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Sample records for radioassay

  1. Radioassay of folates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Givas, J.K.; Gutcho, S.

    1976-01-01

    In the radioassay of folates, the standard is prepared by using folic acid (pteroyl glutamic acid; PGA) as the standard folate at a pH of 9.2 to 9.4. At such pH values, folic acid and 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid (the predominant folate in human serum) have essentially identical reactivity towards folate binders, whereby folic acid can replace unstable 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid standard for such assays

  2. Recounting History through Radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.; Aichele, M.D.; Cahill, M.A.; Estrada, L.; Greenwell, D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a proposed method for using historical documentation to identify unknown wastes resulting from retrieving suspect transuranic (TRU) waste. Identification is accomplished by a historical review of radionuclides identified by radioassay, along with the project controls used to ensure an accurate segregation of TRU from low-level waste (LLW). This paper presents an historical perspective on the identification of radionuclides at the Hanford Site from various waste generators of suspect TRU waste with an emphasis on the Data Quality Objectives (DQO's) and project controls used to ensure the waste is properly classified as TRU or LLW. (authors)

  3. RECOUNTING HISTORY THROUGH RADIOASSAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JASEN, W.G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a proposed method for using historical documentation to identify unknown wastes resulting from retrieving suspect transuranic (TRU) waste. Identification is accomplished by a historical review of radionuclides identified by radioassay, along with the project controls used to ensure an accurate segregation of TRU from low-level waste (LLW). This paper presents an historical perspective on the identification of radionuclides at the Hanford Site from various waste generators of suspect TRU waste with an emphasis on the Data Quality Objectives (DQO's) and project controls used to ensure the waste is properly classified as TRU or LLW

  4. Radioassay services in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belcher, E.H.

    1978-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of an advisory group convened by the IAEA to give guidance relating to the development of IAEA projects involving radioassay are presented. The current status of radioassay services in different countries is reviewed; guiding principles relating to the organization of such services are affirmed, with particular reference to services in developing countries; the needs of services at various levels as regards accommodation, staff, equipment, supporting services and running costs, including minimum initial needs, are specified; operational problems are identified and indications given how they may be solved; facilities for training in radioassay are reviewed; finally, reference is made to IAEA activities in the field in question. (author)

  5. Radioassay in hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, B.I.

    1983-01-01

    In some ways utilization of the computer has enhanced the value of the studies. Its major role, however, has been in simplifying the bookkeeping and calculation of values to evaluate data rather than introducing a capacity to perform new studies. Performance of quantitative in vivo studies utilizing radioactive iron and chromium very much depends on the type of patient population being studied and the background of the referring physician. Even in a highly specialized university center with a referred population, there is still only very limited application of ferrokinetics and blood volume studies. Though blood volumes at one time were thought to be of value to surgeons in most institutions they are now rarely requested. Consequently, except for radioassay of vitamin B/sub 12/, folic acid, and ferritin blood levels, together with the application of the traditional Schilling test and blood volumes in polycythemia vera, this chapter primarily represents an historical review. Platelet and leukocyte studies shall be discussed briefly in the chapter on cardiovascular disease. Quantitating the absorption of iron from the gastroenteric tract by radionuclide techniques is not utilized clinically at present

  6. Automated data processing and radioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samols, E; Barrows, G H

    1978-04-01

    Radioassays include (1) radioimmunoassays, (2) competitive protein-binding assays based on competition for limited antibody or specific binding protein, (3) immunoradiometric assay, based on competition for excess labeled antibody, and (4) radioreceptor assays. Most mathematical models describing the relationship between labeled ligand binding and unlabeled ligand concentration have been based on the law of mass action or the isotope dilution principle. These models provide useful data reduction programs, but are theoretically unfactory because competitive radioassay usually is not based on classical dilution principles, labeled and unlabeled ligand do not have to be identical, antibodies (or receptors) are frequently heterogenous, equilibrium usually is not reached, and there is probably steric and cooperative influence on binding. An alternative, more flexible mathematical model based on the probability or binding collisions being restricted by the surface area of reactive divalent sites on antibody and on univalent antigen has been derived. Application of these models to automated data reduction allows standard curves to be fitted by a mathematical expression, and unknown values are calculated from binding data. The vitrues and pitfalls are presented of point-to-point data reduction, linear transformations, and curvilinear fitting approaches. A third-order polynomial using the square root of concentration closely approximates the mathematical model based on probability, and in our experience this method provides the most acceptable results with all varieties of radioassays. With this curvilinear system, linear point connection should be used between the zero standard and the beginning of significant dose response, and also towards saturation. The importance is stressed of limiting the range of reported automated assay results to that portion of the standard curve that delivers optimal sensitivity. Published methods for automated data reduction of Scatchard plots

  7. Polymeric competitive protein binding adsorbents for radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Serum protein comprising specific binding proteins such as antibodies, B 12 intrinsic factor, thyroxin binding globulin and the like may be copolymerized with globulin constituents of serum by the action of ethylchloroformate to form readily packed insoluble precipitates which, following purification as by washing, are eminently suited for employment as competitive binding protein absorbents in radioassay procedures. 10 claims, no drawings

  8. Measurement quality assurance for radioassay laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurdy, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, the quality of U.S. radioassay laboratory services has been evaluated by a limited number of governmental measurement assurance programs (MAPs). The major programs have been limited to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In 1988, an industry MAP was established for the nuclear power utility industry through the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness/National Institute of Standards and Technology (USCEA/NIST). This program functions as both a MAP for utility laboratories and/or their commercial contractor laboratories, and as a traceability program for the U.S. radioactive source manufacturers and the utility laboratories. Each of these generic MAPs has been initiated and is maintained to serve the specific needs of the sponsoring agency or organization. As a result, there is diversification in their approach, scope, requirements, and degree of traceability to NIST. In 1987, a writing committee was formed under the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N42.2 committee to develop a standard to serve as the basis document for the creation of a national measurement quality assurance (MQA) program for radioassay laboratories in the U.S. The standard is entitled, open-quotes Measurement Quality Assurance For Radioassay Laboratories.open-quotes The document was developed to serve as a guide for MQA programs maintained for the specialized sectors of the radioassay community, such as bioassay, routine environmental monitoring, environmental restoration and waste management, radiopharmaceuticals, and nuclear facilities. It was the intent of the writing committee to develop a guidance document that could be utilized to establish a laboratory's specific data quality objectives (DQOs) that govern the operational requirements of the radioassay process, including mandated protocols and recommendations

  9. Measurement quality assurance for radioassay laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCurdy, D.E. [Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory, Boston, MA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Until recently, the quality of U.S. radioassay laboratory services has been evaluated by a limited number of governmental measurement assurance programs (MAPs). The major programs have been limited to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In 1988, an industry MAP was established for the nuclear power utility industry through the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness/National Institute of Standards and Technology (USCEA/NIST). This program functions as both a MAP for utility laboratories and/or their commercial contractor laboratories, and as a traceability program for the U.S. radioactive source manufacturers and the utility laboratories. Each of these generic MAPs has been initiated and is maintained to serve the specific needs of the sponsoring agency or organization. As a result, there is diversification in their approach, scope, requirements, and degree of traceability to NIST. In 1987, a writing committee was formed under the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N42.2 committee to develop a standard to serve as the basis document for the creation of a national measurement quality assurance (MQA) program for radioassay laboratories in the U.S. The standard is entitled, {open_quotes}Measurement Quality Assurance For Radioassay Laboratories.{open_quotes} The document was developed to serve as a guide for MQA programs maintained for the specialized sectors of the radioassay community, such as bioassay, routine environmental monitoring, environmental restoration and waste management, radiopharmaceuticals, and nuclear facilities. It was the intent of the writing committee to develop a guidance document that could be utilized to establish a laboratory`s specific data quality objectives (DQOs) that govern the operational requirements of the radioassay process, including mandated protocols and recommendations.

  10. The method of thrombolytic radioassay in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yi; Zhao Zhuanyou; Liu Houxiao; Niu Huisheng; Li Huaifen; Wang Yinlan

    1998-01-01

    The similar nature thrombus is made of 125 I-fibrinogen with platelet-rich or antithrombotic blood to culture together with platelet-rich plasma and thrombolytic agent. The thrombolytic rate is calculated depending on the radioactivity of plasma. At the same time, some relative factors with thrombus and thrombolytic effects of recombinant staphylokinase (STAR) is discussed. These results show that radioassay technology is sensitive, stable, specific and wonderful method

  11. Radioassay process using an indium-8-hydroxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedemans, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    There is disclosed an in vivo radioassay process in which a radioactive chelate of indium and an 8-hydroxyquinoline is introduced into a warmblooded animal having an inflammatory reaction in an area in which the chelate would not accumulate to the same extent if the inflammation were not present. The chelate gathers in the inflamed area, for instance, in a body abscess and its location is determined by radio surveying the body by an external imaging technique. (author)

  12. Overnight metyrapone test by plasma corticoid radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Takashi; Araki, Yoshitaka; Kashima, Masaaki.

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of total corticosteroid (cs) and 11-deoxycorticosteroid (deoxy cs) in serum by radioassay after overnight metyrapone test was discussed. 750 mg. (15 mg./kg. weight) of metyrapone was administered at 8 and 12 p.m. and at 4 a.m., and blood was taken at 9 a.m. on the second day to determine the total cs, and the deoxy cs by radioassay. The total cs level in normal human serum is 11.3 to 29.5 μg/dl and the deoxy cs level is 10.4 to 23.0 μg/dl. Determination of the total cs level in serum revealed that cases with less than 6 μg/dl total cs showed apparent reduction of ACTH secretion ability in the pituitary, cases of 6 to 10 μg/dl of total cs required more study of the clinical symptoms and examinations for diagnosis. Gases of less than 8 μg/dl total cs suggested that the pituitary and the adrenal cortical system might be inhibited. In patients with Cushing syndrome, cases of tumor revealed no increase of the total cs level while cases of bilateral proliferation showed remarkable increase of the level. Since metyrapone was administered during the sleeping time, side effects such as vertigo, nausea, depression of the blood pressure and so on were relieved. (Kanao, N.)

  13. Radioassay for serum and red cell folate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, D.L.; Herbert, V.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, reliable assay for serum and red cell folate is described. It uses plain untreated liquid or powdered milk, requiring no special handling or purification, as binder. Such milk makes it possible to ignore endogenous serum folate binder, since crude (but not purified) milk contains a factor which releases folate from serum binder. It simplifies counting radioactivity by employing a gamma emitting isotope of pteroylglutamic acid (PGA), namely the 125 I-tyramide of PGA. Like the 3 H-PGA assay of Givas and Gutcho, it permits the use of stable PGA rather than unstable methyltetrahydrofolic acid (MeTHFA) standards, because it is carried out at pH 9.3, a pH at which milk folate binder is unable to distinguish PGA from MeTHFA, which is the predominant folate in human tissues. The equipment required to do the radioassay is present in most diagnostic chemistry laboratories. Results are essentially identical to the generally accepted Lactobacillus casei microbiologic method of folate assay, except that false low results are not produced in the radioassay by antibiotics, tranquilizers, and chemotherapeutic agents. Three caveats in its use are the relative instability of 125 I-PGA as compared to 3 H-PGA, the fact that various powdered milks differ widely in folate-binding capacity, and that only about 60 percent of commercially obtained skim or powdered milk preparations appear to contain the substance which splits folate from serum binder

  14. Nondestructive radioassay for waste management: an assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmkuhl, G.D.

    1981-06-01

    Nondestructive Assay (NDA) for Transuranic Waste Management is used to mean determining the amount of transuranic (TRU) isotopes in crates, drums, boxes, cans, or other containers without having to open the container. It also means determining the amount of TRU in soil, bore holes, and other environmental testing areas without having to go through extensive laboratory wet chemistry analyses. it refers to radioassay techniques used to check for contamination on objects after decontamination and to determine amounts of TRU in waste processing streams without taking samples to a laboratory. Gednerally, NDA instrumentation in this context refers to all use of radioassay which does not involve taking samples and using wet chemistry techniques. NDA instruments have been used for waste assay at some sites for over 10 years and other sites are just beginning to consider assay of wastes. The instrumentation used at several sites is discussed in this report. Almost all these instruments in use today were developed for special nuclear materials safeguards purposes and assay TRU waste down to the 500 nCi/g range. The need for instruments to assay alpha particle emitters at 10 nCi/g or less has risen from the wish to distinguish between Low Level Waste (LLW) and TRU Waste at the defined interface of 10 nCi/g. Wastes have historically been handled as TRU wastes if they were just suspected to be transuranically contaminated but their exact status was unknown. Economic and political considerations make this practice undesirable since it is easier and less costly to handle LLW. This prompted waste generators to want better instrumentation and led the Transuranic Waste Management Program to develop and test instrumentation capable of assaying many types of waste at the 10 nCi/g level. These instruments are discussed.

  15. Use of protein containing magnetic microparticles in radioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ithakissios, D.S.; Kubiatowicz, D.O.

    1977-01-01

    We describe a radioassay method that involves the use of magnetic protein microparticles composed of a water-insoluble protein matrix containing magnetically responsive material. We define two different types of particles according to the mechanism of action: The substrate is sorbed nonspecifically by the protein matrix of the particle or by a second substance such as charcoal or ion-exchange resin incorporated within the protein matrix of the particle. These particles are useful for separating free from bound substrate. Examples of these are albumin magnetic microparticles for use in a total thyroxine radioassay and triiodothyronine uptake test, or albumin magnetic microparticles containing charcoal for use in a vitamin B 12 radioassay. The substrate is sorbed specifically by a binding protein incorporated within the matrix of the particles. The binding protein can include antibodies or other specific nonimmune proteins. Particles of this type are useful in solid-phase radioassays. These particles are exemplified by albumin magnetic microparticles containing sockeye salmon serum, used in a solid-phase B 12 radioassay. We discuss the methods for the preparation of both types of magnetic microparticles and their use in radioassays. We describe a unique inexpensive magnetic separation rack, which provides simple, fast, and reproducible separation of the magnetic microparticles from their suspending medium during the assay

  16. Radioassay of vitamin B-12 employing bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, N.; Fries, J.E.; Richards, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Radioassay for vitamin B-12 using the unknown quantity of non-radioactive vitamin B-12 released from serum mixed with the radioactivity of a known quantity of radioactive vitamin B-12 tracer. A solution of intrinsic factor having a binding capacity less than the quantity of serum vitamin B-12 and radioactive vitamin B-12 is used to bind a portion of the vitamin B-12 mixture. The vitamin B-12 not bound to intrinsic factor is removed by addition of a bentonite-containing tablet. The quantity of radioactive vitamin B-12 bound to intrinsic factor is compared with standard values and the unknown serum vitamin B-12 obtained. In the steps of the procedure the acid assay medium is pre-combined with the radioactive tracer so that the radioactive vitamin B-12 tracer receives the same treatment as serum vitamin B-12. Certain of the other reagent solutions are pre-combined and the concentration of the components adjusted so that the volume used of each of these other reagent solutions is the same in different assay steps. Thus, fewer pipetting steps are necessary. 7 claims, 1 drawing figure

  17. Simultaneous radioassay of folate and vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An improved simultaneous radioassay for folate and vitamin B 12 in biological specimens is described. A sample containing folate and vitamin B 12 is contacted with 125 I-folate and 57 Co-vitamin B 12 and their respective specific binders. After separation of the bound and free portions, the radioactivity in the portions is counted and the amounts of folate and vitamin B 12 then determined from standard curves. (U.K.)

  18. Simultaneous radioassay of serum vitamin B12 and folic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutcho, S.; Mansbach, L.

    1977-01-01

    The radioassays of vitamin B 12 and folic acid can be carried out in a single tube to give the simultaneous assay of both vitamins in 100 μl of serum. Release of bound vitamins from their endogenous binders and the destruction of these binders are effected by a heating step at pH 9.3. The subsequent binding reactions with hog intrinsic factor and milk binder protein proceed advantageously and simultaneously in the same tube at pH 9.3. A single set of dual reagents replaces two sets of reagents that would normally be used for separate radioassays. Complete separation of bound radioactivities, [ 57 Co] cyanocobalamin and 125 I-labeled folate derivative, is obtained in a dual-channel gamma counter with no requirement for any correction for spill-over of counting data. Analytical results are comparable to those found for previously developed individual radioassays. The simultaneous assay has decreased technical time of analysis for these interrelated vitamins by about 50%

  19. Simultaneous radioassay of folate and vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutcho, S.; Mansbach, L.

    1979-01-01

    A serum sample is heated at an alkaline pH to release folate and vitamin B 12 from endogenous binders. A simultaneous radioassay for folate and vitamin B 12 is effected by contacting the sample with binder for folate, binder for vitamin B 12 , folote labeled with one radioactive isotope and vitamin B 12 labeled with another radioacitve isotope, followed by separation of bound and free portions, and determination of the radioactivity of at least one of the portions. The amounts of folate and vitamin B 12 present in the sample may be determined from standard curves

  20. Validity of transcobalamin II-based radioassay for the determination of serum vitamin B12 concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paltridge, G.; Rudzki, Z.; Ryall, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    A valid radioassay for the estimation of serum vitamin B 12 in the presence of naturally occurring vitamin B 12 (= cobalamin) analogues can be operated if serum transcobalamin II (TC II) is used as the binding protein. Serum samples that gave diagnostically discrepant results when their vitamin B 12 content was analysed (i) by a commercial radioassay known to be susceptible to interference from cobalamin analogues, and (ii) by microbiological assay, were further analysed by an alternative radioassay which uses the transcobalamins (principally TC II) of diluted normal serum as the assay binding protein. Concordance between the results from microbiological assay and the TC II-based radioassay was found in all cases. In an extended study over a three-year period, all routine serum samples sent for vitamin B 12 analysis that had a vitamin B 12 content of less than 320 ng/l by the TC II-based radioassay (reference range 200-850 ng/l) were reanalysed using an established microbiological method. Over 1000 samples were thus analysed. The data are presented to demonstrate the validity of the TC II-based radioassay results in this group of patients, serum samples from which are most likely to produce diagnostically erroneous vitamin B 12 results when analysed by a radioassay that is less specific for cobalamins. (author)

  1. Detergent activation of the binding protein in the folate radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1982-01-01

    A minor cow's whey protein associated with β-lactoglobulin is used as binding protein in the competitive radioassay for serum and erythrocyte folate. Seeking to optimize the assay, we tested the performance of binder solutions of increasing purity. The folate binding protein was isolated from cow's whey by means of CM-Sepharose CL-6B cation-exchange chromatography, and further purified on a methotrexate-AH-Sepharose 4B affinity matrix. In contrast to β-lactoglobulin, the purified protein did not bind folate unless the detergents cetyltrimethylammonium (10 mmol/Ll) or Triton X-100 (1 g/L) were present. Such detergent activation was not needed in the presence of serum. There seems to be a striking analogy between these phenomena and the well-known reactivation of certain purified membrane-derived enzymes by surfactants

  2. Uncertainty analysis of a nondestructive radioassay system for transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, Y.D.; Blackwood, L.G.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Radioassay of transuranic waste in 207 liter drums currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is achieved using a Passive Active Neutron (PAN) nondestructive assay system. In order to meet data quality assurance requirements for shipping and eventual permanent storage of these drums at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico, the total uncertainty of the PAN system measurements must be assessed. In particular, the uncertainty calculations are required to include the effects of variations in waste matrix parameters and related variables on the final measurement results. Because of the complexities involved in introducing waste matrix parameter effects into the uncertainty calculations, standard methods of analysis (e.g., experimentation followed by propagation of errors) could not be implemented. Instead, a modified statistical sampling and verification approach was developed. In this modified approach the total performance of the PAN system is simulated using computer models of the assay system and the resultant output is compared with the known input to assess the total uncertainty. This paper describes the simulation process and illustrates its application to waste comprised of weapons grade plutonium-contaminated graphite molds

  3. The Marshall Islands radioassay quality assurance program. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, T.F.; Robison, W.L.; Kehl, S.; Stoker, A.C.; Conrado, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive quality assurance program to provide high quality data and assessments in support of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Program has been developed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Quality assurance objectives begin with the premise of providing integrated and cost-effective program support (to meet wide-ranging programmatic needs, scientific peer review, and build public confidence) and continue through from design and implementation of large-scale field programs, sampling and sample preparation, radiometric and chemical analyses, documentation of quality assurance/quality control practices, exposure assessments, and dose/risk assessments until publication. The basic structure of the radioassay quality assurance/quality control program can be divided into four essential elements: (1) sample and data integrity control, (2) instrument validation and calibration, (3) method performance testing, validation, development and documentation, and (4) periodic peer review and on-site assessments. While the quality assurance objectives are tailored towards a single research program and the evaluation of major exposure pathways/critical radionuclides pertinent to the Marshall Islands, quality assurance practices that are consistent with proposed criteria designed for laboratory accreditation were attempted to be developed. (author)

  4. A rapid radioassay for human IgG produced in lymphocyte in vitro culture systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weightman, D.R.; Shale, D.J.; Tomlinson, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Protein A bearing Staphylococcus aureus was used to develop a solid-phase radioassay for IgG immunoglobulins. The assay was specifically optimised for use in vitro human lymphocyte culture work. Compared with a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for IgG produced in lymphocyte culture, this assay had a similar performance profile and the advantages of rapidity and technical ease. (Auth.)

  5. Present status and problems in facilities and management in vitro radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaka, Tadako

    1979-01-01

    A questionaire survey of the quality control and the radiation control was performed on the laboratories of 34 university hospitals, 29 community hospitals, 4 research institutes and 9 commercial radioassay laboratories as well. 1) Management of the usage of radioisotopes. In 79% of the laboratories, the usage of radioisotope including the purchasing and discarding, was under the control of centralized organization, such as the central radioisotope division. The radioassays were performed by full time physicians in 18.9% and by technologists in 72.4% of the surveyed laboratories. 2) Management of instruments. 90.8% of the laboratories has a regular program for background counting, examination for contamination and energy spectrum adjustment. The measurement of radioactivity and calculation of the data were carried out on an automated system in a majority of the laboratories: the percentage of the use of these automated systems were 92.1% for measurement, and 76.3% for calculation respectively. The automated system, however, which covers entire procedure: pipeting of samples and reagents, and B/F separation was used in only 7.9 - 18.4%. 3) Quality control. 89.5% of the laboratory had a specific quality control program for radioassay. Main causes of errors they had encountered were: problems in commercial kits, handling of samples, instrument performance, technical and clerical errors in that order. To prevent these errors, it was thought important to establish the detailed protocols for the radioassay performance. (author)

  6. Comparison of radioassay and microbiological assay for serum folate, with clinical assessment of discrepant results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baril, L.; Carmel, R.

    1978-01-01

    Folate assays by use of radiolabeled folate provide obvious practical advantages over the standard microbiological assay, but remain incompletely tested. We therefore compared results for 415 sera with a kit involving 3 H-labeled folate and the Lactobacillus casei microbiological method. We examined the patients' data when there were discrepancies between the two methods. Although the correlation overall was satisfactory, results were discrepant in 25% of cases. In 74% of the latter, the radioassay result appeared to be the correct one, primarily because L. casei results were suppressed by antibiotics being taken by the patient. The radioassay occasionally gave falsely high values for patients with liver disease and falsely low ones for patients who had received isotopes for scanning purposes. Several assay kits that make use of 125 I- or 75 Se-labeled folate were also tested. Although these results correlated with the results of 3 H-labeled folate assay, various problems appeared, including the possible need for serum-supernate control tubes in one kit. Answers to these and other questions and careful clinical correlation of results are needed for any folate radioassays before their adoption for routine clinical use

  7. Use of vitamin B12 radioassay in the analysis of biological materials, mainly of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralova, B.; Rauch, P.; Cerna, J.

    1982-01-01

    Vitamin B 12 was determined in biological materials by three basically different methods: microbiological assay with Lactobacillus leichmannii, microbiological assay with Escherichia coli and radioassay. The method with E. coli has a relatively low sensitivity to vitamin B 12 and in some cases of vitamin B 12 determination in microbial materials it can be used only after a separation of the interfering substances by gel chromatography. The procedure is suitable for orientational determinations of vitamin B 12 because it is very little affected by external factors. The assay with L. leichmannii is universal owing to its high specifity and sensitivity to vitamin B 12 . The main disadvantage of the latter procedure depends on the high requirements for a clean atmosphere which can be maintained in laboratories in industrial areas only with difficulties. These limitations do not apply to the quick and sensitive radioassay. The radioassay can be used after a suitable adjustment of the working procedure for large series of analyses of biological materials without any preliminary separational techniques. (author)

  8. Quantification of antibiotic drug potency by a two-compartment radioassay of bacterial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonkitticharoen, V.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Kirchner, P.T.

    1990-01-01

    The two-compartment radioassay for microbial kinetics based on continuous measurement of the 14 CO 2 released by bacterial metabolism of 14C-labeled substrate offers a valuable approach to testing the potency of antimicrobial drugs. By using a previously validated radioassay with gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, a group of protein synthesis inhibitors was evaluated for their effect on microbial growth kinetics. All tested drugs induced changes in both the slopes and intercepts of the growth curves. An exponential growth model was applied to quantify the drug effect on the processes of bacterial 14 CO 2 liberation and cell generation. The response was measured in terms of a generation rate constant. A linear dependence of the generation rate constant on the dose of spectinomycin was observed with Escherichia coli. Sigmoidal-shaped curves were found in the assays of chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The implications of dose-response curves are discussed on the basis of the receptor site concept for drug action. The assay sensitivities for chloramphenicol and tetracycline were similar to those obtained by the cell counting method, but the sensitivity of the radioassay was at least 10 times greater for spectinomycin

  9. Results with commercial radioassay kits compared with microbiological assay of folate in serum and whole-blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGown, E.L.; Lewis, C.M.; Dong, M.H.; Sauberlich, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Results with three commercial folate radioassay kits [Bio-Rad, New England Nuclear (NEN), and RIA Products] were compared with those by microbiological assay for more than 200 samples of human serum and whole blood. All but one kit (NEN) compared favorably with the microbiological assay for serum samples, although there were notable diagnostic discrepancies. Two kits (NEN and Bio-Rad) were tested on whole-blood samples; both yielded values significantly higher than those by microbiological assay. The frequency distributions of erythrocyte folate data differed strikingly between the two kits; the NEN method yielded a much narrower range of normal values than did either the Bio-Rad or the microbiological assay. Radioassay kits appear to be suitable diagnostic agents for serum folate, if the behavior of a particular kit is investigated thoroughly before its routine use. However, the diagnostic value of radioassays of erythrocyte folate needs to be validated

  10. Development of the remote-handled transuranic waste radioassay data quality objectives. An evaluation of RH-TRU waste inventories, characteristics, radioassay methods and capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, A.M.; Chapman, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant will accept remote-handled transuranic waste as early as October of 2001. Several tasks must be accomplished to meet this schedule, one of which is the development of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) and corresponding Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the assay of radioisotopes in RH-TRU waste. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was assigned the task of providing to the DOE QAO, information necessary to aide in the development of DQOs for the radioassay of RH-TRU waste. Consistent with the DQO process, information needed and presented in this report includes: identification of RH-TRU generator site radionuclide data that may have potential significance to the performance of the WIPP repository or transportation requirements; evaluation of existing methods to measure the identified isotopic and quantitative radionuclide data; evaluation of existing data as a function of site waste streams using documented site information on fuel burnup, radioisotope processing and reprocessing, special research and development activities, measurement collection efforts, and acceptable knowledge; and the current status of technologies and capabilities at site facilities for the identification and assay of radionuclides in RH-TRU waste streams. This report is intended to provide guidance in developing the RH-TRU waste radioassay DQOs, first by establishing a baseline from which to work, second, by identifying needs to fill in the gaps between what is known and achievable today and that which will be required before DQOs can be formulated, and third, by recommending measures that should be taken to assure that the DQOs in fact balance risk and cost with an achievable degree of certainty.

  11. Development of the remote-handled transuranic waste radioassay data quality objectives. An evaluation of RH-TRU waste inventories, characteristics, radioassay methods and capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, A.M.; Chapman, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant will accept remote-handled transuranic waste as early as October of 2001. Several tasks must be accomplished to meet this schedule, one of which is the development of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) and corresponding Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the assay of radioisotopes in RH-TRU waste. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was assigned the task of providing to the DOE QAO, information necessary to aide in the development of DQOs for the radioassay of RH-TRU waste. Consistent with the DQO process, information needed and presented in this report includes: identification of RH-TRU generator site radionuclide data that may have potential significance to the performance of the WIPP repository or transportation requirements; evaluation of existing methods to measure the identified isotopic and quantitative radionuclide data; evaluation of existing data as a function of site waste streams using documented site information on fuel burnup, radioisotope processing and reprocessing, special research and development activities, measurement collection efforts, and acceptable knowledge; and the current status of technologies and capabilities at site facilities for the identification and assay of radionuclides in RH-TRU waste streams. This report is intended to provide guidance in developing the RH-TRU waste radioassay DQOs, first by establishing a baseline from which to work, second, by identifying needs to fill in the gaps between what is known and achievable today and that which will be required before DQOs can be formulated, and third, by recommending measures that should be taken to assure that the DQOs in fact balance risk and cost with an achievable degree of certainty

  12. Studies on folate binding and a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate using goat milk as binding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyasena, R.D.; Weerasekera, D.A.; Hettiaratchi, N.; Wikramanayake, T.W.; Sri Lanka Univ., Peradeniya Campus. Nuclear Medicine Unit)

    1977-01-01

    Preparations of cow, goat, buffalo, and human milk in addition to pig plasma were tested for folate binding properties. Of these, only pig plasma and goat milk showed sufficient binding to enable use as binding agents in a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate. The binding of folate by cow mild preparations in particular was found to be very poor. (orig.) [de

  13. Cold labelled substrate and estimation of cholesterol esterification rate in lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobiasova, M.; Schuetzova, M.

    1986-01-01

    A new method is described of cold labelling of blood serum, plasma and body fluids containing lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and/or lipoproteins for radioassay to assess the cholesterol esterification rate. The method uses the principle of transfer, in refrigeration conditions, of 14 C-cholesterol from filter paper discs to the fluids. The preparation of the disc guarantees homogeneous labelling and high stability. The use of the labelling disc was shown to be reliable, easy and fast and suitable for accurate assessment of LCAT reaction, applicable in the widest possible enzyme concentration range. It was also, found suited for the measurement of the esterification rate of rabbit intraocular fluid which is a medium with the lowest contents of the substrate and LCAT. (L.O.)

  14. Material radioassay and selection for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, LIBPhys, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Sivers, M. von [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics; Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Scotto Lavina, L. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-12-15

    The XENON1T dark matter experiment aims to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through low-energy interactions with xenon atoms. To detect such a rare event necessitates the use of radiopure materials to minimize the number of background events within the expected WIMP signal region. In this paper we report the results of an extensive material radioassay campaign for the XENON1T experiment. Using gamma-ray spectroscopy and mass spectrometry techniques, systematic measurements of trace radioactive impurities in over one hundred samples within a wide range of materials were performed. The measured activities allowed for stringent selection and placement of materials during the detector construction phase and provided the input for XENON1T detection sensitivity estimates through Monte Carlo simulations. (orig.)

  15. Passive active neutron radioassay measurement uncertainty for combustible and glass waste matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, Woo Y.

    1997-01-01

    Using a modified statistical sampling and verification approach, total uncertainty of INEL's Passive Active Neutron (PAN) radioassay system was evaluated for combustible and glass content codes. Waste structure and content of 100 randomly selected drums in each the waste categories were computer modeled based on review of real-time radiography video tapes. Specific quantities of Pu were added to the drum models according to an experimental design. These drum models were then submitted to the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon code processing and subsequent calculations to produce simulated PAN system measurements. The reported Pu masses from the simulation runs were compared with the corresponding input masses. Analysis of the measurement errors produced uncertainty estimates. This paper presents results of the uncertainty calculations and compares them to previous reported results obtained for graphite waste

  16. Radioassays for quantitation of intact complement proteins C2 and B in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oglesby, T J; Ueda, A; Volanakis, J E

    1988-05-25

    Availability of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies recognizing determinants on the major cleavage fragments of complement proteins C2 and B enabled development of sensitive radioassays which can be used to quantitate the intact proteins in human sera. Changes in C2 and B concentrations indicative of classical or alternative pathway activation, or both, were seen in normal serum after incubation with complement activators. The authors determined the normal range of C2 concentration to be 11-35 ..mu..g/ml in 32 healthy individuals, and that of protein B to be 74-286 ..mu..g/ml. Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), septic shock, infections, and following orthopedic surgery were then assayed. Mean protein B concentration was significantly higher in SLE sera and in the infected and post-operative sera, and the mean C2 concentration in the septic shock group was significantly lower than the mean of healthy individuals. Intact C2 was not detected in known C2-deficient individuals. These assays allow parallel quantitation of the structurally and functionally homologous proteins of the classical (C2) and alternative (B) pathways, which is of interest in patients with genetic and acquired hypocomplementemia. 22 refs.; 3 figs.

  17. Methyl salicylate as a medium for radioassay of 36Cl using a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.; Ediss, C.

    1976-01-01

    Methyl salicylate (MS), a high refractive index liquid with wave-shifting properties, has been used as a Cherenkov radiation generating medium for the radioassay of 36 Cl by liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometer. Comparative experiments, using both a standard toluene-based LS fluor and toluene alone, for the measurement of 36 Cl were undertaken. The methyl salicylate medium was found to perform at an intermediate counting efficiency, near that for the LS fluor. In the presence of moderate amounts of nitromethane, the MS was less susceptible to chemical quenching effects than either the fluor or toluene. Counting efficiencies for 36 Cl in MS, toluene and toluene fluor respectively were 82.4, 28.4 and 100.3 percent with a Picker Liquimat 220 LS spectrometer, and 91.6, 54.9 and 100.0 percent with a Searle Mark III LS spectrometer. The addition of nitromethane (11.3 percent of final volume) reduced these efficiencies to 50.5, 10.0 and 15.4 percent, and to 58.8, 12.4 and 19.0 percent, respectively. The data are discussed in relation to observed changes in the pulse height spectra. Chemical quench correction by ESCR and by SCR methods is reported

  18. Radioassay of granulocyte chemotaxis. Studies of human granulocytes and chemotactic factors. [/sup 51/Cr tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallin, J I

    1974-01-01

    The above studies demonstrate that the /sup 51/Cr radiolabel chemotactic assay is a relatively simple and objective means for studying leukocyte chemotaxis in both normal and pathological conditions. Application of this method to studies of normal human chemotaxis revealed a relatively narrow range of normal and little day-to-day variability. Analysis of this variability revealed that there is more variability among the response of different granulocytes to a constant chemotactic stimulus than among the chemotactic activity of different sera to a single cell source. Utilizing the /sup 51/Cr radioassay, the abnormal granulocyte chemotactic behavior reported in Chediak-Higashi syndrome and a patient with recurrent pyogenic infections and mucocutaneous candidiasis has been confirmed. The /sup 51/Cr chemotactic assay has also been used to assess the generation of chemotactic activity from human serum and plasma. The in vitro generation of two distinct chemotactic factors were examined; the complement product (C5a) and kallikrein, an enzyme of the kinin-generating pathway. Kinetic analysis of complement-related chemotactic factor formation, utilizing immune complexes or endotoxin to activate normal sera in the presence or absence of EGTA as well as kinetic analysis of activation of C2-deficient human serum, provided an easy means of distinguishing the classical (antibody-mediated) complement pathway from the alternate pathway. Such kinetic analysis is necessary to detect clinically important abnormalities since, after 60 min of generation time, normal chemotactic activity may be present despite complete absence or inhibition of one complement pathway. The chemotactic factor generated by either pathway of complement activation appears to be predominately attributable to C5a.

  19. Determination of vitamin D in fortified and nonfortified milk powder and infant formula using a specific radioassay after purification by high-performance liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, H. van den; Boshuis, P.G.; Schreurs, W.H.P.

    1986-01-01

    A reliable and sensitive radioassay is described for the determination of vitamin D in milk powder and infant formula. After saponification of the sample interfering compounds like sterols are removed by digitonin precipitation and chromatography on small columns packed with alumina. [3H] Vitamin D

  20. Transfer plate radioassay using cell monolayers to detect anti-cell surface antibodies synthesized by lymphocyte hybridomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.D.; Eisenbarth, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    A solid phase [ 125 I] Protein A radioassay for anti-cell surface antibodies is described, which employs target cell monolayers cultured on fenestrated polyvinyl chloride 96-well plates ('transfer plates'). The calibrated aperture in the bottom of each well is small enough to retain fluid contents by surface tension during monolayer growth, but also permits fluid to enter the wells when transfer plate are lowered into receptacles containing washing buffer on test sera. To assay for antibodies directed against target cell surface antigens, transfer plates bearing monolayers are inserted into microculture plates with corresponding 96-well geometry, thereby simultaneously sampling 96 wells. This assay allows rapid screening of hundreds of hybrid cell colonies for production of antibodies with desired tissue specificity. (Auth.)

  1. The role of the EPA radiation quality assurance program in the measurement quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, T.M. [Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1993-12-31

    As the nature and extent of radiological contamination becomes better documented and more public, radioanalytical laboratories are faced with a constantly expanding variety of new and difficult analytical requirements. Concurrent with those requirements is the responsibility to provide customers, regulatory officials, or the public with defensible data produced in an environment of verifiable, controlled quality. To meet that need, a quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories has been proposed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The standard will provide the organizational framework and functional requirements needed to assure the quality of laboratory outputs. Under the proposed program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Laboratory Intercomparison Program plays a key role as a reference laboratory. The current and proposed roles of the EPA Intercomparison Program are discussed, as are the functional relationships between EPA, the accreditating organization, and the service and monitoring laboratories.

  2. Studies on folate binding and a radioassay for serum and whole-blood folate using goat milk as binding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyasena, R.D.; Weerasekera, D.A.; Hettiaratchi, N.; Wikramanayake, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Preparations of cow, goat, buffalo and human milk in addition to pig plasma were tested for folate binding properties. Of these, only pig plasma and goat milk showed sufficient binding to enable them to be used as binding agents in a radioassay for serum and whole-blood folate. The binding of folate by cow milk preparations in particular was found to be very poor. Goat milk was preferred to pig plasma as a binder for folate radioassay for reasons of convenience, economy and greater stability, and because pteroylglutamic acid (PGA) can be used both as tracer and standard. Where pig plasma is used with the inclusion of folate-free serum in the standard tubes, differences were observed between the standard and serum blanks which themselves varied from sample to sample. By contrast, with goat milk, all blank readings were normally 3% or less. Five out of eight samples of goat milk were seen to contain 'releasing factor' necessary to liberate folate from endogenous binder (FABP). Where present, the factor was found to be stable for at least three months when the partially purified milk was stored freeze dried at 4 0 C. Goat milk binder was found unable to distinguish between PGA and methyltetrahydrofolic acid (MTFA) at pH9.3. This enabled PGA rather than the more unstable MTFA to be used as tracer and standard. The assay employs a one-step incubation procedure at room temperature. It is sensitive to about 0.1 ng of PGA and is reproducible to less than 5% variation. The mean % recovery of inactive added folate was 101+-4%. (author)

  3. Effects of different enzyme treatments in extraction of total folate from infant formula, baby foods and other food products prior to microbiological assay and radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Four different enzyme treatments-conjugase alone, conjugase and alpha-amylase, conjugase and Pronase reg-sign and a triple enzyme combination of conjugase, Pronase reg-sign and alpha-amylase were applied in the extraction of total folate from infant formula, baby foods and various other foods by microbiological and radioassay methods. Significant increases (P < 0.05) in measurable folate were obtained using the triple enzyme system in spinach, Camembert cheese, soy-based infant formula and cereal-based, meat-based and fruit-based infant foods over the use of conjugase alone by the microbiological method. Increases were also observed in many of the same foods using Pronase reg-sign or alpha-amylase in addition to conjugase alone. Increases obtained by microbiological assay were confirmed by radioassay in a number of foods studied

  4. Correlation of antispermatozoal antibody with infertility in immunized female rabbits using 14C-protein A in a filter radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, L.A.; Metz, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    The meaningful detection of antisperm antibody in immunologically infertile females has been confounded by the many methods of assay that exist. With many of these methods there is poor correlation of assay results with infertility. In this report, female rabbits were rendered partially or completely infertile by immunization with sperm fractions. A filter radioassay for antisperm antibody was developed that consists of incubating 10(7) sperm with sperm from immunized rabbits and 14 C-Protein A, a long-lived and versatile indirect radiolabel for many antibodies of the IgG class. The spermatozoa are washed by rapid vacuum filtration on polycarbonate membrane filters instead of by time-consuming centrifugation. The filters with the collected spermatozoa are then counted in a liquid scintillation counter. Sera from female rabbits isoimmunized with sperm antigens show a highly significant correlation (r = -0.904; p less than 0.001) between assay results and infertility as measured by the percentage of eggs that underwent cleavage after artificial insemination

  5. Incorporating Plutonium Particle Size Effects in the Assessment of Active Mode Measurement Uncertainty in Passive-Active Neutron Radioassay Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Harker, Yale D.

    2002-01-01

    Assessment of active mode measurement uncertainty in passive-active neutron radioassay systems used to measure Pu content in nuclear waste is severely hampered by lack of knowledge of the waste Pu particle size distribution, which is a major factor in determining bias in active mode measurements. The sensitivity of active mode measurements to particle size precludes using simulations or surrogate waste forms to estimate uncertainty in active mode measurements when the particle size distribution is not precisely known or inadequately reproduced. An alternative approach is based on a statistical comparison of active and passive mode results in the mass range for which both active and passive mode analyses produce useable measurements. Because passive mode measurements are not particularly sensitive to particle size effects, their uncertainty can be more easily assessed. Once bias corrected, passive mode measurements can serve as confirmatory measurements for the estimation of active mode bias. Further statistical analysis of the errors in measurements leads to precision estimates for the active mode

  6. Thyroid evaluation with radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkar, F.S.

    1983-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is given therapeutically for the treatment of hypothyroidism and in goiterous conditions. When administered in full maintenance dosage, it interrupts the operation of the homeostatic mechanism that evokes excesses of thyrotropin (TSH) in response to various goiterogenic stimuli or impending thyroid failure, resulting in thyroid gland enlargement. All patients with treated thyroid cancer are maintained indefinitely on full replacement dosages of thyroid hormone to eliminate endogenous TSH and its trophic effect, thereby minimizing recurrence and growth of the tumor. A high-risk group of patients that were irradiated to the head and neck in childhood for various reasons are placed on thyroid hormone therapy prophylactically to turn off their endogenous TSH if they are found free of thyroid nodularity on initial evaluation. The adequacy of thyroid hormone therapy and the regularity of its intake can be ultimately evaluated by the thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation test, where no TSH response indicates adequate therapy and a normal TSH response suggests inadequate or irregular treatment

  7. A novel radioassay for the determination of folate in serum and red cells and new observations on the stability of serum folate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, E.P.J.; Tovey, K.C.; Guilford, H.

    1977-01-01

    A Competitive Protein Binding assay for the determination of folate in serum and red cells has been developed. The assay has been fully validated in hospital trials and comparisons have been made with the microbiological assay. We have based the standardization of the radioassay on N 5 -methyltetrahydrofolate (N 5 -MTHF) as this is the predominant folate derivative in serum samples. At about pH 9.5 pteroylglutamic acid (PGA) and N 5 -MTHF demonstrate the same affinity for folate binding proteins. Therefore, many folate assays have adopted PGA largely because of the popular belief that N 5 -MTHF is highly unstable. However, we have demonstrated that N 5 -MTHF in serum standards is surprisingly stable at -20 0 C. All the reagents for the assay (including the N 5 -MTHF standards) have shown perfectly acceptable stability, permitting their storage for at least three weeks at -20 0 C and one week at 4 0 C. Evidence will be presented to support the use of N 5 -MTHF as being the more appropriate standard. Folate in human serum samples is stable even at room temperature in the presence of 0.1% sodium azide. (orig./AJ) [de

  8. Determination of vitamin D in fortified and nonfortified milk powder and infant formula using a specific radioassay after purification by high-performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van den Berg, H.; Boshuis, P.G.; Schreurs, W.H.P.

    1986-01-01

    A reliable and sensitive radioassay is described for the determination of vitamin D in milk powder and infant formula. After saponification of the sample interfering compounds like sterols are removed by digitonin precipitation and chromatography on small columns packed with alumina. [ 3 H] Vitamin D is added to the sample as an internal standard, to correct for losses due to previtamin D formation, as well as other procedural losses. Vitamin D is quantitated by a competitive protein binding (CPB) assay after final cleanup of the extract on a straight-phase HPLC column. Diluted sheep serum is used as the source of the binding protein, having equal affinity for both vitamins D 2 and D 3 . With this HPLC CPB method vitamin D can be determined with high specificity in concentrations as low as 0.1 ng/tube (ca. 0.01 IE/g). Recovery was between 90 and 110%. The coefficients of variation were 2.4 (within run) and 7.5 (between run), respectively

  9. Development and evaluation of the performance of a computer program for the quality control of radioligant assays, application to the radioassay of insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, C.H. de.

    1983-01-01

    A computer program was developed to evaluate several parameters of in radioligant assays. The program was written in FORTRAN-IV having a modular structure. The present version is designed to compute a number of parameters pertinent to the activities of the radioassays. The standard curve is fitted to the empirical model which has four parameters following Marquardt i-iterative scheme. The curve is weighted according to Rodbard criterion. The mini mum detectable dose (MDD) is estimated by a criterion which considers the standard deviation of the experimental data measured with respect to the zero concentration, theoretically computed by the power function. This function considers the standard deviations of all samples and standards being assayed. The Scatchard plot is drawn for one binding component, but it is suitable for up to five components including that nonspecific and non saturated one. The specific activity is computed by the self-displacement method including the corrections suggested by Morris. The computer program processes data pertinent to the thermodynamic analysis through the incubation temperature and its respective reaction affinity constant 'K'. Starting from the estimated enthalpy and entropy of the reaction, the program produces theoretical standard curves for any level of incubation temperature. This allows the analyst to select the interval which best attends the dosage needs. Other general data pertinent to the radioisotope methodology can also be processed by the present program, such as radiochromatogram analysis chi-square test and the estimate the error during the procedures of pipetting. In order to demonstrate the use and the quality of the informations given by the program, a radioimmunoassay of insulin was carried out. The results obtained are in good agreement with those found in the literature. (Author) [pt

  10. Radioassay in allergy and immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluck, J.

    1983-01-01

    The discovering of IgE and the development of RIA to measure the amount of total IgE and assay IgE to specific allergens opened up a new dimension in the study of allergy. PRIST and RAST have been helpful in diagnosis as well as definition of new diseases and quality control of allergen extracts. A clinical diagnosis should not be based on an in vitro measurement alone, but must be combined with a clinical history, physical exam, and other diagnostic tests, such as skin tests. This combination of examinations is probably sufficient to make a diagnosis in the majority of cases, thus obviating the need for provocation testing, except where there are discrepancies in the data or no definitive results. Since provocation testing is time-consuming, uncomfortable, and potentially hazardous for the patient, any decrease in its frequency of use is significant. The standardization, purification, and separation of active fractions of allergens is essential to the further understanding and treatment of allergy and RAST is instrumental in this effort. It must always be kept in mind that the RAST is only as accurate and significant as the antigen that is linked to the disc. In cases where a purified, well-tested antigen is used, the results are excellent as with the codfish study. When the antigen is more variable and contains several proteins, results with RAST will be variable also. As more allergens are studied and purified, RAST will become a more important tool in allergy management

  11. In vitro radioassays for thyroid diseases analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegesippe, M.; Le Gallic, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Some technical aspects of the current and less current tests for thyroid function evaluation and for immunological and cancerous thyroid diseases, were reviewed. This large review was done to confirm that at present, nearly all the parameters playing a role in thyroid disease are measured by RIA technique with an acceptable precision and specificity. It is now possible to study a particular problem of thyroid with a particular assay. The review was illustrated by a certain number of precision profile which are, in our opinion, one of the most important informations to have before adopting a technique. It allows to appreciate what can be obtained -and cannot be obtained- as a reliable response

  12. Circulating forms of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone-related protein for identifying patients with humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy. A comparative study with C-terminal (109-141)- and N-terminal (1-86)-region-specific PTHrP radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehiro, Mitsuko; Murakami, Minoru; Fukuchi, Minoru

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the circulating forms of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone-related protein(PTHrP) in 115 healthy subjects and 122 patients with malignant diseases by using radioassay systems (RAS) specific for the C-terminal (109-141) fragment of PTHrP (C-RAS) and for the N-terminal(1-86) (N-RAS). PTHrP levels in healthy controls ranged from 1.5 to 38.2 (mean: 24.5) pmol/L with the C-RAS and from 0.9 to 2.5 (mean: 1.7) pmol/L with the N-RAS. The ratio of circulating N-terminal fragment (N) to C-terminal fragment (C) of PTHrP was calculated to be about 1 : 14.4 in the healthy subjects. Of the 122 patients with malignant diseases, 40 (32.8%) had circulating PTHrP levels undetectable with the N-RAS, but only 11 (9.0%) patients had levels undetectable with the C-RAS. Of the former 122 patients, 41 (33.6%) had high PTHrP as determined with the C-RAS, and 10 (8.2%) had high PTHrP as determined with the N-RAS. The former of these included only 8 (19.5%) humoral hypercalcemia malignancy(HHM) patients, while the latter included 8 (80.0%) HHM patients. The circulating N to C ratio was about 1 : 70.7 in the HHM patients. The N and C obtained with the different RASs showed a close correlation (r=0.86). The values also showed a close correlation with serum Ca; r=0.75 for C-RAS and r=0.81 for N-RAS. In addition, the correlation between the PTHrP reading obtained with the different RASs and serum Cr were: r=0.42 with C-RAS and r=0.26 with N-RAS. The circulating form of immunoreactive PTHrP fragments is therefore comprised mainly of PTHrP (109-141). In contrast, circulating concentrations of the PTHrP (1-86) fragment are very low, but detection of the PTHrP (1-86) fragment with the N-RAS is a more useful indicator of HHM with fewer false positive results and is less likely to be influenced by renal function than the detection of the PHPrP (109-141) fragment with C-RAS. (author)

  13. In vitro radioassay techniques in the study of reproductive hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivarola, M.

    1980-01-01

    Testosterone (T) levels in the testicular tissue in varicocele were studied in relation to alterations of testicular function. Testicular T levels were measured by a modified radioimmunoassay procedure in which 3 H-testosterone was used as a tracer to monitor losses during extraction of the hormone. Serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and T levels were measured by conventional radioimmunoassay. Testicular function was evaluated from patient histories and physical examinations, and from the results of sperm counts and histological examinations of biopsy specimens. In 4 control patients mean testicular T was 520 +- 127 ng/g tissue and the mean ratio testicular T/serum T 104 +- 47. In the majority of 17 patients with unilateral varicocele, testicular T was within normal limits, but in 3 patients with severe testicular damage values of 2700, 2373 and 1437 ng/g were recorded. Serum T levels were normal in the majority of patients and decreased in 2. Serum FSH levels were normal in the majority of patients and increased in 3. Serum LH levels were increased in approximately one half of patients. The results are considered indicative of impaired Leydig cell function in varicocele. It appears, however, that decreased T production is compensated by increased LH production and that the germinal cells are not deprived of T

  14. Haptoglobin radioassay based on binding to solid-phase hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, D.C.; Reed, R.A.; Peacock, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    A specific and sensitive assay for haptoglobin based on binding to an easily prepred Sepharose-bound hemoglobin reagent is described. The assay is suitable for directly determining radiolabeled amino acid incorporation into haptoglobin in several liver cell systems in vitro and can be adapted to measure unlabeled free haptoglobin in plasma samples regardlss of the presence of the haptoglobin--hemoglobin complex

  15. Evidence for bacterial chemotaxis to cyanobacteria from a radioassay technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangatharalingam, N.; Wang, Lizhu; Priscu, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Lyngbya birgei and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae elicited a significant chemotactic attraction of Aeromonas hydrophila compared with controls lacking cyanobacteria. There was a positive exponential relationship between biomass (chlorophyll a) of L. birgei and A. flos-aquae and chemotactic attraction of A. hydrophila. The assay equipment was simple and reliable and could be used to study bacterial chemotaxis in other species in situ

  16. Volumetric radioassay of lead bricks being considered for unrestricted release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Losinski, S.J.; Seal, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    The hardware, software, and a protocol have been developed for the screening of lead bricks for free release or recycle from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The procedure for measuring the background from a sampling of ''clean'' lead bricks and for deducing the decision limits (in pCi/g) have been developed. At the decision limit, a radioactive lead brick would be detected with 95% confidence if it were present. The total and peak efficiencies of a 2.54-cm diameter x 2.54-cm high NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for the counting geometry of the present study were measured with a mixed radionuclide standard and calculated with a Monte Carlo program, CYLTRAN. The deduced decision limit for the counting conditions of the present study were 0.0588 pCi/g by analyzing the entire spectrum and 0.256 pCi/g by analyzing the 661-keV peak region for a 900-second count

  17. Radioassay method of neuraminidase towards N-acetylneuraminosyl hexasaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, M; Someya, F; Yamada, T; Miyatake, T [Tokyo Metropolitan Research Lab. of Public Health (Japan)

    1982-02-26

    The authors have devised a sensitive method to assay for neuraminidase activities towards ..cap alpha..-(2..-->..3)-N-acetylneuraminosyl hexasaccharide and ..cap alpha..-(2..-->..6)-N-acetylneuraminosyl hexasaccharide, which were isolated from the urine of a patient with adult sialidosis with partial deficiency of ..beta..-galactosidase. Standard assay conditions for the determination of these neuraminidase activities were established and the radiolabeled reduced derivatives of these substrates were used. The fibroblast neuraminidase had its maximum activity at pH 4.0-4.2, with Ksub(m) values of 2.22 x 10/sup -3/ and 4.17 x 10/sup -3/ mol/l and Vsub(max) values of 76.9 and 28.6 nmol.mg/sup -1/ protein.h/sup -1/ towards the 2..-->..3 isomer and the 2..-->..6 isomer, respectively. Neuraminidase deficiencies were found in the fibroblasts of adult sialidosis, mucolipidosis II and III. These studies were compared with the neuraminidase activity towards ..cap alpha..-(2..-->..3)-N-acetylneuraminosyl lactose.

  18. Paraffin scintillator for radioassay of solid support samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Haruo; Takiue, Makoto

    1989-01-01

    A new paraffin scintillator used for solid support sample counting has been proposed, and its composition and various characteristics are described. The solid support sample treated with this scintillator can be easily handled because of rigid sample conditions. This technique provides great advantages such as the elimination of a large volume of scintillator and little radioactive waste material by using an economical polyethylene bag instead of the conventional counting vial. (author)

  19. Competitive receptor binding radioassay for β-1 and β-2 adrenergic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.N.; Culbreth, W.; Dalrymple, R.; Fung, C.; Ricks, C.

    1987-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive competitive receptor bonding assay for β-1 and β-2 adrenergic binding for adrenergic agents has been developed. The steps that are critical for the success of the assay are given in detail so that the assay can be set up in any routine laboratory with relative ease. The rationale behind the use of specific reagents is discussed. The assay requires microgram quantities of test compound, a radiolabeled specific β adrenergic antagonist [ 3 H]dihydroalprenolol (DHA), and turkey erythrocyte β-1 and rat erythrocyte β-2 receptor membranes. Serial dilutions of sample are incubated with appropriate receptor membranes and DHA for 1 hr at room temperature. After equilibrium is attained, the bound radioligand is separated by rapid filtration under vacuum through Whatman GF/B filters. The amount of bound DHA trapped on the filter is inversely proportional to the degree of β-1 and β-2 adrenergic binding of the sample. Separation of bound from free radioligand by filtration permits rapid determination of a large number of samples. This assay quantitates and differentiates β-1 and β-2 adrenergic binding of synthetic adrenergic agents

  20. On clinical use of radioisotopes in the hospital and the commercial radioassay center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nukazawa, Atsushi

    1978-01-01

    The present status of the clinical use of radioisotopes in Tokyo district is reviewed. The increase from 1970 to 1974 in the quantity of radioisotopes used for radiotherapy is tabulated for each radioisotope. sup(99m)Tc has recorded remarkable increase. The in vitro use of 125 I has been also increasing. The number of 3 H kits used during 1974 was 573, which is 6.5 times as many as that in 1970. The increase in the number of organizations using radioisotopes, both in vitro and in vivo, is also presented in another table. The quantity (number of kits and curie) of each isotope used at various clinical organizations is tabulated for consecutive three years from 1974 to 1976. Other lists in this report provide the number of radioisotope suppliers and the examples if the registration format for the registered clinics. It is finally emphasized that urgent measures should be taken to establish the pertinent regulating laws for the treatment of radioisotopes in clinical organizations. (Aoki, K.)

  1. Enkephalin dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (enkephalinase) activity: selective radioassay, properties, and regional distribution in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llorens, C.; Malfroy, B.; Schwartz, J.C.; Gacel, G.; Roques, B.P.; Roy, J.; Morgat, J.L.; Javoy-Agid, F.; Agid, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The compound [ 3 H-Tyr 1 ,D-Ala 2 ,Leu-OH 5 ]enkephalin has been synthesised as a potentially selective substrate for enkephalin dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (enkephalinase) activity in brain. Incubations in the presence of homogenates and particulate fractions from rodent and human brain result in the formation of [ 3 H]Tyr-D-Ala-Gly, which can be conveniently isolated by polystyrene bead column chromatography. The enzyme activity responsible for the hydrolysis of the Gly 3 -Phe 4 amide bond of this substrate displays close resemblance to that hydrolysing the natural enkephalins at the same level. In addition, enkephalinase activity characterised in postmortem human brain is closely similar to that in rodent brain, with regard to optimal pH and apparent affinities of various substrates and inhibitors, including the potent compound thiorphan. Enkephalinase activity is distributed in a highly heterogeneous fashion among regions of human brain, the highest levels being found in globus pallidus and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra. This distribution is poorly correlated with that of opiate receptor binding sites but displays some resemblance to that of reported Met 5 -enkephalin levels. (author)

  2. Synthesis of indium-labeled antibody-chelate conjugates for radioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokce, A; Nakamura, R M; Tubis, M; Wolf, W

    1982-01-01

    A method has been developed to achieve rapid and reproducible complexation of indium to transferrin at pH 7.4. The system consists of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as the intermediate carrier ligand, whose function is to allow the /sup 113/m In ion, in a solution in Tris buffer, pH 7.4, to be transferred rapidly to the specific binding sites on transferrin. Just as in the case of iron, this complexation requires the presence of a synergistic ion such as bicarbonate. The present system can be used to allow the binding of /sup 113/mIn to transferrin when coupled to an antibody. This method has been tested by studying the conjugation of an antibody, the IgG fraction of goat anti-rabbit-IgG, with either transferrin or desferoxamine, using glutaraldehyde as the coupling agent. Optimization in terms of total protein concentration and glutaraldehyde levels lead to products where the specific metal binding capacity of the transferrin moiety remains unchanged, and where the antibody retains 70% of its antigenic activity. The present system can be considered an extension of the ELISA techniques and can be used to determine, by a terminal /sup 113/mIn labeling technique, the level of specific binding of an antibody to its antigen.

  3. The determination of serum vitamin B/sub 12/ values using radioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariyone, S; Morishita, R; Sato, M; Fujimori, K; Miki, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-04-01

    Strong and weak points of both the Phadebas B/sub 12/ test kit by Pharmacia Co. Ltd. and the CIS B/sub 12/ kit by CEA Co. Ltd. were examined to determine and evaluated. One strong point was that both of kits were comparatively easy to operate. Another was that they were very accurate if only one pipet was used and it was correctly handled. The error from the fractional infusion of 0.1 ml of /sup 57/Co-B/sub 12/ sample remained within +-1.8%, including the error of measuring radioactivity. The recovery rate of vitamin B/sub 12/ added to the serum was 100+-10%. Close correlation was found between the serum B/sub 12/ values measured by each kit and with a careful procedure almost accurate, highly reproducible values were obtained. It was necessary to further examine the pH of the buffer solution in the Phadebas kit and the conditions of extraction of B/sub 12/ from the serum in the CIS kit. In reading the B/sub 12/ values from the standard curve, it was preferable to perform a logic change B/B/sub 0/ % in the samples and to make a linear standard curve, so that the accuracy of the reading would not be infuluenced by variations in the data. (Kanao, N.).

  4. Radioassay for hydrogenase activity in viable cells and documentation of aerobic hydrogen-consuming bacteria living in extreme environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schink, B.; Lupton, F.S.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    An isotopic tracer assay based on the hydrogenase-dependent formation of tritiated water from tritium gas was developed for in life analysis of microbial hydrogen transformation. This method allowed detection of bacterial hydrogen metabolism in pure cultures or in natural samples obtained from aquatic ecosystems. A differentiation between chemical-biological and aerobic-anaerobic hydrogen metabolism was established by variation of the experimental incubation temperature or by addition of selective inhibitors. Hydrogenase activity was shown to be proportional to the consumption or production of hydrogen by cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Methanosarcina barkeri. This method was applied, in connection with measurements of free hydrogen and most-probable-number enumerations, in aerobic natural source waters to establish the activity and document the ecology of hydrogen-consuming bacteria in extreme acid, thermal, or saline environments. The utility of the assay is based in part on the ability to quantify bacterial hydrogen transformation at natural hydrogen partial pressures, without the use of artificial electron acceptors

  5. Transfer plate radioassay using adsorbed anti-insulin antibody to detect insulin secreted by islet cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scearce, R.M.; Oie, H.K.; Gazdar, A.F.; Chick, W.L.; Eisenbarth, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay for detection of insulin synthesized by islet cell clones is described. This assay employs anti-insulin antibody adsorbed onto fenestrated polyvinyl chloride 96-well plates ('transfer plates'). The calibrated aperture in the bottom of each transfer plate well permits fluid to enter the wells when transfer plates are lowered into microculture wells containing insulin. With this assay it is possible to rapidly screen hundreds of islet cell cultures for insulin production. The authors have used this assay to facilitate cloning of the RIN rat insulinoma cell line. The assay readily detects insulin synthesis by RIN cells and [ 125 I]insulin is not displaced by culture medium from cells which do not produce insulin. The transfer plate format should be applicable to semiautomate other radioimmunoassays. (Auth.)

  6. Macro creatine kinases: results of isoenzyme electrophoresis and differentiation of the immunoglobulin-bound type by radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohner, J.; Stein, W.; Steinhart, R.; Wurzburg, U.; Eggstein, M.

    1982-01-01

    In 2.9% of sera from 1253 unselected patients we detected two different types of macromolecular creatine kinases (CK;EC 2.7.3.2). One macro type was represented by immunoglobulin-linked CK; in sera containing macro CK-BB isoenzyme, 125 I-labeled CK-BB was bound with high affinity to the immunoglobulin fraction. Furthermore, during electrophoresis, macro CK-BB mostly migrated between CK-MB and CK-MM, and was fixed to Protein A from Staphlococcus aureus. We therefore propose radioelectrophoresis as a specific, highly sensitive, and simple method for detecting this type of macro CK. This form occurs predominantly in elderly women, is not correlated to any specific disease, and persists in blood over a long period of time. In contrast, a second type (macro-CK type 2) never bound radiolabeled CK isoenzymes, and was not adsorbed to protein A. Electrophoretic migration of this macro-CK type 2 was generally cathodic to CK-MM. We observed this type in severely ill patients, frequently those suffering from malignant tumors. Clinical observations and biochemical data suggest that macro-CK type 2 is of mitochondrial origin

  7. Competitive binding radioassays for 1α-25(OH)2 vitamin D; comparative evaluation of two receptor assays and a radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jallet, P.; Bidet, M.; Audran, M.

    1985-01-01

    The performances of a 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D assay using the cytosol receptor of bovine thymus gland were evaluated and compared to the results obtained with an assay based on cytosol receptor of chicK intestine and with a radioimmunoassay [fr

  8. The effect of the oxidation state of the folate standard on the results of the simultaneous radioassay of serum folate and cobalamin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemans, J.; Kapel, J. van

    1981-01-01

    The authors have compared a commercial radioisotope dilution assay using pteroylglutamic acid as a standard and a non-commercial assay using L-methyl-tetrahydrofolate as a standard. The iodinated tracer folate was the same in both methods. Both assays measure folate and colabamin simultaneously, which gave the opportunity to discuss also the results of the cobalamin assay. (Auth.)

  9. Negligible effects of nonesterified fatty acids on serum thyroxine analysis by competitive protein-binding radioassay on Sephadex and by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, N.M.; Nishimoto, M.

    1978-01-01

    Values for thyroxine by our competitive protein-binding assay on Sephadex (I) and by radioimmmunoassy (II) were identical for sera containing markedly increased concentrations of endogenous nonesterified fatty acids. Addition of as much as 5 mmol of long-chain saturated fatty acids per liter to normal serum had no significant effect on the thyroxine values by I; larger concentrations (10 mmol/liter) spuriously increased values by 20 to 30%. Added unsaturated fatty acids (1 mmol/liter) were without effect on procedure I, but spurious elevations in thyroxine appeared when concentrations were further increased up to 10 mmol/liter. The spurious effects by 2 to 5 mmol of added oleate and arachidonate (the most potent inhibitor of thyroxine binding to thyroxine-binding globulin) per liter could be reversed by washing the Sephadex columns with additional barbital buffer before binding with thyroxine-binding globulin (a step that is done on the gel). Three different II procedures were unaffected by as much as 5 mmol of added fatty acids per liter, but moderate spurious increases were noted with 10 mmol of oleate per liter. We conclude that method I is reliable for thyroxine analysis in nearly all sera from human subjects, because the concentrations of unsaturated fatty acids present either in vitro or in vivo are seldom large enough to interfere

  10. VOLUMETRIC LEAD ASSAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dua, S.K.; Roelant, David; Kumar, Sachin

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a system for handling and radioassay of lead, consisting of a robot, a conveyor, and a gamma spectrometer. The report also presents a cost-benefit analysis of options: radioassay and recycling lead vs. disposal as waste

  11. Diagnostic compositions containing a chelate of radioactive indium and 8-hydroxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedemans, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    There are disclosed aqueous, radioassaying solutions of a chelate of radioactive indium and an 8-hydroxyquinoline, having an essential absence of an organic solvent, e.g., alcohol or chloroform. The solutions are useful in radioassaying warmblooded animals. (author)

  12. Regional intercomparison for quality control of radioassays used in thyroid studies. Part of a coordinated programme on quality control of techniques in in-vitro assay of thyroid related hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiori, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    The project dealt with serious variabilities of the results of the radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique presented by different laboratories. The educational purpose of the project was to get users of RIA methods to become aware of the necessity of rigorous internal and external quality control practice. Two hundred and four sera aliquots were distributed among the participants of the project. The first batch consisted of 60 tubes, which were frozen. All others were lyophilized. The first batch consisted of pooled sera with low and high concentrations of T3 and T4, and unknown concentration of TSH. The second and third batches consisted of aliquots of normal sera for T3, T4 and TSH. The fourth batch consisted of coded aliquots of high and low concentrations of T3, T4 and TSH. All data from the participants (laboratories represented the Southern Region of Brazil and Uruguay) were collected and analyzed statistically; a special computer programme was developed for that purpose. Quarterly reports were sent to each laboratory with comments and suggestions aiming at the improvement of the performance of the laboratory in question. A high degree of irregularity in the first reporting results was observed. Individual values for T3 ranged from 0 to 176 nanog/dl with a coefficient of variation of 36.5%. Values for T4 ranged from 3.99 to 7.17 microg/dl with a coefficient of variation of 9.5%. Values for TSH ranged from 0 to 6.71 microU/dl with a coefficient of variation of 75.6%. The variability of results in different laboratories is probably caused by several reasons such as different kit's manufacturers, different standards, different antibody preparation, different separation methods. The educational part of the project seems to be rather successful. The performance of laboratories improved with time. This also demonstrates the need for intra-laboratory quality control

  13. Metabolism and distribution of two 14C-benzidine-congener-based dyes in rats as determined by gas chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and radioassays. Final report Jan-Oct 81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oller, W.L.

    1983-04-01

    Absorption, metabolism, and tissue distribution studies were conducted in the rat with 14 C-biphenyl ring-labeled Direct Blue 15, a 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine (DiMxBzd) based azo dye; Direct Red 2, based on 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine (DiMeBzd) and the corresponding benzidine congener amines. Single oral doses of the 14 C-labeled dyes (12 mg/kg, 62 micro Ci/kg) and molar equivalent doses of the respective amines were administered and urine and fecal samples collected at intervals up to 192 hours. Urine and fecal samples were analyzed for 14 C content. Most of the 14 C present in the urine could not be extracted with benzene nor chloroform, indicating high polarity. Distribution studies conducted with both dyes showed that liver, kidney, and lung accumulated and retained higher levels of 14 C than other tissues (at 72 hrs). Peak levels of 14 C, which occurred 8-12 hours after dosing, were significantly higher with Direct Red 2 than Direct Blue 15. Tissue distribution data (72 hr) for rats dosed with the free amines compared with the dyes showed a generally lower but similar distribution pattern

  14. Radiobioassay, vol 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkar, F.S.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive guide and treatise on various radioassay procedures in specific areas of biology and medicine. Radioassay has revolutionized laboratory medicine with its versatility, accuracy, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Volume I covers problems related to specificity of antigen and/or antibody identification of RIA are extensively reviewed. Coverage is provided on the principles of RIA data management systems, such as data collection and banks, and the principles of scintillation detectors and their application to radioassay. Also discussed are laboratory evaluations on adrenal dysfunction, thyroid and parathyroid hormones, calcitonin, and human reproduction functions

  15. Synthetic antigens, radiolabelled derivatives thereof, and methods of analysis using such derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhardt, W.A. Jr.; Hedaya, E.; Theodoropulos, S.

    1981-01-01

    This patent claim on behalf of Union Carbide Corporation, relates to a method of carrying out a competitive binding radioassay of a compound of interest in a clinical sample, using isocyanates labelled with radioiodine as synthetic antigens. (U.K.)

  16. Detection at a distance of atomic bomb tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahmias, M E

    1954-01-01

    Nahmias describes the radioassay of air, rain, and snowfall as the basis for detecting atomic bomb tests. Tables and graphs give time vs. Ra equivalents, distance vs Roentgens/h of radiation, and distribution of radioelements which can be expected.

  17. Proceedings of the 6.Brazilian Meeting on Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Several subjects on nuclear medicine are presented. The use of scintiscanning in heart diseases, neoplasms, etc. is emphasized. Radioisotope preparation techniques and labelling of compounds used in radioassays are described. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. The insulin radioimmunoassay kit prepared by IPEN-CNEN/SP - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, C.H. de; Silva, C.P.G. da; Hamada, M.M.

    1985-11-01

    The specification and methodological aspects of the insulin radioimmunoassay kit produced by IPEN-CNEN/SP - Brazil are described. The limitations taking care and the following quality control parameters or procedures are discussed: specific radioactivity, comparison between two insulin - 125 I purification procedures, affinity constant 'K' of the antigen - antibody reaction, minimal detectable dose (MDD), kinetics degradation of the radioinsulin, radioassay imprecision profile, radioassay performance temperature dependence and normal values histogram. (Author) [pt

  19. INEL test plan for evaluating waste assay systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandler, J.W.; Becker, G.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Menkhaus, D.E.; Clements, T.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    A test bed is being established at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These tests are currently focused on mobile or portable radioassay systems. Prior to disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), radioassay measurements must meet the quality assurance objectives of the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan. This test plan provides technology holders with the opportunity to assess radioassay system performance through a three-tiered test program that consists of: (a) evaluations using non-interfering matrices, (b) surrogate drums with contents that resemble the attributes of INEL-specific waste forms, and (c) real waste tests. Qualified sources containing a known mixture and range of radionuclides will be used for the non-interfering and surrogate waste tests. The results of these tests will provide technology holders with information concerning radioassay system performance and provide the INEL with data useful for making decisions concerning alternative or improved radioassay systems that could support disposal of waste at WIPP

  20. INEL test plan for evaluating waste assay systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandler, J.W.; Becker, G.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Menkhaus, D.E.; Clements, T.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    A test bed is being established at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These tests are currently focused on mobile or portable radioassay systems. Prior to disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), radioassay measurements must meet the quality assurance objectives of the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan. This test plan provides technology holders with the opportunity to assess radioassay system performance through a three-tiered test program that consists of: (a) evaluations using non-interfering matrices, (b) surrogate drums with contents that resemble the attributes of INEL-specific waste forms, and (c) real waste tests. Qualified sources containing a known mixture and range of radionuclides will be used for the non-interfering and surrogate waste tests. The results of these tests will provide technology holders with information concerning radioassay system performance and provide the INEL with data useful for making decisions concerning alternative or improved radioassay systems that could support disposal of waste at WIPP.

  1. Miscellaneous GI studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansell, J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of radiotracers has served as a valuable adjunct to the myriad of methods available to the physiologist and clinician for measuring various parameters of gastrointestinal (GI) function. The advantage of the technique that employs a radioactive label is the ability to measure function by noninvasive means with relatively little discomfort to the subject. Procedures of this type consist usually of administration of a radioactive form of a substance, by either the oral or intravenous route, followed by radioassay of postadministration samples of body fluids, excreta, or breath. On occasion the body itself is used as the definitive sample for radioassay

  2. Radiobioassays. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkar, F.S.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents papers on radioimmunoassay. Topics considered include the clinical application of the radioimmunoassay of insulin, the renin-angiotensin system, growth hormone radioimmunoassay, estrogen and progesterone receptor techniques for breast cancer, radioassay in hematology, serum bile acids, the role of gastrin in normal physiology and disease states, tumor markers in the immunodiagnosis of cancer, assays of drugs by immunological methods, radioassay in allergy and immunology, radioimmunoassay in cardiovascular disease, and radioimmunoassay in cardiovascular disease, and radioimmunoassays for the diagnosis of infectious diseases

  3. Radioimmunoassay and related procedures in medicine 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Of the 77 papers submitted, 69 were included in INIS. The papers included in the proceedings cover the following sessions: reagents and separation procedures; assay for free hormones; assay for biological substances; assay for drugs; data processing; intralaboratory quality control; external surveillance of assay performance; assay service in developing countries; public health applications; clinical applications; alternatives to radioassay

  4. Abstracts of the 9. Brazilian Congress of Biophysics, 2. Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and 19. Brazilian Congress of Physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts about biophysics, pharmacology, experimental therapeutics and physiology are presented. The use of radioisotopes in radioassays involve topics like biophysics and renal physiology; central nervous system; endocrinology; animal and comparative physiology; general physiology, digestion and nutrition; general pharmacology. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. Radioenzymatic assay for trimethoprim in very small serum samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Yogev, R; Melick, C; Tan-Pong, L

    1985-01-01

    A modification of the methotrexate radioassay kit (supplied by New England Enzyme Center) enabled determination of trimethoprim levels in 5-microliter serum samples. An excellent correlation between this assay and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay was found. These preliminary results suggest that with this method rapid determination of trimethoprim levels in very small samples (5 to 10 microliters) can be achieved.

  6. Radioenzymatic assay for trimethoprim in very small serum samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yogev, R.; Melick, C.; Tan-Pong, L.

    1985-01-01

    A modification of the methotrexate radioassay kit (supplied by New England Enzyme Center) enabled determination of trimethoprim levels in 5-microliter serum samples. An excellent correlation between this assay and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay was found. These preliminary results suggest that with this method rapid determination of trimethoprim levels in very small samples (5 to 10 microliters) can be achieved

  7. Exponential models applied to automated processing of radioimmunoassay standard curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, J.F.; Savina, A.; Caroff, J.; Miossec, J.; Legendre, J.M.; Jacolot, G.; Morin, P.P.

    1979-01-01

    An improved computer processing is described for fitting of radio-immunological standard curves by means of an exponential model on a desk-top calculator. This method has been applied to a variety of radioassays and the results are in accordance with those obtained by more sophisticated models [fr

  8. Liquid scintillation in medical diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, K.

    1976-01-01

    With the tremendous increase in the application of radioassay, particularly radioimmunoassay, in the clinical laboratory liquid scintillation counting became an indispensable tool in diagnostic medicine. Few publications, however, have concerned themselves with problem areas which occur with the method in the clinical laboratory. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize our experiences with the liquid scintillation technique in the clinical situation

  9. Abstracts of the 30. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Several aspects concerning biochemistry and molecular biology of either animals, plants and microorganisms are studied. Topics such as cell membrane structures (including receptors), enzymatic assays, biological pathways, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions are focused. The use of radiolabelled compounds (radioassay, radioreceptor assay) and nuclear magnetic resonance are the most applied techniques

  10. Abstracts of the 29. annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Several aspects concerning biochemistry and molecular biology of either animals (including man), plants and microorganisms are studied. Topics such as cell membrane structures (including receptors), enzymatic assays, biological pathways, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions are focused. The use of radiolabelled compounds (radioassay, radioenzymatic assay, radioreceptor assay and nuclear magnetic resonance are the most applied techniques

  11. Abstracts of the 28. Annual meeting of the Brazilian Society on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Biochemistry, genetic and molecular biology aspects of either animals (including man), plants and microorganisms are studied. Topics such as cell membrane structures (including receptors), enzymatic assays, biological pathways, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions are focused. The use of radiolabelled compounds (radioassay, radioenzymatic assay, radioreceptor assay) and nuclear magnetic resonance are the most applied techniques

  12. Stability of niclosamide in water under local conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hindi, A.M.; Sidra, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The stability of 14 C-labelled niclosamide was studied in distilled water at two different pH values and in canal water. 2 mg/1 niclosamide solutions were exposed to direct atmospheric conditions. The activity was followed by radioassay and the concentration of niclosamide was determined by GLC. The total activity was found to decrease to 46.0% in weakly acidic solution (pH 6.5), 45% in neutral solution (pH 7.0) and 16.7% in filtered canal water after three weeks. GLC analysis showed that niclosamide concentration had dropped to 0.05, 0.06 and 0.03 mg/1 in weakly acidic, neutral medium and canal water after the same period. GLC analysis as compared to radioassay indicated the presence of increasing amounts of degradation product(s), in the chloroform extracts of water with time, which were not detected by GLC

  13. Solid-phase radioimmunoassay for vitamin B12 in serum, with use of radioiodinated tyrosine methyl ester of vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, D.B.; Painter, K.; Niswender, G.D.

    1978-01-01

    Although radioassays for vitamin B 12 with use of any of several binding proteins have been available for many years, a radioimmunoassay for B 12 has not been reported. We describe here such a radioimmunoassay, incorporating, for the first time, a radioiodinated tyrosine methyl ester of B 12 as the radioactive tracer. Polypropylene tubes are coated with antiserum raised in a rabbit against B 12 /bovine serum albumin to simplify the separation of bound and free radioactivity. Factors affecting the preparation of coated tubes are described. The assay is accurate, sensitive, precise, and specific for vitamin B 12 . Accuracy of the assay is unaffected by the presence of denatured protein. The advantages of this radioimmunoassay over conventional radioassays are discussed

  14. Simple radioisotopic technique for the study of urate transport in the rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, R.G.; Levitt, M.F.; Maesaka, J.K.; Katz, J.H.

    1974-01-01

    To study uric acid transport in single nephrons and whole kidney of the rat, a technique has been developed for the radioassay of uric acid-2- 14 C in plasma, urine, and tubular fluid. Labeled allantoin, which results from the in vivo oxidation of uric acid-2- 14 C, is readily separated from the labeled uric acid by a two-step elution from a strongly basic anion exchange resin using column chromatography. It is concluded that this radioassay is a valid technique and that it provides a more sensitive and precise means of measuring U/P uric acid ratios at endogenous plasma uric acid concentrations than does a conventional differential spectrophotometric method

  15. Adaptation of a T3-uptake test and of radioimmunoassays for serum digoxin, thyroxine, and triiodothyronine to an automated radioimmunoassay system: ''Centria''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertingshausen, G.; Shapiro, S.I.; Green, G.; Zborowski, G.

    1975-01-01

    We report the adaptation of four radioassays to the prototype of an automated radioimmunoassay system (''Centria,'' Union Carbide). The system consists of three integrated modules: an automated pipettor, which dispenses samples and reagents; the key module, an incubator/separator, in which centrifugal force is used to initiate and terminate multiple radioassay incubations and separations simultaneously; and a gamma-counter/computer, which counts three tubes simultaneously and converts counts into concentration units. Radioimmunoassays for thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and digoxin were developed with use of well-characterized antibodies and of prepackaged Sephadex-containing columns to separate bound and free radioactive ligand. A triiodothyronine-uptake test in which the same kind of columns were used was also adapted to the instrument. Results for clinical samples compared favorably with those obtained by manual procedures. We report data on correlation between different methods and preliminary data on precision of the prototype system

  16. Quality Assistance Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANTALOUB, M.G.

    2000-01-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Word Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required methods used for waste characterization. The Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, DOE/WIPP-069 (WIPP-WAC) delineates the quality assurance objectives which have been established for NDA measurement systems. Sites must demonstrate that the quality assurance objectives can be achieved for each radioassay system over the applicable ranges of measurement. This report summarizes the validation of the WRAP NDA systems against the radioassay quality assurance objectives or QAOs. A brief description of the each test and significant conclusions are included. Variables that may have affected test outcomes and system response are also addressed

  17. Small scale purification of human pituitary lutropin (hLH) for use in radioligand assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, I.; Morgante, L.; Bartolini, P.

    1988-08-01

    Human lutropin (hLH) is a relatively unstable protein, which even in lyophilised form tends to dissociate into subunits during long storage periods. Considering the limited disposibilty of human pituitaries, a small-scale extraction method is proposed for radioassays. Starting from 10 and 20 hypophyses after Sephadex G 100 purification, 10 μg/gland with approximate 10% purity was obtained. After the last purification, hLH recovery was of 1.5 μg/gland. (author) [pt

  18. Status of radioimmunoassay services in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia, I.G.; Bonoan, L.S.; Medina, V.F.O.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the participation of the Philippines as a member state of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the Regional Cooperation Agreement (RCA) project on radioimmunoassay of thyroid related hormones in Asia and the Pacific. Seven of the twenty-three radioassay laboratories engaged in RIA work have signified their agreement to participate in the program. The proposed organization and function structure of the project, the projected RIA use and strategy to popularize use of RIA are given. (ELC)

  19. Experiences with liquid scintillation counting of 3H, 14C and 35S from plant material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.

    1974-01-01

    Relative merits of different methods in radioassay of three soft beta emitting isotopes like 3 H, 14 C and 35 S from plant material have been assessed. The methods used are: (1) combustion method (2) use of tissue solubilizing agents and (3) wet digestion method. Results show that determinations of 14 C by combustion method; 3 H by combustion and Mahin and Lofberg's method; and 35 S by wet digestion method are superior for plant material than the other methods tried. (author)

  20. An assay for serum vitamin-B12 and for intrinsic factor antibody type I by means of hog intrinsic factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudak, J.; Berger, Z.; Varga, L.

    1980-01-01

    A new radioassay method was elaborated for the determination of the plasma level of vitamin B 12 and of the intrinsic factor antibody type I. The assay applies vitamin-B 12 labelled with 58 Co, but replaces human intrinsic factor by hog intrinsic factor. 124 cases were investigated by both the original and this modified method, and the results were in very good agreement. (L.E.)

  1. Comparative study of the second antibody for radioimmunoassay totally produced in the country to a similar imported one (sheep serum anti-rabbit IgG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S.R. da; Borghi, V.C.; Wajchenberg, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    This work compares a second antibody for radioimmunoassay (RIA) produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP with a commercial one of known quality, produced by Radioassay Systems Laboratories, U.S.A.. This antiserum, sheep serum anti-rabbit IgG produced in its totality in the country, presented title and precipitation characteristics similar to those exhibited by the commercial product, being as suitable for the RIA separation as its imported similar. (author)

  2. Introduction to nuclear techniques in agronomy and plant biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vose, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: nature of isotopes and radiation; nuclear reactions; working with radioisotopes; detection systems and instrumentation; radioassay; radioisotopes and tracer principles; stable isotopes as tracers - mainly the use of 15 N; activation analysis for biological samples; x-ray fluorescence spectrography for plants and soils; autoradiography; isotopes in soils studies; isotopic tracers in field experimentation; nuclear techniques in plant science; nuclear techniques for soil water; radiation and other induced mutation in plant breeding. (author)

  3. 18. Annual meeting of the Federation of Societies on Experimental Biology; 19. Brazilian congress on clinical research; 28. Brazilian congress on neuroscience and behaviour. Accepted abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Utilization of radioisotopes and ionizing radiations is reported in several aspects related to various diseases. Biological pathways, biological receptors and metabolism are studied by radioassay, tracer techniques, labelled compounds (C14, tritium compounds, e.g.) and radiopharmaceuticals application. Radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and radiation effects are studied as well. In vivo dynamic function studies are presented, mainly in rats and mice. Environmental issues are also considered, specially regarding to soils and plants

  4. Proceedings of the 13. Annual meeting of the Federation of Societies on Experimental Biology; 23. Brazilian congress on biophysics; 30. Brazilian congress on pharmacology and experimental therapeutics; 33. Brazilian congress on physiology; 14. Brazilian congress on clinical research; 22. Brazilian congress on neuroscience and behaviour. Abstracts; Anais do 13. Reuniao anual da Federacao de Sociedades de Biologia Experimental; 23. Congresso brasileiro de biofisica; 30. Congresso brasileiro de farmacologia e terapeutica experimental; 33. Congresso brasileiro de fisiologia; 14. Congresso brasileiro de investigacao clinica; 22. Congresso brasileiro de neurociencias e comportamento. Resumos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Several aspects concerning neuroscience and behavior, compared physiology, endocrinology, pharmacology, molecular immunology and immuno diagnosis, biochemistry, genetic and toxicology of either animals, plants and microorganisms are studied. Topics such as cell membrane structures (including receptors), enzymatic assays, biological pathways, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions, blood pressure regulation are focused. The use of radiolabelled compounds, e.g. radioassay, radioimmunoassay, radioreceptor assay, are the most applied techniques.

  5. Prenatal detection of a probable heterozygote for ADA deficiency and severe combined immunodeficiency disease using a microradioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.A.; Kleijer, W.J.; Niermeijer, M.F.; Galjaard, H.; Herbschleb-Voogt, E.

    1980-01-01

    A pregnancy at risk for adenosine deaminase deficiency and severe combined immunodeficiency disease has been investigated by assay of adenosine deaminase activity in cultured amniotic fluid cells using a microradioassay. A low-normal level of consistent with heterozygote status in the foetus was found and confirmed after birth by assay of red cell and fibroblast adenosine deaminase activities. It is suggested that the radioassay method offers significant advantages in sensitivity and specificity over the standard spectrophotometric procedure. (author)

  6. Proceedings of the 13. Annual meeting of the Federation of Societies on Experimental Biology; 23. Brazilian congress on biophysics; 30. Brazilian congress on pharmacology and experimental therapeutics; 33. Brazilian congress on physiology; 14. Brazilian congress on clinical research; 22. Brazilian congress on neuroscience and behaviour. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Several aspects concerning neuroscience and behavior, compared physiology, endocrinology, pharmacology, molecular immunology and immuno diagnosis, biochemistry, genetic and toxicology of either animals, plants and microorganisms are studied. Topics such as cell membrane structures (including receptors), enzymatic assays, biological pathways, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions, blood pressure regulation are focused. The use of radiolabelled compounds, e.g. radioassay, radioimmunoassay, radioreceptor assay, are the most applied techniques

  7. Studies on the availability of sulphur in four soil series of soil and water management project, Patiala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Kesho Ram; Dev, G.

    1974-01-01

    Differential behaviour of four soils series (Banra, Fatehpur, Temple and Samana) for availability of S to wheat (Kalyan-sona) was studied in a pot experiment using five doses of labelled sulphur (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 kg/ha) applied as (NH 4 ) 2 35 SO 4 . The yield, sulphur content and total removal of sulphur by plant, was found dependent upon sulphur supplying power of the soil, which was confirmed by the radioassay data as well. (author)

  8. MCNP efficiency calculations of INEEL passive active neutron assay system for simulated TRU waste assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, W.Y.; Meachum, T.R.; Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.

    2000-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) passive active neutron (PAN) radioassay system is used to certify transuranic (TRU) waste drums in terms of quantifying plutonium and other TRU element activities. Depending on the waste form involved, significant systematic and random errors need quantification in addition to the counting statistics. To determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results, a statistical sampling and verification approach has been developed. In this approach, the total performance of the PAN nondestructive assay system is simulated using the computer models of the assay system, and the resultant output is compared with the known input to assess the total uncertainty. The supporting steps in performing the uncertainty analysis for the passive assay measurements in particular are as follows: (1) Create simulated waste drums and associated conditions; (2) Simulate measurements to determine the basic counting data that would be produced by the PAN assay system under the conditions specified; and (3) Apply the PAN assay system analysis algorithm to the set of counting data produced by simulating measurements to determine the measured plutonium mass. The validity of this simulation approach was verified by comparing simulated output against results from actual measurements using known plutonium sources and surrogate waste drums. The computer simulation of the PAN system performance uses the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Code System to produce a neutron transport calculation for a simulated waste drum. Specifically, the passive system uses the neutron coincidence counting technique, utilizing the spontaneous fission of 240 Pu. MCNP application to the SWEPP PAN assay system uncertainty analysis has been very useful for a variety of waste types contained in 208-ell drums measured by a passive radioassay system. The application of MCNP to the active radioassay system is also feasible

  9. Assay of vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovey, K.C.; Carrick, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    A radioassay is described for vitamin B12 which involves denaturing serum protein binding proteins with alkali. In the denaturation step a dithiopolyol and cyanide are used and in the intrinsic factor assay step a vitamin B12 analogue such as cobinamide is used to bind with any remaining serum proteins. The invention also includes a kit in which the dithiopolyol is provided in admixture with the alkali. The dithiopolyol may be dithiothreitol or dithioerythritol. (author)

  10. Multielemental nondestructive neutron activation analysis of Dy, Mn, Eu, Na, Ga, W, La and Sm involving cyclic irradiations with 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narkhede, S.S.; Turel, Z.R.

    1995-01-01

    Dy, Mn, Eu, Na, Ga, W, La and Sm respond very well to INAA technique because of their favourable nuclear properties such as high thermal neutron cross-section or abundance. In the present work a method has been developed for the determination of these elements employing cycle irradiation with 252 Cf thermal neutron source. Radioassaying of the irradiated sample and standard was done employing HPGe detector in conjunction with a PC based MCA units. (author). 2 tabs

  11. SWEPP PAN assay system uncertainty analysis: Active mode measurements of solidified aqueous sludge waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is being used as a temporary storage facility for transuranic waste generated by the US Nuclear Weapons program at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, Colorado. Currently, there is a large effort in progress to prepare to ship this waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. In order to meet the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan nondestructive assay compliance requirements and quality assurance objectives, it is necessary to determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results produced by the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) Passive Active Neutron (PAN) radioassay system. This paper is one of a series of reports quantifying the results of the uncertainty analysis of the PAN system measurements for specific waste types and measurement modes. In particular this report covers active mode measurements of weapons grade plutonium-contaminated aqueous sludge waste contained in 208 liter drums (item description codes 1, 2, 7, 800, 803, and 807). Results of the uncertainty analysis for PAN active mode measurements of aqueous sludge indicate that a bias correction multiplier of 1.55 should be applied to the PAN aqueous sludge measurements. With the bias correction, the uncertainty bounds on the expected bias are 0 ± 27%. These bounds meet the Quality Assurance Program Plan requirements for radioassay systems

  12. Automated, computer interpreted radioimmunoassay results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.C.; Nagle, C.E.; Dworkin, H.J.; Fink-Bennett, D.; Freitas, J.E.; Wetzel, R.; Sawyer, N.; Ferry, D.; Hershberger, D.

    1984-01-01

    90,000 Radioimmunoassay results have been interpreted and transcribed automatically using software developed for use on a Hewlett Packard Model 1000 mini-computer system with conventional dot matrix printers. The computer program correlates the results of a combination of assays, interprets them and prints a report ready for physician review and signature within minutes of completion of the assay. The authors designed and wrote a computer program to query their patient data base for radioassay laboratory results and to produce a computer generated interpretation of these results using an algorithm that produces normal and abnormal interpretives. Their laboratory assays 50,000 patient samples each year using 28 different radioassays. Of these 85% have been interpreted using our computer program. Allowances are made for drug and patient history and individualized reports are generated with regard to the patients age and sex. Finalization of reports is still subject to change by the nuclear physician at the time of final review. Automated, computerized interpretations have realized cost savings through reduced personnel and personnel time and provided uniformity of the interpretations among the five physicians. Prior to computerization of interpretations, all radioassay results had to be dictated and reviewed for signing by one of the resident or staff physicians. Turn around times for reports prior to the automated computer program generally were two to three days. Whereas, the computerized interpret system allows reports to generally be issued the day assays are completed

  13. Radioimmunoassay and related procedures in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Full text: Radioassay procedures for the measurement of substances such as hormones, vitamins and drugs in the body fluids and tissues, above all in the blood, are now in the front rank of medical applications of radioactive materials. These procedures, which are carried out on specimens in the medical laboratory and do not involve the administration of any radioactive material to the patient, are now widely employed in the routine diagnosis and investigation of disease, whilst their use in research has led to important advances in many branches of medicine. Typical of radioassay methods is radioimmunoassay, which depends on the antigen-antibody reaction between the substance to be measured and the antibodies in an antiserum against that substance produced in a guinea-pig, rabbit, sheep or other animal. The importance of radioimmunoassay was recently underlined by the award of the Nobel Prize in medicine for 1977 to Dr. Rosalyn Yalow of the United States of America for her pioneer work on the method over the past two decades, particularly in relation to the measurement of protein hormones. This symposium was the third on the subject to have been sponsored by the IAEA. The first took place in Vienna in 1969 and the second in Istanbul in 1973. During the four years from 1973 to 1977, the growing commercial availability of reagents and kits for radioassays brought them into routine use. This in turn led to an increasing awareness of the need for assay standardization and quality control and to an increasing attention to techniques of assay data analysis. The burgeoning demands made on assay services stimulated interest in the possibilities for automation of assay procedures. Promising new methods were developed, notably solid-phase radioassay and radioreceptor assay. At the same time there was a resurgence of interest in alternative assay methods not based on the use of radioactive materials, which made a critical re-examination of the entire subject desirable. The

  14. Radioimmunoassay and related procedures in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-02-15

    Full text: Radioassay procedures for the measurement of substances such as hormones, vitamins and drugs in the body fluids and tissues, above all in the blood, are now in the front rank of medical applications of radioactive materials. These procedures, which are carried out on specimens in the medical laboratory and do not involve the administration of any radioactive material to the patient, are now widely employed in the routine diagnosis and investigation of disease, whilst their use in research has led to important advances in many branches of medicine. Typical of radioassay methods is radioimmunoassay, which depends on the antigen-antibody reaction between the substance to be measured and the antibodies in an antiserum against that substance produced in a guinea-pig, rabbit, sheep or other animal. The importance of radioimmunoassay was recently underlined by the award of the Nobel Prize in medicine for 1977 to Dr. Rosalyn Yalow of the United States of America for her pioneer work on the method over the past two decades, particularly in relation to the measurement of protein hormones. This symposium was the third on the subject to have been sponsored by the IAEA. The first took place in Vienna in 1969 and the second in Istanbul in 1973. During the four years from 1973 to 1977, the growing commercial availability of reagents and kits for radioassays brought them into routine use. This in turn led to an increasing awareness of the need for assay standardization and quality control and to an increasing attention to techniques of assay data analysis. The burgeoning demands made on assay services stimulated interest in the possibilities for automation of assay procedures. Promising new methods were developed, notably solid-phase radioassay and radioreceptor assay. At the same time there was a resurgence of interest in alternative assay methods not based on the use of radioactive materials, which made a critical re-examination of the entire subject desirable. The

  15. 19. Annual meeting of the Federation of Societies on Experimental Biology; 29. Brazilian congress on biophysics; 39. Brazilian congress on physiology; 20. Brazilian congress on clinical investigation; 28. Brazilian congress on neuro sciences and behavior. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Utilization of radioisotopes and ionizing radiations is reported in several aspects related to various diseases. Biological pathways, biological receptors and metabolism are studied by radioassay, tracer techniques, labelled compounds (C14, tritium compounds, e.g.) and radiopharmaceuticals application. Radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and radiation effects are studied as well. In vivo dynamic function studies are presented, mainly in rats and mice. Use of phantoms and tissue-equivalent materials in dosimetry and monitoring, evaluation of radiation dose distribution, calculation and measurement of adsorbed doses are also presented. Environmental issues are also considered, specially regarding to soils and plants

  16. 20. Annual meeting of the Federation of Societies on Experimental Biology; 30. Brazilian congress on biophysics; 37. Brazilian congress on pharmacology and experimental therapeutic; 40. Brazilian congress on physiology; 21. Brazilian congress on clinical investigation; 29. Brazilian congress on neuro sciences and behavior. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Utilization of radioisotopes and ionizing radiations is reported in several aspects related to various diseases. Biological pathways, biological receptors and metabolism are studied by radioassay, tracer techniques, labelled compounds (C14, tritium compounds, e.g.) and radiopharmaceuticals application. Radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and radiation effects are studied as well. In vivo dynamic function studies are presented, mainly in rats and mice. Use of phantoms and tissue-equivalent materials in dosimetry and monitoring, evaluation of radiation dose distribution, calculation and measurement of adsorbed doses are also presented. Environmental issues are also considered, specially regarding to soils and plants

  17. Biological reagents and their use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The patent relates to a technique for enabling rapid determination of the concentration of neuroleptic drugs such as the phenthiazines and butyrophenones in body fluids of patients. The method is based on the discovery that a neuroleptic drug contained in the body fluid of a patient will successfully compete with the binding of radioactive dopamine receptor site binders to dopamine receptor sites of dopamine receptor material in such a manner that an accurate determination of neuroleptic drug concentration can readily be made. The invention relates to method of radioassay, to a composition of matter for enabling such assays, and to a test kit for the performance of such assays. (U.K.)

  18. EANM 1989 - Strasbourg. Highlights - 1 September 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The second annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, (EANM), was attended by 2900 participants; a total of 999 abstracts were submitted from all over the world. The topics of the 748 oral and poster presentations were as follows: Heart and circulation (151 papers), oncology (89); instrumentation and data analysis (64), radiopharmaceuticals (55), neurology (48), gastro-enterology (44), nephrology (39), bone-joint disease (36), endocrinology (34), pediatrics (25), immunology - infectious disease (24), pulmonary disease (21), radioassay (18), and nuclear magnetic resonance (14 papers). Some remarkable results concerning cardiology, monoclonal antibodies, oncology as well as neurology are presented. (orig./MG)

  19. Evaluation of an automated assay system to measure soil radionuclides by L x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Drennon, B.J.; Crowell, J.M.

    1982-08-01

    An automated radionuclide assay system for conducting soil radioassays using L x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry was evaluated. Wet chemistry assay procedures were shown to be considerably more time consuming than similar analyses of soil on this radionuclide assay system. The detection limits of 241 Am and plutonium were determined, as well as the reproducibility of radionuclide assay results. The L x-ray spectrometric measurements were compared with radiochemical analyses on several tuff samples. The assay system's intrinsic germanium detector was found to respond linearly to varying low concentrations of 241 Am and plutonium, both of which were easily detected in the presence of elevated concentrations of 137 Cs

  20. The present state of nuclear medicine practice in Japan. A report of the 6th nationwide survey in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ushijima, Yo

    2008-01-01

    The Subcommittee of Japan Radioisotope Association on Survey of Nuclear Medicine Practice in Japan has performed a nationwide survey every five years since 1982. The 6th survey was performed in June 2007. The estimated total annual number of examinations was 1.41 million, 11.5% less than the previous survey (2002). The scintigraphy most frequently performed was bone (38%), followed by myocardium and brain perfusion scintigraphy. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) dramatically increased. 131 I therapy for thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism has been also increasing steadily, while the number of in vitro radioassays has been decreasing continuously since 1992. (author)

  1. Dual germanium detector system for the routine assay of low level transuranics in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    As an outgrowth of previous on soil radioassay, we have developed an automated assay system for determining the transuranic radionuclide content of soils, with particular interest in Pu. The system utilizes two commercial planar intrinsic germanium detectors in opposition. The large area of the detectors (2100 mm 2 ) and the thinness of the detector crystals (7 mm) permit sensitive analysis of the L x ray emission region of the transuranics (13 to 21 keV). With counting times of 5 hours, we obtain detection limits of 241 Am

  2. Investigations of the folic acid content in plasma and erythrocytes by RIA, with special regard to the effects of oral contraceptives, chronic alcohol abuse, and constant haemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poblotzki, E.

    1978-01-01

    With the aid of a new radioassay using 3 H folic acid as tracer and folic acid as standard, 500 folic acid as tracer and folic acid as standard, 500 folic acid measurements have been carried out in plasma and in the erythrocytes of normal persons and patients with chronic alcoholism, haemodialysis patients, patients with idiopathic sprue, and women taking oral contraceptives. According to the findings, folic acid therapy seems to be necessary in chronic alcoholics, patients with renal insufficiency under constant haemolysis, and in patients with idiopathic sprue. (AJ) [de

  3. Sample handling and chemical procedures for efficacious trace analysis of urine by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Rack, E.P.; Roman, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Important for the determination of trace elements, ions, or compounds in urine by chemical neutron activation analysis is the optimization of sample handling, preirradiation chemistry, and radioassay procedures necessary for viable analysis. Each element, because of its natural abundance in the earth's crust and, hence, its potential for reagent and environmental contamination, requires specific procedures for storage, handling, and preirradiation chemistry. Radioassay techniques for radionuclides vary depending on their half-lives and decay characteristics. Described in this paper are optimized procedures for aluminum and selenium. While 28 Al (T 1/2 = 2.24 min) and 77m Se(T 1/2 = 17.4s) have short half-lives, their gamma-ray spectra are quite different. Aluminum-28 decays by a 1779-keV gamma and 77m Se by a 162-keV gamma. Unlike selenium, aluminum is a ubiquitous element in the environment requiring special handling to minimize contamination in all phases of its analytical determination

  4. Determination of urine metabolites containing radioactivatable elements by molecular neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Rack, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    As urine is a final stage for the metabolic pathways of essential trace elements or chemical toxins, it is becoming increasingly important to not only report levels of trace elements but to determine the molecular or ionic identity of these trace elements. For a biological system such as urine, a molecular neutron activation analysis (MONAA) approach must involve a deproteinization step, where necessary, to ensure that metabolites such as amino acids, bases, r nucleosides are not protein bound prior to chemical separation. This can involve the simple application of ammonia or acid hydrolysis. All separations for the metabolites containing the radioactivatable element must be performed prior to neutron irradiation and subsequent radioassay for the metabolite. Separation procedures can include high-pressure liquid chromotography (HPLC), ion-exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, solvent extraction, and/or gas chromatography. After separation, the separated metabolite is neutron irradiated and and radioassayed for the radioactivity in the metabolite. A review of previous work involving the determination of hormonal iodine, iodoamino acids, chlorinated pesticides, trimethyl-selenonium, and selenoamino acids in urine is discussed

  5. Preparation of a 125I-labelled conjugate of pteroylglutamic acid and its use in a radio ligand assay of folate in blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, L.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of a 125 I-labelled folate derivative is described for use in the radioassay of folate in serum and whole blood haemolysate. Pteroylglutamic acid (PGA) was conjugated with tyramine in dimethylformamide solution using a mixed anhydride procedure. The product was characterised by its ultra-violet absorption spectrum and its electrophoretic mobility. Iodination of this conjugate with 125 I, using Chloramine-T as oxidant, was carried out and gave high incorporation of label. The iodinated product, which was separated from other reactants by a simple and rapid Amberlite-IRA-400 resin separation technique, bound avidly to the folate-binding protein of cow's milk, enabling dose response curves to be constructed which provided a sensitive and precise assay for folate in serum and whole blood haemolysates. Comparison of the results obtained on serum and whole blood haemolysates with an established microbiological procedure gave good agreement. The radioassay described had improved precision at low folate levels where the discriminating need of the assay is greatest. (author)

  6. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with 125 I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with 125 I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with 125 I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined

  7. Evaluation of the dose to man in relation to the behavior of tritium from irrigation water in agricultural crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmann, R.; Bruwaene, R. van; Koch, G.; Grauby, A.; Delmas, J.; Athalye, V.

    1977-01-01

    A research program on the transfer of tritium from the irrigation water in the soil-plant environment provides valuable ecological information on the effects of tritium releases from nuclear installations under temperate humide and mediterranean climatic conditions. Field studies are carried out on experimental plots by spraying the crops with irrigation water contaminated with tritium on a single dose, the reference level chosen is 1 nCi/litre. The following crops are investigated: prairie, rye-grass, potato, pea, barley, carrot and sugarbeet as temperate region cultures, and vineyard, olive-tree and orange-tree as mediterranean cultures. Soil and plants samples are collected for radioassay to determine the tritium incorporation in tissue water and organic matter fractions. The tritium activity in these crops after harvest is correlated to the level of radiation dose received through human diet [fr

  8. Characterizing cemented TRU waste for RCRA hazardous constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeamans, D.R.; Betts, S.E.; Bodenstein, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has characterized drums of solidified transuranic (TRU) waste from four major waste streams. The data will help the State of New Mexico determine whether or not to issue a no-migration variance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) so that WIPP can receive and dispose of waste. The need to characterize TRU waste stored at LANL is driven by two additional factors: (1) the LANL RCRA Waste Analysis Plan for EPA compliant safe storage of hazardous waste; (2) the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) The LANL characterization program includes headspace gas analysis, radioassay and radiography for all drums and solids sampling on a random selection of drums from each waste stream. Data are presented showing that the only identified non-metal RCRA hazardous component of the waste is methanol

  9. Small scale extraction and purification of human prolactin for the preparation of radioimmunoassay reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, L.E.M.F.

    1989-01-01

    Purification of human prolactin from pituitaries was carried out in our laboratory to obtain a pure reagent for use in RIA. The extraction and purification procedure was adapted from the method of Mc. Lean et al., and it involves the following steps: 1. Extraction of frozen pituitaries in buffers 0.14M phosphate/citrate pH 4.0 and 0.05M ammonium acetate pH 10.0. 2. Purification by hydrophobic interaction chromatography on Phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B in the presence of acetonitrile. 3. Purification by anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose Cl-68. The purification method is considered effective for obtaining a hPrl of the purity needed for radioassay purposes, having the advantage of rapidity and relative simplicity. (author) [pt

  10. Extraction of 14C-labeled photosynthate from aquatic plants with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filbin, G.J.; Hough, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    DMSO was tested as a solvent to extract 14 C-labeled photosynthate from three species of aquatic plants in photosynthesis measurements and compared with the dry oxidation method for plant radioassay. Extraction of ca. 300 mg of fresh or rehydrated dry plant tissue samples in 10 ml of reagent-grade DMSO for 8h at 65 0 C resulted in a stable, nonviscous solution with excellent liquid scintillation counting characteristics. Extraction efficiency was in the range of 96-99% of fixed 14 C, and precision was comparable to, or better than, that obtained with dry oxidation. The method is simple and inexpensive, and for fresh tissue the same sample extracts can be used for chlorophyll analyses

  11. Rapid separation and liquid scintillation spectroscopic determination of Sr-89, Sr-90 and transuranium elements of interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchtela, Karl; Grass, F.; Schoenhofer, F.

    1995-01-01

    At the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities investigations related to radioactivity in the environment have started around 1960 with monitoring of the site before and after operation of the reactor. Analysis schemes for fission nuclides had been worked out to determine nuclear weapons fallout. Food analysis had do be done, although on a very small scale, on Austrian export crops since 1970. In the seventies the Atominstitute participated in a Coordinated Research Programme on monitoring radioactivity in Danube river water. Radon and radon daughter products in various parts of Austria and radionuclides in construction materials were radioassayed by the Health Physics section. Since 1986 food and environmental radioactivity measurements are done for cooperating governmental and private institutions

  12. Background Model for the Majorana Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, C.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.

    The Majorana Collaboration is constructing a system containing 40 kg of HPGe detectors to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of a future tonne-scale experiment capable of probing the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region. To realize this, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. This goal is pursued through a combination of a significant reduction of radioactive impurities in construction materials with analytical methods for background rejection, for example using powerful pulse shape analysis techniques profiting from the p-type point contact HPGe detectors technology. The effectiveness of these methods is assessed using simulations of the different background components whose purity levels are constrained from radioassay measurements.

  13. Introduction to nuclear techniques in agronomy and plant biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vose, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    A scientific textbook concerning the use of nuclear techniques in agricultural and biological studies has been written. In the early chapters, basic radiation physics principles are described including the nature of isotopes and radiation, nuclear reactions, working with radioisotopes, detection systems and instrumentation, radioassay and tracer techniques. The remaining chapters describe the applications of various nuclear techniques including activation analysis for biological samples, X-ray fluorescence spectrography for plants and soils, autoradiography, isotopes in soils studies, isotopic tracers in field experimentation, nuclear techniques in plant function and soil water studies and radiation-induced mutations in plant breeding. The principles and methods of these nuclear techniques are described in a straightforward manner together with details of many possible agricultural and biological studies which students could perform. (U.K.)

  14. Neutron activation analysis of essential elements in Multani mitti clay using miniature neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, S.; Rahman, S.; Faiz, Y.; Siddique, N.

    2012-01-01

    Multani mitti clay was studied for 19 essential and other elements. Four different radio-assay schemes were adopted for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using miniature neutron source reactor. The estimated weekly intakes of Cr and Fe are high for men, women, pregnant and lactating women and children while intake of Co is higher in adult categories and Mn by pregnant women. Comparison of MM clay with other type of clays shows that it is a good source of essential elements. - Highlights: ► Multani mitti clay has been studied for 19 essential elements for human adequacy and safety using INAA and AAS. ► Weekly intakes for different consumer categories have been calculated and compared with DRIs. ► Comparison of MM with other type of clays depict that MM clay is a good source of essential elements.

  15. Root bioactivity of corn and sunflower as evaluated by 75Se-plant injection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haak, E.; Paltineanu, I.C.

    1982-01-01

    A tracer technique was used for root studies under field conditions on a chernozemic soil in Romania. 75 Se was injected at the stem base and radioassayed for its presence in soil profiles with a gammasond lowered to different depths. Based on the assumption that 75 Se is preferably transferred within the root system to active root tissue of injected plants, the root bioactivity was estimated for corn at the knee high stage and just before tasseling, and for sunflower at early maturing, the crops being subjected to different N-fertilization and irigation treatments. The pattern of root bioactivity varied with crop, time and treatment applied. The technique, which is briefly described, seems to be a promising tool for delineation of root response to variation with depth in the soil profile of moisture and nutrient status and as shown in this pilote investigation for delineation of effects of irrigation and N-fertilization. (Authors)

  16. RIA in cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourani, M.H.

    1983-01-01

    When one discusses the management of chronic cardiac diseases, and in particular congestive heart failure (CHF), one cannot but think of digitalis and the important role it plays in the management of CHF. One also has to think about digitalis toxicity and the narrow margin between the therapeutic and toxic doses of digitalis and the important role that monitoring the serum level of the drug play in preventing and/or recognizing its toxic effects. Again, RIA has something to offer the clinician in this area. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the radioassays for CPK-MB and digoxin mainly, as well as touch upon other assays of use in evaluating patients with cardiovascular disease

  17. Sensitive, specific radioisotope assay for L-glutamine-D-fructose-6- phosphat aminotransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, M.; Tourian, A.; Hung, W.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A sensitive and specific radioassay for L-glutamine-D-fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase (EC 5.3.1.19) activity is presented. Picomoles of product are measurable, and the assay can be applied to systems having limited quantities of available protein, particularly in extracts of either cell or organ cultures. The assay is at least 10,000 times more sensitive under K 1 concentrations of fructose 6-phosphate than the modified Elson-Morgan colorimetric assay and 20 times more sensitive under saturating conditions of fructose 6-phosphate. As little as 0.5 μg of cell-extract protein will yield measurable product. In contrast, 280 μg of crude-extract protein from colon is required with the modified Elson-Morgan colorimetric assay

  18. Tracer study on sulphur use efficiency in potato-barley sequence on acid soil of Shimla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sud, K.C.; Sharma, R.C.; Sharma, N.K.

    1999-01-01

    Controlled studies were conducted on acidic soil of Fagu (Shimla) to study the efficiency of labelled ammonium sulphate as effected by farmyard manure (FYM) on potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and its residual effect on succeeding barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). The direct and residual effects of FYM and sulphur on dry matter yield and S concentration in potato and barley plants were significant. Applied FYM had a positive effect on radioassay values i.e. % Sdff and % S utilization by potato from labelled S carrier, whereas, the residual effect of applied S on barley was more than its direct effect on potato. Results indicate that combined application of S and FYM resulted in 3.4 per cent more S contribution to barley crop and was reflected in % S utilization values. (author)

  19. The use of radioisotopes in the investigation of the iodine status and thyroid function in farm animals in the Sudan. Part of a coordinated programme on the use of isotopes to diagnose moderate mineral imbalances in farm animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid Eltom Ali

    1980-10-01

    The thyroid weight of 2000 grazing animals (sheep, goats, cattle and camels), together with an estimate of thyroid activity and the iodine content of milk, using 131 I, suggest that iodine deficiency prevails in extensive areas of the Sudan. Iodine supplementation for humans and animals in the Sudan appears justified. Results are based on radioassays carried out to determine the blood serum levels of thyroxine and triiodothyronine, and the thyroid uptake of 131 I under conditions of adequate I-uptake. The I-content of milk (and blood serum, pasture, water and soil, where possible) was determined, in order to correlate the levels of the thyroid hormones and of 131 I-uptake with I-supply. Experiments were also carried out on the effects of administering balanced and unbalanced mineral rations on I-metabolism and thyroid hormone production

  20. Vitamin D metabolites in human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisman, Y.; Bawnik, J.C.; Eisenberg, Z.; Spirer, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The concentrations of unconjugated 25-OHD, 24, 25(OH)2D, and 1,25(OH)2D were measured in human milk by competitive protein-binding radioassays following successive preparative Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and HPLC. The mean (+/- SE) concentration of 25-OHD was 0.37 +/- 0.03 ng/ml, of 24,25(OH)2D was 24.8 +/- 1.9 pg/ml, and of 1,25(OH)2D was 2.2 +/-0.1 pg/ml. The concentration of 25-OHD3 in milk as determined by HPLC and UV detection at 254 nm was 0.27 +/- 0.08 ng/ml. The milk concentrations of vitamin D metabolites did not correlate with the maternal serum 25-OHD levels. The total amounts of unconjugated vitamin D metabolites correspond to the known low bioassayable vitamin D antirachitic activity in human milk

  1. Production of biological reagents for radioimmunoassay second antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghi, V.C.; Silva, S.R. da; Bellini, M.H.; Lin, L.H.

    1992-02-01

    The experimental production of second antibody to be used in hormonal assays, in which the first antibody is raised in rabbits, is described. Four sheep were immunized with the rabbit immunoglobulin prepared at IPEN-CNEN laboratory. Their antisera were evaluated by the human thyrotropin radioimmunoassay employing materials provided by the National Hormone and Pituitary Program (USA), in comparison with a reference antiserum of known quality, produced in goat by the Radioassay Systems Laboratories - RSL (USA). From the fourth booster injection the animals developed antiserum with titer similar to that exhibited by the commercial product, even presenting higher values. These antisera are now being examinated for the optimal conditions of precipitation before be packed for future use and distribution. (author)

  2. The present state of nuclear medicine practice in Japan. A report of the 7th nationwide survey in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahara, Yasuo; Kinuya, Seigo; Inoue, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The Subcommittee on Survey of Nuclear Medicine Practice in Japan has performed a nationwide questionnaire surveys every five years since 1982. The latest questionnaire survey was performed in June 2012. The estimated total number of the annual examinations was 1.15 millions, 19% less than that of the last survey in 2007. The scintigraphic examination most frequently performed was bone scintigraphy, followed by myocardial and brain perfusion scintigraphy in order. The number of positron emission tomography (PET) studies and radionuclide targeted therapies increased by 40% and 62%, respectively, as compared to the 2007's survey. The increase was attributable to growing uses of commercially delivered fluorodexyglucose (FDG), and the newly started radionuclide targeted therapy for patients with metastatic bone tumor or malignant lymphoma, in addition to 131 I therapy for patients with thyroid cancer or Graves' disease. The number of in vitro radioassays has been decreasing continuously since 1992. (author)

  3. ScanSort{sup SM} at Whiteshell Laboratories for sorting of experimental cesium pond soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downey, H., E-mail: heath.downey@amecfw.com [Amec Foster Wheeler, Portland, ME (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The ScanSort{sup SM} soil sorting system is a unique and efficient radiological instrument used for measuring and sorting bulk soils and volumetric materials. The system performs automatic radioassay and segregation of preconditioned material using a gamma spectroscopy system mounted above a conveyor belt. It was deployed to the Whiteshell Laboratories site to process the excavated soils generated during the decommissioning of the former Experimental Cesium Pond. The ScanSort{sup SM} system was utilized to segregate material with Cs-137 concentrations above the established site unrestricted release and restricted site reuse levels as well as demonstrated the ability to accurately determine the radioactivity concentrations of the radiologically-impacted material and to confidently segregate volumes of that material for appropriate final disposition. (author)

  4. Investigation of radioactivity-induced backgrounds in EXO-200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, J. B.; Auty, D. J.; Barbeau, P. S.; Beck, D.; Belov, V.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Brunner, T.; Burenkov, A.; Cao, G. F.; Chambers, C.; Cleveland, B.; Coon, M.; Craycraft, A.; Daniels, T.; Danilov, M.; Daugherty, S. J.; Davis, C. G.; Davis, J.; Delaquis, S.; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A.; DeVoe, R.; Didberidze, T.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dunford, M.; Fairbank, W.; Farine, J.; Feldmeier, W.; Fierlinger, P.; Fudenberg, D.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Graham, K.; Gratta, G.; Hall, C.; Herrin, S.; Hughes, M.; Jewell, M. J.; Jiang, X. S.; Johnson, A.; Johnson, T. N.; Johnston, S.; Karelin, A.; Kaufman, L. J.; Killick, R.; Koffas, T.; Kravitz, S.; Kuchenkov, A.; Kumar, K. S.; Leonard, D. S.; Licciardi, C.; Lin, Y. H.; Ling, J.; MacLellan, R.; Marino, M. G.; Mong, B.; Moore, D.; Nelson, R.; Odian, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Prescott, C. Y.; Rivas, A.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Schubert, A.; Sinclair, D.; Smith, E.; Stekhanov, V.; Tarka, M.; Tolba, T.; Tsang, R.; Twelker, K.; Vuilleumier, J. -L.; Waite, A.; Walton, J.; Walton, T.; Weber, M.; Wen, L. J.; Wichoski, U.; Wood, J.; Yang, L.; Yen, Y. -R.; Zeldovich, O. Ya.

    2015-07-15

    The search for neutrinoless double-beta decay ( 0 ν β β ) requires extremely low background and a good understanding of their sources and their influence on the rate in the region of parameter space relevant to the 0 ν β β signal. We report on studies of various β and γ backgrounds in the liquid-xenon-based EXO- 200 0 ν β β experiment. With this work we try to better understand the location and strength of specific background sources and compare the conclusions to radioassay results taken before and during detector construction. Finally, we discuss the implications of these studies for EXO-200 as well as for the next-generation, tonne-scale nEXO detector.

  5. Halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1975--February 14, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.

    1976-02-01

    High energy reactions of halogen atoms or ions, activated by nuclear transformations, are being studied in gaseous, high pressure, and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes, and other organic systems. Experimental and theoretical data are presented in the following areas: systematics of iodine hot atom reactions in halomethanes, reactions and systematics of iodine reactions with pentene and butene isomers, radiative neutron capture activated reactions of iodine with acetylene, gas to liquid to solid transition in hot atom chemistry, kinetic theory applications of hot atom reactions and the mathematical development of caging reactions, solvent dependence of the stereochemistry of the 38 Cl for Cl substitution following 37 Cl(n,γ) 38 Cl in liquid meso and dl-(CHFCl) 2 . A technique was also developed for the radioassay of Al in urine specimens

  6. Interaction effect on nitrogen and sulfur on growth and nutrient uptake by maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaggi, R.C.; Aulakh, M.S.; Dev, G.

    1977-01-01

    A pot culture experiment was conducted in the greenhouse on an arid brown loamy sand deficient in both available N and S with maize (Ganga-5) as the test corp. Three levels of N (0, 30, 60 ppm) as NH 4 Cl in factorial combination with three levels of S (0, 10, 20 ppm) as Na 2 35 SO 4 were replicated thrice. Application of N upto 60 ppm S significantly increased dry matter yield and uptake of N and S by maize (stem + levels) and their combined application showed sinergistic effect for both yield and uptake of these nutrients. Maximum yield of dry matter and uptake of the nutrients were obtained with the application of 60 ppm N and 20 ppm S. The radioassay data corroborated the beneficial effect of N on the efficiency of applied S. (author)

  7. Serum TBG and T4 concentration in non-thyroidal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Tobari, C.; Sekita, N.; Onodera, Y.; Asazu, M.; Someya, K.

    1983-01-01

    Routinely available radioassay kits have recently enabled the measurement of serum concentrations of thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) and thyroxine (T 4 ), both total (TT 4 ) and free (FT 4 ) in various disease conditions. Serum TBG and T 4 level were measured in variety of non-thyroidal diseases, of which significance was evaluated in comparison with that in thyroidal diseases. Abnormal serum TBG concentrations in various non-thyroidal diseases and pregnancy result in abnormal serum TT 4 levels, which may cause difficulty in differentiation of these conditions from hyper- or hypothyroidal states. Serum FT 4 levels give better indicator than TT 4 , though the difference among RIA kits are considerably large. However, measurement of serum FT 4 levels alone is not sufficient to distinguish non-thyroidal disease from thyroidal diseases with abnormal thyroidal function. The differentiation has to be based on the combination of clinical findings and results of multiple thyroidal function tests

  8. MR enhancement of epidural fibrosis by Gd-DTPA: Biodistribution and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J.S.; Delamater, R.; Van Dyke, C.W.; Masaryk, T.J.; Hueftle, M.G.; Bohlman, H.; Modic, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Epidural lumbar fibrosis was induced in eight beagle dogs at the L-6 level. Vascular injection with india ink showed abundant vessels in the scar. This agreed with light microscopy in eight patients with epidural fibrosis, which enhanced with Gd-DTPA from a clinical trial. Electron microscopy of epidural scar in humans and dogs demonstrated a continuous endothelium with scattered tight junctions. Biodistirbution was determined in four dogs with rapid MR scanning following intravenous (IV) bolus of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA and radioassay of tissue samples following Gd-153-DTPA IV injection. Maximum percent enhancement (70% humans, 100% dogs) occurred at 3-6 minutes in epidural fibrosis with a slow decline in enhancement over the next hour. These findings suggest that Gd-DTPA enhancement of epidural fibrosis is via an extracellular distribution within vascularized scar tissue

  9. SWEPP PAN assay system uncertainty analysis: Passive mode measurements of graphite waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, Woo Y.

    1997-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is being used as a temporary storage facility for transuranic waste generated by the U.S. Nuclear Weapons program at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, Colorado. Currently, there is a large effort in progress to prepare to ship this waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. In order to meet the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan nondestructive assay compliance requirements and quality assurance objectives, it is necessary to determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results produced by the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) Passive Active Neutron (PAN) radioassay system. To this end a modified statistical sampling and verification approach has been developed to determine the total uncertainty of a PAN measurement. In this approach the total performance of the PAN nondestructive assay system is simulated using computer models of the assay system and the resultant output is compared with the known input to assess the total uncertainty. This paper is one of a series of reports quantifying the results of the uncertainty analysis of the PAN system measurements for specific waste types and measurement modes. In particular this report covers passive mode measurements of weapons grade plutonium-contaminated graphite molds contained in 208 liter drums (waste code 300). The validity of the simulation approach is verified by comparing simulated output against results from measurements using known plutonium sources and a surrogate graphite waste form drum. For actual graphite waste form conditions, a set of 50 cases covering a statistical sampling of the conditions exhibited in graphite wastes was compiled using a Latin hypercube statistical sampling approach

  10. Uncertainty analysis of the SWEPP PAN assay system for glass waste (content codes 440, 441 and 442)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1996-10-01

    INEL is being used as a temporary storage facility for transuranic waste generated by the Nuclear Weapons program at the Rocky Flats Plant. Currently, there is a large effort in progress to prepare to ship this waste to WIPP. In order to meet the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan nondestructive assay compliance requirements and quality assurance objectives, it is necessary to determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results produced by the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) Passive Action Neutron (PAN) radioassay system. This paper discusses a modified statistical sampling and verification approach used to determine the total uncertainty of SWEPP PAN measurements for glass waste (content codes 440, 441, and 442) contained in 208 liter drums. In the modified statistical sampling and verification approach, the total performance of the SWEPP PAN nondestructive assay system for specifically selected waste conditions is simulated using computer models. A set of 100 cases covering the known conditions exhibited in glass waste was compiled using a combined statistical sampling and factorial experimental design approach. Parameter values assigned in each simulation were derived from reviews of approximately 100 real-time radiography video tapes of RFP glass waste drums, results from previous SWEPP PAN measurements on glass waste drums, and shipping data from RFP where the glass waste was generated. The data in the 100 selected cases form the multi-parameter input to the simulation model. The reported plutonium masses from the simulation model are compared with corresponding input masses. From these comparisons, the bias and total uncertainty associated with SWEPP PAN measurements on glass waste drums are estimated. The validity of the simulation approach is verified by comparing simulated output against results from calibration measurements using known plutonium sources and two glass waste calibration drums

  11. Uncertainty analysis of the SWEPP PAN assay system for glass waste (content codes 440, 441 and 442)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1996-10-01

    INEL is being used as a temporary storage facility for transuranic waste generated by the Nuclear Weapons program at the Rocky Flats Plant. Currently, there is a large effort in progress to prepare to ship this waste to WIPP. In order to meet the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan nondestructive assay compliance requirements and quality assurance objectives, it is necessary to determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results produced by the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) Passive Action Neutron (PAN) radioassay system. This paper discusses a modified statistical sampling and verification approach used to determine the total uncertainty of SWEPP PAN measurements for glass waste (content codes 440, 441, and 442) contained in 208 liter drums. In the modified statistical sampling and verification approach, the total performance of the SWEPP PAN nondestructive assay system for specifically selected waste conditions is simulated using computer models. A set of 100 cases covering the known conditions exhibited in glass waste was compiled using a combined statistical sampling and factorial experimental design approach. Parameter values assigned in each simulation were derived from reviews of approximately 100 real-time radiography video tapes of RFP glass waste drums, results from previous SWEPP PAN measurements on glass waste drums, and shipping data from RFP where the glass waste was generated. The data in the 100 selected cases form the multi-parameter input to the simulation model. The reported plutonium masses from the simulation model are compared with corresponding input masses. From these comparisons, the bias and total uncertainty associated with SWEPP PAN measurements on glass waste drums are estimated. The validity of the simulation approach is verified by comparing simulated output against results from calibration measurements using known plutonium sources and two glass waste calibration drums.

  12. Uncertainty analysis of NDA waste measurements using computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.; Meachum, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainty assessments for nondestructive radioassay (NDA) systems for nuclear waste are complicated by factors extraneous to the measurement systems themselves. Most notably, characteristics of the waste matrix (e.g., homogeneity) and radioactive source material (e.g., particle size distribution) can have great effects on measured mass values. Under these circumstances, characterizing the waste population is as important as understanding the measurement system in obtaining realistic uncertainty values. When extraneous waste characteristics affect measurement results, the uncertainty results are waste-type specific. The goal becomes to assess the expected bias and precision for the measurement of a randomly selected item from the waste population of interest. Standard propagation-of-errors methods for uncertainty analysis can be very difficult to implement in the presence of significant extraneous effects on the measurement system. An alternative approach that naturally includes the extraneous effects is as follows: (1) Draw a random sample of items from the population of interest; (2) Measure the items using the NDA system of interest; (3) Establish the true quantity being measured using a gold standard technique; and (4) Estimate bias by deriving a statistical regression model comparing the measurements on the system of interest to the gold standard values; similar regression techniques for modeling the standard deviation of the difference values gives the estimated precision. Actual implementation of this method is often impractical. For example, a true gold standard confirmation measurement may not exist. A more tractable implementation is obtained by developing numerical models for both the waste material and the measurement system. A random sample of simulated waste containers generated by the waste population model serves as input to the measurement system model. This approach has been developed and successfully applied to assessing the quantity of

  13. Preparation & in vitro evaluation of 90Y-DOTA-rituximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswaran, Mythili; Pandey, Usha; Dash, Ashutosh; Samuel, Grace; Venkatesh, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Radioimmunotherapy is extensively being used for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Use of rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody directed against the CD20 antigen in combination with suitable beta emitters is expected to result in good treatment response by its cross-fire and bystander effects. The present work involves the conjugation of p-isothiocyanatobenzyl DOTA (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA) to rituximab, its radiolabelling with 90Y and in vitro and in vivo evaluation to determine its potential as a radioimmunotherapeutic agent. Methods: Rituximab was conjugated with p-SCN-Bn-DOTA at 1:1 antibody: DOTA molar ratio. The number of DOTA molecules linked to one molecule of rituximab was determined by radioassay and spectroscopic assay. Radiolabelling of rituximab with 90Y was carried out and its in vitro stability was evaluated. In vitro cell binding studies were carried out in Raji cells expressing CD20 antigen. Biodistribution studies were carried out in normal Swiss mice. Results: Using both radioassay and spectroscopic method, it was determined that about five molecules of DOTA were linked to rituximab. Radiolabelling of the rituximab conjugate with 90Y and subsequent purification on PD-10 column gave a product with radiochemical purity (RCP) > 98 per cent which was retained at > 90 per cent up to 72 h when stored at 37°C. In vitro cell binding experiments of 90Y-DOTA-rituximab with Raji cells exhibited specific binding of 20.7 ± 0.1 per cent with 90Y-DOTA-rituximab which reduced to 15.5 ± 0.2 per cent when incubated with cold rituximab. The equilibrium constant Kd for 90Y-DOTA-Rituximab was determined to be 3.38 nM. Radiolabelled antibody showed clearance via hepatobiliary and renal routes and activity in tibia was found to be quite low indicating in vivo stability of 90Y-DOTA-rituximab. Interpretation & conclusions: p-SCN-Bn-DOTA was conjugated with rituximab and radiolabelling with 90Y was carried out. In vitro studies carried

  14. Preparation & in vitro evaluation of ⁹⁰Y-DOTA-rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswaran, Mythili; Pandey, Usha; Dash, Ashutosh; Samuel, Grace; Venkatesh, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy is extensively being used for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Use of rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody directed against the CD20 antigen in combination with suitable beta emitters is expected to result in good treatment response by its cross-fire and bystander effects. The present work involves the conjugation of p-isothiocyanatobenzyl DOTA (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA) to rituximab, its radiolabelling with [90] Y and in vitro and in vivo evaluation to determine its potential as a radioimmunotherapeutic agent. Rituximab was conjugated with p-SCN-Bn-DOTA at 1:1 antibody: DOTA molar ratio. The number of DOTA molecules linked to one molecule of rituximab was determined by radioassay and spectroscopic assay. Radiolabelling of rituximab with 90 Y was carried out and its in vitro stability was evaluated. In vitro cell binding studies were carried out in Raji cells expressing CD20 antigen. Biodistribution studies were carried out in normal Swiss mice. Using both radioassay and spectroscopic method, it was determined that about five molecules of DOTA were linked to rituximab. Radiolabelling of the rituximab conjugate with [90] Y and subsequent purification on PD-10 column gave a product with radiochemical purity (RCP) > 98 per cent which was retained at > 90 per cent up to 72 h when stored at 37°C. In vitro cell binding experiments of 90 Y-DOTA-rituximab with Raji cells exhibited specific binding of 20.7 ± 0.1 per cent with [90] Y-DOTA-rituximab which reduced to 15.5 ± 0.2 per cent when incubated with cold rituximab. The equilibrium constant K d for 90 Y-DOTA-Rituximab was determined to be 3.38 nM. Radiolabelled antibody showed clearance via hepatobiliary and renal routes and activity in tibia was found to be quite low indicating in vivo stability of [90] Y-DOTA-rituximab. p-SCN-Bn-DOTA was conjugated with rituximab and radiolabelling with 90 Y was carried out. In vitro studies carried out in Raji cells showed the specificity of the

  15. Metabolism of 14C-L-arginine and 14C-L-proline in excised burst buds and stem sections of citrus trees (Citrus unshiu Marc.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tadashi; Yamagata, Makoto; Tsukahara, Sadao

    1985-01-01

    Arginine and proline, which are the major forms of soluble reserve N, were fed singly in uniformly labelled 14 C-form to excised 2-year-old stem sections with a new shoot, to wood sections, and to burst buds from a 21-year-old satsuma mandarin tree. Metabolism was studied by radioassay and autoradiography. In stem sections with a new shoot, both 14 C-compounds were metabolized to acidic and neutral components, insoluble components, and 14 CO 2 . This conversion occurred to a greater extent in sections fed with arginine than with proline. When 14 C-arginine was fed, the highest 14 C-activity in the cationic fraction of stem sections, bark, wood and new shoots was found in γ-guanidinobutyric acid, followed by γ-aminobutyric acid and proline; low levels of 14 C was also found in ornithine and trace amounts in citrulline. These findings demonstrate that arginine is metabolized by at least two routes: via ornithine and via γ-guanidinobutyric acid. In every organ, the major metabolic products of 14 C-proline were pyrrolidone-5-carboxlic acid, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, asparagine, an unidentified compound (U 5 in Fig. 4), γ-aminobutyric acid and arginine. The basic metabolic pathways in the conversion of Both 14 C-compounds were the same in burst buds, new shoot, bark and wood, although there was a slight difference autoradiographically. (author)

  16. Assay method and compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Methods are described for measuring catecholamine levels in human and animal body fluids and tissues using the catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) radioassay. The assay involves incubating the biological sample with COMT and the tritiated methyl donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine( 3 H)-methyl. The O-methylated ( 3 H) epinephrine and/or norepinephrine are extracted and oxidised to vanillin- 3 H which in turn is extracted and its radioactivity counted. When analysing dopamine levels the assay is extended by vanillin- 3 H and raising the pH of the aqueous periodate phase from which O-methylated ( 3 H) dopamine is extracted and counted. The assay may be modified depending on whether measurements of undifferentiated total endogenous catecholamine levels or differential analyses of the catecholamine levels are being performed. The sensitivity of the assay can be as low as 5 picograms for norepinephrine and epinephrine and 12 picograms for dopamine. The assemblance of the essential components of the assay into a kit for use in laboratories is also described. (U.K.)

  17. Principles of RIA data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The ultimate objective of an RIA is to correlate observed values of radioactivity with observed clinical manifestations that may indicate the existence of a particular disease or metabolic malfunction. To achieve this objective, a two-step process may be considered. First, it is necessary to measure the concentration of a particular chemical entity, the analyte, in the sample presented for analysis. In most cases the analyte is a drug, hormone, or vitamin, or another well-defined chemical substance of known structure and molecular weight. The principal responsibility for measuring the analyte concentration rests with the clinical chemist performing the assay. Second, it is necessary to interpret the assay results in the light of patient history and clinical observations. The principal responsibility for this step lies with the clinician. In this paper, only the first step, the RIA, is considered. Although RIAs in particular are discussed, many of the topics considered apply equally well to radioassays in which the specific binder is not an antibody and to immunoassays in which the tag is not a radioisotope

  18. Iron, folacin, vitamin B12 and zinc status and immune response in elderly subjects in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry-Christian, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The iron, folacin, vitamin B 12 , and zinc status of a group of economically and socially disadvantaged elderly persons in the Washington Metropolitan Area was evaluated. Factors related to deficiencies of these nutrients, the relationships between the status of these nutrients and cell-mediated immunity, and the relationships of iron, folacin and vitamin B 12 status to hemoglobin levels in the subjects were also examined. It was also determined whether there were any interactions among iron, folacin, vitamin B 12 and zinc status in their relationships to cell-mediated immunity. Socio-demographic and nutritional data on the subjects were obtained using a questionnaire. Dietary data were obtained using a dietary record. A fasting blood sample was drawn and the levels of ferritin, folate and vitamin B 12 , and the erythrocyte levels of folate were determined by radioassay. Plasma and hair zinc levels were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cell-mediated immune response was determined by transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes after stimulation by mitogens, and by allogenic lymphocytes in the mixed lymphocyte reaction

  19. Development of a 2-site radioimmunoassay for antithyroglobulin antibodies using 125I-thyroglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.P.; Taymans, F.; Beckers, C.

    1977-01-01

    A 2-site radioassay for human antithyroglobulin auto-antibodies has been developed using human thyroglobulin (Tg) labelled with 125 I. The technique is based on (1) the use of polystyrene tubes coated with Tg, (2) the binding of the antibodies to the solid phase Tg, (3) the reaction of the labelled Tg with the insolubilized antibodies. Factors affecting the assay were evaluated including (a) the effect of the temperature, Tg concentration and coating time on the adsorption of Tg, (b) the stability and storage of the solid phase Tg, (c) the variations in temperature, reaction times and incubation volumes, (d) the effect of the serum proteins, (e) the influence of the variations in concentration and specific activity of the labelled Tg. Increasing sensitivity resulted from a prolonged incubation at low temperature, the addition of serum proteins and the use of an appropriate specific activity of 125 I-Tg. Nonspecific radioactive uptake normally averaged 1% or less of the total radioactivity added. The use of Tg coated tubes makes the technique rapid and simple to be operated. The ability of the coated tubes to be stored and the relative insensitivity of the test to fluctuations in the quality of the tracer represent additional advantages in the routine application of the method. (orig.) [de

  20. Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste - Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems

  1. Low-level flow counting of liquid chromatography column eluates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, N.G.L.; Farid, Y.; Stewart, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The principal parameters which determine the operation of a high-resolution, high-sensitivity radioactive flow monitor are described: a) Sample preparation to ensure adequate recovery of radiolabelled sample, metabolites and internal standard. b) The instrument background count rate, when no sample or radiolabel is present in the flow cell, is a function of shielding and a reduction in noise obtained with a coincidence time below one microsecond. c) The minimum detectable amount of label depends upon the machine background, HPLC eluent and scintillator flow, whether or not packed flow cells are used, flow cell geometry, and the scintillator used. d) Three types of flow cell have been designed to cover the majority of HPLC and isotope applications. e) The performance of solid and liquid scintillators. It is shown that an instrument has been designed taking account of these parameters. The resulting design satisfies present high sensitivity counting requirements and maintains the resolution of current HPLC procedures when detection is by simultaneous flow radioassay and by optical methods. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of [1-11C]-α-aminoisobutyric acid for tumor detection and amino acid transport measurement: Spontaneous canine tumor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Schmall, B.; Conti, P.S.; Dahl, J.R.; Rothman, L.; Sgouros, G.

    1985-01-01

    Alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) or α-methyl alanine, is a nonmetabolized amino acid treansported into cells particularly malignant cells, predominantly by the ''A'' amino acid transport system. Since it is not metabolized, [1- 11 C]-AIB can be used to quantify A-type amino acid transport into cells using a relatively simple compartmental model and quantitative imaging procedures (e.g. positron tomography). The tissue distribution of [1- 11 C]-AIB was determined in six dogs bearing spontaneous tumors, including lymphosarcoma, osteogenic sarcoma, mammary carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma. Quantitative imaging with tissue radioassay confirmation at necropsy showed poor to excellent tumor localization. However, in all cases the concentrations achieved appear adequate for amino acid transport measurement at known tumor locations. The observed low normal brain (due to blood-brain barrier exclusion) and high (relative to brain) tumor concentrations of [1- 11 C]-AIB suggest that this agent may prove effective for the early detection of human brain tumors. (orig.)

  3. Tritium Packages and 17th RH Canister Categories of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Kenneth Marshall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned large areas near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2011 and heightened public concern and news media attention over transuranic (TRU) waste stored at LANL’s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility. The removal of TRU waste from Area G had been placed at a lower priority in budget decisions for environmental cleanup at LANL because TRU waste removal is not included in the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Reference 1) that is the primary regulatory driver for environmental cleanup at LANL. The Consent Order is a settlement agreement between LANL and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) that contains specific requirements and schedules for cleaning up historical contamination at the LANL site. After the Las Conchas Fire, discussions were held by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with the NMED on accelerating TRU waste removal from LANL and disposing it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report summarizes available information on the origin, configuration, and composition of the waste containers within the Tritium Packages and 17th RH Canister categories; their physical and radiological characteristics; the results of the radioassays; and potential issues in retrieval and processing of the waste containers.

  4. Highly sensitive assay for tyrosine hydroxylase activity by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, T; Oka, K; Kato, T

    1979-07-21

    A highly sensitive assay for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with amperometric detection was devised based on the rapid isolation of enzymatically formed DOPA by a double-column procedure, the columns fitted together sequentially (the top column of Amberlite CG-50 and the bottom column of aluminium oxide). DOPA was adsorbed on the second aluminium oxide column, then eluted with 0.5 M hydrochloric acid, and assayed by HPLC with amperometric detection. D-Tyrosine was used for the control. alpha-Methyldopa was added to the incubation mixture as an internal standard after incubation. This assay was more sensitive than radioassays and 5 pmol of DOPA formed enzymatically could be measured in the presence of saturating concentrations of tyrosine and 6-methyltetrahydropterin. The TH activity in 2 mg of human putamen could be easily measured, and this method was found to be particularly suitable for the assay of TH activity in a small number of nuclei from animal and human brain.

  5. The projected background for the CUORE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduino, C.; Avignone, F.T.; Chott, N.; Creswick, R.J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Alfonso, K.; Hickerson, K.P.; Huang, H.Z.; Sakai, M.; Schmidt, J.; Trentalange, S.; Zhu, B.X. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Artusa, D.R.; Rusconi, C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Azzolini, O.; Camacho, A.; Keppel, G.; Palmieri, V.; Pira, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Banks, T.I.; Drobizhev, A.; Freedman, S.J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Wagaarachchi, S.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bari, G.; Deninno, M.M. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Beeman, J.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F.; Cosmelli, C.; Ferroni, F.; Piperno, G. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Benato, G.; Singh, V. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bersani, A.; Caminata, A. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M.; Faverzani, M.; Fiorini, E.; Gironi, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Nastasi, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pozzi, S.; Sisti, M.; Terranova, F.; Zanotti, L. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Branca, A.; Taffarello, L. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Bucci, C.; Cappelli, L.; D' Addabbo, A.; Gorla, P.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Laubenstein, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Canonica, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Cao, X.G.; Fang, D.Q.; Ma, Y.G.; Wang, H.W.; Zhang, G.Q. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Carbone, L.; Cremonesi, O.; Ferri, E.; Giachero, A.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Dafinei, I.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P.J.; Pettinacci, V.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Copello, S.; Di Domizio, S.; Fernandes, G.; Marini, L.; Pallavicini, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Cushman, J.S.; Davis, C.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Lim, K.E.; Maruyama, R.H. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Dell' Oro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Di Vacri, M.L.; Santone, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, L' Aquila (Italy); Franceschi, M.A.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Fujikawa, B.K.; Mei, Y.; Schmidt, B.; Smith, A.R.; Welliver, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Giuliani, A.; Novati, V.; Tenconi, M. [Universit Paris-Saclay, CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Gladstone, L.; Leder, A.; Ouellet, J.L.; Winslow, L.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Gutierrez, T.D. [California Polytechnic State University, Physics Department, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Han, K. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai (China); Hansen, E. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kadel, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Martinez, M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Moggi, N. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Scienze per la Qualita della Vita, Bologna (Italy); Nones, C. [CEA/Saclay, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Norman, E.B.; Wang, B.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); O' Donnell, T. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Center for Neutrino Physics, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Pagliarone, C.E. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Meccanica, Cassino (Italy); Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Wise, T. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Woodcraft, A. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Zimmermann, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Engineering Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Zucchelli, S. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te with an array of 988 TeO{sub 2} bolometers operating at temperatures around 10 mK. The experiment is currently being commissioned in Hall A of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. The goal of CUORE is to reach a 90% C.L. exclusion sensitivity on the {sup 130}Te decay half-life of 9 x 10{sup 25} years after 5 years of data taking. The main issue to be addressed to accomplish this aim is the rate of background events in the region of interest, which must not be higher than 10{sup -2} counts/keV/kg/year. We developed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation, based on results from a campaign of material screening, radioassays, and bolometric measurements, to evaluate the expected background. This was used over the years to guide the construction strategies of the experiment and we use it here to project a background model for CUORE. In this paper we report the results of our study and our expectations for the background rate in the energy region where the peak signature of neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te is expected. (orig.)

  6. 125I-labeled radioimmunoassay kits for progesterone evaluated for use in an in vitro fertilization program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blight, L.F.; White, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    We have evaluated two commercially available 125 I radioimmunoassay kits (Diagnostic Products Corp., DPC; and Radioassay Systems Laboratories, RSL) for measurement of serum or plasma progesterone, to determine their suitability for use in in vitro fertilization programs. Both kits were suitably rapid for program requirements. Results by both were linear with concentration up to 60 nmol/L, and both had acceptable lower detection limits of 0.3 nmol/L. Kit-determined progesterone concentrations (y) for 100 patients' samples correlated well with results by our existing 3H radioimmunoassay method (y . 1.11x + 0.2, r . 0.965 for the DPC kit; y . 1.01x + 1.4, r . 0.974 for the RSL kit). Mean analytical recovery for the RSL kit was 116%, that for the DPC kit, 202%. Within-batch precision, expressed as the mean CV for three concentrations of progesterone, was 6.5% for the RSL kit, and 16.4% for the DPC kit; between-day CV was 8.1% for the RSL kit, 17.7% for the DPC kit. We conclude that the RSL kit provides a rapid, precise, and accurate assay for serum progesterone, suitable for use in a fertilization program, but do not recommend the DPC kit for either this purpose or the more general purpose of tracking menstrual cycles

  7. Identification of radiopure titanium for the LZ dark matter experiment and future rare event searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Akerlof, C. W.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Alsum, S. K.; Araújo, H. M.; Arnquist, I. J.; Arthurs, M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Balashov, S.; Barry, M. J.; Belle, J.; Beltrame, P.; Benson, T.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boast, K. E.; Bolozdynya, A.; Boxer, B.; Bramante, R.; Brás, P.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. V.; Bunker, R.; Burdin, S.; Busenitz, J. K.; Carels, C.; Carlsmith, D. L.; Carlson, B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Cottle, A.; Coughlen, R.; Craddock, W. W.; Currie, A.; Dahl, C. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edberg, T. K.; Edwards, W. R.; Emmet, W. T.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Fruth, T.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gantos, N. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Gerhard, R. M.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Gomber, B.; Hall, C. R.; Hans, S.; Hanzel, K.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hillbrand, S.; Hjemfelt, C.; Hoff, M. D.; Holbrook, B.; Holtom, E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hor, J. Y.-K.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Hurteau, T. W.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kaboth, A.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Khazov, A.; Khromov, A. V.; Konovalov, A. M.; Korolkova, E. V.; Koyuncu, M.; Kraus, H.; Krebs, H. J.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kumpan, A. V.; Kyre, S.; Lee, C.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J.; Leonard, D. S.; Leonard, R.; Lesko, K. T.; Levy, C.; Liao, F.-T.; Lin, J.; Lindote, A.; Linehan, R. E.; Lippincott, W. H.; Liu, X.; Lopes, M. I.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lorenzon, W.; Luitz, S.; Majewski, P.; Manalaysay, A.; Manenti, L.; Mannino, R. L.; Markley, D. J.; Martin, T. J.; Marzioni, M. F.; McConnell, C. T.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Meng, Y.; Miller, E. H.; Mizrachi, E.; Mock, J.; Monzani, M. E.; Morad, J. A.; Mount, B. J.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; Nikkel, J. A.; O'Dell, J.; O'Sullivan, K.; Olcina, I.; Olevitch, M. A.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Piepke, A.; Powell, S.; Preece, R. M.; Pushkin, K.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C. A.; Richards, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rose, H. J.; Rosero, R.; Rossiter, P.; Saba, J. S.; Sarychev, M.; Schnee, R. W.; Schubnell, M.; Scovell, P. R.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Skarpaas, K.; Skulski, W.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Stancu, I.; Stark, M. R.; Stephenson, S.; Stiegler, T. M.; Stifter, K.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Temples, D.; Terman, P. A.; Thomas, K. J.; Thomson, J. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; Timalsina, M.; To, W. H.; Tomás, A.; Tope, T. E.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Va'Vra, J.; Vacheret, A.; van der Grinten, M. G. D.; Verbus, J. R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Waldron, W. L.; Wang, R.; Watson, R.; Webb, R. C.; Wei, W.-Z.; While, M.; White, D. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Woodward, D.; Worm, S.; Xu, J.; Yeh, M.; Yin, J.; Zhang, C.; Lux-Zeplin (LZ) Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment will search for dark matter particle interactions with a detector containing a total of 10 tonnes of liquid xenon within a double-vessel cryostat. The large mass and proximity of the cryostat to the active detector volume demand the use of material with extremely low intrinsic radioactivity. We report on the radioassay campaign conducted to identify suitable metals, the determination of factors limiting radiopure production, and the selection of titanium for construction of the LZ cryostat and other detector components. This titanium has been measured with activities of 238Ue < 1.6 mBq/kg, 238Ul < 0.09 mBq/kg, 232The = 0.28 ± 0.03 mBq/kg, 232Thl = 0.25 ± 0.02 mBq/kg, 40K < 0.54 mBq/kg, and 60Co < 0.02 mBq/kg (68% CL). Such low intrinsic activities, which are some of the lowest ever reported for titanium, enable its use for future dark matter and other rare event searches. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to assess the expected background contribution from the LZ cryostat with this radioactivity. In 1,000 days of WIMP search exposure of a 5.6-tonne fiducial mass, the cryostat will contribute only a mean background of 0.160 ± 0.001(stat) ± 0.030(sys) counts.

  8. The Majorana Low-noise Low-background Front-end Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope 76Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the 76Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolution performances. We present here the low-noise low- background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.

  9. Food and Environmental Protection Newsletter, Vol. 12, No. 2, July 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-15

    This most recent edition of Food and Environmental Protection newsletter highlights the continuing efforts at strengthening inter-agency collaboration in activities related to food contamination, including the ongoing participation in subsidiary bodies of the Joint FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission. Among other issues are recent activities of jointly managed (with our Monaco laboratories) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Applications of Radiotracer and Radioassay Technologies to Seafood Safety Risk Analysis, and on Survey of Fumonisin B1 Contamination of Food Grade Commercial Maize Kernel Lots in Nigeria, at the recently held 3rd Session of the Codex Committee on Contaminants in Foods (CCCF). These discussions led to Codex agreement to consider research arising from the CRP in the establishment of maximum levels for cadmium (oysters, scallops and cephalopods) in seafood, as well as the consideration of the IAEA generated data on fumonisins. Other inter-agency collaborative activities include input to the recently held Fourth Session of the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM) under the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), particularly in relation to the development of standards for the use of irradiation as a quarantine treatment

  10. Recycled scrap metal and soils/debris with low radioactive contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriker, A.W.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of large volume bulk shipments of materials with low radioactivity have characteristics that complicate compliance with normal transport regulations. Scrap metal for recycling sometimes contains radioactive material that was not known or identified by the shipper prior to it being offered for transport to a scrap recycle processor. If the radioactive material is not detected before the scrap is processed, radiological and economic problems may occur. If detected before processing, the scrap metal will often be returned to the shipper. Uranium mill-tailings and contaminated soils and debris have created potential public health problems that required the movement of large volumes of bulk material to isolated safe locations. Similarly, old radium processing sites have created contamination problems needing remediation. The US Department of Transportation has issued exemptions to shippers and carriers for returning rejected scrap metal to original shippers. Other exemptions simplify transport of mill-tailings and debris from sites being remediated. These exemptions provide relief from detailed radioassay of the radioactive content in each conveyance as well as relief from the normal requirements for packaging, shipping documents, marking, labelling, and placarding which would be required for some of the shipments if the exemptions were not issued. (Author)

  11. Food and Environmental Protection Newsletter, Vol. 12, No. 2, July 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-07-01

    This most recent edition of Food and Environmental Protection newsletter highlights the continuing efforts at strengthening inter-agency collaboration in activities related to food contamination, including the ongoing participation in subsidiary bodies of the Joint FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission. Among other issues are recent activities of jointly managed (with our Monaco laboratories) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Applications of Radiotracer and Radioassay Technologies to Seafood Safety Risk Analysis, and on Survey of Fumonisin B1 Contamination of Food Grade Commercial Maize Kernel Lots in Nigeria, at the recently held 3rd Session of the Codex Committee on Contaminants in Foods (CCCF). These discussions led to Codex agreement to consider research arising from the CRP in the establishment of maximum levels for cadmium (oysters, scallops and cephalopods) in seafood, as well as the consideration of the IAEA generated data on fumonisins. Other inter-agency collaborative activities include input to the recently held Fourth Session of the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM) under the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), particularly in relation to the development of standards for the use of irradiation as a quarantine treatment

  12. A radioimmunoassay for human antibody specific for microbial antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tew, J.G.; Burmeister, J.; Greene, E.J.; Pflaumer, S.K.; Goldstein, J.

    1977-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for detecting and quantitating antibody specific or microbial antigens is described. Bacterial, fungal, parasitic or viral antigens attached to bromoacetyl cellulose or the intact cells themselves were added to a series of two-fold dilutions of human serum. After a short incubation period, which allowed human antibody to attach to the antigens, the complex was thoroughly washed and carbon-14 labeled anti-human light chain antibody was added to each dilution. The resulting complex was washed, collected on a filter pad, placed in a scintillation vial and radioassayed. The relationship between radioactivity bound and -log 2 of the serum dilution was linear. The endpoint for each assay and a confidence interval was calculated by doing inverse prediction from simple linear regression. Results obtained using this assay indicated the presence of antibody in a pool of normal human sera specific for herpes virus and for both cell surface and intracellular antigens of Streptococcus mutans, Naegleria fowleri and Cryptococcus neoformans. In general the dominant response was against the intracellular antigens rather than cell surface antigens

  13. A non-destructive method of determination of biomass of mango (Mangifera indica L.) and guava trees using principle of isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotur, S.C.; Keshava Murthy, S.V.

    2004-01-01

    Biomass of 4-year old trees 'Alphonso' mango was estimated by injecting carrier- free 32 P into the trunk followed by radioassay of the isotope after a complete dilution of 32 P in the tree (3 months after injection). The isotopically calculated plant volume (56.903 - 68.981 m 3 x10 3 ) and biomass (31.70 - 36.23 gx 10 -3 ) showed good agreement but generally overestimated both by about 19 per cent compared to the actual values determined physically (43.720 - 60.693 m 3 x10 3 and 22.88 - 34.78 gx 10 -3 , respectively). Application of the technique in a set of four 15-year old mango trees yielded volume estimates of 170.749 - 175.835 m 3 x10 3 (mean 173.512 ± 1.12 per cent) and biomass estimates of 73.0 - 87.4 gx10 -3 (mean = 80.32 ± 6.79 per cent). In another set of four 12-year old guava trees the corresponding values were 40.165 to 44.014 m 3 x10 3 (mean = 41.743 ± 3.42 per cent) and 22.252 gxl0 -3 (mean = 23.210 ± 2.95 per cent) respectively. The technique is of promise in fertilizer use efficiency and nutrient dynamics studies in tree crops. (author)

  14. 18F in hot atom chemistry and equilibrium chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Root, J.W.; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi; Knickelbein, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Superexcited molecules are unusual species that at present can only be investigated using nuclear recoil methods. The thermochemical technique for measuring the excitation energy distributions of superexcited molecules is reviewed and applied to recent studies of CF 3 18 F and C 2 F 5 18 F formed from high energy atomic exchange reactions in CF 4 and C 2 F 6 . The nascent CF 3 18 F and C 2 F 5 18 F range in energy from 1.7 to about 45 eV. The average energies of these products range from 15 to 20 eV. The internal excitation that accompanies these reactions is initially localized near the 18 F bonding site, and the C 2 F 5 18 F decomposition mechanism is non-statistical. Moderated nuclear recoil experiments yield mechanisms and rates for the reactions of thermal 18 F atoms. Under our standard experimental conditions from 3.4 x 10 4 to 3.4 x 10 8 labeled product molecules are available for radioassay. This procedure is free from systematic error and the measurements yield exceptional precision and sensitivity because (1) high energy reactions with the thermally active reagents are suppressed. (2) the host environment is rigorously controlled, and (3) the molecular products from many single atom reactions are directly counted. The limitations of this technique are described and results are presented for the reactions of thermal 18 F atoms with CH 4 and C 2 H 4 . (J.P.N.)

  15. Development and characterization of radioimmunoassay methods for the measurement of iodothyronines (T4, T3 and rT3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, E.M.K.; Vieira, J.G.H.; Barros Maciel, R.M. de; Fonseca, R.M.G.

    1982-01-01

    The experience acquired in the development of radioimmunoassay for T 4 , T 3 and rT 3 in unextrated serum is described. Antisera were produced in rabbits using iodothyronines conjugated to bovine serum albumin: the antisera selected provided the development of sensitive and specific radioassay methods. Stable high activity T 3 , T 4 and rT 3 tracers were prepared by iodination of 3,5 T 2 , T 3 and 3,3' T 2 by the chloramine-T method, and purified by column chromatography on Sephadex G25. Binding of those iodothyronines to endogenous serum proteins was blocked by including 8-aniline-1-naphtalene sulphonic acid (ANSA) in the T 4 and T 3 assays and thymerosal in the rT 3 assay. Normal values were defined in 46 healthy euthyroid adults of both sexes: T 4 = 7,1 +- 1,3μg/dl; T 3 = 139 +- 35ng/dl and rT 3 = 18,0 +- 7,9ng/dl. (Author) [pt

  16. Determination of biomass of mango (Mangifera indica L.) trees by non-destructive method using principle of isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotur, S.C.; Keshava Murthy, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Biomass of 4-year old trees alphonso mango was estimated by injecting of carrier-free 32 P into the trunk followed by radio-assay of the isotope after a complete dilution of 32 P in the tree, being 3 months after injection. The isotopically calculated plant volume (59 903-68 981 cc plant -1 ) and biomass (31.70 - 36.23 kg plant -1 ) showed good agreement but generally overestimated both by about 23% compared to the actual values determined physically (43 720-60 693 cc plant -1 and 22.88-34.78 kg plant -1 , respectively). Application of the technique in a set of another four 15-year old mango trees yielded volume estimates of 1, 70, 749-1 75 835 cc plant -1 (mean=1, 75 835±1.12%) and biomass estimates of 73.0 - 87.4 kg plant -1 (mean=80.45±6.8%). The technique is of promise in fertilizer use efficiency and nutrient dynamics studies in tree crops. (author)

  17. Availability of S from superphosphate and CaSO4.2H2O to alfafa (Medicago sativa L. Pers.) using tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulakh, M.S.; Dev, G.

    1977-01-01

    The availability of S from superphosphate to alfalfa was evaluated and compared with CaSO 4 .2H 2 O (as the standard) in the greenhouse on a S deficient arid brown soil at 4 levels of applied S (0, 5, 10 and 20 ppm). A basal dose of N, P, K and Ca was made and the effect was studied for two growth stages (80 and 120 days). Sulphur application significantly increased the yield of dry matter, S content and total S removal in both the cuttings individually and for total harvest. In this effect, superphosphate was found to be more efficient. The radio-assay data confirmed that with graded levels of applied S, the fraction of fertilizer S in the plant increased without much off-setting S fraction from the native soil source, the effect being more with superphosphate treatment compared to CaSO 4 .2H 2 O. Phosphorus concentration in alfalfa decreased significantly with increasing level of applied S. The first cutting of alfalfa recorded higher P content in superphosphate series and in the second cutting, this difference between the two sources decreased. At optimum level of 20 ppm S, superphosphate was more effective than CaSO 4 .2H 2 O in narrowing N:S ratio to 11:1 and increasing S:P ratio to more than 1:1. (author)

  18. Transforming a Targeted Porphyrin Theranostic Agent into a PET Imaging Probe for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyun Shi, Tracy W.B. Liu, Juan Chen, David Green, David Jaffray, Brian C. Wilson, Fan Wang, Gang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrin based photosensitizers are useful agents for photodynamic therapy (PDT and fluorescence imaging of cancer. Porphyrins are also excellent metal chelators forming highly stable metallo-complexes making them efficient delivery vehicles for radioisotopes. Here we investigated the possibility of incorporating 64Cu into a porphyrin-peptide-folate (PPF probe developed previously as folate receptor (FR targeted fluorescent/PDT agent, and evaluated the potential of turning the resulting 64Cu-PPF into a positron emission tomography (PET probe for cancer imaging. Noninvasive PET imaging followed by radioassay evaluated the tumor accumulation, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of 64Cu-PPF. 64Cu-PPF uptake in FR-positive tumors was visible on small-animal PET images with high tumor-to-muscle ratio (8.88 ± 3.60 observed after 24 h. Competitive blocking studies confirmed the FR-mediated tracer uptake by the tumor. The ease of efficient 64Cu-radiolabeling of PPF while retaining its favorable biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and selective tumor uptake, provides a robust strategy to transform tumor-targeted porphyrin-based photosensitizers into PET imaging probes.

  19. Development of a method for RIA of MLH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haoyi; Jin Lichun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To develop a method of RIA for MLH to measure the serum level of LH in Rhesus Monkey for animal experiment in reproductive medicine. Methods: 125 I-MLH was prepared with chloramine T-Iodogen method. Rabbit anti-MLH was used as first antibody and sheep anti-rabbit IgG was used as separating agent. RIA was performed with liquid phase competitive radioassay. Results: The specific radioactivity of labelled antigen was 67 μg/mCi; antibody affinity constant was Ka = 3.44 x 10 -9 mol/L the shape of the standard curve was good. r = 0.991, intra-assay error CV = 3.49%, inter-assay error CV = 4.65%. The minimal detectable concentration was 0.42 μg/ml. Mean value of 30 normal Rhesus Monkey serum specimens was 1.17 +- 1.30 μg/ml. Conclusion: The developed method was simple reliable and sensitive. It would be of use in study of contraceptive and sex-physiology drugs

  20. Direct radioimmunoassay (RIA) of salivary testosterone: correlation with free and total serium testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittek, J.; L'Hommedieu, D.G.; Gordon, G.G.; Rappaport, S.C.; Southren, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple and sensitive direct RIA for determination of salivary testosterone was developed by using RSL NOSOLVEX TM (125 1) kit produced by Radioassay System Laboratories (Carcon, California). In addition, a relationship between salivary and serum free and total testosterone concentrations was studied in randomly selected 45 healthy subjects, 5 females on oral contraceptive pills and 28 hypertensive patients on various treatment regimens. The lowest weight of testosterone detectable by the modified method was equivalent to 1 pg/ml of saliva, taking into account analytical variability. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 5.09 +/- 2.7% and 8.2 +/- 5.9% respectively. Statistically significant correlations were found between salivary and serum free testosterone (r = 0.97) and salivary and serum total testosterone concentrations (r = 0.70 - 0.87). The exception to this was a group of hypertensive females in which no correlation (r = 0.14) between salivary and total serum testosterone was found. It is also of interest that, while salivary testosterone was significantly increased in subjects taking oral contraceptives and most of the hypertensive patients, the total serum testosterone concentration was in normal range. These findings suggest that the determination of salivary testosterone is a reliable method to detect changes in the concentration of available biologically active hormone in the circulation. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  1. The projected background for the CUORE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduino, C.; Alfonso, K.; Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Benato, G.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Branca, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Camacho, A.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Cappelli, L.; Carbone, L.; Cardani, L.; Carniti, P.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Copello, S.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Cushman, J. S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dafinei, I.; Davis, C. J.; Dell'Oro, S.; Deninno, M. M.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Drobizhev, A.; Fang, D. Q.; Faverzani, M.; Fernandes, G.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Hansen, E.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hickerson, K. P.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Keppel, G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Leder, A.; Ligi, C.; Lim, K. E.; Ma, Y. G.; Maino, M.; Marini, L.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P. J.; Napolitano, T.; Nastasi, M.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Novati, V.; Nucciotti, A.; O'Donnell, T.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sakai, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Santone, D.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Singh, V.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Tenconi, M.; Terranova, F.; Tomei, C.; Trentalange, S.; Vignati, M.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zhang, G. Q.; Zhu, B. X.; Zimmermann, S.; Zucchelli, S.; Laubenstein, M.

    2017-08-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of ^{130}Te with an array of 988 TeO_2 bolometers operating at temperatures around 10 mK. The experiment is currently being commissioned in Hall A of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. The goal of CUORE is to reach a 90% C.L. exclusion sensitivity on the ^{130}Te decay half-life of 9 × 10^{25} years after 5 years of data taking. The main issue to be addressed to accomplish this aim is the rate of background events in the region of interest, which must not be higher than 10^{-2} counts/keV/kg/year. We developed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation, based on results from a campaign of material screening, radioassays, and bolometric measurements, to evaluate the expected background. This was used over the years to guide the construction strategies of the experiment and we use it here to project a background model for CUORE. In this paper we report the results of our study and our expectations for the background rate in the energy region where the peak signature of neutrinoless double beta decay of ^{130}Te is expected.

  2. Characterization of edible clay (multani mitti) using INAA (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, S.; Fiaz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Multani Mitti is basically clay commonly used in cosmetics, medicines. It is also used for cleansing of body and hair and eating specially women (pregnant and lactating) and children. 16 Essential major, minor and trace elements (Ba, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Se Sr, Ti, V and Zn) have been determined in Multani Mitti (MM) clay using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) technique were studied in collected clay samples from Rakhi Gaj located 40 Km from D. G. Khan, Pakistan. These samples were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to detect the elemental hazard assessment. Radioassay schemes for three sets of elements after neutron irradiation and cooling were evolved to avoid matrix effects. The composition of MM clay shows major elements in descending order as Fe > K > Mg > Na > Mn > Zn > V > Rb > Cr >Ba followed by minor elements as Sr >Co > Cs with trace levels of Se. Data have been compared with clays available in literature globally. Intakes of essential elements were calculated for pregnant, lactating women and children. Intakes were found comparable to WHO levels except Fe and Cr. Risk assessment was measured using mathematical model. The quality assurance of data was performed using Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) of a similar matrix (IAEA Lake sediment SL-1 and IAEA Soil S-7). (author)

  3. [Phylogenetic diversity and activity of anaerobic microorganisms of high-temperature horizons of the Dagang Oilfield (China)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazina, T N; Shestakova, N M; Grigor'ian, A A; Mikhaĭlova, E M; Turova, T P; Poltaraus, A B; Feng, C; Ni, F; Beliaev, S S

    2006-01-01

    The number of microorganisms of major metabolic groups and the rates of sulfate-reducing and methanogenic processes in the formation waters of the high-temperature horizons of Dagang oilfield have been determined. Using cultural methods, it was shown that the microbial community contained aerobic bacteria oxidizing crude oil, anaerobic fermentative bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and methanogenic bacteria. Using cultural methods, the possibility of methane production from a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (H2 + CO2) and from acetate was established, and this result was confirmed by radioassays involving NaH14CO3 and 14CH3COONa. Analysis of 16S rDNA of enrichment cultures of methanogens demonstrated that these microorganisms belong to Methanothermobacter sp. (M. thermoautotrophicus), which consumes hydrogen and carbon dioxide as basic substrates. The genes of acetate-utilizing bacteria were not identified. Phylotypes of the representatives of Thermococcus spp. were found among 16S rDNAs of archaea. 16S rRNA genes of bacterial clones belong to the orders Thermoanaerobacteriales (Thermoanaerobacter, Thermovenabulum, Thermacetogenium, and Coprothermobacter spp.), Thermotogales, Nitrospirales (Thermodesulfovibrio sp.) and Planctomycetales. 16S rDNA of a bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate in the course of syntrophic growth with H2-utilizing methanogens was found at high-temperature petroleum reservoirs for the first time. These results provide further insight into the composition of microbial communities of high-temperature petroleum reservoirs, indicating that syntrophic processes play an important part in acetate degradation accompanied by methane production.

  4. Environmental and Occupational Safety Division annual progress report for 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Over 950 radiation workers were monitored at ORNL for both internal and external exposure to ionizing radiation and radioactive materials in 1984, and no employee exceeded 50% of the applicable DOE dose limit. No internal exposure exceeded 10% of the maximum permissible organ burden, as determined by in-vivo gamma spectrometry. Dose readings from 5000 TLDs and 136,000 pocket meters were determined, and more than 5800 calibrations were performed on these devices. Approximately 82,000 radioassays were performed; among these were 1500 urinalyses and 3000 radiochemical analyses. Over 3000 calibrations were performed for approximately 2000 portable and fixed survey instruments. Response teams were identified in support of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP). Documentation, procedures, and equipment for the RAP vehicle were upgraded. A long-range environmental plan was issued early in the year and again in June 1984 to document the scope and justification for each project. The DEM is developing an environmental information system for managing DOE-ORO and ORNL environmental data. Five hundred eighty-four waste disposal requests containing 5769 items were handled by the Hazardous Materials Control Group during 1984. The Office of Operational Safety made significant progress in the completion of Safety Analysis Reports for existing facilities. The Radiation and Safety Surveys Department is becoming increasingly involved in work resulting in facility improvement, repair, or upgrade as well as decontamination and decommissioning of older facilities

  5. Study on degradation of dimefuron in soil by nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakkong, P.; Vadeilai, J.

    1996-01-01

    Study on degradation of herbicide dimefuron in soil by using bio meter flask experiment was conducted under laboratory condition, 14 C-dimefuron was applied to three conditions of sterile soil normal and bio fertilizer added soil. Every month 14 CO 2 was collected from 1 N KOH in bio meter flask with in eight months period. Carbon-14 activity was analyzed by liquid scintillation counter. The result of dimefuron degradation as 14 CO 2 in sterile normal and bio fertilizer added soil were 0.96 percent 6.31 percent and 9.36 percent. It can be concluded that increasing in dimefuron degradation rate was involved by micro-organism activity. After eight month extracted and bounded residue of dimefuron in soil were analysed. Radioassay show that extracted and bounded residue were 58.62 and 29.58 percent in sterile soil 45.73 and 41.91 percent in normal soil 45.28 and 36.3 percent in bio fertilizer added soil

  6. Hepatic cholesterol ester hydrolase in human liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J B; Poon, R W

    1978-09-01

    Human liver contains an acid cholesterol ester hydrolase (CEH) of presumed lysosomal origin, but its significance is unknown. We developed a modified CEH radioassay suitable for needle biopsy specimens and measured hepatic activity of this enzyme in 69 patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy. Histologically normal livers hydrolyzed 5.80 +/- 0.78 SEM mumoles of cholesterol ester per hr per g of liver protein (n, 10). Values were similar in alcoholic liver disease (n, 17), obstructive jaundice (n, 9), and miscellaneous hepatic disorders (n, 21). In contrast, mean hepatic CEH activity was more than 3-fold elevated in 12 patients with acute hepatitis, 21.05 +/- 2.45 SEM mumoles per hr per g of protein (P less than 0.01). In 2 patients studied serially, CEH returned to normal as hepatitis resolved. CEH activity in all patients paralleled SGOT levels (r, 0.84; P less than 0.01). There was no correlation with serum levels of free or esterified cholesterol nor with serum activity of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, the enzyme responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. These studies confirm the presence of CEH activity in human liver and show markedly increased activity in acute hepatitis. The pathogenesis and clinical significance of altered hepatic CEH activity in liver disease require further study.

  7. Bacterial growth kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonkitticharoen, V.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Kirchner, P.T.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of bacterial growth may be made using a radioassay technique. This method measures, by scintillation counting, the 14 CO 2 derived from the bacterial metabolism of a 14 C-labeled substrate. Mathematical growth models may serve as reliable tools for estimation of the generation rate constant (or slope of the growth curve) and provide a basis for evaluating assay performance. Two models, i.e., exponential and logistic, are proposed. Both models yielded an accurate fit to the data from radioactive measurement of bacterial growth. The exponential model yielded high precision values of the generation rate constant, with an average relative standard deviation of 1.2%. Under most conditions the assay demonstrated no changes in the slopes of growth curves when the number of bacteria per inoculation was changed. However, the radiometric assay by scintillation method had a growth-inhibiting effect on a few strains of bacteria. The source of this problem was thought to be hypersensitivity to trace amounts of toluene remaining on the detector

  8. Antarctic marine sediments as fingerprints of pollution migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, S.; Ahmad, S.; Rahman, A.; Qureshi, I.H.

    2001-01-01

    Forty elements in 21 coastal marine sediment samples collected during the second Antarctic scientific expedition from 18 different sites of Brekilen area located at the coast of Antarctica were analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to detect eventual pollution. Radio-assay schemes for three sets of elements after neutron irradiation and cooling were evolved to avoid matrix effects. Data have been compared with those for sediments of various stations at Antarctica and two other regions in different continents. Lower concentration of certain elements in the Antarctic sediments reflects less environmental exposition. Enrichment factors (EF) were calculated for all the elements using the earth crust as reference matrix, based on elemental values by MASON, TAYLOR and WEDEPOHL which show a normal pattern near to unity expect for Ag and Br. The data obtained could also serve as a reference point from which changes in the global environment can be studied. The quality assurance of data was performed using standard reference materials (SRMs) of a similar matrix (IAEA Marine Sediment SD-M/TM and Chinese Marine Sediment GBW 07313). (author)

  9. [3H]uridine uptake by target monolayers as a terminal label in an in vitro cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.; Nicklin, S.

    1979-01-01

    A terminal labelling method is described for measuring cell-mediated cytotoxicity based on the ability of surviving target cells to incorporate [ 3 H]uridine into their RNA precursor pools. Parameters of the system were examined using whole and damaged embryonic mouse fibroblast monolayers. This assay is less laborious than direct cell counting and gives increased sensitivity at low target to effector cell ratios. The labelling time is short and, unlike similar techniques, it allows target cell monolayers to remain intact after completion of the radioassay and available for histological examination. This is important where heterogeneous target populations are employed since it allows assessment of differential cell killing and eliminates the need for duplicate cultures. The assay was used in conjunction with a well defined mouse popliteal lymph node assay to investigate the appearance of cytotoxic cells during a localised graft versus host response. Results showed a direct correlation between proliferative index and the development of highly specific cell-mediated cytotoxicity. (Auth.)

  10. Hot Cell Liners Category of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Robert Wesley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hargis, Kenneth Marshall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned large areas near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2011 and heightened public concern and news media attention over transuranic (TRU) waste stored at LANL’s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility. The removal of TRU waste from Area G had been placed at a lower priority in budget decisions for environmental cleanup at LANL because TRU waste removal is not included in the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Reference 1) that is the primary regulatory driver for environmental cleanup at LANL. The Consent Order is an agreement between LANL and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) that contains specific requirements and schedules for cleaning up historical contamination at the LANL site. After the Las Conchas Fire, discussions were held by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with the NMED on accelerating TRU waste removal from LANL and disposing it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report summarizes available information on the origin, configuration, and composition of the waste containers within the Hot Cell Liners category; their physical and radiological characteristics; the results of the radioassays; and the justification to reclassify the five containers as LLW rather than TRU waste.

  11. Metabolism of 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,3,5-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene in the squirrel monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, H.; Chu, I.; Villeneuve, D.C.; Benoit, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    The metabolism of three tetrachlorobenzene isomers (TeCB) was investigated in the squirrel monkey. The animals were administered orally 6 single doses of 14 C-labeled 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,4,5-, or 1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene over a 3-wk period at levels ranging from 50 to 100 mg/kg body weight (b.w) and kept in individual metabolism cages to collect urine and feces for radioassay. Approximately 38% (1,2,3,4-TeCB), 36% (1,2,3,5-TeCB), and 18% (1,2,4,5-TeCB) of the doses were excreted respectively in the feces 48 h post administration. In monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,4-TeCB, unchanged compound accounted for 50% of the fecal radioactivity. Unchanged compound accounted for more than 50% of the fecal radioactivity found in the monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,5-TeCB. The fecal metabolites were identified in both groups. No metabolites were detected in the feces of monkeys dosed with 1,2,4,5-TeCB. While the fecal route represented the major route of excretion for 1,2,3,4-TeCB, the other two isomers were eliminated exclusively in the feces. The above data in the squirrel monkey are different from those obtained with the rat and the rabbit, and demonstrate the different metabolic pathways for the isomers

  12. Conformations and orientations of a signal peptide interacting with phospholipid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, D.G.; Dluhy, R.A.; Briggs, M.S.; McKnight, C.J.; Gierasch, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of a chemically synthesized 25-residue signal peptide of LamB protein from Escherichia coli with phospholipids has been studied with a film balance technique. The conformation, orientation, and concentration of the peptides in lipid monolayers have been determined from polarized infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and assay of 14 C-labeled peptide in transferred films. When the LamB signal peptide in injected into the subphase under a phosphatidylethanolamine-phosphatidylglycerol monolayer at low initial pressure, insertion of a portion of the peptide into the lipid film is evidenced by a rapid rise in film pressure. Spectroscopic results obtained on films transferred to quartz plates and Ge crystals show that the peptide is a mixture of α-helix and β-conformation where the long axis of the α-helix penetrates the monolayer plane and the β-structure which is coplanar with the film. By contrast, when peptide is injected under lipid at high initial pressure, no pressure rise is observed, and the spectroscopic results show the presence of only β-structure which is coplanar with the monolayer. The spectroscopic and radioassay results are all consistent with the picture of a peptide anchored to the monolayer through electrostatic binding with a helical portion inserted into the lipid region of the monolayer and a β-structure portion resident in the aqueous phase. The negative charges on the lipid molecules are roughly neutralized by the positive charges of the peptide

  13. Utilization of the noble gases in studies of underground nuclear detonations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.F.

    1973-01-01

    The Livermore Gas Diagnostics Program employs a number of rare gas isotopes, both stable and radioactive, in its investigations of the phenomenology of underground nuclear detonations. Radioactive gases in a sample are radiochemically purified by elution chromatography, and the separated gases are radioassayed by gamma-ray spectrometry and by internal or thin-window beta proportional counting. Concentrations of the stable gases are determined by mass-spectrometry, following chemical removal of the reactive gases in the sample. The most general application of the noble gases is as device fraction indicators to provide a basis for estimating totals of chimney-gas components. All of the stable rare gases, except argon, have been used as tracers, as have xenon-127 and krypton-85. Argon-37 and krypton-85 have proven to be of particular value in the absence of a good tracer material as reference species for studies of chimney-gas chemistry. The rate of mixing of chimney gases, and the degree to which the sampled gas truly represents the underground gas mixture, can be studied with the aid of the fission-product gases. Radon-222 and helium are released to the cavity from the surrounding rock, and are, therefore, useful in studies of the interaction of the detonation with the surrounding medium

  14. Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-23

    This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

  15. Human kinetic distribution of I-123 F(Ab')/sub 2/ and FAb compared to the parent I-123 intact antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nardo, S.J.; De Nardo, G.L.; O'Grady, L.F.; Peng, J.S.; Macey, D.J.; Mills, S.L.; Caridiff, R.D.; Epstein, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies are being performed by many investigators using a variety of molecular forms of the antibody. This study evaluates two I-123-labeled antibodies (Lym-1 IgG2a and B6.01 IgG1) and their I-123-labeled FAb and F(Ab')/sub 2/ for relative whole body distribution and kinetics, selected organ kinetics, and site of degradation. Evidence of immunocomplex formation, circulating antigen, and HAMA, were monitored by HPLC-TSK analysis and appropriate radioassays of the plasma. Each antibody and each I-123-labeled fragment has been evaluated in 5 patients. One patient had serial comparisons of the radiolabeled parent molecule, F(Ab')/sub 2/ (100μg and 5 mg) and FAb (100μg) of Lym-1. Blood clearance, urine excretion rate, and plasma and urine HPLC fractionation of the radioactive species were determined. Whole body clearance by total body scans and organ clearance were obtained by geometric mean of anterior and posterior areas of interest. The FAb and F(Ab')/sub 2/ fragments had similar blood pool recovery 5 minutes after the 5-minute injection. These were the same as blood levels when 5mg of intact I-123-labeled antibody was given. The second phase of the blood curves for F(Ab')/sub 2/ had a T1/2 of 35-40 hours and for FAb was 15-20 hours. Urine excretion varied, but agreed with total body loss from body scan information. The patient with serial studies had a 24-hour residual dose of 82% for FAb, 62% for 10μg for F(Ab')/sub 2/ and 61% for 5mg of F(Ab')/sub 2/. Renal uptake for all patients was higher and more persistent with both fragments than intact antibody, but hepatic uptake was less

  16. PDP cycle 1 tests at INEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, Y.D.; Twedell, G.W. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a participant in the nondestructive assay Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) as part of the U.S. TRU Waste Characterization Program. The PDP program was designed to help ensure compliance with the quality assurance objectives (QAO`s) in the TRU Waste Characterization Program Plan. In June, 1996, cycle 1 of PDP program was completed at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) at INEL. The assay capability at INEL/SWEPP consists of a passive active neutron (PAN) radioassay system (for bulk fissile material assay) and a passive gamma spectrometry system (for isotopic mass ratio determination). The results from the two systems are combined to produce a single assay report which contains isotopic information ({sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu), density, total activity, alpha activity, TRU activity, TRU activity concentration, Pu equivalent Curies and fissile gram equivalent. The PDP cycle 1 tests were expected to test bias and precision of the assay systems under nearly ideal conditions; ie., non-interfering matrices and little or no source self shielding. The test consisted of two drums in which the source loading was not known by the site. One drum was essentially empty and the other was filled with ethafoam. As per PDP`s instructions, the tests were to be conducted using the same procedures and equipment that normally would be used by SWEPP to assay real waste drums. This paper will discuss the lessons learned from these tests and INEL`s plans to improve the capabilities of the SWEPP assay systems. 7 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Performance assessment requirements for the identification and tracking of transuranic waste intended for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, C.A. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Weston, W.W. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    To demonstrate compliance with environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes, a performance assessment (PA) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was made of waste-waste and waste-repository interactions and impacts on disposal system performance. An estimate of waste components and accumulated quantities was derived from a roll-up of the generator/storage sites` TRU waste inventories. Waste components of significance, and some of negligible effect, were fixed input parameters in the model. The results identified several waste components that require identification and tracking of quantities to ensure that repository limits are not exceeded. The rationale used to establish waste component limits based on input estimates is discussed. The distinction between repository limits and waste container limits is explained. Controls used to ensure that no limits are exceeded are identified. For waste components with no explicit repository based limits, other applicable limits are contained in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The 10 radionuclides targeted for identification and tracking on either a waste container or a waste stream basis include Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-242, U-233, U-234, U-238, Sr-90, and Cs-137. The accumulative activities of these radionuclides are to be inventoried at the time of emplacement in the WIPP. Changes in inventory curie content as a function of radionuclide decay and ingrowth over time will be calculated and tracked. Due to the large margin of compliance demonstrated by PA with the 10,000 year release limits specified, the quality assurance objective for radioassay of the 10 radionuclides need to be no more restrictive than those already identified for addressing the requirements imposed by transportation and WIPP disposal operations in Section 9 of the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan. 6 refs.

  18. Electrochemiluminescence assays for insulin and glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies improve prediction of type 1 diabetes risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Dongmei; Steck, Andrea K; Zhang, Li; Guyer, K Michelle; Jiang, Ling; Armstrong, Taylor; Muller, Sarah M; Krischer, Jeffrey; Rewers, Marian; Yu, Liping

    2015-02-01

    We recently developed new electrochemiluminescence (ECL) insulin autoantibody (IAA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibody (GADA) assays that discriminate high-affinity, high-risk diabetes-specific autoantibodies from low-affinity, low-risk islet autoantibodies (iAbs) detected by radioassay (RAD). Here, we report a further validation of the ECL-IAA and -GADA assays in 3,484 TrialNet study participants. The ECL assay and RAD were congruent in those with prediabetes and in subjects with multiple autoantibodies, but only 24% (P<0.0001) of single RAD-IAA-positive and 46% (P<0.0001) of single RAD-GADA-positive were confirmed by the ECL-IAA and -GADA assays, respectively. During a follow-up (mean, 2.4 years), 51% of RAD-IAA-positive and 63% of RAD-GADA-positive subjects not confirmed by ECL became iAb negative, compared with only 17% of RAD-IAA-positive (P<0.0001) and 15% of RAD-GADA-positive (P<0.0001) subjects confirmed by ECL assays. Among subjects with multiple iAbs, diabetes-free survival was significantly shorter if IAA or GADA was positive by ECL and negative by RAD than if IAA or GADA was negative by ECL and positive by RAD (P<0.019 and P<0.0001, respectively). Both positive and negative predictive values in terms of progression to type 1 diabetes mellitus were superior for ECL-IAA and ECL-GADA, compared with RADs. The prevalence of the high-risk human leukocyte antigen-DR3/4, DQB1*0302 genotype was significantly higher in subjects with RAD-IAA or RAD-GADA confirmed by ECL. In conclusion, both ECL-IAA and -GADA are more disease-specific and better able to predict the risk of progression to type 1 diabetes mellitus than the current standard RADs.

  19. The WIPP RCRA Part B permit application for TRU mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    In August 1993, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) issued a draft permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to begin experiments with transuranic (TRU) mixed waste. Subsequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to cancel the on-site test program, opting instead for laboratory testing. The Secretary of the NMED withdrew the draft permit in 1994, ordering the State's Hazardous and Radioactive Waste Bureau to work with the DOE on submittal of a revised permit application. Revision 5 of the WIPP's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application was submitted to the NMED in May 1995, focusing on disposal of 175,600 m 3 of TRU mixed waste over a 25 year span plus ten years for closure. A key portion of the application, the Waste Analysis Plan, shifted from requirements to characterize a relatively small volume of TRU mixed waste for on-site experiments, to describing a complete program that would apply to all DOE TRU waste generating facilities and meet the appropriate RCRA regulations. Waste characterization will be conducted on a waste stream basis, fitting into three broad categories: (1) homogeneous solids, (2) soil/gravel, and (3) debris wastes. Techniques used include radiography, visually examining waste from opened containers, radioassay, headspace gas sampling, physical sampling and analysis of homogeneous wastes, and review of documented acceptable knowledge. Acceptable knowledge of the original organics and metals used, and the operations that generated these waste streams is sufficient in most cases to determine if the waste has toxicity characteristics, hazardous constituents, polychlorinated biphenyls (PBCs), or RCRA regulated metals

  20. Skeletal muscle expresses the extracellular cyclic AMP–adenosine pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavegatti, T; Costa, V L; Araújo, M S; Godinho, R O

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: cAMP is a key intracellular signalling molecule that regulates multiple processes of the vertebrate skeletal muscle. We have shown that cAMP can be actively pumped out from the skeletal muscle cell. Since in other tissues, cAMP efflux had been associated with extracellular generation of adenosine, in the present study we have assessed the fate of interstitial cAMP and the existence of an extracellular cAMP-adenosine signalling pathway in skeletal muscle. Experimental approach: cAMP efflux and/or its extracellular degradation were analysed by incubating rat cultured skeletal muscle with exogenous cAMP, forskolin or isoprenaline. cAMP and its metabolites were quantified by radioassay or HPLC, respectively. Key results: Incubation of cells with exogenous cAMP was followed by interstitial accumulation of 5′-AMP and adenosine, a phenomenon inhibited by selective inhibitors of ecto-phosphodiesterase (DPSPX) and ecto-nucleotidase (AMPCP). Activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) in cultured cells with forskolin or isoprenaline increased cAMP efflux and extracellular generation of 5′-AMP and adenosine. Extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway was also observed after direct and receptor-dependent stimulation of AC in rat extensor muscle ex vivo. These events were attenuated by probenecid, an inhibitor of ATP binding cassette family transporters. Conclusions and implications: Our results show the existence of an extracellular biochemical cascade that converts cAMP into adenosine. The functional relevance of this extracellular signalling system may involve a feedback modulation of cellular response initiated by several G protein-coupled receptor ligands, amplifying cAMP influence to a paracrine mode, through its metabolite, adenosine. PMID:18157164

  1. Evidence for thyroxine transport by the lung and heart capillary endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heltianu, C.; Dobrila, L.; Antohe, F.; Simionescu, M.

    1989-01-01

    The uptake and transport of carrier-bound thyroxine by the endothelium were investigated by perfusing through the heart and lung of young rats radiolabeled thyroxine bound to prealbumin ([125I]T4Pa) or serum ([125I]T4S). In addition these complexes were tagged to 5-nm gold particles to obtain quantitative (radioassay) and qualitative (autoradiography) data from the same experiment. The complexes (prewarmed at 37 degrees) were perfused in situ at various concentrations (1 to 50 muCi/ml) for time intervals ranging from 5 to 30 min. After thorough washing of the unbound probe, tissue fragments were either measured for total uptake in a gamma counter or processed for electron microscopy autoradiography. The results showed that both the lung and heart take up [125I]T4 complexes by a process that is saturable at low hormone concentration; uptake is completed by free T4 and Pa. In specimens perfused with double-labeled complexes (iodinated and tagged to gold) autoradiography revealed that silver grains and gold particles colocalize predominantly on endothelial plasmalemmal vesicles. The probe appeared first in vesicles open to the capillary lumen (5 min) and further on in vesicles apparently free within the cytoplasm or open to the abluminal front. At 30 min, only silver grains seem to be present in the pericapillary space, on the alveolar epithelial cells, as well as on the nucleus and mitochondria of heart myocytes. The findings suggest that (1) T4Pa uptake by the endothelial cell (EC) is a specific process (possibly via specific binding sites); (2) T4Pa is taken up and transported across capillary EC by plasmalemmal vesicles; (3) in the pericapillary space T4 seems to dissociate from its carrier

  2. sup(99m)Tc-labeled monofluorophosphate as a skeletal imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneji; Ito, Yasuhiko; Muranaka, Akira; Yokobayashi, Tsuneo; Uchida, Masahiro

    1976-01-01

    The performance of sup(99m)Tc-monofluorophosphate was compared with those of sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate and sup(99m)Tc-diphosphonate in rabbits. Studies included chromatographic quality control, measurements of blood clearance, tissue distribution, urinary excretion, skeletal imaging, and measurements of the serum calcium. The labeling for sup(99m)Tc-monofluorophosphate was 98% on paper chromatography and 85% on thin layer chromatography. A large fraction of the activity of the three labeled agents was cleared very rapidly from the bloodstream: however, slow components of the curves were the highest for sup(99m)Tc-monofluorophosphate and lowest for sup(99m)Tc-diphosphonate. Three hours after injection 20% of the dose of sup(99m)Tc-monofluorophosphate was taken up by bone. The corresponding values of sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate and sup(99m)Tc-diphosphonate were 29.1% and 40.0% respectively. Ratio of concentration in bone to that in other major organs was highest with sup(99m)Tc-diphosphonate. Ratios were similar for both sup(99m)Tc-monofluorophosphate and sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate and much lower than those of sup(99m)Tc-diphosphonate. No significant differences were demonstrated in urinary excretion of the three labeled agents. Visual comparison of the scans obtained with three compounds confirmed the results of radioassay. All were excellent skeletal imaging agents, although sup(99m)Tc-diphosphonate appeared to be superior to the other two mainly because of a higher target to non-target ratio. With 50 mg of monofluorophosphate and 1 mg of stannous fluoride, no hypocalcemia was observed. (J.P.N.)

  3. Utilization of radioisotopes in medical field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Yasuhito [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The establishment and advance of nuclear medicine was briefly described here and the present situations and recent topics on clinical nuclear medicine were summarized as well as its prospects for the future. A labeling method to monitor dynamic changes of living substances using radioisotope (RI) was established by Hevesy using radionuclides. The radiotracing method has been applied to chemical field. The numbers of yearly application in 1982, 1987, 1992 and 1997 were reported in respects of in vivo assays (scintigram, SPECT, PET), the treatments with unsealed RI, PET and in vitro examination (RIA, IRMA). The data show that the application of in vivo examination greatly increased for the last 5 years. Bone scintigram was most frequent (26.9%) followed by myocardial scintigram (19.6%). On the other hand, application of in vitro radioassay is gradually decreasing now after the peak in 1992 (241,000 cases per day). The determination of blood concentrations of various tumor markers such as CEA, CA19-9, CA15-3 ar3, etc. became able using radioimmunodetection (RID). Positron emission computed tomography (PET) is valuable for detection of malignant tumor especially for postoperative recurrence or metastasis, evaluation of myocardial viability and identification of epileptic focus. PET using {sup 15}O labeled H{sub 2}O is thought useful for the study on higher functions of human brain such as language, thinking, and prognostic evaluation of damages in the brain. Nuclear medicinal examination, which has been used for diagnosis would be utilized for designing of clinical therapy and evaluation of its effects and prognosis. (M.N.)

  4. Gonadal cell surface receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Bhat, M.; Cama, H.R.

    1979-01-01

    A specific membrane receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein has been demonstrated in testicular cells. Prealbumin-2 did not show any specific binding to the membrane. The affinity of retinol-binding protein for receptor drastically decreases upon delivery of retinol and the retinol-binding protein does not enter the cell. The mechanism of delivery of retinol to the target cell by plasma retinol-binding protein has been investigated. The process involves two steps; direct binding of retinol-binding protein to the receptor and uptake of retinol by the target cell with a concomitant drastic reduction in the affinity of the retinol-binding protein to the receptor. Probably the second step of the process needs a cytosolic factor, possibly the cellular retinol-binding protein or an enzyme. The binding of retinol-binding protein to the receptor is saturable and reversible. The interaction shows a Ksub(d) value of 2.1x10 -10 . The specific binding of a retinol-binding protein with great affinity has been employed in the development of a method for radioassay of the receptor. The receptor level of the gonadal cell has been found to vary with the stage of differentiation. The receptor concentrations in 11-week-old birds and adult birds are comparable. Testosterone treatment of 11-week-old birds produced a substantial increase in the receptor concentration over control, while the protein content increased marginally, indicating that, probably, synthesis of the receptor is specifcally induced by testosterone during spermatogenesis, and the concentration of receptor is relatively higher before the formation of the acrosome. (Auth.)

  5. [Stability of folic acid and vitamin B12 in TPN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almodóvar, M J; Hernández Jaras, M V; León-Sanz, M; Ortuño, B; Estenoz, J; Negro Vega, E; Marfagón, N; Herreros de Tejada, A

    1991-01-01

    The stability of folic acid (FA) in mixtures of Total Parenteral Nutrition has been and is a controversial subject, with discussion concerning the influence of factors such as temperature, light and storage time. As regards the stability of the vitamin B12, there are few studies in scientific literature. For all those reasons, we consider it necessary to make a proper study to evaluate the influence of different factors in the stability of both vitamins. The study was made on 3 liter TPN bags of the EVA type, the composition of which was as follows: AA (85g), glucosa (225g), fat (50g), Na (86mEq), K (60 mEq), Ca (15 mEq), Cl (90 mEq), P (17 mmol) acetate (149 mEq) and 10 ml of MVI-12 which contain 400 micrograms of PA and 5 micrograms of Vitamin B 12. Consideration was also given to the stability of these two vitamins in the same diet, to which were added 10 ml of a commercial preparation of oligo-elements. Six TPN bags were prepared (without oligo-elements); two of them were kept in a fridge and protected from the light, two were kept at room temperature and protected from the light and the other two at room temperature without protection from the light. Samples were taken from all the bags immediately after their preparation and after 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. The same process was carried with other TPN bags which did contain oligo-elements. The method for determining FA and Vitamin B12 was by radioassay.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Extracts from IAEA's Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine. Part-3: Establishing Nuclear Medicine Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the past, consideration was given to the categories of nuclear medicine ranging from simple imaging or in-vitro laboratories, to more complex departments performing a full range of in-vitro and in-vivo procedures that are also involved in advanced clinical services, training programmes, research and development. In developing countries, nuclear medicine historically has often been an offshoot of pathology, radiology or radiotherapy services. These origins are currently changing as less radioimmunoassay is performed and fully-fledged, independent departments of nuclear medicine are being set up. The trend appears to be that all assays (radioassay or ELISA) are done in a biochemistry laboratory whereas nuclear medicine departments are involved largely in diagnostic procedures, radionuclide therapy and non-imaging in-vitro tests. The level of nuclear medicine services is categorized according to three levels of need: Level 1: Only one gamma camera is needed for imaging purposes. The radiopharmaceutical supply, physics and radiation protection services are contracted outside the centre. Other requirements include a receptionist and general secretarial assistance. A single imaging room connected to a shared reporting room should be sufficient, with a staff of one nuclear medicine physician and one technologist, with back-up. This level is appropriate for a small private practice. Level 2: This is suitable for a general hospital where there are multiple imaging rooms where in-vitro and other non-imaging studies would generally be performed as well as radionuclide therapy. Level 3: his is appropriate for an academic institution where there is a need for a comprehensive clinical nuclear medicine service, human resource development and research programmes. Radionuclide therapy for in-patients and outpatients is provided

  7. Sealed source peer review plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, Alexander; Leonard, Lee; Burns, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Sealed sources are known quantities of radioactive materials that have been encapsulated in quantities that produce known radiation fields. Sealed sources have multiple uses ranging from instrument calibration sources to sources that produce radiation fields for experimental applications. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), created in 1999, under the direction of the Waste Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque has been assigned the responsibility to recover and manage excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources from the public and private sector. LANL intends to ship drums containing qualified sealed sources to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Prior to shipping, these drums must be characterized with respect to radiological content and other parameters. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that ten radionulcides be quantified and reported for every container of waste to be disposed in the WIPP. The methods traditionally approved by the EPA include non-destructive assay (NDA) in accordance with Appendix A of the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE, 2002) (CH WAC). However, because of the nature and pedigree of historical records for sealed sources and the technical infeasibility of performing NDA on these sources, LANL proposes to characterize the content of these waste drums using qualified existing radiological data in lieu of direct measurement. This plan describes the process and documentation requirements for the use of the peer review process to qualify existing data for sealed radiological sources in lieu of perfonning radioassay. The peer review process will be performed in accordance with criteria provided in 40 CFR (section) 194.22 which specifies the use of the NUREG 1297 guidelines. The plan defines the management approach, resources, schedule, and technical requirements

  8. WIPP Waste Characterization: Implementing Regulatory Requirements in the Real World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper Wayman, J.D.; Goldstein, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    It is imperative to ensure compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) with applicable statutory and regulatory requirements. In particular, compliance with the waste characterization requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its implementing regulation found at 40 CFR Parts 262,264 and 265 for hazardous and mixed wastes, as well as those of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, as amended, and their implementing regulations found at 40 CFR Parts 191 and 194 for non-mixed radioactive wastes, are often difficult to ensure at the operational level. For example, where a regulation may limit a waste to a certain concentration, this concentration may be difficult to measure. For example, does the definition of transuranic waste (TRU) as 100 nCi/grain of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste mean that the radioassay of a waste must show a reading of 100 plus the sampling and measurement error for the waste to be a TRU waste? Although the use of acceptable knowledge to characterize waste is authorized by statute, regulation and DOE Orders, its implementation is similarly beset with difficulty. When is a document or documents sufficient to constitute acceptable knowledge? What standard can be used to determine if knowledge is acceptable for waste characterization purposes? The inherent conflict between waste characterization regulatory requirements and their implementation in the real world, and the resolution of this conflict, will be discussed

  9. Avian radioecology on a nuclear power station site. Technical progress report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, C.K.

    1975-01-01

    The continuation of a program demonstrating that free-ranging wild birds can be used to assess environmental radionuclide levels is described. Wild passerine birds are trapped at a nuclear power station site and at two control sites, uniquely marked, non-destructively counted for levels of gamma-emitting radionuclides, and released. Subsequent recapture rates are as high as 80 percent for certain species. Nuclides detected included 40 K, 95 Zr- 95 Nb, 137 Cs, and apparent 131 I, the latter at levels just above detection limits (0.07 pCi/g). Significant variations in mean 137 Cs body burdens in Blue Jays and Bobwhite have been observed between sites less than 6 km apart. A significant temporal decrease in 137 Cs body burdens has been observed in various species of birds only at the reactor site. Vegetation and meteorological studies have been initiated to help explain these body-burden differences. The effective half-life of 137 Cs in the Blue Jay is 6.7 +- 1.5 days. The highest observed level of 95 Zr- 95 Nb (1.08 +- 0.07 pCi/g) was in a Grey Catbird. The effective half-life of the 95 Zr- 95 Nb was 69.9 +- 15 days, corresponding to the physical half-life of this isotope pair (65.5d), and the activity abruptly disappeared after the twelfth day of captivity suggesting that it was present in particulate form either on the feathers or skin, or in the bird's pulmonary system. Inter-laboratory comparisons of radionuclide measurements are reported. The number of birds banded during the current reporting period is 2720, while 2047 specimens were radioassayed, an increase of 9 percent and 313 percent, respectively. An exercise to test the practicality of obtaining avian samples from remote sites (i.e., > 50 miles away) for radionuclide measurement was performed satisfactorily. (U.S.)

  10. Production of double antibody for radioimmunoassay (sheep anti-rabbit IgG antiserum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S.R. da.

    1993-01-01

    A second antibody (sheep anti-rabbit IgG antiserum) to be used in RIAs in which the first antibody is raised in rabbits was produced. For this production, initially the IgG was isolated from rabbit serum and purified by sodium sulphate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Four sheep were immunized with 500 u g of purified rabbit IgG, emulsified in Freund Complete Adjuvant and administered by multisite subcutaneous injections. These injections were repeated at 20-days intervals and blood samples (40 ml) were taken from the jugular vein 10 days after the boosts for the evaluation of the antisera title. After each four boosts a great bleeding was done by the same route. Approximately 500 ml of serum were obtained in each bleeding per animal. The antisera were evaluated by the human thyrotropin RIA developed at IPEN laboratories employing reagents provided by NIDDKD, USA. These evaluations referred to the determination of the antisera title and of the ideal concentration of carrier IgG, to the study of the kinetic of precipitation and to the confirmation of the inexistent cross-reactivity with human IgG, in comparison with a reference antiserum of know precipitation characteristics supplied by the Radioassay System Laboratories. Approximately 3,6 l of antiserum (sheep anti-rabbit IgG serum) were produced from the four sheep, which presented title and precipitation characteristics very similar to those exhibited by the imported commercial product, even presenting higher titles. The results obtained in this work indicated that it was created enough experience for the production of this biological reagent for RIA, that could be done integrally in the country in greater scale, and at a very reduced cost. (author). 81 refs, 36 figs, 33 tabs

  11. Upgrades to meet LANL SF, 121-2011, hazardous waste facility permit requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, Sean B.; Johns-Hughes, Kathryn W.

    2011-01-01

    Members of San IIdefonso have requested information from LANL regarding implementation of the revision to LANL's Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (the RCRA Permit). On January 26, 2011, LANL staff from the Waste Disposition Project and the Environmental Protection Division will provide a status update to Pueblo members at the offices of the San IIdefonso Department of Environmental and Cultural Preservation. The Waste Disposition Project presentation will focus on upgrades and improvements to LANL waste management facilities at TA-50 and TA-54. The New Mexico Environment Department issued LANL's revised Hazardous Waste Facility permit on November 30, 2010 with a 30-day implementation period. The Waste Disposition Project manages and operates four of LANL's permitted facilities; the Waste Characterization, Reduction and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) at TA-SO, and Area G, Area L and the Radioassay and Nondestructive Testing facility (RANT) at TA-54. By implementing a combination of permanent corrective action activities and shorter-term compensatory measures, WDP was able to achieve functional compliance on December 30, 2010 with new Permit requirements at each of our facilities. One component of WOP's mission at LANL is centralized management and disposition of the Laboratory's hazardous and mixed waste. To support this mission objective, WOP has undertaken a project to upgrade our facilities and equipment to achieve fully compliant and efficient waste management operations. Upgrades to processes, equipment and facilities are being designed to provide defense-in-depth beyond the minimum, regulatory requirements where worker safety and protection of the public and the environment are concerned. Upgrades and improvements to enduring waste management facilities and operations are being designed so as not to conflict with future closure activities at Material Disposal Area G and Material Disposal Area L.

  12. Determination of 241Am in reindeer bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahtinen, P.; Hakanen, M.; Jaakkola, T.; Nikula, A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a procedure to separate americium from other alpha active nuclides present in reindeer bone samples, especially 228 Th and its daughter nuclides. The 241 Am-spectrum of a reindeer bone sample analyzed using the proposed method is given. The α-spectrum was measured one week after electrodeposition. The absence of the alpha peak of 224 Ra, the daughter nuclide of 228 Th, indicates that no 228 Th was electrodeposited onto the platinum disc. Four reindeer bone samples were analyzed for 241 Am using the method developed. The 241 Am/ 239 240 Pu activity ratio in reindeer bone was 0.9 :- 0.4. These results indicate that compared to plutonium, americium is accumulated in reindeer bone more heavily than in liver. All 241 Am values presented are concentrations at the time of radioassay, and no correction has been made for the ingrowth of 241 Am formed by the decay of 241 Pu during stockpilling. However, all 241 Am determinations were made 1 to 3 yrs after sample collection, and thus the corrections due to the ingrowth can be considered slight. About 60% of plutonium body burden is located in liver and 20% in skeleton. The activity ratio 241 Am/ 239 240 Pu in these animals was about 0.2 and 1.0 in liver and skeleton, respectively. This indicates that about 60% of the 241 Am body burden is located in skeleton and about 30% in liver. It can be roughly estimated that the whole-body activity of 241 Am is thus about 40% of the 239 240 Pu body burden

  13. Assessment of thrombus imaging potency of thrombin-targeting recombinant hirudin in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Tan; Rongjun, Zhang; Weixing, Wan; Gangming, Cai; Huixin, Yu; Mengjun, Jiang; Lianfen, Zhang; Guoping, Sheng; Yijun, Fan; Yonghui, Tao; Jian, Jin [Jiangsu Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi (China)

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of recombinant hirudin HV2 (rHHV2) as a thrombus imaging agent. {sup 125}I-rHHV2 and {sup 125}I-Th were prepared with Chloramine method, the labeling rate were 86.64% and 62.20%, with the radioactive purity of 89.70% and 91.22%, with the specific activity of 22.4 TBq/mmol and 94.43 TBq/mmol respectively. The competitive radioassay showed that the Th-fibrin complex formation did not affect the ability of rHHV2 binding with Th. In the complex, the molecular binding ratio of rHHV2 to Th and fibrinogen was 14:14:1. {sup 99m}Tc-rHHV2 was prepared by 2-iminothiolane modified method, the labeled rate was 94%, with the radioactive purity of 93.90%, with the specific activity of 2.30 TBq/mmol. It was used to image fresh thrombi on arteries and veins of dog or rabbit (30 {mu}g/kg). In SPECT images, all thrombin were clearly visible, arterial thrombosis imaging can be seen clearly within 45 min after injection and fade away slowly, venous thrombosis imaging also can be seen within 30 min after injection and quantitative imaging ratios between the thrombus and opposite vessel increased following the time. Biodistribution studies in mouse demonstrated that rHHV2 was excreted from kidneys. These data indicate that Th in Th-fibrin complex could be a potent target for diagnosis of thrombus and {sup 99m}Tc-rHHV2 could be a new thrombotic imaging agent. (authors)

  14. Production of double antibody for radioimmunoassay (sheep anti-rabbit IgG antiserum); Producao de duplo anticorpo para radioimunoensaio (antissoro de carneiro anti-IgG de coelho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, S.R. da

    1994-12-31

    A second antibody (sheep anti-rabbit IgG antiserum) to be used in RIAs in which the first antibody is raised in rabbits was produced. For this production, initially the IgG was isolated from rabbit serum and purified by sodium sulphate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Four sheep were immunized with 500 u g of purified rabbit IgG, emulsified in Freund Complete Adjuvant and administered by multisite subcutaneous injections. These injections were repeated at 20-days intervals and blood samples (40 ml) were taken from the jugular vein 10 days after the boosts for the evaluation of the antisera title. After each four boosts a great bleeding was done by the same route. Approximately 500 ml of serum were obtained in each bleeding per animal. The antisera were evaluated by the human thyrotropin RIA developed at IPEN laboratories employing reagents provided by NIDDKD, USA. These evaluations referred to the determination of the antisera title and of the ideal concentration of carrier IgG, to the study of the kinetic of precipitation and to the confirmation of the inexistent cross-reactivity with human IgG, in comparison with a reference antiserum of know precipitation characteristics supplied by the Radioassay System Laboratories. Approximately 3,6 l of antiserum (sheep anti-rabbit IgG serum) were produced from the four sheep, which presented title and precipitation characteristics very similar to those exhibited by the imported commercial product, even presenting higher titles. The results obtained in this work indicated that it was created enough experience for the production of this biological reagent for RIA, that could be done integrally in the country in greater scale, and at a very reduced cost. (author). 81 refs, 36 figs, 33 tabs.

  15. Serum ferritin in recurrent oral ulceration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challacombe, S.J.; Scully, C.; Keevil, B.; Lehner, T.

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive radio-assay for ferritin was developed and used to examine serum ferritin levels in 105 patients with recurrent oral ulceration (ROU), 41 patients with Behcet's syndrome (BS), 42 with other ulcerative oral lesions, 35 patients with non-ulcerative oral lesions and in 78 controls. Ferritin levels increased with age and were significantly higher in males than females. The mean ferritin concentrations in male patients with ROU, BS or with other oral ulcers were significantly reduced in comparison with controls, and in female patients were significantly reduced in those with major aphthous ulcers. The prevalence of low serum ferritin levels was about 8% in patients with ROU, 15% in BS and 9.5% in patients with other ulcerative oral lesions, compared with less than 3% in patients with non-ulcerative oral disorders and in controls. Most of the iron-deficient patients were female. Serum ferritin levels did not directly correlate with serum iron levels and may be a more accurate indicator of iron deficiency. Furthermore, serum ferritin can distinguish between patients with true iron deficiency and those with secondary sideropenia. It is suggested that in a small number of patients, oral ulceration may be a presenting sign of iron deficiency, and that in a further small proportion of patients, ROU already present will be exacerbated by concurrent iron deficiency. Both groups will show a therapeutic response to correction of the iron deficiency. The results suggest that serum ferritin levels are a useful part of the haematological investigatons in patients with ROU. (author)

  16. In Vivo PET Assay of Tumor Glutamine Flux and Metabolism: In-Human Trial of 18F-(2S,4R)-4-Fluoroglutamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy, Mark P S; Harding, James J; Venneti, Sriram; Zhang, Hanwen; Burnazi, Eva M; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Omuro, Antonio M; Hsieh, James J; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Staton, Kevin; Pressl, Christina; Beattie, Bradley J; Zanzonico, Pat B; Gerecitano, John F; Kelsen, David P; Weber, Wolfgang; Lyashchenko, Serge K; Kung, Hank F; Lewis, Jason S

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical safety, pharmacokinetics, and tumor imaging characteristics of fluorine 18-(2S,4R)-4-fluoroglutamine (FGln), a glutamine analog radiologic imaging agent. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board and conducted under a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved Investigational New Drug application in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. All patients provided written informed consent. Between January 2013 and October 2016, 25 adult patients with cancer received an intravenous bolus of FGln tracer (mean, 244 MBq ± 118, <100 μg) followed by positron emission tomography (PET) and blood radioassays. Patient data were summarized with descriptive statistics. FGln biodistribution and plasma amino acid levels in nonfasting patients (n = 13) were compared with those from patients who fasted at least 8 hours before injection (n = 12) by using nonparametric one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. Tumor FGln avidity versus fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avidity in patients with paired PET scans (n = 15) was evaluated with the Fisher exact test. P < .05 was considered indicative of a statistically significant difference. Results FGln PET depicted tumors of different cancer types (breast, pancreas, renal, neuroendocrine, lung, colon, lymphoma, bile duct, or glioma) in 17 of the 25 patients, predominantly clinically aggressive tumors with genetic mutations implicated in abnormal glutamine metabolism. Acute fasting had no significant effect on FGln biodistribution and plasma amino acid levels. FGln-avid tumors were uniformly FDG-avid but not vice versa (P = .07). Patients experienced no adverse effects. Conclusion Preliminary human FGln PET trial results provide clinical validation of abnormal glutamine metabolism as a potential tumor biomarker for targeted radiotracer imaging in several different cancer types. © RSNA, 2018 Online

  17. Comparison of bifunctional chelates for {sup 64}Cu antibody imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Cara L.; Crisp, Sarah; Bensimon, Corinne [MDS Nordion, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Yapp, Donald T.T.; Ng, Sylvia S.W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columba, The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Sutherland, Brent W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Gleave, Martin [Prostate Centre at Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Jurek, Paul; Kiefer, Garry E. [Macrocyclics Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Improved bifunctional chelates (BFCs) are needed to facilitate efficient {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under mild conditions and to yield stable, target-specific agents. The utility of two novel BFCs, 1-Oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-5-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-4,7,10-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-Oxo-DO3A) and 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-4-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-3,6,9-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-PCTA), for mAb imaging with {sup 64}Cu were compared to the commonly used S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-tetraacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA). The BFCs were conjugated to trastuzumab, which targets the HER2/neu receptor. {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of the conjugates was optimized. Receptor binding was analyzed using flow cytometry and radioassays. Finally, PET imaging and biodistribution studies were done in mice bearing either HER2/neu-positive or HER2/neu-negative tumors. {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab were prepared at room temperature in >95% radiochemical yield (RCY) in <30 min, compared to only 88% RCY after 2 h for the preparation of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab under the same conditions. Cell studies confirmed that the immunoreactivity of the mAb was retained for each of the bioconjugates. In vivo studies showed that {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab had higher uptake than the {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab at 24 h in HER2/neu-positive tumors, resulting in higher tumor to background ratios and better tumor images. By 40 h all three of the {sup 64}Cu-BFC-trastuzumab conjugates allowed for clear visualization of the HER2/neu-positive tumors but not the negative control tumor. The antibody conjugates of PCTA and Oxo-DO3A were shown to have superior {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling efficiency and stability compared to the analogous DOTA conjugate. In addition, {sup 64}Cu-PCTA and Oxo-DO3A antibody conjugates may facilitate earlier imaging with greater target to background ratios than

  18. Revalidation and rationale for high pKa values of unconjugated bilirubin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrow J Donald

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our prior solvent partition analysis, published in 1992, yielded pKa values for unconjugated bilirubin of about 8.1 and 8.4, but these results have been challenged and studies by other methods have suggested pKa values below 5.0. Methods We repeated our published solvent partition studies, using 14C-unconjugated bilirubin highly purified by extraction of residual labeled impurities from CHCl3 into an aqueous buffer, pH 7.0. Partition ratios at six pH values from 5.0 to 9.0 were determined by radioassay and compared with our prior values obtained by diazo assay. Results At pH values ranging from 4.8 to 9.2, stable aqueous/chloroform 14C-partition ratios did not differ significantly from our published partition ratios based on diazo assay. Conclusion These results support the high pKa values of unconjugated bilirubin, above 8.0, derived from our earlier solvent partition study. In both studies, our measurements were based on the rapid analysis of clearly under-saturated solutions of highly-purified bilirubin over a wide pH range, using properly purified and preserved solvents. No previous direct estimate of the aqueous pKa values of unconjugated bilirubin meets all these preconditions. Three theoretical factors acting in combination, each related to the unique, extensive internal H-bonding of the -COOH groups, are proposed to support high pKa values of unconjugated bilirubin in water: a donation of an H-bond from the -OH moiety of the -COOH group, which is broken on ionization; b hindered solvation of the -COO- group after ionization; and c restricted rotation of the -COO- and -COOH groups. Our findings and rationale rebut methodological and theoretical criticisms leveled against our prior work. High pKa values for unconjugated bilirubin dictate that: a bilirubin diacid, which readily diffuses across membranes and can cause neurotoxicity, is the dominant unbound bilirubin species of unconjugated bilirubin in plasma at

  19. Nuclear medicine practice in Japan. A report of the 5th nationwide survey in 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Tomio

    2004-01-01

    The Subcommittee on Survey of Nuclear Medicine Practice in Japan has performed a nationwide survey of nuclear medicine practice every five years since 1982 to provide detailed information on its current status. Questionnaires were sent to every institution known to the Japan Radioisotope Association to provide nuclear medicine examinations. The questionnaires address the number and kind of nuclear medicine examinations performed as well as the kind and dose of the radiopharmaceuticals used during the month of June 2002. The annual number of total or specific examinations was then estimated. Of the institutions sent questionnaires, 1,204 were for in vivo study, 124 were for in vitro study, and 36 were for positron emission tomography (PET) study. Out of these, 95.8% answered them. A total of 1,697 gamma cameras were installed in 1,160 facilities, of which 50% were dual-head cameras. The estimated total annual number of examinations expressed by the number of administered radiopharmaceuticals was 1.60 million, similar to that of the previous survey (1997). The frequency of study with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) increased to 40%, from 30% in the previous survey. The scintigraphy most frequently performed was bone (35%), followed by myocardium (24%) and brain perfusion (12%). All showed a continuous increase over the past 20 years. Tumor imaging, however, fell from third to fourth place. The most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for each scintigraphy was 99m Tc-HMDP for bone, 201 Tl-chloride for myocardium, 67 Ga-citrate for tumor, and 123 1-IMP for brain. A total of 29,376 PET studies were performed yearly. Among them, 18 F-FDG rapidly increased 3.7-fold. 131 I therapy for thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism was conducted yearly in 1,647 and 3,347 patients, respectively. A total of 31.35 million in vitro radioassays were carried out yearly, the number of which has been decreasing continuously since 1992. It was proved that the content of nuclear

  20. Nuclear medicine practice in Japan. A report of the sixth nationwide survey in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Yasuo; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Ushijima, Yo

    2009-01-01

    therapy for thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism was conducted yearly in 2373 and 4146 patients, respectively. A total of 13.1 million in vitro radioassays were carried out yearly, the number of which has been decreasing continuously since 1992. It was proved that the content of nuclear medicine practice in Japan has changed considerably in the past 5 years. Namely, 18 F-FDG-PET and radionuclide therapy increased. This report might be useful for understanding the present trends of nuclear medicine practice in Japan. (author)

  1. A study of the female produced sex pheromone of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Jaswinder

    Mating behaviour in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor , is mediated by several pheromones, including the female-produced 4-methylnonanol (4-MNol). Mating causes a decline in the titre of 4-MNol. The overall goal of this study was to determine the biochemical mechanism(s) responsible for this decline: i.e., whether the decline was due to an inhibition of pheromone biosynthesis and/or a stimulation of pheromone degradation; whether the decline was caused by the physical effect of mating or was due to the transfer of a factor from the male; and to conduct a preliminary investigation of the regulatory and signal transduction mechanisms involved in the regulation of 4-MNol production. In vitro radioassays for 4-MNol biosynthesis and degradation were developed and used to compare the levels of 4-MNol biosynthesis and degradation in virgin and mated females. Mating caused an inhibition of 4-MNol biosynthesis within 2 hours, but did not affect the rate of pheromone degradation. Decapitation of virgin females caused an inhibition of pheromone biosynthesis and did not prevent the inhibitory effect of mating. The inhibitory effect of mating was mimicked in females that were artificially inseminated with male reproductive tract homogenates (MRTH), but not in females similarly "inseminated" with water, saline, or air. Furthermore, 4-MNol biosynthesis could be inhibited in vitro by the addition of MRTH. These findings indicate that the male transferred one or more pheromonostatic factor(s) to the female during copulation that acted directly on the pheromone-producing tissue (the ovaries). In order to investigate the biochemical basis for the inhibition of pheromone biosynthesis after mating, the role of calcium was determined by modulating the level of calcium (using a calcium chelator, an ionophore, and calcium). However, due to the precipitation of calcium with the phosphate present in the buffer solution, we were unable to determine the role of calcium in the

  2. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TP Lynch; DE Bihl; ML Johnson; MA MacLellan; RK Piper

    2000-01-01

    size. The number of incidents and high routine investigations that required follow-up were lower compared with 1998. Also, the number of excreta analyses performed decreased compared with CY 1998. The In Vivo Monitoring Program for Hanford (formerly the Hanford Whole Body Counting Project) provides the in vivo counting services for Hanford Site radiation workers. New computer hardware and software were put into routine operation to acquire, analyze, and store the measurement data. The technical procedures were revamped to reflect operational changes implemented with the new computer system. The U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) accreditation was extended to include two additional categories. New detectors were purchased for wound counting applications. The 8,085 in vivo measurements performed in 1999 represent a 2% decrease from 1998. Several high-purity germanium detectors were repaired at the In Vivo Radioassay and Research Facility, thereby saving out-of-service time and money compared with returning the detectors to the vendor. There were 11 phantom loans made through the DOE Phantom Library in 1999, including 2 international loans

  3. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TP Lynch; DE Bihl; ML Johnson; MA MacLellan; RK Piper

    2000-05-19

    size. The number of incidents and high routine investigations that required follow-up were lower compared with 1998. Also, the number of excreta analyses performed decreased compared with CY 1998. The In Vivo Monitoring Program for Hanford (formerly the Hanford Whole Body Counting Project) provides the in vivo counting services for Hanford Site radiation workers. New computer hardware and software were put into routine operation to acquire, analyze, and store the measurement data. The technical procedures were revamped to reflect operational changes implemented with the new computer system. The U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) accreditation was extended to include two additional categories. New detectors were purchased for wound counting applications. The 8,085 in vivo measurements performed in 1999 represent a 2% decrease from 1998. Several high-purity germanium detectors were repaired at the In Vivo Radioassay and Research Facility, thereby saving out-of-service time and money compared with returning the detectors to the vendor. There were 11 phantom loans made through the DOE Phantom Library in 1999, including 2 international loans.

  4. Applications of Beta Particle Detection for Synthesis and Usage of Radiotracers Developed for Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex Abreu

    fundamental physical characteristics of Cerenkov photon yield at different stages of [F-18]FDG synthesis on the EWOD platform. We are able to use this imaging system to optimize the mixing protocol as well as identify and correct for loss of radioactivity due to the migration of radioactive vapor outside of the EWOD heater, enabling an overall increase in the crude radiochemical yield from 50 +/- 3% (n = 3) to 72 +/- 13% (n = 5). Clinical use of PET has proven to be a critical tool for monitoring cancer treatment response. For the third project, we describe the redesign and performance of Betabox, a specialized device that incorporates PET radiotracers in an assay that gives clinicians and researchers the ability to assess the effectiveness of a drug therapy in-vitro by isolating small samples of patient tumor cells incubated in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip. We find that Betabox is a high sensitivity and low noise charged particle imaging system that can operate without significant impairment of its performance at both room and at elevated temperatures, such as those suitable for cell culture. The dark count rate is within range of the expected signal from cosmic rays, dictating a low detection limit that allows quantitative imaging of very small amounts of radioactivity. This system demonstrates the potential of direct cellular radioassay of small samples of cells (~100 cells per measurement).

  5. Liquid Scintillation Detection of Tritium and other Radioisotopes in Insoluble or Quenching Organic Samples; Detection par compteur a scintillations a liquides du tritium et des autres radioelements contenus dans des echantillons organiques insolubles ou coupeurs; Obnaruzhenie tritiya metodom zhidkostnoj stsintillyatsii v nerastvorimykh ili sposo'nykh gasit' izluchenie organicheskikh o'raztsakh; Deteccion del tritio u otros radioisotopos por centelleo liquido en muestras organicas insolubles o que provocan extincion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastham, J F; Westbrook, H L; Gonzales, D [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1962-01-15

    To facilitate a study of the H{sup 1}/H{sup 3} isotope effect in the reduction of organic compounds, it has been necessary to develop procedures to overcome the two major limitations of the most convenient general method of radioassaying organic material, liquid scintillation counting. These limitations, which are scintillation-quenching by many organic samples and limited solubility of others, are particularly common with material of biological significance: The procedures developed involve combustion of the sample wrapped in filter paper in art oxygen-filled flask, formation of a solution of the combustion products in a suitable solvent added to the flask before combustion, and scintillation-counting of the solution. Advantages of the developed, procedures, in addition to overcoming the indicated limitations, include efficacy with samples with a great range of activity (some as low as 1{mu}c/mole), good precision (as great as any other general method of radio-assaying H{sup 3}), and applicability to other soft beta emitters (C{sup 14} and S{sup 35}). With a scintillation spectrometer and the techniques developed, samples triply labelled with H{sup 3}, C{sup 14} and S{sup 35} can be differentially radio assayed. Details of the solvent systems and techniques developed are reported. Analytical results are reported for such quenching material as 2.4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazones dyes and for such insoluble materials as proteins and carbohydrates. Application of the techniques to evaluation of H{sup 1}/H{sup 3} isotope effects in certain reduction reactions are discussed. (author) [French] Pour faciliter l'etude de l'effet isotopique ''1H/''3H dans la reduction des composes organiques, il a fallu mettre au point des procedes permettant d'elargir le champ d'application de la methode generale la plus pratique de radioanalyse des matieres organiques, savoir l'analyse au moyen d'un compteur a scintillations a liquides. En effet, ce champ d'application est limite pour deux

  6. Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae-Young

    2003-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a state-of-the-art In Vivo Radioassay and Research Facility (IVRRF) facility designed expressly for in vivo measurement of radioactive material. Although the IVRRF's primary activity is providing routine in vivo counting services to KAERI radiation workers, the facility also conducts work for clients including a fuel fabrication facilities and nuclear facilities. Counting System KAERI in vivo counter combines the characteristics of the U/Pu lung counter and the advantage of a high sensitivity scanning NaI(Tl) whole body counter into one compact system. The low energy lung counter is designed for facilities that need to accurately measure lung depositions of actinides such as uranium, plutonium and americium. The scanning whole body counter is designed to detect and identify the location of higher energy nuclides anywhere in the body. The detection system of the low energy lung counter consists of two arrays of ACT (Actinide)-II detector system which combines two ACT I LEGe (Low Energy Germanium) detectors and end caps onto a single 7 liter multi-attitude cryostat. These have been designed specially for the detection of internally deposited actinides, particularly uranium, plutonium and americium. Figure shows the detectors in place over the JAERI Phantom. For comparison, Figure 2 shows the same detector placed over the Livermore Realistic Torso Phantom. Each LEGe detector equipped with a 0.5 mm. Be window has active area of 20 cm 2 and thickness of 20 mm. The resolution of four LEGe detectors averages 400 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV and 700 eV FWHM at 122 keV. One cm Pb and 0.5 mm Cu are attached around sides of ACT-II detectors to reduce the contribution from 40 K and scattered background from the subject and surrounding materials. The detector-subject positioning mechanism allows the optimum placement of detectors on the chest of the subject. The whole body counter utilizes a large 7.6 cm x 12.7 cm x 40.6 cm scanning

  7. Food and environmental protection newsletter. Vol. 14, No. 1, January 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    de Investigacion en Contaminacion Ambiental of the University of Costa Rica. The main purpose of the meeting was to allow nuclear authorities and quarantine/ plant-health authorities from participating Regional Asian Member States to review, revise and agree on guidelines for the audit and accreditation of food irradiation facilities that seek to irradiate produce as a phytosanitary measure. In the area of traceability and food contamination control, the Subprogramme contributed to a number of international conferences and regional and national meetings and training events, including the Korean Society of Environmental Agriculture (KSAE) 30th Anniversary International Symposium on Management and Strategy on Sustainable Environment Leading to Food Safety, the 6th International Symposium on Hormone and Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis (Belgium), a decision makers' forum on The Role of the Analytical Laboratory in Food Safety (Panama), the 21st Annual International Conference of the International Environmetrics Society (Venezuela), and The World Mycotoxin Forum, 6th Conference on Mycotoxins, Plant Toxins and Marine Biotoxins (The Netherlands). A manual, prepared and edited in the Subprogramme, on Sampling Procedures to Detect Mycotoxins in Agricultural Commodities was also recently published by Springer. The Subprogramme has also successfully continued its collaboration with the IAEA Environment Laboratory in Monaco under the Coordinated Research Project on Applications of Radiotracer and Radioassay Technologies to Seafood Safety Risk Analysis. In this regard, we presented an information document to the most recent 33rd Session of the Joint FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission (Geneva, Switzerland, 5-9 July 2010) that highlighted the consideration of research data arising from the Project at the 73rd Meeting of Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (June 2010) in order to establish international standards for maximum levels of cadmium in seafood (oysters

  8. ACCELERATION OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSURANIC WASTE DISPOSITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, Gerald A.

    2007-01-01

    Energy Los Alamos Site Office, Carlsbad Field Office and the Department of Energy Headquaeters. Rather than simply processing containers as retrieved, the plan places priority on efficient curie disposition, a direct correlation to reducing risk. Key elements of the approch include balancing inventory and operational risks, tailoring methods to meet requirements, optimizing existing facilities, equipment and staff, and incorporating best practices from other Department of Energy sites. With sufficient funding this will enable LANL to ship the above-ground high activity contact-handled transuranic waste offsite by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 and to disposition the remaining above- and below-ground contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic waste inventory by December 2010. Nearly 70% of the contact-handled transuranic waste containers, including the high activity waste, require processing and repackaging before characterization and certification for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. LANL is employing a balanced risk approach that accomplishes significant long-term risk reduction by accepting short-term increased facility operations risk under well-developed and justified interim controls. Reviews of facility conditions and additional analyses show that the Waste Characterization, Reduction and Repackaging Facility and the Radioassay and Nondestructive Testing Facility are the most appropriate facilities to safetly remediate, repackage, and ship lower activity and the remaining high activity drums. Updated safety documentation supporting limited Hazard Category 2 operations in these facilities has been developed. Once approved, limited-term operations to process the high activity drums can begin in early 2007, building upon the experience base established performing Hazard Category 3 operations processing lower activity waste in these facilities. LANL is also implementing a series of actions to improve and sustain operations for processing contact

  9. Coincidence scanning with positron-emitting arsenic or copper in the diagnosis of focal intracranial disease; Exploration par coincidences avec l'Arsenic ou le Cuivre Emetteurs de Positrons dans le Diagnostic des Maladies intracraniennes localisees; Raspoznavanie ochagovykh vnutricherepnykh zabolevanij putem podscheta (skanirovaniya) sovpralenij s primeneniem mysh'yaka ili medi, vydelyayushchikh pozitrony; Exploracion por coincidencia con arsenico o cobre emisores de positrones en el diagnostico de enfermedades intracraneanas localizadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, William H; Mealey, John Jr; Brownell, Gordon L; Aronow, Saul [Departments of Surgery and Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Neurosurgical Service and Physics Research Laboratory of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1959-07-01

    This is a report on coincidence counting in man of the paired annihilation gamma rays from positron-emitting copper or arsenic. We discuss the relevant biological behavior of inorganic arsenate and arsenite, of copper versenate, and the results of using these substances during automatic scanning to localize intracranial masses. Radioassay of biopsies of the principal normal cephalic tissues, of various types of neoplasms, of hematomas, abscesses and zones of demyelination were carried out. With arsenic the ratios of concentrations of tumor to normal brain were up to 30 for meningiomas. The remaining main tumor types, in order of decreasing concentrations of isotope, were acoustic neuroma, glioblastoma, metastatic malignancy and astro-cytoma. The high tumor uptake with arsenic persists long enough so that repeat scans one day after injection are valuable. The muscle : brain ratio of concentrations of circa 3 is high enough to interfere with the accuracy of diagnosis in lesions beneath the lower temporal and especially the upper nuchal masses of muscle. Hematomas, abscesses and zones of demyelination also have high enough ratios to permit localization in the majority of patients. The results on biopsies containing copper versenate showed similar ratios insofar as ascertainable from fewer samples. The meningiomas are a probable exception, yielding lower ratios with the copper. On the basis of radioassay both of urinary excretion and of the full range of tissues obtainable at autopsy we compute the local whole-body radiation with As{sup 74} to be about 3.2 rads after the usual scanning dose of 2.3 mC/70 kg. The kidney receives about 12.7 and the liver 9.7 rads. The corresponding figures for Cu{sup 64} are 0.325 rads to the whole body, but with a dose to the liver of 3.2 rads because this organ takes up about half of the administered versenate. The automatic scan includes in 2 simultaneously evolving side views a coincidence count or positrocephalogra m (PCG) and a plot

  10. Optimization of Gamma-Ray Counting and Spectrometry in Biomedical Tracer Studies; Optimisation du Comptage et de la Spectrometrie des Rayons Gamma dans des Etudes Biomedicales Faites a l'Aide de Traceurs; Optimizatsiya gamma-scheta i spektrometrii gamma-luchej v biomeditsinskikh issledovaniyakh s pomoshch'yu indikatorov; Optimizacion del Recuento y de la Espectrometry Gamma en los Estudios Biomedicos con Indicadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinn, V. P. [General Dynamics Corporation, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1965-10-15

    In biomedical tracer studies, especially in man and even more so in children and pregnant women, it is important to operate at the lowest possible level of administered radioisotope that is commensurate with the required precision and accuracy of the subsequent radioassay measurements. Similarly, with administered stable elements (as specified compounds) or enriched stable isotopes (again, in compound form), followed by radioactivation analysis of resulting samples, it is important from the toxicological standpoint to minimize the amounts of administered element. The problem of optimization of counting of one, two and three gamma-emitting radioisotopes, by Nal(Tl) scintillation counting, single-channel spectrometry and multichannel spectrometry, has been considered in some detail in these laboratories, with particular attention to single-, double-, or triple-tagging tracer studies with radioisotopes frequently used in biomedical studies: {sup 51}Cr, {sup 198}Au, {sup 75}Se, {sup 197}Hg, {sup 64}Cu, {sup 76}As, {sup 82}Br, {sup 59}Fe, {sup 60}Co, {sup 42}K, and {sup 24}Na. The same considerations apply to the widely-used thermal-neutron activation analysis determinations of the corresponding elements or enriched stable isotopes, so the results of these counting optimization calculations have a double usefulness. The calculations are based on a few reasonable assumptions made on practical biomedical considerations, namely: (1) small samples ({<=} 10 ml), (2) moderate counting periods (s 20 minutes), (3) modest allowable decay periods ({<=} 3 days) and (4) use of commercially available counting equipment and shielding. On this basis, the most sensitive methods of counting each of the aforementioned radioisotopes, and a number of pairs and trios of them, have been ascertained. The counting variables included in the considerations are: (1) type of Nal(Tl) crystal, i.e., solid or well-type, (2) size of Nal(Tl) crystal, up to a 5 in x 5 in size, (3) type of measuring