S; Kry, Stephen F

    2014-12-01

    The authors investigated the performance of several patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) dosimeters in terms of their ability to correctly identify dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable IMRT patient plans, as determined by an in-house-designed multiple ion chamber phantom used as the gold standard. A further goal was to examine optimal threshold criteria that were consistent and based on the same criteria among the various dosimeters. The authors used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of (1) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with field-by-field evaluation, (2) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with composite evaluation, (3) a 2D diode array using planned irradiation angles with composite evaluation, (4) a helical diode array, (5) radiographic film, and (6) an ion chamber. This was done with a variety of evaluation criteria for a set of 15 dosimetrically unacceptable and 9 acceptable clinical IMRT patient plans, where acceptability was defined on the basis of multiple ion chamber measurements using independent ion chambers and a phantom. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC curves was used to compare dosimeter performance across all thresholds. Optimal threshold values were obtained from the ROC curves while incorporating considerations for cost and prevalence of unacceptable plans. Using common clinical acceptance thresholds, most devices performed very poorly in terms of identifying unacceptable plans. Grouping the detector performance based on AUC showed two significantly different groups. The ion chamber, radiographic film, helical diode array, and anterior-delivered composite 2D diode array were in the better-performing group, whereas the anterior-delivered field-by-field and planned gantry angle delivery using the 2D diode array performed less well. Additionally, based on the AUCs, there was no significant difference

  12. SU-E-T-618: Dosimetric Comparison of Manual and Beam Angle Optimization of Gantry Angles in IMRT for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, X; Sun, T; Liu, T; Zhang, G; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plan with beam angle optimization. Methods: Ten post-operation patients with cervical cancer were included in this analysis. Two IMRT plans using seven beams were designed in each patient. A standard coplanar equi-space beam angles were used in the first plan (plan 1), whereas the selection of beam angle was optimized by beam angle optimization algorithm in Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for the same number of beams in the second plan (plan 2). Two plans were designed for each patient with the same dose-volume constraints and prescription dose. All plans were normalized to the mean dose to PTV. The dose distribution in the target, the dose to the organs at risk and total MU were compared. Results: For conformity and homogeneity in PTV, no statistically differences were observed in the two plans. For the mean dose in bladder, plan 2 were significantly lower than plan 1(p<0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed between two plans for the mean doses in rectum, left and right femur heads. Compared with plan1, the average monitor units reduced 16% in plan 2. Conclusion: The IMRT plan based on beam angle optimization for cervical cancer could reduce the dose delivered to bladder and also reduce MU. Therefore there were some dosimetric advantages in the IMRT plan with beam angle optimization for cervical cancer.

  13. Use of plan quality degradation to evaluate tradeoffs in delivery efficiency and clinical plan metrics arising from IMRT optimizer and sequencer compromises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Joel R; Matuszak, Martha M; Feng, Mary; Moran, Jean M; Fraass, Benedick A

    2013-07-01

    Plan degradation resulting from compromises made to enhance delivery efficiency is an important consideration for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans. IMRT optimization and/or multileaf collimator (MLC) sequencing schemes can be modified to generate more efficient treatment delivery, but the effect those modifications have on plan quality is often difficult to quantify. In this work, the authors present a method for quantitative assessment of overall plan quality degradation due to tradeoffs between delivery efficiency and treatment plan quality, illustrated using comparisons between plans developed allowing different numbers of intensity levels in IMRT optimization and/or MLC sequencing for static segmental MLC IMRT plans. A plan quality degradation method to evaluate delivery efficiency and plan quality tradeoffs was developed and used to assess planning for 14 prostate and 12 head and neck patients treated with static IMRT. Plan quality was evaluated using a physician's predetermined "quality degradation" factors for relevant clinical plan metrics associated with the plan optimization strategy. Delivery efficiency and plan quality were assessed for a range of optimization and sequencing limitations. The "optimal" (baseline) plan for each case was derived using a clinical cost function with an unlimited number of intensity levels. These plans were sequenced with a clinical MLC leaf sequencer which uses >100 segments, assuring delivered intensities to be within 1% of the optimized intensity pattern. Each patient's optimal plan was also sequenced limiting the number of intensity levels (20, 10, and 5), and then separately optimized with these same numbers of intensity levels. Delivery time was measured for all plans, and direct evaluation of the tradeoffs between delivery time and plan degradation was performed. When considering tradeoffs, the optimal number of intensity levels depends on the treatment site and on the stage in the process

  14. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisopoulos, Georgios [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C. [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities are 64.0, 60.9, and 60.8 Gy, respectively. Regarding the risk for secondary cancer, for the heart, the lowest average risk is produced by IMRT (0.10%) compared with the HT (0.17%) and CRT (0.12%) modalities, whereas the 3 radiation modalities show almost equivalent results regarding the contralateral lung (0.8% for HT, 0.9% for IMRT, and 0.9% for CRT). The use of radiobiologic parameters in the evaluation of different treatment plans and estimation of their expected clinical outcome is shown to provide very useful clinical information. The radiobiologic analysis of the response probabilities showed that different radiation modalities appear to be more effective in different patient geometries and target sizes and locations. Furthermore, there is not a clear pattern between the plans that appear to be more effective for the treatment and the risk of secondary malignancy. It seems that radiobiologically based treatment planning taking into account the risk of secondary cancer can be established as an effective clinical tool for a more clinically relevant treatment optimization.

  15. Use of plan quality degradation to evaluate tradeoffs in delivery efficiency and clinical plan metrics arising from IMRT optimizer and sequencer compromises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Joel R.; Matuszak, Martha M.; Feng, Mary; Moran, Jean M.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Plan degradation resulting from compromises made to enhance delivery efficiency is an important consideration for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans. IMRT optimization and/or multileaf collimator (MLC) sequencing schemes can be modified to generate more efficient treatment delivery, but the effect those modifications have on plan quality is often difficult to quantify. In this work, the authors present a method for quantitative assessment of overall plan quality degradation due to tradeoffs between delivery efficiency and treatment plan quality, illustrated using comparisons between plans developed allowing different numbers of intensity levels in IMRT optimization and/or MLC sequencing for static segmental MLC IMRT plans. Methods: A plan quality degradation method to evaluate delivery efficiency and plan quality tradeoffs was developed and used to assess planning for 14 prostate and 12 head and neck patients treated with static IMRT. Plan quality was evaluated using a physician's predetermined “quality degradation” factors for relevant clinical plan metrics associated with the plan optimization strategy. Delivery efficiency and plan quality were assessed for a range of optimization and sequencing limitations. The “optimal” (baseline) plan for each case was derived using a clinical cost function with an unlimited number of intensity levels. These plans were sequenced with a clinical MLC leaf sequencer which uses >100 segments, assuring delivered intensities to be within 1% of the optimized intensity pattern. Each patient's optimal plan was also sequenced limiting the number of intensity levels (20, 10, and 5), and then separately optimized with these same numbers of intensity levels. Delivery time was measured for all plans, and direct evaluation of the tradeoffs between delivery time and plan degradation was performed. Results: When considering tradeoffs, the optimal number of intensity levels depends on the treatment

  16. Determination of optimal PTV margin for patients receiving CBCT-guided prostate IMRT: comparative analysis based on CBCT dose calculation with four different margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sukhdeep K; Reddy, Krishna; Campbell, Nina; Chen, Changhu; Pearson, David

    2015-11-08

    Variations in daily setup and rectum/bladder filling lead to uncertainties in the delivery of prostate IMRT. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal PTV margin for CBCT-guided prostate IMRT based on daily CBCT dose calculations using four different margins. Five patients diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer were treated with prostate IMRT to 70 Gy in 28 fractions using daily CBCT for image guidance. The prostate CTV and OARs were contoured on all CBCTs. IMRT plans were created using 1 mm, 3 mm, 5 mm, and 7 mm CTV to PTV expansions. For each delivered fraction, dose calculations were generated utilizing the pretreatment CBCT translational shifts performed and dosimetric analysis was performed. One hundred and forty total treatment fractions (CBCT sessions) were evaluated. The planned prostate CTV V100% was 100% for all PTV margins. Based on CBCT analysis, the actual cumulative CTVs V100% were 96.55% ± 2.94%, 99.49% ± 1.36%, 99.98% ± 0.26%, and 99.99% ± 0.05% for 1, 3, 5, and 7 mm uniform PTV margins, respectively. Delivered rectum and bladder doses were different as compared to expected planned doses, with the magnitude of differences increasing with PTV margin. Daily setup variation during prostate IMRT yields differences in the actual vs. expected doses received by the prostate CTV, rectum, and bladder. The magnitude of these differences is significantly affected by the PTV margin utilized. It was found that when daily CBCT was used for soft-tissue alignment of the prostate, a 3 mm PTV margin allowed for CTV to be covered for 99% of cases.

  17. Fluence map optimization (FMO) with dose-volume constraints in IMRT using the geometric distance sorting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yihua; Li, Cunhua; Ren, Haozheng; Zhang, Yong; Min, Zhifang

    2012-10-01

    A new heuristic algorithm based on the so-called geometric distance sorting technique is proposed for solving the fluence map optimization with dose-volume constraints which is one of the most essential tasks for inverse planning in IMRT. The framework of the proposed method is basically an iterative process which begins with a simple linear constrained quadratic optimization model without considering any dose-volume constraints, and then the dose constraints for the voxels violating the dose-volume constraints are gradually added into the quadratic optimization model step by step until all the dose-volume constraints are satisfied. In each iteration step, an interior point method is adopted to solve each new linear constrained quadratic programming. For choosing the proper candidate voxels for the current dose constraint adding, a so-called geometric distance defined in the transformed standard quadratic form of the fluence map optimization model was used to guide the selection of the voxels. The new geometric distance sorting technique can mostly reduce the unexpected increase of the objective function value caused inevitably by the constraint adding. It can be regarded as an upgrading to the traditional dose sorting technique. The geometry explanation for the proposed method is also given and a proposition is proved to support our heuristic idea. In addition, a smart constraint adding/deleting strategy is designed to ensure a stable iteration convergence. The new algorithm is tested on four cases including head-neck, a prostate, a lung and an oropharyngeal, and compared with the algorithm based on the traditional dose sorting technique. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is more suitable for guiding the selection of new constraints than the traditional dose sorting method, especially for the cases whose target regions are in non-convex shapes. It is a more efficient optimization technique to some extent for choosing constraints than the dose

  18. Radiobiology of human cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has systematically collected and collated the scientific literature correlating the basic and clinical sciences in this field in order to produce a definitive treatise. The book thoroughly reviews the biology and biochemistry relevant to radiobiology and describes the critical locus for the extinction of cell reproductive capacity. Extensive coverage is given to oxygen effect, hyperthermia, high linear energy transfer, cell populations, and similar topics. Separate sections cover time, dose, and fractionation; radiation hematology; cancer chemotherapy; and cancer immunology. The book also contains invaluable discussions of techniques for optimizing radiotherapy alone and in combination with other therapies.

  19. On the beam direction search space in computerized non-coplanar beam angle optimization for IMRT-prostate SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Linda; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J M; Voet, Peter W J; Lanconelli, Nico; Aluwini, Shafak

    2012-09-01

    In a recent paper, we have published a new algorithm, designated 'iCycle', for fully automated multi-criterial optimization of beam angles and intensity profiles. In this study, we have used this algorithm to investigate the relationship between plan quality and the extent of the beam direction search space, i.e. the set of candidate beam directions that may be selected for generating an optimal plan. For a group of ten prostate cancer patients, optimal IMRT plans were made for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), mimicking high dose rate brachytherapy dosimetry. Plans were generated for five different beam direction input sets: a coplanar (CP) set and four non-coplanar (NCP) sets. For CP treatments, the search space consisted of 72 orientations (5° separations). The NCP CyberKnife (CK) space contained all directions available in the robotic CK treatment unit. The fully non-coplanar (F-NCP) set facilitated the highest possible degree of freedom in selecting optimal directions. CK(+) and CK(++) were subsets of F-NCP to investigate some aspects of the CK space. For each input set, plans were generated with up to 30 selected beam directions. Generated plans were clinically acceptable, according to an assessment of our clinicians. Convergence in plan quality occurred only after around 20 included beams. For individual patients, variations in PTV dose delivery between the five generated plans were minimal, as aimed for (average spread in V(95): 0.4%). This allowed plan comparisons based on organ at risk (OAR) doses, with the rectum considered most important. Plans generated with the NCP search spaces had improved OAR sparing compared to the CP search space, especially for the rectum. OAR sparing was best with the F-NCP, with reductions in rectum D(Mean), V(40Gy), V(60Gy) and D(2%) compared to CP of 25%, 35%, 37% and 8%, respectively. Reduced rectum sparing with the CK search space compared to F-NCP could be largely compensated by expanding CK with beams with

  20. Comparison of IMRT planning with two-step and one-step optimization: a strategy for improving therapeutic gain and reducing the integral dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, A.; Pressello, M. C.; Benassi, M.; Strigari, L.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency in inverse IMRT planning of one-step optimization with the step-and-shoot (SS) technique as compared to traditional two-step optimization using the sliding windows (SW) technique. The Pinnacle IMRT TPS allows both one-step and two-step approaches. The same beam setup for five head-and-neck tumor patients and dose-volume constraints were applied for all optimization methods. Two-step plans were produced converting the ideal fluence with or without a smoothing filter into the SW sequence. One-step plans, based on direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO), had the maximum number of segments per beam set at 8, 10, 12, producing a directly deliverable sequence. Moreover, the plans were generated whether a split-beam was used or not. Total monitor units (MUs), overall treatment time, cost function and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were estimated for each plan. PTV conformality and homogeneity indexes and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) that are the basis for improving therapeutic gain, as well as non-tumor integral dose (NTID), were evaluated. A two-sided t-test was used to compare quantitative variables. All plans showed similar target coverage. Compared to two-step SW optimization, the DMPO-SS plans resulted in lower MUs (20%), NTID (4%) as well as NTCP values. Differences of about 15-20% in the treatment delivery time were registered. DMPO generates less complex plans with identical PTV coverage, providing lower NTCP and NTID, which is expected to reduce the risk of secondary cancer. It is an effective and efficient method and, if available, it should be favored over the two-step IMRT planning.

  1. Radiobiological Research in JINR

    CERN Document Server

    Krasavin, E A

    2000-01-01

    The results of long-term radiobiological and radiation-genetical research in DRRR (Division of Radiobiology) are summarized. The different radiation-induced effects in bacteria, yeasts, mammalian and human cells after irradiation by gamma-rays and heavy charged particles are considered. The important role of DNA repair processes in biological effectiveness of different types of radiation were shown. The data on mutagenic action of such kinds of radiation on pro- and eukaryotic cells were analyzed. On the basis of our data the hypersensitivity of human and mammalian chromosomes after low doses of gamma-rays (10-20 sGy) was revealed. The radiobiological effect of ^{211}At - methylene blue complex on human melanoma cells was studied. The extremely high effectiveness of this complex on melanoma cells was shown.

  2. SU-E-P-47: Evaluation of Improvement of Esophagus Sparing in SBRT Lung Patients with Biologically Based IMRT Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, X; Penagaricano, J; Paudel, N; Zhang, X; Morrill, S; Corry, P; Han, E; Hardee, M; Ratanatharathorn, V [University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the potential of improving esophageal sparing for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) lung cancer patients by using biological optimization (BO) compared to conventional dose-volume based optimization (DVO) in treatment planning. Methods: Three NSCLC patients (PTV (62.3cc, 65.1cc, and 125.1cc) adjacent to the heart) previously treated with SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse TPS (V11) using DVO and BO. The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 5 fractions normalized to 95% of the PTV volume. Plans were evaluated by comparing esophageal maximum doses, PTV heterogeneity (HI= D5%/D95%), and Paddick’s conformity (CI) indices. Quality of the plans was assessed by clinically-used IMRT QA procedures. Results: By using BO, the maximum dose to the esophagus was decreased 1384 cGy (34.6%), 502 cGy (16.5%) and 532 cGy (16.2%) in patient 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The maximum doses to spinal cord and the doses to 1000 cc and 1500 cc of normal lung were comparable in both plans. The mean doses (Dmean-hrt) and doses to 15cc of the heart (V15-hrt) were comparable for patient 1 and 2. However for patient 3, with the largest PTV, Dmean-hrt and V15-hrt increased by 62.2 cGy (18.3%) and 549.9 cGy (24.9%) respectively for the BO plans. The mean target HI of BO plans (1.13) was inferior to the DVO plans (1.07). The same trend was also observed for mean CI in BO plans (0.77) versus DVO plans (0.83). The QA pass rates (3%, 3mm) were comparable for both plans. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the use of biological models in treatment planning optimization can substantially improve esophageal sparing without compromising spinal cord and normal lung doses. However, for the large PTV case (125.1cc) we studied here, Dmean-hrt and V15-hrt increased substantially. The target HI and CI were inferior in the BO plans.

  3. SU-E-T-500: Initial Implementation of GPU-Based Particle Swarm Optimization for 4D IMRT Planning in Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modiri, A; Hagan, A; Gu, X; Sawant, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose 4D-IMRT planning, combined with dynamic MLC tracking delivery, utilizes the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom to achieve improved OAR-sparing. The computational complexity for such optimization increases exponentially with increase in dimensionality. In order to accomplish this task in a clinically-feasible time frame, we present an initial implementation of GPU-based 4D-IMRT planning based on particle swarm optimization (PSO). Methods The target and normal structures were manually contoured on ten phases of a 4DCT scan of a NSCLC patient with a 54cm3 right-lower-lobe tumor (1.5cm motion). Corresponding ten 3D-IMRT plans were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Ver-13.6). A vendor-provided scripting interface was used to export 3D-dose matrices corresponding to each control point (10 phases × 9 beams × 166 control points = 14,940), which served as input to PSO. The optimization task was to iteratively adjust the weights of each control point and scale the corresponding dose matrices. In order to handle the large amount of data in GPU memory, dose matrices were sparsified and placed in contiguous memory blocks with the 14,940 weight-variables. PSO was implemented on CPU (dual-Xeon, 3.1GHz) and GPU (dual-K20 Tesla, 2496 cores, 3.52Tflops, each) platforms. NiftyReg, an open-source deformable image registration package, was used to calculate the summed dose. Results The 4D-PSO plan yielded PTV coverage comparable to the clinical ITV-based plan and significantly higher OAR-sparing, as follows: lung Dmean=33%; lung V20=27%; spinal cord Dmax=26%; esophagus Dmax=42%; heart Dmax=0%; heart Dmean=47%. The GPU-PSO processing time for 14940 variables and 7 PSO-particles was 41% that of CPU-PSO (199 vs. 488 minutes). Conclusion Truly 4D-IMRT planning can yield significant OAR dose-sparing while preserving PTV coverage. The corresponding optimization problem is large-scale, non-convex and computationally rigorous. Our initial results

  4. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  5. An Estimation of Radiobiological Parameters for Head-and-Neck Cancer Cells and the Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Yang, Qiuhui; Lee, Steve P.; Li, X. Allen; Wang, Dian

    2012-01-01

    In vitro survival measurements using two human head-and-neck cancer (HNC) cell lines were performed. The specially designed split-dose surviving fraction was obtained and fitted to the linear-quadratic formalism. The repair halftime (Tr), the potential doubling time (Td), α/β and radiosensitivity α, were estimated. Other radiobiological models: EUD, BED, TCP, etc., were used to examine the potential treatment effectiveness of different IMRT techniques. Our data indicated the repair halftime of ~17 min based on two HNC cell lines. The combined α/β, α and Td are α/β = 8.1 ± 4.1 Gy, α = 0.22 ± 0.08 Gy−1, Td = 4.0 ± 1.8 day, respectively. The prolonged IMRT dose delivery for entire HNC treatment course could possibly result in the loss of biological effectiveness, i.e., the target EUDs decreased by 11% with fraction dose delivery time varying from 5 to 30 min. We determined the sublethal damage repair halftime and other radiobiological parameters for HNC cells, and to evaluate treatment effectiveness of the prolonged dose delivery times associated with different IMRT techniques. The estimated repair halftime for HNC is relatively short and may be comparable to the step-and-shoot IMRT fraction dose delivery time. The effectiveness of IMRT treatment may be improved by reducing the fraction delivery time for HNC treatment. PMID:24213325

  6. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor

  7. Radiation Protection Research: Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C

    2000-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium; to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (2) to participate in the IARC study; (3) to elucidate the molecular basis of the effects of ionising radiation in the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (4) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (5) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 1999 are reported.

  8. Radiobiology and Epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C; Holmstock, L

    2001-04-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium and to co-ordinate the Belgian contribution to the 'International Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry'; (2) to elucidate the molecular basis of individual susceptibility to ionizing radiation in mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (3) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (4) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (5) to monitor the early variations of gene expression induced by ionising radiation and cytokines; (6) to evaluate the use of cytokines and natural substances for improving radiotherapy protocols; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are reported.

  9. Impact of MLC properties and IMRT technique in meningioma and head-and-neck treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantz, Steffi; Söhn, Matthias; Troeller, Almut

    2015-01-01

    -planned for step-and-shoot IMRT (ssIMRT), sliding window IMRT (dMLC) and VMAT using the MLCi2 without (-) and with (+) interdigitation and the Agility-MLC attached to an Elekta 6MV linac. This results in nine plans per patient. Consistent patient individual optimization parameters are used. Plans are generated...

  10. The radiobiology of hypofractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Alan E

    2015-05-01

    If the α/β ratio is high (e.g. 10 Gy) for tumour clonogen killing, but low (e.g. 3 Gy) for late normal tissue complications, then delivering external beam radiotherapy in a large number (20-30) of small (≈2 Gy) dose fractions should yield the highest 'therapeutic ratio'; this is demonstrated via the linear-quadratic model of cell killing. However, this 'conventional wisdom' is increasingly being challenged, partly by the success of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) extreme hypofractionation regimens of three to five large fractions for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and partly by indications that for certain tumours (prostate, breast) the α/β ratio may be of the same order or even lower than that characterising late complications. It is shown how highly conformal dose delivery combined with quasi-parallel normal tissue behaviour (n close to 1) enables 'safe' hypofractionation; this can be predicted by the (α/β)eff concept for normal tissues. Recent analyses of the clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer radiotherapy covering 'conventional' hyper- to extreme hypofractionation (stereotactic ablative radiotherapy) regimens are consistent with linear-quadratic radiobiology, even at the largest fraction sizes, despite there being theoretical reasons to expect 'LQ violation' above a certain dose. Impairment of re-oxygenation between fractions and the very high (α/β) for hypoxic cells can complicate the picture regarding the analysis of clinical outcomes; it has also been suggested that vascular damage may play a role for very large dose fractions. Finally, the link between high values of (α/β)eff and normal-tissue sparing for quasi-parallel normal tissues, thereby favouring hypofractionation, may be particularly important for proton therapy, but more generally, improved conformality, achieved by whatever technique, can be translated into individualisation of both prescription dose and fraction

  11. Microirradiation techniques in radiobiological research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guido A Drexler; Miguel J Ruiz-Gómez

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work is to review the uses of laser microirradiation and ion microbeam techniques within the scope of radiobiological research. Laser microirradiation techniques can be used for many different purposes. In a specific condition, through the use of pulsed lasers, cell lysis can be produced for subsequent separation of different analytes. Microsurgery allows for the identification and isolation of tissue sections, single cells and subcellular components, using different types of lasers. The generation of different types of DNA damage, via this type of microirradiation, allows for the investigation of DNA dynamics. Ion microbeams are important tools in radiobiological research. There are only a limited number of facilities worldwide where radiobiological experiments can be performed. In the beginning, research was mostly focused on the bystander effect. Nowadays, with more sophisticated molecular and cellular biological techniques, ion microirradiation is used to unravel molecular processes in the field of radiobiology. These include DNA repair protein kinetics or chromatin modifications at the site of DNA damage. With the increasing relevance of charged particles in tumour therapy and new concepts on how to generate them, ion microbeam facilities are able to address unresolved questions concerning particle tumour therapy.

  12. On the beam direction search space in computerized non-coplanar beam angle optimization for IMRT - Prostate SBRT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Rossi (Linda); S. Breedveld (Sebastiaan); B.J.M. Heijmen (Ben); P.W.J. Voet (Peter W.J.); N. Lanconelli (Nico); S. Aluwini (Shafak)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn a recent paper, we have published a new algorithm, designated iCycle, for fully automated multi-criterial optimization of beam angles and intensity profiles. In this study, we have used this algorithm to investigate the relationship between plan quality and the extent of the beam dire

  13. Arc binary intensity modulated radiation therapy (AB IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun

    The state of the art Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) has been one of the most significant breakthroughs in the cancer treatment in the past 30 years. There are two types of IMRT systems. The first system is the binary-based tomotherapy, represented by the Peacock (Nomos Corp) and Tomo unit (TomoTherapy Inc.), adopting specific binary collimator leafs to deliver intensity modulated radiation fields in a serial or helical fashion. The other uses the conventional dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver intensity modulated fields through a number of gantry positions. The proposed Arc Binary IMRT attempts to deliver Tomo-like IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC and combines the advantages of the two types of IMRT techniques: (1) maximizing the number of pencil beams for better dose optimization, (2) enabling conventional linear accelerator with dynamic MLC to deliver Tomo-like IMRT. In order to deliver IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC in a binary fashion, the slice-by-slice treatment with limited slice thickness has been proposed in the thesis to accommodate the limited MLC traveling speed. Instead of moving the patient to subsequent treatment slices, the proposed method offsets MLC to carry out the whole treatment, slice by slice sequentially, thus avoid patient position error. By denoting one arc pencil beam set as a gene, genetic algorithm (GA) is used as the searching engine for the dose optimization process. The selection of GA parameters is a crucial step and has been studied in depth so that the optimization process will converge with reasonable speed. Several hypothetical and clinical cases have been tested with the proposed IMRT method. The comparison of the dose distribution with other commercially available IMRT systems demonstrates the clear advantage of the new method. The proposed Arc Binary Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy is not only theoretically sound but practically feasible. The implementation of this method would expand the

  14. SU-E-T-647: Plan Quality in Computerized Non-Coplanar IMRT Beam Angle Optimization is Highly Dependent on the Extent of the Beam direction Search Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, P; Rossi, L; Breedveld, S; Aluwini, S; Heijmen, B

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between plan quality and the extent of the beam direction search space in computerized beam angle selection for generating optimal (non-coplanar) IMRT plans for prostate SBRT with dose distributions simulating HDR brachytherapy. iCycle (1) was used to investigate the relationship between plan quality and the extent of the set of beam directions available for plan generation. For a group of 10 prostate patients, optimal plans were generated for 5 direction search spaces. For coplanar treatments (CP set), 72 orientations were available for selection (separation 5°). The fully non-coplanar set (F-NCP) included the CP directions plus 430 directions spread over the sphere. The CK set contained the directions available at the robotic Cyberknife unit. CK+ and CK++ were extensions of CK to investigate some of its characteristics. Generated plans were in accordance with our clinical SBRT protocol for Cyberknife treatment, delivering 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy. Adequate PTV coverage had the highest priority. Reduction of rectum dose was the highest OAR priority. The mean PTV coverage (V95) of all SBRT plans was 99% ï,± 0.9% (1 SD). F-NCP plans had most favorable OAR dose parameters, while for coplanar plans OAR doses were highest. Compared to coplanar treatment, rectum Dmean/V60 were 25% / 37% and 19% / 21% lower in F-NCP and CK plans. Higher rectum dose for the Cyberknife set compared to F-NCP was not caused by a lack of posterior beams for Cyberknife. For all search spaces, reduction in OAR dose only leveled off with > 20 beams in the plans (for CP, rectum V60 in 25 beam plans was reduced by 64% compared to 11 beams). In the non-coplanar set-ups, there was a preference for beams with a (large) lateral component. Plan quality clearly improved with the extent of the beam direction search space (coplanar worst), and the number of beam directions in the plan (25 clearly better than 11).(1) Breedveld S, Storchi P, Voet P, Heijmen B, Med Phys 2012

  15. SU-E-T-385: 4D Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourkal, E; Hossain, M; Veltchev, I; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Horwitz, E [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nahum, A [Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Bebington (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The linear-quadratic model is the most prevalent model for planning dose fractionation in radiation therapy in the low dose per fraction regimens. However for high-dose fractions, used in SRS/SBRT/HDR treatments the LQ model does not yield accurate predictions, due to neglecting the reduction in the number of sublethal lesions as a result of their conversion to lethal lesions with subsequent irradiation. Proper accounting for this reduction in the number of sublethally damaged lesions leads to the dependence of the survival fraction on the temporal structure of the dose. The main objective of this work is to show that the functional dependence of the dose rate on time in each voxel is an important additional factor that can significantly influence the TCP. Methods: Two SBRT lung plans have been used to calculate the TCPs for the same patient. One plan is a 3D conformal plan and the other is an IMRT plan. Both plans are normalized so that 99.5% of PTV volume receives the same prescription dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions. The dose rate in each individual voxel is calculated as a function of treatment time and subsequently used in the calculation of TCP. Results: The calculated TCPs show that shorter delivery times lead to greater TCP, despite all delivery times being short compared to the repair half-time for sublethal lesions. Furthermore, calculated TCP(IMRT) =0.308 for the IMRT plan is smaller than TCP(3D) =0.425 for 3D conformal, even though it shows greater tumor hot spots and equal PTV coverage. The calculated TCPs are considerably lower compared to those based on the LQ model for which TCP=1 for both plans. Conclusion: The functional dependence of the voxel-by-voxel dose rate on time may be an important factor in predicting the treatment outcome and cannot be neglected in radiobiological modeling.

  16. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  17. A new plan quality index for nasopharyngeal cancer SIB IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Yi, J; Zhou, Y; Yan, H; Han, C; Xie, C

    2014-02-01

    A new plan quality index integrating dosimetric and radiobiological indices was proposed to facilitate the evaluation and comparison of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients. Ten NPC patients treated by SIB-IMRT were enrolled in the study. Custom software was developed to read dose-volume histogram (DVH) curves from the treatment planning system (TPS). A plan filtering matrix was introduced to filter plans that fail to satisfy treatment protocol. Target plan quality indices and organ at risk (OAR) plan quality indices were calculated for qualified plans. A unique composite plan quality index (CPQI) was proposed based on the relative weight of these indices to evaluate and compare competing plans. Plan ranking results were compared with detailed statistical analysis, radiation oncology quality system (ROQS) scoring results and physician's evaluation results to verify the accuracy of this new plan quality index. The average CPQI values for plans with OAR priority of low, normal, high, and PTV only were 0.22 ± 0.08, 0.49 ± 0.077, 0.71 ± 0.062, and -0.21 ± 0.16, respectively. There were significant differences among these plan quality indices (One-way ANOVA test, p plans were selected. Plan filtering matrix was able to speed up the plan evaluation process. The new matrix plan quality index CPQI showed good consistence with physician ranking results. It is a promising index for NPC SIB-IMRT plan evaluation.

  18. [Systemic approach to radiobiological studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, K Ia; Lobanok, L M

    2004-01-01

    The principles of information theory were applied for analysis of radiobiological effects. The perception of ionizing radiations as a signal enables living organism to discern their benefits or harm, to react to absolute and relatively small deviations, to keep the logic and chronicle of events, to use the former experience for reacting in presence, to forecast consequences. The systemic analysis of organism's response to ionizing radiations allows explaining the peculiarities of effects of different absorbed doses, hormesis, apoptosis, remote consequences and other post-radiation effects.

  19. Dosimetric and radiobiologic comparison of 3D conformal versus intensity modulated planning techniques for prostate bed radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Das, Shiva; Temple, Kathy; Bynum, Sigrun; Catalano, Suzanne; Koontz, Jason I; Montana, Gustavo S; Oleson, James R

    2009-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer improves biochemical and clinical disease-free survival. While comparisons in intact prostate cancer show a benefit for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) over 3D conformal planning, this has not been studied for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT). This study compares normal tissue and target dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of IMRT vs. 3D conformal planning in the postoperative setting. 3D conformal plans were designed for 15 patients who had been treated with IMRT planning for salvage post-prostatectomy RT. The same computed tomography (CT) and target/normal structure contours, as well as prescription dose, was used for both IMRT and 3D plans. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were calculated based on the dose given to the bladder and rectum by both plans. Dose-volume histogram and NTCP data were compared by paired t-test. Bladder and rectal sparing were improved with IMRT planning compared to 3D conformal planning. The volume of the bladder receiving at least 75% (V75) and 50% (V50) of the dose was significantly reduced by 28% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.002 and 0.037). Rectal dose was similarly reduced, V75 by 33% and V50 by 17% (p = 0.001 and 0.004). While there was no difference in the volume of rectum receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), IMRT planning significant reduced the volume receiving 40 Gy or more (V40, p = 0.009). Bladder V40 and V65 were not significantly different between planning modalities. Despite these dosimetric differences, there was no significant difference in the NTCP for either bladder or rectal injury. IMRT planning reduces the volume of bladder and rectum receiving high doses during post-prostatectomy RT. Because of relatively low doses given to the bladder and rectum, there was no statistically significant improvement in NTCP between the 3D conformal and IMRT plans.

  20. Radiobiological modeling analysis of the optimal fraction scheme in patients with peripheral non-small cell lung cancer undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bao-Tian Huang; Jia-Yang Lu; Pei-Xian Lin; Jian-Zhou Chen; De-Rui Li; Chuang-Zhen Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the optimal fraction scheme (FS) in patients with small peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with the 4 × 12 Gy scheme as the reference. CT simulation data for sixteen patients diagnosed with primary NSCLC or metastatic tumor with a single peripheral lesion ≤3 cm were used in this study. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were designed based on ten different FS of 1 × 25 Gy, 1 × 30 Gy, 1 × 34 Gy...

  1. Dosimetric Comparison of Combined Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Proton Therapy Versus IMRT Alone for Pelvic and Para-Aortic Radiotherapy in Gynecologic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman Milby, Abigail [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Both, Stefan, E-mail: both@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ingram, Mark; Lin, Lilie L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT), and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to the para-aortic (PA) nodal region in women with locally advanced gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The CT treatment planning scans of 10 consecutive patients treated with IMRT to the pelvis and PA nodes were identified. The clinical target volume was defined by the primary tumor for patients with cervical cancer and by the vagina and paravaginal tissues for patients with endometrial cancer, in addition to the regional lymph nodes. The IMRT, PSPT, and IMPT plans were generated using the Eclipse Treatment Planning System and were analyzed for various dosimetric endpoints. Two groups of treatment plans including proton radiotherapy were created: IMRT to pelvic nodes with PSPT to PA nodes (PSPT/IMRT), and IMRT to pelvic nodes with IMPT to PA nodes (IMPT/IMRT). The IMRT and proton RT plans were optimized to deliver 50.4 Gy or Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE)), respectively. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed for all of the organs at risk. The paired t test was used for all statistical comparison. Results: The small-bowel V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 35}, andV{sub 40} were reduced in PSPT/IMRT by 11%, 18%, 27%, and 43%, respectively (p < 0.01). Treatment with IMPT/IMRT demonstrated a 32% decrease in the small-bowel V{sub 20}. Treatment with PSPT/IMRT showed statistically significant reductions in the body V{sub 5-20}; IMPT/IMRT showed reductions in the body V{sub 5-15}. The dose received by half of both kidneys was reduced by PSPT/IMRT and by IMPT/IMRT. All plans maintained excellent coverage of the planning target volume. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT alone, PSPT/IMRT and IMPT/IMRT had a statistically significant decrease in dose to the small and large bowel and kidneys, while maintaining excellent planning target volume coverage. Further studies should be done to

  2. IMRT in hypopharyngeal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, G.; Luetolf, U.M.; Davis, J.B.; Glanzmann, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-06-15

    Background and purpose: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) data on hypopharyngeal cancer (HC) are scant. In this study, the authors report on early results in an own HC patient cohort treated with IMRT. A more favorable outcome as compared to historical data on conventional radiation techniques was expected. Patients and methods: 29 consecutive HC patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT between 01/2002 and 07/2005 (mean follow-up 16 months, range 4-44 months). Doses of 60-71 Gy with 2.0-2.2 Gy/fraction were applied. 26/29 patients were definitively irradiated, 86% received simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. 60% presented with locally advanced disease (T3/4 Nx, Tx N2c/3). Mean primary tumor volume measured 36.2 cm{sup 3} (4-170 cm{sup 3}), mean nodal volume 16.6 cm{sup 3} (0-97 cm{sup 3}). Results: 2-year actuarial local, nodal, distant control, and overall disease-free survival were 90%, 93%, 93%, and 90%, respectively. In 2/4 patients with persistent disease (nodal in one, primary in three), salvage surgery was performed. The mean dose to the spinal cord (extension of > 5-15 mm) was 26 Gy (12-38 Gy); the mean maximum (point) dose was 44.4 Gy (26-58.9 Gy). One grade (G) 3 dysphagia and two G4 reactions (laryngeal fibrosis, dysphagia), both following the schedule with 2.2 Gy per fraction, have been observed so far. Larynx preservation was achieved in 25/26 of the definitively irradiated patients (one underwent a salvage laryngectomy); 23 had no or minimal dysphagia (G0-1). Conclusion: excellent early disease control and high patient satisfaction with swallowing function in HC following SIB IMRT were observed; these results need to be confirmed based on a longer follow-up period. In order to avoid G4 reactions, SIB doses of < 2.2 Gy/fraction are recommended for large tumors involving laryngeal structures. (orig.)

  3. SU-E-T-521: Feasibility Study of a Rotational Step-And-Shoot IMRT Treatment Planning Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X [Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chang, S [UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cullip, T [UNC Hospitals, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Yuan, L; Zhang, X [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Lian, J; Tang, X [UniversityNorth Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Tracton, G; Dooley, J [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Rotational step-and-shot IMRT (r-IMRT) could improve delivery efficiency with good dose conformity, especially if it can leverage the burst mode of the accelerator where radiation is turned on/off momentarily while the gantry rotates continuously. The challenge for the r-IMRT planning is to minimize the number of beams to achieve a fast and smooth rotational delivery. Methods: Treatment plans for r-IMRT were created using an in-house treatment planning system. To generate the plan using a very few beams, gantry angle was optimized by weighting the beam monitoring unit (MU), and beam shape optimization was a combination of column search with k-means clustering. A prostate case and a head and neck case were planned using r-IMRT. The dosimetry is compared to s-IMRT planned with Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Results: With the same PTV dose coverage D95=100%, the r-IMRT plans shows comparable sparing as the s-IMRT plans in the prostate for the rectum D10cc and the bladder Dmean, and in the head and neck for the spinal cord Dmax, the brain stem Dmax, the left/right parotid Dmean, the larynx Dmean, and the mandible Dmean. Both plans meet the established institutional clinical dosimetric criteria. The r-IMRT plan uses 19 beam/405 MU for the prostate, and 68 beam/880 MU for the head and neck, while the s-IMRT uses 7 beam/724 MU and 9 beam/1812 MU, respectively. Compared to the corresponding s-IMRT, r-IMRT has a reduction of MUs of 44% for the prostate case and 41% for the head and neck case. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a rotational step and shoot IMRT treatment planning approach that significantly shortens the conventional IMRT treatment beam-on time without degrading the dose comformity.

  4. Development of applicable software containing radiobiological and physical indices to evaluate radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seu Ran; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Yeon [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stafnord University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) provides more conformal dose distribution to the morphologically and physiologically changed tumor volumes during fractionated radiation therapy (RT). To develop an enhanced treatment plan evaluation tool based on multi-modality imaging which incorporates physical and radiobiological parameters, the software system was developed using MATLAB v.7.10.0499 (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). The application of plan evaluation can help the user choose more biologically optimal treatment plans and potentially predict treatment outcome more accurately. The radiotherapy planning based on the multi-modality images had more accurate results than that of based on only CT images in both physical and radiobiological perspectives.

  5. Introduction to radiobiology of targeted radionuclide therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre ePOUGET

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRT are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure and low absorbed dose rate differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure and high absorbed dose rate, and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining dose-effect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main

  6. Comparison of VMAT and IMRT strategies for cervical cancer patients using automated planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharfo, Abdul Wahab M; Voet, Peter W J; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Mens, Jan Willem M; Hoogeman, Mischa S; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2015-03-01

    In a published study on cervical cancer, 5-beam IMRT was inferior to single arc VMAT. Here we compare 9, 12, and 20 beam IMRT with single and dual arc VMAT. For each of 10 patients, automated plan generation with the in-house Erasmus-iCycle optimizer was used to assist an expert planner in generating the five plans with the clinical TPS. For each patient, all plans were clinically acceptable with a high and similar PTV coverage. OAR sparing increased when going from 9 to 12 to 20 IMRT beams, and from single to dual arc VMAT. For all patients, 12 and 20 beam IMRT were superior to single and dual arc VMAT, with substantial variations in gain among the study patients. As expected, delivery of VMAT plans was significantly faster than delivery of IMRT plans. Often reported increased plan quality for VMAT compared to IMRT has not been observed for cervical cancer. Twenty and 12 beam IMRT plans had a higher quality than single and dual arc VMAT. For individual patients, the optimal delivery technique depends on a complex trade-off between plan quality and treatment time that may change with introduction of faster delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dosimetric evaluation of CR, 3DCRT and two types of IMRT for breast cancer after conservative surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuli Zhang; Yongqian Zhang; Yadi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the dose distribution and dose volume histogram (DVH) of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) among conventional radiation therapy (CR), three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), two-step intensity-modulated radiation therapy (TS-IMRT) and direct machine parameter optimization intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DMPO-IMRT) after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: For each of 20 randomly chosen patients, 4 plans were designed using 4 irradiation techniques. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy/2 Gy/25 f, 95% of the planning target volume received this dose. The cumulated DVHs and 3D dose distributions of CR, 3DCRT, TSIMRT and DMPO-IMRT plans were compared. Results: For the homogeneity indices, no statistically significant difference was observed among CR, 3DCRT, TS-IMRT and DMPO-IMRT while the difference of the conformality indices were statistically significant. With regard to the organs at risk, IMRT and 3DCRT showed a significantly fewer exposure dose to the ipsilateral lung than CR in the high-dose area while in the low-dose area, IMRT demonstrated a significant increase of exposure dose to ipsilateral lung, heart and contralateral breast compared with 3DCRT and CR. In addition, the monitor units (MUs) for DMPOIMRT were approximately 26% more than those of TS-IMRT and the segments of the former were approximately 24% less than those of the latter. Conclusion: Compared with CR, 3DCRT and IMRT improved the homogeneity and conformity of PTV, reduced the irradiated volume of OARs in high dose area but IMRT increased the irradiated volume of OARs in low dose area. DMPO-IMRT plan has fewer delivery time but more MUs than TS-IMRT.

  8. Dosimetry for radiobiology experiments at GANIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durantel, Florent; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Cassimi, Amine; Chevalier, François; Ngono-Ravache, Yvette; Madi, Toiammou; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Ramillon, Jean-Marc; Rothard, Hermann; Ropars, Frédéric; Schwob, Lucas; Testard, Isabelle; Saintigny, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    Mainly encouraged by the increasing application of ion beams for cancer treatment (hadron-therapy) including carbon beams, the use of heavy ion facilities for radiobiology is expanding rapidly today. As an alternative to dedicated centers for treatment and medical research, accelerators like GANIL offer the possibility to undertake such experiments. Since 20 years, CIMAP, reinforced 15 years ago by the biological host laboratory LARIA, has been receiving researchers in radiobiology and assisted them in performing experiments in different fields such as hadron-therapy, space radioprotection and fundamental biological and physico-chemical mechanisms. We present here a short description of the beam line and the on-line equipments that allow the automatic irradiation of up to 24 biological samples at once. We also developed an original on-line beam monitoring procedure for low ion flux (low dose rates) based on the measurement of the K-shell X-rays emitted from a thin iron foil. This detector is calibrated on an absolute scale before each experiment by counting etched tracks on an irradiated CR39 polymer plate. We present the performances and limits of this method and finally give typical fluence (dose) uncertainties for a standard irradiation in radiobiology.

  9. Dosimetry for radiobiology experiments at GANIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durantel, Florent, E-mail: durantel@ganil.fr [CIMAP-GANIL, Caen (France); Balanzat, Emmanuel; Cassimi, Amine [CIMAP-GANIL, Caen (France); Chevalier, François [CEA/DSV/LARIA, Caen (France); Ngono-Ravache, Yvette; Madi, Toiammou; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Ramillon, Jean-Marc; Rothard, Hermann; Ropars, Frédéric; Schwob, Lucas [CIMAP-GANIL, Caen (France); Testard, Isabelle [CEA/DSV/CBM/iRTSV, Grenoble (France); Saintigny, Yannick [CEA/DSV/LARIA, Caen (France)

    2016-04-21

    Mainly encouraged by the increasing application of ion beams for cancer treatment (hadron-therapy) including carbon beams, the use of heavy ion facilities for radiobiology is expanding rapidly today. As an alternative to dedicated centers for treatment and medical research, accelerators like GANIL offer the possibility to undertake such experiments. Since 20 years, CIMAP, reinforced 15 years ago by the biological host laboratory LARIA, has been receiving researchers in radiobiology and assisted them in performing experiments in different fields such as hadron-therapy, space radioprotection and fundamental biological and physico-chemical mechanisms. We present here a short description of the beam line and the on-line equipments that allow the automatic irradiation of up to 24 biological samples at once. We also developed an original on-line beam monitoring procedure for low ion flux (low dose rates) based on the measurement of the K-shell X-rays emitted from a thin iron foil. This detector is calibrated on an absolute scale before each experiment by counting etched tracks on an irradiated CR39 polymer plate. We present the performances and limits of this method and finally give typical fluence (dose) uncertainties for a standard irradiation in radiobiology.

  10. A comprehensive comparison of IMRT and VMAT plan quality for prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Enzhuo M; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Yupeng; Wang, Xiaochun; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Johnson, Jennifer L; Kuban, Deborah A; Lee, Andrew K; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-07-15

    We performed a comprehensive comparative study of the plan quality between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of prostate cancer. Eleven patients with prostate cancer treated at our institution were randomly selected for this study. For each patient, a VMAT plan and a series of IMRT plans using an increasing number of beams (8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 beams) were examined. All plans were generated using our in-house-developed automatic inverse planning (AIP) algorithm. An existing eight-beam clinical IMRT plan, which was used to treat the patient, was used as the reference plan. For each patient, all AIP-generated plans were optimized to achieve the same level of planning target volume (PTV) coverage as the reference plan. Plan quality was evaluated by measuring mean dose to and dose-volume statistics of the organs at risk, especially the rectum, from each type of plan. For the same PTV coverage, the AIP-generated VMAT plans had significantly better plan quality in terms of rectum sparing than the eight-beam clinical and AIP-generated IMRT plans (p plans in all the dosimetric indices decreased as the number of beams used in IMRT increased. IMRT plan quality was similar or superior to that of VMAT when the number of beams in IMRT was increased to a certain number, which ranged from 12 to 24 for the set of patients studied. The superior VMAT plan quality resulted in approximately 30% more monitor units than the eight-beam IMRT plans, but the delivery time was still less than 3 min. Considering the superior plan quality as well as the delivery efficiency of VMAT compared with that of IMRT, VMAT may be the preferred modality for treating prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amit, Guy; Marshall, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Purdie, Thomas G., E-mail: tom.purdie@rmp.uhn.ca; Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Levinshtein, Alex [Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Pekar, Vladimir [Philips Healthcare, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The treatment of thoracic cancer using external beam radiation requires an optimal selection of the radiation beam directions to ensure effective coverage of the target volume and to avoid unnecessary treatment of normal healthy tissues. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is a lengthy process, which requires the planner to iterate between choosing beam angles, specifying dose–volume objectives and executing IMRT optimization. In thorax treatment planning, where there are no class solutions for beam placement, beam angle selection is performed manually, based on the planner’s clinical experience. The purpose of this work is to propose and study a computationally efficient framework that utilizes machine learning to automatically select treatment beam angles. Such a framework may be helpful for reducing the overall planning workload. Methods: The authors introduce an automated beam selection method, based on learning the relationships between beam angles and anatomical features. Using a large set of clinically approved IMRT plans, a random forest regression algorithm is trained to map a multitude of anatomical features into an individual beam score. An optimization scheme is then built to select and adjust the beam angles, considering the learned interbeam dependencies. The validity and quality of the automatically selected beams evaluated using the manually selected beams from the corresponding clinical plans as the ground truth. Results: The analysis included 149 clinically approved thoracic IMRT plans. For a randomly selected test subset of 27 plans, IMRT plans were generated using automatically selected beams and compared to the clinical plans. The comparison of the predicted and the clinical beam angles demonstrated a good average correspondence between the two (angular distance 16.8° ± 10°, correlation 0.75 ± 0.2). The dose distributions of the semiautomatic and clinical plans were equivalent in terms of primary target volume

  12. Method for validating radiobiological samples using a linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brengues, Muriel [The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Liu, David; Korn, Ronald [Scottsdale Clinical Research Institute, Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Zenhausern, Frederic [The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Scottsdale Clinical Research Institute, Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2014-12-15

    There is an immediate need for rapid triage of the population in case of a large scale exposure to ionizing radiation. Knowing the dose absorbed by the body will allow clinicians to administer medical treatment for the best chance of recovery for the victim. In addition, today's radiotherapy treatment could benefit from additional information regarding the patient's sensitivity to radiation before starting the treatment. As of today, there is no system in place to respond to this demand. This paper will describe specific procedures to mimic the effects of human exposure to ionizing radiation creating the tools for optimization of administered radiation dosimetry for radiotherapy and/or to estimate the doses of radiation received accidentally during a radiation event that could pose a danger to the public. In order to obtain irradiated biological samples to study ionizing radiation absorbed by the body, we performed ex-vivo irradiation of human blood samples using the linear accelerator (LINAC). The LINAC was implemented and calibrated for irradiating human whole blood samples. To test the calibration, a 2 Gy test run was successfully performed on a tube filled with water with an accuracy of 3% in dose distribution. To validate our technique the blood samples were ex-vivo irradiated and the results were analyzed using a gene expression assay to follow the effect of the ionizing irradiation by characterizing dose responsive biomarkers from radiobiological assays. The response of 5 genes was monitored resulting in expression increase with the dose of radiation received. The blood samples treated with the LINAC can provide effective irradiated blood samples suitable for molecular profiling to validate radiobiological measurements via the gene-expression based biodosimetry tools. (orig.)

  13. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2010-01-01

    From a distinguished author comes this new edition for technologists, practitioners, residents, and students in radiology and nuclear medicine. Encompassing major topics in nuclear medicine from the basic physics of radioactive decay to instrumentation and radiobiology, it is an ideal review for Board and Registry examinations. The material is well organized and written with clarity. The book is supplemented with tables and illustrations throughout. It provides a quick reference book that is concise but comprehensive, and offers a complete discussion of topics for the nuclear medicine and radi

  14. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R.; Lin, Yong; Wilder, Julie; Hutt, Julie A.; Padilla, Mabel T.; Gott, Katherine M.

    2013-02-01

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  15. SU-E-T-126: Dosimetric Comparisons of VMAT, IMRT and 3DCRT for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with Simultaneous Integrated Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J; Wang, J; Zhang, Z; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Caner Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), fixed-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for the preoperative locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods: Ten LARC patients treated in our department using the simultaneous escalate strategy were retrospectively analyzed in this study. All patients had T3 with N+/− and were treated with IMRT. Two additional VMAT and 3DCRT plans were created for each patient. Both IMRT and VMAT had similar optimization objectives. The prescription was 50Gy to the PTV and 55Gy to the GTV. The target coverage and organs at risk were compared for all the techniques.The paired, two-tailed Wilcoxcon signed-rank test was applied for statistical analysis. Results: IMRT and VMAT plans achieved comparable tumor response except for the conformality index (1.07 vs 1.19 and 1.08 vs 1.03 of IMRT vs VMAT for PTV-G and PTV-C respectively). Compared to VMAT, IMRT showed superior or similar dose sparing in the small bowel, bladder, femoral head. Both IMRT and VMAT had better organs at risk sparing and homogeneity index of PTV-G. Conclusion: All 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT meet the prescript. The IMRT and VMAT provided comparable dosemitric parameters for target volume. IMRT shows better sparing for small bowel, bladder, femoral heads and normal tissue to 3DCRT and VMAT.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy techniques: 3D CRT, noncoplanar IMRT, coplanar IMRT, and VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sua; Blitzblau, Rachel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Horton, Janet K

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of treatment plans among four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy in order to select an optimal treatment technique. The techniques evaluated were noncoplanar 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTNC), coplanar IMRT (IMRTCO), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The planning CT scans of 16 patients in the prone position were used in this study, with the single-fraction prescription doses of 15 Gy for the first eight patients and 18 Gy for the remaining eight patients. Six (6) MV photon beams were designed to avoid the heart and contralateral breast. Optimization for IMRT and VMAT was performed to reduce the dose to the skin and normal breast. All plans were normalized such that 100% of the prescribed dose covered greater than 95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) consisting of gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1.5 cm margin. Mean homogeneity index (HI) was the lowest (1.05 ± 0.02) for 3D CRT and the highest (1.11 ± 0.04) for VMAT. Mean conformity index (CI) was the lowest (1.42 ± 0.32) for IMRTNC and the highest (1.60 ± 0.32) for VMAT. Mean of the maximum point dose to skin was the lowest (73.7 ± 11.5%) for IMRTNC and the highest (86.5 ± 6.68%) for 3D CRT. IMRTCO showed very similar HI, CI, and maximum skin dose to IMRTNC (differences radiotherapy, we can conclude that noncoplanar or coplanar IMRT were optimal in this study as IMRT plans provided homogeneous and conformal target coverage, skin sparing, and relatively short treatment delivery time.

  17. The use of IMRT in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Kruell, Andreas [Ambulanzzentrum des UKE GmbH, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Bereich Strahlentherapie, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is frequently used, but there are no data about current frequency regarding specific tumor sites and equipment used for quality assurance (QA). An online survey about IMRT was executed from April to October 2014 by the collaborative IMRT working group (AK IMRT) of the German Association of Medical Physicists (DGMP). A total of 23 German institutions took part in the survey. Most reports came from users working with Elekta, Varian, and Siemens treatment machines, but also from TomoTherapy and BrainLab. Most frequent IMRT technology was volumetric modulated arc therapy (58.37 %: VMAT/''rapid arc''), followed by step-and-shoot IMRT (14.66 %), dynamic MLC (dMLC: 14.53 %), TomoTherapy (9.25 %), and 3.2 % other techniques. Different commercial hard- and software solutions are available for QA, whereas many institutes still develop their own phantoms. Data of 26,779 patients were included in the survey; 44 % were treated using IMRT techniques. IMRT was most frequently used for anal cancer, (whole) craniospinal irradiation, head and neck cancer, prostate cancer, other tumors in the pelvic region, gynecological tumors (except for breast cancer), and brain tumors. An estimated 10 % of all patients treated in 2014 with radiation in Germany were included in the survey. It is representative for the members of the AK IMRT. IMRT may be on the way to replace other treatment techniques. However, many scientific questions are still open. In particular, it is unclear when the IMRT technique should not be used. (orig.) [German] Intensitaetsmodulierte Bestrahlungstechniken (IMRT) werden oft eingesetzt. Es gibt jedoch keine Daten ueber deren Haeufigkeit in Abhaengigkeit von den Tumorentitaeten und welche Geraete fuer die Qualitaetssicherung (QA) zum Einsatz kommen. Der Arbeitskreis IMRT (AK IMRT) der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) hat von April bis Oktober 2014 eine Online-Umfrage zu diesem Themenbereich

  18. Dosimetric comparison of treatment techniques IMRT and VMAT for breast cancer; Comparacion dosimetrica de las tecnicas de tratamiento IMRT y VMAT para cancer en mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbina, G. L. [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Maestria en Fisica Medica, Av. Tupac Amaru s/n, Rimac, Lima 25 (Peru); Garcia, B. G., E-mail: gerlup@hotmail.com [Red AUNA, Clinica Delgado, Av. Angamos Cdra. 4 esquina Gral. Borgono, Miraflores, Lima (Peru)

    2015-10-15

    In this study the dosimetric distribution was compared in the different treatment techniques such as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in female patients with breast cancer with stage II-B and III-A, 6 cases (both calculated on VMAT and IMRT) were studied, comparison parameter that are taken into account are: compliance rate, homogeneity index, monitor units, volume dose 50 Gy (D-50%) and 5 Gy (D-5%) volume dose. Comparisons are made in primary tumor volume to optimize treatment in patients with breast cancer, with IMRT using Step, Shoot and VMAT Monte Carlo algorithm, in addition to the organs at risk; the concern to make this work is due to technological advances in radiotherapy and the application of new treatment techniques, that increase the accuracy allowing treatment dose climbing delivering a higher dose to the patient. (Author)

  19. BNL ACCELERATOR-BASED RADIOBIOLOGY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    2000-05-28

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40--3,000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} ions per pulse. The BAF Project is described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans are presented.

  20. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2013-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of Dr. Gopal B. Saha’s Physics and Radiobiology of Nuclear Medicine was prompted by the need to provide up-to-date information to keep pace with the perpetual growth and improvement in the instrumentation and techniques employed in nuclear medicine since the last edition published in 2006. Like previous editions, the book is intended for radiology and nuclear medicine residents to prepare for the American Board of Nuclear Medicine, American Board of Radiology, and American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine examinations, all of which require a strong physics background. Additionally, the book will serve as a textbook on nuclear medicine physics for nuclear medicine technologists taking the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board examination.

  1. Accelerated iterative beam angle selection in IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangert, Mark, E-mail: m.bangert@dkfz.de [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center—DKFZ, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Iterative methods for beam angle selection (BAS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning sequentially construct a beneficial ensemble of beam directions. In a naïve implementation, the nth beam is selected by adding beam orientations one-by-one from a discrete set of candidates to an existing ensemble of (n − 1) beams. The best beam orientation is identified in a time consuming process by solving the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem for every candidate beam and selecting the beam that yields the largest improvement to the objective function value. This paper evaluates two alternative methods to accelerate iterative BAS based on surrogates for the FMO objective function value. Methods: We suggest to select candidate beams not based on the FMO objective function value after convergence but (1) based on the objective function value after five FMO iterations of a gradient based algorithm and (2) based on a projected gradient of the FMO problem in the first iteration. The performance of the objective function surrogates is evaluated based on the resulting objective function values and dose statistics in a treatment planning study comprising three intracranial, three pancreas, and three prostate cases. Furthermore, iterative BAS is evaluated for an application in which a small number of noncoplanar beams complement a set of coplanar beam orientations. This scenario is of practical interest as noncoplanar setups may require additional attention of the treatment personnel for every couch rotation. Results: Iterative BAS relying on objective function surrogates yields similar results compared to naïve BAS with regard to the objective function values and dose statistics. At the same time, early stopping of the FMO and using the projected gradient during the first iteration enable reductions in computation time by approximately one to two orders of magnitude. With regard to the clinical delivery of noncoplanar IMRT treatments, we could

  2. Comparative dosimetric and radiobiological assessment among a nonstandard RapidArc, standard RapidArc, classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 3D brachytherapy for the treatment of the vaginal vault in patients affected by gynecologic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Califano, Giorgia [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Barbieri, Viviana; Sanpaolo, Piero; Castaldo, Giovanni [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumors of Romagna IRST, Meldola (Italy); Fusco, Vincenzo [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a nonstandard RapidArc (RA) modality as alternative to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT) or IMRT treatments of the vaginal vault in patients with gynecological cancer (GC). Nonstandard (with vaginal applicator) and standard (without vaginal applicator) RapidArc plans for 27 women with GC were developed to compare with HDR-BRT and IMRT. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison were performed by means of dose-volume histogram and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). In addition, the integral dose and the overall treatment times were evaluated. RA, as well as IMRT, results in a high uniform dose on PTV compared with HDR-BRT. However, the average of EUD for HDR-BRT was significantly higher than those with RA and IMRT. With respect to the OARs, standard RA was equivalent of IMRT but inferior to HDR-BRT. Furthermore, nonstandard RA was comparable with IMRT for bladder and sigmoid and better than HDR-BRT for the rectum because of a significant reduction of d{sub 2cc}, d{sub 1cc}, and d{sub max} (p < 0.01). Integral doses were always higher than HDR-BRT, although the values were very low. Delivery times were about the same and more than double for HDR-BRT compared with IMRT and RA, respectively. In conclusion, the boost of dose on vaginal vault in patients affected by GC delivered by a nonstandard RA technique was a reasonable alternative to the conventional HDR-BRT because of a reduction of delivery time and rectal dose at substantial comparable doses for the bladder and sigmoid. However HDR-BRT provides better performance in terms of PTV coverage as evidenced by a greater EUD.

  3. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekha Reddy, B.; Ravikumar, M.; Tanvir Pasha, C.R; Anil Kumar, M.R; Varatharaj, C. [Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Pyakuryal, A [University Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Narayanasamy, Ganesh [UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory.

  4. Radiobiology with heavy charged particles: a historical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarsgard, L.D. [Dept. of Medical Biophysics, B.C. Cancer Research Centre and TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation will attempt to briefly review some of radiobiological data on the effects of heavy charged particles and to discuss the influence of those studies on the clinical application which followed. (orig./MG)

  5. Esophagus and Contralateral Lung-Sparing IMRT for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer in the Community Hospital Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Johnny eKao; Jeffrey ePettit; Soombal eZahid; Gold, Kenneth D.; Terry ePalatt

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal technique for performing lung IMRT remains poorly defined. We hypothesize that improved dose distributions associated with normal tissue-sparing IMRT can allow safe dose escalation resulting in decreased acute and late toxicity. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 82 consecutive lung cancer patients treated with curative intent from 1/10 to 9/14. From 1/10 to 4/12, 44 patients were treated with the community standard of three-dimensional conforma...

  6. Does VMAT for treatment of NSCLC patients increase the risk of pneumonitis compared to IMRT ? - a planning study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients potentially changes the risk of radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP) compared to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if the dose to the healthy lung is changed significantly. In this study,......, clinical IMRT plans were used as starting point for VMAT optimization and differences in risk estimates of RP between the two plan types were evaluated....

  7. Radiobiology of Radiosurgery for the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Santacroce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Leksell radiosurgery is defined as “the delivery of a single, high dose of irradiation to a small and critically located intracranial volume through the intact skull.” Before its birth in the early 60s and its introduction in clinical therapeutic protocols in late the 80s dose application in radiation therapy of the brain for benign and malignant lesions was based on the administration of cumulative dose into a variable number of fractions. The rationale of dose fractionation is to lessen the risk of injury of normal tissue surrounding the target volume. Radiobiological studies of cell culture lines of malignant tumors and clinical experience with patients treated with conventional fractionated radiotherapy helped establishing this radiobiological principle. Radiosurgery provides a single high dose of radiation which translates into a specific toxic radiobiological response. Radiobiological investigations to study the effect of high dose focused radiation on the central nervous system began in late the 50s. It is well known currently that radiobiological principles applied for dose fractionation are not reproducible when single high dose of ionizing radiation is delivered. A review of the literature about radiobiology of radiosurgery for the central nervous system is presented.

  8. Impact of different IMRT techniques to improve conformity and normal tissue sparing in upper esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin E Amin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for cervical esophageal cancer is challenging. Although IMRT techniques using inverse planning algorithms are facilitating the treatment planning process, the irradiation dose to the normal tissues can be a critical issue. This study was performed to investigate the effect of beam numbers and their directions and local optimization on: (1 dose conformity and homogeneity to the planning target volume (PTV and (2 dose to the organ at risks (OARs.Methods: Four upper esophageal cancer cases were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. Eight IMRT plans were generated for each case with the same dose-volume constraints but with different beam numbers and arrangements. Local optimization using regular structures drawn automatically around the PTV with margins from 0.5-1.5 cm was performed. IMRT plans were evaluated with respect to isodose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVHs parameters, homogeneity index (HI, and conformity index (CI. The statistical comparison between the types of plans was done using the One Way ANOVA test.Results: The results showed that IMRT using three or five beams was not sufficient to obtain good dose optimization. The seven field plans showed the best coverage for the PTV with tolerable doses for the OARs, and the beam orientation was very critical. Increasing beams (Bs number from 7 to 13 did not show significant differences in the PTV coverage, while the mean lung dose was increased. The PTV coverage were 95.1, 95.1, 98.1, 97.3, 97.3, 97.3, 97.0, and 97.0% for 3Bs, 5Bs, 7Bs, 9Bs, 13Bs, 7Bs(30, 7Bs(60 (beam angles were changed from 0o to 30o and 60o, and 7Bs(R (seven IMRT plans with ring, respectively. The mean heart dose did not exceed 0.36 Gy with p < 0.05. For lung doses, the best plan was the one with 9Bs which reduced lung volume doses V20Gy (% and V30Gy (%, and reduced mean lung dose from 5.4 to 4.5 Gy with p < 0.05 for 7Bs(R plans. IMRT improved the

  9. SU-E-J-125: A Novel IMRT Planning Technique to Spare Sacral Bone Marrow in Pelvic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S; Bhatia, S; Sun, W; Menda, Y; Ponto, L; Gross, B; Buatti, J [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Develop an IMRT planning technique that can preferentially spare sacral bone marrow for pelvic cancer patients. Methods: Six pelvic cancer patients (two each with anal, cervical, and rectal cancer) were enrolled in an IRB approved protocol to obtain FLT PET images at simulation, during, and post chemoradiation therapy. Initially, conventional IMRT plans were created to maintain target coverage and reduce dose to OARs such as bladder, bowel, rectum, and femoral heads. Simulation FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans to spare bone marrow identified as regions with SUV of 2 or greater (IMRT-BMS) within the pelvic bones from top of L3 to 5mm below the greater trochanter without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing when compared to the initial IMRT plan. IMRT-BMS plans used 8–10 beam angles that surrounded the subject. These plans were used for treatment. Retrospectively, the same simulation FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans that spared bone marrow located in the sacral pelvic bone region (IMRT-FAN) also without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing. IMRT-FAN plans used 16 beam angles every 12° anteriorly from 90° – 270°. Optimization objectives for the sacral bone marrow avoidance region were weighted to reduce ≥V10. Results: IMRT-FAN reduced dose to the sacral bone marrow for all six subjects. The average V5, V10, V20, and V30 differences from the IMRT-BMS plan were −2.2 ± 1.7%, −11.4 ± 3.6%, −17.6 ± 5.1%, and −19.1 ± 8.1% respectively. Average PTV coverage change was 0.5% ± 0.8% from the conventional IMRT plan. Conclusion: An IMRT planning technique that uses beams from the anterior and lateral directions reduced the volume of sacral bone marrow that receives ≤10Gy while maintaining PTV coverage and OAR sparing. Additionally, the volume of sacral bone marrow that received 20 or 30 Gy was also reduced.

  10. Tcp and NTCP radiobiological models: conventional and hypo fractionated treatments in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo V, A.; Paredes G, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Resendiz G, G.; Posadas V, A. [Hospital Angeles Lomas, Av. Vialidad de la Barranca s/n, Col. Valle de las Palmas, 52763 Huixquilucan de Degallado, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mitsoura, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, Paseo Tollocan, Esq. Jesus Carranza s/n, Col. Moderna de la Cruz, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rodriguez L, A.; Flores C, J. M., E-mail: armando.astudillo@inin.gob.mx [Hospital Medica Sur, Puente de Piedra 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, 14050 Tlalpan, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The hypo and conventional fractionated schedules performance were compared in terms of the tumor control and the normal tissue complications. From the records of ten patients, treated for adenocarcinoma and without mastectomy, the dose-volume histogram was used. Using radiobiological models the probabilities for tumor control and normal tissue complications were calculated. For both schedules the tumor control was approximately the same. However, the damage in the normal tissue was larger in conventional fractionated schedule. This is important because patients assistance time to their fractions (15 fractions/25 fractions) can be optimized. Thus, the hypo fractionated schedule has suitable characteristics to be implemented. (Author)

  11. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 22. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 22. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Cordes, Nils; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Krause, Mechthild; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, H. Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2013-03-01

    The proceedings of the 22th Symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiotherapy contain lectures and poster on the following issues: Radiation induced immuno-targeting of tumors; targeting in the radiotherapy; biomarkers; targeting; radio-oncological therapy of rectal carcinoma - contribution of radiobiology for therapy optimization; biomarkers for radiation sensibility; resistance mechanisms of tumors; resistance mechanisms of normal tissue; micro ambience, P13L inhibition in radiotherapy: improvement of the local tumor control by molecular mechanisms or the influence of the tumor micro-ambience? DNA repair; radiation effects and technical development.

  12. Biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Highlights of my biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology is presented. Early adventures involved developing state-vector models'' for specific harmful effects (cell killing, life shortening) of exposure to radiation. More recent adventures led to developing hazard-function models'' for predicting biological effects (e.g., cell killing, mutations, tumor induction) of combined exposure to different toxicants. Hazard-function models were also developed for predicting harm to man from exposure to large radiation doses. Major conclusions derived from the modeling adventures are as follows: (1) synergistic effects of different genotoxic agents should not occur at low doses; (2) for exposure of the lung or bone marrow to large doses of photon radiation, low rates of exposure should be better tolerated than high rates; and (3) for some types of radiation (e.g., alpha particles and fission neutrons), moderate doses delivered at a low rate may be more harmful than the same dose given at a high rate. 53 refs., 7 figs.

  13. IMRT in a pregnant patient: how to reduce the fetal dose?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Nyström, Håkan; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    was the greatest contributor to the peripheral dose. Therefore, the shielding used for the IMRT treatment of our patient could also be used when shielding in conventional radiotherapy. It is important for a radiation therapy department to be prepared for treatment of a pregnant patient to shield the fetus......The purpose of our study was to find a solution for fetal dose reduction during head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a pregnant patient. The first step was optimization of the IMRT treatment plan with as few monitor units (MUs) as possible, while maintaining an acceptable...... peripheral dose was divided into leakage, and internal and collimator scatter, to find the degree to which each component influences the peripheral dose to build an appropriate shield. Collimator scatter was the greatest contributor to the peripheral dose throughout the range of the growing fetus. A shield...

  14. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenski, Matthew T; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua; Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph; Tuluc, Madalina; Harrison, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  15. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph [Department of Otolaryngology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tuluc, Madalina [Department of Pathology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  16. Dosimetry tools and techniques for IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Daniel A; Moran, Jean M; Dempsey, James F; Dong, Lei; Oldham, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) poses a number of challenges for properly measuring commissioning data and quality assurance (QA) radiation dose distributions. This report provides a comprehensive overview of how dosimeters, phantoms, and dose distribution analysis techniques should be used to support the commissioning and quality assurance requirements of an IMRT program. The proper applications of each dosimeter are described along with the limitations of each system. Point detectors, arrays, film, and electronic portal imagers are discussed with respect to their proper use, along with potential applications of 3D dosimetry. Regardless of the IMRT technique utilized, some situations require the use of multiple detectors for the acquisition of accurate commissioning data. The overall goal of this task group report is to provide a document that aids the physicist in the proper selection and use of the dosimetry tools available for IMRT QA and to provide a resource for physicists that describes dosimetry measurement techniques for purposes of IMRT commissioning and measurement-based characterization or verification of IMRT treatment plans. This report is not intended to provide a comprehensive review of commissioning and QA procedures for IMRT. Instead, this report focuses on the aspects of metrology, particularly the practical aspects of measurements that are unique to IMRT. The metrology of IMRT concerns the application of measurement instruments and their suitability, calibration, and quality control of measurements. Each of the dosimetry measurement tools has limitations that need to be considered when incorporating them into a commissioning process or a comprehensive QA program. For example, routine quality assurance procedures require the use of robust field dosimetry systems. These often exhibit limitations with respect to spatial resolution or energy response and need to themselves be commissioned against more established dosimeters. A chain of

  17. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjei, Daniel, E-mail: nana.adjeidan@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Vyšín, Luděk [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 152, Radzikowskiego Str., 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Pina, Ladislav [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Davídková, Marie [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Řež (Czech Republic); Juha, Libor [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray “water window” spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280–540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 10{sup 3} photons/μm{sup 2}/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms’ sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the “water window”, where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET – Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  18. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  19. Esophagus and contralateral lung-sparing IMRT for locally advanced lung cancer in the community hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny eKao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The optimal technique for performing lung IMRT remains poorly defined. We hypothesize that improved dose distributions associated with normal tissue sparing IMRT can allow for safe dose escalation resulting in decreased acute and late toxicity. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 82 consecutive lung cancer patients treated with curative intent from 1/10 to 9/14. From 1/10 to 4/12, 44 patients were treated with the community standard of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or IMRT without specific esophagus or contralateral lung constraints (standard RT. From 5/12 to 9/14, 38 patients were treated with normal tissue-sparing IMRT with selective sparing of contralateral lung and esophagus. The study endpoints were dosimetry, toxicity and overall survival.Results: Despite higher mean prescribed radiation doses in the normal tissue-sparing IMRT cohort (64.5 Gy vs. 60.8 Gy, p=0.04, patients treated with normal tissue-sparing IMRT had significantly lower lung V20, V10, V5, mean lung, maximum esophagus and mean esophagus doses compared to patients treated with standard RT (p≤0.001. Patients in the normal tissue-sparing IMRT group had reduced acute grade ≥3 esophagitis (0% vs. 11%, p<0.001, acute grade ≥2 weight loss (2% vs. 16%, p=0.04, late grade ≥2 pneumonitis (7% vs. 21%, p=0.02. The 2-year overall survival was 52% with normal tissue-sparing IMRT arm compared to 28% for standard RT (p=0.015.Conclusion: These data provide proof of principle that suboptimal radiation dose distributions are associated with significant acute and late lung and esophageal toxicity that may result in hospitalization or even premature mortality. Strict attention to contralateral lung and esophageal dose volume constraints are feasible in the community hospital setting without sacrificing disease control.

  20. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, V; Kurup, P G G; Mahadev, P; Mahalakshmi, S

    2010-04-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  1. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR, namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  2. Dosimetric study for cervix carcinoma treatment using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D intracavitary brachytherapy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Gang; Wang, Pei; Lang, Jinyi; Tian, Yin; Luo, Yangkun; Fan, Zixuan; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-06-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) boost technique (ICBT + IMRT) has been used in our hospital for advanced cervix carcinoma patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the four different boost techniques (the conventional 2D HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [CICBT], 3D optimized HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [OICBT], and IMRT-alone with the applicator in situ). For 30 patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma, after the completion of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for whole pelvic irradiation 45 Gy/25 fractions, five fractions of ICBT + IMRT boost with 6 Gy/fractions for high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and 5 Gy/fractions for intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were applied. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired using an in situ CT/MRI-compatible applicator. The gross tumor volume (GTV), the high/intermediate-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV/IRCTV), bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured by CT scans. For ICBT + IMRT plan, values of D90, D100 of HRCTV, D90, D100, and V100 of IRCTV significantly increased (p < 0.05) in comparison to OICBT and CICBT. The D2cc values for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were significantly lower than that of CICBT and IMRT alone. In all patients, the mean rectum V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT and OICBT techniques were very similar but for bladder and sigmoid, the V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT were higher than that of OICBT. For the ICBT + IMRT plan, the standard deviations (SD) of D90 and D2cc were found to be lower than other three treatment plans. The ICBT + IMRT technique not only provides good target coverage but also maintains low doses (D2cc) to the OAR. ICBT + IMRT is an optional technique to boost parametrial region or tumor of large size and irregular shape when intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy

  3. SU-E-T-163: Evaluation of Dose Distributions Recalculated with Per-Field Measurement Data Under the Condition of Respiratory Motion During IMRT for Liver Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J; Yoon, M; Nam, T; Ahn, S; Chung, W [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun-kun, Chonnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The dose distributions within the real volumes of tumor targets and critical organs during internal target volume-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (ITV-IMRT) for liver cancer were recalculated by applying the effects of actual respiratory organ motion, and the dosimetric features were analyzed through comparison with gating IMRT (Gate-IMRT) plan results. Methods: The 4DCT data for 10 patients who had been treated with Gate-IMRT for liver cancer were selected to create ITV-IMRT plans. The ITV was created using MIM software, and a moving phantom was used to simulate respiratory motion. The period and range of respiratory motion were recorded in all patients from 4DCT-generated movie data, and the same period and range were applied when operating the dynamic phantom to realize coincident respiratory conditions in each patient. The doses were recalculated with a 3 dose-volume histogram (3DVH) program based on the per-field data measured with a MapCHECK2 2-dimensional diode detector array and compared with the DVHs calculated for the Gate-IMRT plan. Results: Although a sufficient prescription dose covered the PTV during ITV-IMRT delivery, the dose homogeneity in the PTV was inferior to that with the Gate-IMRT plan. We confirmed that there were higher doses to the organs-at-risk (OARs) with ITV-IMRT, as expected when using an enlarged field, but the increased dose to the spinal cord was not significant and the increased doses to the liver and kidney could be considered as minor when the reinforced constraints were applied during IMRT plan optimization. Conclusion: Because Gate-IMRT cannot always be considered an ideal method with which to correct the respiratory motional effect, given the dosimetric variations in the gating system application and the increased treatment time, a prior analysis for optimal IMRT method selection should be performed while considering the patient's respiratory condition and IMRT plan results.

  4. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, C.; Smith, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Prather, J. (Linfield Coll., McMinnville, OR (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems.

  5. Automation of the particle dosimetry and the dose application for radiobiological experiments at a vertical proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Moertel, H; Eyrich, W; Fritsch, M; Distel, L

    2002-01-01

    A facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been setup at the Tandem accelerator at Erlangen. This energy region is optimal to investigate the biological effects of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg region under physiological conditions. A new automated data acquisition system for dosimetry and monitoring based on a personal computer was developed and optimized for this setup. A specially designed sample holder offers possibilities of cooling or changing of atmosphere during irradiation. First irradiations of biological samples have shown the functionality of the setup.

  6. Dosimetric advantages of IMPT over IMRT for laser-accelerated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, W; Li, J; Fourkal, E; Fan, J; Xu, X; Chen, Z; Jin, L; Price, R; Ma, C-M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)], E-mail: wei.luo@duke.edu

    2008-12-21

    As a clinical application of an exciting scientific breakthrough, a compact and cost-efficient proton therapy unit using high-power laser acceleration is being developed at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The significance of this application depends on whether or not it can yield dosimetric superiority over intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The goal of this study is to show how laser-accelerated proton beams with broad energy spreads can be optimally used for proton therapy including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and achieve dosimetric superiority over IMRT for prostate cancer. Desired energies and spreads with a varying {delta}E/E were selected with the particle selection device and used to generate spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). Proton plans were generated on an in-house Monte Carlo-based inverse-planning system. Fifteen prostate IMRT plans previously used for patient treatment have been included for comparison. Identical dose prescriptions, beam arrangement and consistent dose constrains were used for IMRT and IMPT plans to show the dosimetric differences that were caused only by the different physical characteristics of proton and photon beams. Different optimization constrains and beam arrangements were also used to find optimal IMPT. The results show that conventional proton therapy (CPT) plans without intensity modulation were not superior to IMRT, but IMPT can generate better proton plans if appropriate beam setup and optimization are used. Compared to IMRT, IMPT can reduce the target dose heterogeneity ((D{sub 5}-D{sub 95})/D{sub 95}) by up to 56%. The volume receiving 65 Gy and higher (V{sub 65}) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 45% and 88%, respectively, while the volume receiving 40 Gy and higher (V{sub 40}) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 49% and 68%, respectively. IMPT can also reduce the whole body non-target tissue dose by up to 61% or a factor 2.5. This study has shown that the laser

  7. An IMRT/VMAT Technique for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study is to investigate a Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combines intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Two partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT, and hybrid plans were created for 15 patients with NSCLC. The hybrid plans were combination of 2 partial arcs VMAT and 5-field IMRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV and organs at risk (OARs for hybrid technique was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Hybrid technique significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT. The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. Hybrid technique reduced V5, V10, V30, and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT and spared the OARs better with fewer MUs with the cost of a little higher V5, V10, and mean lung dose (MLD of normal lung compared with IMRT. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT can be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality.

  8. An IMRT/VMAT Technique for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Zhang, Xile; Li, Jinna

    2015-01-01

    The study is to investigate a Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combines intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT, and hybrid plans were created for 15 patients with NSCLC. The hybrid plans were combination of 2 partial arcs VMAT and 5-field IMRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for hybrid technique was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Hybrid technique significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT. The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. Hybrid technique reduced V5, V10, V30, and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT and spared the OARs better with fewer MUs with the cost of a little higher V5, V10, and mean lung dose (MLD) of normal lung compared with IMRT. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT can be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality.

  9. An IMRT/VMAT Technique for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Zhang, Xile; Li, Jinna

    2015-01-01

    The study is to investigate a Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combines intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT, and hybrid plans were created for 15 patients with NSCLC. The hybrid plans were combination of 2 partial arcs VMAT and 5-field IMRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for hybrid technique was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Hybrid technique significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT. The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. Hybrid technique reduced V 5, V 10, V 30, and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT and spared the OARs better with fewer MUs with the cost of a little higher V 5, V 10, and mean lung dose (MLD) of normal lung compared with IMRT. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT can be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality. PMID:26539515

  10. A comparative study of dose distribution of PBT, 3D-CRT and IMRT for pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Daichi; Mizumoto, Masashi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Fukushima, Hiroko; Fukushima, Takashi; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2017-02-22

    It was reported that proton beam therapy (PBT) reduced the normal brain dose compared with X-ray therapy for pediatric brain tumors. We considered whether there was not the condition that PBT was more disadvantageous than intensity modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT) and 3D conventional radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for treatment of pediatric brain tumors about the dose reduction for the normal brain when the tumor location or tumor size were different. The subjects were 12 patients treated with PBT at our institute, including 6 cases of ependymoma treated by local irradiation and 6 cases of germinoma treated by irradiation of all four cerebral ventricles. IMRT and 3D-CRT treatment plans were made for these 12 cases, with optimization using the same planning conditions as those for PBT. Model cases were also compared using sphere targets with different diameters or locations in the brain, and the normal brain doses with PBT, IMRT and 3D-CRT were compared using the same planning conditions. PBT significantly reduced the average dose to normal brain tissue compared to 3D-CRT and IMRT in all cases. There was no difference between 3D-CRT and IMRT. The average normal brain doses for PBT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT were 5.1-34.8% (median 14.9%), 11.0-48.5% (23.8%), and 11.5-53.1% (23.5%), respectively, in ependymoma cases; and 42.3-61.2% (48.9%), 54.5-74.0% (62.8%), and 56.3-72.1% (61.2%), respectively, in germinoma cases. In the model cases, PBT significantly reduced the average normal brain dose for larger tumors and for tumors located at the periphery of the brain. PBT reduces the average dose to normal brain tissue, compared with 3D-CRT and IMRT. The effect is higher for a tumor that is larger or located laterally.

  11. Towards adaptive IMRT sequencing for the MR-linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxis, C.; Bol, G. H.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2015-03-01

    The MRI linear accelerator (MR-linac) that is currently being installed in the University Medical Center Utrecht (Utrecht, The Netherlands), will be able to track the patient’s target(s) and Organ(s) At Risk during radiation delivery. In this paper, we present a treatment planning system for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). It is capable of Adaptive Radiotherapy and consists of a GPU Monte Carlo dose engine, an inverse dose optimization algorithm and a novel adaptive sequencing algorithm. The system is able to compensate for patient anatomy changes and enables radiation delivery immediately from the first calculated segment. IMRT plans meeting all clinical constraints were generated for two breast cases, one spinal bone metastasis case, two prostate cases with integrated boost regions and one head and neck case. These plans were generated by the segment weighted version of our algorithm, in a 0 T environment in order to test the feasibility of the new sequencing strategy in current clinical conditions, yielding very small differences between the fluence and sequenced distributions. All plans went through stringent experimental quality assurance on Delta4 and passed all clinical tests currently performed in our institute. A new inter-fraction adaptation scheme built on top of this algorithm is also proposed that enables convergence to the ideal dose distribution without the need of a final segment weight optimization. The first results of this method confirm that convergence is achieved within the first fractions of the treatment. These features combined will lead to a fully adaptive intra-fraction planning system able to take into account patient anatomy updates during treatment.

  12. Influence of the order of introduction of a set of objectives in IMRT treatment schedules prostate; Influencia del orden de introduccion de un conjunto de objetivos en planificaciones de tratamientos IMRT de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravilla Limorte, M.; Gomez Martin, C.; Alonso Iracheta, L.; Bejar Navarro, M. J.; Capuz Suarez, A. B.; Comenares Fernandez, R.; Moris Pablos, R.; Rot Sanjuan, M. J.

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze to what extent could influence the order in which you enter the target calculation algorithm of planning. For this, assesses the implications-both-dosimetric calculation as derived from the implementation of 3 IMRT optimization methods, which only differ in regard to the order of introduction of a fixed set of objectives.

  13. The effect of beam energy on the quality of IMRT plans for prostate conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Steven F; Kumek, Yunus; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2007-04-01

    Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for prostate cancer is most commonly delivered with high-energy photons, typically in the range of 10-21 MV. With the advent of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), an increase in the number of monitor units (MU) relative to 3DCRT has lead to a concern about secondary malignancies. This risk becomes more relevant at higher photon energies where there is a greater neutron contribution. Subsequently, the majority of IMRT prostate treatments being delivered today are with 6-10 MV photons where neutron production is negligible. However, the absolute risk is small [Hall, E. J. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, Protons, and the Risk of Second Cancers. Int J Radiat Oncol Bio Phys 65, 1-7 (2006); Kry, F. S., Salehpour, M., Followill, D. S., Stovall, M., Kuban, D. A., White, R. A., and Rosen, I. I. The Calculated Risk of Fatal Secondary Malignancies From Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Bio Phys 62, 1195-1203 (2005).] and therefore it has been suggested that the use of an 18MV IMRT may achieve better target coverage and normal tissue sparing such that this benefit outweighs the risks. This paper investigates whether 18MV IMRT offer better target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Computed Tomography (CT) image sets of ten prostate cancer patients were acquired and two separate IMRT plans were created for each patient. One plan used 6 MV beams, and the other used 18 MV, both in a coplanar, non-opposed beam geometry. Beam arrangements and optimization constraints were the same for all plans. This work includes a comparison and discussion of the total integral dose, neutron dose conformity index, and total number of MU for plans generated with both energies.

  14. Domestic comparison of radiation treatment techniques for breast cancer: 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Yoon, Myong Geun [Dept. of Bio-convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yusung Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare method in the treatment of breast cancer using dose index. And, it is to find the optimized treatment technique to the patient. The phantom filled with tissue-equivalent material were used simulation and treatment as techniques of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT was planned using Eclipse v10. By using HI(homogeneity index), CI(Conformity index), OE (Organ equivalent dose), EAR(Excess Absolute Risk), were assessed for each treatment plans. HI and CI of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT were calculated 16.89, 11.21, 9.55 and 0.59, 0.61, 0.83. The organ average doses of Lt lung, Rt lung, liver, heart, esophagus, cord, Lt breast, trachea and stomach were 0.01 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.36 ∼ 5.01 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 2.49 Gy, 0.14 ∼ 6.92 Gy, 0.03 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.06 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 6.08 Gy, 0.08 ∼ 0.59 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.34 Gy, respectively. The OED, EAR of the IMRT and VMAT show higher than 3D-CRT. As the result of this study, we could confirm being higher dose index(HI, CI) in IMRT and VMAT than 3D-CRT, but doses of around normal organs was higher IMRT, VMAT than 3D-CRT.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations to replace film dosimetry in IMRT verification

    OpenAIRE

    Goetzfried, Thomas; Rickhey, Mark; Treutwein, Marius; Koelbl, Oliver; Bogner, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    Patient-specific verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans can be done by dosimetric measurements or by independent dose or monitor unit calculations. The aim of this study was the clinical evaluation of IMRT verification based on a fast Monte Carlo (MC) program with regard to possible benefits compared to commonly used film dosimetry. 25 head-and-neck IMRT plans were recalculated by a pencil beam based treatment planning system (TPS) using an appropriate quality assu...

  16. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  17. Toward a consensus on radiobiology teaching to radiation oncology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynlacht, Joseph R; Dewhirst, Mark W; Hall, Eric J; Rosenstein, Barry S; Zeman, Elaine M

    2002-05-01

    There are approximately 82 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States, which provide training opportunities for about 400 residents. All accredited radiation oncology residency programs must have at least one basic scientist on the faculty, and it is these individuals who often assume, wholly or in part, the responsibility of teaching radiation and cancer biology to radiation oncology residents in preparation for the American College of Radiology (ACR) In-Training Examination in Radiation Oncology and the American Board of Radiology (ABR) written examinations. In response to a perceived lack of uniformity in radiation and cancer biology curricula currently being taught to residents and a perceived lack of guidance for instructors in formulating course content for this population, a special session was presented at the Forty-eighth Annual Radiation Research Society meeting on April 23, 2001. The session, entitled "Toward a Consensus on Radiobiology Teaching to Radiation Oncology Residents", was focused on issues related to teaching radiobiology to radiation oncology residents and targeted for individuals who actively teach radiation and cancer biology as well as coordinators of residency training programs. The speakers addressed current challenges and future problems facing instructors and programs. Among these were lack of feedback on resident performance on ABR and ACR written examinations and on course content, uncertainty about what topics residents must know to pass the ABR examination, and, in the near future, a reduction (due to retirement) of instructors qualified to teach radiobiology. This article provides a synopsis of the information that was presented during that session, offers a glimpse into how the ABR and ACR examinations are prepared and details of the content of past and future examinations, and summarizes the activities of the Joint Working Group on Radiobiology Teaching which was formed to educate instructors, to establish a

  18. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M

    2014-03-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, α-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space.

  19. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, α-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space. PMID:24198199

  20. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 20. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, Hans-Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  1. IMRT treatment planning based on prioritizing prescription goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Jan J; Alaly, James R; Zakarian, Konstantin; Thorstad, Wade L; Deasy, Joseph O

    2007-03-21

    Determining the 'best' optimization parameters in IMRT planning is typically a time-consuming trial-and-error process with no unambiguous termination point. Recently we and others proposed a goal-programming approach which better captures the desired prioritization of dosimetric goals. Here, individual prescription goals are addressed stepwise in their order of priority. In the first step, only the highest order goals are considered (target coverage and dose-limiting normal structures). In subsequent steps, the achievements of the previous steps are turned into hard constraints and lower priority goals are optimized, in turn, subject to higher priority constraints. So-called 'slip' factors were introduced to allow for slight, clinically acceptable violations of the constraints. Focusing on head and neck cases, we present several examples for this planning technique. The main advantages of the new optimization method are (i) its ability to generate plans that meet the clinical goals, as well as possible, without tuning any weighting factors or dose-volume constraints, and (ii) the ability to conveniently include more terms such as fluence map smoothness. Lower level goals can be optimized to the achievable limit without compromising higher order goals. The prioritized prescription-goal planning method allows for a more intuitive and human-time-efficient way of dealing with conflicting goals compared to the conventional trial-and-error method of varying weighting factors and dose-volume constraints.

  2. IMRT treatment planning based on prioritizing prescription goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Jan J.; Alaly, James R.; Zakarian, Konstantin; Thorstad, Wade L.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2007-03-01

    Determining the 'best' optimization parameters in IMRT planning is typically a time-consuming trial-and-error process with no unambiguous termination point. Recently we and others proposed a goal-programming approach which better captures the desired prioritization of dosimetric goals. Here, individual prescription goals are addressed stepwise in their order of priority. In the first step, only the highest order goals are considered (target coverage and dose-limiting normal structures). In subsequent steps, the achievements of the previous steps are turned into hard constraints and lower priority goals are optimized, in turn, subject to higher priority constraints. So-called 'slip' factors were introduced to allow for slight, clinically acceptable violations of the constraints. Focusing on head and neck cases, we present several examples for this planning technique. The main advantages of the new optimization method are (i) its ability to generate plans that meet the clinical goals, as well as possible, without tuning any weighting factors or dose-volume constraints, and (ii) the ability to conveniently include more terms such as fluence map smoothness. Lower level goals can be optimized to the achievable limit without compromising higher order goals. The prioritized prescription-goal planning method allows for a more intuitive and human-time-efficient way of dealing with conflicting goals compared to the conventional trial-and-error method of varying weighting factors and dose-volume constraints.

  3. IMRT treatment planning based on prioritizing prescription goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkens, Jan J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, and Siteman Cancer Center, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Alaly, James R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, and Siteman Cancer Center, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Zakarian, Konstantin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, and Siteman Cancer Center, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Thorstad, Wade L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, and Siteman Cancer Center, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Deasy, Joseph O [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, and Siteman Cancer Center, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2007-03-21

    Determining the 'best' optimization parameters in IMRT planning is typically a time-consuming trial-and-error process with no unambiguous termination point. Recently we and others proposed a goal-programming approach which better captures the desired prioritization of dosimetric goals. Here, individual prescription goals are addressed stepwise in their order of priority. In the first step, only the highest order goals are considered (target coverage and dose-limiting normal structures). In subsequent steps, the achievements of the previous steps are turned into hard constraints and lower priority goals are optimized, in turn, subject to higher priority constraints. So-called 'slip' factors were introduced to allow for slight, clinically acceptable violations of the constraints. Focusing on head and neck cases, we present several examples for this planning technique. The main advantages of the new optimization method are (i) its ability to generate plans that meet the clinical goals, as well as possible, without tuning any weighting factors or dose-volume constraints, and (ii) the ability to conveniently include more terms such as fluence map smoothness. Lower level goals can be optimized to the achievable limit without compromising higher order goals. The prioritized prescription-goal planning method allows for a more intuitive and human-time-efficient way of dealing with conflicting goals compared to the conventional trial-and-error method of varying weighting factors and dose-volume constraints.

  4. Statistical process control for IMRT dosimetric verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Stephen L; Moseley, Douglas J; Zhang, Beibei; Sharpe, Michael B

    2008-10-01

    Patient-specific measurements are typically used to validate the dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). To evaluate the dosimetric performance over time of our IMRT process, we have used statistical process control (SPC) concepts to analyze the measurements from 330 head and neck (H&N) treatment plans. The objectives of the present work are to: (i) Review the dosimetric measurements of a large series of consecutive head and neck treatment plans to better understand appropriate dosimetric tolerances; (ii) analyze the results with SPC to develop action levels for measured discrepancies; (iii) develop estimates for the number of measurements that are required to describe IMRT dosimetry in the clinical setting; and (iv) evaluate with SPC a new beam model in our planning system. H&N IMRT cases were planned with the PINNACLE treatment planning system versions 6.2b or 7.6c (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) and treated on Varian (Palo Alto, CA) or Elekta (Crawley, UK) linacs. As part of regular quality assurance, plans were recalculated on a 20-cm-diam cylindrical phantom, and ion chamber measurements were made in high-dose volumes (the PTV with highest dose) and in low-dose volumes (spinal cord organ-at-risk, OR). Differences between the planned and measured doses were recorded as a percentage of the planned dose. Differences were stable over time. Measurements with PINNACLE3 6.2b and Varian linacs showed a mean difference of 0.6% for PTVs (n=149, range, -4.3% to 6.6%), while OR measurements showed a larger systematic discrepancy (mean 4.5%, range -4.5% to 16.3%) that was due to well-known limitations of the MLC model in the earlier version of the planning system. Measurements with PINNACLE3 7.6c and Varian linacs demonstrated a mean difference of 0.2% for PTVs (n=160, range, -3.0%, to 5.0%) and -1.0% for ORs (range -5.8% to 4.4%). The capability index (ratio of specification range to range of the data) was 1.3 for the PTV data, indicating that almost

  5. Assessment and Comparison of Homogeneity and Conformity Indexes in Step-and-Shoot and Compensator-Based Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D CRT) in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Marzieh; Abi, Kaveh Shirani Tak; Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Hassani, Hossein; Gharaati, Hussain; Samei, Mahmood; Shahi, Rezgar; Zarei, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) are two treatment modalities in prostate cancer, which provide acceptable dose distribution in tumor region with sparing the surrounding normal tissues. IMRT is based on inverse planning optimization; in which, intensity of beams is modified by using multileaf collimators and also compensators with optimum shapes in step and shoot (SAS) and compensator-based method, respectively. In the recent study, some important parameters were compared in two IMRT and 3D CRT methods. Prescribed dose was 80 Gy for both IMRT procedures and 70 Gy for 3D CRT. Treatment plans of 15 prostate cancer candidates were compared to target the minimum dose, maximum dose, V 76 Gy (for IMRT plans) V 66.5 Gy (for 3D CRT), mean dose, conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI). Dose conformity in compensators-based IMRT was better than SAS and 3D CRT. The same outcome was also achieved for homogeneity index. The target coverage was achieved 95% of prescribed dose to 95% of planning target volume (PTV) in 3D CRT and 95% of prescribed dose to 98% of PTV in IMRT methods. IMRT increases maximum dose of tumor region, improves CI and HI of target volume, and also reduces dose of organs at risks.

  6. Total dural irradiation: RapidArc versus static-field IMRT: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Paul J., E-mail: paulj.kelly@hse.ie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mannarino, Edward; Lewis, John Henry; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Hacker, Fred L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional fixed-gantry angle intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with RapidArc for total dural irradiation. We also hypothesize that target volume-individualized collimator angles may produce substantial normal tissue sparing when planning with RapidArc. Five-, 7-, and 9-field fixed-gantry angle sliding-window IMRT plans were generated for comparison with RapidArc plans. Optimization and normal tissue constraints were constant for all plans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 100% of the dose. RapidArc was delivered using 350 Degree-Sign clockwise and counterclockwise arcs. Conventional collimator angles of 45 Degree-Sign and 315 Degree-Sign were compared with 90 Degree-Sign on both arcs. Dose prescription was 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. PTV metrics used for comparison were coverage, V{sub 107}%, D1%, conformality index (CI{sub 95}%), and heterogeneity index (D{sub 5}%-D{sub 95}%). Brain dose, the main challenge of this case, was compared using D{sub 1}%, Dmean, and V{sub 5} Gy. Dose to optic chiasm, optic nerves, globes, and lenses was also compared. The use of unconventional collimator angles (90 Degree-Sign on both arcs) substantially reduced dose to normal brain. All plans achieved acceptable target coverage. Homogeneity was similar for RapidArc and 9-field IMRT plans. However, heterogeneity increased with decreasing number of IMRT fields, resulting in unacceptable hotspots within the brain. Conformality was marginally better with RapidArc relative to IMRT. Low dose to brain, as indicated by V5Gy, was comparable in all plans. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed no clinically meaningful differences. The number of monitor units was lower and delivery time was reduced with RapidArc. The case-individualized RapidArc plan compared favorably with the 9-field conventional IMRT plan. In view of lower monitor unit requirements and shorter delivery time, Rapid

  7. Towards accurate dose accumulation for step- and -shoot IMRT. Impact of weighting schemes and temporal image resolution on the estimation of dosimetric motion effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Rene; Ehrhardt, Jan; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Medical Informatics; Albers, Dirk; Petersen, Cordula; Cremers, Florian [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology; Frenzel, Thorsten [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Health Care Center

    2012-07-01

    . Conclusions: Radiobiological consequences of reported single fraction local point differences > 25% of the prescribed dose are widely unclear and should be subject to future investigation. Meanwhile, if aiming at accurate and reliable estimation of dosimetric motion effects, precise weighting schemes such as the presented patient- and plan-specific scheme for step- and -shoot IMRT and full available temporal 4D CT image resolution should be applied for IMRT dose accumulation. (orig.)

  8. Lhermitte's Sign Developing after IMRT for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong C.; Gagnon, Patrick J.; Meranvil, Sophia; Kaurin, Darryl; Lipp, Linda; Holland, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Lhermitte's sign (LS) is a benign form of myelopathy with neck flexion producing an unpleasant electric-shock sensation radiating down the extremities. Although rare, it can occur after head and neck radiotherapy. Results. We report a case of Lhermitte's developing after curative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for a patient with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT delivers a conformal dose of radiation in head and neck cancer resulting in a gradient of radiation dose throughout the spinal cord. Using IMRT, more dose is delivered to the anterior spinal cord than the posterior cord. Conclusions. Lhermitte's sign can develop after IMRT for head and neck cancer. We propose an anterior spinal cord structure, the spinothalamic tract to be the target of IMRT-caused LS. PMID:20628529

  9. Lhermitte's Sign Developing after IMRT for Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong C. Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lhermitte's sign (LS is a benign form of myelopathy with neck flexion producing an unpleasant electric-shock sensation radiating down the extremities. Although rare, it can occur after head and neck radiotherapy. Results. We report a case of Lhermitte's developing after curative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for a patient with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT delivers a conformal dose of radiation in head and neck cancer resulting in a gradient of radiation dose throughout the spinal cord. Using IMRT, more dose is delivered to the anterior spinal cord than the posterior cord. Conclusions. Lhermitte's sign can develop after IMRT for head and neck cancer. We propose an anterior spinal cord structure, the spinothalamic tract to be the target of IMRT-caused LS.

  10. A semi-analytical radiobiological model may assist treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundrat, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-07

    A semi-analytical model of light ions' Bragg peaks is presented and used in conjunction with a detailed probabilistic radiobiological module to predict the biological effectiveness of light ion irradiation for hadrontherapy applications. The physical Bragg peak model is based on energy-loss calculations with the SRIM code and phenomenological formulae for the energy-loss straggling. Effects of nuclear reactions are accounted for on the level of reducing the number of primary particles only. Reaction products are not followed at all and their contribution to dose deposition is neglected. Beam widening due to multiple scattering and calculations of spread-out Bragg peaks are briefly discussed. With this simple physical model, integral depth-dose distributions are calculated for protons, carbon, oxygen and neon ions. A good agreement with published experimental data is observed for protons and lower energy ions (with ranges in water up to approximately 15 cm), while less satisfactory results are obtained for higher energy ions due to the increased role of nuclear reaction products, neglected in this model. A detailed probabilistic radiobiological module is used to complement the simple physical model and to estimate biological effectiveness along the penetration depth of Bragg peak irradiation. Excellent agreement is found between model predictions and experimental data for carbon beams, indicating potential applications of the present scheme in treatment planning in light ion hadrontherapy. Due to the semi-analytical character of the model, leading to high computational speed, applications are foreseen in particular in the fully biological optimization of multiple irradiation fields and intensity-modulated beams.

  11. A semi-analytical radiobiological model may assist treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2007-12-07

    A semi-analytical model of light ions' Bragg peaks is presented and used in conjunction with a detailed probabilistic radiobiological module to predict the biological effectiveness of light ion irradiation for hadrontherapy applications. The physical Bragg peak model is based on energy-loss calculations with the SRIM code and phenomenological formulae for the energy-loss straggling. Effects of nuclear reactions are accounted for on the level of reducing the number of primary particles only. Reaction products are not followed at all and their contribution to dose deposition is neglected. Beam widening due to multiple scattering and calculations of spread-out Bragg peaks are briefly discussed. With this simple physical model, integral depth-dose distributions are calculated for protons, carbon, oxygen and neon ions. A good agreement with published experimental data is observed for protons and lower energy ions (with ranges in water up to approximately 15 cm), while less satisfactory results are obtained for higher energy ions due to the increased role of nuclear reaction products, neglected in this model. A detailed probabilistic radiobiological module is used to complement the simple physical model and to estimate biological effectiveness along the penetration depth of Bragg peak irradiation. Excellent agreement is found between model predictions and experimental data for carbon beams, indicating potential applications of the present scheme in treatment planning in light ion hadrontherapy. Due to the semi-analytical character of the model, leading to high computational speed, applications are foreseen in particular in the fully biological optimization of multiple irradiation fields and intensity-modulated beams.

  12. Dosimetric benefits of IMRT and VMAT in the treatment of middle thoracic esophageal cancer: is the conformal radiotherapy still an alternative option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqin; Xie, Congying; Hu, Meilong; Han, Ce; Yi, Jinling; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yuan, Huawei; Jin, Xiance

    2014-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric differences among conformal radiotherapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) in the treatment of middle thoracic esophageal cancer, and determine the most appropriate treatment modality. IMRT and one-arc VMAT plans were generated for eight middle thoracic esophageal cancer patients treated previous with CRT. The planning target volume (PTV) coverage and protections on organs at risk of three planning schemes were compared. All plans have sufficient PTV coverage and no significant differences were observed, except for the conformity and homogeneity. The lung V5, V10, and V13 in CRT were 47.9% ± 6.1%, 36.5% ± 4.6%, and 33.2% ± 4.2%, respectively, which were greatly increased to 78.2% ± 13.7% (p VMAT, respectively. The lung V20 (p = 0.03) in VMAT and the V30 (p = 0.04) in IMRT were lower than those in CRT. Both IMRT and VMAT achieved a better protection on heart. However, the volumes of the healthy tissue outside of PTV irradiated by a low dose were higher for IMRT and VMAT. IMRT and VMAT also had a higher MU, optimization time, and delivery time compared to CRT. In conclusion, all CRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans are able to meet the prescription and there is no clear distinction on PTV coverage. IMRT and VMAT can only decrease the volume of lung and heart receiving a high dose, but at a cost of delivering low dose to more volume of lung and normal tissues. CRT is still a feasible option for middle thoracic esophageal cancer radiotherapy, especially for the cost-effective consideration.

  13. IsoBED: a tool for automatic calculation of biologically equivalent fractionation schedules in radiotherapy using IMRT with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benassi Marcello

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An advantage of the Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT technique is the feasibility to deliver different therapeutic dose levels to PTVs in a single treatment session using the Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB technique. The paper aims to describe an automated tool to calculate the dose to be delivered with the SIB-IMRT technique in different anatomical regions that have the same Biological Equivalent Dose (BED, i.e. IsoBED, compared to the standard fractionation. Methods Based on the Linear Quadratic Model (LQM, we developed software that allows treatment schedules, biologically equivalent to standard fractionations, to be calculated. The main radiobiological parameters from literature are included in a database inside the software, which can be updated according to the clinical experience of each Institute. In particular, the BED to each target volume will be computed based on the alpha/beta ratio, total dose and the dose per fraction (generally 2 Gy for a standard fractionation. Then, after selecting the reference target, i.e. the PTV that controls the fractionation, a new total dose and dose per fraction providing the same isoBED will be calculated for each target volume. Results The IsoBED Software developed allows: 1 the calculation of new IsoBED treatment schedules derived from standard prescriptions and based on LQM, 2 the conversion of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs for each Target and OAR to a nominal standard dose at 2Gy per fraction in order to be shown together with the DV-constraints from literature, based on the LQM and radiobiological parameters, and 3 the calculation of Tumor Control Probability (TCP and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP curve versus the prescribed dose to the reference target.

  14. Radiobiological and standard data for radioprotection and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammet, H.

    1972-09-01

    From ninth annual meeting of the European Society for Radiation Biology; Rome, Italy (26 Sep 1972). Radiobiological data provide the scientific bases for radioprotection norms and radiotherapy practices. Nevertheless numerous problems remain unsolved including dosimetry at the cellular and infracellular level, metabolic curves for the purlfication of radionuclides, dose-effect relations for stochastic phenomena, effect of high doses on conjunctive tissue, value of the calibration factor in time, RBE of high energy particles, and radiosensitivity as a function of age and sex. The scope of these problems is briefly indicated. (JSR)

  15. Standardized beam bouquets for lung IMRT planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lulin; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fangfang; Li, Ying; Sheng, Yang; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Ge, Yaorong

    2015-02-01

    The selection of the incident angles of the treatment beams is a critical component of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning for lung cancer due to significant variations in tumor location, tumor size and patient anatomy. We investigate the feasibility of establishing a small set of standardized beam bouquets for planning. The set of beam bouquets were determined by learning the beam configuration features from 60 clinical lung IMRT plans designed by experienced planners. A k-medoids cluster analysis method was used to classify the beam configurations in the dataset. The appropriate number of clusters was determined by maximizing the value of average silhouette width of the classification. Once the number of clusters had been determined, the beam arrangements in each medoid of the clusters were designated as the standardized beam bouquet for the cluster. This standardized bouquet set was used to re-plan 20 cases randomly selected from the clinical database. The dosimetric quality of the plans using the beam bouquets was evaluated against the corresponding clinical plans by a paired t-test. The classification with six clusters has the largest average silhouette width value and hence would best represent the beam bouquet patterns in the dataset. The results shows that plans generated with a small number of standardized bouquets (e.g. 6) have comparable quality to that of clinical plans. These standardized beam configuration bouquets will potentially help improve plan efficiency and facilitate automated planning.

  16. Comparison of whole-field simultaneous integrated boost VMAT and IMRT in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xiance; Yi, Jinling; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yan, Huawei; Han, Ce; Xie, Congying, E-mail: billy07@wzhospital.cn

    2013-01-01

    To study the feasibility of using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to deliver whole-field simultaneous integrated boost (WF-SIB) to treat patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). WF-SIB intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, one-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans, and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans were generated with identical objective functions for 8 patients with NPC of various stages. Isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms were evaluated. Dosimetric and biological quality indices of clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were calculated to study the optimization capability of these 3 modalities in the treatment of patients with NPC. The optimization time, delivery time, required monitor units (MUs), and delivery accuracy were also compared to investigate the feasibility of these 3 modalities. There was no significant difference (p = 0.92) in target coverage (TC) between WF-SIB IMRT (99.00 ± 0.79) and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT (97.98 ± 1.29). However, both had higher TC than one-arc VMAT plans (89.92 ± 6.32, p < 0.01). IMRT demonstrated the best protection of the spinal cord, whereas two-arc VMAT showed the minimum D{sub max} to OARs. No other significant differences were observed among these 3 modalities on CTV coverage and OAR sparing. The delivery and MU efficiency of one-arc and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT were greatly improved compared with WF-SIB IMRT. The optimization time of one-arc and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans were 5 and 10 times greater than that of WF-SIB IMRT, respectively. The delivery accuracy of WF-SIB VMAT was not affected by the increased freedom. For patients with NPC, one-arc WF-SIB VMAT might not be able to achieve sufficient TC, whereas two-arc WF-SIB VMAT was able to achieve reasonable TC. No significant advantage on OAR protection was demonstrated by VMAT compared with IMRT. WF-SIB VMAT has significantly shorter delivery times, but WF-SIB IMRT may still be the first treatment choice for patients with NPC.

  17. REVIEW: Development of radiobiology for oncology—a personal view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jack F.

    2006-07-01

    When I came into radiotherapy in 1950, I was puzzled that some patients were treated to 3000 rads (cGy) in 3 weeks but others received 4000 in 5 or 6000 in 6 weeks. When I asked why, there were no convincing answers given, except 'this is what we usually do'. It wasn't until I went to a course on 'Radiobiology for Radiotherapy' in Cambridge that I learnt about the basic theories of Douglas Lea and the very considerable history of research into radiobiology and clinical radiotherapy. And there were still some questions outstanding, such as the relative importance of intracellular repair between 'daily' fractions, whether a 2 day gap each week was a good or a bad idea, and the role of proliferation, if any, during irradiation. I thought that a few simple animal experiments might help to give answers! That led me to a continuing interest in these questions and answers, which has taken me more than 50 years to pursue. This is the very personal story of what I saw happening in the subject, decade by decade. I was happy to experience all this together with scientists in many other countries, and our own, along the way.

  18. Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer: Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mangoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76–80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α/β. Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting.

  19. Hypofractionation in prostate cancer: radiobiological basis and clinical appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoni, M; Desideri, I; Detti, B; Bonomo, P; Greto, D; Paiar, F; Simontacchi, G; Meattini, I; Scoccianti, S; Masoni, T; Ciabatti, C; Turkaj, A; Serni, S; Minervini, A; Gacci, M; Carini, M; Livi, L

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76-80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α / β . Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting.

  20. Influence of oxygen on the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Pisaková, Hana; Simr, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    The simulation of the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism may be very helpful in studying the radiobiological effect of ionizing radiation when the water radical clusters formed by the densely ionizing ends of primary or secondary charged particle may form DSBs damaging DNA molecules in living cells. It is possible to study not only the efficiency of individual radicals but also the influence of other species or radiomodifiers (mainly oxygen) being present in water medium during irradiation. The mathematical model based on Continuous Petri nets (proposed by us recently) will be described. It makes it possible to analyze two main processes running at the same time: chemical radical reactions and the diffusion of radical clusters formed during energy transfer. One may study the time change of radical concentrations due to the chemical reactions running during diffusion process. Some orientation results concerning the efficiency of individual radicals in DSB formation (in the case of Co60 radiation) will be presented; the influence of oxygen present in water medium during irradiation will be shown, too.

  1. An irradiation facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological studies

    CERN Document Server

    Besserer, J; Dellert, M; Gahn, C; Moosburger, M; Pemler, P; Quicken, P; Distel, L; Schuessler, H

    1999-01-01

    A vertical beam facility for radiobiological experiments was designed and constructed at the Munich Tandem-Accelerator Laboratory. The main part of the facility is a 90 deg. dipole magnet bending the beam of protons or heavy particles into a vertical upward direction, which is advantageous for wet-cell irradiation. After collimation the beam is spread out passively by thin scattering foils and dynamically by magnetic coils. A homogeneity of the radiation field better than +-5% has been achieved over the diameter of the exit window of 60 mm. The dose rate can be widely adjusted from single particles to more than 10 sup 1 sup 0 particles (i.e. hundreds of Grays) per second. The dose measurement is based on single-particle counting and on standard dosimeters. The detector system for dosimetry and irradiation control is described. In a first radiobiological experiment the cell survival of chinese hamster cells was measured after irradiation with 22.7 MeV protons and compared with the X-ray result.

  2. Feasibility Study of Pelvic Helical IMRT for Elderly Patients with Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Nickers, Philippe; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Cordoba, Abel; Leblanc, Eric; Comte, Pauline; Lacornerie, Thomas; Lartigau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Standard treatment for early-stage endometrial cancer involves surgery (when possible) followed by brachytherapy or external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for high-risk tumors. EBRT is not without toxicity, meaning that it could be difficult to complete for elderly patients, who typically have decreased reserve and resistance to stressors. Patients and methods Patients aged 70 and over treated between April 2009 and May 2013 for endometrial cancer and received IMRT (Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy) were included in this observational study. IMRT could be performed as adjuvant treatment or as an exclusive treatment for patients not amenable to surgery. The primary endpoints of this study were to assess the feasibility and toxicity of pelvic IMRT in this population. Secondary endpoints were to assess disease-specific survival, overall survival, and local control. Predictors of toxicity were also explored. Results Forty seven consecutive patients were included in the analysis. Median age at diagnosis was 75 years (range, 70–89 years). Eleven patients were aged 80 years and older. Toxicities were found in thirty four patients (72%) during treatment. Among these, toxicity did not exceed grade 2 for 32 patients (68%). Two patients had a grade 3 toxicity (4%). Overall survival rates were 87% and 83% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Six patients (12.8%) had a local relapse and nine others (19.1%) had distant relapse. Conclusions Pelvic helical IMRT for patients aged 70 and older is feasible with full standard radiation doses, showing that age greater than 70 should not be considered as a reason not to perform optimal treatment. PMID:25423024

  3. Feasibility study of pelvic helical IMRT for elderly patients with endometrial cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Emmanuel Bibault

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Standard treatment for early-stage endometrial cancer involves surgery (when possible followed by brachytherapy or external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT for high-risk tumors. EBRT is not without toxicity, meaning that it could be difficult to complete for elderly patients, who typically have decreased reserve and resistance to stressors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients aged 70 and over treated between April 2009 and May 2013 for endometrial cancer and received IMRT (Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy were included in this observational study. IMRT could be performed as adjuvant treatment or as an exclusive treatment for patients not amenable to surgery. The primary endpoints of this study were to assess the feasibility and toxicity of pelvic IMRT in this population. Secondary endpoints were to assess disease-specific survival, overall survival, and local control. Predictors of toxicity were also explored. RESULTS: Forty seven consecutive patients were included in the analysis. Median age at diagnosis was 75 years (range, 70-89 years. Eleven patients were aged 80 years and older. Toxicities were found in thirty four patients (72% during treatment. Among these, toxicity did not exceed grade 2 for 32 patients (68%. Two patients had a grade 3 toxicity (4%. Overall survival rates were 87% and 83% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Six patients (12.8% had a local relapse and nine others (19.1% had distant relapse. CONCLUSIONS: Pelvic helical IMRT for patients aged 70 and older is feasible with full standard radiation doses, showing that age greater than 70 should not be considered as a reason not to perform optimal treatment.

  4. Bridging the gap between IMRT and VMAT: Dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To propose an alternative radiation therapy (RT) planning and delivery scheme with optimal angular beam sampling and intrabeam modulation for improved dose distribution while maintaining high delivery efficiency. Methods: In the proposed approach, coined as dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated RT (DASSIM-RT), a large number of beam angles are used to increase the angular sampling, leading to potentially more conformal dose distributions as compared to conventional IMRT. At the same time, intensity modulation of the incident beams is simplified to eliminate the dispensable segments, compensating the increase in delivery time caused by the increased number of beams and facilitating the plan delivery. In a sense, the proposed approach shifts and transforms, in an optimal fashion, some of the beam segments in conventional IMRT to the added beams. For newly available digital accelerators, the DASSIM-RT delivery can be made very efficient by concatenating the beams so that they can be delivered sequentially without operator’s intervention. Different from VMAT, the level of intensity modulation in DASSIS-RT is field specific and optimized to meet the need of each beam direction. Three clinical cases (a head and neck (HN) case, a pancreas case, and a lung case) are used to evaluate the proposed RT scheme. DASSIM-RT, VMAT, and conventional IMRT plans are compared quantitatively in terms of the conformality index (CI) and delivery efficiency. Results: Plan quality improves generally with the number and intensity modulation of the incident beams. For a fixed number of beams or fixed level of intensity modulation, the improvement saturates after the intensity modulation or number of beams reaches to a certain level. An interplay between the two variables is observed and the saturation point depends on the values of both variables. For all the cases studied here, the CI of DASSIM-RT with 15 beams and 5 intensity levels (0.90, 0.79, and 0.84 for the

  5. IMRT versus 3D-CRT for thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizynska, Marta K.; Zawadzka, Anna

    2008-01-01

    A 3D-CRT involving a 4-field (5-field, 6-field, etc.) technique (photon and electron beams) and an alternative IMRT 7-field technique with 6 MV photon fields for thyroid cancer were compared. The IMRT allows reduction in the dose to the spinal cord of about 12 Gy and permits better coverage of the target volume with smaller standard deviation (average 4.65% for 3D-CRT as compared with 1.81% for IMRT). The time needed to prepare therapy (TPS, dosimetry, preparing boluses and electron aperture) and the session time are about the same for both techniques.

  6. Dosimetric adaptive IMRT driven by fiducial points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crijns, Wouter, E-mail: wouter.crijns@uzleuven.be [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van Herck, Hans [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Haustermans, Karin [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Slagmolen, Pieter [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); iMinds-KU Leuven Medical IT Department, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven and iMinds, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Oncology, MRC-CR-UK Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy have become standard treatments but are more sensitive to anatomical variations than 3D conformal techniques. To correct for inter- and intrafraction anatomical variations, fast and easy to implement methods are needed. Here, the authors propose a full dosimetric IMRT correction that finds a compromise in-between basic repositioning (the current clinical practice) and full replanning. It simplifies replanning by avoiding a recontouring step and a full dose calculation. It surpasses repositioning by updating the preoptimized fluence and monitor units (MU) using a limited number of fiducial points and a pretreatment (CB)CT. To adapt the fluence the fiducial points were projected in the beam's eye view (BEV). To adapt the MUs, point dose calculation towards the same fiducial points were performed. The proposed method is intrinsically fast and robust, and simple to understand for operators, because of the use of only four fiducial points and the beam data based point dose calculations. Methods: To perform our dosimetric adaptation, two fluence corrections in the BEV are combined with two MU correction steps along the beam's path. (1) A transformation of the fluence map such that it is realigned with the current target geometry. (2) A correction for an unintended scaling of the penumbra margin when the treatment beams scale to the current target size. (3) A correction for the target depth relative to the body contour and (4) a correction for the target distance to the source. The impact of the correction strategy and its individual components was evaluated by simulations on a virtual prostate phantom. This heterogeneous reference phantom was systematically subjected to population based prostate transformations to simulate interfraction variations. Additionally, a patient example illustrated the clinical practice. The correction strategy was evaluated using both dosimetric

  7. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyreuther, Elke

    2010-09-10

    of damage for decreasing photon energy. For this reason, the assumed photon energy dependence was reconfirmed for a cell line other than human lymphocytes, an important finding that was discussed on the 2007 Retreat of the German Commission on Radiological Protection. After successful finalization of the photon experiments the focus of the present dissertation was directed to the realization of in vitro cell irradiation experiments with laser-accelerated electrons. This research was carried out in the frame of the project onCOOPtics that aims on the development of laser-based particle accelerators, which promise accelerators of potentially compact size and more cost-effectiveness suitable for a widespread medical application, especially for high precision hadron therapy. The unique properties, i.e., the ultrashort bunch length and resultant ultrahigh pulse dose rate, of these unconventional particle accelerators demand for extensive investigations with respect to potential effects on the dosimetric and radiobiological characterization. Based on the experiences gained at ELBE first experiments on the radiobiological characterization of laser-accelerated electrons have been performed at the Jena Titanium:Sapphire laser system. After beam optimization, a sophisticated dosimetry system was established that allow for the online control of the beam parameters and for the controlled delivery of dose to the cell sample. Finally, worldwide first systematic in vitro cell irradiation experiments were carried out resulting in a reduced biological effectiveness for laser-accelerated electrons relative to the 200 kV X-ray reference, irrespectively on the biological effect and cell lines examined. These successful results are the basis for future in vivo studies and experiments with laser-accelerated protons.

  8. Pareto navigation: algorithmic foundation of interactive multi-criteria IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monz, M; Küfer, K H; Bortfeld, T R; Thieke, C

    2008-02-21

    Inherently, IMRT treatment planning involves compromising between different planning goals. Multi-criteria IMRT planning directly addresses this compromising and thus makes it more systematic. Usually, several plans are computed from which the planner selects the most promising following a certain procedure. Applying Pareto navigation for this selection step simultaneously increases the variety of planning options and eases the identification of the most promising plan. Pareto navigation is an interactive multi-criteria optimization method that consists of the two navigation mechanisms 'selection' and 'restriction'. The former allows the formulation of wishes whereas the latter allows the exclusion of unwanted plans. They are realized as optimization problems on the so-called plan bundle -- a set constructed from pre-computed plans. They can be approximately reformulated so that their solution time is a small fraction of a second. Thus, the user can be provided with immediate feedback regarding his or her decisions. Pareto navigation was implemented in the MIRA navigator software and allows real-time manipulation of the current plan and the set of considered plans. The changes are triggered by simple mouse operations on the so-called navigation star and lead to real-time updates of the navigation star and the dose visualizations. Since any Pareto-optimal plan in the plan bundle can be found with just a few navigation operations the MIRA navigator allows a fast and directed plan determination. Besides, the concept allows for a refinement of the plan bundle, thus offering a middle course between single plan computation and multi-criteria optimization. Pareto navigation offers so far unmatched real-time interactions, ease of use and plan variety, setting it apart from the multi-criteria IMRT planning methods proposed so far.

  9. Simplifying EPID dosimetry for IMRT treatment verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecharroman-Gallego, R.; Mans, Anton; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep C.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Herk, Marcel van; Mijnheer, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are increasingly used for IMRT dose verification, both pretreatment and in vivo. In this study, an earlier developed backprojection model has been modified to avoid the need for patient-specific transmission measurements and, consequently, leads to a faster procedure. Methods: Currently, the transmission, an essential ingredient of the backprojection model, is estimated from the ratio of EPID measurements with and without a phantom/patient in the beam. Thus, an additional irradiation to obtain ''open images'' under the same conditions as the actual phantom/patient irradiation is required. However, by calculating the transmission of the phantom/patient in the direction of the beam instead of using open images, this extra measurement can be avoided. This was achieved by using a model that includes the effect of beam hardening and off-axis dependence of the EPID response on photon beam spectral changes. The parameters in the model were empirically obtained by performing EPID measurements using polystyrene slab phantoms of different thickness in 6, 10, and 18 MV photon beams. A theoretical analysis to verify the sensitivity of the model with patient thickness changes was performed. The new model was finally applied for the analysis of EPID dose verification measurements of step-and-shoot IMRT treatments of head and neck, lung, breast, cervix, prostate, and rectum patients. All measurements were carried out using Elekta SL20i linear accelerators equipped with a hydrogenated amorphous silicon EPID, and the IMRT plans were made using PINNACLE software (Philips Medical Systems). Results: The results showed generally good agreement with the dose determined using the old model applying the measured transmission. The average differences between EPID-based in vivo dose at the isocenter determined using either the new model for transmission and its measured value were 2.6{+-}3.1%, 0.2{+-}3.1%, and 2

  10. Small bowel protection in IMRT for rectal cancer. A dosimetric study on supine vs. prone position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeck, Julia; Kromer, Katharina; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Mai, Sabine; Fleckenstein, Jens; Wenz, Frederik [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Lohr, Frank [Az. Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Unita Operativa di Radioterapia, Dipartimento di Oncologia, Modena (Italy); Baack, Tobias [GRN Clinic Weinheim, Department of Internal Medicine, Weinheim (Germany); Buettner, Sylvia [University of Heidelberg, Department of Biomathematics and Medical Statistics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    This treatment planning study analyzes dose coverage and dose to organs at risk (OAR) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of rectal cancer and compares prone vs. supine positioning as well as the effect of dose optimization for the small bowel (SB) by additional dose constraints in the inverse planning process. Based on the CT datasets of ten male patients in both prone and supine position, a total of four different IMRT plans were created for each patient. OAR were defined as the SB, bladder, and femoral heads. In half of the plans, two additional SB cost functions were used in the inverse planning process. There was a statistically significant dose reduction for the SB in prone position of up to 41% in the high and intermediate dose region, compared with the supine position. Furthermore, the femoral heads showed a significant dose reduction in prone position in the low dose region. Regarding the additional active SB constraints, the dose in the high dose region of the SB was significantly reduced by up to 14% with the additional cost functions. There were no significant differences in the dose distribution of the planning target volume (PTV) and the bladder. Prone positioning can significantly reduce dose to the SB in IMRT for rectal cancer and therefore should not only be used in 3D conformal radiotherapy but also in IMRT of rectal cancer. Further protection of the SB can be achieved by additional dose constraints in inverse planning without jeopardizing the homogeneity of the PTV. (orig.) [German] Diese Planungsstudie analysiert die Dosisverteilung im Zielvolumen und in den Risikoorganen (''organs at risk'', OAR) bei der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (''intensity-modulated radiotherapy'', IMRT) des Rektumkarzinoms und vergleicht hierbei Bauch- und Rueckenlagerung sowie die Effekte der Dosisoptimierung fuer den Duenndarm (DD) durch zusaetzliche Dosiseinschraenkungen bei der inversen Planung. Anhand der

  11. The implementation in-house dose verification for IMRT and VMAT on breast cancer and NPC cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, A.; Dimitri, F. Y.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    IMRT and VMAT have been widely implemented on breast cancer and NPC cases. Dose verification was conducted to ensure the comparison between dose delivered and prescribe dose in TPS to obtain optimal results and the dose delivered. The gafchromic films measurement was done for breast and NPC simulation on RANDO Phantom, irradiating film by 6 MV photon with 200 cGy and scanned with EPSON V700 using 72 dpi. Dose distribution was calculated using the MATLAB-based in-house algorithm. In order to evaluate the gamma index, gafchromic films and MatriXX 2D array were placed in the Multi Cube and irradiated with EPID in same position. Dose distribution differences for IMRT and VMAT with modalities to TPS on film was 5.34% and 6.68% for NPC PTV70; 12.81% and 6.15% for NPC PTV50; 11.14% and 10.80% for breast cancer. Gamma index differences on IMRT with modalities to MatriXX 2D array and EPID was -0.09% and 5.13% for NPC; 0.51% and 2.28% for breast cancer. On the other hand, gamma index difference on VMAT was -1.65% and 1.43% for NPC; 0.19% and 4.38% for breast cancer. This measurement method can be used to verify dose for breast cancer and NPC cases in IMRT and VMAT.

  12. Automated generation of IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses: Comparison of different planning strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voet, Peter W. J.; Dirkx, Maarten L. P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M. [Erasmus MC - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To compare IMRT planning strategies for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses.Methods: All plans were generated fully automatically (i.e., no human trial-and-error interactions) using iCycle, the authors' in-house developed algorithm for multicriterial selection of beam angles and optimization of fluence profiles, allowing objective comparison of planning strategies. For 18 prostate cancer patients (eight with bilateral hip prostheses, ten with a right-sided unilateral prosthesis), two planning strategies were evaluated: (i) full exclusion of beams containing beamlets that would deliver dose to the target after passing a prosthesis (IMRT{sub remove}) and (ii) exclusion of those beamlets only (IMRT{sub cut}). Plans with optimized coplanar and noncoplanar beam arrangements were generated. Differences in PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were quantified. The impact of beam number on plan quality was evaluated.Results: Especially for patients with bilateral hip prostheses, IMRT{sub cut} significantly improved rectum and bladder sparing compared to IMRT{sub remove}. For 9-beam coplanar plans, rectum V{sub 60Gy} reduced by 17.5%{+-} 15.0% (maximum 37.4%, p= 0.036) and rectum D{sub mean} by 9.4%{+-} 7.8% (maximum 19.8%, p= 0.036). Further improvements in OAR sparing were achievable by using noncoplanar beam setups, reducing rectum V{sub 60Gy} by another 4.6%{+-} 4.9% (p= 0.012) for noncoplanar 9-beam IMRT{sub cut} plans. Large reductions in rectum dose delivery were also observed when increasing the number of beam directions in the plans. For bilateral implants, the rectum V{sub 60Gy} was 37.3%{+-} 12.1% for coplanar 7-beam plans and reduced on average by 13.5% (maximum 30.1%, p= 0.012) for 15 directions.Conclusions: iCycle was able to automatically generate high quality plans for prostate cancer patients with prostheses. Excluding only beamlets that passed through the prostheses (IMRT{sub cut} strategy) significantly improved

  13. Characterization and performances of DOSION, a dosimetry equipment dedicated to radiobiology experiments taking place at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Boissonnat, G; Balanzat, E; Boumard, F; Carniol, B; Colin, J; Cussol, D; Etasse, D; Fontbonne, C; Frelin, A -M; Hommet, J; Peronnel, J; Salvador, S

    2016-01-01

    Currently, radiobiology experiments using heavy ions at GANIL(Grand Acc\\'el\\'erateur National d'Ions Lourds) are conducted under the supervision of the CIMAP (Center for research on Ions, MAterials and Photonics). In this context, a new beam monitoring equipment named DOSION has been developed. It allows to perform measurements of accurate fluence and dose maps in near real time for each biological sample irradiated. In this paper, we present the detection system, its design, performances, calibration protocol and measurements performed during radiobiology experiments. This setup is currently available for any radiobiology experiments if one wishes to correlate one's own sample analysis to state of the art dosimetric references.

  14. Present limitations of CVD diamond detectors for IMRT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, C. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: cinzia.deangelis@iss.it; Casati, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    The aim of the work was to test the suitability of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond detectors for dosimetry in IMRT fields. We used in-house CVD detectors prepared with state-of-the-art polycrystalline diamond films (Element Six Ltd., UK). The parameters considered were time stability, dynamic response, dose-rate dependence and energy dependence. Output factors and TPR were measured in conventional photon fields and dose measurements were performed in IMRT fields using the step-and-shoot technique. Results prove that CVD diamond detectors are suitable for dosimetry in conventional treatments, but they still do not fit the IMRT dosimetry requirements, mainly because of their slow dynamic response. In particular, the slow dynamics affects linearity at low Monitor Units and renders it impossible to follow the sharp transients of IMRT fields. Time stability and dose-rate dependence as well must be improved to reduce their influence on dose assessment.

  15. Operation and Maintenance of the National Radiobiology Archives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Anthony C. James; Stacey L. McCord

    2012-03-07

    The National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) are an archival program, started in 1989, to collect, organize and maintain data, laboratory notebooks, and animal tissue specimens from government (Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies) sponsored radiobiology life-span animal studies. These unique records, histopathology slides and paraffin embedded tissue blocks are maintained in a central facility and are available for further research study. The materials include electronic and paper records for each of more than 6,000 life-span-observations on dogs as well as details of major studies involving nearly 30,000 mice. Although these studies were performed over many years and at different laboratories with differing data management systems, the NRA has translated them into a standardized set of relational database tables. These can be distributed to interested individuals on written request. Specific Aims are: (1) To Maintain the Archive of Written Records from the Animal Experiments - The USTUR continued to maintain the NRA archives which consist of approximately 175 storage boxes containing laboratory notebooks, animal exposure records, animal pathologic records, and radiographs. These were stored in a 6,000 square foot leased facility in Richland, WA. Additionally, through a collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Low Dose Program, many of these records were scanned into digital files. These totaled 34 GB of data, which are saved in 2,407 separate PDF files that are organized by box number and animal identification number. (2) To Maintain the Archive of Animal Tissues at Washington State University - The USTUR continued to house the NRA dog tissue collection in the leased facility. The NRA tissue collection consisted of pathology slides and tissue blocks. Approximately 25% of the laboratory facility was dedicated to the storage of the NRA materials. (3) To Organize the Datasets of These Animals in the Context of Other Datasets so

  16. Evaluation of IMRT plans for prostate treatment using energies of 6 MV and 15 MV; Avaliacao de planejamentos de IMRT para tratamento de prostata utilizando energias de 6 MV e 15 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lucas Francisco C.; Silva, Murilo C. da; Silveira, Paula J.; Flosi, Adriana A.; Boccaletti, Karina W., E-mail: mcollete@gmail.com [A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-08-15

    This study aims to evaluate and compare radiotherapy plans with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer treatments optimized for photon energies of 6 MV and 15 MV. We retrospectively evaluated 29 patients with prostate cancer, planned with IMRT technique with prescribed dose of 78 Gy. The initial plan was done for the two photon energies, keeping the same optimization parameters and comparing maximum, minimum and modal PTV doses, conformity and homogeneity indexes, dose gradients, isodoses volumes of 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 Gy, and the total number of monitor units. It was found that the plans are equivalent regarding higher isodose volumes, conformity and homogeneity indexes, maximum, minimum and modal PTV doses. However, for 6 MV plans there was a considerable increase in both number of monitor units and volume lower isodose volumes, especially the 30 Gy. (author)

  17. Heavy ion radiobiology for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco

    2004-12-01

    Research in the field of biological effects of heavy charged particles is needed for both heavy-ion therapy (hadrontherapy) and protection from the exposure to galactic cosmic radiation in long-term manned space missions. Although the exposure conditions (e.g. high- vs. low-dose rate) and relevant endpoints (e.g. cell killing vs. neoplastic transformation) are different in the two fields, it is clear that a substantial overlap exists in several research topics. Three such topics are discussed in this short review: individual radiosensitivity, mixed radiation fields, and late stochastic effects of heavy ions. In addition, researchers involved either in experimental studies on space radiation protection or heavy-ion therapy will basically use the same accelerator facilities. It seems to be important that novel accelerator facilities planned (or under construction) for heavy-ion therapy reserve a substantial amount of beamtime to basic studies of heavy-ion radiobiology and its applications in space radiation research.

  18. IMRT and radiation protection in the prostate cancer therapy; IMRT e a protecao radiologica no tratamento do cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Helena C.; Silva, Andre R.M.; Oliveira, Claudia F.M., E-mail: andrerichard88@bol.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to specify the technological advances that IMRT presents relative to other traditional radiotherapy, particularly to conformal radiotherapy three dimensional (3D-TCR) and benefits compared to the side effects caused by from treatment of radiotherapy.

  19. An investigation of PRESAGE® 3D dosimetry for IMRT and VMAT radiation therapy treatment verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jake; Juang, Titania; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize three formulations of PRESAGE® dosimeters (DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX) and to identify optimal readout timing and procedures for accurate in-house 3D dosimetry. The optimal formulation and procedure was then applied for the verification of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment technique. PRESAGE® formulations were studied for their temporal stability post-irradiation, sensitivity, and linearity of dose response. Dosimeters were read out using a high-resolution optical-CT scanner. Small volumes of PRESAGE® were irradiated to investigate possible differences in sensitivity for large and small volumes (‘volume effect’). The optimal formulation and read-out technique was applied to the verification of two patient treatments: an IMRT plan and a VMAT plan. A gradual decrease in post-irradiation optical-density was observed in all formulations with DEA-1 exhibiting the best temporal stability with less than 4% variation between 2-22 h post-irradiation. A linear dose response at the 4 h time point was observed for all formulations with an R2 value >0.99. A large volume effect was observed for DEA-1 with sensitivity of the large dosimeter being ~63% less than the sensitivity of the cuvettes. For the IMRT and VMAT treatments, the 3D gamma passing rates for 3%/3 mm criteria using absolute measured dose were 99.6 and 94.5% for the IMRT and VMAT treatments, respectively. In summary, this work shows that accurate 3D dosimetry is possible with all three PRESAGE® formulations. The optimal imaging windows post-irradiation were 3-24 h, 2-6 h, and immediately for the DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX formulations, respectively. Because of the large volume effect, small volume cuvettes are not yet a reliable method for calibration of larger dosimeters to absolute dose. Finally, PRESAGE® is observed to be a useful method of 3D verification when careful consideration is given

  20. Fast IMRT by increasing the beam number and reducing the number of segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratengeier Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The purpose of this work is to develop fast deliverable step and shoot IMRT technique. A reduction in the number of segments should theoretically be possible, whilst simultaneously maintaining plan quality, provided that the reduction is accompanied by an increased number of gantry angles. A benefit of this method is that the segment shaping could be performed during gantry motion, thereby reducing the delivery time. The aim was to find classes of such solutions whose plan quality can compete with conventional IMRT. Materials/Methods A planning study was performed. Step and shoot IMRT plans were created using direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO as a reference. DMPO plans were compared to an IMRT variant having only one segment per angle ("2-Step Fast". 2-Step Fast is based on a geometrical analysis of the topology of the planning target volume (PTV and the organs at risk (OAR. A prostate/rectum case, spine metastasis/spinal cord, breast/lung and an artificial PTV/OAR combination of the ESTRO-Quasimodo phantom were used for the study. The composite objective value (COV, a quality score, and plan delivery time were compared. The delivery time for the DMPO reference plan and the 2-Step Fast IMRT technique was measured and calculated for two different linacs, a twelve year old Siemens Primus™ ("old" linac and two Elekta Synergy™ "S" linacs ("new" linacs. Results 2-Step Fast had comparable or better quality than the reference DMPO plan. The number of segments was smaller than for the reference plan, the number of gantry angles was between 23 and 34. For the modern linac the delivery time was always smaller than that for the reference plan. The calculated (measured values showed a mean delivery time reduction of 21% (21% for the new linac, and of 7% (3% for the old linac compared to the respective DMPO reference plans. For the old linac, the data handling time per beam was the limiting factor for the treatment time

  1. Fast IMRT by increasing the beam number and reducing the number of segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratengeier, Klaus; Gainey, Mark B; Flentje, Michael

    2011-12-09

    The purpose of this work is to develop fast deliverable step and shoot IMRT technique. A reduction in the number of segments should theoretically be possible, whilst simultaneously maintaining plan quality, provided that the reduction is accompanied by an increased number of gantry angles. A benefit of this method is that the segment shaping could be performed during gantry motion, thereby reducing the delivery time. The aim was to find classes of such solutions whose plan quality can compete with conventional IMRT. A planning study was performed. Step and shoot IMRT plans were created using direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) as a reference. DMPO plans were compared to an IMRT variant having only one segment per angle ("2-Step Fast"). 2-Step Fast is based on a geometrical analysis of the topology of the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR). A prostate/rectum case, spine metastasis/spinal cord, breast/lung and an artificial PTV/OAR combination of the ESTRO-Quasimodo phantom were used for the study. The composite objective value (COV), a quality score, and plan delivery time were compared. The delivery time for the DMPO reference plan and the 2-Step Fast IMRT technique was measured and calculated for two different linacs, a twelve year old Siemens Primus™ ("old" linac) and two Elekta Synergy™ "S" linacs ("new" linacs). 2-Step Fast had comparable or better quality than the reference DMPO plan. The number of segments was smaller than for the reference plan, the number of gantry angles was between 23 and 34. For the modern linac the delivery time was always smaller than that for the reference plan. The calculated (measured) values showed a mean delivery time reduction of 21% (21%) for the new linac, and of 7% (3%) for the old linac compared to the respective DMPO reference plans. For the old linac, the data handling time per beam was the limiting factor for the treatment time reduction. 2-Step Fast plans are suited to reduce the

  2. Comparison of step and shoot IMRT treatment plans generated by three inverse treatment planning systems; Comparacion de tratamientos de IMRT estatica generados por tres sistemas de planificacion inversa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Moreno, J. M.; Zucca Aparicio, D.; Fernandez leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Minambres Moro, A.

    2011-07-01

    One of the most important issues of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments using the step-and-shoot technique is the number of segments and monitor units (MU) for treatment delivery. These parameters depend heavily on the inverse optimization module of the treatment planning system (TPS) used. Three commercial treatment planning systems: CMS XiO, iPlan and Prowess Panther have been evaluated. With each of them we have generated a treatment plan for the same group of patients, corresponding to clinical cases. Dosimetric results, MU calculated and number of segments were compared. Prowess treatment planning system generates plans with a number of segments significantly lower than other systems, while MU are less than a half. It implies important reductions in leakage radiation and delivery time. Degradation in the final dose calculation of dose is very small, because it directly optimizes positions of multileaf collimator (MLC). (Author) 13 refs.

  3. Comparison of whole-field simultaneous integrated boost VMAT and IMRT in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiance; Yi, Jinling; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yan, Huawei; Han, Ce; Xie, Congying

    2013-01-01

    To study the feasibility of using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to deliver whole-field simultaneous integrated boost (WF-SIB) to treat patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). WF-SIB intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, one-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans, and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans were generated with identical objective functions for 8 patients with NPC of various stages. Isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms were evaluated. Dosimetric and biological quality indices of clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were calculated to study the optimization capability of these 3 modalities in the treatment of patients with NPC. The optimization time, delivery time, required monitor units (MUs), and delivery accuracy were also compared to investigate the feasibility of these 3 modalities. There was no significant difference (p = 0.92) in target coverage (TC) between WF-SIB IMRT (99.00 ± 0.79) and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT (97.98 ± 1.29). However, both had higher TC than one-arc VMAT plans (89.92 ± 6.32, p VMAT showed the minimum Dmax to OARs. No other significant differences were observed among these 3 modalities on CTV coverage and OAR sparing. The delivery and MU efficiency of one-arc and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT were greatly improved compared with WF-SIB IMRT. The optimization time of one-arc and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans were 5 and 10 times greater than that of WF-SIB IMRT, respectively. The delivery accuracy of WF-SIB VMAT was not affected by the increased freedom. For patients with NPC, one-arc WF-SIB VMAT might not be able to achieve sufficient TC, whereas two-arc WF-SIB VMAT was able to achieve reasonable TC. No significant advantage on OAR protection was demonstrated by VMAT compared with IMRT. WF-SIB VMAT has significantly shorter delivery times, but WF-SIB IMRT may still be the first treatment choice for patients with NPC.

  4. SU-E-T-581: A Comparative Study of Standard IMRT and VMAT Planning Techniques for Unilateral and Bilateral Head and Neck Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pursley, J; Tishler, R B; Margalit, D N; Sher, D J; Damato, A L [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric properties and monitor units (MU) of IMRT plans with several VMAT head and neck (H and N) plans. Methods: Seventeen unilateral H and N (UHN) and five bilateral H and N (BHN) patients initially treated with IMRT were replanned with VMAT. Several arc arrangements were studied for each patient: 1)for UHN, two 360° arcs, two 260° arcs, two 210° arcs, two 360° arcs with contralateral avoidance sectors, and 2)for BHN, two 360° arcs, two 360° arcs with bilateral avoidance sectors, two 360° arcs with bilateral avoidance sectors and a third arc limited to the upper neck. Optimization constraints were adjusted for each patient and plan. All plans were normalized to achieve the same highest-dose PTV coverage. Percent differences (IMRT-VMAT)/VMAT in MU, dose homogeneity (HI=maximum point dose/prescription dose), and organ-at-risk (OAR) metrics are reported and statistical significance evaluated (p<0.05; paired Student t-test). Results: Average reduction in MU with VMAT was 28% for UHN (p<0.0001) and 63% for BHN (p<0.0001). Average HI for UHN IMRT and 360° arc VMAT plans was 1.08 and for plans with arcs <360° average HI=1.10. Average HI for BHN IMRT was 1.07, for three-arc VMAT 1.08, and for two-arc VMAT 1.11. For UHN, two 210° arcs achieved lower contralateral parotid max (−2.6 Gy, p<0.02) and mean (−1.2 Gy, p=0.06) dose. For BHN two-arc plans, contralateral parotid mean dose increased (3.3 Gy, p<0.04) and larynx max dose increased (2.9 Gy, p<0.02) with no change in larynx mean dose. Conclusion: For UHN, 360degree arc VMAT consistently produced plans dosimetrically comparable to IMRT with the benefit of lower MU. VMAT with arcs <360degrees produced plans inferior to IMRT in dose homogeneity and without significantly improved OAR sparing. For BHN, three-arc plans were dosimetrically comparable to IMRT with lower MU, while two-arc plans were inferior to IMRT in HI and OAR dose. Research supported in part by a Kaye Family Award.

  5. Automated generation of IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses: comparison of different planning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Peter W J; Dirkx, Maarten L P; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2013-07-01

    To compare IMRT planning strategies for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses. All plans were generated fully automatically (i.e., no human trial-and-error interactions) using iCycle, the authors' in-house developed algorithm for multicriterial selection of beam angles and optimization of fluence profiles, allowing objective comparison of planning strategies. For 18 prostate cancer patients (eight with bilateral hip prostheses, ten with a right-sided unilateral prosthesis), two planning strategies were evaluated: (i) full exclusion of beams containing beamlets that would deliver dose to the target after passing a prosthesis (IMRT remove) and (ii) exclusion of those beamlets only (IMRT cut). Plans with optimized coplanar and noncoplanar beam arrangements were generated. Differences in PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were quantified. The impact of beam number on plan quality was evaluated. Especially for patients with bilateral hip prostheses, IMRT cut significantly improved rectum and bladder sparing compared to IMRT remove. For 9-beam coplanar plans, rectum V60 Gy reduced by 17.5% ± 15.0% (maximum 37.4%, p = 0.036) and rectum D mean by 9.4% ± 7.8% (maximum 19.8%, p = 0.036). Further improvements in OAR sparing were achievable by using noncoplanar beam setups, reducing rectum V 60Gy by another 4.6% ± 4.9% (p = 0.012) for noncoplanar 9-beam IMRT cut plans. Large reductions in rectum dose delivery were also observed when increasing the number of beam directions in the plans. For bilateral implants, the rectum V 60Gy was 37.3% ± 12.1% for coplanar 7-beam plans and reduced on average by 13.5% (maximum 30.1%, p = 0.012) for 15 directions. iCycle was able to automatically generate high quality plans for prostate cancer patients with prostheses. Excluding only beamlets that passed through the prostheses (IMRTcut strategy) significantly improved OAR sparing. Noncoplanar beam arrangements and, to a larger extent, increasing the number of

  6. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-induced Acute Nausea and Vomiting in IMRT for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Victor H.F., E-mail: vhflee@hku.hk [Department of Clinical Oncology, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong); Ng, Sherry C.Y.; Leung, T.W.; Au, Gordon K.H.; Kwong, Dora L.W. [Department of Clinical Oncology, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: We wanted to investigate dosimetric parameters that would predict radiation-induced acute nausea and vomiting in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for undifferentiated carcinoma of the nasopharynx (NPC). Methods and Materials: Forty-nine consecutive patients with newly diagnosed NPC were treated with IMRT alone in this prospective study. Patients receiving any form of chemotherapy were excluded. The dorsal vagal complex (DVC) as well as the left and right vestibules (VB-L and VB-R, respectively) were contoured on planning computed tomography images. A structure combining both the VB-L and the VB-R, named VB-T, was also generated. All structures were labeled organs at risk (OAR). A 3-mm three-dimensional margin was added to these structures and labeled DVC+3 mm, VB-L+3 mm, VB-R+3 mm, and VB-T+3 mm to account for physiological body motion and setup error. No weightings were given to these structures during optimization in treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were recorded from dose-volume histograms. Statistical analysis of parameters' association with nausea and vomiting was performed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Six patients (12.2%) reported Grade 1 nausea, and 8 patients (16.3%) reported Grade 2 nausea. Also, 4 patients (8.2%) complained of Grade 1 vomiting, and 4 patients (8.2%) experienced Grade 2 vomiting. No patients developed protracted nausea and vomiting after completion of IMRT. For radiation-induced acute nausea, V40 (percentage volume receiving at least 40Gy) to the VB-T and V40>=80% to the VB-T were predictors, using univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, V40>=80% to the VB-T was the only predictor. There were no predictors of radiation-induced acute vomiting, as the number of events was too small for analysis. Conclusions: This is the first study demonstrating that a V40 to the VB-T is predictive of radiation-induced acute nausea. The vestibules should be labeled as sensitive OARs

  7. A difference-matrix metaheuristic for intensity map segmentation in step-and-shoot IMRT delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Athula D. A.; D'Souza, Warren D.; Goadrich, Laura D.; Meyer, Robert R.; Sorensen, Kelly J.; Naqvi, Shahid A.; Shi, Leyuan

    2006-05-01

    At an intermediate stage of radiation treatment planning for IMRT, most commercial treatment planning systems for IMRT generate intensity maps that describe the grid of beamlet intensities for each beam angle. Intensity map segmentation of the matrix of individual beamlet intensities into a set of MLC apertures and corresponding intensities is then required in order to produce an actual radiation delivery plan for clinical use. Mathematically, this is a very difficult combinatorial optimization problem, especially when mechanical limitations of the MLC lead to many constraints on aperture shape, and setup times for apertures make the number of apertures an important factor in overall treatment time. We have developed, implemented and tested on clinical cases a metaheuristic (that is, a method that provides a framework to guide the repeated application of another heuristic) that efficiently generates very high-quality (low aperture number) segmentations. Our computational results demonstrate that the number of beam apertures and monitor units in the treatment plans resulting from our approach is significantly smaller than the corresponding values for treatment plans generated by the heuristics embedded in a widely use commercial system. We also contrast the excellent results of our fast and robust metaheuristic with results from an 'exact' method, branch-and-cut, which attempts to construct optimal solutions, but, within clinically acceptable time limits, generally fails to produce good solutions, especially for intensity maps with more than five intensity levels. Finally, we show that in no instance is there a clinically significant change of quality associated with our more efficient plans.

  8. Dosimetric and radiobiological consequences of computed tomography-guided adaptive strategies for intensity modulated radiation therapy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Jerry J; Johnson, Carol; Turnbull, David; Kempe, Jeff; Bzdusek, Karl; Van Dyk, Jacob; Bauman, Glenn

    2013-12-01

    To examine a range of scenarios for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer, including different schedules for megavoltage CT imaging, patient repositioning, and dose replanning. We simulated multifraction dose distributions with deformable registration using 35 sets of megavoltage CT scans of 13 patients. We computed cumulative dose-volume histograms, from which tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for rectum were calculated. Five-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 18-MV x-rays was planned to achieve an isocentric dose of 76 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV). The differences between D95, tumor control probability, V70Gy, and NTCP for rectum, for accumulated versus planned dose distributions, were compared for different target volume sizes, margins, and adaptive strategies. The CTV D95 for IMRT treatment plans, averaged over 13 patients, was 75.2 Gy. Using the largest CTV margins (10/7 mm), the D95 values accumulated over 35 fractions were within 2% of the planned value, regardless of the adaptive strategy used. For tighter margins (5 mm), the average D95 values dropped to approximately 73.0 Gy even with frequent repositioning, and daily replanning was necessary to correct this deficit. When personalized margins were applied to an adaptive CTV derived from the first 6 treatment fractions using the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) algorithm, target coverage could be maintained using a single replan 1 week into therapy. For all approaches, normal tissue parameters (rectum V(70Gy) and NTCP) remained within acceptable limits. The frequency of adaptive interventions depends on the size of the CTV combined with target margins used during IMRT optimization. The application of adaptive target margins (adaptive CTV determined 1 week into therapy minimizes the need for subsequent dose replanning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Iori, E-mail: sumida@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  10. Feasibility of BNCT radiobiological experiments at the HYTHOR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, J.; Ceballos, C.; Soncin, M.; Fabris, C.; Friso, E.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Jori, G.; Rosi, G.; Nava, E.

    2008-06-01

    HYTHOR (HYbrid Thermal spectrum sHifter tapirO Reactor) is a new thermal-neutron irradiation facility, which was installed and became operative in mid 2005 at the TAPIRO (TAratura PIla Rapida potenza 0) fast reactor, in the Casaccia research centre (near Rome) of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie Energia ed Ambiente). The facility has been designed for in vivo radiobiological studies. In HYTHOR irradiation cavity, 1-6 mice can be simultaneously irradiated to study skin melanoma treatments with the BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy). The therapeutic effects of HYTHOR radiation field on mouse melanoma has been studied as a preliminary investigation before studying the tumour local control due to boron neutron capture effect after boronated molecule injection. The method to properly irradiate small animals has been precisely defined. Results show that HYTHOR radiation field is by itself effective in reducing the tumour-growth rate. This finding has to be taken into account in studying the effectiveness of new 10B carriers. A method to properly measure the reduction of the tumour-growth rate is reported and discussed.

  11. Amchitka Radiobiological Program progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, L.D.; Sibley, T.H.; Nakatani, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of the Amchitka Radiobiological Program for the period 1970-1979 was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from world-wide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear blasts on Amchitka Island. The objective is achieved, by the collection and radiological analyses of biological and environmental samples and by background radiation measurements. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground sites of the Amchitka nuclear detonations would be suspected if the contamination was significntly greater than would be expected from world fallout. An account of the program from July 1970 to December 1978 has been given in nine previous reports from the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology to the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1979. The results of analyses of the samples collected in 1979 lead to the same conclusions as in previous years; i.e., there is no evidence that the radionuclide contamination at Amchitka Island is greater than would be expected from world fallout except for a slight contamination of the Long Shot Mud Pits with tritium.

  12. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and multivariate methods for radiobiological dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, A D; Clarke, C; Byrne, H J; Lyng, F M

    2010-02-01

    The scientific literature contains an ever-growing number of reports of applications of vibrational spectroscopy as a multivariate non-invasive tool for analysis of biological effects at the molecular level. Recently, Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) has been demonstrated to be sensitive to molecular events occurring in cells and tissue after exposure to ionizing radiation. In this work the application of FTIRM in the examination of dose-dependent molecular effects occurring in skin cells after exposure to ionizing radiation with the use of partial least-squares regression (PLSR) and generalized regression neural networks (GRNN) was studied. The methodology is shown to be sensitive to molecular events occurring with radiation dose and time after exposure. The variation in molecular species with dose and time after irradiation is shown to be non-linear by virtue of the higher modeling efficiency yielded from the non-linear algorithms. Dose prediction efficiencies of approximately +/-10 mGy were achieved at 96 h after irradiation, highlighting the potential applications of the methodology in radiobiological dosimetry.

  13. Amchitka Radiobiological Program. Final report, July 1970-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibley, T.H.; Tornberg, L.D.

    1982-11-01

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program, to collect biological and environmental samples for radiological analyses, began in 1970 and continued through 1979. The principal objective was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from worldwide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground test sites would be suspected if the amount of contamination was significantly greater than could be attributed to worldwide fallout or if an unexpected assemblage of radionuclides was detected. No radionuclides from the underground sites were detected, except for tritium from the Long Shot test (1965) which produced increased tritium concentrations in surface water and freshwater plants near the test site. This final report compiles all previous data into one report and considers the temporal trends in these data. Two naturally occurring radionuclides, /sup 40/K and /sup 7/Be, were the most abundantly occurring radionuclides in most samples; in lichen samples either /sup 137/Cs or /sup 144/Ce had the highest activity. All samples were below applicable Radiation Protection Guides and by 1979 most samples were near or below the statistical detection limits. Increased concentrations of short-lived fallout radionuclides following the Chinese atmospheric tests were found in freshwater and seawater samples and in most indicator organisms.

  14. A comparison of three commercial IMRT treatment planning systems for selected paediatric cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldesoky, Ismail; Attalla, Ehab M; Elshemey, Wael M; Zaghloul, Mohamed S

    2012-03-08

    This work aimed at evaluating the performance of three different intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning systems (TPSs)--KonRad, XiO and Prowess--for selected pediatric cases. For this study, 11 pediatric patients with different types of brain, orbit, head and neck cancer were selected. Clinical step-and-shoot IMRT treatment plans were designed for delivery on a Siemens ONCOR accelerator with 82-leaf multileaf collimators (MLCs). Plans were optimized to achieve the same clinical objectives by applying the same beam energy and the same number and direction of beams. The analysis of performance was based on isodose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for planning target volume (PTV), the relevant organs at risk (OARs), as well as mean dose (Dmean), maximum dose (Dmax), 95% dose (D₉₅), volume of patient receiving 2 and 5 Gy, total number of segments, monitor units per segment (MU/Segment), and the number of MU/cGy. Treatment delivery time and conformation number were two other evaluation parameters that were considered in this study. Collectively, the Prowess and KonRad plans showed a significant reduction in the number of MUs that varied between 1.8% and 61.5% (p-value = 0.001) for the different cases, compared to XiO. This was reflected in shorter treatment delivery times. The percentage volumes of each patient receiving 2 Gy and 5 Gy were compared for the three TPSs. The general trend was that KonRad had the highest percentage volume, Prowess showed the lowest (p-value = 0.0001). The KonRad achieved better conformality than both of XiO and Prowess. Based on the present results, the three treatment planning systems were efficient in IMRT, yet XiO showed the lowest performance. The three TPSs achieved the treatment goals according to the internationally approved standards.

  15. The effect of the target-organ geometric complexity on the choice of delivery between RapidArc and sliding-window IMRT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Monica W.K., E-mail: kanwkm@ha.org.hk [Department of Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Leung, Lucullus H.T. [Department of Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yu, Peter K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2013-10-01

    We attempted to assess the effect of target-organ geometric complexity on the plan quality of sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), double-arc (RA2), and triple-arc (RA3) RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Plans for 9-field sliding-window IMRT, RA2, and RA3 were optimized for 36 patients with NPC ranging from T1 to T4 tumors. Initially the patients were divided into 2 groups, with group A representing the most simple early stage (T1 and T2) cases, whereas group B represented the more complex advanced cases (T3 and T4). Evaluation was performed based on target conformity, target dose homogeneity, organ-sparing capability, and delivery efficiency. Based on the plan quality results, a subgroup of advanced cases, group B2, representing the most demanding task was distinguished and reported separately from the rest of the group B cases, B1. Detailed analysis was performed on the anatomic features for each group of cases, so that planners can easily identify the differences between B1 and B2. For the group A cases, RA3 plans were superior to the IMRT plans in terms of organ sparing, whereas target conformity and dose homogeneity were similar. For the group B1 cases, the RA3 plans produced almost equivalent plan quality as the IMRT plans. For the group B2 cases, for most of which large target volumes were adjacent to (5 mm or less) and wrapping around the brain stem, RA2 and RA3 were inferior to the IMRT regarding both target dose homogeneity and conformity. RA2 plans were slightly inferior to IMRT and RA3 plans for most cases. The plan comparison results depend on the target to brain stem distances and the target sizes. The plan quality results together with the anatomic information may allow the evaluation of the 3 treatment options before actual planning.

  16. Peripheral doses of cranial pediatric IMRT performed with attenuator blocks; Doses perifericas de IMRT cranial pediatrica realizada com blocos atenuadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger; Schitz, Ivette; Schelin, Hugo Reuters, E-mail: soboll@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: iveteschitz@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Silva, Ricardo Goulart da, E-mail: ricardo.goulart@ymail.co [Hospital Angelina Caron, Campina Grande do Sul, PR (Brazil); Viamonte, Alfredo, E-mail: aviamonte@inca.gov.b [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper presents values of peripheral doses measured at six vital points of simulator objects which represent the ages of 2, 5 and 10 years old, submitted to a cranial IMRT procedure that applied compensator blocks interposed to 6 MV beams. The found values indicate that there is independence of dose with position of measurements and age of the patient, as the peripheral dose at the points nearest and the 2 year old simulator object where larger. The doses in thyroid reached the range of 1.4 to 2.9% of the dose prescribed in the isocenter, indicating that the peripheral doses for IMRT that employ compensator blocks can be greater than for the IMRT produced with sliding window technique

  17. Comparison of the radiobiological effect of carbon ion beam therapy and conventional radiation therapy on cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Oka, Kuniyuki

    2008-09-01

    Little clinical evidence has been provided to show the minimization of radiation resistance of tumors using high linear energy transfer radiation. We therefore investigated the radiobiological and molecular pathological aspects of carbon beam therapy. A total of 27 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix were treated using a carbon beam and 50 control patients with SCC of the cervix using a photon beam. The expression of Ki-67, p53, and p27 proteins before radiotherapy and 5 and 15 days after therapy initiation were investigated using immunohistochemistry. Similar changes were observed in Ki-67 labeling index (LI) and p53 LI during carbon and photon beam therapies. However, for carbon beam therapy, the mean p27 LI significantly decreased from 25.2% before treatment to 18.6% on the 5th day after treatment initiation, followed by a significant increase to 36.1% on the 15th day. In contrast, for photon beam therapy, the p27 LI consistently decreased from the initial 19.9% to 13.7% on the 15th day. Histological effects were observably stronger under carbon than photon beam therapy, though no statistically significant difference was observed (p = 0.07 on the 5th day and p = 0.10 on the 15th day). The changes in p27 LI under carbon beam therapy were significantly different from those under photon beam therapy, which suggests important molecular differences in the radio-biological response between therapies. Further investigation is required to elucidate the clinical relevance of these putative changes and optimize the relative biological effectiveness of carbon beam to X-ray.

  18. 77 FR 68155 - The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R-84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... COMMISSION The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R... Operating License No. R-84 (Application), which currently authorizes the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research... the renewal of Facility Operating License No. R-84, which currently authorizes the licensee to...

  19. Dosimetric comparison of the simultaneous integrated boost in whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery: IMRT, IMRT plus an electron boost and VMAT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangang Wu

    Full Text Available To compare the target volume coverage and doses to organs at risks (OARs using three techniques that simultaneous integrated boost (SIB in whole-breast irradiation (WBI after breast-conserving surgery, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, IMRT plus an electron boost (IMRT-EB, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT.A total of 10 patients with early-stage left-sided breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery were included in this study. IMRT, IMRT-EB and VMAT plans were generated for each patient.The conformity index (CI of the planning target volumes evaluation (PTV-Eval of VMAT was significantly superior to those of IMRT and IMRT-EB (P 0.05.Considered the target volume coverage and radiation dose delivered to the OARs (especially the heart and lung, IMRT may be more suitable for the SIB in WBI than IMRT-EB and VMAT. Additional clinical studies with a larger sample size will be needed to assess the long-term feasibility and efficacy of SIB using different radiotherapy techniques.

  20. Performance assessment of a 2D array of plastic scintillation detectors for IMRT quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2013-07-01

    The purposes of this work are to assess the performance of a 2D plastic scintillation detectors array prototype for quality assurance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to determine its sensitivity and specificity to positioning errors of one multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf and one MLC leaf bank by applying the principles of signal detection theory. Ten treatment plans (step-and-shoot delivery) and one volumetric modulated arc therapy plan were measured and compared to calculations from two treatment-planning systems (TPSs) and to radiochromic films. The averages gamma passing rates per beam found for the step-and-shoot plans were 95.8% for the criteria (3%, 2 mm), 97.8% for the criteria (4%, 2 mm), and 98.1% for the criteria (3%, 3 mm) when measurements were compared to TPS calculations. The receiver operating characteristic curves for the one leaf errors and one leaf bank errors were determined from simulations (theoretical upper limits) and measurements. This work concludes that arrays of plastic scintillation detectors could be used for IMRT quality assurance in clinics. The use of signal detection theory could improve the quality of dosimetric verifications in radiation therapy by providing optimal discrimination criteria for the detection of different classes of errors.

  1. Physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation for ultra-fast IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Niklas; Bangert, Mark; Kamerling, Cornelis P; Ziegenhein, Peter; Bol, Gijsbert H; Raaymakers, Bas W; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-07-08

    Conventional treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a trial-and-error process that usually involves tedious tweaking of optimization parameters. Here, we present an algorithm that automates part of this process, in particular the adaptation of voxel-based penalties within normal tissue. Thereby, the proposed algorithm explicitly considers a priori known physical limitations of photon irradiation. The efficacy of the developed algorithm is assessed during treatment planning studies comprising 16 prostate and 5 head and neck cases. We study the eradication of hot spots in the normal tissue, effects on target coverage and target conformity, as well as selected dose volume points for organs at risk. The potential of the proposed method to generate class solutions for the two indications is investigated. Run-times of the algorithms are reported. Physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation is an adequate means to automatically detect and eradicate hot-spots during IMRT planning while maintaining target coverage and conformity. Negative effects on organs at risk are comparably small and restricted to lower doses. Using physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation, it was possible to improve the generation of class solutions for both indications. Considering the reported run-times of less than 20 s, physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation has the potential to reduce the clinical workload during planning and automated treatment plan generation in the long run, facilitating adaptive radiation treatments.

  2. Single-Ion Microbeam for Applications in Radiobiology: State of the Art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhiwen; Wu Lijun; Yu Zengliang

    2005-01-01

    Single-Ion Microbeam (SIM) is uniquely capable of precisely delivering a predefined number of charged particles (precise doses of radiation) to individual cells or sub-cellular targets in situ. Since the early 1990's, there has been an ever-increasing interest in developing and applying the SIM technique to problems in radiobiology for studies of cell and tissue damaged by ionizing radiations. Potential applications for SIM in radiobiology continues to grow and have been diversified. There are currently more than 14 SIM facilities worldwide, and they have been in a constant state of evolution. This paper reviews the current state of SIM research worldwide and the related pivotal technological developments in the fields of both biophysics and radiobiology.Representative applications and the perspective of SIM are also introduced and discussed.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations to replace film dosimetry in IMRT verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzfried, Thomas; Rickhey, Mark; Treutwein, Marius; Koelbl, Oliver; Bogner, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    Patient-specific verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans can be done by dosimetric measurements or by independent dose or monitor unit calculations. The aim of this study was the clinical evaluation of IMRT verification based on a fast Monte Carlo (MC) program with regard to possible benefits compared to commonly used film dosimetry. 25 head-and-neck IMRT plans were recalculated by a pencil beam based treatment planning system (TPS) using an appropriate quality assurance (QA) phantom. All plans were verified both by film and diode dosimetry and compared to MC simulations. The irradiated films, the results of diode measurements and the computed dose distributions were evaluated, and the data were compared on the basis of gamma maps and dose-difference histograms. Average deviations in the high-dose region between diode measurements and point dose calculations performed with the TPS and MC program were 0.7 ± 2.7% and 1.2 ± 3.1%, respectively. For film measurements, the mean gamma values with 3% dose difference and 3mm distance-to-agreement were 0.74 ± 0.28 (TPS as reference) with dose deviations up to 10%. Corresponding values were significantly reduced to 0.34 ± 0.09 for MC dose calculation. The total time needed for both verification procedures is comparable, however, by far less labor intensive in the case of MC simulations. The presented study showed that independent dose calculation verification of IMRT plans with a fast MC program has the potential to eclipse film dosimetry more and more in the near future. Thus, the linac-specific QA part will necessarily become more important. In combination with MC simulations and due to the simple set-up, point-dose measurements for dosimetric plausibility checks are recommended at least in the IMRT introduction phase. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yañez, Elvia; López, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerología de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  5. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yanez, Elvia; Lopez, Jesus [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango, Victoria de Durango, Durango (Mexico); ISSSTE General Hospital Dr. Santiago Ramon y Cajal, Victoria de Durango, Durango (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  6. Multicriteria optimization informed VMAT planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huixiao; Craft, David L.; Gierga, David P., E-mail: dgierga@partners.org

    2014-04-01

    We developed a patient-specific volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization procedure using dose-volume histogram (DVH) information from multicriteria optimization (MCO) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. The study included 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing standard fractionation treatment, 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing hypofractionation treatment, and 5 patients with head/neck cancer. MCO-IMRT plans using 20 and 7 treatment fields were generated for each patient on the RayStation treatment planning system (clinical version 2.5, RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden). The resulting DVH of the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan for each patient was used as the reference DVH, and the extracted point values of the resulting DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan were used as objectives and constraints for VMAT optimization. Weights of objectives or constraints of VMAT optimization or both were further tuned to generate the best match with the reference DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan. The final optimal VMAT plan quality was evaluated by comparison with MCO-IMRT plans based on homogeneity index, conformity number of planning target volume, and organ at risk sparing. The influence of gantry spacing, arc number, and delivery time on VMAT plan quality for different tumor sites was also evaluated. The resulting VMAT plan quality essentially matched the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan but with a shorter delivery time and less monitor units. VMAT plan quality of head/neck cancer cases improved using dual arcs whereas prostate cases did not. VMAT plan quality was improved by fine gantry spacing of 2 for the head/neck cancer cases and the hypofractionation-treated prostate cancer cases but not for the standard fractionation–treated prostate cancer cases. MCO-informed VMAT optimization is a useful and valuable way to generate patient-specific optimal VMAT plans, though modification of the weights of objectives or constraints extracted from resulting DVH of MCO-IMRT

  7. Multicriteria optimization informed VMAT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huixiao; Craft, David L; Gierga, David P

    2014-01-01

    We developed a patient-specific volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization procedure using dose-volume histogram (DVH) information from multicriteria optimization (MCO) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. The study included 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing standard fractionation treatment, 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing hypofractionation treatment, and 5 patients with head/neck cancer. MCO-IMRT plans using 20 and 7 treatment fields were generated for each patient on the RayStation treatment planning system (clinical version 2.5, RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden). The resulting DVH of the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan for each patient was used as the reference DVH, and the extracted point values of the resulting DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan were used as objectives and constraints for VMAT optimization. Weights of objectives or constraints of VMAT optimization or both were further tuned to generate the best match with the reference DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan. The final optimal VMAT plan quality was evaluated by comparison with MCO-IMRT plans based on homogeneity index, conformity number of planning target volume, and organ at risk sparing. The influence of gantry spacing, arc number, and delivery time on VMAT plan quality for different tumor sites was also evaluated. The resulting VMAT plan quality essentially matched the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan but with a shorter delivery time and less monitor units. VMAT plan quality of head/neck cancer cases improved using dual arcs whereas prostate cases did not. VMAT plan quality was improved by fine gantry spacing of 2 for the head/neck cancer cases and the hypofractionation-treated prostate cancer cases but not for the standard fractionation-treated prostate cancer cases. MCO-informed VMAT optimization is a useful and valuable way to generate patient-specific optimal VMAT plans, though modification of the weights of objectives or constraints extracted from resulting DVH of MCO-IMRT or

  8. Re-planning for compensator-based IMRT with original compensators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geoffrey; Feygelman, Vladimir; Stevens, Craig; Li, Weiqi; Leuthold, Susan; Springett, Gregory; Hoffe, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Compared with multileaf collimator (MLC)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for moving targets, compensator-based IMRT has advantages such as shorter beam-on time, fewer monitor units with potentially decreased secondary carcinogenesis risk, better optimization-to-deliverable dose conversion, and often better dose conformity. Some of the disadvantages include additional time for the compensators to be built and delivered, as well as extra cost. Patients undergoing treatment of abdominal cancers often experience weight loss. It would be necessary to account for this change in weight with a new plan and a second set of compensators. However, this would result in treatment delays and added costs. We have developed a method to re-plan the patient using the same set of compensators. Because the weight changes seen with the treatment of abdominal cancers are usually relatively small, a new 4D computed tomography (CT) acquired in the treatment position with markers on the original isocenter tattoos can be registered to the original planning scan. The contours of target volumes from the original scans are copied to the new scan after fusion. The original compensator set can be used together with a few field-in-field (FiF) beams defined by the MLC (or beams with cerrobend blocks for accelerators not equipped with a MLC). The weights of the beams with compensators are reduced so that the FiF or blocked beams can be optimized to mirror the original plan and dose distribution. Seven abdominal cancer cases are presented using this technique. The new plan on the new planning CT images usually has the same dosimetric quality as the original. The target coverage and dose uniformity are improved compared with the plan without FiF/block modification. Techniques combining additional FiF or blocked beams with the original compensators optimize the treatment plans when patients lose weight and save time and cost compared with generating plans with a new set of compensators.

  9. A Hybrid IMRT/VMAT Technique for the Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combined intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT was developed for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC. Two-full-arc VMAT (2ARC-VMAT, 9-field IMRT (9F-IMRT, and Hybrid IMRT/VMAT plans for NPC were compared in terms of the dosimetric quality, sparing of organs at risk (OARs, and delivery efficiency. The Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique can improve the target dose homogeneity and conformity compared with 9F-IMRT and 2ARC-VMAT. It can reduce the dose delivered to the TMJ, mandible, temporal lobe, and unspecified tissue with fewer MUs compared with 9F-IMRT and dose delivered to parotids, brainstem, and spinal cord compared with 2ARC-VMAT technique. The mean delivery time of Hybrid plans was shorter than that of 9F-IMRT plans (408 s versus 812 s; P=0.00 and longer than that of 2ARC-VMAT plans (408 s versus 179 s; P=0.00. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique could be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality.

  10. A hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yuliang; Tian, Suqing; Guo, Fuxin; Wang, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combined intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was developed for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Two-full-arc VMAT (2ARC-VMAT), 9-field IMRT (9F-IMRT), and Hybrid IMRT/VMAT plans for NPC were compared in terms of the dosimetric quality, sparing of organs at risk (OARs), and delivery efficiency. The Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique can improve the target dose homogeneity and conformity compared with 9F-IMRT and 2ARC-VMAT. It can reduce the dose delivered to the TMJ, mandible, temporal lobe, and unspecified tissue with fewer MUs compared with 9F-IMRT and dose delivered to parotids, brainstem, and spinal cord compared with 2ARC-VMAT technique. The mean delivery time of Hybrid plans was shorter than that of 9F-IMRT plans (408 s versus 812 s; P=0.00) and longer than that of 2ARC-VMAT plans (408 s versus 179 s; P=0.00). Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique could be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality.

  11. A Hybrid IMRT/VMAT Technique for the Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yuliang; Tian, Suqing; Guo, Fuxin; Wang, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combined intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was developed for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Two-full-arc VMAT (2ARC-VMAT), 9-field IMRT (9F-IMRT), and Hybrid IMRT/VMAT plans for NPC were compared in terms of the dosimetric quality, sparing of organs at risk (OARs), and delivery efficiency. The Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique can improve the target dose homogeneity and conformity compared with 9F-IMRT and 2ARC-VMAT. It can reduce the dose delivered to the TMJ, mandible, temporal lobe, and unspecified tissue with fewer MUs compared with 9F-IMRT and dose delivered to parotids, brainstem, and spinal cord compared with 2ARC-VMAT technique. The mean delivery time of Hybrid plans was shorter than that of 9F-IMRT plans (408 s versus 812 s; P = 0.00) and longer than that of 2ARC-VMAT plans (408 s versus 179 s; P = 0.00). Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique could be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality. PMID:25688371

  12. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry of kidneys for treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Sebastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Boubaker, Ariane; Buchegger, Franz; He Bin; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) delivers high absorbed doses to kidneys and may lead to permanent nephropathy. Reliable dosimetry of kidneys is thus critical for safe and effective PRRT. The aim of this work was to assess the feasibility of planning PRRT based on 3D radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) in order to optimize both the amount of activity to administer and the fractionation scheme, while limiting the absorbed dose and the biological effective dose (BED) to the renal cortex. Methods: Planar and SPECT data were available for a patient examined with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide at 0.5 (planar only), 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection. Absorbed dose and BED distributions were calculated for common therapeutic radionuclides, i.e., {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu, using the 3D-RD methodology. Dose-volume histograms were computed and mean absorbed doses to kidneys, renal cortices, and medullae were compared with results obtained using the MIRD schema (S-values) with the multiregion kidney dosimetry model. Two different treatment planning approaches based on (1) the fixed absorbed dose to the cortex and (2) the fixed BED to the cortex were then considered to optimize the activity to administer by varying the number of fractions. Results: Mean absorbed doses calculated with 3D-RD were in good agreement with those obtained with S-value-based SPECT dosimetry for {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu. Nevertheless, for {sup 111}In, differences of 14% and 22% were found for the whole kidneys and the cortex, respectively. Moreover, the authors found that planar-based dosimetry systematically underestimates the absorbed dose in comparison with SPECT-based methods, up to 32%. Regarding the 3D-RD-based treatment planning using a fixed BED constraint to the renal cortex, the optimal number of fractions was found to be 3 or 4, depending on the radionuclide administered and the value of the fixed BED. Cumulative activities obtained using the proposed simulated

  13. IMRT planning and delivery incorporating daily dose from mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miften, Moyed; Gayou, Olivier; Reitz, Bodo; Fuhrer, Russell; Leicher, Brian; Parda, David S

    2007-10-01

    The technology of online mega-voltage cone-beam (CB) computed tomography (MV-CBCT) imaging is currently used in many institutions to generate a 3D anatomical dataset of a patient in treatment position. It utilizes an accelerator therapy beam, delivered with 200 degrees gantry rotation, and captured by an electronic portal imager to account for organ motion and setup variations. Although the patient dose exposure from a single volumetric MV-CBCT imaging procedure is comparable to that from standard double-exposure orthogonal portal images, daily image localization procedures can result in a significant dose increase to healthy tissue. A technique to incorporate the daily dose, from a MV-CBCT imaging procedure, in the IMRT treatment planning optimization process was developed. A composite IMRT plan incorporating the total dose from the CB was optimized with the objective of ensuring uniform target coverage while sparing the surrounding normal tissue. One head and neck cancer patient and four prostate cancer patients were planned and treated using this technique. Dosimetric results from the prostate IMRT plans optimized with or without CB showed similar target coverage and comparable sparing of bladder and rectum volumes. Average mean doses were higher by 1.6 +/- 1.0 Gy for the bladder and comparable for the rectum (-0.3 +/- 1.4 Gy). In addition, an average mean dose increase of 1.9 +/- 0.8 Gy in the femoral heads and 1.7 +/- 0.6 Gy in irradiated tissue was observed. However, the V65 and V70 values for bladder and rectum were lower by 2.3 +/- 1.5% and 2.4 +/- 2.1% indicating better volume sparing at high doses with the optimized plans incorporating CB. For the head and neck case, identical target coverage was achieved, while a comparable sparing of the brain stem, optic chiasm, and optic nerves was observed. The technique of optimized planning incorporating doses from daily online MV-CBCT procedures provides an alternative method for imaging IMRT patients. It allows

  14. The number of beams in IMRT - theoretical investigations and implications for single-arc IMRT

    CERN Document Server

    Bortfeld, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The first purpose of this paper is to shed some new light on the old question of selecting the number of beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The second purpose is to illuminate the related issue of discrete static beam angles vs. rotational techniques, which has recently re-surfaced due to the advancement of volumetric arc therapy (VMAT). A specific objective is to find analytical expressions that allow one to address the points raised above. To make the problem mathematically tractable, it is assumed that the depth dose is flat and that the lateral dose profile can be approximated by polynomials, specifically Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind, of finite degree. The application of methods known from image reconstruction then allows one to answer the first question above as follows: The required number of beams is determined by the maximum degree of the polynomials used in the approximation of the beam profiles, which is a measure of the dose variability. There is nothing to be gained ...

  15. Outcomes of Induction Chemotherapy Plus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT Versus IMRT Plus Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Propensity Matched Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu-Yun OuYang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: It deserves investigation whether induction chemotherapy (IC followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT is inferior to the current standard of IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy (CC in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. METHODS: Patients who received IC (94 patients or CC (302 patients plus IMRT at our center between March 2003 and November 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Propensity-score matching method was used to match patients in both arms at equal ratio. Failure-free survival (FFS, overall survival (OS, distant metastasis–free survival (DMFS, and locoregional relapse–free survival (LRFS were assessed with Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, and Cox regression. RESULTS: In the original cohort of 396 patients, IC plus IMRT resulted in similar FFS (P = .565, OS (P = .334, DMFS (P = .854, and LRFS (P = .999 to IMRT plus CC. In the propensity-matched cohort of 188 patients, no significant survival differences were observed between the two treatment approaches (3-year FFS 80.3% vs 81.0%, P = .590; OS 93.4% vs 92.1%, P = .808; DMFS 85.9% vs 87.7%, P = .275; and LRFS 93.1% vs 92.0%, P = .763. Adjusting for the known prognostic factors in multivariate analysis, IC plus IMRT did not cause higher risk of treatment failure, death, distant metastasis, or locoregional relapse. CONCLUSIONS: IC plus IMRT appeared to achieve comparable survival to IMRT plus CC in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Further investigations were warranted.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy, step-and-shoot, and sliding window IMRT for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnell, Erich; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Young, Julie; Hildebrand, Kim; Algan, Ozer; Syzek, Elizabeth; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 800 N.E. 10th St., OKCC L100, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study aims to evaluate treatment plans generated by Step-and-Shoot (SS), Sliding Window (SW) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) in order to assess the differences in dose volume histograms of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR), conformity indices, radiobiological evaluations, and plan quality for prostate cancer cases. Six prostate cancer patients treated in our center were selected for this retrospective study. Treatment plans were generated with Eclipse version 8.9 using 10 MV photon beams. For VMAT, Varian Rapid Arc with 1 or 2 arcs, and for SS and SW IMRT, 7-9 fields were used. Each plan had three PTVs with prescription doses of 81, 59.4, and 45 Gy to prostate, to prostate and lymph nodes, and to pelvis, respectively. Doses to PTV and OAR and the conformal indices (COIN) were compared among three techniques. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated and compared. The mean doses to the PTV prostate on average were 83 Gy and the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 0.28. For bladder and rectum, the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 2.2. The COIN did not favour any particular delivery method over the other. The TCP was higher with SS and SW for four patients and higher with VMAT for two patients. The NTCP for the rectum was the lowest with VMAT in five out of the six patients. The results show similar target coverage in general.

  17. Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons. [on cells of mammals, bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, N. I.; Vorozhtsova, S. V.; Krasavin, Y. A.; Mashinskaya, T. Y.; Savchenko, N. Y.; Fedorov, B. S.; Khlaponina, V. F.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Gut, L.; Sabo, L.

    1974-01-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons are studied on cells of mammals, bacteria, viruses and DNA of bacteria. Results show that the dose effect dependence bears an exponential character; the reduction of RBE as LET of particle increases reflects the different character of microdistribution of absorbed energy in biological objects with different levels of biological organization.

  18. A community call for a dedicated radiobiological research facility to support particle beam cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Dosanjh, Manjit;

    2012-01-01

    Recently more than one hundred researchers followed an invitation to a brainstorming meeting on the topic of a future dedicated radio-biological and radio-physical research center. 100 more joint the meeting via webcast. After a day of presentations and discussions it was clear, that an urgent need...

  19. Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons. [on cells of mammals, bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, N. I.; Vorozhtsova, S. V.; Krasavin, Y. A.; Mashinskaya, T. Y.; Savchenko, N. Y.; Fedorov, B. S.; Khlaponina, V. F.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Gut, L.; Sabo, L.

    1974-01-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons are studied on cells of mammals, bacteria, viruses and DNA of bacteria. Results show that the dose effect dependence bears an exponential character; the reduction of RBE as LET of particle increases reflects the different character of microdistribution of absorbed energy in biological objects with different levels of biological organization.

  20. Serial tomotherapy vs. MLC-IMRT (Multileaf Collimator Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) for simultaneous boost treatment large intracerebral lesions; Serielle Tomotherapie vs. MLC-IMRT (Multileaf Collimator Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) fuer die simultane Boostbestrahlung mehrerer groesserer Hirnfiliae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Dirk; Lohr, Frank; Mai, Sabine; Polednik, Martin; Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Abo-Madyan, Yasser [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Kasr-El-Einy Hospital. Cairo Univ. (EG). Dept. of Oncology (NEMROCK); Dobler, Barbara [Klinikum der Universitaet Regensburg (Germany). Strahlentherapie

    2009-07-01

    Introduction: Recent data suggest that a radiosurgery boost treatment for up to three brain metastases in addition to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is beneficial. Sequential treatment of multiple metastatic lesions is time-consuming and optimal normal tissue sparing is not trivial for larger metastases when separate plans are created and are only superimposed afterwards. Sequential Tomotherapy with noncoplanar arcs and Multi-field IMRT may streamline the process and enable easy simultaneous treatment. We compared plans for 2-3 intracerebral targets calculated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) based on treatment with MLC or sequential Tomotherapy using the Peacock-System. Treatment time was not to exceed 90 min on a linac with standart dose rate. MIMiC plans without treatment-time restrictions were created as a benchmark. Materials and methods: Calculations are based on a Siemens KD2 linac with a dose rate of 200 MU/min. Step-and-Shoot IMRT is performed with a standard MLC (2 x 29 leaves, 1 cm), serial Tomotherapy with the Multivane-Collimator MIMiC (NOMOS Inc. USA). Treatment plans are created with Corvus 5.0. To create plans with good conformity we chose a noncoplanar beam- and arc geometry for each approach (IMRT 4-, MIMiC 5-couch angles). The benchmark MIMiC plans with maximally steep dose gradients had 9 couch angles. For plan comparison reasons, 10Gy were prescribed to 90% of the PTV. Steepness of dose gradients, homogeneity and conformity were assessed by the following parameters: Volume encompassed by certain isodoses outside the target as well as homogeneity and conformity as indicated by Homogeneity- and Conformity-Index. Results: Plans without treatment-time restrictions had slightest dose to organ at risk (OAR), normal tissue and least Conformity-index. MIMiC- and MLC-IMRT based plans can be treated within the intended period of 90 min, all plans met the required dose. MLC based plans resulted in higher dose to organs at risk (OAR) and dose

  1. Feasibility and limitations of bulk density assignment in MRI for head and neck IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alexander L; Lin, Alexander; Anamalayil, Shibu; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers centered at the base of skull are better visualized on MRI than on CT. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the accuracy of bulk density assignment in head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan optimization. Our study investigates dose calculation differences between density-assigned MRI and CT, and identifies potential limitations related to dental implants and MRI geometrical distortion in the framework of MRI-only-based treatment planning. Bulk density assignment was performed and applied onto MRI to generate three MRI image sets with increasing levels of heterogeneity for seven patients: 1) MRIW: all water-equivalent; 2) MRIW+B: included bone with density of 1.53 g/cm3; and 3) MRIW+B+A: included bone and air. Using identical planning and optimization parameters, MRI-based IMRT plans were generated and compared to corresponding, forward-calculated, CT-based plans on the basis of target coverage, isodose distributions, and dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Phantom studies were performed to assess the magnitude and spatial dependence of MRI geometrical distortion. MRIW-based dose calculations overestimated target coverage by 16.1%. Segmentation of bone reduced differences to within 2% of the coverage area on the CT-based plan. Further segmentation of air improved conformity near air-tissue interfaces. Dental artifacts caused substantial target coverage overestimation even on MRIW+B+A. Geometrical distortion was less than 1 mm in an imaging volume 20 × 20 × 20 cm3 around scanner isocenter, but up to 4 mm at 17 cm lateral to isocenter. Bulk density assignment in the framework of MRI-only IMRT head and neck treatment planning is a feasible method with certain limitations. Bone and teeth account for the majority of density heterogeneity effects. While soft tissue is well visualized on MRI compared to CT, dental implants may not be visible on MRI and must be identified by other means and assigned

  2. Mathematical Optimization Techniques for Multi-Phase Radiation Treatment Design

    OpenAIRE

    Sonderman, David

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model for optimal external beam radiotherapy treatment design over multiple treatment phases is presented. The solution procedure is discussed and illustrated on a case of boost treatment for lung cancer. The models are integrated with current radiobiological software to produce an optimal design over both phases of treatment displayed by means of computer graphics.

  3. The in vivo study on the radiobiologic effect of prolonged delivery time to tumor control in C57BL mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guo-Pei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-precision radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT or sterotactic radiosurgery, delivers more complex treatment fields than conventional techniques. The increased complexity causes longer dose delivery times for each fraction. The purpose of this work is to explore the radiobiologic effect of prolonged fraction delivery time on tumor response and survival in vivo. Methods 1-cm-diameter Lewis lung cancer tumors growing in the legs of C57BL mice were used. To evaluate effect of dose delivery prolongation, 18 Gy was divided into different subfractions. 48 mice were randomized into 6 groups: the normal control group, the single fraction with 18 Gy group, the two subfractions with 30 min interval group, the seven subfractions with 5 min interval group, the two subfractions with 60 min interval group and the seven subfractions with 10 min interval group. The tumor growth tendency, the tumor growth delay and the mice survival time were analyzed. Results The tumor growth delay of groups with prolonged delivery time was shorter than the group with single fraction of 18 Gy (P 0.05. Compared to the group with single fraction of 18 Gy, the groups with prolonged delivery time shorten the mice survival time while there was no significant difference between the groups with prolonged delivery time 30 min and the groups with prolonged delivery time 60 min. Conclusions The prolonged delivery time with same radiation dose shorten the tumor growth delay and survival time in the mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer. The anti-tumor effect decreased with elongation of the total interfractional time.

  4. The in vivo study on the radiobiologic effect of prolonged delivery time to tumor control in C57BL mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Xiong, Xiao-Peng; Lu, Jiade; Zhu, Guo-Pei; He, Shao-Qin; Hu, Chao-Su; Ying, Hong-Mei

    2011-01-12

    High-precision radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT or sterotactic radiosurgery, delivers more complex treatment fields than conventional techniques. The increased complexity causes longer dose delivery times for each fraction. The purpose of this work is to explore the radiobiologic effect of prolonged fraction delivery time on tumor response and survival in vivo. 1-cm-diameter Lewis lung cancer tumors growing in the legs of C57BL mice were used. To evaluate effect of dose delivery prolongation, 18 Gy was divided into different subfractions. 48 mice were randomized into 6 groups: the normal control group, the single fraction with 18 Gy group, the two subfractions with 30 min interval group, the seven subfractions with 5 min interval group, the two subfractions with 60 min interval group and the seven subfractions with 10 min interval group. The tumor growth tendency, the tumor growth delay and the mice survival time were analyzed. The tumor growth delay of groups with prolonged delivery time was shorter than the group with single fraction of 18 Gy (P delivery time 30 min was longer than that of groups with prolonged delivery time 60 min P delivery time (P > 0.05). Compared to the group with single fraction of 18 Gy, the groups with prolonged delivery time shorten the mice survival time while there was no significant difference between the groups with prolonged delivery time 30 min and the groups with prolonged delivery time 60 min. The prolonged delivery time with same radiation dose shorten the tumor growth delay and survival time in the mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer. The anti-tumor effect decreased with elongation of the total interfractional time.

  5. Dose domain regularization of MLC leaf patterns for highly complex IMRT plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dan; Yu, Victoria Y.; Ruan, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); O’Connor, Daniel [Department of Mathematics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The advent of automated beam orientation and fluence optimization enables more complex intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning using an increasing number of fields to exploit the expanded solution space. This has created a challenge in converting complex fluences to robust multileaf collimator (MLC) segments for delivery. A novel method to regularize the fluence map and simplify MLC segments is introduced to maximize delivery efficiency, accuracy, and plan quality. Methods: In this work, we implemented a novel approach to regularize optimized fluences in the dose domain. The treatment planning problem was formulated in an optimization framework to minimize the segmentation-induced dose distribution degradation subject to a total variation regularization to encourage piecewise smoothness in fluence maps. The optimization problem was solved using a first-order primal-dual algorithm known as the Chambolle-Pock algorithm. Plans for 2 GBM, 2 head and neck, and 2 lung patients were created using 20 automatically selected and optimized noncoplanar beams. The fluence was first regularized using Chambolle-Pock and then stratified into equal steps, and the MLC segments were calculated using a previously described level reducing method. Isolated apertures with sizes smaller than preset thresholds of 1–3 bixels, which are square units of an IMRT fluence map from MLC discretization, were removed from the MLC segments. Performance of the dose domain regularized (DDR) fluences was compared to direct stratification and direct MLC segmentation (DMS) of the fluences using level reduction without dose domain fluence regularization. Results: For all six cases, the DDR method increased the average planning target volume dose homogeneity (D95/D5) from 0.814 to 0.878 while maintaining equivalent dose to organs at risk (OARs). Regularized fluences were more robust to MLC sequencing, particularly to the stratification and small aperture removal. The maximum and

  6. Beam rate influence on dose distribution and fluence map in IMRT dynamic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slosarek, Krzysztof; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Osewski, Wojciech; Dolla, Lukasz; Bekman, Barbara; Petrovic, Borislava

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impact of beam rate on dose distribution in IMRT plans and then to evaluate agreement of calculated and measured dose distributions for various beam rate values. Accelerators used in radiotherapy utilize some beam rate modes which can shorten irradiation time and thus reduce ability of patient movement during a treatment session. This aspect should be considered in high conformal dynamic techniques. Dose calculation was done for two different beam rates (100 MU/min and 600 MU/min) in an IMRT plan. For both, a comparison of Radiation Planning Index (RPI) and MU was conducted. Secondly, the comparison of optimal fluence maps and corresponding actual fluence maps was done. Next, actual fluence maps were measured and compared with the calculated ones. Gamma index was used for that assessment. Additionally, positions of each leaf of the MLC were controlled by home made software. Dose distribution obtained for lower beam rates was slightly better than for higher beam rates in terms of target coverage and risk structure protection. Lower numbers of MUs were achieved in 100 MU/min plans than in 600 MU/min plans. Actual fluence maps converted from optimal ones demonstrated more similarity in 100 MU/min plans. Better conformity of the measured maps to the calculated ones was obtained when a lower beam rate was applied. However, these differences were small. No correlation was found between quality of fluence map conversion and leaf motion accuracy. Execution of dynamic techniques is dependent on beam rate. However, these differences are minor. Analysis shows a slight superiority of a lower beam rate. It does not significantly affect treatment accuracy.

  7. A difference-matrix metaheuristic for intensity map segmentation in step-and-shoot IMRT delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawardena, Athula D A [Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 800 West Main Street, Whitewater, WI (United States); D' Souza, Warren D [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goadrich, Laura D [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Meyer, Robert R [Department of Computer Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Sorensen, Kelly J [Department of Computer Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Naqvi, Shahid A [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD (United States); Shi, Leyuan [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-05-21

    At an intermediate stage of radiation treatment planning for IMRT, most commercial treatment planning systems for IMRT generate intensity maps that describe the grid of beamlet intensities for each beam angle. Intensity map segmentation of the matrix of individual beamlet intensities into a set of MLC apertures and corresponding intensities is then required in order to produce an actual radiation delivery plan for clinical use. Mathematically, this is a very difficult combinatorial optimization problem, especially when mechanical limitations of the MLC lead to many constraints on aperture shape, and setup times for apertures make the number of apertures an important factor in overall treatment time. We have developed, implemented and tested on clinical cases a metaheuristic (that is, a method that provides a framework to guide the repeated application of another heuristic) that efficiently generates very high-quality (low aperture number) segmentations. Our computational results demonstrate that the number of beam apertures and monitor units in the treatment plans resulting from our approach is significantly smaller than the corresponding values for treatment plans generated by the heuristics embedded in a widely use commercial system. We also contrast the excellent results of our fast and robust metaheuristic with results from an 'exact' method, branch-and-cut, which attempts to construct optimal solutions, but, within clinically acceptable time limits, generally fails to produce good solutions, especially for intensity maps with more than five intensity levels. Finally, we show that in no instance is there a clinically significant change of quality associated with our more efficient plans.

  8. A critical evaluation of the PTW 2D-ARRAY seven29 and OCTAVIUS II phantom for IMRT and VMAT verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohammad; Adams, Elizabeth J; Jordan, Thomas J; Clark, Catharine H; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-11-04

    Quality assurance (QA) for intensity- and volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and VMAT) has evolved substantially. In recent years, various commercial 2D and 3D ionization chamber or diode detector arrays have become available, allowing for absolute verification with near real time results, allowing for streamlined QA. However, detector arrays are limited by their resolution, giving rise to concerns about their sensitivity to errors. Understanding the limitations of these devices is therefore critical. In this study, the sensitivity and resolution of the PTW 2D-ARRAY seven29 and OCTAVIUS II phantom combination was comprehensively characterized for use in dynamic sliding window IMRT and RapidArc verification. Measurement comparisons were made between single acquisition and a multiple merged acquisition techniques to improve the effective resolution of the 2D-ARRAY, as well as comparisons against GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film and electronic portal imaging dosimetry (EPID). The sensitivity and resolution of the 2D-ARRAY was tested using two gantry angle 0° modulated test fields. Deliberate multileaf collimator (MLC) errors of 1, 2, and 5 mm and collimator rotation errors were inserted into IMRT and RapidArc plans for pelvis and head & neck sites, to test sensitivity to errors. The radiobiological impact of these errors was assessed to determine the gamma index passing criteria to be used with the 2D-ARRAY to detect clinically relevant errors. For gamma index distributions, it was found that the 2D-ARRAY in single acquisition mode was comparable to multiple acquisition modes, as well as film and EPID. It was found that the commonly used gamma index criteria of 3% dose difference or 3 mm distance to agreement may potentially mask clinically relevant errors. Gamma index criteria of 3%/2 mm with a passing threshold of 98%, or 2%/2 mm with a passing threshold of 95%, were found to be more sensitive. We suggest that the gamma index passing thresholds may be used for guidance

  9. Statistical process control analysis for patient-specific IMRT and VMAT QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Srisatit, Somyot; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-05-01

    This work applied statistical process control to establish the control limits of the % gamma pass of patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA), and to evaluate the efficiency of the QA process by using the process capability index (Cpml). A total of 278 IMRT QA plans in nasopharyngeal carcinoma were measured with MapCHECK, while 159 VMAT QA plans were undertaken with ArcCHECK. Six megavolts with nine fields were used for the IMRT plan and 2.5 arcs were used to generate the VMAT plans. The gamma (3%/3 mm) criteria were used to evaluate the QA plans. The % gamma passes were plotted on a control chart. The first 50 data points were employed to calculate the control limits. The Cpml was calculated to evaluate the capability of the IMRT/VMAT QA process. The results showed higher systematic errors in IMRT QA than VMAT QA due to the more complicated setup used in IMRT QA. The variation of random errors was also larger in IMRT QA than VMAT QA because the VMAT plan has more continuity of dose distribution. The average % gamma pass was 93.7% ± 3.7% for IMRT and 96.7% ± 2.2% for VMAT. The Cpml value of IMRT QA was 1.60 and VMAT QA was 1.99, which implied that the VMAT QA process was more accurate than the IMRT QA process. Our lower control limit for % gamma pass of IMRT is 85.0%, while the limit for VMAT is 90%. Both the IMRT and VMAT QA processes are good quality because Cpml values are higher than 1.0.

  10. Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic based low cost tissue equivalent phantom for verification dosimetry in IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, S D; Deshpande, Sudesh; Ghadi, Yogesh; Shaiju, V S; Amols, H I; Mayya, Y S

    2009-12-17

    A novel IMRT phantom was designed and fabricated using Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic. Physical properties of ABS plastic related to radiation interaction and dosimetry were compared with commonly available phantom materials for dose measurements in radiotherapy. The ABS IMRT phantom has provisions to hold various types of detectors such as ion chambers, radiographic/radiochromic films, TLDs, MOSFETs, and gel dosimeters. The measurements related to pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT of carcinoma prostate were carried out using ABS and Scanditronics-Wellhoffer RW3 IMRT phantoms for five different cases. Point dose data were acquired using ionization chamber and TLD discs while Gafchromic EBT and radiographic EDR2 films were used for generating 2-D dose distributions. Treatment planning system (TPS) calculated and measured doses in ABS plastic and RW3 IMRT phantom were in agreement within +/-2%. The dose values at a point in a given patient acquired using ABS and RW3 phantoms were found comparable within 1%. Fluence maps and dose distributions of these patients generated by TPS and measured in ABS IMRT phantom were also found comparable both numerically and spatially. This study indicates that ABS plastic IMRT phantom is a tissue equivalent phantom and dosimetrically it is similar to solid/plastic water IMRT phantoms. Though this material is demonstrated for IMRT dose verification but it can be used as a tissue equivalent phantom material for other dosimetry purposes in radiotherapy.

  11. Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the γ passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were −4.5 cGy/−0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and −19.7 cGy/−0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was −13.3 cGy/−0.32%, to esophagus was −63.4 cGy/−0.89%, and to spinal cord was −16.3 cGy/−0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2–161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median γ passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.9654–0.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by

  12. IMRT QA: Selecting gamma criteria based on error detection sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steers, Jennifer M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 and Physics and Biology in Medicine IDP, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Fraass, Benedick A., E-mail: benedick.fraass@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The gamma comparison is widely used to evaluate the agreement between measurements and treatment planning system calculations in patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA). However, recent publications have raised concerns about the lack of sensitivity when employing commonly used gamma criteria. Understanding the actual sensitivity of a wide range of different gamma criteria may allow the definition of more meaningful gamma criteria and tolerance limits in IMRT QA. We present a method that allows the quantitative determination of gamma criteria sensitivity to induced errors which can be applied to any unique combination of device, delivery technique, and software utilized in a specific clinic. Methods: A total of 21 DMLC IMRT QA measurements (ArcCHECK®, Sun Nuclear) were compared to QA plan calculations with induced errors. Three scenarios were studied: MU errors, multi-leaf collimator (MLC) errors, and the sensitivity of the gamma comparison to changes in penumbra width. Gamma comparisons were performed between measurements and error-induced calculations using a wide range of gamma criteria, resulting in a total of over 20 000 gamma comparisons. Gamma passing rates for each error class and case were graphed against error magnitude to create error curves in order to represent the range of missed errors in routine IMRT QA using 36 different gamma criteria. Results: This study demonstrates that systematic errors and case-specific errors can be detected by the error curve analysis. Depending on the location of the error curve peak (e.g., not centered about zero), 3%/3 mm threshold = 10% at 90% pixels passing may miss errors as large as 15% MU errors and ±1 cm random MLC errors for some cases. As the dose threshold parameter was increased for a given %Diff/distance-to-agreement (DTA) setting, error sensitivity was increased by up to a factor of two for select cases. This increased sensitivity with increasing dose

  13. [SIB-IMRT radiotherapy given concomitantly with cisplatin for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCHNC). Evaluation of the early results and toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiprian, Dorota; Jarząbski, Andrzej; Pawłowska, Beata; Michalski, Wojciech; Kawecki, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    Concomitant radiochemotherapy become the treatment of choice for locally advanced SCHNC. This strategy of treatment has a limitation, which is an acute and late toxicity. The IMRT technique provides the possibility of better sparing of healthy tissue. Radiobiological and clinical data also suggest that accelerated fractionation and higher dose per fraction given in GTV may produce better locoregional control. Therefore it might be expected that concomitant chemotherapy and SIB-IMRT radiotherapy could increase locoregional control and reduce acute and late radiation reactions. The evaluation of early results and toxicity of this treatment modality is presented. The evaluation of the early results and toxicity of SIB-IMRT radiotherapy given concomitantly with cisplatin for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCHNC). SIB-IMRT technique was applied. The boost volume was limited to the GTV + 3mm margin (macroscopic tumor extension was defined on the basis of CT and/or MRI examinations). Dose per fraction given to this volume was 2.25 Gy up to 67.5 Gy of total dose. The PTV-CTV + 3mm - was defined as an area of increased risk of microscopic spread. Dose per fraction given to this volume was 2 Gy up to 60 Gy. The PTV1-ETV+ 3mm (electively irradiated volume) received dose per fraction -1.8 Gy up to 54-56 Gy. Overall treatment time was 6 weeks (5 fractions per week, 30 fractions). Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin in daily dose100mg/m2 given two times during irradiation (1 and 22 day of treatment). The evaluation of early tolerance was performed once weekly during the treatment than during the follow up every 2 months. The early reactions were scored according to the EORTC/RTOG scale. Between June 2006 and December 2009 99 patients diagnosed with III and IV clinical stage of SCHNC were treated with this method. 65 patients were diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer, 18 with laryngeal cancer and 16 with hypopharyngeal cancer. PEG was performed at

  14. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeuenstein, P.; Gschwend, B. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs.

  15. SU-E-T-621: Planning Methodologies for Cancer of the Anal Canal: Comparing IMRT, Rapid Arc, and Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGlade, J; Kassaee, A [University of Pennsylvenia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate planning methods for anal canal cancer and compare the results of 9-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (Varian, RapidArc), and Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Methods: We generated plans with IMRT, RapidArc (RA) and PBS for twenty patients for both initial phase including nodes and cone down phase of treatment using Eclipe (Varian). We evaluated the advantage of each technique for each phase. RA plans used 2 to 4 arcs and various collimator orientations. PBS used two posterior oblique fields. We evaluated the plans comparing dose volume histogram (DVH), locations of hot spots, and PTV dose conformity. Results: Due to complex shape of target, for RA plans, multiple arcs (>2) are required to achieve optimal PTV conformity. When the PTV exceeds 15 cm in the superior-inferior direction, limitations of deliverability start to dominate. The PTV should be divided into a superior and an inferior structure. The optimization is performed with fixed jaws for each structure and collimator set to 90 degrees for the inferior PTV. Proton PBS plans show little advantage in small bowel sparing when treating the nodes. However, PBS plan reduces volumetric dose to the bladder at the cost of higher doses to the perineal skin. IMRT plans provide good target conformity, but they generate hot spots outside of the target volume. Conclusion: When using one planning technique for entire course of treatment, Multiple arc (>2) RA plans are better as compared to IMRT and PBS plans. When combining techniques, RA for the initial phase in combination with PBS for the cone down phase results in the most optimal plans.

  16. SU-E-T-59: A Novel Multi-Beam Dynamic IMRT with Fixed-Jaw Technique for Left Breast Cancer Patients with Regional Lymph Nodes Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Yang, Z; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study was to investigate the dosimetric benefit of a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for irradiating the left breast and regional lymph node (RLN). Methods: The breast and RLN (internal mammary node and periclavicular node) and normal tissue were contoured for 16 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients previously treated with RT after lumpectomy. Nine equi-spaced fields IMRT (9 -field IMRT), tangential multi-beam IMRT (tangential-IMRT) and IMRT with fixed-jaw technique (FJT-IMRT) were developed and compared with three-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT). Prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose distributions and dose volume histograms were used to evaluate plans. Results: All IMRTs achieved similar target coverage and substantially reduced heart V30 and V20 compared to the 3DCRT. The average heart mean dose had different changes, which were 9.0Gy for 9-field IMRT, 5.7Gy for tangential-IMRT and 4.2Gy for FJT-IMRT. For the contralateral lung and breast, the 9-field IMRT has the highest mean dose; and the FJT-IMRT and tangential-IMRT had similar lower value. For the thyroid, both 9-field IMRT and FJT-IMRT had similar V30 (20% and 22%) and were significantly lower than that of 3DCRT (34%) and tangential-IMRT (46%). Moreover, the thyroid mean dose of FJT-IMRT is the lowest. For cervical esophagus and humeral head, the FJT-IMRT also had the best sparing. Conclusion: All 9-field IMRT, tangential-IMRT and FJT-IMRT had superiority for targets coverage and substantially reduced the heart volume of high dose irradiation. The FJT-IMRT showed advantages of avoiding the contralateral breast and lung irradiation and decreasing the thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophagus radiation dose at the expense of a slight monitor units (MUs) increasing.

  17. Effects of radiobiological uncertainty on shield design for a 60-day lunar mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Schimmerling, Walter

    1993-01-01

    Some consequences of uncertainties in radiobiological risk due to galactic cosmic ray exposure are analyzed to determine their effect on engineering designs for a first lunar outpost - a 60-day mission. Quantitative estimates of shield mass requirements as a function of a radiobiological uncertainty factor are given for a simplified vehicle structure. The additional shield mass required for compensation is calculated as a function of the uncertainty in galactic cosmic ray exposure, and this mass is found to be as large as a factor of 3 for a lunar transfer vehicle. The additional cost resulting from this mass is also calculated. These cost estimates are then used to exemplify the cost-effectiveness of research.

  18. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment planning with IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Claus A; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming; Sapru, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    The study was undertaken in order to compare dose plans for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) dose plans in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Clinical data from 20 consecutive patients treated with IMRT are presented. For 11 patients 3D-CR...

  19. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvetsov, Alevei V.; Sandison, George A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  20. The impact of modeling nuclear fragmentation on delivered dose and radiobiology in ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Armin; Hansen, David C; Teiwes, Ricky; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Jäkel, Oliver; Bassler, Niels

    2012-08-21

    The importance of nuclear interactions for ion therapy arises from the influence of the particle spectrum on, first, radiobiology and therefore also on treatment planning, second, the accuracy of measuring dose and, third, the delivered dose distribution. This study tries to determine the qualitative as well as the quantitative influence of the modeling of inelastic nuclear interactions on ion therapy. Thereby, three key disciplines are investigated, namely dose delivery, dose assessment and radiobiology. In order to perform a quantitative analysis, a relative comparison between six different descriptions of nuclear interactions is carried out for carbon ions. The particle transport is simulated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT10A while dose planning and radiobiology are covered by the analytic treatment planning program for particles TRiP, which determines the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with the local effect model. The obtained results show that the physical dose distribution can in principle be significantly influenced by the modeling of fragmentation (about 10% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections for a target volume ranging from 15 to 25 cm). While the impact of nuclear fragmentation on stopping power ratios can be neglected, the fluence correction factor may be influenced by the applied nuclear models. In contrast to the results for the physical dose, the variation of the RBE is only small (about 1% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections) suggesting a relatively weak dependence of radiobiology on the detailed composition of the particle energy spectrum of the mixed radiation field. Also, no significant change (about 0.2 mm) of the lateral penumbra of the RBE-weighted dose is observed.

  1. Soft-Rt: software for IMRT simulations based on MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira F, T. C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Campos, T., E-mail: tcff01@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment technique, widely used in external radiotherapy. This paper presents the Soft-Rt which allows the simulation of an entire IMRT treatment protocol. The Soft-Rt performs a full three-dimensional rendering of a set of patient images, including the definitions of region of interest with organs in risk, and the target tumor volume and margins (PTV). Thus, a more accurate analysis and planning can be performed, taking into account the features and orientation of the radiation beams. The exposed tissues as well as the amount of absorbed dose is depicted in healthy and/or cancerous tissues. As conclusion, Soft-Rt can predict dose on the PTV accurately, preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. Soft-Rt is coupled with SISCODES code. The SISCODES code is firstly applied to segment the set of CT or MRI patient images in distinct tissues pointing out its respective density and chemical compositions. Later, the voxel model is export to the Soft-Rt IMRT planning module in which a full treatment planning is created. All geometrical parameters are sent to the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code - MCNP - to simulate the interaction of each incident beam towards to the PTV avoiding organs in risk. The normalized dose results are exported to the Soft-Rt out-module, in which the three-dimensional model visualization is shown in a transparent glass procedure adopting gray scale for the dependence on the mass density of the correlated tissue; while, a color scale to depict dose values in a superimpose protocol. (Author)

  2. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Canis Lupus LLC and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Departments of Human Oncology, Medical Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa

  3. Comparison and Limitations of DVH-Based NTCP Models Derived From 3D-CRT and IMRT Data for Prediction of Gastrointestinal Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients by Using Propensity Score Matched Pair Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troeller, Almut [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich (Germany); Yan, Di, E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Marina, Ovidiu; Schulze, Derek [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Alber, Markus [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Parodi, Katia [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich (Germany); Belka, Claus; Söhn, Matthias [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: This study compared normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling of chronic gastrointestinal toxicities following prostate cancer treatment for 2 treatment modalities. Possible factors causing discrepancies in optimal NTCP model parameters between 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT) were analyzed and discussed, including the impact of patient characteristics, image guidance, toxicity scoring bias, and NTCP model limitations. Methods and Materials: Rectal wall dose-volume histograms of 1115 patients treated for prostate cancer under an adaptive radiation therapy protocol were used to model gastrointestinal toxicity grade ≥2 (according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events). A total of 457 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 658 with IMRT. 3D-CRT patients were matched to IMRT patients based on various patient characteristics, using a propensity score–based algorithm. Parameters of the Lyman equivalent uniform dose and cut-off dose logistic regression NTCP models were estimated for the 2 matched treatment modalities and the combined group. Results: After they were matched, the 3D-CRT and IMRT groups contained 275 and 550 patients with a large discrepancy of 28.7% versus 7.8% toxicities, respectively (P<.001). For both NTCP models, optimal parameters found for the 3D-CRT groups did not fit the IMRT patients well and vice versa. Models developed for the combined data overestimated NTCP for the IMRT patients and underestimated NTCP for the 3D-CRT group. Conclusions: Our analysis did not reveal a single definitive cause for discrepancies of model parameters between 3D-CRT and IMRT. Patient characteristics and bias in toxicity scoring, as well as image guidance alone, are unlikely causes of the large discrepancy of toxicities. Whether the cause was inherent to the specific NTCP models used in this study needs to be verified by future investigations. Because IMRT is increasingly used

  4. Prognostic value of radiobiological hypoxia during fractionated irradiation for local tumor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zips, Daniel; Böke, Simon; Kroeber, Theresa; Meinzer, Andreas; Brüchner, Kerstin; Thames, Howard D; Baumann, Michael; Yaromina, Ala

    2011-05-01

    Previous experiments showed that the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells (rHF) in un-treated tumors did not accurately predict local tumor control after fractionated irradiation. Thus, the prognostic value of rHF determined during fractionated irradiation was investigated. Six human squamous cell carcinoma lines were transplanted into nude mice and then irradiated with 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Thereafter, single dose irradiation under normal and clamped blood flow was given. Local tumor control rates were used to calculate the rHF and the TCD₅₀, i.e., the radiation dose necessary to control 50% of the tumors, after single dose irradiation. These values were compared with the in parallel determined TCD₅₀ after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. The rHF after 15 fractions varied between 28% and 100%. No correlation was found with the TCD₅₀ after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. Single dose top-up TCD₅₀ under ambient and clamp conditions after 15 fractions significantly correlated with TCD₅₀ after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. rHF after 15 fractions is not a prognostic parameter for the outcome after fractionated irradiation. In contrast, the radiobiological parameters number of tumor stem cells, intrinsic radiosensitivity, and number of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells appear promising to predict outcome after fractionated irradiation.

  5. Prognostic value of radiobiological hypoxia during fractionated irradiation for local tumor control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zips, Daniel; Boeke, Simon; Kroeber, Theresa; Meinzer, Andreas; Bruechner, Kerstin; Yaromina, Ala [OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Thames, Howard D. [Texas Univ., M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States). Div. of Quantitative Sciences; Baumann, Michael [OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Experimental Center

    2011-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Previous experiments showed that the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells (rHF) in untreated tumors did not accurately predict local tumor control after fractionated irradiation. Thus, the prognostic value of rHF determined during fractionated irradiation was investigated. Materials and Methods: Six human squamous cell carcinoma lines were transplanted into nude mice and then irradiated with 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Thereafter, single dose irradiation under normal and clamped blood flow was given. Local tumor control rates were used to calculate the rHF and the TCD{sub 50}, i.e., the radiation dose necessary to control 50% of the tumors, after single dose irradiation. These values were compared with the in parallel determined TCD{sub 50} after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. Results: The rHF after 15 fractions varied between 28% and 100%. No correlation was found with the TCD{sub 50} after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. Single dose top-up TCD{sub 50} under ambient and clamp conditions after 15 fractions significantly correlated with TCD{sub 50} after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. Conclusion: rHF after 15 fractions is not a prognostic parameter for the outcome after fractionated irradiation. In contrast, the radiobiological parameters number of tumor stem cells, intrinsic radiosensitivity, and number of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells appear promising to predict outcome after fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  6. Fast neutrons set the pace. [Radiobiological investigations with fast neutrons at the CSIR cyclotron in Pretoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, J.H.; Slabbert, J.P. (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa). National Accelerator Centre)

    1985-01-01

    Radiobiological investigations with fast neutrons have been initiated at the CSIR cyclotron in Pretoria. It was proposed some years ago to create a neutron therapy facility using the CSIR cyclotron. Neutrons are classified as high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. Biological damage occurring in tissue is a direct function of the LET of the incident radiation. To quantify the biological effects of different types of radiation on mammalian cells, several procedures and concepts have evolved from radiobiological research. Probably the most significant laboratory techniques developed, were the derivation of cell survival curves which are obtained by determining the number of cell colonies that have survived a certain radiation dose. A semi-logarithmic plot of surviving fraction versus the absorbed dose yields the survival curve. Dose modifying factors such as the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the radiation can be quantified in terms of this relationship. A radiobiological programme has to be undertaken before patients can receive neutron therapy at the CSIR cyclotron. The article is a discussion of this programme.

  7. Incorrect dosimetric leaf separation in IMRT and VMAT treatment planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjölin, Maria; Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Dynamic treatment planning algorithms use a dosimetric leaf separation (DLS) parameter to model the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) characteristics. Here, we quantify the dosimetric impact of an incorrect DLS parameter and investigate whether common pretreatment quality assurance (QA) methods...... can detect this effect. METHODS: 16 treatment plans with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique for multiple treatment sites were calculated with a correct and incorrect setting of the DLS, corresponding to a MLC gap difference of 0.5mm...

  8. Hybrid plan verification for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX--a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, Barbara; Streck, Natalia; Klein, Elisabeth; Loeschel, Rainer; Haertl, Petra; Koelbl, Oliver

    2010-01-21

    The 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX (IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) has been developed for absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for perpendicular beam incidence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of I'mRT MatriXX for oblique beam incidence and hybrid plan verification of IMRT with original gantry angles. For the assessment of angular dependence, open fields with gantry angles in steps of 10 degrees were calculated on a CT scan of I'mRT MatriXX. For hybrid plan verification, 17 clinical IMRT plans and one rotational plan were used. Calculations were performed with pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC) and Monte Carlo (MC) methods, which had been previously validated. Measurements were conducted on an Elekta SynergyS linear accelerator. To assess the potential and limitations of the system, gamma evaluation was performed with different dose tolerances and distances to agreement. Hybrid plan verification passed the gamma test with 4% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement in all cases, in 82-88% of the cases for tolerances of 3%/3 mm, and in 59-76% of the cases if 3%/2 mm were used. Separate evaluation of the low dose and high dose regions showed that I'mRT MatriXX can be used for hybrid plan verification of IMRT plans within 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement with a relaxed dose tolerance of 4% in the low dose region outside the multileaf collimator (MLC).

  9. Optimism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  10. SU-F-BRD-01: A Logistic Regression Model to Predict Objective Function Weights in Prostate Cancer IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutilier, J; Chan, T; Lee, T [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, T; Sharpe, M [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre - UHN, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a statistical model that predicts optimization objective function weights from patient geometry for intensity-modulation radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer. Methods: A previously developed inverse optimization method (IOM) is applied retrospectively to determine optimal weights for 51 treated patients. We use an overlap volume ratio (OVR) of bladder and rectum for different PTV expansions in order to quantify patient geometry in explanatory variables. Using the optimal weights as ground truth, we develop and train a logistic regression (LR) model to predict the rectum weight and thus the bladder weight. Post hoc, we fix the weights of the left femoral head, right femoral head, and an artificial structure that encourages conformity to the population average while normalizing the bladder and rectum weights accordingly. The population average of objective function weights is used for comparison. Results: The OVR at 0.7cm was found to be the most predictive of the rectum weights. The LR model performance is statistically significant when compared to the population average over a range of clinical metrics including bladder/rectum V53Gy, bladder/rectum V70Gy, and mean voxel dose to the bladder, rectum, CTV, and PTV. On average, the LR model predicted bladder and rectum weights that are both 63% closer to the optimal weights compared to the population average. The treatment plans resulting from the LR weights have, on average, a rectum V70Gy that is 35% closer to the clinical plan and a bladder V70Gy that is 43% closer. Similar results are seen for bladder V54Gy and rectum V54Gy. Conclusion: Statistical modelling from patient anatomy can be used to determine objective function weights in IMRT for prostate cancer. Our method allows the treatment planners to begin the personalization process from an informed starting point, which may lead to more consistent clinical plans and reduce overall planning time.

  11. Comparison of dose distribution between hypofractionated IMRT and SRT plans in lung tumor%IMRT和SRT大分割治疗肺部肿瘤的剂量分布研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴凤; 肖建平; 张可; 姜雪松; 宋一昕; 张红志; 李晔雄

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the characteristics of dose distribution between hypofractionated intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) plans in lung tumor and to select an optimal clinical approach. Methods SRT plans were designed for 16 patients with lung tumors who had received IMRT between April 2007 and April 2008. The dose distribution of target volume and normal tissues, conformal index (CI) and heteregenous index (HI) were analyzed using the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for the IMRT and SRT plans. Results The mean dose and equivalent uni-form dose of planning target volume (PTV) in IMRT were similar to those in SRT. SRT had significantly better CI and HI than IMRT (t = 2.77, P 0.05 ). The lung V20 of IMRT and SRT was 6.9% ± 2.1% and 4.2%± 1.9%, respectively ( t = 3.30, P 0.05),均一化剂量分别为6366.7 cGy和6246.8 cGy(t=-1.18,P>0.05),CI平均值分别为0.78和0.57(t=2.77,P0.05),全肺V20分别为6.9%±2.1%和4.2%±1.9%(t=3.30,P<0.01).IMRT和SRT计划的心脏和脊髓平均受照剂量无差别.结论 PTV最大径<4.7 cm、靶体积<57 cm3、靶区呈圆形或类圆形时,SRT靶区剂量与大分割IMRT接近并可满足临床要求;SRT计划正常肺组织受照剂量低于大分割IMRT计划.

  12. Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Focuses on mathematical structure, and on real-world applications. This book includes developments in several optimization-related topics such as decision theory, linear programming, turnpike theory, duality theory, convex analysis, and queuing theory.

  13. MRI-based IMRT planning for MR-linac: comparison between CT- and MRI-based plans for pancreatic and prostate cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Phil; Chen, Xinfeng; Botros, Maikel; Paulson, Eric S.; Lawton, Colleen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2016-05-01

    The treatment planning in radiation therapy (RT) can be arranged to combine benefits of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together to maintain dose calculation accuracy and improved target delineation. Our aim is study the dosimetric impact of uniform relative electron density assignment on IMRT treatment planning with additional consideration given to the effect of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field (TMF) in MR-Linac. A series of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) plans were generated for two representative tumor sites, pancreas and prostate, using CT and MRI datasets. Representative CT-based IMRT plans were generated to assess the impact of different electron density (ED) assignment on plan quality using CT without the presence of a 1.5 T TMF. The relative ED (rED) values used were taken from the ICRU report 46. Four types of rED assignment in the organs at risk (OARs), the planning target volumes (PTV) and in the non-specified tissue (NST) were considered. Dose was recalculated (no optimization) using a Monaco 5.09.07a research planning system employing Monte Carlo calculations with an option to include TMF. To investigate the dosimetric effect of different rED assignment, the dose-volume parameters (DVPs) obtained from these specific rED plans were compared to those obtained from the original plans based on CT. Overall, we found that uniform rED assignment results in differences in DVPs within 3% for the PTV and 5% for OAR. The presence of 1.5 T TMF on IMRT DVPs resulted in differences that were generally within 3% of the Gold St for both the pancreas and prostate. The combination of uniform rED assignment and TMF produced differences in DVPs that were within 4-5% of the Gold St. Larger differences in DVPs were observed for OARs on T2-based plans. The effects of using different rED assignments and the presence of 1.5 T TMF for pancreas and prostate IMRT plans are generally within 3% and 5% of PTV and OAR Gold St values. There are

  14. Different IMRT solutions vs. 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: dosimetric comparison and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiandra Christian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy in Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (HL is currently evolving with new attempts to further reduce radiation volumes to the involved-node concept (Involved Nodes Radiation Therapy, INRT and with the use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Currently, IMRT can be planned and delivered with several techniques, and its role is not completely clear. We designed a planning study on a typical dataset drawn from clinical routine with the aim of comparing different IMRT solutions in terms of plan quality and treatment delivery efficiency. Methods A total of 10 young female patients affected with early stage mediastinal HL and treated with 30 Gy INRT after ABVD-based chemotherapy were selected from our database. Five different treatment techniques were compared: 3D-CRT, VMAT (single arc, B-VMAT (“butterfly”, multiple arcs, Helical Tomotherapy (HT and Tomodirect (TD. Beam energy was 6 MV, and all IMRT planning solutions were optimized by inverse planning with specific dose-volume constraints on OAR (breasts, lungs, thyroid gland, coronary ostia, heart. Dose-Volume Histograms (DVHs and Conformity Number (CN were calculated and then compared, both for target and OAR by a statistical analysis (Wilcoxon’s Test. Results PTV coverage was reached for all plans (V95% ≥ 95%; highest mean CN were obtained with HT (0.77 and VMAT (0.76. B-VMAT showed intermediate CN mean values (0.67, while the lowest CN were obtained with TD (0.30 and 3D-CRT techniques (0.30. A trend of inverse correlation between higher CN and larger healthy tissues volumes receiving low radiation doses was shown for lungs and breasts. For thyroid gland and heart/coronary ostia, HT, VMAT and B-VMAT techniques allowed a better sparing in terms of both Dmean and volumes receiving intermediate-high doses compared to 3D-CRT and TD. Conclusions IMRT techniques showed superior target coverage and OAR sparing, with, as an expected consequence, larger volumes of healthy

  15. Optimizing patient positioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy in hippocampal-sparing whole brain radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siglin, Joshua; Champ, Colin E; Vakhnenko, Yelena; Witek, Matthew E; Peng, Cheng; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Harrison, Amy S; Shi, Wenyin

    2014-01-01

    Sparing the hippocampus during whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) offers potential neurocognitive benefits. However, previously reported intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans use multiple noncoplanar beams for treatment delivery. An optimized coplanar IMRT template for hippocampal-sparing WBRT would assist in clinical workflow and minimize resource utilization. In this study, we sought to determine the optimal patient position to facilitate coplanar treatment planning and delivery of hippocampal-sparing WBRT using IMRT. A variable angle, inclined board was utilized for patient positioning. An anthropomorphic phantom underwent computed tomography simulation at various head angles. The IMRT goals were designed to achieve target coverage of the brain while maintaining hippocampal dose-volume constraints designed to conform to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0933 protocol. Optimal head angle was then verified using data from 8 patients comparing coplanar and noncoplanar WBRT IMRT plans. Hippocampal, hippocampal avoidance region, and whole brain mean volumes were 1.1 cm(3), 12.5 cm(3), and 1185.1 cm(3), respectively. The hippocampal avoidance region occupied 1.1% of the whole brain planning volume. For the 30-degree head angle, a 7-field coplanar IMRT plan was generated, sparing the hippocampus to a maximum dose of 14.7 Gy; D100% of the hippocampus was 7.4 Gy and mean hippocampal dose was 9.3 Gy. In comparison, for flat head positioning the hippocampal Dmax was 22.9 Gy with a D100% of 9.2 Gy and mean dose of 11.7 Gy. Target coverage and dose homogeneity was comparable with previously published noncoplanar IMRT plans. Compared with conventional supine positioning, an inclined head board at 30 degrees optimizes coplanar whole brain IMRT treatment planning. Clinically acceptable hippocampal-sparing WBRT dosimetry can be obtained using a simplified coplanar plan at a 30-degree head angle, thus obviating the need for complex and time consuming noncoplanar

  16. SU-E-T-541: Bolus Effect of Thermoplastic Masks in IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, H; Nedzi, L; Chen, S; Jiang, S; Zhao, B [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the bolus effect of thermoplalstic mask on patient skin dose during multi-field IMRT and VMAT treatment. Methods: The clinically approved target contours for five head and neck patients were deformably registered to an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. Two plans: Multifield IMRT plan with 7-9 beams and VMAT plan with 2-4 arcs were created for each patient following same dose constraints. 3mm skin was excluded from PTVs but not constrained during optimization. The prescription dose was 200-220 cGy/fraction. A thermoplastic head and shoulder mask was customized for the Rando phantom. Each plan was delivered to the phantom twice with and without mask. During each delivery, two rectangular strips of EBT3 films (1cm x 6.8cm) were placed across the anterior upper and lower neck near PTVs to measure the surface dose. For consistency films were positioned at same locations for same patient. A total of 8 film strips were obtained for each patient. Film dose was calibrated in the range of 0-400cGy on the day of plan delivery. For dose comparison 3 regions of interests (ROIs) of 1×1 cm{sup 2} were selected at left, right and middle part of each film, resulting in 6 point doses at each plan delivery. Results: The films without mask show relatively uniform dose distribution while those with mask clearly show mesh pattern of mask, usually indicating an increase in skin dose. On average the increase in skin dose over all ROIs with mask was 31.9%(±14.8%) with a range of 11.4%- 58.4%. There is no statistically significant difference (p=0.44) between skin dose increase in VMAT (30.8%±15.3%) and IMRT delivery (33.0%±14.9%). Conclusion: Thermoplastic immobilization masks increase surface dose for HN patient by around 30%. The magnitude is comparable between multi-field IMRT and VMAT. Radiochromic EBT3 film serves as an effective tool to quantify bolus effect.

  17. A novel implementation of mARC treatment for non-dedicated planning systems using converted IMRT plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Nuesken, Frank; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2013-08-03

    The modulated arc (mARC) technique has recently been introduced by Siemens as an analogue to VMAT treatment. However, up to now only one certified treatment planning system supports mARC planning. We therefore present a conversion algorithm capable of converting IMRT plans created by any treatment planning system into mARC plans, with the hope of expanding the availability of mARC to a larger range of clinical users and researchers. As additional advantages, our implementation offers improved functionality for planning hybrid arcs and provides an equivalent step-and-shoot plan for each mARC plan, which can be used as a back-up concept in institutions where only one linac is equipped with mARC. We present a feasibility study to outline a practical implementation of mARC plan conversion using Philips Pinnacle and Prowess Panther. We present examples for three different kinds of prostate and head-and-neck plans, for 6 MV and flattening-filter-free (FFF) 7 MV photon energies, which are dosimetrically verified. It is generally more difficult to create good quality IMRT plans in Pinnacle using a large number of beams and few segments. We present different ways of optimization as examples. By careful choosing the beam and segment arrangement and inversion objectives, we achieve plan qualities similar to our usual IMRT plans. The conversion of the plans to mARC format yields functional plans, which can be irradiated without incidences. Absolute dosimetric verification of both the step-and-shoot and mARC plans by point dose measurements showed deviations below 5% local dose, mARC plans deviated from step-and-shoot plans by no more than 1%. The agreement between GafChromic film measurements of planar dose before and after mARC conversion is excellent. The comparison of the 3D dose distribution measured by PTW Octavius 729 2D-Array with the step-and-shoot plans and with the TPS is well above the pass criteria of 90% of the points falling within 5% local dose and 3

  18. Does IMRT increase the peripheral radiation dose? A comparison of treatment plans 2000 and 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salz, Henning; Eichner, Regina; Wiezorek, Tilo [Jena Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-07-01

    It has been reported in several papers and textbooks that IMRT treatments increase the peripheral dose in comparison with non-IMRT fields. But in clinical practice not only open fields have been used in the pre-IMRT era, but also fields with physical wedges or composed fields. The aim of this work is to test the hypothesis of increased peripheral dose when IMRT is used compared to standard conformal radiotherapy. Furthermore, the importance of the measured dose differences in clinical practice is discussed and compared with other new technologies for the cases where an increase of the peripheral dose was observed. For cancers of the head and neck, the cervix, the rectum and for the brain irradiation due to acute leukaemia, one to four plans have been calculated with IMRT or conformal standard technique (non-IMRT). In an anthropomorphic phantom the dose at a distance of 30 cm in cranio-caudal direction from the target edge was measured with TLDs using a linear accelerator Oncor {sup registered} (Siemens) for both techniques. IMRT was performed using step-and-shoot technique (7 to 11 beams), non-IMRT plans with different techniques. The results depended on the site of irradiation. For head and neck cancers IMRT resulted in an increase of 0.05 - 0.09% of the prescribed total dose (Dptv) or 40 - 70 mGy (Dptv = 65 Gy), compared to non-IMRT technique without wedges or a decrease of 0.16% (approx. 100 mGy) of the prescribed total dose compared to non-IMRT techniques with wedges. For the cervical cancer IMRT resulted in an increased dose in the periphery (+ 0.07% - 0.15% of Dptv or 30 - 70 mGy at Dptv = 45 Gy), for the rectal cancer in a dose reduction (0.21 - 0.26% of Dptv or 100 - 130 mGy at Dptv = 50 Gy) and for the brain irradiation in an increase dose (+ 0.05% of Dptv = 18 Gy or 9 mSv). In summary IMRT does not uniformly cause increased radiation dose in the periphery in the model used. It can be stated that these dose values are smaller than reported in earlier

  19. Interactive dose shaping part 1: a new paradigm for IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenhein, Peter; Ph Kamerling, Cornelis; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-03-21

    In this work we present a novel treatment planning technique called interactive dose shaping (IDS) to be employed for the optimization of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). IDS does not rely on a Newton-based optimization algorithm which is driven by an objective function formed of dose volume constraints on pre-segmented volumes of interest (VOIs). Our new planning technique allows for direct, interactive adaptation of localized planning features. This is realized by a dose modification and recovery (DMR) planning engine which implements a two-step approach: firstly, the desired localized plan adaptation is imposed on the current plan (modification) while secondly inevitable, undesired disturbances of the dose pattern elsewhere are compensated for automatically by the recovery module. Together with an ultra-fast dose update calculation method the DMR engine has been implemented in a newly designed 3D therapy planning system Dynaplan enabling true real-time interactive therapy planning. Here we present the underlying strategy and algorithms of the DMR based planning concept. The functionality of the IDS planning approach is demonstrated for a phantom geometry of clinical resolution and size.

  20. Improved normal tissue sparing in head and neck radiotherapy using biological cost function based-IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N; Lawford, C; Khoo, V; Rolfo, M; Joon, D L; Wada, M

    2011-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has reduced the impact of acute and late toxicities associated with head and neck radiotherapy. Treatment planning system (TPS) advances in biological cost function based optimization (BBO) and improved segmentation techniques have increased organ at risk (OAR) sparing compared to conventional dose-based optimization (DBO). A planning study was undertaken to compare OAR avoidance in DBO and BBO treatment planning. Simultaneous integrated boost treatment plans were produced for 10 head and neck patients using both planning systems. Plans were compared for tar get coverage and OAR avoidance. Comparisons were made using the BBO TPS Monte Carlo dose engine to eliminate differences due to inherent algorithms. Target coverage (V95%) was maintained for both solutions. BBO produced lower OAR doses, with statistically significant improvement to left (12.3%, p = 0.005) and right parotid mean dose (16.9%, p = 0.004), larynx V50_Gy (71.0%, p = 0.005), spinal cord (21.9%, p < 0.001) and brain stem dose maximums (31.5%, p = 0.002). This study observed improved OAR avoidance with BBO planning. Further investigations will be undertaken to review any clinical benefit of this improved planned dosimetry.

  1. The potential for dose dumping in normal tissues with IMRT for pelvic and H&N cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Nandanuri M S; Mazur, Andrzej K; Sampath, Seshadri; Osian, Adrian; Sood, Brij M; Ravi, Akkamma; Nori, Dattatreyudu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the potential for dose dumping in normal tissues (>85% of prescription dose) and to analyze effectiveness of techniques used in reducing dose dumping during IMRT. Two hundred sixty-five intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for 55 patients with prostate, head-and-neck (H&N), and cervix cancers with 6-MV photon beams and >5 fields were reviewed to analyze why dose dumping occurred, and the techniques used to reduce dose dumping. Various factors including gantry angles, depth of beams (100-SSD), duration of optimization, severity of dose-volume constraints (DVC) on normal structures, and spatial location of planning treatment volumes (PTV) were reviewed in relation to dose dumping. In addition, the effect of partial contouring of rectum in beam's path on dose dumping in rectum was studied. Dose dumping occurred at d(max) in 17 pelvic cases (85% to 129%). This was related to (1) depth of beams (100 SSD [source-to-skin distance]), (2) PTV located between normal structures with DVC, and (3) relative lack of rectum and bladder in beam's path. Dose dumping could be reduced to 85% by changing beam angles and/or DVC for normal structures in 5 cases and by creating "phantom structures" in 12 cases. Decreasing the iterations (duration of optimization) also reduced dose dumping and monitor units (MUs). Part of uncontoured rectum, if present in the field, received a higher dose than the contoured rectum with DVC, indicating that complete delineation of normal structures and DVC is necessary to prevent dose dumping. In H&N, when PTV extends inadvertently into air beyond the body even by a few millimeters, dose dumping occurred in beam's path (220% for 5-field and 170%, 7-field plans). Keeping PTV margins within body contour reduced this type of dose dumping. Beamlet optimization, duration of optimization, spatial location of PTV, and DVC on PTV and normal structures has the potential to cause dose dumping. However, these

  2. Rotational IMRT techniques compared to fixed gantry IMRT and Tomotherapy: multi-institutional planning study for head-and-neck cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutters Gerd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments enable to deliver rotational IMRT with standard C-arm gantry based linear accelerators. This upcoming treatment technique was benchmarked in a multi-center treatment planning study against static gantry IMRT and rotational IMRT based on a ring gantry for a complex parotid gland sparing head-and-neck technique. Methods Treatment plans were created for 10 patients with head-and-neck tumours (oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx using the following treatment planning systems (TPS for rotational IMRT: Monaco (ELEKTA VMAT solution, Eclipse (Varian RapidArc solution and HiArt for the helical tomotherapy (Tomotherapy. Planning of static gantry IMRT was performed with KonRad, Pinnacle and Panther DAO based on step&shoot IMRT delivery and Eclipse for sliding window IMRT. The prescribed doses for the high dose PTVs were 65.1Gy or 60.9Gy and for the low dose PTVs 55.8Gy or 52.5Gy dependend on resection status. Plan evaluation was based on target coverage, conformity and homogeneity, DVHs of OARs and the volume of normal tissue receiving more than 5Gy (V5Gy. Additionally, the cumulative monitor units (MUs and treatment times of the different technologies were compared. All evaluation parameters were averaged over all 10 patients for each technique and planning modality. Results Depending on IMRT technique and TPS, the mean CI values of all patients ranged from 1.17 to 2.82; and mean HI values varied from 0.05 to 0.10. The mean values of the median doses of the spared parotid were 26.5Gy for RapidArc and 23Gy for VMAT, 14.1Gy for Tomo. For fixed gantry techniques 21Gy was achieved for step&shoot+KonRad, 17.0Gy for step&shoot+Panther DAO, 23.3Gy for step&shoot+Pinnacle and 18.6Gy for sliding window. V5Gy values were lowest for the sliding window IMRT technique (3499 ccm and largest for RapidArc (5480 ccm. The lowest mean MU value of 408 was achieved by Panther DAO, compared to 1140 for sliding window IMRT. Conclusions All

  3. Predicting objective function weights from patient anatomy in prostate IMRT treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taewoo, E-mail: taewoo.lee@utoronto.ca; Hammad, Muhannad [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Chan, Timothy C. Y. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning typically combines multiple criteria into a single objective function by taking a weighted sum. The authors propose a statistical model that predicts objective function weights from patient anatomy for prostate IMRT treatment planning. This study provides a proof of concept for geometry-driven weight determination. Methods: A previously developed inverse optimization method (IOM) was used to generate optimal objective function weights for 24 patients using their historical treatment plans (i.e., dose distributions). These IOM weights were around 1% for each of the femoral heads, while bladder and rectum weights varied greatly between patients. A regression model was developed to predict a patient's rectum weight using the ratio of the overlap volume of the rectum and bladder with the planning target volume at a 1 cm expansion as the independent variable. The femoral head weights were fixed to 1% each and the bladder weight was calculated as one minus the rectum and femoral head weights. The model was validated using leave-one-out cross validation. Objective values and dose distributions generated through inverse planning using the predicted weights were compared to those generated using the original IOM weights, as well as an average of the IOM weights across all patients. Results: The IOM weight vectors were on average six times closer to the predicted weight vectors than to the average weight vector, usingl{sub 2} distance. Likewise, the bladder and rectum objective values achieved by the predicted weights were more similar to the objective values achieved by the IOM weights. The difference in objective value performance between the predicted and average weights was statistically significant according to a one-sided sign test. For all patients, the difference in rectum V54.3 Gy, rectum V70.0 Gy, bladder V54.3 Gy, and bladder V70.0 Gy values between the dose distributions generated by

  4. Robotic-based carbon ion therapy and patient positioning in 6 degrees of freedom: setup accuracy of two standard immobilization devices used in carbon ion therapy and IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Alexandra D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To investigate repositioning accuracy in particle radiotherapy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, 3 DOF for two immobilization devices (Scotchcast masks vs thermoplastic head masks currently in use at our institution for fractionated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. Methods and materials Position verifications in patients treated with carbon ion therapy and IMRT for head and neck malignancies were evaluated. Most patients received combined treatment regimen (IMRT plus carbon ion boost, immobilization was achieved with either Scotchcast or thermoplastic head masks. Position corrections in robotic-based carbon ion therapy allowing 6 DOF were compared to IMRT allowing corrections in 3 DOF for two standard immobilization devices. In total, 838 set-up controls of 38 patients were analyzed. Results Robotic-based position correction including correction of rotations was well tolerated and without discomfort. Standard deviations of translational components were between 0.5 and 0.8 mm for Scotchcast and 0.7 and 1.3 mm for thermoplastic masks in 6 DOF and 1.2 - 1.4 mm and 1.0 - 1.1 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Mean overall displacement vectors were between 2.1 mm (Scotchcast and 2.9 mm (thermoplastic masks in 6 DOF and 3.9 - 3.0 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Displacement vectors were lower when correction in 6 DOF was allowed as opposed to 3 DOF only, which was maintained at the traditional action level of > 3 mm for position correction in the pre-on-board imaging era. Conclusion Setup accuracy for both systems was within the expected range. Smaller shifts were required when 6 DOF were available for correction as opposed to 3 DOF. Where highest possible positioning accuracy is required, frequent image guidance is mandatory to achieve best possible plan delivery and maintenance of sharp gradients and optimal normal tissue sparing inherent in carbon ion therapy.

  5. SU-E-T-16: A Hybrid VMAT/IMRT Technique for the Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, N; Yang, R; Wang, J [Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate a Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique which combines volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 2 full arcs VMAT, 9-field IMRT and Hybrid VMAT/IMRT plans were created for 10 patients with NPC. The Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique consisted of 1 full VMAT arc and 7 IMRT fields. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for Hybrid VMAT/IMRT was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) were also evaluated. Results: The Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved target dose homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT for PTV70 and PTV54. For PTV70 and PTV60, the Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved target dose conformity compared with IMRT (0.62 vs 0.47; p<0.05 and 0.64 vs 0.58; p<0.05, respectively) and VMAT (0.62 vs 0.43; p<0.05 and 0.64 vs 0.6; p<0.05, respectively). The near maximum dose (D2%) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), temporal lobe and mandible for Hybrid plans were 5.5%, 7.9% and 5.2% lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean dose of TMJ, temporal lobe, mandible and unspecified tissue for Hybrid plans were 12.8%, 11.4%, 4.2% and 4.1% lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean dose of right parotid, mandible and unspecified tissue for Hybrid plans were 3.3%, 2.4% and 3.1% lower than VMAT plans (p<0.05). The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT and Hybrid plans were 2256, 507 and 1394, respectively. Conclusion: Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved the target dose homogeneity and conformity compared with IMRT and VMAT and reduced the dose of OARs and unspecified tissue compared with IMRT with fewer MUs. Compared with VMAT, Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique can better protect parotid gland, mandible and unspecified tissue. Ruijie Yang was funded by the grant project: National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237). Other authors have no competing interest for this work.

  6. Laser-driven particle acceleration towards radiobiology and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the new method of laser-driven acceleration for application to radiation biophysics and medicine. It provides multidisciplinary contributions from world leading scientist in order to assess the state of the art of innovative tools for radiation biology research and medical applications of ionizing radiation. The book contains insightful contributions on highly topical aspects of spatio-temporal radiation biophysics, evolving over several orders of magnitude, typically from femtosecond and sub-micrometer scales. Particular attention is devoted to the emerging technology of laser-driven particle accelerators and their applicatio to spatio-temporal radiation biology and medical physics, customization of non-conventional and selective radiotherapy and optimized radioprotection protocols.

  7. Preparation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiobiological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzkes, J., E-mail: j.metzkes@fzd.de [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), 01314 Dresden (Germany); Cowan, T.E. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), 01314 Dresden (Germany); Karsch, L. [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kraft, S.D. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), 01314 Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, J.; Richter, C. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), 01314 Dresden (Germany); OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Richter, T.; Zeil, K. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), 01314 Dresden (Germany); Schramm, U., E-mail: u.schramm@fzd.de [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-10-11

    This paper presents the concept of transport and filtering of laser-accelerated proton pulses used for the first cell irradiation experiments performed with the Dresden 150 TW laser DRACO. Based on a simple non-focusing magnetic dipole equipped with two apertures the concept makes use of an energy dependent angular asymmetry of the proton spectra. For micron thin target foils protons of interest with energies above 7 MeV are observed to be significantly offset from target normal where low energy emission is dominantly centered. As the effect can be controlled via the target rotation with respect to the incoming light, it can be used to optimize the transport efficiency for high energy protons while simultaneously suppressing background radiation.

  8. Comparative analysis of Pareto surfaces in multi-criteria IMRT planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichert, K; Suess, P; Serna, J I; Monz, M; Kuefer, K H [Department of Optimization, Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics (ITWM), Fraunhofer Platz 1, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Thieke, C, E-mail: katrin.teichert@itwm.fhg.de [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-06-21

    In the multi-criteria optimization approach to IMRT planning, a given dose distribution is evaluated by a number of convex objective functions that measure tumor coverage and sparing of the different organs at risk. Within this context optimizing the intensity profiles for any fixed set of beams yields a convex Pareto set in the objective space. However, if the number of beam directions and irradiation angles are included as free parameters in the formulation of the optimization problem, the resulting Pareto set becomes more intricate. In this work, a method is presented that allows for the comparison of two convex Pareto sets emerging from two distinct beam configuration choices. For the two competing beam settings, the non-dominated and the dominated points of the corresponding Pareto sets are identified and the distance between the two sets in the objective space is calculated and subsequently plotted. The obtained information enables the planner to decide if, for a given compromise, the current beam setup is optimal. He may then re-adjust his choice accordingly during navigation. The method is applied to an artificial case and two clinical head neck cases. In all cases no configuration is dominating its competitor over the whole Pareto set. For example, in one of the head neck cases a seven-beam configuration turns out to be superior to a nine-beam configuration if the highest priority is the sparing of the spinal cord. The presented method of comparing Pareto sets is not restricted to comparing different beam angle configurations, but will allow for more comprehensive comparisons of competing treatment techniques (e.g. photons versus protons) than with the classical method of comparing single treatment plans.

  9. Comparative analysis of Pareto surfaces in multi-criteria IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, K; Süss, P; Serna, J I; Monz, M; Küfer, K H; Thieke, C

    2011-06-21

    In the multi-criteria optimization approach to IMRT planning, a given dose distribution is evaluated by a number of convex objective functions that measure tumor coverage and sparing of the different organs at risk. Within this context optimizing the intensity profiles for any fixed set of beams yields a convex Pareto set in the objective space. However, if the number of beam directions and irradiation angles are included as free parameters in the formulation of the optimization problem, the resulting Pareto set becomes more intricate. In this work, a method is presented that allows for the comparison of two convex Pareto sets emerging from two distinct beam configuration choices. For the two competing beam settings, the non-dominated and the dominated points of the corresponding Pareto sets are identified and the distance between the two sets in the objective space is calculated and subsequently plotted. The obtained information enables the planner to decide if, for a given compromise, the current beam setup is optimal. He may then re-adjust his choice accordingly during navigation. The method is applied to an artificial case and two clinical head neck cases. In all cases no configuration is dominating its competitor over the whole Pareto set. For example, in one of the head neck cases a seven-beam configuration turns out to be superior to a nine-beam configuration if the highest priority is the sparing of the spinal cord. The presented method of comparing Pareto sets is not restricted to comparing different beam angle configurations, but will allow for more comprehensive comparisons of competing treatment techniques (e.g., photons versus protons) than with the classical method of comparing single treatment plans.

  10. Non-coplanar automatic beam orientation selection in cranial IMRT: a practical methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer, Jorge [EC Engineering Consultants LLC, 130 Forest Hill Drive, Los Gatos, CA 95032 (United States); Li Sicong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Agazaryan, Nzhde; Solberg, Timothy D [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Promberger, Claus [BrainLAB AG, Kapellenstrasse 12, 85622 Feldkirchen (Germany)], E-mail: escalivat@jllacer.com, E-mail: sl1@unmc.edu, E-mail: NAgazaryan@mednet.ucla.edu, E-mail: claus.promberger@brainlab.com, E-mail: Timothy.Solberg@utsouthwestern.edu

    2009-03-07

    This paper proposes a method for automatic selection of beam orientations in non-coplanar cranial IMRT. Methods of computer vision, beam's eye view techniques and neural networks are used to define a new geometry-based methodology that leads to treatment plans for cranial lesions that are comparable in quality to those generated by experienced radiation physicists. The automatic beam selection (ABS) process can be carried out in clinically useful computation times, in 1 min or less for most cases. In the process of describing the ABS process, it is shown that the cranial beam orientation optimization problem is mathematically ill posed, with the expectation that a large number of solutions will lead to similar results. Nevertheless, there are better and worse solutions and we show that the proposed ABS process, by its design, has to lead to one of the better ones. We have carried out extensive tests with 14 patients with beam selection tasks ranging from the rather simple to quite complex. The ABS process has always yielded optimizations with results that are considered good for clinic use. Seven-beam coplanar optimizations for some of the patients have also been investigated. Comparisons with non-coplanar optimizations indicate in which cases the simpler coplanar plans can be used to advantage. Parameters used in the comparisons are dose-volume histograms, minimum and maximum PTV doses, equivalent uniform doses for the PTV and OARs, and treatment volume, conformity and normal tissue indices. It is felt that the current ABS methodology is ready for extensive clinical tests.

  11. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research Using Ground Based Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20% accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  12. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground Based Accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hee Y Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR ground-based accelerators have been used for radiobiology research with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE particles. In this paper we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving understanding of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology

  13. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Carrington, Rhys [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  14. SU-E-T-368: Evaluating Dosimetric Outcome of Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) Optimization for Head and Neck Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeachy, P; Villarreal-Barajas, JE; Khan, R [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Zinchenko, Y [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric outcome of optimized treatment plans obtained by modulating the photon beamlet energy and fluence on a small cohort of four Head and Neck (H and N) patients was investigated. This novel optimization technique is denoted XMRT for modulated photon radiotherapy. The dosimetric plans from XMRT for H and N treatment were compared to conventional, 6 MV intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization plans. Methods: An arrangement of two non-coplanar and five coplanar beams was used for all four H and N patients. Both XMRT and IMRT were subject to the same optimization algorithm, with XMRT optimization allowing both 6 and 18 MV beamlets while IMRT was restricted to 6 MV only. The optimization algorithm was based on a linear programming approach with partial-volume constraints implemented via the conditional value-at-risk method. H and N constraints were based off of those mentioned in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1016 protocol. XMRT and IMRT solutions were assessed using metrics suggested by International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements report 83. The Gurobi solver was used in conjunction with the CVX package to solve each optimization problem. Dose calculations and analysis were done in CERR using Monte Carlo dose calculation with VMC{sub ++}. Results: Both XMRT and IMRT solutions met all clinical criteria. Trade-offs were observed between improved dose uniformity to the primary target volume (PTV1) and increased dose to some of the surrounding healthy organs for XMRT compared to IMRT. On average, IMRT improved dose to the contralateral parotid gland and spinal cord while XMRT improved dose to the brainstem and mandible. Conclusion: Bi-energy XMRT optimization for H and N patients provides benefits in terms of improved dose uniformity to the primary target and reduced dose to some healthy structures, at the expense of increased dose to other healthy structures when compared with IMRT.

  15. Dosimetric comparison between 3DCRT/IMRT for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal carcinoma%颈段、胸上段食管癌3DCRT/IMRT剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠蓓娜; 张晓智; 王蕊华; 李毅

    2012-01-01

    IMRT可进一步降低肺和脊髓受照剂量.%Objective To select the optimal radiotherapy plan for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer through dosi-metric comparison between 3DCRT and IMRT plans. Methods Fourteen patients with cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer underwent CT simulation. GTV was contoured referring the esophagogram and endoscopy simultaneously, then CTV and PTV were de fined by the uniform standards. A 3DCRT plan and two five-fields IMRT plans consisting of conventional uniform bean angles and non uniform beam angles were designed respectively. Dose distribution of the PTV and OARs in different plans were compared under the premise that 95% of PTV volume received 100% prescription dose. Results All the IMRT plan could meet the requrements, but 4 of the 3DCRT plan (4/14) could not meet the requrements, so only 10 group of treatment pains in this study were feasible for further Do simetric comparison. For PTV 1, the dose parameters D,^, D^ , DM of 3 DCRT plans were 5725 ± 54. 96 cGy, 4703 ± 25. 26 cGy, 5203 ±71. 70 cGy, which were higher than those in IMRT-A(5348 ±27. 14 cGy,4158 ±27. 36 cGy,4996 ±54. 74cGy)and IMRT-B (5232±26.85 cGy,4286±12. 13 cGy,4979 ±31. 78 cGy),showing significant differences (P 0.05). For PTV2, there was no significant difference in Dmean, D100, D95, V105 and V95(P>0.05), but the size parameters V100 in IMRT-A and IMRT-B were 95. 21 ± 1. 78% and 96. 12 ±2. 55% , which was significantly higher than 3DCRT(88. 69 ± 1. 84% ), showing significant differences (P 0.05). But, MLD and the maximum dose of spinal cord could be re duced by the non-uniform beam angles IMRT plans(P <0. 05). Conclusion IMRT plan is better than 3DCRT plan for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer, non-uniform beam angles IMRT plans design according to the target can reduce the exposure dose of lung and spinal cord.

  16. Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy With Flattening Filter-Free Beams Compared With Static Gantry IMRT and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolini, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgia.nicolini@eoc.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore; Banerjee, Sushovan; Chaudhary, Suresh; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Munshi, Anusheel [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Mancosu, Pietro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Milano-Rozzano (Italy); Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: A feasibility study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), and the potential benefit of flattening filter-free beams, on advanced esophageal cancer against intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT with three to seven and five to seven fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with avoidance sectors to spare the lungs for 10 patients. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. The RA plans were studied for conventional and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. The objectives for the planning target volume were the volume receiving {>=}95% or at most 107% of the prescribed dose of <1% with a dose prescription of 59.4 Gy. For the organs at risk, the lung volume (minus the planning target volume) receiving {>=}5 Gy was <60%, that receiving 20 Gy was <20%-30%, and the mean lung dose was <15.0 Gy. The heart volume receiving 45 Gy was <20%, volume receiving 30 Gy was <50%. The spinal dose received by 1% was <45 Gy. The technical delivery parameters for RA were assessed to compare the normal and FFF beam characteristics. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity, slightly superior to 3D-CRT. The conformity index was 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for RA and IMRT and 1.5 {+-} 0.2 for 3D-CRT. The mean lung dose was 12.2 {+-} 4.5 for IMRT, 11.3 {+-} 4.6 for RA, and 10.8 {+-} 4.4 for RA with FFF beams, 18.2 {+-} 8.5 for 3D-CRT. The percentage of volume receiving {>=}20 Gy ranged from 23.6% {+-} 9.1% to 21.1% {+-} 9.7% for IMRT and RA (FFF beams) and 39.2% {+-} 17.0% for 3D-CRT. The heart and spine objectives were met by all techniques. The monitor units for IMRT and RA were 457 {+-} 139, 322 {+-} 20, and 387 {+-} 40, respectively. RA with FFF beams showed, compared with RA with normal beams, a {approx}20% increase in monitor units per Gray, a 90% increase in the average dose rate, and 20% reduction in beam on time (owing to different

  17. Extraretinal induced visual sensations during IMRT of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm-Buchstab, Timo; Buchstab, Barbara Myrthe; Leitzen, Christina; Garbe, Stephan; Müdder, Thomas; Oberste-Beulmann, Susanne; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Simon, Birgit; Nelles, Michael; Block, Wolfgang; Schoroth, Felix; Schild, Hans Heinz; Schüller, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    We observed visual sensations (VSs) in patients undergoing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of the brain without the beam passing through ocular structures. We analyzed this phenomenon especially with regards to reproducibility, and origin. Analyzed were ten consecutive patients (aged 41-71 years) with glioblastoma multiforme who received pulsed IMRT (total dose 60Gy) with helical tomotherapy (TT). A megavolt-CT (MVCT) was performed daily before treatment. VSs were reported and recorded using a triggered event recorder. The frequency of VSs was calculated and VSs were correlated with beam direction and couch position. Subjective patient perception was plotted on an 8x8 visual field (VF) matrix. Distance to the orbital roof (OR) from the first beam causing a VS was calculated from the Dicom radiation therapy data and MVCT data. During 175 treatment sessions (average 17.5 per patient) 5959 VSs were recorded and analyzed. VSs occurred only during the treatment session not during the MVCTs. Plotting events over time revealed patient-specific patterns. The average cranio-caudad extension of VS-inducing area was 63.4mm (range 43.24-92.1mm). The maximum distance between the first VS and the OR was 56.1mm so that direct interaction with the retina is unlikely. Data on subjective visual perception showed that VSs occurred mainly in the upper right and left quadrants of the VF. Within the visual pathways the highest probability for origin of VSs was seen in the optic chiasm and the optic tract (22%). There is clear evidence that interaction of photon irradiation with neuronal structures distant from the eye can lead to VSs.

  18. Extraretinal induced visual sensations during IMRT of the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wilhelm-Buchstab

    Full Text Available We observed visual sensations (VSs in patients undergoing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT of the brain without the beam passing through ocular structures. We analyzed this phenomenon especially with regards to reproducibility, and origin.Analyzed were ten consecutive patients (aged 41-71 years with glioblastoma multiforme who received pulsed IMRT (total dose 60Gy with helical tomotherapy (TT. A megavolt-CT (MVCT was performed daily before treatment. VSs were reported and recorded using a triggered event recorder. The frequency of VSs was calculated and VSs were correlated with beam direction and couch position. Subjective patient perception was plotted on an 8x8 visual field (VF matrix. Distance to the orbital roof (OR from the first beam causing a VS was calculated from the Dicom radiation therapy data and MVCT data. During 175 treatment sessions (average 17.5 per patient 5959 VSs were recorded and analyzed. VSs occurred only during the treatment session not during the MVCTs. Plotting events over time revealed patient-specific patterns. The average cranio-caudad extension of VS-inducing area was 63.4mm (range 43.24-92.1mm. The maximum distance between the first VS and the OR was 56.1mm so that direct interaction with the retina is unlikely. Data on subjective visual perception showed that VSs occurred mainly in the upper right and left quadrants of the VF. Within the visual pathways the highest probability for origin of VSs was seen in the optic chiasm and the optic tract (22%.There is clear evidence that interaction of photon irradiation with neuronal structures distant from the eye can lead to VSs.

  19. The new hybrid thermal neutron facility at TAPIRO reactor for BNCT radiobiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, J; Rosi, G; Agosteo, S

    2007-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, devoted to carry out both dosimetric and radiobiological studies on boron carriers, which are being developed in the framework of INFN BNCT project, has been installed at the ENEA Casaccia TAPIRO research fast reactor. The thermal column, based on an original, hybrid, neutron spectrum shifter configuration, has been recently become operative. In spite of its low power (5 kW), the new facility is able to provide a high thermal neutron flux level, uniformly distributed inside the irradiation cavity, with a quite low gamma background. The main features and preliminary benchmark measurements of the Beam-shaping assembly are here presented and discussed.

  20. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 22. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 25. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild [Universitaetsklinikum Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologie; Cordes, Nils [Universitaetsklinikum Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Radioonkologie; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Rodemann, H. Peter [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Strahlenbiologie; Rothkamm, Kai [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Lab. fuer Strahlentherapie und Experimentelle Radioonkologie; Zips, Daniel (ed.) [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie

    2016-05-01

    The proceedings of the 25th symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology include papers on the following issues: radiotherapy individualization based on imaging; pre-clinic imaging and new experimental methods; methods and models, micromilieu and metabolism, combined therapy; secondary tumors following radiotherapy; radiogenic effects in normal tissue; resistance mechanism of tumors and normal tissue; personalized radio-oncology - which biological data are needed; pre-clinic and personalized radio-oncology; biomarkers - pre-clinic and translational; translational examinations for personalized radio-oncology.

  1. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 18. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 18. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemann, H. Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2009-07-15

    The proceedings on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology contain two review articles (prediction of normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy, ?H2AX foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks) and 34 contributions to the following topics: Hypoxia and molecular mechanisms of radiation resistance; biological imaging of the tumor micromilieu; DNA repair, genomic instability and carcerogenesis; molecular factors of radiation resistance; actual controversial discussion on possible irradiation caused metastasis risk enhancement; EGFR inhibition and irradiation; biology of experimental radiation/ normal tissue toxicity.

  2. Radiobiological risk estimates of adverse events and secondary cancer for proton and photon radiation therapy of pediatric medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, N. Patrik (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Inst., Faculty of Sciences, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)), e-mail: brodin.patrik@gmail.com; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Aznar, Marianne C.; Vogelius, Ivan R. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)); Kiil-Berthelsen, Anne (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Diagnostic Investigations, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)); Nilsson, Per; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas (Dept. of Oncology, Skaane Univ. Hospital and Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)); Lannering, Birgitta (Dept. of Paediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden))

    2011-08-15

    Introduction. The aim of this model study was to estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced adverse late effects in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma (MB) treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), inversely-optimized arc therapy (RapidArc (RA)) or spot-scanned intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The aim was also to find dose-volume toxicity parameters relevant to children undergoing RT to be used in the inverse planning of RA and IMPT, and to use in the risk estimations. Material and methods. Treatment plans were created for all three techniques on 10 pediatric patients that have been treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) at our institution in 2007-2009. Plans were generated for two prescription CSI doses, 23.4 Gy and 36 Gy. Risk estimates were based on childhood cancer survivor data when available and secondary cancer (SC) risks were estimated as a function of age at exposure and attained age according to the organ-equivalent dose (OED) concept. Results. Estimates of SC risk was higher for the RA plans and differentiable from the estimates for 3D CRT at attained ages above 40 years. The risk of developing heart failure, hearing loss, hypothyroidism and xerostomia was highest for the 3D CRT plans. The risks of all adverse effects were estimated as lowest for the IMPT plans, even when including secondary neutron (SN) irradiation with high values of the neutron radiation weighting factors (WR{sub neutron}). Conclusions. When comparing RA and 3D CRT treatment for pediatric MB it is a matter of comparing higher SC risk against higher risks of non-cancer adverse events. Considering time until onset of the different complications is necessary to fully assess patient benefit in such a comparison. The IMPT plans, including SN dose contribution, compared favorably to the photon techniques in terms of all radiobiological risk estimates

  3. IMRT Commissioning: application of the AAPM's TG-119; Comissionamento de IMRT: aplicacao do TG-119 da AAPM

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    Zeppellini, Caroline; Furnari, Laura, E-mail: laurafurnari@hotmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Inst. de Radiologia

    2013-08-15

    In order to verify the commissioning of the planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy system (IMRT), the TG-119 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) was applied. Using pre defined targets and normal structures, plans were realized, absolute and relative dose were measured with an ionizing chamber and films, and the results were compared with planned values. The maximum deviation of the measurements with the ionization chamber was 3,6%, but, in the total eleven measurements, only two were bigger than the tolerance limit of 3%, recommended by TG-119. The number of points which passed criteria gamma 3% to 3 mm ranged between 96.36% and 99.92%, all measurements were within the recommended 95%. The confidence limits found for both film and for chamber were lower than those achieved in the TG-119. Our results showed a good concordance with TG-119, what means that the system is adequate for clinical applications. (author)

  4. SU-E-T-460: Comparison of Proton and IMRT Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontenla, S; Zhou, Y; Kowalski, A [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States); Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Leven, T [Procure Proton Therapy Cneter, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Cahlon, O [ProCure Proton Therapy, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Lee, N [Memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center, NY, NY (United States); Hunt, M [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, NY, NY (United States); Mechalakos, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study comparing proton and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer Methods: This study consists of six H and N cancer patients that underwent proton as well as IMRT planning. Patients analyzed had unilateral target volumes, one had prior RT. 3D-conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT) plans with multiple field uniform scanning were generated for delivery on the inclined beam line. IMRT was planned using fixed field sliding window. Final plan evaluations were performed by a radiation oncologist and a physicist. Metrics for comparison included tumor coverage, organ sparing with respect to spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, submandibulars, oral cavity, larynx, brachial plexus, cochleas, normal brain tissue, and skin using relevant indices for these structures. Dose volume histograms were generated as well as a qualitative comparison of isodose distributions between the two modalities. Planning and treatment delivery times were compared. Results: Results showed that IMRT plans offered better conformality in the high dose region as demonstrated by the conformality index for each plan. Ipsilateral cochlea, submandibular gland, and skin doses were lower with IMRT than proton therapy. There was significant sparing of larynx, oral cavity, and brainstem with proton therapy compared to IMRT. This translated into direct patient benefit with no evidence of hoarseness, mucositis, or nausea. Contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were equally spared. IMRT had shorter planning/parts fabrication and treatment times which needs to be taken into account when deciding modality. Conclusion: Sparing of clinically significant normal tissue structures such as oral cavity and larynx for unilateral H and N cancers was seen with 3D-CPT versus IMRT. However, this is at the expense of less conformality at the high dose region and higher skin dose. Future studies are needed with full gantry systems and pencil beam scanning as these

  5. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy vs. IMRT for the Treatment of Distal Esophageal Cancer

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    Van Benthuysen, Liam, E-mail: liam.vanbenthuysen@roswellpark.org; Hales, Lee; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the ability to reduce monitor units and treatment time when compared with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This study aims to demonstrate that VMAT is able to provide adequate organs at risk (OAR) sparing and planning target volume (PTV) coverage for adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus while reducing monitor units and treatment time. Fourteen patients having been treated previously for esophageal cancer were planned using both VMAT and IMRT techniques. Dosimetric quality was evaluated based on doses to several OARs, as well as coverage of the PTV. Treatment times were assessed by recording the number of monitor units required for dose delivery. Body V{sub 5} was also recorded to evaluate the increased volume of healthy tissue irradiated to low doses. Dosimetric differences in OAR sparing between VMAT and IMRT were comparable. PTV coverage was similar for the 2 techniques but it was found that IMRT was capable of delivering a slightly more homogenous dose distribution. Of the 14 patients, 12 were treated with a single arc and 2 were treated with a double arc. Single-arc plans reduced monitor units by 42% when compared with the IMRT plans. Double-arc plans reduced monitor units by 67% when compared with IMRT. The V{sub 5} for the body was found to be 18% greater for VMAT than for IMRT. VMAT has the capability to decrease treatment times over IMRT while still providing similar OAR sparing and PTV coverage. Although there will be a smaller risk of patient movement during VMAT treatments, this advantage comes at the cost of delivering small doses to a greater volume of the patient.

  6. Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. IMRT for the treatment of distal esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Benthuysen, Liam; Hales, Lee; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the ability to reduce monitor units and treatment time when compared with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This study aims to demonstrate that VMAT is able to provide adequate organs at risk (OAR) sparing and planning target volume (PTV) coverage for adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus while reducing monitor units and treatment time. Fourteen patients having been treated previously for esophageal cancer were planned using both VMAT and IMRT techniques. Dosimetric quality was evaluated based on doses to several OARs, as well as coverage of the PTV. Treatment times were assessed by recording the number of monitor units required for dose delivery. Body V(5) was also recorded to evaluate the increased volume of healthy tissue irradiated to low doses. Dosimetric differences in OAR sparing between VMAT and IMRT were comparable. PTV coverage was similar for the 2 techniques but it was found that IMRT was capable of delivering a slightly more homogenous dose distribution. Of the 14 patients, 12 were treated with a single arc and 2 were treated with a double arc. Single-arc plans reduced monitor units by 42% when compared with the IMRT plans. Double-arc plans reduced monitor units by 67% when compared with IMRT. The V(5) for the body was found to be 18% greater for VMAT than for IMRT. VMAT has the capability to decrease treatment times over IMRT while still providing similar OAR sparing and PTV coverage. Although there will be a smaller risk of patient movement during VMAT treatments, this advantage comes at the cost of delivering small doses to a greater volume of the patient.

  7. Parotid gland sparing IMRT for head and neck cancer improves xerostomia related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balm AJM

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose To assess the impact of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT versus conventional radiation on late xerostomia and Quality of Life aspects in head and neck cancer patients. Patients and nethods Questionnaires on xerostomia in rest and during meals were sent to all patients treated between January 1999 and December 2003 with a T1-4, N0-2 M0 head and neck cancer, with parotid gland sparing IMRT or conventional bilateral neck irradiation to a dose of at least 60 Gy, who were progression free and had no disseminated disease (n = 192. Overall response was 85% (n = 163; 97% in the IMRT group (n = 75 and 77% in the control group (n = 88 the median follow-up was 2.6 years. The prevalence of complaints was compared between the two groups, correcting for all relevant factors at multivariate ordinal regression analysis. Results Patients treated with IMRT reported significantly less difficulty transporting and swallowing their food and needed less water for a dry mouth during day, night and meals. They also experienced fewer problems with speech and eating in public. Laryngeal cancer patients in general had fewer complaints than oropharynx cancer patients but both groups benefited from IMRT. Within the IMRT group the xerostomia scores were better for those patients with a mean parotid dose to the "spared" parotid below 26 Gy. Conclusion Parotid gland sparing IMRT for head and neck cancer patients improves xerostomia related quality of life compared to conventional radiation both in rest and during meals. Laryngeal cancer patients had fewer complaints but benefited equally compared to oropharyngeal cancer patients from IMRT.

  8. Pre-segmented 2-Step IMRT with subsequent direct machine parameter optimisation – a planning study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flentje Michael

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT mostly uses iterative optimisation methods. The integration of machine parameters into the optimisation process of step and shoot leaf positions has been shown to be successful. For IMRT segmentation algorithms based on the analysis of the geometrical structure of the planning target volumes (PTV and the organs at risk (OAR, the potential of such procedures has not yet been fully explored. In this work, 2-Step IMRT was combined with subsequent direct machine parameter optimisation (DMPO-Raysearch Laboratories, Sweden to investigate this potential. Methods In a planning study DMPO on a commercial planning system was compared with manual primary 2-Step IMRT segment generation followed by DMPO optimisation. 15 clinical cases and the ESTRO Quasimodo phantom were employed. Both the same number of optimisation steps and the same set of objective values were used. The plans were compared with a clinical DMPO reference plan and a traditional IMRT plan based on fluence optimisation and consequent segmentation. The composite objective value (the weighted sum of quadratic deviations of the objective values and the related points in the dose volume histogram was used as a measure for the plan quality. Additionally, a more extended set of parameters was used for the breast cases to compare the plans. Results The plans with segments pre-defined with 2-Step IMRT were slightly superior to DMPO alone in the majority of cases. The composite objective value tended to be even lower for a smaller number of segments. The total number of monitor units was slightly higher than for the DMPO-plans. Traditional IMRT fluence optimisation with subsequent segmentation could not compete. Conclusion 2-Step IMRT segmentation is suitable as starting point for further DMPO optimisation and, in general, results in less complex plans which are equal or superior to plans generated by DMPO alone.

  9. Standard fractionation intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT of primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Clifton D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT affords unparalleled capacity to deliver conformal radiation doses to tumors in the central nervous system. However, to date, there are few reported outcomes from using IMRT, either alone or as a boost technique, for standard fractionation radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Methods Forty-two patients were treated with IMRT alone (72% or as a boost (28% after 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT. Thirty-three patients with primary disease and 9 patients with recurrent tumors were included. Thirty-four patients (81% had surgery, with gross tumor resection in 13 patients (36%; 22 patients (53% received chemo-radiotherapy. The median total radiation dose for all patients was 60 Gy with a range from 30.6 to 74 Gy. Standard fractions of 1.8 Gy/day to 2.0 Gy/day were utilized. Results Median survival was 8.7 months, with 37 patients (88% deceased at last contact. Nonparametric analysis showed no survival difference in IMRT-boost vs. IMRT-only groups. Conclusion While technically feasible, preliminary results suggest delivering standard radiation doses by IMRT did not improve survival outcomes in this series compared to historical controls. In light of this lack of a survival benefit and the costs associated with use of IMRT, future prospective trials are needed to evaluate non-survival endpoints such as quality of life and functional preservation. Short of such evidence, the use of IMRT for treatment of GBM needs to be carefully rationalized.

  10. Comparison of online IGRT techniques for prostate IMRT treatment: Adaptive vs repositioning correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongphiew, Danthai; Wu, Q. Jackie; Lee, W. Robert; Chankong, Vira; Yoo, Sua; McMahon, Ryan; Yin Fangfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3295, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3295, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    This study compares three online image guidance techniques (IGRT) for prostate IMRT treatment: bony-anatomy matching, soft-tissue matching, and online replanning. Six prostate IMRT patients were studied. Five daily CBCT scans from the first week were acquired for each patient to provide representative ''snapshots'' of anatomical variations during the course of treatment. Initial IMRT plans were designed for each patient with seven coplanar 15 MV beams on a Eclipse treatment planning system. Two plans were created, one with a PTV margin of 10 mm and another with a 5 mm PTV margin. Based on these plans, the delivered dose distributions to each CBCT anatomy was evaluated to compare bony-anatomy matching, soft-tissue matching, and online replanning. Matching based on bony anatomy was evaluated using the 10 mm PTV margin (''bone10''). Soft-tissue matching was evaluated using both the 10 mm (''soft10'') and 5 mm (''soft5'') PTV margins. Online reoptimization was evaluated using the 5 mm PTV margin (''adapt''). The replanning process utilized the original dose distribution as the basis and linear goal programming techniques for reoptimization. The reoptimized plans were finished in less than 2 min for all cases. Using each IGRT technique, the delivered dose distribution was evaluated on all 30 CBCT scans (6 patientsx5CBCT/patient). The mean minimum dose (in percentage of prescription dose) to the CTV over five treatment fractions were in the ranges of 99%-100%(SD=0.1%-0.8%), 65%-98%(SD=0.4%-19.5%), 87%-99%(SD=0.7%-23.3%), and 95%-99%(SD=0.4%-10.4%) for the adapt, bone10, soft5, and soft10 techniques, respectively. Compared to patient position correction techniques, the online reoptimization technique also showed improvement in OAR sparing when organ motion/deformations were large. For bladder, the adapt technique had the best (minimum) D90, D50, and D30 values for 24, 17

  11. Modeling Clinical Radiation Responses in the IMRT Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, J. L.; Murray, D.; Stewart, R. D.; Phillips, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the critical issues of radiobiological models, particularly as they apply to clinical radiation therapy. Developing models of radiation responses has a long history that continues to the present time. Many different models have been proposed, but in the field of radiation oncology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has had the most impact on the design of treatment protocols. Questions have been raised as to the value of the LQ model given that the biological assumption underlying it has been challenged by molecular analyses of cell and tissue responses to radiation. There are also questions as to use of the LQ model for hypofractionation, especially for high dose treatments using a single fraction. While the LQ model might over-estimate the effects of large radiation dose fractions, there is insufficient information to fully justify the adoption of alternative models. However, there is increasing evidence in the literature that non-targeted and other indirect effects of radiation sometimes produce substantial deviations from LQ-like dose-response curves. As preclinical and clinical hypofractionation studies accumulate, new or refined dose-response models that incorporate high-dose/fraction non-targeted and indirect effects may be required, but for now the LQ model remains a simple, useful tool to guide the design of treatment protocols.

  12. A comprehensive comparison of IMRT and VMAT plan quality for orbital lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Soon Mi; Ban, Tae Joon; Yun, In Ha; Baek, Geum Mun; Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan medical center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare the plan quality of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of orbital lymphoma. IMRT, partial single arc(SA) and partial-double arc(DA) VMAT plans for four patients with orbital lymphoma treated at our institution were used for this study. Conformity Index(CI), Paddick's Conformity Index(PCI) and Homogeneity Index(HI) of planning target volume(PTV) were used to evaluate dosimetric quality of each plan. The Monitor Unit (MU), treatment time and dose of ipsilateral lens from each type of plan were measured for comparison. The CI of PTV for IMRT, SA and DA were measured as 0.88, 0.86, 0.92. The PCI of DA was the lowest as 1.33. Also HI of DA was the lowest in measured plans as 1.15. Mean dose of lens, lacrimal gland, optic chiasm, the opposite optic nerve and both orbit was analyzed with V30, V20, V10, V5. The result showed that the lowest dose in IMRT highest in SA in opposite lens, lacrimal gland, optic nerve, orbit. Results : Treatment time and average MU of IMRT was about three times higher than SA. Considering the superior plan quality as well as the delivery efficiency of VMAT compared with that of IMRT, VMAT may be the preferred modality for treating orbital lymphoma.

  13. Motion as perturbation. II. Development of the method for dosimetric analysis of motion effects with fixed-gantry IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Opp, Daniel; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.feygelman@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In this work, the feasibility of implementing a motion-perturbation approach to accurately estimate volumetric dose in the presence of organ motion—previously demonstrated for VMAT-–is studied for static gantry IMRT. The method's accuracy is improved for the voxels that have very low planned dose but acquire appreciable dose due to motion. The study describes the modified algorithm and its experimental validation and provides an example of a clinical application. Methods: A contoured region-of-interest is propagated according to the predefined motion kernel throughout time-resolved 4D phantom dose grids. This timed series of 3D dose grids is produced by the measurement-guided dose reconstruction algorithm, based on an irradiation of a staticARCCHECK (AC) helical dosimeter array (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL). Each moving voxel collects dose over the dynamic simulation. The difference in dose-to-moving voxel vs dose-to-static voxel in-phantom forms the basis of a motion perturbation correction that is applied to the corresponding voxel in the patient dataset. A new method to synchronize the accelerator and dosimeter clocks, applicable to fixed-gantry IMRT, was developed. Refinements to the algorithm account for the excursion of low dose voxels into high dose regions, causing appreciable dose increase due to motion (LDVE correction). For experimental validation, four plans using TG-119 structure sets and objectives were produced using segmented IMRT direct machine parameters optimization in Pinnacle treatment planning system (v. 9.6, Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI). All beams were delivered with the gantry angle of 0°. Each beam was delivered three times: (1) to the static AC centered on the room lasers; (2) to a static phantom containing a MAPCHECK2 (MC2) planar diode array dosimeter (Sun Nuclear); and (3) to the moving MC2 phantom. The motion trajectory was an ellipse in the IEC XY plane, with 3 and 1.5 cm axes. The period

  14. Dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment plans at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ); Dosimetrische Verifikation von IMRT-Gesamtplaenen am Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhein, B.; Haering, P.; Debus, J.; Schlegel, W. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The present paper describes a method for the individual dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment plans. The German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum; DKFZ) has implemented the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) since 1997. So far, 246 patients with head and neck cancer, cancer of the prostate, breast, and vertebral column, as well as mesothelioma of the pleura have been treated. Every IMRT plan is transferred into a special IMRT verification phantom, recalculated, and dosimetrically verified. Absolute dose distributions are measured with Kodak EDR films and compared with the results of the dose calculation. After correction of the optical density in relationship to the dose, EDR films are able to measure the absolute dose with an accuracy of {+-}2% compared to an ionization chamber. A Visual C{sup ++} software tool has been developed to correlate and evaluate the film dose distributions with the corresponding slices of the 3D dose cube. Beside the overlay of absolute or relative isodoses and dose profiles, the median dose within correlated regions of interest (ROIs) is also included in the quantitative dose evaluation. The deviation between EDR film dosimetry and dose calculation is {delta}D=-0.3%{+-}2.3%. After introduction of the verification software, the total verification time (including handling, correlation, evaluation, and documentation of the data), could be reduced to less than 2 hours. (orig.) [German] In dieser Arbeit wird eine Methode zur individuellen dosimetrischen Ueberpruefung von IMRT-Bestrahlungsplaenen beschrieben. Am Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) wird die intensitaetsmodulierte Strahlentherapie (IMRT) seit 1997 durchgefuehrt. 246 Patienten mit Tumoren im Kopf-Hals Bereich, der Wirbelsaeule, der Prostata, der weiblichen Brust und Pleuramesotheliome wurden bisher bestrahlt. Jeder IMRT-Bestrahlungsplan wird in ein spezielles Verifikationsphantom uebertragen, dort neu berechnet und dosimetrisch verifiziert

  15. A radiobiological model of radiotherapy response and its correlation with prognostic imaging variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispin-Ortuzar, Mireia; Jeong, Jeho; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2017-04-01

    Radiobiological models of tumour control probability (TCP) can be personalized using imaging data. We propose an extension to a voxel-level radiobiological TCP model in order to describe patient-specific differences and intra-tumour heterogeneity. In the proposed model, tumour shrinkage is described by means of a novel kinetic Monte Carlo method for inter-voxel cell migration and tumour deformation. The model captures the spatiotemporal evolution of the tumour at the voxel level, and is designed to take imaging data as input. To test the performance of the model, three image-derived variables found to be predictive of outcome in the literature have been identified and calculated using the model’s own parameters. Simulating multiple tumours with different initial conditions makes it possible to perform an in silico study of the correlation of these variables with the dose for 50% tumour control (\\text{TC}{{\\text{D}}50} ) calculated by the model. We find that the three simulated variables correlate with the calculated \\text{TC}{{\\text{D}}50} . In addition, we find that different variables have different levels of sensitivity to the spatial distribution of hypoxia within the tumour, as well as to the dynamics of the migration mechanism. Finally, based on our results, we observe that an adequate combination of the variables may potentially result in higher predictive power.

  16. A model to describe potential effects of chemotherapy on critical radiobiological treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, D.; Desco, M. M.; Antoranz, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Although chemo- and radiotherapy can annihilate tumors on their own. they are also used in coadjuvancy: improving local effects of radiotherapy using chemotherapy as a radiosensit.izer. The effects of radiotherapy are well described by current radiobiological models. The goal of this work is to describe a discrete radiotherapy model, that has been previously used describe high radiation dose response as well as unusual radio-responses of some types of tumors (e.g. prostate cancer), to obtain a model of chemo+radiotherapy that can describe how the outcome of their combination is a more efficient removal of the tumor. Our hypothesis is that, although both treatments haven different mechanisms, both affect similar key points of cell metabolism and regulation, that lead to cellular death. Hence, we will consider a discrete model where chemotherapy may affect a fraction of the same targets destroyed by radiotherapy. Although radiotherapy reaches all cells equally, chemotherapy diffuses through a tumor attaining lower concentration in its center and higher in its surface. With our simulations we study the enhanced effect of combined therapy treatment and how it depends on the tissue critical parameters (the parameters of the lion-extensive radiobiological model), the number of “targets” aimed at by chemotherapy, and the concentration and diffusion rate of the drug inside the tumor. The results show that an equivalent, cliemo-radio-dose can be computed that allows the prediction of the lower radiation dose that causes the same effect than a radio-only treatment.

  17. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E A; Kronenberg, A

    1998-11-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  18. In vivo radiobiological assessment of the new clinical carbon ion beams at CNAO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facoetti, A; Vischioni, B; Ciocca, M; Ferrarini, M; Furusawa, Y; Mairani, A; Matsumoto, Y; Mirandola, A; Molinelli, S; Uzawa, A; Vilches, Freixas G; Orecchia, R

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the in vivo study performed to evaluate the uniformity of biological doses within an hypothetical target volume and calculate the values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at different depths in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the new CNAO (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) carbon beams is presented, in the framework of a typical radiobiological beam calibration procedure. The RBE values (relative to (60)Co γ rays) of the CNAO active scanning carbon ion beams were determined using jejunal crypt regeneration in mice as biological system at the entrance, centre and distal end of a 6-cm SOBP. The RBE values calculated from the iso-effective doses to reduce crypt survival per circumference to 10, ranged from 1.52 at the middle of the SOBP to 1.75 at the distal position and are in agreement with those previously reported from other carbon ion facilities. In conclusion, this first set of in vivo experiments shows that the CNAO carbon beam is radiobiologically comparable with the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan) and GSI (Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany) ones.

  19. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  20. Development of a soft X-ray microprobe for single cell radiobiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Liang; YAN Jingwen; JIANG Shiping; YU Yang

    2009-01-01

    An X-ray microprobe for radiobiological studies was developed which deliver precise doses of radiation to the selected individual cells. The facility used synchrotron radiation as soft X-ray source. A zone plate combining with a pinhole produced a fine probe from bending magnet for single cell irradiating with defined doses. The diameter of microprobe at the target position was about 2 μm by scanning a knife-edge with an AXUV photo diode. The fluxes of soft X-rays at 516.7 eV (2.4 nm) were about 5.4×104 photons/s.100mA measured with the photo diode. The absorbed dose rate for typical yeast cells was about 11.34 Gy/s with the storage current of 100 mA. A preliminary experiment for yeast cells irradiation has shown that the microprobe had a definite biological effect for radiobiological investigations. The soft X-ray microprobe at "water window" region has provided a useful tool for single cell irradiating damage and a capability of individually irradiating a certain numbers of cells each time.

  1. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.; Kronenberg, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  2. Bringing the heavy: carbon ion therapy in the radiobiological and clinical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaff, Cody D; Krauze, Andra; Belard, Arnaud; O'Connell, John J; Camphausen, Kevin A

    2014-03-28

    Radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer is undergoing an evolution, shifting to the use of heavier ion species. For a plethora of malignancies, current radiotherapy using photons or protons yields marginal benefits in local control and survival. One hypothesis is that these malignancies have acquired, or are inherently radioresistant to low LET radiation. In the last decade, carbon ion radiotherapy facilities have slowly been constructed in Europe and Asia, demonstrating favorable results for many of the malignancies that do poorly with conventional radiotherapy. However, from a radiobiological perspective, much of how this modality works in overcoming radioresistance, and extending local control and survival are not yet fully understood. In this review, we will explain from a radiobiological perspective how carbon ion radiotherapy can overcome the classical and recently postulated contributors of radioresistance (α/β ratio, hypoxia, cell proliferation, the tumor microenvironment and metabolism, and cancer stem cells). Furthermore, we will make recommendations on the important factors to consider, such as anatomical location, in the future design and implementation of clinical trials. With the existing data available we believe that the expansion of carbon ion facilities into the United States is warranted.

  3. Radiobiological characterization of post-lumpectomy focal brachytherapy with lipid nanoparticle-carried radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Goins, Beth; Yan, Weiqiang; Phillips, William T.; Otto, Pamela M.; Bao, Ande

    2011-02-01

    Post-operative radiotherapy has commonly been used for early stage breast cancer to treat residual disease. The primary objective of this work was to characterize, through dosimetric and radiobiological modeling, a novel focal brachytherapy technique which uses direct intracavitary infusion of β-emitting radionuclides (186Re/188Re) carried by lipid nanoparticles (liposomes). Absorbed dose calculations were performed for a spherical lumpectomy cavity with a uniformly injected activity distribution using a dose point kernel convolution technique. Radiobiological indices were used to relate predicted therapy outcome and normal tissue complication of this technique with equivalent external beam radiotherapy treatment regimens. Modeled stromal damage was used as a measure of the inhibition of the stimulatory effect on tumor growth driven by the wound healing response. A sample treatment plan delivering 50 Gy at a therapeutic range of 2.0 mm for 186Re-liposomes and 5.0 mm for 188Re-liposomes takes advantage of the dose delivery characteristics of the β-emissions, providing significant EUD (58.2 Gy and 72.5 Gy for 186Re and 188Re, respectively) with a minimal NTCP (0.046%) of the healthy ipsilateral breast. Modeling of kidney BED and ipsilateral breast NTCP showed that large injected activity concentrations of both radionuclides could be safely administered without significant complications.

  4. Conventionally-fractionated image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT: a safe and effective treatment for cancer spinal metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xiaoqin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatments for cancer spinal metastasis were always palliative. This study was conducted to investigate the safety and effectiveness of IG-IMRT for these patients. Methods 10 metastatic lesions were treated with conventionally-fractionated IG-IMRT. Daily kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT scan was applied to ensure accurate positioning. Plans were evaluated by the dose-volume histogram (DVH analysis. Results Before set-up correction, the positioning errors in the left-right (LR, superior-inferior (SI and anterior-posterior (AP axes were 0.3 ± 3.2, 0.4 ± 4.5 and -0.2 ± 3.9 mm, respectively. After repositioning, those errors were 0.1 ± 0.7, 0 ± 0.8 and 0 ± 0.7 mm, respectively. The systematic/random uncertainties ranged 1.4–2.3/3.0–4.1 before and 0.1–0.2/0.7–0.8 mm after online set-up correction. In the original IMRT plans, the average dose of the planning target volume (PTV was 61.9 Gy, with the spinal cord dose less than 49 Gy. Compared to the simulated PTVs based on the pre-correction CBCT, the average volume reduction of PTVs was 42.3% after online correction. Also, organ at risk (OAR all benefited from CBCT-based set-up correction and had significant dose reduction with IGRT technique. Clinically, most patients had prompt pain relief within one month of treatment. There was no radiation-induced toxicity detected clinically during a median follow-up of 15.6 months. Conclusion IG-IMRT provides a new approach to treat cancer spinal metastasis. The precise positioning ensures the implementation of optimal IMRT plan, satisfying both the dose escalation of tumor targets and the radiation tolerance of spinal cord. It might benefit the cancer patient with spinal metastasis.

  5. Feasibility of using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation for IMRT dose calculations for the Novalis Tx with a HD-120 multi-leaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunuk; Shin, Jungsuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Han, Youngyih; Kim, Jinsung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an independent dose verification system by using a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) conducted by using a Varian Novalis Tx (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) equipped with a highdefinition multi-leaf collimator (HD-120 MLC). The Geant4 framework was used to implement a dose calculation system that accurately predicted the delivered dose. For this purpose, the Novalis Tx Linac head was modeled according to the specifications acquired from the manufacturer. Subsequently, MC simulations were performed by varying the mean energy, energy spread, and electron spot radius to determine optimum values of irradiation with 6-MV X-ray beams by using the Novalis Tx system. Computed percentage depth dose curves (PDDs) and lateral profiles were compared to the measurements obtained by using an ionization chamber (CC13). To validate the IMRT simulation by using the MC model we developed, we calculated a simple IMRT field and compared the result with the EBT3 film measurements in a water-equivalent solid phantom. Clinical cases, such as prostate cancer treatment plans, were then selected, and MC simulations were performed. The accuracy of the simulation was assessed against the EBT3 film measurements by using a gamma-index criterion. The optimal MC model parameters to specify the beam characteristics were a 6.8-MeV mean energy, a 0.5-MeV energy spread, and a 3-mm electron radius. The accuracy of these parameters was determined by comparison of MC simulations with measurements. The PDDs and the lateral profiles of the MC simulation deviated from the measurements by 1% and 2%, respectively, on average. The computed simple MLC fields agreed with the EBT3 measurements with a 95% passing rate with 3%/3-mm gamma-index criterion. Additionally, in applying our model to clinical IMRT plans, we found that the MC calculations and the EBT3 measurements agreed well with a passing rate of greater

  6. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once. (KRM)

  7. MO-G-BRD-01: Point/Counterpoint Debate: Arc Based Techniques Will Make Conventional IMRT Obsolete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, D [Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Popple, R [University Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Balter, P [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    A variety of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery techniques have been developed that have provided clinicians with the ability to deliver highly conformal dose distributions. The delivery techniques include compensators, step-and-shoot IMRT, sliding window IMRT, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and tomotherapy. A key development in the field of IMRT was the introduction of new planning algorithms and delivery control systems in 2007 that made it possible to coordinate the gantry rotation speed, dose rate, and multileaf collimator leaf positions during the delivery of arc therapy. With these developments, VMAT became a routine clinical tool. The use of VMAT has continued to grow in recent years and some would argue that this will soon make conventional IMRT obsolete, and this is the premise of this debate. To introduce the debate, David Shepard, Ph.D. will provide an overview of IMRT delivery techniques including historical context and how they are being used today. The debate will follow with Richard Popple, Ph.D. arguing FOR the Proposition and Peter Balter, Ph.D. arguing AGAINST it. Learning Objectives: Understand the different delivery techniques for IMRT. Understand the potential benefits of conventional IMRT. Understand the potential benefits of arc-based IMRT delivery.

  8. Clinically evaluating directional dependence of 2D seven29 ion-chamber array with different IMRT plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to clinically evaluate the directional dependence of a 2D seven29 ion-chamber array with different intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plans. Methods: Twenty-five patients who had already been treated with IMRT plans were selected for the study. Verification plans were created in an Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS for each treatment plan. The verification plans were executed twice for each patient. The first IMRT plan used a true gantry angle (plan-related approach, and the second plan used a 0° gantry angle (field-related approach. Measurements were performed using a Varian Clinac 2100 iX linear accelerator. The fluence was measured for all the delivered plans and analyzed using Verisoft software. A comparison of the fluence was performed between IMRT with a static gantry (0° gantry angle and real gantry angles. Results: The results indicate that the Gamma average was 98.8 % for IMRT with a 0° gantry angle and 96.616% for IMRT with a true gantry angle. Average percent difference of normalized doses for IMRT delivered with zero degree gantry angle and IMRT with actual gantry angles is 0.15 and 0.88 respectively. Conclusion: The ion chamber of the 2D array used in IMRT verification has angular dependence, reducing the verification accuracy when the 2D array is used for measuring the actual beams of the treatment plan.

  9. Application programming in C# environment with recorded user software interactions and its application in autopilot of VMAT/IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Xing, Lei

    2016-11-01

    An autopilot scheme of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)/intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning with the guidance of prior knowledge is established with recorded interactions between a planner and a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Microsoft (MS) Visual Studio Coded UI is applied to record some common planner-TPS interactions as subroutines. The TPS used in this study is a Windows-based Eclipse system. The interactions of our application program with Eclipse TPS are realized through a series of subroutines obtained by prerecording the mouse clicks or keyboard strokes of a planner in operating the TPS. A strategy to autopilot Eclipse VMAT/IMRT plan selection process is developed as a specific example of the proposed "scripting" method. The autopiloted planning is navigated by a decision function constructed with a reference plan that has the same prescription and similar anatomy with the case at hand. The calculation proceeds by alternating between the Eclipse optimization and the outer-loop optimization independent of the Eclipse. In the C# program, the dosimetric characteristics of a reference treatment plan are used to assess and modify the Eclipse planning parameters and to guide the search for a clinically sensible treatment plan. The approach is applied to plan a head and neck (HN) VMAT case and a prostate IMRT case. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of application programming method in C# environment with recorded interactions of planner-TPS. The process mimics a planner's planning process and automatically provides clinically sensible treatment plans that would otherwise require a large amount of manual trial and error of a planner. The proposed technique enables us to harness a commercial TPS by application programming via the use of recorded human computer interactions and provides an effective tool to greatly facilitate the treatment planning process. PACS number(s): 87.55.D-, 87.55.kd, 87.55.de. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Application programming in C# environment with recorded user software interactions and its application in autopilot of VMAT/IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Xing, Lei

    2016-11-08

    An autopilot scheme of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)/intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning with the guidance of prior knowl-edge is established with recorded interactions between a planner and a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Microsoft (MS) Visual Studio Coded UI is applied to record some common planner-TPS interactions as subroutines. The TPS used in this study is a Windows-based Eclipse system. The interactions of our application program with Eclipse TPS are realized through a series of subrou-tines obtained by prerecording the mouse clicks or keyboard strokes of a planner in operating the TPS. A strategy to autopilot Eclipse VMAT/IMRT plan selection process is developed as a specific example of the proposed "scripting" method. The autopiloted planning is navigated by a decision function constructed with a reference plan that has the same prescription and similar anatomy with the case at hand. The calculation proceeds by alternating between the Eclipse optimization and the outer-loop optimization independent of the Eclipse. In the C# program, the dosimetric characteristics of a reference treatment plan are used to assess and modify the Eclipse planning parameters and to guide the search for a clinically sensible treatment plan. The approach is applied to plan a head and neck (HN) VMAT case and a prostate IMRT case. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of application programming method in C# environment with recorded interactions of planner-TPS. The process mimics a planner's planning process and automatically provides clinically sensible treatment plans that would otherwise require a large amount of manual trial and error of a planner. The proposed technique enables us to harness a commercial TPS by application programming via the use of recorded human computer interactions and provides an effective tool to greatly facilitate the treatment planning process.

  11. Radioembolization of hepatocarcinoma with {sup 90}Y glass microspheres: development of an individualized treatment planning strategy based on dosimetry and radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiesa, C.; Maccauro, M.; Aliberti, G.; Padovano, B.; Seregni, E.; Crippa, F. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Nuclear Medicine Division, Milan (Italy); Mira, M.; Negri, A. [University of Milan, Postgraduate Health Physics School, Milan (Italy); Spreafico, C.; Morosi, C.; Civelli, E.; Lanocita, R.; Marchiano, A. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Radiology 2, Milan (Italy); Romito, R.; Sposito, C.; Bhoori, S.; Facciorusso, A.; Mazzaferro, V. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Surgery 1, Milan (Italy); Camerini, T. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Scientific Direction, Milan (Italy); Carrara, M. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Health Physics, Milan (Italy); Pellizzari, S. [University La Sapienza, Engineering Faculty, Rome (Italy); Migliorisi, M. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Nuclear Medicine Division, Milan (Italy); Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Clinical Engineering, Milan (Italy); De Nile, M.C. [University of Pavia, Physics Faculty, Pavia, Lombardy (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study was to optimize the dosimetric approach and to review the absorbed doses delivered, taking into account radiobiology, in order to identify the optimal methodology for an individualized treatment planning strategy based on {sup 99m}Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. We performed retrospective dosimetry of the standard TheraSphere registered treatment on 52 intermediate (n = 17) and advanced (i.e. portal vein thrombosis, n = 35) hepatocarcinoma patients with tumour burden < 50 % and without obstruction of the main portal vein trunk. Response was monitored with the densitometric radiological criterion (European Association for the Study of the Liver) and treatment-related liver decompensation was defined ad hoc with a time cut-off of 6 months. Adverse events clearly attributable to disease progression or other causes were not attributed to treatment. Voxel dosimetry was performed with the local deposition method on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT images. The reconstruction protocol was optimized. Concordance of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA and {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung microsphere biodistributions was studied in 35 sequential patients. Two segmentation methods were used, based on SPECT alone (home-made code) or on coregistered SPECT/CT images (IMALYTICS trademark by Philips). STRATOS trademark absorbed dose calculation was validated for {sup 90}Y with a single time point. Radiobiology was used introducing other dosimetric variables besides the mean absorbed dose D: equivalent uniform dose (EUD), biologically effective dose averaged over voxel values (BED{sub ave}) and equivalent uniform biologically effective dose (EUBED). Two sets of radiobiological parameters, the first derived from microsphere irradiation and the second from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), were used. A total of 16 possible methodologies were compared. Tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were

  12. Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days Growth of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2 Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days'Grown of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days Growth of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2 Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days'Grown of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2

  13. HybridArc: A novel radiation therapy technique combining optimized dynamic arcs and intensity modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robar, James L., E-mail: james.robar@cdha.nshealth.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada); Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada); Thomas, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    This investigation focuses on possible dosimetric and efficiency advantages of HybridArc-a novel treatment planning approach combining optimized dynamic arcs with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. Application of this technique to two disparate sites, complex cranial tumors, and prostate was examined. HybridArc plans were compared with either dynamic conformal arc (DCA) or IMRT plans to determine whether HybridArc offers a synergy through combination of these 2 techniques. Plans were compared with regard to target volume dose conformity, target volume dose homogeneity, sparing of proximal organs at risk, normal tissue sparing, and monitor unit (MU) efficiency. For cranial cases, HybridArc produced significantly improved dose conformity compared with both DCA and IMRT but did not improve sparing of the brainstem or optic chiasm. For prostate cases, conformity was improved compared with DCA but not IMRT. Compared with IMRT, the dose homogeneity in the planning target volume was improved, and the maximum doses received by the bladder and rectum were reduced. Both arc-based techniques distribute peripheral dose over larger volumes of normal tissue compared with IMRT, whereas HybridArc involved slightly greater volumes of normal tissues compared with DCA. Compared with IMRT, cranial cases required 38% more MUs, whereas for prostate cases, MUs were reduced by 7%. For cranial cases, HybridArc improves dose conformity to the target. For prostate cases, dose conformity and homogeneity are improved compared with DCA and IMRT, respectively. Compared with IMRT, whether required MUs increase or decrease with HybridArc was site-dependent.

  14. A Monte Carlo model for independent dose verification in IMRT and VMAT for the Varian Novalis TX with high definition MLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vazquez Quino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, the physician can prescribe, design and deliver optimized treatment plans that target the tumor and spare adjacent critical structures. The increased conformity of such plans often comes at the expenses of adding significant complexity to the delivery of the treatment. With volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT, in addition to the modulation of the intensity of the radiation beam, other mechanical parameters such as gantry speed and dose rate are varied during treatment delivery. It is therefore imperative that we develop comprehensive and accurate methods to validate such complex delivery techniques prior to the commencement of the patient’s treatment. Methods: In this study, a Monte Carlo simulation was performed for the high definition multileaf collimator (HD-MLC of a Varian Novalis TX linac. Our simulation is based on the MCSIM code and provides a comprehensive model of the linac head. After validating the model in reference geometries, treatment plans for different anatomical sites were simulated and compared against the treatment planning system (TPS dose calculations. All simulations were performed in a cylindrical water phantom as opposed to the patient anatomy, to remove any complexities associated with density effects. Finally, a comparison through gamma analysis of dose plane between the simulation, the TPS and the measurements from the Matrixx array (IBA was conducted to verify the accuracy of our model against both the measurements and the TPS. Results: Gamma analysis of ten IMRT and ten VMAT cases for different anatomical sites was performed, using a 3%/3 mm passing criterion. The average passing rates were 97.5% and 94.3% for the IMRT and the VMAT plans respectively when comparing the MCSIM and TPS dose calculations. Conclusion: In the present work a Monte Carlo model of a Novalis TX linac which has been tested and benchmarked to produce phase-space files for the

  15. Modification of radiobiological effects of 171 MeV protons by elements of physical protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulinina, Taisia; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Ivanov, Alexander; Molokanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation includes protons of various energies. Physical protection is effective in the case of low energy protons (50-100 MeV) and becomes insufficient for radiation with a high part of high-energy protons. In the experiment performed on outbred mice, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiobiological effect of 171 MeV protons and protons modified by elements of physical protection of the spacecraft, on a complex of indicators of the functional condition of the system hematopoiesis and the central nervous system in 24 hours after irradiation at 20 cGy dose. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a «protective curtain», and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Mass thickness of the " protective curtain" in terms of water equivalent was ̴ 6,2 g/cm2. Physical shielding along the path of 171 MeV protons increases their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, the two types of shielding together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. The effects observed in the experiment indicate the necessity to carry out comprehensive radiobiological researches (physical, biological and mathematical) in assessing the effects of physical protection, that are actual for ensuring radiation safety of crews in

  16. MO-D-BRD-03: Radiobiology and Commissioning of Electronic Brachytherapy for IORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. [Oregon Health & Science Univ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  17. Proton Radiobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tommasino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak, the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE, protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed.

  18. Evaluation of quality control tools for patients submitted to IMRT; Avaliacao das ferramentas de controle da qualidade para pacientes submetidos ao IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavor, Milton; Rodrigues, Laura N.; Silva, Marco A., E-mail: miltonlavor@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-04-15

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is currently being implemented in a rapidly growing number of centers in Brazil. As consequence many institutions are now facing the problem of performing a comprehensive quality control program before and during the implementation of IMRT in the clinical practice. This paper proposes a methodology for quality control and presents the results and evaluations of the data obtained from the proposed methodology. Ionization chamber and two-dimensional array detector were performed in IMRT treatment planning in order to assess the absolute value of the total dose of all fields. The relative total dose distribution of all fields was measured with a radiochromic film and a two-dimensional array in a phantom. A comparison between measured and calculated dose distributions was performed using the gamma-index method, assessing the percentage of points that meet the criteria of ±3% dose difference and ±3mm distance to agreement. As a result and review of 113 tested IMRT beams using ionization chamber and 81 using two-dimensional array, the proposal was to take an action level of about ±5% compared to the treatment planning systems and measurements, for the verification of the dose in a single point at the low gradient dose region. Analysis of the two-dimensional array measurements showed that the gamma value was <1 for 97.7% of the data and for the film the gamma value was <1 for 96.6% of the data. This work can establish action levels required for quality control program proposed and implemented in the Department of Radiotherapy - Hospital das Clinicas in Sao Paulo that allows an accurate delivery of dose in 'sliding-window' IMRT with micro multi leaf collimator. (author)

  19. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, July, August and September 1986. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Contents include: post-radiation regional cerebral blood flow in primates; heart-function studies in dogs after acute gamma irradiation of the precordium; the effect of anesthetic, sedative or narcotic drugs on intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary kinetics; effect of gamma radiation on sodium channels in different conformations in neuroblastoma cells; effects of ethanol exposure on brain sodium channels; ionizing radiation alters the properties of sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes; thymic hormones in thymus recovery from radiation injury; acute toxicity of petroleum- and shale-derived distillate fuel; light microscopic, hematologic, and serum chemistry studies; radioprotective properties of detoxified lipid A from Salmonella Minnesota R595; brain areas involved in production of morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the C57B1/6J mouse; preliminary evaluation of US Army radiac detector DT-236/PD and radiac computer-indicator CP-696/UD; and calorimetric dose measurements and calorimetric system developed for the armed forces radiobiology research institute.

  20. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-03

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  1. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, G.A.; Schubert, W.W.; Marshall, T.M. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represents a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space. (author).

  2. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Marshall, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represent a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space.

  3. Chasing Ghosts in Space Radiobiology Research: The Lost Focus on Non-Targeted Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Saganti, Premkumar; Cacao, Eliedonna

    2016-07-01

    The doses and dose-rates of astronaut exposures to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are accurately known, and lead to particle hits per cell nucleus from high charge and energy (HZE) particles of much less than one hit per cell per week. A large number of experiments have shown that additivity of biological effects is a valid assumption for space radiation exposures, while experiments at higher doses and dose-rates than occur in space continue to be a focus of the majority of space radiobiology research. Furthermore HZE particle exposures with mono-energetic particles manifest themselves as a mixed-radiation field due to the contributions of delta-rays and the random impact parameter of a particles track core to DNA and non-DNA targets in cells and tissues. The mixed-field manifestation of mono-energetic HZE particle exposures is well known from theoretical studies of microdosimetry and track structure. Additional mixed-field effects occur for single species experiments due to nuclear fragmentation in particle accelerator beam-lines and biological samples along with energy straggling. In contrast to these well known aspects of space radiobiology there are many open questions on the contribution of non-targeted effects to low dose and dose-rate exposures. Non-targeted effects (NTEs) include bystander effects and genomic instability, and have been shown to be the most important outstanding question for reducing uncertainties in space radiation cancer risk assessment. The dose-rate and radiation quality dependence of NTE's has not been established, while there is an over-arching need to develop 21st century experimental models of human cancer risk. We review possible mechanisms of NTE's and how new experiments to address these issues could be designed.

  4. Transnational science and collaborative networks. The case of Genetics and Radiobiology in Mexico, 1950-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The transnational approach of the science and technology studies (S&TS) abandons the nation as a unit of analysis in order to understand the development of science history. It also abandons Euro-US-centred narratives in order to explain the role of international collaborative networks and the circulation of knowledge, people, artefacts and scientific practices. It is precisely under this perspective that the development of genetics and radiobiology in Mexico shall be analyzed, together with the pioneering work of the Mexican physician-turned-geneticist Alfonso León de Garay who spent two years in the Galton Laboratory in London under the supervision of Lionel Penrose. Upon his return de Garay funded the Genetics and Radiobiology Program of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy based on local needs and the aim of working beyond geographical limitations to thus facilitate the circulation of knowledge, practices and people. The three main lines of research conducted in the years after its foundation that were in line with international projects while responding to the national context were, first, cytogenetic studies of certain abnormalities, and the cytogenetics and anthropological studies of the Olympic Games held in Mexico in 1968; second, the study of the effects of radiation on hereditary material; and third, the study of population genetics in Drosophila and in Mexican indigenous groups. The program played a key role in reshaping the scientific careers of Mexican geneticists, and in transferring locally sourced research into broader networks. This case shows the importance of international collaborative networks and circulation in the constitution of national scientific elites, and also shows the national and transnational concerns that shaped local practices.

  5. Heavy ion microprobes: a unique tool for bystander research and other radiobiological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, K. O.; Fournier, C.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    2008-07-01

    The risk assessment for low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation has been challenged by a growing body of experimental evidence showing that non-irradiated bystander cells can receive signals from irradiated cells to elicit a variety of cellular responses. These may be significant for radiation protection but also for radiation therapy using heavy ions. Charged particle microbeams for radiobiological application provide a unique means to address these issues by allowing the precise irradiation of single cells with a counted numbers of ions. Here, we focus specifically on heavy ion microbeam facilities currently in use for biological purposes, describing their technical features and biological results. Typically, ion species up to argon are used for targeted biological irradiation at the vertically collimated microbeam at JAEA (Takasaki, Japan). At the SNAKE microprobe in Munich, mostly oxygen ions have been used in a horizontal focused beam line for cell targeting. At GSI (Darmstadt), a horizontal microprobe with a focused beam for defined targeting using ion species up to uranium is operational. The visualization of DNA damage response proteins relocalizing to defined sites of ion traversal has been accomplished at the three heavy ion microbeam facilities described above and is used to study mechanistic aspects of heavy ion effects. However, bystander studies have constituted the main focus of biological applications. While for cell inactivation and effects on cell cycle progression a response of non-targeted cells has been described at JAEA and GSI, respectively, in part controversial results have been obtained for the induction of DNA damage measured by double-strand formation or at the cytogenetic level. The results emphasize the influence of the cellular environment, and standardization of experimental conditions for cellular studies at different facilities as well as the investigation of bystander effects in tissue will be the aims of future

  6. The radiobiological principles of boron neutron capture therapy: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopewell, J.W., E-mail: john.hopewell@gtc.ox.ac.uk [Green Templeton College and Particle Therapy Cancer Research Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Morris, G.M. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schwint, A. [Department of Radiobiology, Constituyentes Atomic Center, National Atomic Energy Commission, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Coderre, J.A. [Ora Inc, 300 Brickstone Square, Andover, MA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The radiobiology of the dose components in a BNCT exposure is examined. The effect of exposure time in determining the biological effectiveness of {gamma}-rays, due to the repair of sublethal damage, has been largely overlooked in the application of BNCT. Recoil protons from fast neutrons vary in their relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as a function of energy and tissue endpoint. Thus the energy spectrum of a beam will influence the RBE of this dose component. Protons from the neutron capture reaction in nitrogen have not been studied but in practice protons from nitrogen capture have been combined with the recoil proton contribution into a total proton dose. The relative biological effectiveness of the products of the neutron capture reaction in boron is derived from two factors, the RBE of the short range particles and the bio-distribution of boron, referred to collectively as the compound biological effectiveness factor. Caution is needed in the application of these factors for different normal tissues and tumors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiobiological properties of different dose components in BNCT are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effectiveness of {gamma}-ray dose depends strongly on exposure time due to sublethal damage repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effectiveness of fast neutron dose depends on neutron energy spectrum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma}-ray and fast neutron characteristics vary between beams and thus weighting factors will differ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weighing factors for boron dose depend on the carrier, the tissue and its mode of administration.

  7. Algorithm for correcting optimization convergence errors in Eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacarias, Albert S; Mills, Michael D

    2009-10-14

    IMRT plans generated in Eclipse use a fast algorithm to evaluate dose for optimization and a more accurate algorithm for a final dose calculation, the Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm. The use of a fast optimization algorithm introduces optimization convergence errors into an IMRT plan. Eclipse has a feature where optimization may be performed on top of an existing base plan. This feature allows for the possibility of arriving at a recursive solution to optimization that relies on the accuracy of the final dose calculation algorithm and not the optimizer algorithm. When an IMRT plan is used as a base plan for a second optimization, the second optimization can compensate for heterogeneity and modulator errors in the original base plan. Plans with the same field arrangement as the initial base plan may be added together by adding the initial plan optimal fluence to the dose correcting plan optimal fluence.A simple procedure to correct for optimization errors is presented that may be implemented in the Eclipse treatment planning system, along with an Excel spreadsheet to add optimized fluence maps together.

  8. Validation of the implementation of IMRT with three dosimetric methods of independent verification; Validacion de la puesta en marcha de la IMRT con tres metodos dosimetricos de verificacion independientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortosa Oliver, R. A.; Chinillach ferrando, N.; Alonso Arrizabalaga, S.; Campayo Esteban, J. M.; Morales Marco, J. C.; Soler Catalan, P.; Andreu Martinez, F. J.

    2013-07-01

    The TG119 is a simple and clear framework to verify the implementation of IMRT technique in a radiotherapy service. Verifications of this document recommended tests conducted with the three dosimetric methods listed above, allow to affirm that our Center is within the margins of tolerance considered suitable in the TG119 for the clinical implementation of IMRT. (Author)

  9. Six years of experience in the planning and verification of the IMRT dynamics with portal dosimetry; Seis anos de expereincia en la planificacion y verificacion de la IMRT dinamica con portal dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Castro Novais, J.; Diaz Gavela, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is the make a review of the method of verification of the IMRT throughout the 6 years of functioning of the service of-radiophysics and radiology protection, analyzing the parameters of each field evaluation to the 718 made IMRT during this period. (Author)

  10. TU-C-17A-09: Multi-Case Knowledge-Based IMRT Treatment Planning in Head and Neck Cancer: Are Six Heads Better Than One?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzetic, S; Lutzky, C; Das, S; Lo, J [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: HNC IMRT treatment planning is a challenging process that relies heavily on the planner’s experience. Previously, we used the single, best match from a library of manually planned cases to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for a new patient. The current multi-case Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy (MC-KBRT) study utilized different matching cases for each of six individual organs-at-risk (OARs), then combined those six cases to create the new treatment plan. Methods: From a database of 103 patient plans created by experienced planners, MC-KBRT plans were created for 40 (17 unilateral and 23 bilateral) HNC “query” patients. For each case, 2D beam’s-eye-view images were used to find similar geometric “match” patients separately for each of 6 OARs. Dose distributions for each OAR from the 6 matching cases were combined and then warped to suit the query case’s geometry. The dose-volume constraints were used to create the new query treatment plan without the need for human decision-making throughout the IMRT optimization. The optimized MC-KBRT plans were compared against the clinically approved plans and Version 1 (original KBRT) using the dose metrics: mean, median, and maximum (brainstem and cord+5mm) doses. Results: Compared to Version 1, MC-KBRT had no significant reduction of the dose to any of the OARs in either unilateral/bilateral cases. Compared to the manually-planned unilateral cases, there was significant reduction of the oral cavity mean/median dose (>2Gy) at the expense of the contralateral parotid. Compared to the manually-planned bilateral cases, reduction of dose was significant in the ipsilateral parotid, larynx, and oral cavity (>3Gy mean/median) while maintaining PTV coverage. Conclusion: MC-KBRT planning in head and neck cancer generates IMRT plans with equivalent dose sparing to manually created plans. MC-KBRT using multiple case matches does not show significant dose reduction compared to using a single match case with

  11. SU-E-P-48: Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Three Different Commercial Planning Systems for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D; Chi, Z; Yang, H; Miao, M; Jing, Z [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the performances of three commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization regarding cervical cancer. Methods: For twenty cervical cancer patients, three IMRT plans were retrospectively re-planned: one with Pinnacle TPS,one with Oncentra TPS and on with Eclipse TPS. The total prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy delivered for PTV and 58.8 Gy for PTVnd by simultaneous integrated boost technique. The treatments were delivered using the Varian 23EX accelerator. All optimization schemes generated clinically acceptable plans. They were evaluated based on target coverage, homogeneity (HI) and conformity (CI). The organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed according to the percent volume under some doses and the maximum doses. The statistical method of the collected data of variance analysis was used to compare the difference among the quality of plans. Results: IMRT with Eclipse provided significant better HI, CI and all the parameters of PTV. However, the trend was not extension to the PTVnd, it was still significant better at mean dose, D50% and D98%, but plans with Oncentra showed significant better in the hight dosage volume, such as maximum dose and D2%. For the bladder wall, there were not notable difference among three groups, although Pinnacle and Oncentra systems provided a little lower dose sparing at V50Gy of bladder and rectal wall and V40Gy of bladder wall, respectively. V40Gy of rectal wall (p=0.037), small intestine (p=0.001 for V30Gy, p=0.010 for maximum dose) and V50Gy of right-femoral head (p=0.019) from Eclipse plans showed significant better than other groups. Conclusion: All SIB-IMRT plans were clinically acceptable which were generated by three commercial TPSs. The plans with Eclipse system showed advantages over the plans with Oncentra and Pinnacle system in the overwhelming majority of the dose coverage for targets and dose sparing of OARs in cervical cancer.

  12. Tl and OSL dose response of LiF:Mg, Ti and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C dosimeters using a PMMA phantom for IMRT technique quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, L. C.; Veneziani, G. R.; Campos, L. L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sakuraba, R. K.; Cruz, J. C., E-mail: lmatsushima@usp.br [Sociedade Beneficente Israelita Brasileira - Hospital Albert Einstein, Av. Albert Einstein 627/701, Morumbi, 05652-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The principle of IMRT is to treat a patient from a number of different directions (or continuous arcs) with beams of nonuniform fluences, which have been optimized to deliver a high dose to the target volume and an acceptably low dose to the surrounding normal structures (Khan, 2010). This study intends to provide information to the physicist regarding the application of different dosimeters type, phantoms and analysis technique for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) dose distributions evaluation. The measures were performed using dosimeters of LiF:Mg,Ti and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C evaluated by techniques of thermoluminescent (Tl) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL). A polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom with five cavities, two principal target volumes considered like tumours to be treated and other three cavities to measure the scattered radiation dose was developed to carried out the measures. (Author)

  13. Trade-off bounds for the Pareto surface approximation in multi-criteria IMRT planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, J I; Monz, M; Kuefer, K H [Department of Optimization, Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics (ITWM), Fraunhofer Platz 1, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Thieke, C [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: serna@itwm.fhg.de

    2009-10-21

    One approach to multi-criteria IMRT planning is to automatically calculate a data set of Pareto-optimal plans for a given planning problem in a first phase, and then interactively explore the solution space and decide on the clinically best treatment plan in a second phase. The challenge of computing the plan data set is to ensure that all clinically meaningful plans are covered and that as many clinically irrelevant plans as possible are excluded to keep computation times within reasonable limits. In this work, we focus on the approximation of the clinically relevant part of the Pareto surface, the process that constitutes the first phase. It is possible that two plans on the Pareto surface have a small, clinically insignificant difference in one criterion and a significant difference in another criterion. For such cases, only the plan that is clinically clearly superior should be included into the data set. To achieve this during the Pareto surface approximation, we propose to introduce bounds that restrict the relative quality between plans, the so-called trade-off bounds. We show how to integrate these trade-off bounds into the approximation scheme and study their effects. The proposed scheme is applied to two artificial cases and one clinical case of a paraspinal tumor. For all cases, the quality of the Pareto surface approximation is measured with respect to the number of computed plans, and the range of values occurring in the approximation for different criteria is compared. Through enforcing trade-off bounds, the scheme disregards clinically irrelevant plans during the approximation. Thereby, the number of plans necessary to achieve a good approximation quality can be significantly reduced. Thus, trade-off bounds are an effective tool to focus the planning and to reduce computation time.

  14. Trade-off bounds for the Pareto surface approximation in multi-criteria IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, J I; Monz, M; Küfer, K H; Thieke, C

    2009-10-21

    One approach to multi-criteria IMRT planning is to automatically calculate a data set of Pareto-optimal plans for a given planning problem in a first phase, and then interactively explore the solution space and decide on the clinically best treatment plan in a second phase. The challenge of computing the plan data set is to ensure that all clinically meaningful plans are covered and that as many clinically irrelevant plans as possible are excluded to keep computation times within reasonable limits. In this work, we focus on the approximation of the clinically relevant part of the Pareto surface, the process that constitutes the first phase. It is possible that two plans on the Pareto surface have a small, clinically insignificant difference in one criterion and a significant difference in another criterion. For such cases, only the plan that is clinically clearly superior should be included into the data set. To achieve this during the Pareto surface approximation, we propose to introduce bounds that restrict the relative quality between plans, the so-called trade-off bounds. We show how to integrate these trade-off bounds into the approximation scheme and study their effects. The proposed scheme is applied to two artificial cases and one clinical case of a paraspinal tumor. For all cases, the quality of the Pareto surface approximation is measured with respect to the number of computed plans, and the range of values occurring in the approximation for different criteria is compared. Through enforcing trade-off bounds, the scheme disregards clinically irrelevant plans during the approximation. Thereby, the number of plans necessary to achieve a good approximation quality can be significantly reduced. Thus, trade-off bounds are an effective tool to focus the planning and to reduce computation time.

  15. SU-F-BRB-14: Dosimetric Effects at Air- Tissue Boundary Due to Magnetic Field in MR-Guided IMRT/VMAT Delivery for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, P; Chen, X; Schultz, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of the MR-Linac enables real-time and high soft tissue contrast image guidance in radiation therapy (RT) delivery. Potential hot-spots at air-tissue interfaces, such as the sphenoid sinus, in RT for head and neck cancer (HNC), could potentially occur due to the electron return effect (ERE). In this study, we investigate the dosimetric effects of ERE on the dose distribution at air-tissues interfaces in HNC IMRT treatment planning. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on planning CT’s acquired for HNC cases (nasopharynx, base of skull and paranasal sinus) using a research planning system (Monaco, v5.09.06, Elekta) employing Monte Carlo dose calculations with or without the presence of a transverse magnetic field (TMF). The dose in the air cavity was calculated in a 1 & 2 mm thick tissue layer, while the dose to the skin was calculated in a 1, 3 and 5 mm thick tissue layer. The maximum dose received in 1 cc volume, D1cc, were collected at different TMF strengths. Plan qualities generated with or without TMF or with increasing TMF were compared in terms of commonly-used dose-volume parameters (DVPs). Results: Variations in DVPs between plans with and without a TMF present were found to be within 5% of the planning CT. The presence of a TMF results in <5% changes in sinus air tissue interface. The largest skin dose differences with and without TMF were found within 1 mm of the skin surface Conclusion: The presence of a TMF results in practically insignificant changes in HNC IMRT plan quality, except for skin dose. Planning optimization with skin DV constraints could reduce the skin doses. This research was partially supported by Elekta Inc. (Crowley, U.K.)

  16. Radiobiology for eye plaque brachytherapy and evaluation of implant duration and radionuclide choice using an objective function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Clinical optimization of Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaque brachytherapy is currently limited to tumor coverage, consensus prescription dosage, and dose calculations to ocular structures. The biologically effective dose (BED) of temporary brachytherapy treatments is a function of both chosen radionuclide R and implant duration T. This study endeavored to evaluate BED delivered to the tumor volume and surrounding ocular structures as a function of plaque position P, prescription dose, R, and T. Methods: Plaque-heterogeneity-corrected dose distributions were generated with MCNP5 for the range of currently available COMS plaques loaded with sources using three available low-energy radionuclides. These physical dose distributions were imported into the PINNACLE{sup 3} treatment planning system using the TG-43 hybrid technique and used to generate dose volume histograms for a T = 7 day implant within a reference eye geometry including the ciliary body, cornea, eyelid, foveola, lacrimal gland, lens, optic disc, optic nerve, retina, and tumor at eight standard treatment positions. The equation of Dale and Jones was employed to create biologically effective dose volume histograms (BEDVHs), allowing for BED volumetric analysis of all ROIs. Isobiologically effective prescription doses were calculated for T = 5 days down to 0.01 days, with BEDVHs subsequently generated for all ROIs using correspondingly reduced prescription doses. Objective functions were created to evaluate the BEDVHs as a function of R and T. These objective functions are mathematically accessible and sufficiently general to be applied to temporary or permanent brachytherapy implants for a variety of disease sites. Results: Reducing T from 7 to 0.01 days for a 10 mm plaque produced an average BED benefit of 26%, 20%, and 17% for {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs, respectively, for all P; 16 and 22 mm plaque results were more position-dependent. {sup 103}Pd produced a 16

  17. Microionization chamber for reference dosimetry in IMRT verification: clinical implications on OAR dosimetric errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Doblado, Francisco [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, RadiofIsica, Sevilla (Spain); Capote, Roberto [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Leal, Antonio [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, RadiofIsica, Sevilla (Spain); Rosello, Joan V [RadiofIsica, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia (Spain); Lagares, Juan I [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, RadiofIsica, Sevilla (Spain); Arrans, Rafael [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, RadiofIsica, Sevilla (Spain); Hartmann, Guenther H [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abt. Medizinische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-03-07

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has become a treatment of choice in many oncological institutions. Small fields or beamlets with sizes of 1 to 5 cm{sup 2} are now routinely used in IMRT delivery. Therefore small ionization chambers (IC) with sensitive volumes {<=}0.1 cm{sup 3}are generally used for dose verification of an IMRT treatment. The measurement conditions during verification may be quite different from reference conditions normally encountered in clinical beam calibration, so dosimetry of these narrow photon beams pertains to the so-called non-reference conditions for beam calibration. This work aims at estimating the error made when measuring the organ at risk's (OAR) absolute dose by a micro ion chamber ({mu}IC) in a typical IMRT treatment. The dose error comes from the assumption that the dosimetric parameters determining the absolute dose are the same as for the reference conditions. We have selected two clinical cases, treated by IMRT, for our dose error evaluations. Detailed geometrical simulation of the {mu}IC and the dose verification set-up was performed. The Monte Carlo (MC) simulation allows us to calculate the dose measured by the chamber as a dose averaged over the air cavity within the ion-chamber active volume (D{sub air}). The absorbed dose to water (D{sub water}) is derived as the dose deposited inside the same volume, in the same geometrical position, filled and surrounded by water in the absence of the ion chamber. Therefore, the D{sub water}/D{sub air} dose ratio is the MC estimator of the total correction factor needed to convert the absorbed dose in air into the absorbed dose in water. The dose ratio was calculated for the {mu}IC located at the isocentre within the OARs for both clinical cases. The clinical impact of the calculated dose error was found to be negligible for the studied IMRT treatments.

  18. TU-G-BRD-03: IMRT Dosimetry Differences in An Institution with Community and Academic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S [Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Andersen, A; Das, I [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cheng, C [University Hospitals Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation outcome among institutions can be interpreted meaningfully if the dose delivery and prescription to the target volume is documented accurately and consistently. ICRU-83 recommended specific guidelines in IMRT for target volume definitions and dose reporting. This retrospective study evaluates the pattern of IMRT dose prescription and recording in an academic institution (AI) and a community hospital (CH) models in a single institution with reference to ICRU-83 recommendation. Materials & Methods: Dosimetric information of 625 (500 from academic and 125 from community) patients treated with IMRT was collected retrospectively from the AI and a CH. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) for the target volume of each patient was extracted. Standard dose parameters such as D2, D50, D95, D98, D100, as well as the homogeneity index (HI) defined as (D2-D98)/D50 and monitor units (MUs) were collected. Results: Significant dosimetric variations were observed in disease sites and between AI and CH. The variation in the mean value of D95 for AI is 98.48±4.12 and for CH is 96.41±4.13. A similar pattern was noticed for D50 (104.18±6.04 for AI and 101.05±3.49 for CH). Thus, nearly 95% of patients received dosage higher than 100% to the site viewed by D50 and varied between AI and CH models. The average variation of HI is found to be 0.12±0.08 and 0.11±0.08 for AI and CH model, showing better IMRT treatment plans for academic model compared to community. Conclusion: Even with the implementation of ICRU-83 guidelines, there is a large variation in dose prescription and delivery in IMRT. The variation is institution and site specific. For any meaningful comparison of the IMRT outcome, strict guidelines for dose reporting should be maintained in every institution.

  19. Professor Hassan K. Awwad; The Father of Radiation Oncology and Radiobiology in Egypt and the Arab World, His Good Deeds Last Forever and Inspire us for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S; El-Badawi, Samy A; Abd Elbaky, Hoda

    2007-03-01

    , Libya, Palastine, Iraq, Uganda, Nigeria and other countries. He himself had many teaching missions in different Arab countries (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and others) for the sake of groups of his students that could not come to Egypt. He served as the head of the Department of Radiation Oncology for more than 15 years (1970-1985), full time Professor in Radiation Oncology and Radiobiology (1985-2007), Professor of Radiotherapy, Alexandria University (1954-1970), Chief of the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Research Institute, University of Alexandria (1963-1964), Chief of the Radiotherapy Unit in the Heliopolis Hospital, Ministry of Public Health, 1985-2007. He was co-founder of the Egyptian Society of Cancer and acted as vice present and head of the scientific committee of the society. He shared the activities of many Egyptian, Arab and international scientific societies. His activities in these societies were great. Prof. Awwad had direct contact with his students that never ended, even after some of them left to work in other places in USA, Canada, Europe or Arab Countries. His students' specialty varied between radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, tumor biology, radiation oncology, medical oncology and surgical oncology. Prof. Awwad had more than 100 published articles on hypoxia and hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, biology of growth of human tumors, biology and clinical models of the time factor in external beam radiotherapy, biology and mathematical models of time factor in brachytherapy, radioactive dynamic cancer studies of plasma protein metabolism, radioactive dynamic factor studies of blood disorders and lymphoma, radiation damage of DNA and normal tissues,head and neck cancer, bladder cancer, breast cancer, cervical cancer and development and optimization of clinical radiotherapy. He had continuous cooperation and collaboration with many of the great scientists and clinicians in Holland, France, United Kingdom, USA and Japan. He continued to exchange

  20. Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Miller, Brigitte E. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Hildebrandt, Evangeline; Nuanjing, Jenny [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); D' Souza, David [London Regional Cancer Center, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Gaur, Rakesh [St. Luke' s Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients with cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ≥2 HT than did those with a dose of ≤34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is

  1. Risk profile for osteoradionecrosis of the mandible in the IMRT era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, Gabriela; Glanzmann, Christoph [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Head Neck Cancer Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Bredell, Marius; Studer, Stephan [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Craniomaxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Head Neck Cancer Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Huber, Gerhard [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head Neck Cancer Center, Head and Neck Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-01-15

    The risk for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible is positively related to bone volume exposed to >∝ 60 Gy. We hypothesized that in combined treatment, surgery may also be a risk factor. The impact of mandibular surgery on ORN in locally disease-free IMRT cohorts was retrospectively analyzed. Between October 2002 and October 2013, 531 of 715 patients with oral cavity cancer (OCC), mesopharyngeal cancer (MC), or salivary gland tumor were treated with the mandible bone exposed to ∝> 60 Gy (mean follow-up, 38 months; 7-143 months). Of the 531 patients, 36 developed ORN (7 %; 1.5 % with grade 3-4). The ORN rate in definitive IMRT MC (16/227) and in postoperative IMRT OCC patients with no mandibular surgery (3/46) was 7 % each; in OCC patients with mandibular surgery the rate was 29 % (15/60, p = 0.002). Marginal or periosteal bone resection was found to be a high risk factor (39 %, vs. 7 % followed by segmental or no resection, p < 0.0001). Marginal or periosteal bone resection of the mandible was identified as the highest ORN risk factor in our IMRT cohort. (orig.) [German] Das Risiko fuer die Entwicklung einer Kiefernekrose nach Radiotherapie (Osteoradionekrose, ORN) korreliert bekanntlich mit dem Knochenvolumen, das einer Dosis von ∝> 60 Gy ausgesetzt wurde. Hypothese war, dass die Chirurgie bei kombinierten Therapien ebenfalls einen Risikofaktor darstellt. Der Einfluss chirurgischer Interventionen am Kiefer auf das Risiko einer ORN wurde in unserem lokal krankheitsfreien IMRT-Kollektiv retrospektiv analysiert. Zwischen Oktober 2002 und Oktober 2013 wurden 531/715 Patienten mit Mundhoehlenkarzinomen (OCC), Mesopharynxkarzinomen (MC) oder Speicheldruesentumoren mit Dosen > 60 Gy am Kieferknochen behandelt (mittlere Beobachtungszeit 38 Monate; Spanne 7-143 Monate). Von 531 Patienten entwickelten 36 eine ORN (7 %; 1,5 % mit Grad 3-4). Die ORN-Rate nach definitiver IMRT bei MC (16/227) und nach postoperativer IMRT bei OCC ohne chirurgischen Eingriff am

  2. Comparative dosimetric analysis of IMRT and VMAT (RapidArc in brain, head and neck, breast and prostate malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Athar Ali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in the recent past has established itself as a gold standard for organs at risk (OAR sparing, target coverage and dose conformity. With the advent of a rotational treatment technology such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT, an inter-comparison is warranted to address the advantages and disadvantages of each technique. Methods: Twenty patients were selected retrospectively from our patient database. Sites included were brain, head and neck, chest wall, and prostate, with five patients for each site. For all the selected patients, both the IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were generated. Plan comparison was done in terms of OAR dose, dose homogeneity index (HI, dose conformity index (CI, target coverage, low isodose volumes, monitor units (MUs, and treatment time.Results: The VMAT showed better sparing of “parotids minus planning target volume (PTV”, spinal cord and head of femur as compared to the IMRT. The lung V40 for VMAT was lower, whereas the lung V10, contralateral lung mean dose, contralateral breast mean dose and mean body dose were lower with IMRT for chest wall cases. Both the VMAT and IMRT achieved comparable HI except for the brain site, where IMRT scored over VMAT. The CI achieved by the IMRT and VMAT were similar except for chest wall cases, whereas the VMAT achieved better dose conformity. The target coverage was comparable with both the plans. The VMAT clearly scored over IMRT in terms of average MUs (486 versus 812 respectively and average treatment time (2.54 minutes versus 5.54 minutes per treatment session. Conclusion: The VMAT (RapidArc has a potential to generate treatment plans for various anatomical sites which are comparable with the corresponding IMRT plans in terms of OAR sparing and plan quality parameters. The VMAT significantly reduces treatment time as compared to the IMRT, thus VMAT can increase the throughput of a busy radiotherapy department.

  3. Efficiency gains for spinal radiosurgery using multicriteria optimization intensity modulated radiation therapy guided volumetric modulated arc therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huixiao; Winey, Brian A; Daartz, Juliane; Oh, Kevin S; Shin, John H; Gierga, David P

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate plan quality and delivery efficiency gains of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus a multicriteria optimization-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (MCO-IMRT) for stereotactic radiosurgery of spinal metastases. MCO-IMRT plans (RayStation V2.5; RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden) of 10 spinal radiosurgery cases using 7-9 beams were developed for clinical delivery, and patients were replanned using VMAT with partial arcs. The prescribed dose was 18 Gy, and target coverage was maximized such that the maximum dose to the planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) of the spinal cord was 10 or 12 Gy. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints from the clinically acceptable MCO-IMRT plans were utilized for VMAT optimization. Plan quality and delivery efficiency with and without collimator rotation for MCO-IMRT and VMAT were compared and analyzed based upon DVH, planning target volume coverage, homogeneity index, conformity number, cord PRV sparing, total monitor units (MU), and delivery time. The VMAT plans were capable of matching most DVH constraints from the MCO-IMRT plans. The ranges of MU were 4808-7193 for MCO-IMRT without collimator rotation, 3509-5907 for MCO-IMRT with collimator rotation, 4444-7309 for VMAT without collimator rotation, and 3277-5643 for VMAT with collimator of 90 degrees. The MU for the VMAT plans were similar to their corresponding MCO-IMRT plans, depending upon the complexity of the target and PRV geometries, but had a larger range. The delivery times of the MCO-IMRT and VMAT plans, both with collimator rotation, were 18.3 ± 2.5 minutes and 14.2 ± 2.0 minutes, respectively (P < .05). The MCO-IMRT and VMAT can create clinically acceptable plans for spinal radiosurgery. The MU for MCO-IMRT and VMAT can be reduced significantly by utilizing a collimator rotation following the orientation of the spinal cord. Plan quality for VMAT is similar to MCO-IMRT, with similar MU for both modalities. Delivery times can be reduced

  4. Comparison of Different Fractionation Schedules Toward a Single Fraction in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Using 3-Dimensional Radiobiological Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Milickovic, Natasa [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Cruz, Wilbert F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Tselis, Nikolaos [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Karabis, Andreas [Pi-Medical Ltd., Athens (Greece); Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was the investigation of different fractionation schemes to estimate their clinical impact. For this purpose, widely applied radiobiological models and dosimetric measures were used to associate their results with clinical findings. Methods and Materials: The dose distributions of 12 clinical high-dose-rate brachytherapy implants for prostate were evaluated in relation to different fractionation schemes. The fractionation schemes compared were: (1) 1 fraction of 20 Gy; (2) 2 fractions of 14 Gy; (3) 3 fractions of 11 Gy; and (4) 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy. The clinical effectiveness of the different fractionation schemes was estimated through the complication-free tumor control probability (P{sub +}), the biologically effective uniform dose, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose index. Results: For the different fractionation schemes, the tumor control probabilities were 98.5% in 1 × 20 Gy, 98.6% in 2 × 14 Gy, 97.5% in 3 × 11 Gy, and 97.8% in 4 × 9.5 Gy. The corresponding P{sub +} values were 88.8% in 1 × 20 Gy, 83.9% in 2 × 14 Gy, 86.0% in 3 × 11 Gy, and 82.3% in 4 × 9.5 Gy. With use of the fractionation scheme 4 × 9.5 Gy as reference, the isoeffective schemes regarding tumor control for 1, 2, and 3 fractions were 1 × 19.68 Gy, 2 × 13.75 Gy, and 3 × 11.05 Gy. The optimum fractionation schemes for 1, 2, 3, and 4 fractions were 1 × 19.16 Gy with a P{sub +} of 91.8%, 2 × 13.2 Gy with a P{sub +} of 89.6%, 3 × 10.6 Gy with a P{sub +} of 88.4%, and 4 × 9.02 Gy with a P{sub +} of 86.9%. Conclusions: Among the fractionation schemes 1 × 20 Gy, 2 × 14 Gy, 3 × 11 Gy, and 4 × 9.5 Gy, the first scheme was more effective in terms of P{sub +}. After performance of a radiobiological optimization, it was shown that a single fraction of 19.2 to 19.7 Gy (average 19.5 Gy) should produce at least the same benefit as that given by the 4 × 9.5 Gy scheme, and it should reduce the expected total complication probability by

  5. Implementation and acceptance of dynamic MLC for IMRT and VMAT; Implementacion y aceptacion de MLC dinamicos para IMRT y VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, B.; Marquina, J.; Ramirez, J.; Gonzales, A., E-mail: bertha.garcia@aliada.com.pe [ALIADA, Oncologia Integral, Av. Jose Galvez Barrenechea 1044, San Isidro, Lima 27 (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The use of Multi-leaf Collimator (MLC) in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for dynamic treatment techniques as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) makes that the movement controls as the speed of the MLC are quantified by means of an acceptance test. The objective determination of the operation regulations of the radiotherapy equipment requires ideally the establishment of the quantitative relationship among the performance deviations and clinical results or some acceptable substitute. Different protocols exist detailed with parameters and acceptance ranges according to the MLC thickness. In our case the acceptance test was carried out for 120-MLC of Trilogy equipment brand Varian. For all the test were used 300-200 Um for each formed beam lets; source-surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. 9 acceptance tests were used each one with different purposes like to quantify, synchronization, stability, complexity, precision, positioning, conformity, dynamic movements for the case of dynamic wedges, consecutive moves, among others, for the measurements were used film badges dosimetry (Gafchromic Ebt-3 scanner Epson expression 10000 XL); additionally the results were compared with a diodes arrangement Map-Check 2 brand Sun Nuclear; that consists of 1527 diodes prepared in a field of 32 x 26 cm located at a distance of 1 cm parallel, 0.5 cm diagonally. All the developed tests were inside the acceptance tolerance parameters when comparing the obtained result regarding the badges and the Map-Check was found a discrepancy of 0.01%, what gives a treatment certainty to the moment to impart volumetric dose in dynamic fields to the patients. (Author)

  6. Radiobiological rationale and clinical implications of hypo-fractionated radiation therapy; Bases radiobiologiques et applications cliniques de la radiotherapie hypofractionnee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, E.C.; Forsythe, K.; Buckstein, M.; Kao, J.; Rosenstein, B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1236, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Recent clinical trials of hypo-fractionated radiation treatment have provided critical insights into the safety and efficacy of hypo-fractionation. However, there remains much controversy in the field, both at the level of clinical practice and in our understanding of the underlying radiobiological mechanisms. In this article, we review the clinical literature on hypo-fractionated radiation treatment for breast, prostate, and other malignancies. We highlight several ongoing clinical trials that compare outcomes of a hypo-fractionated approach versus those obtained with a conventional approach. Lastly, we outline some of the preclinical and clinical evidence that argue in favor of differential radiobiological mechanisms underlying hypo-fractionated radiation treatment. Emerging data from the ongoing studies will help to better define and guide the rational use of hypo-fractionation in future years. (authors)

  7. Comp Plan: A computer program to generate dose and radiobiological metrics from dose-volume histogram files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Lois Charlotte; Miller, Julie-Anne; Kumar, Shivani; Whelan, Brendan M; Vinod, Shalini K

    2012-01-01

    Treatment planning studies often require the calculation of a large number of dose and radiobiological metrics. To streamline these calculations, a computer program called Comp Plan was developed using MATLAB. Comp Plan calculates common metrics, including equivalent uniform dose, tumor control probability, and normal tissue complication probability from dose-volume histogram data. The dose and radiobiological metrics can be calculated for the original data or for an adjusted fraction size using the linear quadratic model. A homogeneous boost dose can be added to a given structure if desired. The final output is written to an Excel file in a format convenient for further statistical analysis. Comp Plan was verified by independent calculations. A lung treatment planning study comparing 45 plans for 7 structures using up to 6 metrics for each structure was successfully analyzed within approximately 5 minutes with Comp Plan. The code is freely available from the authors on request.

  8. The photon dose calculation algorithm used in breast radiotherapy has significant impact on the parameters of radiobiological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petillion, Saskia; Swinnen, Ans; Defraene, Gilles; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-07-08

    The comparison of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm with modified Batho heterogeneity correction (PBC-MB) and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and the mutual comparison of advanced dose calculation algorithms used in breast radiotherapy have focused on the differences between the physical dose distributions. Studies on the radiobiological impact of the algorithm (both on the tumor control and the moderate breast fibrosis prediction) are lacking. We, therefore, investigated the radiobiological impact of the dose calculation algorithm in whole breast radiotherapy. The clinical dose distributions of 30 breast cancer patients, calculated with PBC-MB, were recalculated with fixed monitor units using more advanced algorithms: AAA and Acuros XB. For the latter, both dose reporting modes were used (i.e., dose-to-medium and dose-to-water). Next, the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of each dose distribution were calculated with the Poisson model and with the relative seriality model, respectively. The endpoint for the NTCP calculation was moderate breast fibrosis five years post treatment. The differences were checked for significance with the paired t-test. The more advanced algorithms predicted a significantly lower TCP and NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis then found during the corresponding clinical follow-up study based on PBC calculations. The differences varied between 1% and 2.1% for the TCP and between 2.9% and 5.5% for the NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis. The significant differences were eliminated by determination of algorithm-specific model parameters using least square fitting. Application of the new parameters on a second group of 30 breast cancer patients proved their appropriateness. In this study, we assessed the impact of the dose calculation algorithms used in whole breast radiotherapy on the parameters of the radiobiological models. The radiobiological impact was eliminated by

  9. Local control and intermediate-term cosmetic outcome following IMRT for nasal tumors. An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Yuki [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Head Neck Cancer Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Janssen, Stefan [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Head Neck Cancer Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Glanzmann, Christoph; Studer, Gabriela [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Head Neck Cancer Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Lucerne, Institute for Radiation Oncology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Holzmann, David [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Head Neck Cancer Center, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    This study aims to evaluate local control and intermediate-term cosmetic outcome in patients with cancer of the nose treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From June 2008 to September 2015, 36 consecutive patients presenting with nasal cavity, ala of the nose, or nasal vestibule tumors were treated at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich either postoperatively (n = 14; 3/14 with nasal ablation) or with definitive IMRT (n = 22). Of these 36 patients, 8 presented with recurrent disease after surgery only and 1/36 with N1 disease. Concurrent systemic therapy was administered in 18/36 patients (50%). Nasal follow-up (FU) imaging documentation of 13 patients with preserved organ and >6 months FU offers a pre/post IMRT FU comparison. In addition, these patients' subjective evaluation of cosmesis was assessed. Mean/median FU was 41/33 months (range 5-92 months). Salvage ablation with curative intent was undergone by 3 patients with local relapse after definitive (n = 2) and postoperative (n = 1) IMRT. The 3-year local control, ultimate local control, and overall survival rates were 90, 97, and 90 %, respectively. Subjective and objective cosmetic outcome after IMRT is very satisfying so far. IMRT for nasal tumors was found to be effective and well tolerated. Intermediate-term cosmetic results are good. Radical surgical procedures may be saved for curative salvage treatment. (orig.) [German] Evaluation der Lokalkontrolle und des mittelfristigen kosmetischen Resultats nach intensitaetsmodulierter Radiotherapie (IMRT) von Patienten mit Nasentumoren. Von Juni 2008 bis September 2015 wurden an der Klinik fuer RadioOnkologie am UniversitaetsSpital Zuerich 36 konsekutive Patienten mit Tumoren der Nasenhoehle, der Nasenfluegel oder des Vestibulum nasi postoperativ (n = 14; 3/14 nach Nasenablation) oder definitiv IMRT-bestrahlt (n = 22). Von diesen 36 Patienten zeigten 8 ein Lokalrezidiv nach alleiniger vorangegangener Chirurgie und

  10. SU-E-T-597: Influence of Smoothing Parameters on Dynamic IMRT Plan Quality and Deliverability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigandan, D; Sharma, S; Gandhi, A; Subramani, V; Sharma, D; Kumar, P; Julka, P; Rath, G

    2012-06-01

    To study the impact of different smoothing parameters on IMRT plan quality and deliverabilityMethods: Five previously treated patients of carcinoma cervix were chosen. Planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR) i.e. bladder and rectum were contoured. In each case, five different dynamic IMRT plans with 6MV photon beam were created in eclipse TPS for Varian 2300C/D linear accelerator. During optimization, dose volume constraints and priorities were kept constant and smoothing parameters were varied as follows: 10/5, 40/30 (TPS default value), 80/60, 100/80 and 200/150 in x/y direction. Total dose was 5040cGy in 28 fractions and prescribed at 95% isodose. Plan quality was analyzed by means of coverage index (CI=PTV covered by prescription dose/PTV), OAR mean doses and total monitor units (MUs) required to deliver a plan. In each case, deliverability of treatment plans were verified with I'matriXX ion-chamber array and compared with TPS dose-plane using gamma index of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement criteria. The CI values were 0.9435±0.032, 0.9418±0.034, 0.9380±0.041, 0.9330±0.047 and 0.8681±0.072 for 10/5, 40/30, 80/60, 100/80 and 200/150 in x/y direction. PTV dose maximum decreases with the increase of smoothing parameters and values were 5724.38±106.08 5723.30±131.60, 5708.44±1 16.74, 5697.92±116.82 and 5587.50±189.50cGy. The bladder mean doses were 4027.46±630.40, 3821.62±420.62, 3819.58±427.08, 3813.42±435.02 and 3814.78±438.0cGy. Rectum mean doses were 3839.88±466.02, 3835.52±473.18, 3837.52±472.88, 3839.10±471.20 and 3918.94±469.76cGy. Similarly, Total MUs were 1588±205, 1573±214, 1513±274, 1456±335 and 1219±68. Gamma pass rate increases with the increase of smoothing parameters and values were 99.16±0.21%, 99.07±0.19%, 99.24±0.28%, 99.29±0.29% and 99.75±0.15%. When smoothing parameters decreased below TPS default value, plan quality increases, but deliverability decreases. If smoothing parameters

  11. Evaluation of different calibration curves QA of IMRT plans with radiochromic films; Evaluacion de diversas curvas de calibracion QA de planes de IMRT con peliculas radiocromicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Rodriguez, J.; Martin Rincon, C.; Garcia Repiso, S.; Ramos Paheo, J. A.; Verde Velasco, J. M.; Sena Espinel, E. de

    2013-07-01

    The non-linear relationship between dose and the optical density, characteristic plates radiochromic Gafchromic EBT and EBT2, has been studied by various authors, whose publications are proposed different functional forms that fit the specific values measured curves that allow the full range of useful dose calibration. The objective of the work focuses on evaluating the influence of the use of different calibration curves in the dose measurement for quality control of IMRT treatments. (Author)

  12. Verification of the algorithm of sum of fluences for quality control in IMRT; Verificacion del algoritmo de suma de fluencias para control de calidad en IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela Rodriguez, F.; Camara Turbi, A.; Melchor Iniguez, M.; Martinez Rodriguez, D.

    2013-07-01

    In prior to each IMRT treatment quality control measures face are made to verify the match between the Royal treatment and details of the Planner. verified values of absolute dose at different points of a mannequin, the distribution of doses of all the fields (individual fluences), and the distribution of dose in the treatment full (global creep). This paper compares the distribution of doses for the full treatment measurement with that obtained by combining data from the fluences of the individual fields. (Author)

  13. Solution IMRT static of a radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer with lymphangitis; Solucion IMRT estatica de un tratamiento radioterapico del cancer de mama con linfangitis carcinomatosa cutanea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puertolas Hernandez, J. R.; Iriondo Igerabide, U.; Urraca de la Serna, J. M.; Lozano Flores, F. J.; Pino Leon, C.; Larretxa Etxarri, R.

    2013-07-01

    In breast cancer, the planning of treatment with IMRT technique mode static MLC has been efficient to get a perfect union of doses in the skin between the lower limit of the supraclavicular fields and the upper limit of the tangential fields. The technique Planning requires the creation of auxiliary volumes that allow you to manage the particularities inherent to the tangential fields of breast. (Author)

  14. Validation of static IMRT. TG-119 recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Validacion de IMRT estatica. Recomendaciones TG-119 de la AAPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Sanchez Jimenez, E.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    The implementation of radiotherapy by intensity modulated (IMRT) requires a series of previous checks that ensure the quality of the treatments. There are several national and international recommendations, and of which we highlight the conclusions of the Task Group 119 from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). This work describes the implementation and results of the tests proposed in the recommendations of the AAPM TG-1191, to validate an improved model of our linear accelerator (LINAC) in our Planner system. (Author)

  15. TH-E-BRF-02: 4D-CT Ventilation Image-Based IMRT Plans Are Dosimetrically Comparable to SPECT Ventilation Image-Based Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kida, S [UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); University of Tokyo Hospital, Bunkyo, Tokyo (Japan); Bal, M [Philips Healthcare (Netherlands); Kabus, S [Philips Research, Hamburg (Germany); Loo, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown (Australia); Yamamoto, T [UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: An emerging lung ventilation imaging method based on 4D-CT can be used in radiotherapy to selectively avoid irradiating highly-functional lung regions, which may reduce pulmonary toxicity. Efforts to validate 4DCT ventilation imaging have been focused on comparison with other imaging modalities including SPECT and xenon CT. The purpose of this study was to compare 4D-CT ventilation image-based functional IMRT plans with SPECT ventilation image-based plans as reference. Methods: 4D-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for five thoracic cancer patients in an IRB-approved prospective clinical trial. The ventilation images were created by quantitative analysis of regional volume changes (a surrogate for ventilation) using deformable image registration of the 4D-CT images. A pair of 4D-CT ventilation and SPECT ventilation image-based IMRT plans was created for each patient. Regional ventilation information was incorporated into lung dose-volume objectives for IMRT optimization by assigning different weights on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The objectives and constraints of the other structures in the plan were kept identical. The differences in the dose-volume metrics have been evaluated and tested by a paired t-test. SPECT ventilation was used to calculate the lung functional dose-volume metrics (i.e., mean dose, V20 and effective dose) for both 4D-CT ventilation image-based and SPECT ventilation image-based plans. Results: Overall there were no statistically significant differences in any dose-volume metrics between the 4D-CT and SPECT ventilation imagebased plans. For example, the average functional mean lung dose of the 4D-CT plans was 26.1±9.15 (Gy), which was comparable to 25.2±8.60 (Gy) of the SPECT plans (p = 0.89). For other critical organs and PTV, nonsignificant differences were found as well. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that 4D-CT ventilation image-based functional IMRT plans are dosimetrically comparable to SPECT ventilation image

  16. SU-E-T-807: VMAT Vs. DIMRT Vs. SsIMRT Assessing the Dosimetric Parameters of Cervical Carcinoma Treatment with a 20-Patient Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the dosimetric parameters of cervical carcinoma treatment using 3 different radiation therapy delivery Methods: volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the static-field dynamic multileaf collimator intensity-modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) and the static-field step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ssIMRT). Methods: Twenty patients with cervical carcinoma were selected to be planned with dual arc VMAT, dIMRT and ssIMRT using Monaco 3.3 TPS on the Axesse™ linear accelerator in this investigation. The total dose of the planning target volume (PTV) is 60Gy. The homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), dose volume histograms (DVHs), delivery efficiency, dose of organs at risks (bladder, rectum, and femoral heads), were all measured. Results: Dose distribution in 3 different radiation therapy delivery methods satisfied clinical requirements. Mean HI of PTV with VMAT, dIMRT and ssIMRT is 1.08, 1.10, and 1.09 (p>0.05). Mean CI of PTV with VMAT, dIMRT and ssIMRT is 0.82, 0.8 and 0.8 (p>0.05). For the DVH of V10, V20 and V30 in bladder, there was a significant difference: VMAT>dIMRT=ssIMRT (p <0.05). For the DVH of V40 and V50, there was a significant difference: VMATIMRT=ssIMRT (p <0.05). The DVHs of rectum and femoral heads also reflected a similar characteristic with bladder that VMAT gave a higher dose than dIMRT and ssIMRT in low-dose regions (p <0.05), but gave a lower dose than dIMRT and ssIMRT in high-dose regions (p <0.05). For the delivery efficiency, there was a significant difference: VMAT > dIMRT >ssIMRT (p <0.05). Conclusion: The results show that VMAT has a great advantage in delivery efficiency than dIMRT and ssIMRT, without compromise to the PTV coverage, HI and CI. The delivery methods should be considered under the actual cervical carcinoma radiotherapy situation.

  17. An Expanded Multi-scale Monte Carlo Simulation Method for Personalized Radiobiological Effect Estimation in Radiotherapy: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Wang, Wei; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    A novel and versatile “bottom-up” approach is developed to estimate the radiobiological effect of clinic radiotherapy. The model consists of multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations from organ to cell levels. At cellular level, accumulated damages are computed using a spectrum-based accumulation algorithm and predefined cellular damage database. The damage repair mechanism is modeled by an expanded reaction-rate two-lesion kinetic model, which were calibrated through replicating a radiobiological experiment. Multi-scale modeling is then performed on a lung cancer patient under conventional fractionated irradiation. The cell killing effects of two representative voxels (isocenter and peripheral voxel of the tumor) are computed and compared. At microscopic level, the nucleus dose and damage yields vary among all nucleuses within the voxels. Slightly larger percentage of cDSB yield is observed for the peripheral voxel (55.0%) compared to the isocenter one (52.5%). For isocenter voxel, survival fraction increase monotonically at reduced oxygen environment. Under an extreme anoxic condition (0.001%), survival fraction is calculated to be 80% and the hypoxia reduction factor reaches a maximum value of 2.24. In conclusion, with biological-related variations, the proposed multi-scale approach is more versatile than the existing approaches for evaluating personalized radiobiological effects in radiotherapy. PMID:28322329

  18. An Expanded Multi-scale Monte Carlo Simulation Method for Personalized Radiobiological Effect Estimation in Radiotherapy: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Wang, Wei; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Ping

    2017-03-01

    A novel and versatile “bottom-up” approach is developed to estimate the radiobiological effect of clinic radiotherapy. The model consists of multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations from organ to cell levels. At cellular level, accumulated damages are computed using a spectrum-based accumulation algorithm and predefined cellular damage database. The damage repair mechanism is modeled by an expanded reaction-rate two-lesion kinetic model, which were calibrated through replicating a radiobiological experiment. Multi-scale modeling is then performed on a lung cancer patient under conventional fractionated irradiation. The cell killing effects of two representative voxels (isocenter and peripheral voxel of the tumor) are computed and compared. At microscopic level, the nucleus dose and damage yields vary among all nucleuses within the voxels. Slightly larger percentage of cDSB yield is observed for the peripheral voxel (55.0%) compared to the isocenter one (52.5%). For isocenter voxel, survival fraction increase monotonically at reduced oxygen environment. Under an extreme anoxic condition (0.001%), survival fraction is calculated to be 80% and the hypoxia reduction factor reaches a maximum value of 2.24. In conclusion, with biological-related variations, the proposed multi-scale approach is more versatile than the existing approaches for evaluating personalized radiobiological effects in radiotherapy.

  19. Design study of the ESS-Bilbao 50 MeV proton beam line for radiobiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Parajon, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Abad, E.

    2015-02-01

    The ESS-Bilbao proton accelerator facility has been designed fulfilling the European Spallation Source (ESS) specifications to serve as the Spanish contribution to the ESS construction. Furthermore, several applications of the ESS-Bilbao proton beam are being considered in order to contribute to the knowledge in the field of radiobiology, materials and aerospace components. Understanding of the interaction of radiation with biological systems is of vital importance as it affects important applications such as cancer treatment with ion beam therapy among others. ESS-Bilbao plans to house a facility exclusively dedicated to radiobiological experiments with protons up to 50 MeV. Beam line design, optimisation and initial calculations of flux densities and absorbed doses were undertaken using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. A proton beam with a flux density of about 106 protons/cm2 s reaches the water sample with a flat lateral distribution of the dose. The absorbed dose at the pristine Bragg peak calculated with FLUKA is 2.4 ± 0.1 Gy in 1 min of irradiation time. This value agrees with the clinically meaningful dose rates, i.e. around 2 Gy/min, used in hadrontherapy. Optimisation and validation studies in the ESS-Bilbao line for radiobiological experiments are detailed in this article.

  20. Design study of the ESS-Bilbao 50 MeV proton beam line for radiobiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta-Parajon, M., E-mail: mhuerta@essbilbao.org; Martinez-Ballarin, R., E-mail: rmartinez@essbilbao.org; Abad, E., E-mail: eabad@essbilbao.org

    2015-02-01

    The ESS-Bilbao proton accelerator facility has been designed fulfilling the European Spallation Source (ESS) specifications to serve as the Spanish contribution to the ESS construction. Furthermore, several applications of the ESS-Bilbao proton beam are being considered in order to contribute to the knowledge in the field of radiobiology, materials and aerospace components. Understanding of the interaction of radiation with biological systems is of vital importance as it affects important applications such as cancer treatment with ion beam therapy among others. ESS-Bilbao plans to house a facility exclusively dedicated to radiobiological experiments with protons up to 50 MeV. Beam line design, optimisation and initial calculations of flux densities and absorbed doses were undertaken using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. A proton beam with a flux density of about 10{sup 6} protons/cm{sup 2} s reaches the water sample with a flat lateral distribution of the dose. The absorbed dose at the pristine Bragg peak calculated with FLUKA is 2.4 ± 0.1 Gy in 1 min of irradiation time. This value agrees with the clinically meaningful dose rates, i.e. around 2 Gy/min, used in hadrontherapy. Optimisation and validation studies in the ESS-Bilbao line for radiobiological experiments are detailed in this article.

  1. Multi-wire detector characterization for daily quality control on IMRT; Caracterizacao de um detector planar de multiplos fios para controle de qualidade diario de tratamentos com IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Vilma A.; Watanabe, Erika Y.; Santos, Gabriela R.; Menegussi, Gisela, E-mail: vilmaferrari@uol.com.br [Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo (ICESP), SP (Brazil). Setor de Radioterapia

    2012-08-15

    Several dosimetry devices are being developed for quality control of radiation treatments using modern techniques as, for example, the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). The main function of these devices are to daily quality control of treatments of patients submitted to IMRT technique. The aim of this study is to characterize a type of planar multi-wire detector - DAVID (PTW) - for use in clinical practice. It was evaluated the influence of the system in the radiation beam by measuring the absorption factors and surface dose. We also analyzed the dose-linearity, reproducibility, the dependence with the dose rate and the angle of the linac head. Small errors in the position of the multi-leaf were inserted to evaluate the sensitivity of the system. The results showed that the detector can absorb up to 6.7% of the dose, depending of the energy beam and the field size. A significant increase in surface dose was observed, indicating that individual analysis is necessary for each patient. The system showed good reproducibility, linear response with dose, low dependence with dose rate and low dependence with the angle of the linac head. When small errors were inserted in the position of the multi-leaf, the system was able to detect them. Thus, the detector DAVID proved to be suitable for daily verification of IMRT treatments. (author)

  2. Evaluation of homogeneity and dose conformity in IMRT planning in prostate radiotherapy; Avaliacao da homogeneidade e conformidade de dose em planejamentos de IMRT de prostata em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Juliane S.; Leidens, Matheus; Estacio, Daniela R., E-mail: juliane.lopes@pucrs.br [Hospital Sao Lucas (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Razera, Ricardo A.Z.; Streck, Elaine E.; Silva, Ana M.M. da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica

    2015-12-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the dose distribution homogeneity and conformity of radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. Data from 34 treatment plans of Hospital Sao Lucas of PUCRS, where those plans were executed, were retrospectively analyzed. All of them were done with 6MV X-rays from a linear accelerator CLINAC IX, and the prescription doses varied between 60 and 74 Gy. Analyses showing the homogeneity and conformity indices for the dose distribution of those plans were made. During these analyses, some comparisons with the traditional radiation therapy planning technic, the 3D-CRT, were discussed. The results showed that there is no correlation between the prescribed dose and the homogeneity and conformity indices, indicating that IMRT works very well even for higher doses. Furthermore, a comparison between the results obtained and the recommendations of ICRU 83 was carried out. It has also been observed that the indices were really close to the ideal values. 82.4% of the cases showed a difference below 5% of the ideal value for the index of conformity, and 88.2% showed a difference below 10% for the homogeneity index. Concluding, it is possible to confirm the quality of the analyzed radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. (author)

  3. Development of a quality control system in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT); Desenvolvimento de um sistema para controle de qualidade em radioterapia de intensidade modulada (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Roberto Salomon de, E-mail: salomon@inca.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (PQRT/INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Qualidade em Radioterapia; Rosa, Luiz A.R. da, E-mail: lrosa@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Braz, Delson, E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    The more complex the technique of radiotherapy is, the more refined the quality control must be. The technique of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the technological innovations that gained space in the whole worlds in the last decade whose parameters of quality control are not fully established yet. The present work developed a phantom for quality control in IMRT to be implemented in the routine of the Radiotherapy Quality Control Program (PQRT) of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCa). The device consists of a block formed by several polystyrene slice with TDLs and radiochromic film inserted. It should be sent (or taken) to the Program participating institutions to be irradiated under certain conditions and then be returned to the PQRT., where the discrepancy degree between the planned treatment and those effectively delivered will be evaluated. The system was validated through the test cases and the pilot program preformed in nine radiotherapy centers that perform IMRT in the southeast region of Brazil. (author)

  4. A comparative analysis of radiobiological models for cell surviving fractions at high doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andisheh, B; Edgren, M; Belkić, Dž; Mavroidis, P; Brahme, A; Lind, B K

    2013-04-01

    For many years the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been widely used to describe the effects of total dose and dose per fraction at low-to-intermediate doses in conventional fractionated radiotherapy. Recent advances in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) have increased the interest in finding a reliable cell survival model, which will be accurate at high doses, as well. Different models have been proposed for improving descriptions of high dose survival responses, such as the Universal Survival Curve (USC), the Kavanagh-Newman (KN) and several generalizations of the LQ model, e.g. the Linear-Quadratic-Linear (LQL) model and the Pade Linear Quadratic (PLQ) model. The purpose of the present study is to compare a number of models in order to find the best option(s) which could successfully be used as a fractionation correction method in SRT. In this work, six independent experimental data sets were used: CHOAA8 (Chinese hamster fibroblast), H460 (non-small cell lung cancer, NSLC), NCI-H841 (small cell lung cancer, SCLC), CP3 and DU145 (human prostate carcinoma cell lines) and U1690 (SCLC). By detailed comparisons with these measurements, the performance of nine different radiobiological models was examined for the entire dose range, including high doses beyond the shoulder of the survival curves. Using the computed and measured cell surviving fractions, comparison of the goodness-of-fit for all the models was performed by means of the reduced χ (2)-test with a 95% confidence interval. The obtained results indicate that models with dose-independent final slopes and extrapolation numbers generally represent better choices for SRT. This is especially important at high doses where the final slope and extrapolation numbers are presently found to play a major role. The PLQ, USC and LQL models have the least number of shortcomings at all doses. The extrapolation numbers and final slopes of these models do not depend on dose. Their asymptotes

  5. Radioembolisation with {sup 90}Y-microspheres: dosimetric and radiobiological investigation for multi-cycle treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, Marta; Ferrari, Mahila; Pedroli, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Bartolomei, Mirco; Arico, Demetrio; De Cicco, Concetta [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Orsi, Franco; Bonomo, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Interventistic Radiology, Milan (Italy); Mallia, Andrew [Gamma Unit, Radiology Department, St. Luke' s Hospital (Malta); Paganelli, Giovanni [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    Radioembolisation with {sup 90}Y-microspheres is a new locoregional treatment of hepatic lesions, usually applied as single cycle. Multi-cycle treatments might be considered as a strategy to improve the risk-benefit balance. With the aim to derive suitable information for patient tailored therapy, available patients' dosimetric data were reviewed according to the linear-quadratic model and converted into biological effective dose (BED) values. Single vs. multi-cycle approaches were compared through radiobiological perspective. Twenty patients with metastatic lesions underwent radioembolisation. The {sup 90}Y-administered activity (AA) was established in order to respect a precautionary limit dose (40 Gy) for the non-tumoral liver (NTL). BED was calculated setting {alpha}/{beta} = 2.5 Gy (NTL), 10 Gy (tumours); T{sub 1/2,eff} = T{sub 1/2,phys} = 64.2 h; T{sub 1/2,rep} = 2.5 h (NTL), 1.5 h (tumours). The BED to NTL was considered as a constraint for multi-cycle approach. The AA for two cycles and the percent variations of AA, tumour dose, BED were estimated. In one-cycle, for a prescribed BED to NTL of 64 Gy (NTL dose = 40 Gy), AA was 1.7 (0.9-3.2) GBq, tumour dose was 130 (65-235) Gy, and tumour BED was 170 (75-360) Gy. Considering two cycles, {proportional_to}15% increase was found for AA and dose to NTL, with unvaried BED for NTL. Tumour dose increase was 20 (10-35) Gy; tumour BED increase was 10 (3-11) Gy. In different protocols allowing 80 Gy to NTL, the BED sparing estimated was {proportional_to}50 Gy (two cycles) and 65 Gy (three cycles). From a radiobiological perspective, multi-cycle treatments would allow administering higher activities with increased tumour irradiation and preserved radiation effects on NTL. Trials comparing single vs. multiple cycles are suggested. (orig.)

  6. Cell survivor: Modeling radiobiological phenomena with a new kind of simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Melissa A.

    Despite widespread societal fear of radiation, whether justified or unjustified, and whether related to medicine (e.g., CT scans) or other forms of nuclear and atomic radiation (e.g., nuclear power) there is a fundamental lack of basic understanding of radiation effects on the human body. Different types of radiation are psychologically grouped into the same general fear category irrespective of their different potential to do harm, and this fear is not balanced by their potential beneficial effects. By modeling certain types of radiation biology experiments within a game engine, it is possible to enhance the player's intuitive understanding of radiobiology, both the effects of different types of radiation as well as different environmental factors that can enhance or suppress repair. For this dissertation, a game/simulation has been developed that intends to narrow the gap between public perception and the reality of these physical processes. The building blocks of this simulation are cells, which are damaged by incident radiation, accumulating either single or double strand breaks. They grow and reproduce, and are especially vulnerable during certain phases of the cell cycle (e.g. mitosis). Two dominant damage mechanisms are modeled, along with multiple repair mechanisms, for example, double strand breaks can be repaired by either non-homologous end joining or homologous repair. The output of the developed simulation was compared to data collected in experimental studies and the simulation appears to be a valid representation of the dominant mechanisms of radiobiology, as far as can be determined within the scope of this dissertation. Cell survival curves generated from playtest data display shoulders that depend on the LET of incident radiation, and rest time restores repair capability. In addition to public outreach, the presented code can be used to aid investigators by collecting data during play that can be used as a distributed Monte Carlo simulation

  7. Multicriteria VMAT optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Craft, David; Wala, Jeremiah; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new optimization technique for planning single arc VMAT (volumetric modulated arc therapy). The technique allows the planner to first navigate the ideal dose distribution space created by forming a 180-beam IMRT Pareto optimal surface. The plan that is selected is then made VMAT deliverable by a simple fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm. Our approach offers significant improvements over existing algorithms. The first is the multicriteria planning aspect, which greatly speeds up planning time and allows the user to select the plan which represents the most desirable compromise between target coverage and organ at risk sparing. The second is the (user-chosen) epsilon-optimality guarantee of the final VMAT plan. Finally, the user can explore the tradeoff between delivery time and plan quality, which is a fundamental aspect of VMAT that cannot be easily investigated with current commercial planning systems.

  8. Dosimetric validation of a commercial Monte Carlo based IMRT planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grofsmid, Dennis; Dirkx, Maarten; Marijnissen, Hans; Woudstra, Evert; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-02-01

    Recently a commercial Monte Carlo based IMRT planning system (Monaco version 1.0.0) was released. In this study the dosimetric accuracy of this new planning system was validated. Absolute dose profiles, depth dose curves, and output factors calculated by Monaco were compared with measurements in a water phantom. Different static on-axis and off-axis fields were tested at various source-skin distances for 6, 10, and 18 MV photon beams. Four clinical IMRT plans were evaluated in a water phantom using a linear diode detector array and another six IMRT plans for different tumor sites in solid water using a 2D detector array. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the dose engine near tissue inhomogeneities absolute dose distributions were measured with Gafchromic EBT film in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. For an end-to-end test a four-field IMRT plan was applied to an anthropomorphic lung phantom with a simulated tumor peripherally located in the right lung. Gafchromic EBT film, placed in and around the tumor area, was used to evaluate the dose distribution. Generally, the measured and the calculated dose distributions agreed within 2% dose difference or 2 mm distance-to-agreement. But mainly at interfaces with bone, some larger dose differences could be observed. Based on the results of this study, the authors concluded that the dosimetric accuracy of Monaco is adequate for clinical introduction.

  9. IMRT dose fractionation for head and neck cancer: Variation in current approaches will make standardisation difficult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Kean F. (Academic Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)); Fowler, Jack F. (Dept. of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin, Wisconsin (United States)); Sykes, Andrew J.; Yap, Beng K.; Lee, Lip W.; Slevin, Nick J. (Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom))

    2009-04-15

    Introduction. Altered fractionation has demonstrated clinical benefits compared to the conventional 2 Gy/day standard of 70 Gy. When using synchronous chemotherapy, there is uncertainty about optimum fractionation. IMRT with its potential for Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) adds further to this uncertainty. This survey will examine international practice of IMRT fractionation and suggest possible reasons for diversity in approach. Material and methods. Fourteen international cancer centres were surveyed for IMRT dose/fractionation practised in each centre. Results. Twelve different types of dose fractionation were reported. Conventional 70-72 Gy (daily 2 Gy/fraction) was used in 3/14 centres with concurrent chemotherapy while 11/14 centres used altered fractionation. Two centres used >1 schedule. Reported schedules and number of centres included 6 fractions/week DAHANCA regime (3), modest hypofractionation (=2.2 Gy/fraction) (3), dose-escalated hypofractionation (=2.3 Gy/fraction) (4), hyperfractionation (1), continuous acceleration (1) and concomitant boost (1). Reasons for dose fractionation variability include (i) dose escalation; (ii) total irradiated volume; (iii) number of target volumes; (iv) synchronous systemic treatment; (v) shorter overall treatment time; (vi) resources availability; (vii) longer time on treatment couch; (viii) variable GTV margins; (ix) confidence in treatment setup; (x) late tissue toxicity and (xi) use of lower neck anterior fields. Conclusions. This variability in IMRT fractionation makes any meaningful comparison of treatment results difficult. Some standardization is needed particularly for design of multi-centre randomized clinical trials.

  10. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs c-IMRT in esophageal cancer: A treatment planning comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yin; Bo Xu; Guang-Ying Zhu; Hao Wu; Jian Gong; Jian-Hao Geng; Fan Jiang; An-Hui Shi; Rong Yu; Yong-Heng Li; Shu-Kui Han

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare the volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with conventional sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (c-IMRT) plans in esophageal cancer (EC).METHODS:Twenty patients with EC were selected,including 5 cases located in the cervical,the upper,the middle and the lower thorax,respectively.Five plans were generated with the eclipse planning system:three using c-IMRT with 5 fields (5F),7 fields (7F) and 9 fields (9F),and two using VMAT with a single arc (1A) and double arcs (2A).The treatment plans were designed to deliver a dose of 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) with the same constrains in a 2.0 Gy daily fraction,5 d a week.Plans were normalized to 95% of the PTV that received 100% of the prescribed dose.We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of PTV and the organs at risk (OAR) such as lungs,spinal cord and heart.Monitor units (MU) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of OAR were also reported.RESULTS:Both c-IMRT and VMAT plans resulted in abundant dose coverage of PTV for EC of different locations.The dose conformity to PTV was improved as the number of field in c-IMRT or rotating arc in VMAT was increased.The doses to PTV and OAR in VMAT plans were not statistically different in comparison with c-IMRT plans,with the following exceptions:in cervical and upper thoracic EC,the conformity index (CI) was higher in VMAT (1A 0.78 and 2A 0.8) than in c-IMRT (SF 0.62,7F 0.66 and 9F 0.73) and homogeneity was slightly better in c-IMRT (7F 1.09 and 9F 1.07) than in VMAT (1A 1.1 and 2A 1.09).Lung V30 was lower in VMAT (1A 12.52 and 2A 12.29) than in c-IMRT (7F 14.35 and 9F 14.81).The humeral head doses were significantly increased in VMAT as against c-IMRT.In the middle and lower thoracic EC,CI in VMAT (1A 0.76 and 2A 0.74) was higher than in c-IMRT (5F 0.63 Gy and 7F 0.67 Gy),and homogeneity was almost similar between VMAT and c-IMRT.V20 (2A 21.49 Gy vs 7F 24.59 Gy and 9F 24.16 Gy) and V30 (2A 9.73 Gy vs 5F 12

  11. Fast, daily linac verification for segmented IMRT using electronic portal imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, S.C.; Bolt, R.A.; Dirkx, M.L.; Visser, A.G.; Heijmen, B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) requires dedicated quality assurance (QA). Recently, we have published a method for fast (1-2 min) and accurate linac quality control for dynamic multileaf collimation, using a portal imaging device. This method is in routine use for daily leaf motion

  12. Fast, daily linac verification for segmented IMRT using electronic portal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, Sandra C.; Bolt, Rene A.; Dirkx, Maarten L. P.; Visser, Andries G.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) requires dedicated quality assurance (QA). Recently, we have published a method for fast (1-2 min) and accurate linac quality control for dynamic multileaf collimation, using a portal imaging device. This method is in routine use for daily leaf motion

  13. Time-resolved dosimetry using a pinpoint ionization chamber as quality assurance for IMRT and VMAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwe, R.J.; Wendling, M.; Monshouwer, R.; Satherley, T.; Day, R.A.; Greig, L.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a method to verify the dose delivery in relation to the individual control points of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an ionization chamber. In addition to more effective problem solving during patient-specific quality assu

  14. Fast online Monte Carlo-based IMRT planning for the MRI linear accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, G.H.; Hissoiny, S.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2012-01-01

    The MRI accelerator, a combination of a 6 MV linear accelerator with a 1.5 T MRI, facilitates continuous patient anatomy updates regarding translations, rotations and deformations of targets and organs at risk. Accounting for these demands high speed, online intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) r

  15. Accurate two-dimensional IMRT verification using a back-projection EPID dosimetry method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendling, M.; Louwe, R.J.W.; McDermott, L.N.; Sonke, J.J.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is a promising method for the dosimetric verification of external beam, megavoltage radiation therapy-both pretreatment and in vivo. In this study, a previously developed EPID back-projection algorithm was modified for IMRT techniques and applied

  16. Automated IMRT planning in Pinnacle : A study in head-and-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, J M A M; Bzdusek, K; Kumar, P; van Kollenburg, P G M; Kunze-Busch, M C; Wendling, M; Dijkema, T; Kaanders, J H A M

    2017-08-02

    This study evaluates the performance and planning efficacy of the Auto-Planning (AP) module in the clinical version of Pinnacle 9.10 (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI, USA). Twenty automated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were compared with the original manually planned clinical IMRT plans from patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Auto-Planning with IMRT offers similar coverage of the planning target volume as the original manually planned clinical plans, as well as better sparing of the contralateral parotid gland, contralateral submandibular gland, larynx, mandible, and brainstem. The mean dose of the contralateral parotid gland and contralateral submandibular gland could be reduced by 2.5 Gy and 1.7 Gy on average. The number of monitor units was reduced with an average of 143.9 (18%). Hands-on planning time was reduced from 1.5-3 h to less than 1 h. The Auto-Planning module was able to produce clinically acceptable head and neck IMRT plans with consistent quality.

  17. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham [Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong Hospital, Geelong, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  18. Local confidence limits for IMRT and VMAT techniques: a study based on TG119 test suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M; Chandroth, M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a local confidence limit (CL) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques used at Waikato Regional Cancer Centre. This work was carried out based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group (TG) 119 report. The AAPM TG 119 report recommends CLs as a bench mark for IMRT commissioning and delivery based on its multiple institutions planning and dosimetry comparisons. In this study the locally obtained CLs were compared to TG119 benchmarks. Furthermore, the same bench mark was used to test the capabilities and quality of the VMAT technique in our clinic. The TG 119 test suite consists of two primary and four clinical tests for evaluating the accuracy of IMRT planning and dose delivery systems. Pre defined structure sets contoured on computed tomography images were downloaded from AAPM website and were transferred to a locally designed phantom. For each test case two plans were generated using IMRT and VMAT optimisation. Dose prescriptions and planning objectives recommended by TG119 report were followed to generate the test plans in Eclipse Treatment Planning System. For each plan the point dose measurements were done using an ion chamber at high dose and low dose regions. The planar dose distribution was analysed for percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3%/3 mm, for both the composite plan and individual fields of each plan. The CLs were generated based on the results from the gamma analysis and point dose measurements. For IMRT plans, the CLs obtained were (1) from point dose measurements: 2.49% at high dose region and 2.95% for the low dose region (2) from gamma analysis: 2.12% for individual fields and 5.9% for the composite plan. For VMAT plans, the CLs obtained were (1) from point dose measurements: 2.56% at high dose region and 2.6% for the low dose region (2) from gamma analysis: 1.46% for individual fields and 0.8% for

  19. SU-E-T-643: Pure Alanine Dosimeter for Verification Dosimetry in IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Karmi, Anan M.; Zraiqat, Fadi [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was evaluation of accuracy of pure alanine dosimeters measuring intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions in a thorax phantom. Methods: Alanine dosimeters were prepared in the form of 110 mg pure L-α-alanine powder filled into clear tissue-equivalent polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plastic tubes with the dimensions 25 mm length, 3 mm inner diameter, and 1 mm wall thickness. A dose-response calibration curve was established for the alanine by placing the dosimeters at 1.5 cm depth in a 30×30×30 cm{sup 3} solid water phantom and then irradiating on a linac with 6 MV photon beam at 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size to doses ranging from 1 to 5 Gy. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the absorbed dose in alanine. An IMRT treatment plan was designed for a commercial heterogeneous CIRS thorax phantom and the dose values were calculated at three different points located in tissue, lung, and bone equivalent materials. A set of dose measurements was carried out to compare measured and calculated dose values by placing the alanine dosimeters at those selected locations inside the thorax phantom and delivering the IMRT to the phantom. Results: The alanine dose measurements and the IMRT plan dose calculations were found to be in agreement within ±2%. Specifically, the deviations were −0.5%, 1.3%, and −1.7% for tissue, lung, and bone; respectively. The slightly large deviations observed for lung and bone may be attributed to tissue inhomogeneity, steep dose gradients in these regions, and uncontrollable changes in spectrometer conditions. Conclusion: The results described herein confirmed that pure alanine dosimeter was suitable for in-phantom dosimetry of IMRT beams because of its high sensitivity and acceptable accuracy. This makes the dosimeter a promising option for quality control of the therapeutic beams, complementing the commonly used ionization chambers, TLDs, and films.

  20. Evaluation of IMRT treatments performed in Rio de Janeiro radiotherapy services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Roberto Salomon de, E-mail: salomon@inca.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (PQRT/INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Qualidade em Radioterapia; Rosa, Luiz A.R. da, E-mail: lrosa@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Braz, Delson, E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The Radiotherapy Quality Program (PQRT) of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) has developed a phantom for quality control in IMRT and has implemented it in its routine. It must be sent or taken to the participating institutions to be irradiated under certain conditions and then be returned to the PQRT, where the discrepancy degree between the planned treatment and those effectively delivered will be evaluated. This work aims to show the results of the use of this system to evaluate those radiotherapy services in Rio de Janeiro that perform the IMRT technique. To evaluate the conformity between the planned and delivered dose in the planning target volume (PTV) we have considered two parameters: absorbed dose measured with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) and gamma index of the dose distribution, measured with radiochromic films and a dose analysis software. We have evaluated all the radiotherapy services in Rio de Janeiro that performed the IMRT technique until the period of end of 2011 and the beginning of 2012. Among the nine linear accelerators evaluated, 33,3% of them were out of ± 3% for measured dose in PTV and 50% of them less than 95% of conformity for the 5%-3mm gamma index for the dose distribution. Although IMRT is a high precision radiotherapy technique and its use has spread out quickly over the world, its quality control still needs more attention, as demonstrated with the numbers presented in this work. This sample held in Rio de Janeiro can be extrapolated to other sites that perform the IMRT technique and its use in these services also need to be evaluated. (author)

  1. Individualized IMRT treatment approach for cervical lymph node metastases of unknown primary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, S.; Glanzmann, C.; Studer, G. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Huber, G. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-04-15

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the outcome of risk-adapted planning treatment volumes (PTVs) in patients with cervical lymph node metastases of unknown primary cancer (UPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Between January 2006 and November 2012, 28 patients with cervical lymph node metastases of UPC were treated in our institution with IMRT either postoperatively (n=20) or as definitive treatment (n=8). Nodal involvement distributed as follows: N1 (n=2), N2a (8), N2b (10), N2c (4), and N3 (4). Systemic therapy with cisplatin or cetuximab was added concomitantly in 20 of 28 patients (71%). Radiotherapy using simultaneously integrated boost (SIB-IMRT) was carried out with 2.0 or 2.11 Gy single doses up to 66/70 Gy. Mean/median follow-up was 31.6/30.5 months (range 3-78 months). In all, 15 of 28 patients were treated with unilateral SIB-IMRT (54%). An elective PTV to the contralateral oropharynx and contralateral level II-III lymph nodes was carried out in 8 patients with PET-CT suspected but not histologically proven involvement, recurrences or former tumor of the oropharynx. More extended treatment fields were reserved for patients with N2c or bilaterally N3 status (n=5). The 3-year overall survival, mucosal control, neck control and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 76, 100, 93, and 88%, respectively. No patient suffered from a locoregional recurrence. Two patients treated with radiotherapy alone had persistent nodal disease. No grade II or higher late sequel has been observed. Our single center approach to treat patients with cervical lymph node metastases of UPC with individualized, risk-adapted SIB-IMRT resulted in high locoregional tumor control and was well tolerated. (orig.)

  2. Acute toxicity of whole-pelvis IMRT in 87 patients with localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Bicquart, Celine; Little, Michael; Chen, George; Berilgen, Jason (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (US)); Endres, Eugene J.; Parker, Brent C. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (US))

    2008-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the acute toxicity profile of whole pelvis IMRT (WP-IMRT) for localized prostate cancer. Materials. Eighty seven patients treated with definitive WP-IMRT at UTMB from May 2002 to November 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Treatment consisted of two sequential phases, WP-IMRT to 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction to the pelvic nodes and seminal vesicles and 60 Gy at 2 Gy to the prostate, and a separate external beam boost, 3DCRT or IMRT, to bring the dose to the prostate to 76 Gy. Acute toxicity was prospectively scored weekly during treatment and at 3 month follow-up according to CTC v2.0 for 10 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) domains. The proportion of patients experiencing a given level of peak acute toxicity at a given point is reported. Results. Treatment was feasible with delivered doses to PTVs not significantly lower than planned ones and with only two patients experiencing treatment gaps longer than 5 days. About 2/3 and 1/10 of the patients experienced peak grade 2 and grade 3 reactions at least once during RT, respectively. Frequency/urgency (Grade 2+: 37.9%) and diarrhea (36.7%) were the most prevalent symptoms followed by proctitis (21.8%) and dysuria (16.1%). GI reactions were generally shorter lasting compared to GU ones which accumulated progressively during treatment. At 3 months, almost half of the patients were asymptomatic and most of observed reactions (89.2%) were mild, with GI ones more likely to be fully resolved (92.5%) than GU ones (68.7%, 2, p=0.001). Conclusion. Our approach is dosimetrically and clinically feasible with intense, but transient, acute toxicity

  3. A dosimetric selectivity intercomparison of HDR brachytherapy, IMRT and helical tomotherapy in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermesse, Johanne; Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas; Coucke, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Dept. of Medical Physics, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); De Patoul, Nathalie; Vynckier, Stefaan [Dept. of Medical Physics, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Scalliet, Pierre [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2009-11-15

    Background and purpose: dose escalation in order to improve the biochemical control in prostate cancer requires the application of irradiation techniques with high conformality. The dosimetric selectivity of three radiation modalities is compared: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT), intensity-modulated radiation radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients and methods: ten patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated by a 10-Gy HDR-BT boost after external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. For each patient, HDR-BT, IMRT and HT theoretical treatment plans were realized using common contour sets. A 10-Gy dose was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). The PTVs and critical organs' dose-volume histograms obtained were compared using Student's t-test. Results: HDR-BT delivers spontaneously higher mean doses to the PTV with smaller cold spots compared to IMRT and HT. 33% of the rectal volume received a mean HDR-BT dose of 3.86 {+-} 0.3 Gy in comparison with a mean IMRT dose of 6.57 {+-} 0.68 Gy and a mean HT dose of 5.58 {+-} 0.71 Gy (p < 0.0001). HDR-BT also enables to better spare the bladder. The hot spots inside the urethra are greater with HDR-BT. The volume of healthy tissue receiving 10% of the prescribed dose is reduced at least by a factor of 8 with HDR-BT (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HDR-BT offers better conformality in comparison with HT and IMRT and reduces the volume of healthy tissue receiving a low dose. (orig.)

  4. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Won Woo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eun Jin; Jung, Jae Hoon [Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Lawrence Chin Soo; Song, Chang W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS.

  5. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constanzo, J. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Fallavier, M., E-mail: m.fallavier@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Alphonse, G. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Faculté de Médecine Lyon-Sud, LRCM, F-69921 Oullins (France); Hospices-Civils-de-Lyon, CHLS, F-69495 Pierre-Bénite (France); Bernard, C. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Battiston-Montagne, P. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Faculté de Médecine Lyon-Sud, LRCM, F-69921 Oullins (France); Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Faculté de Médecine Lyon-Sud, LRCM, F-69921 Oullins (France); Hospices-Civils-de-Lyon, CHLS, F-69495 Pierre-Bénite (France); and others

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  6. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Danielle; Chun, Stacey; Follett, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5-7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1-4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread.

  7. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2011-08-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Radiobiological inactivation of Epstein-Barr virus. [UV and X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, E.; Heston, L.; Grogan, E.; Miller, G.

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocyte transforming properties of B95-8 strain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are very sensitive to inactivation by either uv or x irradiation. No dose of irradiation increases the transforming capacity of EBV. The x-ray dose needed for inactivation of EBV transformation (dose that results in 37% survival, 60,000 rads) is similar to the dose required for inactivation of plaque formation by herpes simplex virus type 1 (Fischer strain). Although herpes simplex virus is more sensitive than EBV to uv irradiation, this difference is most likely due to differences in the kinetics or mechanisms of repair of uv damage to the two viruses. The results lead to the hypothesis that a large part, or perhaps all, of the EBV genome is in some way needed to initiate transformation. The abilities of EBV to stimulate host cell DNA synthesis, to induce nuclear antigen, and to immortalize are inactivated in parallel. All clones of marmoset cells transformed by irradiated virus produce extracellular transforming virus. These findings suggest that the abilities of the virus to transform and to replicate complete progeny are inactivated together. The amounts of uv and x irradiation that inactivate transformation by B95-8 virus are less than the dose needed to inactivate early antigen induction by the nontransforming P/sub 3/HR-1 strain of EBV. Based on radiobiological inactivation, 10 to 50% of the genome is needed for early antigen induction.

  9. Light ion production for a future radiobiological facility at CERN: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford-Haworth, Joshua; Bellodi, Giulia; Küchler, Detlef; Lombardi, Alessandra; Röhrich, Jörg; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Recent medical applications of ions such as carbon and helium have proved extremely effective for the treatment of human patients. However, before now a comprehensive study of the effects of different light ions on organic targets has not been completed. There is a strong desire for a dedicated facility which can produce ions in the range of protons to neon in order to perform this study. This paper will present the proposal and preliminary investigations into the production of light ions, and the development of a radiobiological research facility at CERN. The aims of this project will be presented along with the modifications required to the existing linear accelerator (Linac3), and the foreseen facility, including the requirements for an ion source in terms of some of the specification parameters and the flexibility of operation for different ion types. Preliminary results from beam transport simulations will be presented, in addition to some planned tests required to produce some of the required light ions (lithium, boron) to be conducted in collaboration with the Helmholtz-Zentrum für Materialien und Energie, Berlin.

  10. Radiobiology and Reproduction—What Can We Learn from Mammalian Females?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Garcia-Caldés

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation damages DNA and induces mutations as well as chromosomal reorganizations. Although radiotherapy increases survival among cancer patients, this treatment does not come without secondary effects, among which the most problematic is gonadal dysfunction, especially in women. Even more, if radio-induced DNA damage occurs in germ cells during spermatogenesis and/or oogenesis, they can produce chromosomal reorganizations associated with meiosis malfunction, abortions, as well as hereditary effects. However, most of our current knowledge of ionizing radiation genotoxic effects is derived from in vitro studies performed in somatic cells and there are only some experimental data that shed light on how germ cells work when affected by DNA alterations produced by ionizing radiation. In addition, these few data are often related to mammalian males, making it difficult to extrapolate the results to females. Here, we review the current knowledge of radiobiology and reproduction, paying attention to mammalian females. In order to do that, we will navigate across the female meiotic/reproductive cycle/life taking into account the radiation-induced genotoxic effects analysis and animal models used, published in recent decades.

  11. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, April, May, June 1987. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-07-01

    This document is a collection of reprinted technical reports. Partial contents include: Effect of ionizing radiation on prostaglandins and gastric secretion in rhesus monkeys; Characterization of rat prothymocyte with monoclonal antibodies recognizing rat lymphocyte membrane antigenic determinants; Effects of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced condition taste aversion; Ethanol-induced taste aversions; Lack of involvement of acetaldehyde and the area postrema; Dose and time relationships of the radioprotector WR-2721 on locomotor activity in mice; Purification and analysis of rat hematopoietic stem cells by flow cytometry, Plasma histamine and catecholamine levels during hypotension induced by morphine and compound 48/80; Effects of ionizing radiation on hippocampal excitability, Tumor necrosis factor/cachectin is a less-potent inducer of serum amyloid A synthesis than interleukin 1, Protection of mice against fission-neutron irradiation by WR-2721 or WR-151327, Induction of colony-stimulating factor in vivo by recombinant interleukin 1 a and recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha; 16,16-Dimethyl prostaglandin E2 increases survival in mice following irradiation, Selenium pretreatment enhances the radioprotective effect and reduces the lethal toxicity of WR-2721; Rat phantom depth dose studies in electron, x-ray, gamma-ray, and reactor-radiation fields; Wall attenuation and scatter characteristics of ionization chambers at Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute.

  12. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, July, August, September 1989. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    This volume contains AFRRI Scientific Reports SR 89-26 through SR89-39 and Technical Report TR89-1 for Jul-Sep 1989. Partial contents include: Induction of marrow hypoxia by radioprotective agents; Cell-cycle radiation response: Role of intracellular factors; Characteristics of radiation-induced performance changes in bar-press avoidance with and without a preshock warning cue; Norepinephrine-induced phosphorylation of a 25 kd phosphoprotein in rat aorta is altered in intraperitoneal sepsis; Quantitative measurement of radiation-induced base products in DNA using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; Tropism of canine neutrophils to xanthine oxidase; Effects of acute sublethal gamma radiation exposure on aggressive behavior in male mice: A dose-response study; Progressive behavioral changes during the maturation of rats with early radiation-induced hypoplasia of fascia dentata granule cells; Stomach nodules in pigeons; An assessment of the behavioral toxicity of high-energy iron particles compared to other qualities of radiation; L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester treatment of canine marrow and peripheral blood cells; Localization of cyclo-oxygenase and prostaglandin E2 in the secretory granule of the mast cell; Radioprotection of mice with interleukin-1: Relationship to the number of spleen colony-forming units; Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small-bowel shielding; Laboratory x-ray irradiator for cellular radiobiology research studies: Dosimetry report.

  13. Developing free software for automatic registration for the quality control of IMRT with movies; Desarrollo de un software gratuito para el registro automatico durante el control de calidad de la IMRT con peliculas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, F. del; Meilan, E.; Pereira, L.; Salvador, F.; Munoz, V.; Salgado, M.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, as the commissioner of the e-JMRT, a Monte Carlo calculation network for IMRT planning, has developed software for the automatic recording of the image of the film with the results of the planning system.

  14. Effect of averaged of the matrix 2D of ionization chambers and correction in the verification of IMRT plans; Efecto de promediado de matrices 2D de camaras de ionizacion y correccion en la verificacion de planes de IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino Leon, C.; Iriondo Igerabide, U.; Lozano FGlores, F. J.; Puertolas Hernandez, J. R.; Larretxea Etxarri, R.

    2013-07-01

    In this work in addition to measuring the camera response of our detector (PTW seven29) applies correction to different cases of IMRT ENT and prostate and will assess the effect of convolutioner the dose of TPS. (Author)

  15. Investigation of pulsed IMRT and VMAT for re-irradiation treatments: dosimetric and delivery feasibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Price, Robert A., Jr.; Li, Jinsheng; Kang, Shengwei; Li, Jie; Ma, C.-M.

    2013-11-01

    Many tumor cells demonstrate hyperradiosensitivity at doses below ˜50 cGy. Together with the increased normal tissue repair under low dose rate, the pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR), which separates a daily fractional dose of 200 cGy into 10 pulses with 3 min interval between pulses (˜20 cGy/pulse and effective dose rate 6.7 cGy min-1), potentially reduces late normal tissue toxicity while still providing significant tumor control for re-irradiation treatments. This work investigates the dosimetric and technical feasibilities of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based PLDR treatments using Varian Linacs. Twenty one cases (12 real re-irradiation cases) including treatment sites of pancreas, prostate, pelvis, lung, head-and-neck, and breast were recruited for this study. The lowest machine operation dose rate (100 MU min-1) was employed in the plan delivery. Ten-field step-and-shoot IMRT and dual-arc VMAT plans were generated using the Eclipse TPS with routine planning strategies. The dual-arc plans were delivered five times to achieve a 200 cGy daily dose (˜20 cGy arc-1). The resulting plan quality was evaluated according to the heterogeneity and conformity indexes (HI and CI) of the planning target volume (PTV). The dosimetric feasibility of retaining the hyperradiosensitivity for PLDR was assessed based on the minimum and maximum dose in the target volume from each pulse. The delivery accuracy of VMAT and IMRT at the 100 MU min-1 machine operation dose rate was verified using a 2D diode array and ion chamber measurements. The delivery reproducibility was further investigated by analyzing the Dynalog files of repeated deliveries. A comparable plan quality was achieved by the IMRT (CI 1.10-1.38 HI 1.04-1.10) and the VMAT (CI 1.08-1.26 HI 1.05-1.10) techniques. The minimum/maximum PTV dose per pulse is 7.9 ± 5.1 cGy/33.7 ± 6.9 cGy for the IMRT and 12.3 ± 4.1 cGy/29.2 ± 4.7 cGy for the VMAT. Six out of

  16. Dosimetric comparison between Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT vs Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT for radiotherapy of mid esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejinder Kataria

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: VMAT can be a better option in treating mid esophageal carcinoma as compared to IMRT. The VMAT plans resulted in equivalent or superior dose distribution with a reduction in the dose to lung and heart.

  17. Evaluation of DVH-based treatment plan verification in addition to gamma passing rates for head and neck IMRT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Ruurd; Wauben, David J. L.; de Groot, Martijn; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; Bijl, Henk P.; Godart, Jeremy; van t Veld, Aart; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    Background and purpose: Treatment plan verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is generally performed with the gamma index (GI) evaluation method, which is difficult to extrapolate to clinical implications. Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) information can compensate for

  18. Clinical validation of an in-house EPID dosimetry system for IMRT QA at the Prince of Wales Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, M.; Vial, P.; Metcalfe, P.; Downes, S.

    2013-06-01

    In this study a simple method using standard flood-field corrected Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) images for routine Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Quality Assurance (QA) was investigated. The EPID QA system was designed and tested on a Siemens Oncor Impression linear accelerator with an OptiVue 1000ST EPID panel (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc, USA) and an Elekta Axesse linear accelerator with an iViewGT EPID (Elekta AB, Sweden) for 6 and 10 MV IMRT fields with Step-and-Shoot and dynamic-MLC delivery. Two different planning systems were used for patient IMRT field generation for comparison with the measured EPID fluences. All measured IMRT plans had >95% agreement to the planning fluences (using 3 cGy / 3 mm Gamma Criteria) and were comparable to the pass-rates calculated using a 2-D diode array dosimeter.

  19. Efficacy and toxicity of rectal cancer reirradiation using IMRT for patients who have received prior pelvic radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fady F. Youssef, MS

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Rectal cancer reirradiation using IMRT is well-tolerated in the setting of prior pelvic radiation therapy. Given significant risk of local progression, further dose escalation may be warranted for patients with life expectancy exceeding 1 year.

  20. Analysis of Local Control in Patients Receiving IMRT for Resected Pancreatic Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yovino, Susannah; Maidment, Bert W. [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Herman, Joseph M. [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Pandya, Naimish; Goloubeva, Olga [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wolfgang, Chris; Schulick, Richard; Laheru, Daniel [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Hanna, Nader; Alexander, Richard [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Regine, William F., E-mail: wregine@umm.edu [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly incorporated into therapy for pancreatic cancer. A concern regarding this technique is the potential for geographic miss and decreased local control. We analyzed patterns of first failure among patients treated with IMRT for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients who underwent resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for pancreas cancer are included in this report. IMRT was used for all to a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-FU-based in 72% of patients and gemcitabine-based in 28%. Results: At median follow-up of 24 months, 49/71 patients (69%) had failed. The predominant failure pattern was distant metastases in 35/71 patients (49%). The most common site of metastases was the liver. Fourteen patients (19%) developed locoregional failure in the tumor bed alone in 5 patients, regional nodes in 4 patients, and concurrently with metastases in 5 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 25 months. On univariate analysis, nodal status, margin status, postoperative CA 19-9 level, and weight loss during treatment were predictive for OS. On multivariate analysis, higher postoperative CA19-9 levels predicted for worse OS on a continuous basis (p < 0.01). A trend to worse OS was seen among patients with more weight loss during therapy (p = 0.06). Patients with positive nodes and positive margins also had significantly worse OS (HR for death 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.5; HR for death 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.2, respectively). Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting was seen in 8% of patients. Late complication of small bowel obstruction occurred in 4 (6%) patients. Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive report of patterns of failure among patients treated with adjuvant IMRT for pancreas cancer. IMRT was not associated with an increase in local recurrences in our cohort. These data support the use of IMRT in the recently activated EORTC/US Intergroup/RTOG 0848 adjuvant pancreas

  1. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Daniel L; Paliwal, Bhudatt R; Bayouth, John E

    2014-04-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and volume receiving conformity increase for lung. The volume receiving 20% of the prescription dose increased 2-8% for head and neck and up to 4% for lung and prostate. Overall, for head and neck Co-60 ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system.

  2. SU-E-T-580: Comparison of Cervical Carcinoma IMRT Plans From Four Commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y; Li, R; Chi, Z; Zhu, S [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Different treatment planning systems (TPS) use different treatment optimization and leaf sequencing algorithms. This work compares cervical carcinoma IMRT plans optimized with four commercial TPSs to investigate the plan quality in terms of target conformity and delivery efficiency. Methods: Five cervical carcinoma cases were planned with the Corvus, Monaco, Pinnacle and Xio TPSs by experienced planners using appropriate optimization parameters and dose constraints to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. Plans were normalized for at least 95% of PTV to receive the prescription dose (Dp). Dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions were compared. Other quantities such as Dmin(the minimum dose received by 99% of GTV/PTV), Dmax(the maximum dose received by 1% of GTV/PTV), D100, D95, D90, V110%, V105%, V100% (the volume of GTV/PTV receiving 110%, 105%, 100% of Dp), conformity index(CI), homogeneity index (HI), the volume of receiving 40Gy and 50 Gy to rectum (V40,V50) ; the volume of receiving 30Gy and 50 Gy to bladder (V30,V50) were evaluated. Total segments and MUs were also compared. Results: While all plans meet target dose specifications and normal tissue constraints, the maximum GTVCI of Pinnacle plans was up to 0.74 and the minimum of Corvus plans was only 0.21, these four TPSs PTVCI had significant difference. The GTVHI and PTVHI of Pinnacle plans are all very low and show a very good dose distribution. Corvus plans received the higer dose of normal tissue. The Monaco plans require significantly less segments and MUs to deliver than the other plans. Conclusion: To deliver on a Varian linear-accelerator, the Pinnacle plans show a very good dose distribution. Corvus plans received the higer dose of normal tissue. The Monaco plans have faster beam delivery.

  3. High value of the radiobiological parameter Dq correlates to expression of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in a panel of small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Krarup, M; Nørgaard, P;

    1998-01-01

    Our panel of SCLC cell lines have previously been examined for their radiobiological characteristics and sensitivity to treatment with TGF beta 1. In this study we examined the possible correlations between radiobiological parameters and the expression of the TGF beta type II receptor (TGF beta-r...... role for the repair of radiation induced DNA damage in SCLC....

  4. Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Neville, Bridget A. [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Aileen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Schrag, Deborah [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

  5. Small bowel sparing effect of small bowel displacement system in 3D-CRT and IMRT for cervix cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Min Kyu; Huh, Seung Jae; Han, Young Yih [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2004-06-15

    In radiotherapy for cervix cancer, both 3-dimensional radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could reduce the dose to the small bowel (SB), while the small bowel displacement system (SBDS) could reduce the SB volume in the pelvic cavity. To evaluate the effect of the SBDS on the dose to the SB in 3D-CRT and IMRT plans, 3D-CRT and IMRT plans, with or without SBDS, were compared. Ten consecutive uterine cervix cancer, receiving curative radiotherapy, were accrued. Ten pairs of computerized tomography (CT) scans were obtained in the prone position, with or without SBDS, which consisted of a Styrofoam compression device and an individualized custom-made abdominal immobilization device. Both 3D-CRT, using the 4-field box technique, and IMRT plans, with 7 portals of 15 MV X-ray, were generated for each CT image, and prescribed 50 Gy (25 fractions) to the isocenter. For the SB, the volume change due to the SBDS and the DVHs of the four different plans were analyzed using paired t-tests. The SBDS significantly reduced the mean SB volume from 522 to 262 cm{sup 3} (49.8% reduction). The SB volumes that received a dose of 10 {approx} 50 Gy were significantly reduced in 3D-CRT (65 {approx} 80% reduction) and IMRT plans (54 {approx} 67% reduction) using the SBDS. When the SB volumes that received 20 {approx} 50 Gy were compared between the 3D-CRT and IMRT plans, those of the IMRT without the SBDS were significantly less, by 6{approx} 7%, than those for the 3D-CRT without the SBDS, but the volume difference was less than 1% when using the SBDS. The SBDS reduced the radiation dose to the SB in both the 3D-CRT and IMRT plans, so could reduce the radiation injury of the SB.

  6. Characteristic 8 keV X rays possess radiobiological properties of higher-LET radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridhar, Ravi; Estabrook, William; Yudelev, Mark; Rakowski, Joseph; Burmeister, Jay; Wilson, George D; Joiner, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    Electronic brachytherapy systems are being developed that can deliver X rays of varying energy depending on the material of a secondary target. A copper target produces characteristic 8 keV X rays. Our aim was to determine whether 8 keV X rays might deliver greater biological effectiveness than megavoltage photons. Cells of the U251 human glioma cell line were used to compare the biological effects of 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays in terms of relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and DNA damage. The RBE at 50% and 10% survival was 2.6 and 1.9, respectively. At 50% survival, the OER for cells treated with 8 keV X rays was 1.6 compared with 3.0 for (60)Co gamma rays. The numbers of H2AX foci per Gy after treatment with 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays were similar; however, the size of the foci generated at 8 keV was significantly larger, possibly indicating more complex DNA damage. The mean area of H2AX foci generated by 8 keV X rays was 0.785 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.756-0.814) compared with 0.491 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.462-0.520) for (60)Co gamma rays (P X rays produce two to three times the biological effectiveness of megavoltage photons, with a radiobiological profile similar to higher-LET radiations.

  7. [Observation of radiobiological characteristics in a HepG2 cell line with mitochondrial DNA deletion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hengwen; Pan, Yi; Zeng, Zijun; Fang, Liangyi; Zhang, Hongdan; Xie, Songxi; Li, Weixiong; Xu, Jiabin

    2015-06-01

    To study the radiobiological characteristics of a HepG2 cell line with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion. HepG2 cells were cultured in a medium containing ethidium bromide, acetylformic acid and uracil. The HepG2 cell line with mtDNA deletion (ρ(0)HepG2 cells) were acquired after 30 subcultures by limited dilution cloning. The cell survival was then observed in the absence of acetylformic acid and uracil, and the total mtDNA deletion in the cells was confirmed by PCR. The radiosensitivity of HepG2 and ρ(0)HepG2 cells was evaluated by exposure to gradient doses of 6 MV X ray irradiation. The cell apoptosis was assessed following a 2 Gy X-ray exposure with Hochest33342 staining, and the invasiveness of ρ(0)HepG2 cells was measured by Transwell assay. HepG2 cells could survive 30 subcultures in the presence of ethidium bromide, and massive cell death occurred after removal of acetylformic acid and uracil from the medium. PCR confirmed total mtDNA deletion from ρ(0)HepG2 cells, whose α/β value was significantly lower than that of HepG2 cells. ρ(0)Hep-G2 cells showed an obviously lowered cell apoptosis rate following X-ray exposure with enhanced cell invasiveness. HepG2 cells can be induced by ethidium bromide into ρ(0)HepG2 cells with an increased radiation resistance, anti-apoptosis ability and cell invasiveness.

  8. SU-E-T-583: Operated Left Breast and Chest Wall Radiotherapy: A Dosimetric Comparison Between 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, B [AMRI Cancer Centre and GLA university, Mathura, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Roy, S [AMRI Cancer Centre, Kolkata, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Munshi, A [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgon, haryana (India); Pradhan, A [GLA University, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the comparative dosimetric efficacy between field and field 3DCRT(FnF), multiple field Intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) and, partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in case of post operative left side breast and chest wall irradiation. Methods: CT study set of fifteen post-operative left breast and chest wall patient was tested for a treatment plan of 50Gy in 25 fraction using partial arc VMAT, SnSIMRT and tangential beam 3DCRT . 3DCRT FnF gantry angle was ranging for left medial tangential 290±17{sup 0} and Lt lateral tangential l14°±12{sup 0}. For IMRT four fixed beam at gantry angle G130{sup 0} G110{sup 0} G300{sup 0} and G330{sup 0} was used, in case of insufficient dose another beam G150{sup 0} was added. In case of partial arc VMAT, lateral tangential arc G130{sup 0}-G100{sup 0} and medial tangential arc G280{sup 0}-G310{sup 0}. Inverse optimization was opted to cover at least 95%PTV by 95% prescription dose (RxD) and a strong weightage on reduction of heart and lung dose. PTV coverage was evaluated for it’s clinically acceptability depending on the tumor spatial location and its quadrant. Out of the three plans, any one was used for the actual patient treatment. Results: Dosimetric analysis done for breast PTV, left lung, heart and the opposite breast. PTV mean dose and maximum dose was 5129.8±214.8cGy, 4749.0±329.7cGy, 5024.6±73.4cGy and 5855.2±510.7cGy, 5340.7±146.1cGy, 5347.2±196.8cGy for FnF, VMAT and IMRT respectively. Ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20Gy and 5Gy was 23.6±9.5cGy and 32.7±10.3cGy for FnF, 18.6±8.7cGy and 38.8±15.2cGy for VMAT and 25.7±9.6cGy and 50.7±8.4cGy for IMRT respectively. Heart mean and 2cc dose was 867.9±456.7cGy and 5038.5±184.3cGy for FnF, 532.6±263cGy and 3632.1±990.6 for VMAT, 711±229.9cGy and 4421±463.7cGy for IMRT respectively. VMAT shows minimum contralateral breast dose 168±113.8cGy. Conclusion: VMAT shows a better tumor conformity, minimum heart

  9. Radiobiological comparison of two schemes of radiotherapy treatment in high-risk prostate; Comparacion radiobiologica de dos esquemas de tratamiento en radioterapia de prostate de alto riesgo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Hernandez, T.; Vicedo Gonzalez, A.; Pastor Peidro, J.; Rosello Ferrando, J.; Granero Cabanero, D.; Brualla Gonzalez, L.; Lopez Torrecilla, J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to compare two techniques of IMRT for treatment of high-risk prostate cancer. One of the techniques involves a sequential treatment in the that are treated in three phases pelvic nodules, vesicles and the prostate, using a conventional fractionation of 2Gy/fraction (SIMRT). Other treatment consists of two phases which are administered various dose levels simultaneously in each phase (SIB IMRT). (Author)

  10. Comprehensive clinical study of concurrent chemotherapy breathing IMRT middle part of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae Hong; Moon, Seong Kwon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University , Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Songho College, Hoengseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The standard treatment of locally advanced type of mid-esophageal cancer is concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). We evaluated the feasibility of chemotherapy with adding docetaxel to the classical basic regimens of cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiotherapy up to 70.2 Gy using dose escalations for esophageal cancer. It was possible to escalate radiation treatment dose up to 70.2 Gy by the respiratory-gated intensity- modulated radiotherapy (gated-IMRT) based on the 4DCT-simulation, with improving target coverage and normal tissue (ex., lung, heart, and spinal cord) sparing. This study suggested that the definitive chemo-radiotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (i.e., DCF-R) and gating IMRT is tolerable and active in patients with locally advanced mid-esophageal cancer (AEC)

  11. COMPARISON OF THE PERIPHERAL DOSES FROM DIFFERENT IMRT TECHNIQUES FOR PEDIATRIC HEAD AND NECK RADIATION THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Masahiko; Saigo, Yasumasa; Higuchi, Kenta; Fujimura, Takuya; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi; Akiba, Suminori

    2017-02-25

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver high and homogeneous doses to the target area while limiting doses to organs at risk. We used a pediatric phantom to simulate the treatment of a head and neck tumor in a child. The peripheral doses were examined for three different IMRT techniques [dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC), segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)]. Peripheral doses were evaluated taking thyroid, breast, ovary and testis as the points of interest. Doses were determined using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter, and the COMPASS system was used for three-dimensional dose evaluation. VMAT achieved the lowest peripheral doses because it had the highest monitor unit efficiency. However, doses in the vicinity of the irradiated field, i.e. the thyroid, could be relatively high, depending on the VMAT collimator angle. DMLC and SMLC had a large area of relatively high peripheral doses in the breast region.

  12. Investigating the feasibility of 3D dosimetry in the RPC IMRT H and N phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhalkar, H S; Sterling, D [Department of Radiation Oncology Physics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Adamovics, J [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ (United States); Ibbott, G [Department of Radiation Physics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Tx (United States); Oldham, M, E-mail: mark.oldham@duke.edu

    2009-05-01

    An urgent requirement for 3D dosimetry has been recognized because of high failure rate ({approx}25%) in RPC credentialing, which relies on point and 2D dose measurements. Comprehensive 3D dosimetry is likely to resolve more errors and improve IMRT quality assurance. This work presents an investigation of the feasibility of PRESAGE/optical-CT 3D dosimetry in the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) IMRT H and N phantom. The RPC H and N phantom (with standard and PRESAGE dosimetry inserts alternately) was irradiated with the same IMRT plan. The TLD and EBT film measurement data from standard insert irradiation was provided by RPC. The 3D dose measurement data from PRESAGE insert irradiation was readout using the OCTOPUS{sup TM} 5X optical-CT scanner at Duke. TLD, EBT and PRESAGE dose measurements were inter-compared with Eclipse calculations to evaluate consistency of planning and delivery. Results showed that the TLD point dose measurements agreed with Eclipse calculations to within 5% dose-difference. Relative dose comparison between Eclipse dose, EBT dose and PRESAGE dose was conducted using profiles and gamma comparisons (4% dose-difference and 4 mm distance-to-agreement). Profiles showed good agreement between measurement and calculation except along steep dose gradient regions where Eclipse modelling might be inaccurate. Gamma comparisons showed that the measurement and calculation showed good agreement (>96%) if edge artefacts in measurements are ignored. In conclusion, the PRESAGE/optical-CT dosimetry system was found to be feasible as an independent dosimetry tool in the RPC IMRT H and N phantom.

  13. SU-E-T-436: Accelerated Gated IMRT: A Feasibility Study for Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, M; Boussion, N; Visvikis, D [INSERM UMR 1101 - LaTIM, Brest (France); Fayad, H [INSERM UMR 1101 - LaTIM, UBO, Brest (France); Pradier, O [CHRU Morvan, Radiotherapy, Brest (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering a gated Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment using multiple respiratory phases in order to account for all anatomic changes during free breathing and accelerate the gated treatment without increasing the dose per fraction. Methods: For 7 patients with lung cancer, IMRT treatment plans were generated on a full inspiration (FI) Computed Tomography (CT) and a Mid Intensity Position (MIP) CT. Moreover, in order to achieve an accelerated gated IMRT, multiple respiratory phase plans were calculated: 2-phase plans including the FI and the full expiration phases, and 3-phase plans by adding the mid-inspiration phase. In order to assess the tolerance limits, plans' doses were registered and summed to the FI-based plan. Mean dose received by Organs at Risk (OARs) and target volumes were used to compare obtained plans. Results: The mean dose differences between the FI plans and the multi-phase plans never exceeded 0.4 Gy (Fig. 1). Concerning the clinical target volume these differences were even smaller: less than 0.1 Gy for both the 2-phase and 3-phase plans. Regarding the MIP treatment plan, higher doses in different healthy structures were observed, with a relative mean increase of 0.4 to 1.5 Gy. Finally, compared to the prescribed dose, the FI as well as the multi-phase plans were associated with a mean difference of 0.4 Gy, whereas in the case of MIP a higher mean difference of 0.6 Gy was observed. Conclusion: The doses obtained while planning a multi-phase gated IMRT treatment were within the tolerance limits. Compared to MIP, a better healthy tissue sparing was observed in the case of treatment planning based on one or multiple phases. Future work will consist in testing the multi-phase treatment delivery while accounting for the multileaf collimator speed constraints.

  14. Characterization of dose impact on IMRT and VMAT from couch attenuation for two Varian couches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Lee, Andrew K; Johnson, Jennifer L; Zhu, Ronald X; Kudchadker, Rajat J

    2011-03-02

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the use of posterior oblique beams has become common. Beam attenuation by the treatment couch is not negligible when the couch is in the beam portal. In this study, we established the relationship of relative dose vs. beam angle for two Varian 21EX linacs, one equipped with the Exact couch (standard couch) with sliding side support rails, and the other equipped with the Exact image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) carbon fiber couch. Measurements were performed using an ion chamber placed at the center of an acrylic cylindrical phantom positioned at the linac isocenter for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams. Measurements were performed at three different field sizes (3 × 3, 5 × 5, and 10 × 10 cm2), and were repeated with the phantom positioned at different longitudinal locations on the couches. To evaluate beam attenuation by the standard couch in a clinical setting, two test IMRT plans and two test VMAT plans on the standard couch were delivered. The plans were generated with the sliding rails at the "in" position and delivered with the rails at both "in" and "out" positions. The dose difference to the ion chamber was determined. For oblique fields with 6 MV photons, the standard couch attenuated the radiation beam by up to 26.8%, while the carbon fiber IGRT couch attenuated the beam by up to 4.1%. In the clinical evaluation, the highest dose difference between rails set at the "in" and "out" positions was 2.6% in the IMRT case and 2.1% in the VMAT case. The magnitude of potential dose difference has been quantified and could be used for a quick estimation of dose difference due to couch attenuation in IMRT and VMAT.

  15. Propensity score matched comparison of SBRT versus IMRT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oliai, Caspian; Bernetich, Matthew; Brady, Luther; Yang, Jun; Hanlon, Alexandra; Lamond, John; Arrigo, Steven; Good, Michael; Mooreville, Michael; Garber, Bruce; Lanciano, Rachelle

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an attractive option for prostate cancer due to its short treatment duration and cost. In this report, we compare the efficacy and toxicity outcomes of prostate cancer patients treated with SBRT to those who received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods Two hundred sixty-three patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma were included, ranging from clinically very low- to high-risk groups. We retrospectively compare c...

  16. A system for EPID-based real-time treatment delivery verification during dynamic IMRT treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn [Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, the University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Woodruff, Henry C.; O’Connor, Daryl J. [Faculty of Science and IT, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, the University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Uytven, Eric van; McCurdy, Boyd M. C. [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Kuncic, Zdenka [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [Faculty of Science and IT, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, the University of Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Locked Bag 7, Hunter region Mail Centre, Newcastle, NSW 2310 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To design and develop a real-time electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based delivery verification system for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) which enables detection of gross treatment delivery errors before delivery of substantial radiation to the patient.Methods: The system utilizes a comprehensive physics-based model to generate a series of predicted transit EPID image frames as a reference dataset and compares these to measured EPID frames acquired during treatment. The two datasets are using MLC aperture comparison and cumulative signal checking techniques. The system operation in real-time was simulated offline using previously acquired images for 19 IMRT patient deliveries with both frame-by-frame comparison and cumulative frame comparison. Simulated error case studies were used to demonstrate the system sensitivity and performance.Results: The accuracy of the synchronization method was shown to agree within two control points which corresponds to approximately ∼1% of the total MU to be delivered for dynamic IMRT. The system achieved mean real-time gamma results for frame-by-frame analysis of 86.6% and 89.0% for 3%, 3 mm and 4%, 4 mm criteria, respectively, and 97.9% and 98.6% for cumulative gamma analysis. The system can detect a 10% MU error using 3%, 3 mm criteria within approximately 10 s. The EPID-based real-time delivery verification system successfully detected simulated gross errors introduced into patient plan deliveries in near real-time (within 0.1 s).Conclusions: A real-time radiation delivery verification system for dynamic IMRT has been demonstrated that is designed to prevent major mistreatments in modern radiation therapy.

  17. SU-E-T-49: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification for IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, H; Tachibana, H [The National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Kamima, T; Takahashi, R [The Cancer Institute Hospital of JFCR, Koutou-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Kawai, D [Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa-prefecture (Japan); Sugawara, Y [The National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, T [Otemae Hospital, Chuou-ku, Osaka-city (Japan); Sato, A [Itabashi Central General Hospital, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, M [Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM TG114 does not cover the independent verification for IMRT. We conducted a study of independent dose verification for IMRT in seven institutes to show the feasibility. Methods: 384 IMRT plans in the sites of prostate and head and neck (HN) were collected from the institutes, where the planning was performed using Eclipse and Pinnacle3 with the two techniques of step and shoot (S&S) and sliding window (SW). All of the institutes used a same independent dose verification software program (Simple MU Analysis: SMU, Triangle Product, Ishikawa, JP), which is Clarkson-based and CT images were used to compute radiological path length. An ion-chamber measurement in a water-equivalent slab phantom was performed to compare the doses computed using the TPS and an independent dose verification program. Additionally, the agreement in dose computed in patient CT images between using the TPS and using the SMU was assessed. The dose of the composite beams in the plan was evaluated. Results: The agreement between the measurement and the SMU were −2.3±1.9 % and −5.6±3.6 % for prostate and HN sites, respectively. The agreement between the TPSs and the SMU were −2.1±1.9 % and −3.0±3.7 for prostate and HN sites, respectively. There was a negative systematic difference with similar standard deviation and the difference was larger in the HN site. The S&S technique showed a statistically significant difference between the SW. Because the Clarkson-based method in the independent program underestimated (cannot consider) the dose under the MLC. Conclusion: The accuracy would be improved when the Clarkson-based algorithm should be modified for IMRT and the tolerance level would be within 5%.

  18. WE-G-BRB-02: MU-EPID an EPID Based Tool for IMRT Quality Assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quino, L Vazquez; Stathakis, S; Gutierrez, A; Esquivel, C; Alkhatib, H; Papanikolaou, N

    2012-06-01

    A software program (MU-EPID) has been developed to perform patient specific IMRT pre-treatment QA verification using an electronic portal imaging device. The software converts measured images of intensity modulated beams delivered to an EPID, into fluence maps that can be imported in the treatment planning system. The dose can then be calculated in the patient anatomy and compared against the patient's treatment plan for QA purposes. We first benchmarked the software us