WorldWideScience

Sample records for radioactively powered electromagnetic

  1. Remote detection of radioactive material using high-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsung; Yu, Dongho; Sawant, Ashwini; Choe, Mun Seok; Lee, Ingeun; Kim, Sung Gug; Choi, EunMi

    2017-05-09

    Remote detection of radioactive materials is impossible when the measurement location is far from the radioactive source such that the leakage of high-energy photons or electrons from the source cannot be measured. Current technologies are less effective in this respect because they only allow the detection at distances to which the high-energy photons or electrons can reach the detector. Here we demonstrate an experimental method for remote detection of radioactive materials by inducing plasma breakdown with the high-power pulsed electromagnetic waves. Measurements of the plasma formation time and its dispersion lead to enhanced detection sensitivity compared to the theoretically predicted one based only on the plasma on and off phenomena. We show that lower power of the incident electromagnetic wave is sufficient for plasma breakdown in atmospheric-pressure air and the elimination of the statistical distribution is possible in the presence of radioactive material.

  2. Electromagnetic compatibility in power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Costa , François; Revol , Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Scientists largely attribute the recent deterioration of the electromagnetic environment to power electronics. This realization has spurred the study of methodical approaches to electromagnetic compatibility designs as explored in this text. The book addresses major challenges, such as handling numerous parameters vital to predicting electro magnetic effects and achieving compliance with line-harmonics norms, while proposing potential solutions.

  3. Electromagnetic transients in power cables

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Filipe Faria

    2013-01-01

    From the more basic concepts to the most advanced ones where long and laborious simulation models are required, Electromagnetic Transients in Power Cables provides a thorough insight into the study of electromagnetic transients and underground power cables. Explanations and demonstrations of different electromagnetic transient phenomena are provided, from simple lumped-parameter circuits to complex cable-based high voltage networks, as well as instructions on how to model the cables.Supported throughout by illustrations, circuit diagrams and simulation results, each chapter contains exercises,

  4. Electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabayan, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Lately, there has been a mounting concern about the electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear-power-plant systems mainly because of the effects due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse, and also because of the introduction of more-sophisticated and, therefore, more-susceptible solid-state devices into the plants. Questions have been raised about the adequacy of solid-state-device protection against plant electromagnetic-interference sources and transients due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse. In this paper, the author briefly reviews the environment, and the coupling, susceptibility, and vulnerability assessment issues of commercial nuclear power plants

  5. Penetrating power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Guilizzoni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of revealing the presence and identifying the nature of conductive targets is of central interest in many fields, including security, medicine, industry, archaeology and geophysics. In many applications, these targets are shielded by external materials and thus cannot be directly accessed. Hence, interrogation techniques are required that allow penetration through the shielding materials, in order for the target to be identified. Electromagnetic interrogation techniques represent a powerful solution to this challenge, as they enable penetration through conductive shields. In this work, we demonstrate the power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging to penetrate through metallic shields (1.5-mm-thick and image targets (having conductivities σ ranging from 0.54 to 59.77 MSm−1 concealed behind them.

  6. Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I ampersand C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I ampersand C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper

  7. Radioactively powered emission from black hole-neutron star mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Wanajo, Shinya; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Detection of the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) sources is important to unveil the nature of compact binary coalescences. We perform three-dimensional, time-dependent, multi-frequency radiative transfer simulations for radioactively powered emission from the ejecta of black hole (BH)-neutron star (NS) mergers. Depending on the BH to NS mass ratio, spin of the BH, and equations of state of dense matter, BH-NS mergers can eject more material than NS-NS mergers. In such cases, radioactively powered emission from the BH-NS merger ejecta can be more luminous than that from NS-NS mergers. We show that, in spite of the expected larger distances to BH-NS merger events, the observed brightness of BH-NS mergers can be comparable to or even higher than that of NS-NS mergers. We find that, when the tidally disrupted BH-NS merger ejecta are confined to a small solid angle, the emission from BH-NS merger ejecta tends to be bluer than that from NS-NS merger ejecta for a given total luminosity. Thanks to this property, we might be able to distinguish BH-NS merger events from NS-NS merger events by multi-band observations of the radioactively powered emission. In addition to the GW observations, such electromagnetic observations can potentially provide independent information on the progenitors of GW sources and the nature of compact binary coalescences.

  8. Application of electromagnetic fields to improve the removal rate of radioactive corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Tae Young; Lee, Kun Jai; Song, Min Chul

    2004-01-01

    To comply with increasingly strict regulations for protection against radiation exposure, many nuclear power plants have been working ceaselessly to reduce and control both the radiation sources within power plants and the radiation exposure experienced by operational and maintenance personnel. Many research studies have shown that deposits of irradiated corrosion products on the surfaces of coolant systems are the main cause of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants. These corrosion product deposits on the fuel-clad surface are also known to be main factors in the onset of Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA). Hence, there is a great deal of ongoing research on water chemistry and corrosion processes. In this study, a magnetic filter with permanent magnets was devised to remove the corrosion products in the coolant stream by taking advantage of the magnetic properties of the corrosion particles. Experiments using permanent magnets to filter the corrosion products demonstrated a removal efficiency of over 90% for particles above 5 μm. This finding led to the construction of an electromagnetic device that causes the metallic particulates to flocculate into larger aggregates of about 5 μm in diameter by using a novel application of electromagnetic flocculation on radioactive corrosion products

  9. Exposure to power frequency electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skotte, J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose was to asses personal exposure to power frequency electromagnetic fields in Denmark. Exposure to electrical and magnetic 50 Hz fields were measured with personal dosimeters in periods of 24 hours covering both occupational and residential environments. The study included both highly exposed and 'normal' exposed jobs. Measurements were carried out with dosimeters, which sample electrical and magnetic fields every 5 sec. Participants also wore the dosimeter during transportation. The dynamic range of the dosimeters was 0.01-200 μT and 0.6-10000 V/m. The highest average exposure in homes near high power lines was 2.24 μT. In most homes without nearby high power lines the average exposure was below 0.05 μT. Average values of '24-hour-dose' (μT times hours) for the generator facility, transmission line and substation workers were approximately the same as for the people living near high power lines (5 μT x hours). Electric field measurements with personal dosimeters involve several factors of uncertainty, as the body, posture, position of dosimeter etc. influence the results. The highest exposed groups were transmission line workers (GM: 44 V/m) and substation workers (GM: 23 V/m) but there were large variations (GSD: 4.7-4.8). In the work time the exposure level was the same for office workers and workers in the industry groups (GM: 12-13 V/m). In homes near high power lines (GM: 23 V/m) there was a non-significant tendency to higher exposure compared to homes without nearby high power lines. (AB) (11 refs.)

  10. O Electromagnetic Power Waves and Power Density Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Donald Wayne

    1980-12-01

    On January 10, 1884 Lord Rayleigh presented a paper entitled "On the Transfer of Energy in the Electromagnetic Field" to the Royal Society of London. This paper had been authored by the late Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, Professor J. H. Poynting and in it he claimed that there was a general law for the transfer of electromagnetic energy. He argued that associated with each point in space is a quantity, that has since been called the Poynting vector, that is a measure of the rate of energy flow per unit area. His analysis was concerned with the integration of this power density vector at all points over an enclosing surface of a specific volume. The interpretation of this Poynting vector as a true measure of the local power density was viewed with great skepticism unless the vector was integrated over a closed surface, as the development of the concept required. However, within the last decade or so Shadowitz indicates that a number of prominent authors have argued that the criticism of the interpretation of Poynting's vector as a local power density vector is unjustified. The present paper is not concerned with these arguments but instead is concerned with a decomposition of Poynting's power density vector into two and only two components: one vector which has the same direction as Poynting's vector and which is called the forward power density vector, and another vector, directed opposite to the Poynting vector and called the reverse power density vector. These new local forward and reverse power density vectors will be shown to be dependent upon forward and reverse power wave vectors and these vectors in turn will be related to newly defined forward and reverse components of the electric and magnetic fields. The sum of these forward and reverse power density vectors, which is simply the original Poynting vector, is associated with the total electromagnetic energy traveling past the local point. Another vector which is the difference between the forward

  11. Nuclear power and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimston, M.

    1991-03-01

    The gap between the relative perceptions in the area of nuclear waste is wide. The broad view of the industry is that the disposal of nuclear waste is not a serious technical problem, and that solutions are already available to provide safe disposal of all our waste. The broad view of those who oppose the industry is that radioactive waste is so unpleasant, and will remain lethal for so long, that no acceptable policy will ever be developed, and so production of such waste (except, oddly, the significant amounts arising from uses of radioactive materials in medicine, agriculture, industrial safety research, etc) should stop immediately. This booklet will not attempt to describe in great detail the technicalities of the United Kingdom nuclear industry's current approach to radioactive waste: such issues are described in detail in other publications, especially those by Nirex. It is our intention to outline some of the main issues involved, and to associate these issues with the divergence in perceptions of various parties. (author)

  12. Management of radioactive waste nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.; Marek, J.

    1976-01-01

    The authors give a survey of the sources, types and amounts of radioactive waste in LWR nuclear power stations (1,300 MWe). The amount of solid waste produced by a Novovorenezh-type PWR reactor (2 x 400 resp. 1 x 1,000 MWe) is given in a table. Treatment, solidification and final storage of radioactive waste are shortly discussed with special reference to the problems of final storage in the CSR. (HR) [de

  13. Radioactive waste management policy for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrei, V.; Glodeanu, F.; Simionov, V.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear power is part of energy future as a clean and environmental friendly source of energy. For the case of nuclear power, two specific aspects come more often in front of public attention: how much does it cost and what happens with radioactive waste. The competitiveness of nuclear power vs other sources of energy is already proved in many developed and developing countries. As concerns the radioactive wastes treatment and disposal, industrial technologies are available. Even final solutions for disposal of high level radioactive waste, including spent fuel, are now fully developed and ready for large scale implementation. Policies and waste management strategies are established by all countries having nuclear programs. Once, the first nuclear power reactor was commissioned in Romania, and based on the national legal provisions, our company prepared the first issue of a general strategy for radioactive waste management. The general objective of the strategy is to dispose the waste according to adequate safety standards protecting the man and the environment, without undue burden on future generations. Two target objectives were established for long term: an interim spent fuel dry storage facility and a low and intermediate level waste repository. A solution for spent fuel disposal will be implemented in the next decade, based on international experience. Principles for radioactive waste management, recommended by IAEA are closely followed in the activities of our company. The continuity of responsibilities is considered to be very important. The radioactive waste management cost will be supported by the company. A tax on unit price of electricity will be applied. The implementation of radioactive waste management strategy includes as a major component the public information. A special attention will be paid by the company to an information program addressed to different categories of public in order to have a better acceptance of our nuclear power projects

  14. Radioactive emission from thermal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Dept. of Applied Mathematics

    1981-07-01

    Radioactive hazards of the emissions and wastes of thermal power plants arising from fuel impurities of uranium and thorium are discussed. The hazard due to radioactive emission is calculated for an average Australian bituminous coal which contains 2 ppm of U and 2.7 ppm of Th. When the dust removal efficiency of a coal-fired power plant is 99%, the radioactive hazard is greater than that of a nuclear reactor of the same electrical output. After 500 years the radioactive toxicity of the coal waste will be higher than that of fission products of a nuclear reactor and after 2,000 years it will exceed the toxicity of all the nuclear wastes including actinides. The results of a recent calculation are shown, according to which the radioactive hazard of a coal-fired power plant to the public is from several hundred to several tens of thousands of times higher than that of a total fuel cycle of plutonium. It is found that in some regions, such as Japan, the hazard due to /sup 210/Po through seafood could be considerable.

  15. Radioactive waste treatment technology at Czech nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulovany, J.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes the main technologies for the treatment and conditioning of radioactive wastes at Czech nuclear power plants. The main technologies are bituminisation for liquid radioactive wastes and supercompaction for solid radioactive wastes. (author)

  16. Disposal of radioactive wastes from Czechoslovak nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, L.

    In gaseous radioactive waste disposal, aerosol particles are filtered and gaseous wastes are discharged in the environment. The filters and filter materials used are stored on solid radioactive waste storage sites in the individual power plants. Liquid radioactive wastes are concentrated and the concentrates are stored. Distillates and low-level radioactive waste water are discharged into the hydrosphere. Solid radioactive wastes are stored without treatment in power plant bunkers. Bituminization and cementation of liquid radioactive wastes are discussed. (H.S.)

  17. Protecting the Power Grid From Electromagnetic Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Sarah

    2004-10-01

    A nuclear explosion high in the Earth's atmosphere does no immediate known harm to living things, but the resulting electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from a single detonation could degrade 70 percent or more of the country's electrical service in an instant, warns the Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse Attack, which presented its findings to the U.S. Congress in July.

  18. HIGH POWER APPLICATIONS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VASILE DOBREF

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For the next generation, conventional weapon will touch the best performance limits and will became more and more what in what more an important part plans of improvement systems of weapon to the future. Physical laws that govern electromagnetic propulsion of guns, enabling them higher speeds than those of conventional arms projectiles. This is substantially benefit electromagnetic weapons - using electricity as energy for an lectromagnetic weapons.

  19. A hybrid power system for unmanned aerial vehicle electromagnetic launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiren; Wu, Jun; Huang, Shengjun

    2018-06-01

    According to the UAV electromagnetic catapult with fixed timing, a hybrid energy storage system consist with battery and super capacitor is designed, in order to reduce the volume and weight of the energy storage system. The battery is regarded as the energy storage device and the super capacitor as power release device. Firstly, the battery charges the super capacitor, and then the super capacitor supplies power to electromagnetic catapult separately. The strategy is using the Buck circuit to charge the super capacitor with constant current and using the Boost circuit to make super capacitor provide a stable voltage circuit for electromagnetic catapult. The Simulink simulation results show that the designed hybrid energy storage system can meet the requirements of electromagnetic catapult. Compared with the system powered by the battery alone, the proposed scheme can reduce the number of batteries, and greatly reduce the volume and weight of the energy storage system.

  20. Inductive-pulsed power supplying system for a betatron electromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otrubyannikov, Yu.A.; Safronov, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Circuit of producing quasitriangular current pulses designed for the pulsed power supply system of betatron electromagnet is described. Introduction of additional winding into electromagnet provides circuit galvanic isolation, artificial commutation of basic circuit thyristors and inductive power input to the winding during thyristor commutation. The considered system is used for excitation of betatron electromagnet up to 18 MeV. Magnetic field energy equals 1100 Y. The maximal voltage in energy storage capacitor - 4.8 kV. Current amplitude in basic winding - 335 A. The number of loops in basic winding equals 80, in additional one - 32. Current pulse duration in electromagnet-3.8 ms. The system provides operation with controlled current pulse frequency from 0 up to 150 Hz. The maximal consumption power - 18 kW

  1. The power and beauty of electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenthaler, Frederic R

    2011-01-01

    Unique, multi-level textbook is adaptable to introductory, intermediate, and advanced levels This revolutionary textbook takes a unique approach to electromagnetic theory, comparing both conventional and modern theories. It explores both the Maxwell-Poynting representation as well as the Alternate representation, which the author demonstrates is generally simpler and more suitable for analyzing modern electromagnetic environments. Throughout the text, students and researchers have the opportunity to examine both of these theories and discover how each one can be applied to solve problems.

  2. Electric converters of electromagnetic strike machine with battery power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanov, K. M.; Volgin, A. V.; Kargin, V. A.; Moiseev, A. P.; Chetverikov, E. A.

    2018-03-01

    At present, the application of pulse linear electromagnetic engines to drive strike machines for immersion of rod elements into the soil, strike drilling of shallow wells, dynamic probing of soils is recognized as quite effective. The pulse linear electromagnetic engine performs discrete consumption and conversion of electrical energy into mechanical work. Pulse dosing of a stream transmitted by the battery source to the pulse linear electromagnetic engine of the energy is provided by the electrical converter. The electric converters with the control of an electromagnetic strike machine as functions of time and armature movement, which form the unipolar supply pulses of voltage and current necessary for the normal operation of a pulse linear electromagnetic engine, are proposed. Electric converters are stable in operation, implement the necessary range of output parameters control determined by the technological process conditions, have noise immunity and automatic disconnection of power supply in emergency modes.

  3. Role of electromagnetic filter in limitating radioactivity in the primary circuits of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.

    1978-01-01

    High temperature electromagnetic filtration of particulate corrosion products can be carried out with discharges up to 5% of the cooling flow rate. It allows efficient extraction of particulate matter which rate constants required for considerable reduction of activable crud deposition in the core. The paper holds a review of the preventing operation in the primary circuit of a PWR, and reports experimental results of efficiency measurments with an electromagnetic filter set in out-of-pile and in-pile pressurized water loops. The notable efficiencies towards radioactive fine grain and colloidal matter justify more extensive reactor scale application experiments. (author)

  4. Role of electromagnetic filter in limitating radioactivity in the primary circuits of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.

    1978-01-01

    High temperature electromagnetic filtration of particulate corrosion products can be carried out with discharges up to 5% of the cooling flow rate. It allows efficient extraction of particulate matter with rate constants required for considerable reduction of activable crud deposition in the core. The paper holds a review of the preventing operation in the primary circuit of a PWR, and reports experimental results of efficiency measurements with an electromagnetic filter set in out-of-pile and in-pile pressurized water loops. The notable efficiencies towards radioactive fine grain and colloidal matter justify more extensive reactor scale application experiments

  5. Development of Design Information Template for Nuclear Power Plants for Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Effect Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minyi; Ryu, Hosan; Ye, Songhae; Lee, Euijong

    2016-01-01

    An electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is a transient electromagnetic shock wave that has powerful electric and magnetic fields that can destroy electronic equipment. It is generally well-known that EMPs can cause the malfunction and disorder of electronic equipment and serious damages to electric power systems and communication networks. Research is being carried out to protect nuclear power plants (NPPs) from EMP threats. Penetration routes of EMPs can be roughly categorized into two groups, radioactivity and conductivity. The radioactive effect refers to an impact transmitted to the ground from high-altitude electromagnetic pulses (HEMP). Such an impact may affect target equipment through the point of entry (POE) of the concrete structure of an NPP. The conductive effect refers to induced voltage or current coupled to the NPPs cable structure. The induced voltage and current affect the target equipment via connected cables. All these factors must be considered when taking into account EMP effect analysis for NPPs. To examine all factors, it is necessary to fully understand the schemes of NPPs. This paper presents a four type design information template that can be used to analyze the EMP effect in operating nuclear power plants. In order to analyze of the effects of EMPs on operating NPPs, we must consider both the conductive and radioactive effects on the target (system, equipment, structure). For these reasons, not only the equipment information, but also the information about the structure and the external penetration will be required. We are developing a design information template for robust nuclear design information acquisition. We expect to develop a block diagram on the basis of the template

  6. Development of Design Information Template for Nuclear Power Plants for Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Effect Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minyi; Ryu, Hosan; Ye, Songhae; Lee, Euijong [KNHP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    An electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is a transient electromagnetic shock wave that has powerful electric and magnetic fields that can destroy electronic equipment. It is generally well-known that EMPs can cause the malfunction and disorder of electronic equipment and serious damages to electric power systems and communication networks. Research is being carried out to protect nuclear power plants (NPPs) from EMP threats. Penetration routes of EMPs can be roughly categorized into two groups, radioactivity and conductivity. The radioactive effect refers to an impact transmitted to the ground from high-altitude electromagnetic pulses (HEMP). Such an impact may affect target equipment through the point of entry (POE) of the concrete structure of an NPP. The conductive effect refers to induced voltage or current coupled to the NPPs cable structure. The induced voltage and current affect the target equipment via connected cables. All these factors must be considered when taking into account EMP effect analysis for NPPs. To examine all factors, it is necessary to fully understand the schemes of NPPs. This paper presents a four type design information template that can be used to analyze the EMP effect in operating nuclear power plants. In order to analyze of the effects of EMPs on operating NPPs, we must consider both the conductive and radioactive effects on the target (system, equipment, structure). For these reasons, not only the equipment information, but also the information about the structure and the external penetration will be required. We are developing a design information template for robust nuclear design information acquisition. We expect to develop a block diagram on the basis of the template.

  7. Power corrections to the asymptotics of the pion electromagnetic formfactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorsky, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    The first power correction to the pion electromagnetic form factor is derived. A few asymptotic wave functions corresponding to the different series of operators and matrix elements of four-particle operators in pion have been found. The large scale of the first power correction approximately 10 2 (GeV 2 )/Q 2 where Q 2 is the momentum transfer indicates that at low energies the whole series of power corrections seems to be taken into account

  8. Nuclear power stations: environmental surveillance of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellerin, P.

    1972-01-01

    Because of the radiations they emit, radioactive substances can be detected, identified and measured at extremely low concentrations ? the corresponding masses are lower by a factor ranging from 1000 to 10 000 than those that can be measured by any other chemical or physical method, however precise, applied to non-radioactive substances. Radioisotopes can therefore be detected in the environment at levels much lower than those at which genuine public health problems begin to arise. Unfortunately, we cannot say the same of numerous non-radio active pollutants, which can be measured only at concentrations very close to, or even exceeding, the toxicity threshold. In the mind of the uninformed public confusion seems quite frequently to reign as between the detection threshold and the toxicity threshold. This undoubtedly explains the following situation which is, to say the least, paradoxical: people are afraid of the hypothetical effects of radioactivity at ridiculously low levels, whereas nobody is alarmed at the fact that the toxicity limits for a very large number of non-radioactive, but very real pollutants are being exceeded almost continuously. The sum of all artificial irradiations does not exceed the normal fluctuations of natural irradiation, and if the genetic effects of very low radiation doses were truly cumulative, the natural radiation to which we are all exposed and which is by far the highest would by itself have eliminated every trace of life on earth long ago. Lastly, let us not forget that merely the use of X-rays in medicine, particularly in radiodiagnosis, represents an additional average artificial irradiation of the population amounting to double the natural radiation (100 millirem per year). This is about 100 times the irradiation which would accrue from nuclear industry even according to the most pessimistic estimate. We have seen that the measures described above will make it genuinely possible to maintain environmental radioactivity in all

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF LIMITING FACTORS ON ELECTRIC MACHINES ELECTROMAGNETIC POWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Konstantin K. Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase of electromechanical transducers single capacity is one of the main ways of their efficiency upgrading. The article discusses the impact of the main electromagnetic and me-chanical factors on the power, transmitted through the air gap of DC electric machines.

  10. simulation of electromagnetic transients in power systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    1996-09-01

    Sep 1, 1996 ... Transients in power systems are initiated by abrupt changes to otherwise steady operating conditions. These changes would .... The method is applicable both to single transmission in real time. The method is applicable both ...

  11. Modeling of MEMS piezoelectric energy harvesters using electromagnetic and power system theories

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Alshareef, Husam N.; Elshurafa, Amro M.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    -to-electrical analogy, electromagnetic theory, and power system theory is developed. The mechanical-to-electrical analogy and power system theory allow the derivation of an equivalent input impedance expression for the network, whereas electromagnetic transmission line

  12. Nuclear power and radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feates, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    The generation of electrical power by nuclear means leads to a very considerable reduction in the quantities of waste which would result from the use of any other fuel. The waste possess particular hazards which diminish with time. They are most dangerous during the first 500 years whilst fission products are decaying; subsequently their toxicity is comparable with that of many industrial chemicals which are currently in widespread use. There is no reason to believe that environmentally satisfactory disposal means cannot be found either on or under the ocean bed or below the surface of the earth. Nevertheless, since so little waste is involved considerable care can be devoted to ensure that whatever disposal method is selected is safe. The standards to be adopted are that any disposal method selected will, even in the worst conceivable situation, not lead to a significant increase in the exposure man already receives due to radioactivity arising from natural sources. (author)

  13. Environmental radioactive contamination and its control for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhongqi; Qu Jingyuan; Cui Yongli

    1998-01-01

    The environmental radioactive releases and exposure to human being due to operation of nuclear power plants in the world and in China, environmental contamination and consequences caused by severe nuclear power plant accidents in the history, control of the radioactive contamination in China, and some nuclear laws on the radioactive contamination control established by international organizations and USA etc. are described according to literature investigation and research. Some problems and comments in radioactive contamination control for nuclear power plants in China are presented. Therefore, perfecting laws and regulations and enhancing surveillances on the contamination control are recommended

  14. Effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, P.R.; Manweiler, R.W.; Davis, R.R.

    1977-09-01

    The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from a high-altitude nuclear detonation consists of a transient pulse of high intensity electromagnetic fields. These intense fields induce current and voltage transients in electrical conductors. Although most nuclear power plant cables are not directly exposed to these fields, the attenuated EMP fields that propagate into the plant will couple some EMP energy to these cables. The report predicts the probable effects of the EMP transients that could be induced in critical circuits of safety-related systems. It was found that the most likely consequence of EMP for nuclear plants is an unscheduled shutdown. EMP could prolong the shutdown period by the unnecessary actuation of certain safety systems. In general, EMP could be a nuisance to nuclear power plants, but it is not considered a serious threat to plant safety

  15. Research on the Countermeasures against Electromagnetic Interface in Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Bin; Kang, Young Suk; Choi, Hyo Yul; Cha, Ok Hyun [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gi Chul; Le, Jae Bok; Ha, Tae Hyun; Kim, Suk Joo; Na, Dae Yul; Kim, Yong Ho; Jeong, Kyo Beom [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    As the results of widespread use of microelectronics in electric power system, electric environment of power operation facilities in substation has become more weak and severe for surge voltages. Electromagnetic coupled overvoltage caused by HV bus switching operating lead to the malfunction or destruction of low voltage control circuit which mostly used signal. To scope with this transients overvoltage, it is necessary to be investigated transient source and propagation path and analysed its effects to low voltage circuit such as relay. This study is to analysis source of conducted EMP(electromagnetic pulse) on the low voltage control circuit and to acquits transient voltage waveforms, and to provide countermeasures against transient voltage, and EMP filtering method according to each EMP each type. With this, gradual improvement of EMI countermeasure will be achieved. (author). 49 refs., figs.

  16. Research on the Countermeasures against Electromagnetic Interface in Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Bin; Kang, Young Suk; Choi, Hyo Yul; Cha, Ok Hyun [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gi Chul; Le, Jae Bok; Ha, Tae Hyun; Kim, Suk Joo; Na, Dae Yul; Kim, Yong Ho; Jeong, Kyo Beom [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    As the results of widespread use of microelectronics in electric power system, electric environment of power operation facilities in substation has become more weak and severe for surge voltages. Electromagnetic coupled overvoltage caused by HV bus switching operating lead to the malfunction or destruction of low voltage control circuit which mostly used signal. To scope with this transients overvoltage, it is necessary to be investigated transient source and propagation path and analysed its effects to low voltage circuit such as relay. This study is to analysis source of conducted EMP(electromagnetic pulse) on the low voltage control circuit and to acquits transient voltage waveforms, and to provide countermeasures against transient voltage, and EMP filtering method according to each EMP each type. With this, gradual improvement of EMI countermeasure will be achieved. (author). 49 refs., figs.

  17. Spacetime algebra as a powerful tool for electromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressel, Justin, E-mail: prof.justin.dressel@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bliokh, Konstantin Y. [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Theoretical Science Research Group (iTHES), RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Nori, Franco [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2015-08-08

    We present a comprehensive introduction to spacetime algebra that emphasizes its practicality and power as a tool for the study of electromagnetism. We carefully develop this natural (Clifford) algebra of the Minkowski spacetime geometry, with a particular focus on its intrinsic (and often overlooked) complex structure. Notably, the scalar imaginary that appears throughout the electromagnetic theory properly corresponds to the unit 4-volume of spacetime itself, and thus has physical meaning. The electric and magnetic fields are combined into a single complex and frame-independent bivector field, which generalizes the Riemann–Silberstein complex vector that has recently resurfaced in studies of the single photon wavefunction. The complex structure of spacetime also underpins the emergence of electromagnetic waves, circular polarizations, the normal variables for canonical quantization, the distinction between electric and magnetic charge, complex spinor representations of Lorentz transformations, and the dual (electric–magnetic field exchange) symmetry that produces helicity conservation in vacuum fields. This latter symmetry manifests as an arbitrary global phase of the complex field, motivating the use of a complex vector potential, along with an associated transverse and gauge-invariant bivector potential, as well as complex (bivector and scalar) Hertz potentials. Our detailed treatment aims to encourage the use of spacetime algebra as a readily available and mature extension to existing vector calculus and tensor methods that can greatly simplify the analysis of fundamentally relativistic objects like the electromagnetic field.

  18. Spacetime algebra as a powerful tool for electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, Justin; Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Nori, Franco

    2015-08-01

    We present a comprehensive introduction to spacetime algebra that emphasizes its practicality and power as a tool for the study of electromagnetism. We carefully develop this natural (Clifford) algebra of the Minkowski spacetime geometry, with a particular focus on its intrinsic (and often overlooked) complex structure. Notably, the scalar imaginary that appears throughout the electromagnetic theory properly corresponds to the unit 4-volume of spacetime itself, and thus has physical meaning. The electric and magnetic fields are combined into a single complex and frame-independent bivector field, which generalizes the Riemann-Silberstein complex vector that has recently resurfaced in studies of the single photon wavefunction. The complex structure of spacetime also underpins the emergence of electromagnetic waves, circular polarizations, the normal variables for canonical quantization, the distinction between electric and magnetic charge, complex spinor representations of Lorentz transformations, and the dual (electric-magnetic field exchange) symmetry that produces helicity conservation in vacuum fields. This latter symmetry manifests as an arbitrary global phase of the complex field, motivating the use of a complex vector potential, along with an associated transverse and gauge-invariant bivector potential, as well as complex (bivector and scalar) Hertz potentials. Our detailed treatment aims to encourage the use of spacetime algebra as a readily available and mature extension to existing vector calculus and tensor methods that can greatly simplify the analysis of fundamentally relativistic objects like the electromagnetic field.

  19. Review of radioactive discharges from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    HM Inspectorate of Pollution commissioned, with authorising responsibilities in England and Wales, a study into the discharges of radioactive effluents from Nuclear Power Stations. The study considered arisings from nuclear power stations in Europe and the USA and the technologies to treat and control the radioactive discharges. This report is a review of the arisings and concludes that suitable technologies exist, which if applied, could reduce discharges from nuclear power plants in England and Wales in line with the rest of Europe. (author)

  20. Radioactive droplet moisture transfer from nuclear power plant spray pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    Problem on transfer of radioactive droplet moisture with an account of its evaporation from the nuclear power plant spray pool (NPP coolant) is considered. Formulae enabling evaluation of droplet and radioactive water admixture lifetime as a whole, as well as the maximum distance (by wind), over which it can extend, are obtained. Recommendations for decrease in the droplet dispersed composition and reduction in scale of radioactive contamination of underlying surface are given. 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  1. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  2. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  3. A 16 MJ compact pulsed power system for electromagnetic launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ling; Zhang, Qin; Zhong, Heqing; Lin, Fuchang; Li, Hua; Wang, Yan; Su, Cheng; Huang, Qinghua; Chen, Xu

    2015-07-01

    This paper has established a compact pulsed power system (PPS) of 16 MJ for electromagnetic rail gun. The PPS consists of pulsed forming network (PFN), chargers, monitoring system, and current junction. The PFN is composed of 156 pulse forming units (PFUs). Every PFU can be triggered simultaneously or sequentially in order to obtain different total current waveforms. The whole device except general control table is divided into two frameworks with size of 7.5 m × 2.2 m × 2.3 m. It is important to estimate the discharge current of PFU accurately for the design of the whole electromagnetic launch system. In this paper, the on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor have been researched to improve the estimation accuracy. The on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor are expressed as a logarithmic function based on experimental data. The circuit current waveform of the single PFU agrees with the simulating one. On the other hand, the coaxial discharge cable is a quick wear part in PFU because the discharge current will be up to dozens of kA even hundreds of kA. In this article, the electromagnetic field existing in the coaxial cable is calculated by finite element method. On basis of the calculation results, the structure of cable is optimized in order to improve the limit current value of the cable. At the end of the paper, the experiment current wave of the PPS with the load of rail gun is provided.

  4. Radioactive waste management at nuclear power plant Cernavoda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raducea, D.

    2002-01-01

    Many human activities generate waste, but people are worried about wastes produced in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Their concern is an unjustified fear toward the hazards from radioactive waste, probably because in any country generating electric power by NPPs a lot of attention is paid to relevant parties involved in radioactive waste management. Significant attention is also given to the management of radioactive waste at the Cemavoda NPP. The general approach required for the collection, handling, conditioning and storage of radioactive wastes, while maintaining acceptable levels of safety for workers, members of the public and the environment, is conceptually established. The overall programme provides the necessary facilities to adequately manage solid radioactive waste from Cemavoda NPP Unit 1 and will be capable of expansion when other units are brought into service. (author)

  5. Investigation of radioactive contamination at non-radioactive drains of the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Hiroaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Ebisawa, Toru; Kawano, Shinji; Kobayashi, Keiji.

    1982-05-01

    In April, 1981, it was disclosed that a drainage area at the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station was so much contaminated with radioactivites. Although Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) officially provided an explanation of a process that resulted in the contamination, many problems remain unsolved on account of insufficient and limited investigations. The authors collected mud samples from contaminated manholes and examined radioactivities in them through the measurement of #betta#- and #betta#-spectra. Chemical separation of the samples was carried out in order to obtain precise concentration of radioactive cesium. Results are as follows: i) the concentration of radioactivities does not show monotonous decrease along the stream line but an anomalous peak at downstream manholes, ii) at the manhole specified No. 6 located rather downstream, 137 Cs concentration is significantly high and the composition of radioactive nuclides is quite different from that in the other manholes, and iii) additional radioactive contamination was observed in other manholes of non-radioactive drains which would not be influenced by the accident explained by MITI. Our present work has provided much more data than by MITI and made it clear that the overall data cnnot be consistent with the simple MITI explanation; a single radioactive release accident caused the disclosed contamination. It is concluded that non-radioactive water drains at the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station had been under continual contamination. (author)

  6. Electromagnetic Interference Issues of A Wireless Power Transmission Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khazraj, Hesam; Haji Bashi, Mazaher; Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da

    2018-01-01

    field and the leakage current flowing through stray capacitors. In this paper, the EMI of wireless power transmission technology is highlighted and for the first time evaluated from a new perspective. The possible parasitic paths are identified simply. Additionally, effective high-frequency models......Many recent studies have focused on the inductive charging to transfer electrical power from a source to batteries without any electrical interface. The main problem with them is that inductive charging technologies may have electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) issues caused by the leakage magnetic...... for each part of the inductive charger are presented. At the first, the lowest EMI technology for wireless charging is chosen and simulated. To overcome the EMI and leakage current problems, this paper also suggests using a new passive EMI filter topology. Simulation results show the necessity...

  7. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1991-05-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1988 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1988 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized. 16 tabs

  8. Supply, operation and radioactive waste disposal of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohrhauer, H.; Krey, M.; Haag, G.; Wolters, J.; Merz, E.; Sauermann, P.F.

    1981-07-01

    The subject of 'Nuclear Fuel Cycle' is treated in 5 reports: 1. Uranium supply; 2. Fabrication and characteristics of fuel elements; 3. Design, operation and safety of nuclear power plants after Harrisburg; 4. Radioactive waste disposal of nuclear power plants - changed political scenery after 1979; 5. Shutdown and dismantling of LWR-KKW - state of knowledge and feasibility. (HP) [de

  9. Management of radioactive wastes at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirements of the Regulation CNEN-NE.1.26, 'Safety Operation of Nuclear Power Plants', as expressed in the section 13, specifically in the subsection 13.4, relatives to the management of radioactive wastes at nuclear power plants

  10. The application of magnetic gradiometry and electromagnetic induction at a former radioactive waste disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Dale Franklin

    2010-04-01

    A former radioactive waste disposal site is surveyed with two non-intrusive geophysical techniques, including magnetic gradiometry and electromagnetic induction. Data were gathered over the site by towing the geophysical equipment mounted to a non-electrically conductive and non-magnetic fibre-glass cart. Magnetic gradiometry, which detects the location of ferromagnetic material, including iron and steel, was used to map the existence of a previously unknown buried pipeline formerly used in the delivery of liquid waste to a number of surface disposal trenches and concrete vaults. The existence of a possible pipeline is reinforced by historical engineering drawing and photographs. The electromagnetic induction (EMI) technique was used to map areas of high and low electrical conductivity, which coincide with the magnetic gradiometry data. The EMI also provided information on areas of high electrical conductivity unrelated to a pipeline network. Both data sets demonstrate the usefulness of surface geophysical surveillance techniques to minimize the risk of exposure in the event of future remediation efforts.

  11. Radioactive waste from nuclear power stations and other nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek-Fink, P.

    1976-01-01

    After estimating the amounts of liquid and solid radioactive wastes that will be produced in nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants, by the fuel cycle industry, and in the nuclear research centers in the FRG until 1990, it is reported on the state of technology and on the tendencies in the development of processing radioactive waste. The paper also describes, how waste disposal is managed by those producing radioactive waste (see above), and discusses the future development of the complex of waste disposal from the industry's point of view. (HR/LN) [de

  12. An electromagnetic field measurement protocol for monitoring power lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubritto, C.; Iavazzo, A.; D'Onofrio, A.; Palmieri, A.; Sabbarese, C.; Terrasi, F.

    2002-01-01

    In the actions aiming to prevent risks related to the exposure to Low Frequencies Non Ionising electromagnetic Radiations (ELF-NIR), always arises the need to perform measurements in order to assess the field level existing in the considered sites. As a matter of fact very often it turns out difficult to predict, on the base of calculations, with sufficient approximation the field levels, due to extended variability of environmental conditions (e.g. coexistence of several sources, ground and building conformation, etc..). The measurement procedures must follow a methodology that could allow to minimise the interferences with the measurement set-up and the systematic and accidental errors. Risks for the operator and damages to the instrument should also be taken into account. One of the goal set for this research program was then the definition of the measurement protocol for electromagnetic field generated by low frequency non ionising radiation sources. In particular sources like power lines will be considered in order to validate the protocol by means of in-field measurements

  13. Radioactive iodine releases from nuclear power plant, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuya

    1974-01-01

    Concerning the release of radioactive iodine from nuclear power plants, the guidelines and data both in Japan and abroad are briefed, including those in the United States, Tsuruga nuclear power station and working Group of the Environmental Radiation Study Committee. In case of the Tsuruga nuclear power station, the radiation dose and other data for a few years are presented. Parameters and factors proposed by the working group cover such as the dose through food intake and respiration, concentration factor, etc. (Mori, K.)

  14. Radioactive commitment due to use of coal in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenger, J. and H. Flyger.

    1980-11-01

    A short review of the literature on release of radioactivity due to use of coal in power plants with the emphasis on the stack effluent and waste products. It is concluded that during normal operation coal fired power plants give a larger dose commitment than nuclear power plants, but both types have insignificant effects. The problem of waste management has never been studied in detail; ash deposit should probably be monitored. (Auth)

  15. Complementary power output characteristics of electromagnetic generators and triboelectric generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Feng-Ru; Tang, Wei; Yao, Yan; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-04-04

    Recently, a triboelectric generator (TEG) has been invented to convert mechanical energy into electricity by a conjunction of triboelectrification and electrostatic induction. Compared to the traditional electromagnetic generator (EMG) that produces a high output current but low voltage, the TEG has different output characteristics of low output current but high output voltage. In this paper, we present a comparative study regarding the fundamentals of TEGs and EMGs. The power output performances of the EMG and the TEG have a special complementary relationship, with the EMG being a voltage source and the TEG a current source. Utilizing a power transformed and managed (PTM) system, the current output of a TEG can reach as high as ∼3 mA, which can be coupled with the output signal of an EMG to enhance the output power. We also demonstrate a design to integrate a TEG and an EMG into a single device for simultaneously harvesting mechanical energy. In addition, the integrated NGs can independently output a high voltage and a high current to meet special needs.

  16. Issues in radioactive waste management for fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maninger, R.C.; Dorn, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of recent conceptual designs reveals that commercial fusion power systems will raise issues of occupational and public health and safety. This paper focuses on radioactive wastes from fusion reactor materials activated by neutrons. The analysis shows that different selections of materials and neutronic designs can make differences in orders-of magnitude of the kinds and amounts of radioactivity to be expected. By careful and early evaluation of the impacts of the selections on waste management, designers can produce fusion power systems with radiation from waste well below today's limits for occupational and public health and safety

  17. Issues in radioactive-waste management for fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maninger, R.C.; Dorn, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of recent conceptual designs reveals that commercial fusion power systems will raise issues of occupational and public health and safety. This paper focuses on radioactive wastes from fusion reactor materials activated by neutrons. The analysis shows that different selections of materials and neutronic designs can make differences in orders-of-magnitude of the kinds and amounts of radioactivity to be expected. By careful and early evaluation of the impacts of the selections on waste management, designers can produce fusion power systems with radiation from waste well below today's limits for occupational and public health and safety

  18. Radioactive waste processing method for a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kuriyama, O

    1976-06-04

    Object is to subject radioactive liquid waste in a nuclear power plant to reverse permeation process after which it is vaporized and concentrated thereby decreasing the quantity of foam to be used to achieve effective concentration of the liquid waste. Liquid waste containing a radioactive material produced from a nuclear power plant is first applied with pressure in excess of osmotic pressure by a reverse permeation device and is separated into clean water and concentrated liquid by semi-permeable membrane. Next, the thus reverse-permeated and concentrated waste is fed to an evaporator which control foaming by the foam and then further reconcentrated for purification of the liquid waste.

  19. Management of nontritium radioactive wastes from fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser, J.D.; Postma, A.K.; Bradley, D.J.

    1976-09-01

    This report identifies nontritium radioactive waste sources for current conceptual fusion reactor designs. Quantities and compositions of the radwaste are estimated for the tokamaks of the University of Wisconsin (UWMAK-I), the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); the Reference Theta Pinch Reactor of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL); and the Minimum Activation Blanket of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary for fusion reactors. Although the curie (Ci) level of the wastes is comparable to that of fission products in fission reactors, the isotopes are less hazardous, and have shorter half-lives. Therefore radioactivity from fusion power production should pose a smaller risk than radioactivity from fission reactors. Radioactive waste sources identified for the five reference plants are summarized. Specific radwaste treatments or systems had to be assumed to estimate these waste quantities. Future fusion power plant conceptual designs should include radwaste treatment system designs so that assumed designs do not have to be used to assess the environmental effects of the radioactive waste

  20. Radioactive iodine releases from nuclear power plant, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naritomi, Mitsuo

    1974-01-01

    Internal radiation dose through the respiratory intake of fission products is predominantly due to radioactive iodine not only at the time of reactor accidents but also in normal operation of nuclear facilities. Technological studies in this field have thus been quite active to this day. With the rapid advance of nuclear power generation in recent years, the efforts to reduce environmental release of radioactive iodine and to enhance environmental safety are all the more emphasized. Experiences in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute during past about six years are described concerning the radioactive iodine release to the atmosphere in 131 I production and the measures taken to reduce the release. Then, problems are expounded regarding the radioactive iodine release at the time of reactor accidents and in spent fuel reprocessing. (Mori, K.)

  1. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  2. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  3. Power of SNH with regard to storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The debate relates to the powers of Scottish National Heritage and several new clauses were discussed. The first concerned the storage of radioactive wastes. The new clause would make it an offence for any person to store radioactive waste under the land without first informing Scottish National Heritage of their intention to do so. This allowed discussion on the proposal to use Dounreay or Caithness for deep nuclear storage. The main concern was over the safety of nuclear material and the consideration of public opinion which is against radioactive disposal at Dounreay. The question of the disposal of nuclear submarines and possible environmental damage was also raised. This part of the debate lasted about 2 hours. The new clause was defeated. Other clauses -about Scottish National Heritage's powers in relation to private roads, habitat management, access to the countryside and drought orders - were also debated. The whole debate lasted six hours and is reported verbatim. (UK)

  4. Management of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This Code of Practice defines the minimum requirements for the design and operation of structures, systems and components important for the management of radioactive wastes from thermal neutron nuclear power plants. The topics covered include design and operation of gaseous, liquid and solid waste systems, waste transport, storage and disposal, decommissioning wastes and wastes from unplanned events

  5. Possible standoff detection of ionizing radiation using high-power THz electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sprangle, Phillip; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; Rodgers, John; Pu, Ruifeng; Kashyn, Dmytro G.; Antonsen, Thomas M., Jr.; Granatstein, Victor L.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a new method of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials was proposed. This method is based on focusing high-power short wavelength electromagnetic radiation in a small volume where the wave electric field exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of free electrons caused by ionizing radiation, in this volume an avalanche discharge can then be initiated. When the wavelength is short enough, the probability of having even one free electron in this small volume in the absence of additional sources of ionization is low. Hence, a high breakdown rate will indicate that in the vicinity of this volume there are some materials causing ionization of air. To prove this concept a 0.67 THz gyrotron delivering 200-300 kW power in 10 microsecond pulses is under development. This method of standoff detection of concealed sources of ionizing radiation requires a wide range of studies, viz., evaluation of possible range, THz power and pulse duration, production of free electrons in air by gamma rays penetrating through container walls, statistical delay time in initiation of the breakdown in the case of low electron density, temporal evolution of plasma structure in the breakdown and scattering of THz radiation from small plasma objects. Most of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  6. Management of radioactive wastes at power reactor sites in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amalraj, R.V.; Balu, K.

    Indian nuclear power programme, at the present stage, is based on natural uranium fuelled heavy water moderated CANDU type reactors except for the first nuclear power station consisting of two units of enriched uranium fuelled, light water moderated, BWR type of reactors. Some of the salient aspects of radioactive waste management at power reactor sites in India are discussed. Brief reviews are presented on treatment of wastes, their disposal and environmental aspects. Indian experience in power reactor waste management is also summarised identifying some of the areas needing further work. (auth.)

  7. Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations. Power Systems Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; McConnell, B.W.; Van Dyke, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [Tesche (F.M.), Dallas, TX (United States); Vance, E.F. [Vance (E.F.), Fort Worth, TX (United States)

    1993-01-01

    A single nuclear detonation several hundred kilometers above the central United States will subject much of the nation to a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (BENT). This pulse consists of an intense steep-front, short-duration transient electromagnetic field, followed by a geomagnetic disturbance with tens of seconds duration. This latter environment is referred to as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (NMENT). Both the early-time transient and the geomagnetic disturbance could impact the operation of the nation`s power systems. Since 1983, the US Department of Energy has been actively pursuing a research program to assess the potential impacts of one or more BENT events on the nation`s electric energy supply. This report summarizes the results of that program and provides recommendations for enhancing power system reliability under HENT conditions. A nominal HENP environment suitable for assessing geographically large systems was developed during the program and is briefly described in this report. This environment was used to provide a realistic indication of BEMP impacts on electric power systems. It was found that a single high-altitude burst, which could significantly disturb the geomagnetic field, may cause the interconnected power network to break up into utility islands with massive power failures in some areas. However, permanent damage would be isolated, and restoration should be possible within a few hours. Multiple bursts would likely increase the blackout areas, component failures, and restoration time. However, a long-term blackout of many months is unlikely because major power system components, such as transformers, are not likely to be damaged by the nominal HEND environment. Moreover, power system reliability, under both HENT and normal operating conditions, can be enhanced by simple, and often low cost, modifications to current utility practices.

  8. Costs related to radioactive residues from nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The nuclear power enterprises are responsible for proper actions for safe handling and final storage of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from Swedish nuclear power facilities. The most important actions are to plan, build and operate necessary plants and systems. The nuclear power enterprises have designated Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., (SKB), to perform these tasks. In this report calculations concerning costs to carry out these tasks are presented. The calculations are based upon a plan prepared by SKB. The plan is described in the report. As final storage of the long lived and highly radioactive waste is planned to take place in the 21st century continuing research and development may indicate new methods which may affect system design as well as costs in a simplifying way. Plants and systems already operational are: Transport systems for radioactive waste products; A central temporary storage for spent nuclear fuel, 'CLAB'; A final storage for radioactive waste from operating nuclear facilities, 'SFR 1'. (L.F.)

  9. Reducing Electromagnetic Interference in a Grid Tied Single Phase Power Inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    With the growing demand for a reliable electrical grid, backup power supplies and energy management systems are a necessity. Systems such as server...ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE IN A GRID TIED SINGLE PHASE POWER INVERTER by Jason Hassan Valiani September 2016 Thesis Advisor: Giovanna Oriti...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE REDUCING ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE IN A GRID TIED SINGLE PHASE POWER

  10. Factor of radioactive waste on nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Abdul Malik Syed Zain

    2009-01-01

    Global warming phenomena and rising oil prices have brought the excitement of open space use of nuclear power. Arguments in favor of this technology range in terms of more environmentally friendly, energy diversification and cost efficiency has prompted the government to widen the choice of nuclear power be considered as a serious alternative. Despite the attractive factors to the use of these powers, there are also factors that stem from the continued development of nuclear power. These include the factor of safety, security, security of fuel supply, and public attention is often associated with radioactive waste management. This article attempts to debate specific to radioactive waste management factors that impact on public acceptance of a country's nuclear power program, especially in Malaysia. Starting from the absence of radioactive waste management policy to model uncertainty of the landfill and complications in selecting a repository site shows the basic infrastructure is still lacking. In addition, previous experience handling thorium waste has not reached a final settlement after several years of implementation. It reinforced the perception about the level of public confidence in the competence and attitude of local workers who are not very encouraging to pursue this advanced.

  11. Radioactive waste from non-power applications in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haegg, Ann-Christin; Lindbom, Gunilla; Persson, Monica

    2001-01-01

    regulations enable the free release of small amounts of radioactive waste either to the municipal sewage system or for delivering to a municipal dumpsite. Identified issues. It is not possible for the SSI to conduct more than a limited number of inspections. SSI relies on the licensee to inform the SSI when the source is no longer in use. An incitement for this is the annual fee mentioned above. Sources with activity below 500 megaBq from facilities with a summary licence are not accounted for separately and can therefore be difficult to control. The only radioactive waste facility (recognised waste facility) with the capacity and the authorisation for taking care of disused radioactive sources and other forms of radioactive waste from Non-Power applications is Studsvik AB. The future costs for final disposal of this waste is unclear because of the lack of final repository. Studsvik has to make sure that future costs are covered by the fee they charges for taking care of radioactive waste. As the only recognised waste facility Studsvik can freely set the fee for taking care of radioactive waste. If the fee is set too high there's a risk that waste from some unserious license-holder will be lost' or kept in storage. Studsvik has no formal responsibility for taking care of used radioactive sources. It's not unrealistic that Studsvik in the future decides not to accept a specific waste-form. Commercial products: Approximately there are 10 millions fireguards containing about 40 kBq Am-241 in Sweden. The average lifetime of the fireguards is 10 years and implicates that about one million fireguards are disposed of each year. SSI has issued regulations stating that private persons are allowed to occasionally throw a fireguard on municipal dump-sites. Companies are allowed to throw up to five fireguards each month. Identified issues: An assumption for the regulations was that the fireguards were not disposed at the same time nor at the same place. A dilution was anticipated

  12. Environmental radioactivity at the heat power complex enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, D.A.; Putintseva, V.E.

    1997-01-01

    Environmental radioactivity at the heat power complex enterprises (coal mines, oil and gas deposits, coal thermal power plants and heat-electric generation plant) is considered. IT is shown that elevated level of radiation effect on the personnel lungs (2-3 times higher than that of safety standard) is observed at 80 coal mines. High levels of gamma radiation from natural radionuclides (300 μR/h and above) are marked at the separate objects of oil and gas mining industry. It is revealed that the contamination of ash wastes resulted from certain coals combustion reaches 520 Bq/kg at separate thermal power plants

  13. Design of Radioactive Waste Management Systems at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Guide is addressed to the administrative and technical authorities and specialists dealing with the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, and in particular waste management facilities at nuclear power plants. This Guide has been prepared as part of the IAEA Waste Handling, Treatment and Storage programme. It is a follow-up document to the Code of Practice on Management of Radioactive Wastes from Nuclear Power Plants published in 1985 in the IAEA Safety Standards, Safety Series No. 69, in which basic principles for management of radioactive wastes at nuclear power plants are set out. The IAEA has established wide ranging programmes to provide Member States with guidance on different aspects of safety and technology related to thermal neutron power reactors and associated nuclear fuel cycle operations, including those for management of radioactive wastes. There are many IAEA publications related to various technical and safety aspects of different nuclear energy applications. All these publications are issued by the Agency for the use of Member States in connection with their own nuclear technological safety requirements. They are based on national experience contributed by experts from different countries and relate to common features in approaches to the problems discussed. However, the final decision and legal responsibility in any regulatory procedure always rest with the Member State. This particular Guide aims to provide general and detailed principles for the design of waste management facilities at nuclear power plants. It emphasizes what and how specific safety requirements for the management of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants can be met in the design and construction stage. The safety requirements for operation of such facilities will be considered in the Agency's next Safety Series publication, Safety Guide 50-SG-011, Operational Management for Radioactive Effluents and Wastes Arising in Nuclear Power Plants

  14. Prospects for high-power radioactive beam facilities worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, Jerry A

    2003-01-01

    Advances in accelerators, targets, ion sources, and experimental instrumentation are making possible ever more powerful facilities for basic and applied research with short-lived radioactive isotopes. There are several current generation facilities, based on a variety of technologies, operating worldwide. These include, for example, those based on the in-flight method such as the recently upgraded National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, the facility at RIKEN in Japan, GANIL in Caen, France, and GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. Present facilities based on the Isotope-Separator On-Line method include, for example, the ISOLDE laboratory at CERN, HRIBF at Oak Ridge, and the new high-power facility ISAC at TRIUMF in Vancouver. Next-generation facilities include the Radioactive-Ion Factory upgrade of RIKEN to higher energy and intensity and the upgrade of ISAC to a higher energy secondary beam; both of these projects are in progress. A new project, LINAG, to upgrade the capabilities at...

  15. Safety transport of radioactive waste in the nuclear power area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tureková Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive wastes require strict rules for manipulation with them due to the hazards for the human health and environment, not excluding the hazards during their internal transport. The article deals with the transport of packing unit inside of the company and it proposes the possible alternatives so that meet the limit conditions and reduce the manipulation time with the radioactive material in the packing unit. The packing unite isolates fixated liquid waste from the environment while it also serves as protection. There are also important external radiation characteristics of package unit, which consist of measurable values of the scratch contamination surface and dose power on the surface of package unit. Thus, the paper is aimed to point out the necessity of the logistics during manipulation with the package unit in the process of internal transport so that the dose power of exposed employees would achieve the lowest possible level and meet the strict limits in a full extent.

  16. High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) and High Power Microwave (HPM) Devices: Threat Assessments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Clay

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is an instantaneous, intense energy field that can disrupt at a distance numerous electrical systems and high technology microcircuits that are especially sensitive to power surges...

  17. High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) and High Power Microwave (HPM) Devices: Threat Assessments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Clay

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is an instantaneous, intense energy field that can overload or disrupt at a distance numerous electrical systems and high technology microcircuits, which are especially sensitive to power surges...

  18. Method for removing radioactive waste from a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    By using the existing safety and auxiliary systems in a nuclear power plant a bunker-type building is to be linked up with the region of the main airlock, in which the radioactive material to be disposed of may pass through the necessary mechanical and chemical process while being handled in mobile containers. The constructional and engineering measures are described by a design example. (TK) [de

  19. The risk of storing radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruemm, H.

    1976-09-01

    Serious bottle-necks exist in the nuclear fuel cycle and will continue for the next decade. A total of 800 nuclear reactors are now in operation. 153 nuclear power plants represent an installed capacity of 70 GVe. Until 1985 five hundred nuclear power plants will be in operation from which up to this date 53.000 t uranium will have been discharged. Part of this will have to be reprocessed. Associated with the above mentioned amount are 500 t plutonium and 1.500 t highly radioactive wastes. Two risks for the population have to be considered: firstly, the effect of small amounts of radioactive substances released during normal operation of nuclear power plants (the annual dose is about 1 mrem per person). Secondly, the possibility of the release of great amounts of radioactivity during heavy accidents (the probability for which is extremely small). A series of feasible possibilities for conditioning are shown. Firstly, the wastes are packed in substances which are insoluble in water. Secondly, for low and medium wastes these can be mixed with concrete or bitumen and filled into stable containers. Thirdly, the wastes could also be solidified. Fourthly, the wastes could be enclosed in small glass spheres which are embedded in a metal matrix. (H.G.)

  20. An overview of the transportation of radioactive waste at Ontario Power Generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Material Transportation Department (RMT) ensures regulatory compliance in radioactive material shipping within Ontario Power Generation (OPG). OPG provides a radioactive shipping program, high quality carrier service, stringent packaging maintenance, and quality assurance oversight to the corporation's nuclear facilities and its customers. This paper will speak to the transport of radioactive waste in Ontario Power Generation. It will also mention non-waste shipments and the quality assurance programme used at Ontario Power Generation to ensure a high quality transportation system. (author)

  1. Electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, Ian S

    1990-01-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw the Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scient

  2. Environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure by radioactive emissions of coal-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.

    1981-03-01

    On the basis of measurements of the radioactive emissions of a 300 MW coal-fired power plant and of a 600 MW lignite-fired power plant the expected activity increase in air and soil in the environment of both plants is estimated and compared with the normal, natural activity level. Due to these emissions it results for the point of maximum immission a committed effective dose equivalent per GW x a of about 0.2 mrem = 0.002 mSv for the coal-fired plant and of about 0.04 mrem = 0.0004 mSv for the lignite-fired plant. This dose is caused to nearly equal parts by inhalation, ingestion and external γ-radiation. The normalized effective dose equivalent in the environment of the modern coal-fired power plant is in the same order of magnitude like that of a modern pressurized water reactor. The total, collective effective dose equivalent commitment by the annual radioactive emissions of coal-fired power plants in the F.R.Germany is estimated to 2000-6000 Man x rem = 20-60 Man x Sv. This corresponds to a mean per caput-dose in the population of the F.R.Germany of about 0.03-0.1 mrem = 0.0003-0.001 mSv; this is about 0.02-0.06% of the mean normal natural radiation exposure of the population. (orig.) [de

  3. Cost for the radioactive wastes from nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The future cost for handling, storing and disposing of radioactive wastes from the Swedish nuclear power plants are calculated in this report. The following plants and systems are already operating: * Transport system for radioactive wastes, * A control spent fuel intermediate storage plant, * A repository for low and medium level wastes. These are planned: * A treatment plant for used fuels, * A repository for high-level wastes, and * Repository for decommissioning wastes. The costs include R and D and decommissioning. Total future costs from 1993 are estimated to be 46.4 billion SEK (8.3 billion USD), during 60 years. Up to 1992 8.7 billion SEK (1.6 billion USD) have been spent

  4. Cost for the radioactive wastes from nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The future cost for handling, storing and disposing of radioactive wastes from the Swedish nuclear power plants are calculated in this report. The following plants and systems are already operating: - Transportsystem for radioactive wastes. - A control spent fuel intermediate storage plant. - A repository for low and medium level wastes. These are planned: - A treatment plant for used fuels. A repository for high-level wastes and repository for decommissioning wastes. The costs include Rand D and decommissioning. Total future costs from 1990 are estimated to be 43 billion SEK (6,5 billion dollars), during 60 years. Up to 1990 7,4 billion SEK (1,1 billion dollars) have been spent. (L.E.)

  5. Communication on SWIPT and EH Using Electromagnetic Behaviour for Power Allocation in Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sohel Rana; Ajij, Sayyad

    2017-12-01

    This review paper focuses on the basic relations between wireless power transfer, wireless information transfer and combined phenomenon of simultaneous wireless information and power transfer. The authors reviewed and discussed electromagnetic fields behaviour (EMB) for enhancing the power allocation strategies (PAS) in energy harvesting (EH) wireless communication systems. Further, this paper presents relations between Friis transmission equation and Maxwell's equations to be used in propagation models for reduction in specific absorption rate (SAR). This paper provides a review of various methods and concepts reported in earlier works. This paper also reviews Poynting vector and power densities along with boundary conditions for antennas and human body. Finally, this paper explores the usage of electromagnetic behaviour for the possible enhancement in power saving methods for electromagnetic behaviour centered-wireless energy harvesting (EMBC-WEH). At the same time, possibilities of PAS for reduction in SAR are discussed.

  6. Disposal of slightly contaminated radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    With regard to the disposal of solid wastes, nuclear power plants basically have two options, disposal in a Part 61 licensed low-level waste site, or receive approval pursuant to 20.2002 for disposal in a manner not otherwise authorized by the NRC. Since 1981, the staff has reviewed and approved 30 requests for disposal of slightly contaminated radioactive materials pursuant to Section 20.2002 (formerly 20.302) for nuclear power plants located in non-Agreement States. NRC Agreement States have been delegated the authority for reviewing and approving such disposals (whether onsite or offsite) for nuclear power plants within their borders. This paper describes the characteristics of the waste disposed of, the review process, and the staff`s guidelines.

  7. Natural radioactivity releases from lignite power plants in Southwestern Anatolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaprak, G.; Guer, F.; Cam, F.; Candan, O.

    2006-01-01

    The Mugla basin is one of the most productive lignite basins in Southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Mining activities started in 1979 and total reserves were estimated during exploration at 767.5 million tonnes. Total mean annual lignite production of the Mugla basin is estimated at about 10 million tonnes per year. Most of the lignite production supplies three thermal power plants (Yatagan 630 MW, Yenikoey 420 MW, Kemerkoey 630 MW) with a total capacity of 1680 MW. It is well known that the lignite contains naturally occurring primordial radionuclides arising from the uranium and thorium series as well as from 4 0K. Lignite burning is, therefore, one of the sources of technologically enhanced exposure to humans from natural radionuclides. The investigation reported here deals with the determination of the 2 26Ra, 2 32Th and 4 0K concentrations in the lignite feeding 3 thermal power plants in Mugla region and in the product ash. Samples of lignite feeding the power plants and fly and bottom ashes produced in the same power plants were collected over a period of 1 year and therefore systematic sampling allowed for the determination of mean representative values for the natural radioactivity content of above materials and also estimation of the radioactivity releases to the environment. Furthermore, grid soil sampling within 10-15 km around the power plants allowed for the mapping of the surface soil activity of natural radionuclides. Dosimetric calculations from terrestrial gamma radiation for the population living around the power plants were performed based on the guidance of UNSCEAR 2000 report

  8. Thermally Driven Transport and Relaxation Switching Self-Powered Electromagnetic Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Maosheng; Wang, Xixi; Cao, Wenqiang; Fang, Xiaoyong; Wen, Bo; Yuan, Jie

    2018-06-07

    Electromagnetic energy radiation is becoming a "health-killer" of living bodies, especially around industrial transformer substation and electricity pylon. Harvesting, converting, and storing waste energy for recycling are considered the ideal ways to control electromagnetic radiation. However, heat-generation and temperature-rising with performance degradation remain big problems. Herein, graphene-silica xerogel is dissected hierarchically from functions to "genes," thermally driven relaxation and charge transport, experimentally and theoretically, demonstrating a competitive synergy on energy conversion. A generic approach of "material genes sequencing" is proposed, tactfully transforming the negative effects of heat energy to superiority for switching self-powered and self-circulated electromagnetic devices, beneficial for waste energy harvesting, conversion, and storage. Graphene networks with "well-sequencing genes" (w = P c /P p > 0.2) can serve as nanogenerators, thermally promoting electromagnetic wave absorption by 250%, with broadened bandwidth covering the whole investigated frequency. This finding of nonionic energy conversion opens up an unexpected horizon for converting, storing, and reusing waste electromagnetic energy, providing the most promising way for governing electromagnetic pollution with self-powered and self-circulated electromagnetic devices. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. RADIOACTIVELY POWERED RISING LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    The rising luminosity of the recent, nearby supernova 2011fe shows a quadratic dependence with time during the first ≈0.5-4 days. In addition, studies of the composite light curves formed from stacking together many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have found similar power-law indices for the rise, but may also show some dispersion that may indicate diversity. I explore what range of power-law rises are possible due to the presence of radioactive material near the surface of the exploding white dwarf (WD). I summarize what constraints such a model places on the structure of the progenitor and the distribution and velocity of ejecta. My main conclusion is that for the inferred explosion time for SN 2011fe, its rise requires an increasing mass fraction X 56 ≈ (4-6) × 10 –2 of 56 Ni distributed between a depth of ≈10 –2 and 0.3 M ☉ below the WD's surface. Radioactive elements this shallow are not found in simulations of a single C/O detonation. Scenarios that may produce this material include helium-shell burning during a double-detonation ignition, a gravitationally confined detonation, and a subset of deflagration to detonation transition models. In general, the power-law rise can differ from quadratic depending on the details of the velocity, density, and radioactive deposition gradients in a given event. Therefore, comparisons of this work with observed bolometric rises of SNe Ia would place strong constraints on the properties of the shallow outer layers, providing important clues for identifying the elusive progenitors of SNe Ia.

  10. Improvements of radioactive waste management at WWER nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    This report is part of a systematic IAEA effort to improve waste management practices at WWER plants and to make them consistent with the current requirements and standards for safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The report reviews the wet and dry solid waste management practices at the various types of WWER nuclear power plants (NPP) and describes approaches and recent achievements in waste minimization. Waste minimization practices in use at western PWRs are reviewed and compared, and their applicability at WWER plants is evaluated. Radioactive waste volume reduction issues and waste management practices are reflected in many IAEA publications. However, aspects of waste minimization specific to individual WWER nuclear power plant designs and WWER waste management policies are not addressed extensively in those publications. This report covers the important aspects applicable to the improvement of waste management at WWER NPP, including both plant-level and country-level considerations. It is recognized that most WWER plants are already implementing many of these concepts and recommendations with varying degrees of success; others will benefit from the included considerations. The major issues addressed are: - Review of current waste management policies and practices related to WWERs and western PWRs, including the influence of the original design concepts and significant modifications, liquid waste discharge limits and dry solid waste clearance levels applied in individual countries, national policies and laws, and other relevant aspects affecting the nature and quantities of waste arisings; - Identification of strategies and methods for improving the radioactive waste management generated in normal operation and maintenance at WWERs. This report is a composite (combination) of the two separate initiatives mentioned above. The first draft report was prepared at the meeting 26-30 May 1997 by five consultants. The draft was improved during an

  11. Relations between focusing power of space-charge lenses and external electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingchang; Qiu Hong; Huang Jiachang

    1991-01-01

    Under different external electromagnetic fields, the electron densities of the electron cloud in a self-sustaning spece-charge lens are measured with the radio-frequency method and the energy distributions of the ions produced in ionization are measured with the stopping field method. From them the relations between the focusing power of space-charge lenses and the external electromagnetic fields are determined. The available region of the Lebedev-Morozov formula is discussed

  12. Management of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, H.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants (NPPs) results primarily from their large amounts. In NPPs more radioactive wastes arise than in all other plants of the nuclear fuel cycle, with the exception of uranium mills. Although the volume is great, NPP wastes are relatively low in activity and radiotoxicity and short in half-life. Several methods for treatment of NPP wastes are available that meet all the relevant requirements and they have attained high technical standards and are highly reliable. Consequently, the discharge of radionuclides with liquid and gaseous effluents and the resulting dose commitment to the general public are far below established limits. The quality of the conditioned wastes conforms to the requirements for ultimate disposal. The final disposal of NPP wastes has already been demonstrated successfully in several places and the feasibility of NPP decommissioning and management of the wastes arising in this process have been proved. The problems associated with the management of radioactive wastes from NPPs have been solved both scientifically and technically; there is no urgent need for improvement. This is why for new developments cost-benefit aspects must be considered, including the dose commitment to the operating staff and general aspects such as public acceptance and socio-ethical questions. Spectacular new developments are not to be expected in the near future. However, by continuous improvement of details and optimization of the whole system useful contributions can still be made to develop nuclear technology further. (author)

  13. Treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    This rule is to be applied to the design, construction, and operation of facilities for treatment of water contaminated with radioactive material in stationary nuclear power plants with LWRs and HTRs. According to the requirements of the rule these facilities are to be designed, constructed, and operated in such a way that a) uncontrolled discharge of water contaminated with radioactive material is avoided, b) the activity discharged with water is as low as possible, c) water contaminated with radioactive material will not reach the ground, d) the radiation exposure as a consequence of direct radiation, contamination, and inhalation of the persons occupied in the facilities is as low as possible and as a maximum corresponds to the values laid down in the radiation protection regulation or to the values of the operating license. This rule is not to be applied to facilities for coolant and storage pit clean-up as well as facilities for the treatment of concentrates produced during the contamination of the water. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Protection of Advanced Electrical Power Systems from Atmospheric Electromagnetic Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    group within 18 inches of the tips of the horizontal and vertical stabilizers, trailing edge of the horizontal stabilizer, tail cone, and any other...expression for Kconc is: Kconc ) x 2E(k) , where E=Complete elliptic intergral of first kind T = thickness of wing or tail W = width of wing or tail 2. Non...electromagnetic environments include linearly polarized plane waves, horizontal or vertical monopole and dipole radiators, and user-defined arbitrary non

  15. Releases of radioactive substances from Swedish nuclear power plants (RAKU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingemansson, T.; Bergstroem, C. [ALARA Engineering AB, Skultuna (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    Releases of radioactivity to air and water from Swedish nuclear power plants have been studied and compared with those from foreign reactors. Averaged over the years from commissioning of the reactors to the last year data are available, the release of radioactive noble gas from the Swedish BWRs has been about the same as from comparable foreign reactors. The oldest Swedish BWRs, Oskarshamn 1 and 2 (O1 and O2) and Ringhals 1 (R1), have simple off-gas systems with only one delay volume. All BWRs in US, Germany, Japan and Switzerland are equipped with more sophisticated off-gas systems. It can be expected that O1, O2 and R1 therefore will have the highest release of noble gas activity at an international comparison if they do not modernize their off-gas system. BWRs in US, Germany and Japan are today equipped with recombiners and with one exception also charcoal columns. Japanese BWRs report zero releases to air. Releases of radioactivity to water after commissioning was about the same for most of the studied reactors. Some of the newest German plants have had low annual releases already at commissioning. Improvements of the treatment systems at old German, Swiss and US reactors have significantly lowered the releases. For most of the Swedish plants the annual releases to water have remained at the initial level. Forsmark 3 has succeeded in decreasing the release of radionuclides to water by a factor of almost one hundred compared to other Swedish reactors. Also O3 has managed to decrease the liquid effluents. Japanese plants have zero release of radioactivity excluding tritium to water. The release of tritium is about the same for all reactors of the same type in the world. 35 refs, 31 figs, 24 tabs.

  16. Examination of electromagnetic powers with the example of a uc(Faraday) disc dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Felix A.; Müller, Wolfgang H.

    2018-03-01

    This paper studies the mathematical form of electromagnetic powers and their influence on the balance of energy by using the example of a uc(Faraday) disc. First, two forms of energy (and balances thereof) are discussed. These employ different forms of powers, which can be distinguished w.r.t. their physical origins and their interpretations in context with the notions of supply and production. The stationary uc(Faraday) disc experiment is modeled following the description by Kovetz (Electromagnetic theory, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000). Concepts for formulating the electromagnetic field equations for the rotating disc are discussed, and the corresponding approximate analytical solutions are presented. Based on the obtained electromagnetic fields, the powers of the disc are analyzed for a stationary process. The conversion of mechanical power to heating and electromagnetic powering of an external resistor is explained. The paper concludes with the computation of the time evolution of the angular velocity for a magnetically induced breaking process of the disc.

  17. Technologically enhanced natural radioactivity around the coal fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, J.; Marovic, G.

    1997-01-01

    In some situations the exposure to natural radiation sources is enhanced as a result to technological developments. Burning of coal is one source of enhanced radiation exposure to naturally occurring elements, particularly radium, thorium and uranium. Most of the radioactive substances are concentrated in the ash and slag, which are heavy and drop to the bottom of a furnace. Lighter fly ash is carried up the chimney and into the atmosphere. The bottom ash and slag are usually deposited in a waste pile, from where some activity may leach into aquifers or be dispersed by wind.The main pathways through which the populations living around coal fired power plants are exposed to enhanced levels of natural radionuclides are inhalation and ingestion of the activity discharged into the Exosphere. For this reason, extensive investigations have been under way for several years in the coal fired power plant in Croatia, which uses an anthracite coal with a higher than usual uranium content. (authors)

  18. Management of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear power industry, which accounts for about 20% of the total electricity supply, is a vital part of the nation's energy resource. While it generates approximately one-third of the commercial low-level radioactive waste produced in the country, it has achieved one of the most successful examples in waste minimization. On the other hand, progress on development of new disposal facilities by the state compacts is currently stalled. The milestones have been repeatedly postponed, and the various Acts passed by Congress on nuclear waste disposal have not accomplished what they were intended to do. With dwindling access to waste disposal sites and with escalating disposal costs, the power plant utilities are forced to store wastes onsite as an interim measure. However, such temporary measures are not a permanent solution. A national will is sorely needed to break out of the current impasse

  19. Characterization of radioactive waste from nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piumetti, Elsa H.; Medici, Marcela A.

    2007-01-01

    Different kinds of radioactive waste are generated as result of the operation of nuclear power reactors and in all cases the activity concentration of several radionuclides had to be determined in order to optimize resources, particularly when dealing with final disposal or long-term storage. This paper describes the three basic approaches usually employed for characterizing nuclear power reactor wastes, namely the direct methods, the semi-empirical methods and the analytical methods. For some radionuclides or kind of waste, the more suitable method or combination of methods applicable is indicated, stressing that these methods shall be developed and applied during the waste generation step, i.e. during the operation of the reactor. In addition, after remarking the long time span expected from waste generation to their final disposal, the importance of an appropriate record system is pointed out and some basic requirements that should be fulfilled for such system are presented. It is concluded that the tools for a proper characterization of nuclear reactor radioactive waste are available though such tools should be tailored to each specific reactor and their history. (author) [es

  20. Studies of Effect Analysis of Electromagnetic Pulses (EMP) in Operating Nuclear Power Plants (NPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Song Hae; Ryu, Ho Sun; Kim, Min Yi; Lee, Eui Jong [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The effect analysis of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) has been studied for the past year by the Central Research Institute of Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Co. (KHNP) in order to better establish safety measures in operating nuclear power plants. What is an electromagnetic pulse (EMP)? As a general term for high-power electromagnetic radiation, it refers to strong electromagnetic pulses that destroy only electronic equipment devices in a short period without loss of life. The effect analysis of EMPs in operating NPPs and their corresponding safety measures in terms of selecting target devices against EMP impact have been examined in this paper. In general, domestic nuclear power plants do apply the design of fail-safe concepts. For example, if key instruments of a system fail because of EMPs, the control rods of a nuclear reactor are dropped automatically in order to maintain safe conditions of the NPP. Reactor cooling presents no problem because the diesel generator will adopt the analog starting circuit least affected by the electromagnetic waves.

  1. Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) design guidelines for I and C systems for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In Koo; Lee, Dong Young; Cha, Kyung Ho; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Ki Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    This report describes the research results on Electromagnetic Compatibility technologies for I and C(Instrumentation and Control) systems for nuclear power plants. As the nuclear industries are adopting the digital equipment rather than the conventional analog type equipment for safety I and C systems as well as non-safety systems of nuclear power plants(NPPs), it is necessary to secure compatibility against EMI(electromagnetic interference) for the digital safety I and C systems. EMI qualification, identified as a regulatory compliance item by US NRC and Korean regulatory body, should be performed in accordance with appropriate standards, because the electromagnetic environment is regarded as one of the environmental factors possible to affect the safety functions. As a technical guide on this EMI issue, this report includes description of code and standards scheme, EMI qualification methods, noise reduction strategies, and survey on noise levels in nuclear power plants. 29 refs., 72 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  2. Wireless system controlling of electromagnetic wave distribution in nuclear power plant use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Hidehiko; Kume, Naoto; Oshima, Tomomi; Takakura, Kei; Oda, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Odanaka, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Recently, wireless technologies have rapidly spread by cellular phones, smartphones and tablet devices. Wireless systems in the nuclear power plant are expected to bring various advantages such as shortening of the inspection time, online monitoring, remote control and cable reduction, etc. However, wireless systems have hardly applied to the nuclear power plant, from the point of security and electromagnetic interference (EMI). We propose a new wireless system controlling automatically electromagnetic wave distribution. In our wireless system, the transmitter / receiver modules automatically measure the wave strength and adjust the power and directivity of the wave, resulting in wireless communication only in target zones, i.e. non-influence to safety-related instruments and non-leakage of information. We will present the algorithm of the electromagnetic wave controlling and experimental results about the proposed system. (author)

  3. Radioactivity monitoring programme of Krsko nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklavzic, U.; Martincic, R.; Kanduc, M.; Lulic, S.; Kovac, J.; Breznik, B.

    1996-01-01

    As a successor to the preoperational surveillance programme, the regular offsite radioactivity monitoring programme (RMP) of the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) was implemented in 1982, when the power plant formally commenced operating. Observations collected during the first years of its operation were later also the basis for setting up the official 'Regulatory guide on monitoring of nuclear installations', issued not earlier than in 1986. The basic criterion which governed the selection of measuring methods, sampling techniques and locations, was the extent to which the data obtained could serve for the realistic assessment of the committed dose to a member of the population, and later on to members of a representative (critical) group. To be able to differentiate the radioactivity released through the liquid and gaseous effluents of the NPP from other radiation sources (natural radioactivity, global contamination), and especially because of the varying radiotoxicity of different radionuclides, in principle monitoring in the environment, as at the source, had to provide activity data for each individual radionuclide appearing in the effluents. Therefore, as early as 1982 the programme attributed the main weight to high resolution gamma spectrometry, combined with specific radiochemical analytical methods (e.g. 90 Sr/ 89 Sr, 3 H, 14 C, alpha spectrometry of Pu isotopes) which together made feasible determination of individual specific activities of the most significant man-made and natural radionuclides. By weighting the specific activities of the radionuclides identified and measured in the media surveyed by dose factors for intake, the quantity 'B' - the so-called 'radiological burden', was calculated and introduced in the yearly-summary tables. Expressed in relative units, from which the committed dose could be readily calculated, the burden B very lucidly disclosed the relative importance of different artificial pollutants and natural radioactivity present in

  4. High power electromagnetic propulsion research at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Sankovic, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Interest in megawatt-class electromagnetic propulsion has been rekindled to support newly proposed high power orbit transfer and deep space mission applications. Electromagnetic thrusters can effectively process megawatts of power to provide a range of specific impulse values to meet diverse in-space propulsion requirements. Potential applications include orbit raising for the proposed multi-megawatt Space Solar Power Satellite and other large commercial and military space platforms, lunar and interplanetary cargo missions in support of the NASA Human Exploration and Development of Space strategic enterprise, robotic deep space exploration missions, and near-term interstellar precursor missions. As NASA's lead center for electric propulsion, the Glenn Research Center is developing a number of high power electromagnetic propulsion technologies to support these future mission applications. Program activities include research on MW-class magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, high power pulsed inductive thrusters, and innovative electrodeless plasma thruster concepts. Program goals are highlighted, the status of each research area is discussed, and plans are outlined for the continued development of efficient, robust high power electromagnetic thrusters

  5. Electromagnetic compatibility for the control and command equipments in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buisson, J.

    1985-06-01

    Different kinds of electrical interference produce some disturbance on electronic sub-assemblies used to assume the control and the command of nuclear reactors. Following interferences are described: power supply lines perturbations, potential difference between grounding connections, electromagnetic fields. A method is described for testing the EMC of different equipments. The advantages of this method are: no destructive method, usable for testing equipment ''in situ'' in operating conditions on nuclear power plant, usable for testing equipment before operating conditions (acceptance test), level of the testing signals similar to the electrical interference level induced by the electromagnetic environment in normal operating conditions, no particular equipment and installation for test are required [fr

  6. Incinerators for radioactive wastes in Japanese nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karita, Yoichi

    1983-01-01

    As the measures of treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes in nuclear power stations, the development of the techniques to decrease wastes, to reduce the volume of wastes, to treat wastes by solidification and to dispose wastes has been advanced energetically. In particular, efforts have been exerted on the volume reduction treatment from the viewpoint of the improvement of storage efficiency and the reduction of transport and disposal costs. Incineration as one of the volume reduction techniques has been regarded as the most effective method with large reduction ratio, but it was not included in waste treatment system. NGK Insulators Ltd. developed NGK type miscellaneous solid incinerators, and seven incinerators were installed in nuclear power stations. These incinerators have been operated smoothly, and the construction is in progress in six more plants. The necessity of incinerators in nuclear power stations and the problems in their adoption, the circumstance of the development of NGK type miscellaneous solid incinerators, the outline of the incinerator of Karlsruhe nuclear power station and the problems, the contents of the technical development in NGK, the outline of NGK type incinerators and the features, the outline of the pretreatment system, incinerator system, exhaust gas treatment system, ash taking out system and accessory equipment, the operational results and the performance are described. (Kako, I.)

  7. Method of reducing the radioactivity in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Kenya; Honda, Takashi; Furutani, Yasumasa; Kashimura, Eiji; Minato, Akira; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the radioactivity in nuclear power plants in contact with pure water at high temperature and high pressure. Method: For suppressing the deposition of radioactive materials in nuclear reactor coolants to the structural materials, oxide layers which are relatively porous but have a sufficient layer thickness are formed as the primary treatment and then thin but dense layers are formed as the secondary treatment. Oxidization is applied by means of heated water or steams with less oxidizing property in the first treatment, while oxidizing treatment is applied with heated water and steams at high oxidizing property in the second treatment, because the effect of suppressing corrosion is insufficient only by means of the membranes in the primary treatment, while the layers formed by the secondary treatment alone are liable to be injured and degraded. Since coolants for use in BWR type reactors usually contain about 200 ppb of dissolved oxygen, it is desirably from 40 to 100 ppb for the primary treatment and from 400 ppb to 8 ppb for the secondary treatment, and non-oxidating heated gases at high purity such as Ar, N 2 , He may be used in addition to heated water and steams. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. Radioactive waste management and disposal scenario for fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabara, Takashi; Yamano, Naoki [Sumitomo Atomic Energy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Seki, Yasushi; Aoki, Isao

    1997-10-01

    The environmental and economic impact of radioactive waste (radwaste) generated from fusion power reactors using five types of structural materials and a light water reactor (LWR) have been evaluated and compared. At first, the amount and the radioactive level of the radwaste generated in five fusion reactors ware evaluated by an activation calculation code. Next, a possible radwaste disposal scenario applicable to fusion radwaste in Japan is considered and the disposal cost evaluated under certain assumptions. The exposure doses are evaluated for the skyshine of gamma-rays during the disposal operation, groundwater migration scenario during the institutional control period of 300 years and future site use scenario after the institutional period. The radwaste generated from a typical LWR was estimated based on a literature survey and the disposal cost was evaluated using the same assumptions as for the fusion reactors. It is found that the relative cost of disposal is strongly dependent on the cost for interim storage of medium level waste of fusion reactors and the cost of high level waste for the LWR. (author)

  9. Storage, handling and internal transport of radioactive materials (fuel elements excepted) in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The rule applies to storage and handling as well as to transport within the plant and to the exchange of - solid radioactive wastes, - liquid radioactive wastes, except for those covered by the rule KTA 3603, - radioactive components and parts which are planned to be mounted and dismounted until shutdown of the plant, - radioactive-contaminated tools and appliances, - radioactive preparations. The rule is to be applied within the fenced-in sites of stationary nuclear power plants with LWR or HTR including their transport load halls, as fas as these are situated so as to be approachable from the nuclear power station by local transport systems. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Survey of ambient electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference levels in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercel, S.W.; Moore, M.R.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ewing, P.D.; Wood, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    This document reports the results of a survey of ambient electromagnetic conditions in representative nuclear power plants. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research engaged the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform these measurements to characterize the electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio-frequency interference (RFI) levels that can be expected in nuclear power plant environments. This survey is the first of its kind, being based on long-term unattended observations. The data presented in this report were measured at eight different nuclear units and required 14 months to collect. A representative sampling of power plant conditions (reactor type, operating mode, site location) monitored over extended observation periods (up to 5 weeks) were selected to more completely determine the characteristic electromagnetic environment for nuclear power plants. Radiated electric fields were measured over the frequency range of 5 MHz to 8 GHz. Radiated magnetic fields and conducted EMI events were measured over the frequency range of 305 Hz to 5 MHz. Highest strength observations of the electromagnetic ambient environment across all measurement conditions at each site provide frequency-dependent profiles for EMI/RFI levels in nuclear power plants

  11. Management of effluents and radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Management of effluents and radioactive waste from nuclear power plants, from the viewpoint of radiological protection, basically consists of three main themes: 1) developing and implementing actions that minimize, or where possible, eliminate generation. These actions ranging from simple awareness of people involved with the work on project modifications; 2) maintain a system of accounting and control that allows to know the characteristics of effluents and wastes, charting indicators that reveal the performance and trends of plant, and supplying data proving the compliance of national regulatory body standards; 3) Storing the solid waste generated in a safe manner, ensuring that the physical integrity of the packaged is maintained and that there is no impact to the population and the environment

  12. Simulation of Electromagnetic Transients in Power Systems | Ibe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transients in power systems are initiated by abrupt changes to otherwise steady operating conditions. These changes would be as a result of any of the following: opening or closing of circuit breakers, switching conditions, lightning or any other fault condition. For purposes of power system analysis these conditions are ...

  13. Wireless power transfer inspired by the modern trends in electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingzhao; Belov, Pavel; Kapitanova, Polina

    2017-06-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been looking for an effective way to transfer power without wired connections, but the wireless power transfer technology started to attract extensive interest from the industry side only in 2007 when the first smartphone was released and a consumer electronics revolution was triggered. Currently, the modern technology of wireless power transfer already has a rich research and development history as well as outstanding advances in commercialization. This review is focused on the description of distinctive implementations of this technology inspired by the modern trends in electrodynamics. We compare the performances of the power transfer systems based on three kinds of resonators, i.e., metallic coil resonators, dielectric resonators, and cavity mode resonators. We argue that metamaterials and meta-atoms are powerful tools to improve the functionalities and to obtain novel properties of the systems. We review different approaches to enhance the functionality of the wireless power transfer systems including control of the power transfer path and increase of the operation range and efficiency. Various applications of wireless power transfer are discussed and currently available standards are reviewed.

  14. Optimization of passive low power wireless electromagnetic energy harvesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimo, Antwi; Grgić, Dario; Reindl, Leonhard M

    2012-10-11

    This work presents the optimization of antenna captured low power radio frequency (RF) to direct current (DC) power converters using Schottky diodes for powering remote wireless sensors. Linearized models using scattering parameters show that an antenna and a matched diode rectifier can be described as a form of coupled resonator with different individual resonator properties. The analytical models show that the maximum voltage gain of the coupled resonators is mainly related to the antenna, diode and load (remote sensor) resistances at matched conditions or resonance. The analytical models were verified with experimental results. Different passive wireless RF power harvesters offering high selectivity, broadband response and high voltage sensitivity are presented. Measured results show that with an optimal resistance of antenna and diode, it is possible to achieve high RF to DC voltage sensitivity of 0.5 V and efficiency of 20% at -30 dBm antenna input power. Additionally, a wireless harvester (rectenna) is built and tested for receiving range performance.

  15. Assessment methodology of counter-personnel high power electromagnetic millimeter wave effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente, F.; Horst, M.J. van der; Paulissen, J.J.M.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.; Toet, A.

    2013-01-01

    The group of NLW that arguably offers the largest amount of useful applications are based on high power electromagnetic millimetre wave technology. This group is often referred to as ‘Active Denial Systems’ (ADS), since they are primarily aimed at deterring and dispersing people out of an area. The

  16. Methodology to assess the effects of magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP) on power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legro, J.R.; Abi-Samra, N.C.; Crouse, J.C.; Tesche, F.M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes a method to evaluate the possible effects of magnetohydrodynamic-electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP) on power systems. This method is based on the approach adapted to study the impact of geomagnetic storms on power systems. The paper highlights the similarities and differences between the two phenomena. Also presented are areas of concern which are anticipated from MHD-EMP on the overall system operation. 12 refs., 1 fig

  17. Radioactive releases of nuclear power plants: the code ASTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdouz, G.; Pachole, M.

    1999-11-01

    In order to adopt potential countermeasures to protect the population during the course of an accident in a nuclear power plant a fast prediction of the radiation exposure is necessary. The basic input value for such a dispersion calculation is the source term, which is the description of the physical and chemical behavior of the released radioactive nuclides. Based on a source term data base a pilot system has been developed to determine a relevant source term and to generate the input file for the dispersion code TAMOS of the Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geodynamik (ZAMG). This file can be sent directly as an attachment of e-mail to the TAMOS user for further processing. The source terms for 56 European nuclear power plant units are included in the pilot version of the code ASTEC (Austrian Source Term Estimation Code). The use of the system is demonstrated in an example based on an accident in the unit TEMELIN-1. In order to calculate typical core inventories for the data bank the international computer code OBIGEN 2.1 was installed and applied. The report has been completed with a discussion on the optimal data transfer. (author)

  18. Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing of Power Plant Equipment: Revision 3 to TR-102323

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Cunningham and J. Shank

    2004-11-01

    To continue meeting safety and reliability requirements while controlling costs, operators of nuclear power plants must be able to replace and upgrade equipment in a cost-effective manner. One issue that has been problematic for new plant equipment and especially for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in recent years is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). The EMC issue usually involves testing to show that critical equipment will not be adversely affected by electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the plant environment. This guide will help nuclear plant engineers address EMC issues and qualification testing in a consistent, comprehensive manner.

  19. Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing of Power Plant Equipment: Revision 3 to TR-102323

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.; Shank, J.

    2004-01-01

    To continue meeting safety and reliability requirements while controlling costs, operators of nuclear power plants must be able to replace and upgrade equipment in a cost-effective manner. One issue that has been problematic for new plant equipment and especially for digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in recent years is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). The EMC issue usually involves testing to show that critical equipment will not be adversely affected by electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the plant environment. This guide will help nuclear plant engineers address EMC issues and qualification testing in a consistent, comprehensive manner

  20. Modeling of MEMS piezoelectric energy harvesters using electromagnetic and power system theories

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2012-07-23

    This work proposes a novel methodology for estimating the power output of piezoelectric generators. An analytical model that estimates for the first time the loss ratio and output power of piezoelectric generators based on the direct mechanical-to-electrical analogy, electromagnetic theory, and power system theory is developed. The mechanical-to-electrical analogy and power system theory allow the derivation of an equivalent input impedance expression for the network, whereas electromagnetic transmission line theory allows deduction of the equivalent electromechanical loss of the piezoelectric generator. By knowing the mechanical input power and the loss of the network, calculation of the output power of the piezoelectric device becomes a straightforward procedure. Experimental results based on published data are also presented to validate the analytical solution. In order to fully benefit from the well-established electromagnetic transmission line and electric circuit theories, further analyses on the resonant frequency, bandwidth, and sensitivity are presented. Compared to the conventional modeling methods currently being adopted in the literature, the proposed method provides significant additional information that is crucial for enhanced device operation and quick performance optimization. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Modeling of MEMS piezoelectric energy harvesters using electromagnetic and power system theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Alshareef, H N; Elshurafa, Amro M; Salama, Khaled N

    2011-01-01

    This work proposes a novel methodology for estimating the power output of piezoelectric generators. An analytical model that estimates for the first time the loss ratio and output power of piezoelectric generators based on the direct mechanical-to-electrical analogy, electromagnetic theory, and power system theory is developed. The mechanical-to-electrical analogy and power system theory allow the derivation of an equivalent input impedance expression for the network, whereas electromagnetic transmission line theory allows deduction of the equivalent electromechanical loss of the piezoelectric generator. By knowing the mechanical input power and the loss of the network, calculation of the output power of the piezoelectric device becomes a straightforward procedure. Experimental results based on published data are also presented to validate the analytical solution. In order to fully benefit from the well-established electromagnetic transmission line and electric circuit theories, further analyses on the resonant frequency, bandwidth, and sensitivity are presented. Compared to the conventional modeling methods currently being adopted in the literature, the proposed method provides significant additional information that is crucial for enhanced device operation and quick performance optimization

  2. Radioactive waste treatment system for Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Takashi; Takeshima, Masaki; Saito, Toru; Kikkawa, Ryozo

    1978-01-01

    The augmentation of the radioactive waste treatment system in the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station was planned in 1973, and this enlarged facility was completed in June, 1977. The object of this augmentation is to increase the storage capacity for wastes and to enlarge the treating capacity utilizing the newly installed facility. The operating experience in the facility having been already constructed was fed back for the engineering of this new facility. This new facility contains the newly developed vacuum forced circulation type concentrator, the exclusive storage pool for solid wastes, etc. At the design stage of this new system, the pilot plant test of slurry transportation and the corrosion test of long hours were carried out as the research and developmental works for the confirmation of correct design condition. The measures for augmenting this radioactive waste treatment system are the installation of a long time storage tank with the capacity of 350 m 3 , the sit bunker facility and the drum storage as the storage facility, and the vacuum forced circulation type concentrator with the circulating flow rate more than 200 times as much as the treating flow rate and vacuum level of 0.255 ata. The augmented system is shown with the flow sheet of whole waste disposal system. The flow sheet of the concentrator is separately shown, and the relating research and developmental works, for example, the test of the cause of corrosion, the surface finishing test, the material test, the blockage test for heat transfer tubes and the inhibiter test, are explained with the test results. The ion exchange resin is transported by air and water as the slurry state, and the long distance transport of about 250 m is required in this new system. As clogging has to be avoided in this transportation, the experimental work was conducted to obtain the flow characteristics of slurry, and the test result is outlined. (Nakai, Y.)

  3. Optimization of Passive Low Power Wireless Electromagnetic Energy Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimo, Antwi; Grgić, Dario; Reindl, Leonhard M.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the optimization of antenna captured low power radio frequency (RF) to direct current (DC) power converters using Schottky diodes for powering remote wireless sensors. Linearized models using scattering parameters show that an antenna and a matched diode rectifier can be described as a form of coupled resonator with different individual resonator properties. The analytical models show that the maximum voltage gain of the coupled resonators is mainly related to the antenna, diode and load (remote sensor) resistances at matched conditions or resonance. The analytical models were verified with experimental results. Different passive wireless RF power harvesters offering high selectivity, broadband response and high voltage sensitivity are presented. Measured results show that with an optimal resistance of antenna and diode, it is possible to achieve high RF to DC voltage sensitivity of 0.5 V and efficiency of 20% at −30 dBm antenna input power. Additionally, a wireless harvester (rectenna) is built and tested for receiving range performance. PMID:23202014

  4. Optimization of Passive Low Power Wireless Electromagnetic Energy Harvesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Grgić

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the optimization of antenna captured low power radio frequency (RF to direct current (DC power converters using Schottky diodes for powering remote wireless sensors. Linearized models using scattering parameters show that an antenna and a matched diode rectifier can be described as a form of coupled resonator with different individual resonator properties. The analytical models show that the maximum voltage gain of the coupled resonators is mainly related to the antenna, diode and load (remote sensor resistances at matched conditions or resonance. The analytical models were verified with experimental results. Different passive wireless RF power harvesters offering high selectivity, broadband response and high voltage sensitivity are presented. Measured results show that with an optimal resistance of antenna and diode, it is possible to achieve high RF to DC voltage sensitivity of 0.5 V and efficiency of 20% at −30 dBm antenna input power. Additionally, a wireless harvester (rectenna is built and tested for receiving range performance.

  5. Comment on 'On the long-range detection of radioactivity using electromagnetic radiation'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuks, I.M.; Martynenko, S.I.

    2004-01-01

    The fact that the mesosphere is an electrically active element in the global atmospheric electric circuit provides a possible mechanism for troposphere-mesosphere-ionosphere coupling during releases of radioactive materials at the ground level, and this is discussed in this comment

  6. Examples of digital simulation of AC-DC power converter with the Electromagnetic Transients Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanahashi, Shugo; Yamada, Shuichi; Mugishima, Mituo; Kitagawa, Shiro.

    1989-03-01

    This article gives a practical guidance for analysis of power converter circuits using the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP). First how to use the program is shown with two simple examples; (1) a power supply with three-phase diode bridge and (2) a feedback system for current control. Then its application to more complicated system is shown with an example of a power supply for Compact Helical System (CHS), where a hybrid power supply with multi-phase diode and thyristor bridges, and two three-phase thyristor converters are driven by an AC generator. (author)

  7. Nonlinear interaction of powerful short electromagnetic pulses with an electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, N.N.; Yu, M.Y.; Shukla, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction of powerful short electromagnetic pulses with a plasma consisting of two groups of electrons and immobile ions has been studied. It is shown that the interaction is governed by a nonlinear equation for the electromagnetic wave envelope and a driven nonlinear equation for the low-frequency electron fluctuations. The driver for the latter depends explicitly on the spatio-temporal evolution of the electromagnetic wave flux. It is found that, depending on the cold-to-hot electron density ratio, the localized pulse can propagate with sub- as well as supersonic velocities accompanied by compressional or rarefactional density perturbations. The conditions of existence for the different types of solitary pulses are obtained. The present investigation may be relevant to the study of wave-plasma interaction devices such as inertial fusion confinement as well as to ionospheric modification experiments. (author)

  8. Measurents of natural radioactivity in an underground hydroelectric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvicini, Andrea; Esposito, PierLuigi; Depiesse, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    In underground working places, especially when ventilation is not properly regulated, large amounts of natural radioactivity can be found. This can give rise to potential exposures of non-negligible magnitude. Direct measurements of gamma radiation and radon were carried out during excavation works for the construction of an hydroelectric plant in the north of Italy. After the construction of the plant, in order to reduce radon concentrations and to improve ventilation effectiveness, the main entry gate was motorized and automated. Then, in order to find the optimal speed for the fans located in the galleries and in the power plant, radon and airflow velocity were measured. Correlation data between airflow and radon concentrations were found. An automatic regulation system has been set up using air velocity detectors and slightly modifying the software for the control and regulation of the power plant. Measurements must be made in order to identify radon sources and evaluate quantitative contributions as a function of ventilation. Underground hydroelectric plants are provided with entry galleries as well as secondary galleries from which radon coming out from the soil and the walls can exhale in quantities that depend on the contents of 226 Ra in the rocks and in the building materials. Other radon sources are the water coming out from the walls of the galleries and the water in the deep well located at the bottom of the power plant. Geological studies and mathematical models are useful means for the analysis of the relative contributions of the main sources as well as for the prediction of the effects deriving from modifications of the hydroelectric plant ventilation system or resulting from other important structural changes. (author)

  9. Monitoring for radioactive materials releasing to environment in M310 reformatived nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Zhenyu; Yang Guangli; Xu Guang

    2012-01-01

    Airborne radioactive materials of nuclear power plant (NPP) releases to the environment from the stack of NPP. Radioactive liquid waste releases of the ocean, the fluvial and the lake through the liquid waste letdyke of NPP. Further more, a few radioactive waste may be taken out of the NPP by vehicle or personnel. For the purpose of strict management and control above-mentioned waste, we use detect equipment monitoring radioactive waste of NPP. Management and control for the releasing of radioactive material to the environment in M310 reformatived NPP is strict and safety. (authors)

  10. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging biomechanical energy for sustainably powering wearable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Xue; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    We report a hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for highly efficient scavenging of biomechanical energy to sustainably power wearable electronics by human walking. Based on the effective conjunction of triboelectrification and electromagnetic induction, the hybridized nanogenerator, with dimensions of 5 cm × 5 cm × 2.5 cm and a light weight of 60 g, integrates a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that can deliver a peak output power of 4.9 mW under a loading resistance of 6 MΩ and an electromagnetic generator (EMG) that can deliver a peak output power of 3.5 mW under a loading resistance of 2 kΩ. The hybridized nanogenerator exhibits a good stability for the output performance and a much better charging performance than that of an individual energy-harvesting unit (TENG or EMG). Furthermore, the hybridized nanogenerator integrated in a commercial shoe has been utilized to harvest biomechanical energy induced by human walking to directly light up tens of light-emitting diodes in the shoe and sustainably power a smart pedometer for reading the data of a walking step, distance, and energy consumption. A wireless pedometer driven by the hybrid nanogenerator can work well to send the walking data to an iPhone under the distance of 25 m. This work pushes forward a significant step toward energy harvesting from human walking and its potential applications in sustainably powering wearable electronics.

  11. Three-dimensional electromagnetic model of the pulsed-power Z-pinch accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional, fully electromagnetic model of the principal pulsed-power components of the 26-MA ZR accelerator [D. H. McDaniel et al., in Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches (AIP, New York, 2002, p. 23] has been developed. This large-scale simulation model tracks the evolution of electromagnetic waves through the accelerator’s intermediate-storage capacitors, laser-triggered gas switches, pulse-forming lines, water switches, triplate transmission lines, and water convolute to the vacuum insulator stack. The insulator-stack electrodes are coupled to a transmission-line circuit model of the four-level magnetically insulated vacuum-transmission-line section and double-post-hole convolute. The vacuum-section circuit model is terminated by a one-dimensional self-consistent dynamic model of an imploding z-pinch load. The simulation results are compared with electrical measurements made throughout the ZR accelerator, and are in good agreement with the data, especially for times until peak load power. This modeling effort demonstrates that 3D electromagnetic models of large-scale, multiple-module, pulsed-power accelerators are now computationally tractable. This, in turn, presents new opportunities for simulating the operation of existing pulsed-power systems used in a variety of high-energy-density-physics and radiographic applications, as well as even higher-power next-generation accelerators before they are constructed.

  12. Power systems and electromagnetic safety in of powerful utility buildings and structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.І. Запорожець

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available  Researching of origin terms of electromagnetic contaminations from the unbalanced currents and leak currents in the industrial networks of electric supply of structures and buildings saturated energy.

  13. Limitation of releases of radioactive effluents for nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolksdorf, P.; Buehling, A.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical values relating to the effluents of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany are now available. These values cover a period of several years of operation. The measured emissions of radioactive substances are often very much below the maximum permissible values, based on the dose limits for the environment stipulated in the legal regulations. Extensive technical and administrative measures contribute to the reduction of radioactive effluents. Furthermore, additional possibilities for improvement are mentioned which may lead to a further reduction of radioactive effluents. These are derived from investigations into the release of radioactive substances in nuclear power plants. The licensing procedure in the Federal Republic of Germany in fixing discharge limits is outlined. Proposals are made concerning licence values which may be determined for the radioactive effluents in modern standardized nuclear power plants with light-water reactors. The resulting radiation exposures are quoted for a typical nuclear power plant site. (author)

  14. Monitoring device for radioactive leakage from steam system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tateo; Sato, Kohei

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability for the monitor of radio-active leakage by accumulating small quantity of radioactivities each lower than the detectable level and increasing their dose rate. Constitution: Even if the steam system radiation monitor in the nuclear power plant is disposed for the detection of in-leak radioactivity, radioactive leakage can be monitored at high reliability by increasing the small quantity of radioactivities in the drains to a detectable sensitivity range of the monitor upon detection. In view of the above, in the present invention, radioactive material catching medium is incorporated to a radio-activity monitor spool piece for accumulating small quantity of radioactivities. Specifically as the catching medium, an ion exchange resin is used for the leakage of ionic radioactive material, while an ion exchange resin increased with the mixing ratio of a cationic resin or hollow thread membrane filter is used for crud-like radioactive material leakage. These catching media are incorporated into the spool piece, thereby enabling to catch even small quantity of radioactive leakage lower than the detectable sensitivity of the radiation monitor, if should occur, in the spool piece and enabling radioactive detection for the accumulated dose rate. (Horiuchi, T.)

  15. Interaction of electromagnetic pulse with commercial nuclear-power-plant systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Strawe, D.F.; Sandberg, S.J.; Jones, V.K.; Rensner, G.D.; Shoup, R.W.; Hanson, R.J.; Williams, C.B.

    1983-02-01

    This study examines the interaction of the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear burst with commercial nuclear power plant systems. The potential vulnerability of systems required for safe shutdown of a specific nuclear power plant are explored. EMP signal coupling, induced plant response and component damage thresholds are established using techniques developed over several decades under Defense Nuclear Agency sponsorship. A limited test program was conducted to verify the coupling analysis technique as applied to a nuclear power plant. The results are extended, insofar as possible, to other nuclear plants.

  16. Interaction of electromagnetic pulse with commercial nuclear-power-plant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Strawe, D.F.; Sandberg, S.J.; Jones, V.K.; Rensner, G.D.; Shoup, R.W.; Hanson, R.J.; Williams, C.B.

    1983-02-01

    This study examines the interaction of the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear burst with commercial nuclear power plant systems. The potential vulnerability of systems required for safe shutdown of a specific nuclear power plant are explored. EMP signal coupling, induced plant response and component damage thresholds are established using techniques developed over several decades under Defense Nuclear Agency sponsorship. A limited test program was conducted to verify the coupling analysis technique as applied to a nuclear power plant. The results are extended, insofar as possible, to other nuclear plants

  17. Selected problems of minimization and management of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plant decommissioning. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrs, M.; Moravec, A.

    1988-06-01

    The processing prior to storage of radioactive wastes produced in nuclear power plant decommissioning is described as are the types of containers employed for waste transport and/or disposal. Data are summarized on exposure of personnel to radioactivity resulting from nuclear power plant decommissioning activities, and accessible data are collected on the costs of nuclear power plant decommissioning and of waste management. Potential directions of research in this field under Czechoslovak conditions are specified. (author)

  18. Radioactivity and food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references

  19. The minimization of the extraneous electromagnetic fields of an inductive power transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, James; Sutton, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of inductive wireless power transfer (IPT) systems has been extensively studied. However, the electromagnetic compatibility of such systems is at least as important as the efficiency and has received much less attention. We consider the net magnetic dipole moment of the system as a figure of merit. That is, we seek to minimize the magnitude of the net dipole moment in order to minimize both the near magnetic fields and the radiated power. A 20 kHz, 3.3 kW, IPT system, representative of typical wireless vehicular battery charging systems, is considered and it is seen that one particular value of load impedance minimizes the net dipole moment while another, distinct, value maximizes efficiency. Thus, efficiency must be traded off, at least to some extent, in order to minimize extraneous electromagnetic fields.

  20. High Power Laser Beam Welding of Thick-walled Ferromagnetic Steels with Electromagnetic Weld Pool Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, André; Avilov, Vjaceslav; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Hilgenberg, Kai; Rethmeier, Michael

    The development of modern high power laser systems allows single pass welding of thick-walled components with minimal distortion. Besides the high demands on the joint preparation, the hydrostatic pressure in the melt pool increases with higher plate thicknesses. Reaching or exceeding the Laplace pressure, drop-out or melt sagging are caused. A contactless electromagnetic weld support system was used for laser beam welding of thick ferromagnetic steel plates compensating these effects. An oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in the weld pool which generate Lorentz forces counteracting the gravity forces. Hysteresis effects of ferromagnetic steels are considered as well as the loss of magnetization in zones exceeding the Curie temperature. These phenomena reduce the effective Lorentz forces within the weld pool. The successful compensation of the hydrostatic pressure was demonstrated on up to 20 mm thick plates of duplex and mild steel by a variation of the electromagnetic power level and the oscillation frequency.

  1. Decontamination methods of the vegetables contaminated with radioactive materials from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kunihide; Shiba, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Among agricultural products, vegetables contaminated with radioactive materials were examined to find a practical decontamination method. For spinach, washing by running water or hot water, and by ultrasonic or shower washing were tested. Furthermore, chemical method using detergent acid, alkaline salt was examined. High removal efficiency was obtained for iodine 131 using sodium hydrosulfate. For visual observation, IP imaging and scanning electromagnetic method were used to find spots and plane contamination. (S. Ohno)

  2. The Effect of Electromagnetic Waves on the General Health of Zahedan Gas Power Plant Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoon Laal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: With ever improving technology and increasing the use of high voltage power in industrial environments, concerns about the destructive effects of electromagnetic waves on human health have increased. Thus the present study aims to evaluate the effects of electromagnetic waves on the general health of Zahedan gas power plant personnel. Materials & Method: The present case-control study investigated the health of people at one point of time and their amount of exposure to electromagnetic waves at the same time. The data collection tool in this study was 28-item general health questionnaire (GHQ-28. After measuring the electromagnetic waves at distances of 1, 1.5 and 3 meters at high voltage power substations and data extraction, the data were entered to SPSS software and analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test and chi-square. Results: In this study, the age and experience variables were not significantly different in two groups (p> 0.05. The highest magnetic fields in high voltage power substations was at a distance of 1 meter in the substation 607 (28/1 mG and in precision tool work units (7.03 mG. The results showed that the depressive and general health symptoms were significantly different between the exposed and unexposed groups (p = 0.04, however the difference was not significant in terms of physical performance, anxiety and social performance (p> 0.05. Conclusion: although the level of exposure was lower than standard level determined in Iran, the significant difference of the general health and depression between the two groups, explains the necessity of conducting more studies in this regard. Also by reducing the exposure time and increasing people’s awareness it is possible to take important steps to reduce exposure and complications.

  3. Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; McConnell, B.W.; Van Dyke, J.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Tesche, F.M. (Tesche (F.M.), Dallas, TX (United States)); Vance, E.F. (Vance (E.F.), Fort Worth, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01

    A single nuclear detonation several hundred kilometers above the central United States will subject much of the nation to a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (BENT). This pulse consists of an intense steep-front, short-duration transient electromagnetic field, followed by a geomagnetic disturbance with tens of seconds duration. This latter environment is referred to as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (NMENT). Both the early-time transient and the geomagnetic disturbance could impact the operation of the nation's power systems. Since 1983, the US Department of Energy has been actively pursuing a research program to assess the potential impacts of one or more BENT events on the nation's electric energy supply. This report summarizes the results of that program and provides recommendations for enhancing power system reliability under HENT conditions. A nominal HENP environment suitable for assessing geographically large systems was developed during the program and is briefly described in this report. This environment was used to provide a realistic indication of BEMP impacts on electric power systems. It was found that a single high-altitude burst, which could significantly disturb the geomagnetic field, may cause the interconnected power network to break up into utility islands with massive power failures in some areas. However, permanent damage would be isolated, and restoration should be possible within a few hours. Multiple bursts would likely increase the blackout areas, component failures, and restoration time. However, a long-term blackout of many months is unlikely because major power system components, such as transformers, are not likely to be damaged by the nominal HEND environment. Moreover, power system reliability, under both HENT and normal operating conditions, can be enhanced by simple, and often low cost, modifications to current utility practices.

  4. National policy for control of radioactive sources and radioactive waste from non-power applications in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevinskas, G.; Mastauskas, A.

    2001-01-01

    According to the Law on Radiation Protection of the Republic of Lithuania (passed in 1999), the Radiation Protection Centre of the Ministry of Health is the regulatory authority responsible for the radiation protection of public and of workers using sources of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. One of its responsibilities is the control of radioactive sources from the beginning of their 'life cycle', when they are imported in, used, transported and placed as spent into the radioactive waste storage facilities. For the effective control of sources there is national authorization system (notification- registration-licensing) based on the international requirements and recommendations introduced, which also includes keeping and maintaining the Register of Sources, controlling and investigating events while illegally carrying on or in possession of radioactive material, decision making and performing the state radiation protection supervision and control of users of radioactive sources, controlling, within the limits of competence, the radioactive waste management activities in nuclear and non-nuclear power applications. According to the requirements set out in the Law on Radiation Protection and the Government Resolution 'On Establishment of the State Register of the Sources of Ionizing Radiation and Exposure of Workers' (1999) and supplementary legal acts, all licence-holders conducting their activities with sources of ionizing radiation have to present all necessary data to the State Register after annual inventory of sources, after installation of new sources, after decommissioning of sources, after disposal of spent sources, after finishing the activities with the generators of ionizing radiation. The information to the Radiation Protection Centre has to be presented every week from the Customs Department of the Ministry of Finance about all sources of ionizing radiation imported to or exported from Lithuania and the information about the companies performed these

  5. Deployment of Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility with the Introduction of Nuclear Power Plants in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadrack, Antoony; Kim, Changlak [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Uljin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear power program will inevitably generate radioactive wastes including low-and intermediate radioactive waste and spent fuel. These wastes are hazardous to human health and the environment and therefore, a reliable radioactive waste disposal facility becomes a necessity. This paper describes Kenya's basic plans for the disposal of radioactive wastes expected from the nuclear program. This plan is important as an initial implementation of a national Low to intermediate level wastes storage facility in Kenya. In Kenya, radioactive waste is generated from the use of radioactive materials in medicine, industry, education and research and development. Future radioactive waste is expected to arise from nuclear reactors, oil exploration, radioisotope and fuel production, and research reactors as shown in table 1. The best strategy is to store the LILW and spent fuel temporarily within reactor sites pending construction of a centralized interim storage facility or final disposal facility. The best philosophy is to introduce both repository and nuclear power programs concurrently. Research and development on volume reduction technology and conceptual design of disposal facility of LILW should be pursued. Safe management of radioactive waste is a national responsibility for sustainable generation of nuclear power. The republic of Kenya is set to become the second African nuclear power generation country after South Africa.

  6. Management of radioactive waste generated from nuclear power reactors in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong-Mook Kim

    2000-01-01

    Fundamental objectives and efforts to safely manage radioactive wastes generating from the expanding nuclear power industry in the Republic of Korea are described. Management, treatment and storage of radioactive wastes arising in different form are addressed. A long tern plan to reduce the volume of solid waste is outlined. (author)

  7. Estimation of radioactive effluents dispersion from the nuclear power plants in Yugoslavia surrounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehauc, A.

    1997-01-01

    The computational method for atmospheric dispersion of radioactive effluents is applied to the nuclear power plants in Yugoslavia surrounding. On the basis of computation results, ground level concentrations and washout of radioactive nuclides on exposed Yugoslav territories during unfavourable meteorological conditions are estimated. (author)

  8. Natural radioactivity measurements at the proposed nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojuangco, J.G.; Salomon, A.Ph.

    1976-01-01

    Natural radioactivity measurement in the Philippines aims to establish baseline radioactivity levels in the environment of items essential to man. In this article, results of the environmental surveillance conducted in Bagac, Bataan from 1973 to 1974 are presented. Analyses were made on air parti-culates, sea and fresh water, grass, and soil samples for gross beta-gamma activities. Results obtained showed activity levels below the maximum permissible concentration recommended by the International Committee on Radiation Protection (ICRP)

  9. Predicting the radioactive contamination of the surroundings near a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khristova, M; Paskalev, Z

    1975-01-01

    Predicting the radioactive contamination requires determining the concentration of radioactive material emitted from the stack of a nuclear power plant into the air and deposited on the earth's surface. The main factors determining the degree of contamination are the distance from the stack, the wind velocity and air turbulence. Formulas are presented for predicting the amount of radioactivity as a function of the initial concentration of activity, the distance from the stack and the meteorological condition. Formulas are given for the maximum deposition of radioactive aerosols at a distance R from the stack under wet and dry condtions. 2 refs. (SJR)

  10. Calculation of radioactive inventory of activated parts for nuclear power unit and analysis of influence factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Cai Qi; Lin Xiaoling

    2011-01-01

    Based on the operation characteristics of the nuclear power unit, the radioactive inventory of activated parts was calculated by ORIGEN2, and the effects of bum-up, operation mode and power change on the radioactive inventory for activated parts were analyzed. The results indicated that the radioactive inventory grew with the increasing of burn-up, and when the actual operation time was longer than the effective operation time, the increasing rate of nuclide activity approximated the burn-up increasing; Radioactive inventory of activated parts was influenced directly by the operation modes of the nuclear power unit, and under same reactor load, operation power and bum-up, the radioactive inventory for non-continuous operation mode is less than that for the continuous operation mode. Effects of operation modes on radioactive inventory reversed with half life of nuclides. Under same bum-up and longer operation time, the effect of operation power change on the radioactive inventory is not obvious, (authors)

  11. Requirements and analysis of electromagnetic compatibility of safety-related instrumentation and control system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Sujuan

    2002-01-01

    The state-of-the-art instrumentation and control system and the influence of their application to the electromagnetic compatibility is analyzed. Based on the present situation of nuclear safety in China and relevant experiences from other countries, the author tries to probe into the requirements and test methods about how safety-related instrument and control system to accommodate electromagnetic interference, radio-frequency interference and power surges in the environments of nuclear power plant so as to develop Chinese safety standards

  12. Accumulation of radioactive cesium released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in terrestrial cyanobacteria Nostoc commune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hideaki; Shirato, Susumu; Tahara, Tomoya; Sato, Kenji; Takenaka, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident released large amounts of radioactive substances into the environment and contaminated the soil of Tohoku and Kanto districts in Japan. Removal of radioactive material from the environment is an urgent problem, and soil purification using plants is being considered. In this study, we investigated the ability of 12 seed plant species and a cyanobacterium to accumulate radioactive material. The plants did not accumulate radioactive material at high levels, but high accumulation was observed in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. In Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture, N. commune accumulated 415,000 Bq/kg dry weight (134)Cs and 607,000 Bq kg(-1) dry weight (137)Cs. The concentration of cesium in N. commune tended to be high in areas where soil radioactivity was high. A cultivation experiment confirmed that N. commune absorbed radioactive cesium from polluted soil. These data demonstrated that radiological absorption using N. commune might be suitable for decontaminating polluted soil.

  13. Measurement of electromagnetic pulses generated during interactions of high power lasers with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, M.; Krása, J.; Margarone, D.; Giuffrida, L.; Vrana, R.; Velyhan, A.; Korn, G.; Weber, S.; Cikhardt, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Krouský, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Ahmed, H.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Limpouch, J.; Velardi, L.; Side, D. Delle; Nassisi, V.

    2016-01-01

    A target irradiated with a high power laser pulse, blows off a large amount of charge and as a consequence the target itself becomes a generator of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) owing to high return current flowing to the ground through the target holder. The first measurement of the magnetic field induced by the neutralizing current reaching a value of a few kA was performed with the use of an inductive target probe at the PALS Laser Facility (Cikhardt et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85 (2014) 103507). A full description of EMP generation should contain information on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the electromagnetic field inside and outside of the interaction chamber. For this reason, we consider the interaction chamber as a resonant cavity in which different modes of EMP oscillate for hundreds of nanoseconds, until the EMP is transmitted outside through the glass windows and EM waves are attenuated. Since the experimental determination of the electromagnetic field distribution is limited by the number of employed antennas, a mapping of the electromagnetic field has to be integrated with numerical simulations. Thus, this work reports on a detailed numerical mapping of the electromagnetic field inside the interaction chamber at the PALS Laser Facility (covering a frequency spectrum from 100 MHz to 3 GHz) using the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 5.2. Moreover we carried out a comparison of the EMP generated in the parallelepiped-like interaction chamber used in the Vulcan Petawatt Laser Facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, against that produced in the spherical interaction chamber of PALS.

  14. New research discovery may mean less radioactive contamination, safer nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-20

    Murph has now made another nanoparticle breakthrough that could benefit various work environments such as nuclear power plants. Murph and her team have created nanoparticle treated stainless steel filters that are capable to capturing radioactive vapor materials. Just like air filters capture dust and dirt, these filters are capable of capturing large amounts of radioactive vapors. The new research may one day mean that nuclear power plant workers, and other workers in related fields, will have a safer working environment.

  15. Optimized use of superconducting magnetic energy storage for electromagnetic rail launcher powering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badel, Arnaud; Tixador, Pascal; Arniet, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic rail launchers (EMRLs) require very high currents, from hundreds of kA to several MA. They are usually powered by capacitors. The use of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in the supply chain of an EMRL is investigated, as an energy buffer and as direct powering source. Simulations of direct powering are conducted to quantify the benefits of this method in terms of required primary energy. In order to enhance further the benefits of SMES powering, a novel integration concept is proposed, the superconducting self-supplied electromagnetic launcher (S3EL). In the S3EL, the SMES is used as a power supply for the EMRL but its coil serves also as an additional source of magnetic flux density, in order to increase the thrust (or reduce the required current for a given thrust). Optimization principles for this new concept are presented. Simulations based on the characteristics of an existing launcher demonstrate that the required current could be reduced by a factor of seven. Realizing such devices with HTS cables should be possible in the near future, especially if the S3EL concept is used in combination with the XRAM principle, allowing current multiplication.

  16. Optimized use of superconducting magnetic energy storage for electromagnetic rail launcher powering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badel, Arnaud; Tixador, Pascal; Arniet, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic rail launchers (EMRLs) require very high currents, from hundreds of kA to several MA. They are usually powered by capacitors. The use of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in the supply chain of an EMRL is investigated, as an energy buffer and as direct powering source. Simulations of direct powering are conducted to quantify the benefits of this method in terms of required primary energy. In order to enhance further the benefits of SMES powering, a novel integration concept is proposed, the superconducting self-supplied electromagnetic launcher (S 3 EL). In the S 3 EL, the SMES is used as a power supply for the EMRL but its coil serves also as an additional source of magnetic flux density, in order to increase the thrust (or reduce the required current for a given thrust). Optimization principles for this new concept are presented. Simulations based on the characteristics of an existing launcher demonstrate that the required current could be reduced by a factor of seven. Realizing such devices with HTS cables should be possible in the near future, especially if the S 3 EL concept is used in combination with the XRAM principle, allowing current multiplication.

  17. A coupled piezoelectric–electromagnetic energy harvesting technique for achieving increased power output through damping matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challa, Vinod R; Prasad, M G; Fisher, Frank T

    2009-01-01

    Vibration energy harvesting is being pursued as a means to power wireless sensors and ultra-low power autonomous devices. From a design standpoint, matching the electrical damping induced by the energy harvesting mechanism to the mechanical damping in the system is necessary for maximum efficiency. In this work two independent energy harvesting techniques are coupled to provide higher electrical damping within the system. Here the coupled energy harvesting device consists of a primary piezoelectric energy harvesting device to which an electromagnetic component is added to better match the total electrical damping to the mechanical damping in the system. The first coupled device has a resonance frequency of 21.6 Hz and generates a peak power output of ∼332 µW, compared to 257 and 244 µW obtained from the optimized, stand-alone piezoelectric and electromagnetic energy harvesting devices, respectively, resulting in a 30% increase in power output. A theoretical model has been developed which closely agrees with the experimental results. A second coupled device, which utilizes the d 33 piezoelectric mode, shows a 65% increase in power output in comparison to the corresponding stand-alone, single harvesting mode devices. This work illustrates the design considerations and limitations that one must consider to enhance device performance through the coupling of multiple harvesting mechanisms within a single energy harvesting device

  18. Decontamination and radioactivity measurement on building surfaces related to dismantling of Japan power demonstration reactor (JPDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Mutsuo; Tachibana, Mitsuo; Yanagihara, Satoshi

    1997-12-01

    In the final stage of dismantling activities for decommissioning a nuclear power plant, building structures have to be demolished to release the site for unrestricted use. Since building structures are generally made from massive reinforced concrete materials, it is not a rational way to treat all concrete materials arising from its demolition as radioactive waste. Segregation of radioactive parts from building structures is therefore indispensable. The rational procedures were studied for demolition of building structures by treating arising waste as non-radioactive materials, based on the concept established by Nuclear Safety Commission, then these were implemented in the following way by the JPDR dismantling demonstration project. Areas of the JPDR facilities are categorized into two groups : possibly contaminated areas, and possibly non-contaminated areas, based on the document of the reactor operation. Radioactivity on the building surfaces was then measured to confirm that the qualitative categorization is reasonable. After that, building surfaces were decontaminated in such a way that the contaminated layers were removed with enough margin to separate radioactive parts from non-radioactive building structures. Thought it might be possible to demolish the building structures by treating arising waste as non-radioactive materials, confirmation survey for radioactivity was conducted to show that there is no artificial radioactive nuclides produced by operation in the facility. This report describes the procedures studied on measurement of radioactivity and decontamination, and the results of its implementation in the JPDR dismantling demonstration project. (author)

  19. Use of fixation techniques in processing radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliga, M.

    1977-01-01

    The current state of radioactive waste disposal from the Bohunice nuclear power plant is described. The method of vacuum cementation was chosen for solidifying liquid radioactive wastes. This method makes it possible to obtain a product whose properties, namely strength, leachability, and radiation stability allow for the production of blocks without packing material. Also solved was the fixation of liquid radioactive waste using bituminization based on mixing liquid radioactive waste with aqueous bitumen emulsion in a film evaporator in which the mixture of liquid radioactive wastes and bitumen emulsion evaporate producing solid bitumen. The parameters are given of the cementation and bituminization lines which are designed for use in nuclear power plants with WWER type reactors. (J.B.)

  20. Modelling of radioactive fallout in the vicinity of Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, Y.A.; Petrov, V.N.; Severov, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    Deposition of radioactive products escaping into the atmosphere for a long time from the Chernobylsk-4 reactor resulting in residual radioactive contamination of the region at a distance of up to 100 km from the nuclear power plant is considered. The suggested model may be used for estimation of the possible scope of nuclear danger in the regions of nuclear power plants and creation of conditions ensuring safety of the population at possible accidents. The following topics are developed: height of elevation and conditions of radionuclide transfer in the atmosphere; dynamics of release and dispersive composition of radioactive products; calculations of radiation levels at a close trace [fr

  1. Electromagnetic interference produced by power or electrified railway lines on metallic pipe networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucca, G.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents an algorithm for the calculation, in the frequency domain, of the induced voltages and currents on a generic metallic pipe network exposed to the electromagnetic interference from a power line or an electrified railway line. By assuming as known the voltages and the currents on the inducing line, the algorithm may be subdivided into the following main steps: a) determination of the ideal electromotive force and current generators to be applied to the induced structure in order to represent the electromagnetic influence from the inducing line; b) modelling of the pipe network by means of a suitable equivalent electric network; c) calculation of voltages and currents on the induced network [it

  2. Harmonic balance finite element method applications in nonlinear electromagnetics and power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Junwei; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2016-01-01

    The first book applying HBFEM to practical electronic nonlinear field and circuit problems * Examines and solves wide aspects of practical electrical and electronic nonlinear field and circuit problems presented by HBFEM * Combines the latest research work with essential background knowledge, providing an all-encompassing reference for researchers, power engineers and students of applied electromagnetics analysis * There are very few books dealing with the solution of nonlinear electric- power-related problems * The contents are based on the authors' many years' research and industry experience; they approach the subject in a well-designed and logical way * It is expected that HBFEM will become a more useful and practical technique over the next 5 years due to the HVDC power system, renewable energy system and Smart Grid, HF magnetic used in DC/DC converter, and Multi-pulse transformer for HVDC power supply * HBFEM can provide effective and economic solutions to R&D product development * Includes Matlab e...

  3. International and Domestic Development Trends of Electromagnetic Transient Analysis Programs for Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Taku

    Nowadays, there is quite high demand for electromagnetic transient (EMT) analysis programs and real-time simulators for power systems. In addition to the conventional demand such as overvoltage, over-current and oscillation simulations, the new demand that includes simulations of power-electronics circuits and power quality is increasing. With this background, development groups of EMT programs and real-time simulators have made progress in terms of computational performance and user experience. In Japan, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry has newly developed an EMT analysis program called XTAP (eXpandable Transient Analysis Program). This article overviews these international and domestic development trends of EMT analysis programs and real-time simulators.

  4. Method to determine the radioactivity of radioactive waste packages. Basic procedure of the method used to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants: 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    This document describes the procedures adopted in order to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants in Japan. The standards applied have been approved by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan after deliberations by the Subcommittee on the Radioactivity Verification Method for Waste Packages, the Nuclear Cycle Technical Committee, and the Standards Committee. The method for determining the radioactivity of the low-level radioactive waste packages was based on procedures approved by the Nuclear Safety Commission in 1992. The scaling factor method and other methods of determining radioactivity were then developed on the basis of various investigations conducted, drawing on extensive accumulated knowledge. Moreover, the international standards applied as common guidelines for the scaling factor method were developed by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear Energy, Subcommittee SC 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology. Since the application of accumulated knowledge to future radioactive waste disposal is considered to be rational and justified, such body of knowledge has been documented in a standardized form. The background to this standardization effort, the reasoning behind the determination method as applied to the measurement of radioactivity, as well as other related information, are given in the Annexes hereto. This document includes the following Annexes. Annex 1: (reference) Recorded items related to the determination of the scaling factor. Annex 2 (reference): Principles applied to the determining the radioactivity of waste packages. (author)

  5. Cost of the radioactive residues of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    The calculation of cost for the management and final storage of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste is presented. The continuing Research and Development activities are judged to render simplified designs. The existing and planned systems and and plans are as follows: - transport system for radioactive residues - central intermediate storage of spent fuel, CLAB - processing of spent fuel - final storing of long-lived waste - final storing of reactor waste and decommissioning waste, SFR. The total future cost of the Swedish waste management is calculated to be 39 billion SEK from 1987 and 60 years onwards. 5.3 billion SEK have been spent up to the year 1986. (G.B.)

  6. Nucleation and Grain Refinement of 7A04 Aluminum Alloy Under a Low-Power Electromagnetic Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qingwei; Ma, Yonglin; Xing, Shuqing; Bao, Xinyu; Feng, Yanfei; Kang, Xiaolan

    2018-02-01

    The effects of a low-power electromagnetic pulse on the grain size and cooling curve of high-strength aluminum alloy 7A04 were investigated for various pulse duty cycles. This electromagnetic pulse treatment was found to effectively produce fine grains with globular crystals and a uniform microstructure for pulse duty cycles between 20 and 40%. The key factors that affected grain refinement under the electromagnetic pulse included the electromagnetic energy and the conversion frequency between \\varvec{B} and \\varvec{E} . The nucleation rate increased as the nucleation period was extended. A new kinetic condition of magnetic nucleation was explored by decreasing the critical Gibbs free energy in the electromagnetic pulse, which was more sensitive under low undercooling. In addition, the crystal orientation was controlled in such a solidification environment.

  7. Low activation material design methodology for reduction of radio-active wastes of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Satou, M.; Nogami, S.; Kakinuma, N.; Kinno, M.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the concrete shielding walls and pipes around a reactor pressure vessel of a light water reactor become low level radioactive waste at decommission phase because they contain radioactive nuclides by thermal-neutron irradiation during its operation. The radioactivity of some low level radioactive wastes is close to the clearance level. It is very desirable in terms of life cycle cost reduction that the radioactivity of those low level radioactive wastes is decreased below clearance level. In case of light water reactors, however, methodology of low activation design of a nuclear plant has not been established yet because the reactor is a large-scale facility and has various structural materials. The Objectives of this work are to develop low activation material design methodology and material fabrication for reduction of radio-active wastes of nuclear power plant such as reinforced concrete. To realize fabrication of reduced radioactive concrete, it is necessary to develop (1) the database of the chemical composition of raw materials to select low activation materials, (2) the tool for calculation of the neutron flux and the spectrum distribution of nuclear plants to evaluate radioactivity of reactor components, (3) optimization of material process conditions to produce the low activation cement and the low activation steels. Results of the data base development, calculation tools and trial production of low activation cements will be presented. (authors)

  8. De minimis applications for alternative disposal of very low level radioactive waste at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, C.

    1986-01-01

    Existing NRC regulations provide no minimum level of radioactivity in waste from a licensee's facility that may be disposed of in a manner other than as radioactive waste. With one exception, in 10CFRsection20.306, licensees may dispose of certain levels of tritium and carbon-14 in liquid-scintillation and animal-carcass waste without regard to its radioactivity. In the interim, before specific or generic provisions for disposing of very low level radioactive wastes are adopted through rule making, licensees have another alternative for obtaining approval to dispose of large volumes of materials contaminated with very low levels of radioactivity under provision 10CFRsection20.302(a) ''Method for obtaining approval of proposed disposal procedures.'' This paper provides the experiences of obtaining both NRC and states (North Carolina and South Carolina) approval for disposing of very low-level radioactive wastes from Duke Power Company's nuclear stations. The approved disposal procedures include landfarming of water treatment residues, on-site disposal (burial) of sand and feedwater heaters, and include offsite release for treatment and disposal of sanitary sewage sludge. In summary, users of radioactive materials should not exclude this approach in their quest to reduce the volume of radioactive waste. It is expected that such submittals could provide a data base for further development of generic limits for radioactive wastes

  9. Electromagnetically powered electrolytic pump and thermo-responsive valve for drug delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying; Zaher, Amir; Yassine, Omar; Buttner, Ulrich; Kosel, Jü rgen; Foulds, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    A novel drug delivery device is presented, implementing an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve. The device is remotely operated by an AC electromagnetic field (40.5∼58.5 mT, 450 kHz) that provides the power for the pump and the valve. It is suitable for long-term therapy applications, which use a solid drug in reservoir (SDR) approach and avoids unwanted drug diffusion. When the electromagnetic field is on, the electrolytic pump drives the drug towards the valve. The valve is made of a magnetic composite consisting of a smart hydrogel: Poly (N-Isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) and iron powder. The heat generated in the iron powder via magnetic losses causes the PNIPAm to shrink, allowing the drug to flow past it. When the electromagnetic field is off, the PNIPAm swells, sealing the outlet. In the meantime, the bubbles generated by electrolysis recombine into water, causing a pressure reduction in the pumping chamber. This draws fresh fluid from outside the pump into the drug reservoir before the valve is fully sealed. The recombination can be accelerated by a platinum (Pt) coated catalytic reformer, allowing more fluid to flow back to the drug reservoir and dissolve the drug. By repeatedly turning on and off the magnetic field, the drug solution can be delivered cyclically. © 2015 IEEE.

  10. Electromagnetically powered electrolytic pump and thermo-responsive valve for drug delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2015-04-01

    A novel drug delivery device is presented, implementing an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve. The device is remotely operated by an AC electromagnetic field (40.5∼58.5 mT, 450 kHz) that provides the power for the pump and the valve. It is suitable for long-term therapy applications, which use a solid drug in reservoir (SDR) approach and avoids unwanted drug diffusion. When the electromagnetic field is on, the electrolytic pump drives the drug towards the valve. The valve is made of a magnetic composite consisting of a smart hydrogel: Poly (N-Isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) and iron powder. The heat generated in the iron powder via magnetic losses causes the PNIPAm to shrink, allowing the drug to flow past it. When the electromagnetic field is off, the PNIPAm swells, sealing the outlet. In the meantime, the bubbles generated by electrolysis recombine into water, causing a pressure reduction in the pumping chamber. This draws fresh fluid from outside the pump into the drug reservoir before the valve is fully sealed. The recombination can be accelerated by a platinum (Pt) coated catalytic reformer, allowing more fluid to flow back to the drug reservoir and dissolve the drug. By repeatedly turning on and off the magnetic field, the drug solution can be delivered cyclically. © 2015 IEEE.

  11. Power absorption of high-frequency electromagnetic waves in a partially ionized magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Bin; Wang Xiaogang

    2005-01-01

    Power absorption of high-frequency electromagnetic waves in a uniformly magnetized plasma layer covering a highly conducting surface is studied under atmosphere conditions. It is assumed that the system consists of not only electrons and positive ions but negative ions as well. By a general formula derived in our previous work [B. Guo and X. G. Wang, Plasma Sci. Tech. 7, 2645 (2005)], the total power absorption in the plasma layer with multiple reflections between an air-plasma interface and the conducting surface is computed. The results show that although the existence of negative ions greatly reduces the total power absorption, the magnetization of the plasma can, however, partially enhance it. Parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed

  12. Simulation and testing of a micro electromagnetic energy harvester for self-powered system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Lei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a low cost and efficient electromagnetic vibration energy harvester (EVEH for a self-powered system. The EVEH consists of a resistant (copper spring, a permanent magnet (NdFeB35 and a wire-wound copper coil. The copper spring was fabricated by the laser precision cutting technology. A numerical model was adopted to analyze magnetic field distribution of a rectangle permanent magnet. The finite element (FEM soft ANSYS was used to simulate the mechanical properties of the system. The testing results show that the micro electromagnetic vibration energy harvester can generate the maximal power 205.38 μW at a resonance frequency of 124.2 Hz with an acceleration of 0.5 g (g = 9.8 ms−2 across a load the 265 Ω and a superior normalized power density (NPD of 456.5 μW cm−3 g−2. The magnetic field distribution of the permanent magnet was calculated to optimize geometric parameters of the coil. The proposed EVEH has a high efficiency with the lower cost.

  13. Schwarzschild black holes as unipolar inductors: Expected electromagnetic power of a merger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2011-01-01

    The motion of a Schwarzschild black hole with velocity v 0 =β 0 c through a constant magnetic field B 0 in vacuum induces a component of the electric field along the magnetic field, generating a nonzero second Poincare electromagnetic invariant * F·F≠0. This will produce (e.g., via radiative effects and vacuum breakdown) an electric charge density of the order of ρ ind =B 0 β 0 /(2πeR G ), where R G =2GM/c 2 is the Schwarzschild radius and M is the mass of the black hole; the charge density ρ ind is similar to the Goldreich-Julian density. The magnetospheres of moving black holes resemble in many respects the magnetospheres of rotationally-powered pulsars, with pair formation fronts and outer gaps, where the sign of the induced charge changes. As a result, the black hole will generate bipolar electromagnetic jets each consisting of two counter-aligned current flows (four current flows total), each carrying an electric current of the order I≅eB 0 R G β 0 . The electromagnetic power of the jets is L≅(GM) 2 B 0 2 β 0 2 /c 3 ; for a particular case of merging black holes the resulting Poynting power is L≅(GM) 3 B 0 2 /(c 5 R), where R is the radius of the orbit. In addition, in limited regions near the horizon the first electromagnetic invariant changes sign, so that the induced electric field becomes larger than the magnetic field, E>B. As a result, there will be local dissipation of the magnetic field close to the horizon, within a region with the radial extent ΔR≅R G β 0 . The total energy loss from a system of merging black holes is a sum of two components with similar powers, one due to the rotation of space-time within the orbit, driven by the nonzero angular momentum in the system, and the other due to the linear motion of the black holes through the magnetic field. Since the resulting electrodynamics is in many respects similar to pulsars, merging black holes may generate coherent radio and high energy emission beamed approximately along the

  14. Radioactivity around Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant 9 months after the disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shozugawa, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    We have measured radioactivities around Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in December, 2011, 9 months after the disaster, to compare with measurements in April, 2011. The radioactivity originated by radioactive iodine should have disappeared before December due to its comparatively short lifetime. At the point 1.5km apart from the Plant, the dose rate 1m above the earth was 78 μ Sv/h in April whereas it was 56 μ Sv/h in December, which was higher than anticipation. The measured radioactivities of the soil of fields and forests around the Plant in December were even four times higher than those in April. These phenomena may be resulted with the movement of soil particles attached with radioactive cesium by rainwater or wind. (author)

  15. Soil radioactivity levels and radiation hazard assessment around a Thermal Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Pankaj; Sharma, Somdutt; Agrawal, Anshu; Kumar, Rajesh; Prajith, Rama; Sahoo, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Coal based thermal power plants further enhance the level of radioactivity in the environment, as burning of coal produces fly ash that can be released into the environment containing traces of 238 U, 232 Th and their decay products. Therefore, coal fired power plants are one of the major contributor towards the Technologically Enhanced Natural Radiation (TENR). Keeping this in view, a study of natural radioactivity in the soil of twenty five villages within 5 km radius around the Harduaganj Thermal Power Plant, Aligarh, UP, India is going on under a BRNS major project, to know the radiological implications on general population living around this plant

  16. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants: Annual report, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1987-08-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1984 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1984 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  17. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants (1976)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, T.R.

    1978-11-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1976 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1976 release data are compared with previous year releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  18. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, T.R.

    1978-11-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1977 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1977 release data are compared with previous years releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  19. Process of liquid radioactive waste treatment in nuclear power plant and development trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiean; Wang Xin; Liu Dan; Zhu Laiye; Chen Bin

    2014-01-01

    The popular liquid radioactive waste treatment methods in nuclear power plants (NPP) are Chemical precipitation, evaporation, ion exchange, membrane treatment, chemical coagulation and activated carbon absorption and so on. 'Filter + activated carbon absorption (Chemical coagulation) + ion exchange' has a good prospect for development, as its simple process, high decontamination factor, low energy consumption and smaller secondary wastes. Also the process is used in Sanmen and Haiyang Projects. The severe incident in NPP set an even higher demand on liquid radioactive waste treatment. The new type treatment materials, optimization of the existed treatment, combination of treatment and the mobile treatment facility is the development trend in liquid radioactive waste treatment in NPP. (authors)

  20. Report on radioactivity monitoring during the visits of nuclear powered ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The National Radiation Laboratory of the Department of Health is required under NZAEC Report 500 'New Zealand Code for Nuclear Powered Shipping' (June 1976) to monitor for release of radioactivity during the stay of such a ship in a New Zealand port and to provide technical assistance to Civil Defence organisations charged with dealing with any emergency arising from an accidental release of radioactive materials. This report outlines the activities undertaken for the two visits which took place in 1976

  1. Low-level radioactive waste management in EDF nuclear power plants (FRANCE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper shows some recent examples of Low-level radioactive waste management in EDF nuclear power plants: - Radioactive liquid wastes proceeding from steam generators leaching (NOGENT SUR SEINE-1 REACTOR) - Thermal insulation proceeding from heat exchanger and blower (CHINON-2 REACTOR) - Old iron from reactor dismantling (CHINON-3 REACTOR, MARCOULE G1 REACTOR, MARCOULE G2-G3 REACTORS) - fresh air filter and fire detector - CHINON-2 REACTOR breaker chambers

  2. Converting Existing Copper Wire Firing System to a Fiber Optically Controlled Firing System for Electromagnetic Pulsed Power Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-19

    Pulsed Power Experiments by Robert Borys Jr Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Colby Adams Bowhead Total Enterprise Solutions...ARL-TN-0863 ● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Converting Existing Copper Wire Firing System to a Fiber-Optically Controlled...Firing System for Electromagnetic Pulsed Power Experiments by Robert Borys Jr and Colby Adams Approved for public release

  3. Management of radioactive waste from non-power applications in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codee, H.D.K.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive waste results from the use of radioactive materials in hospitals, research establishments, industry and nuclear power plants. The Netherlands forms a good example of a country with a small and in the near future ending nuclear power programme. The radioactive waste from non-power applications therefore strongly influences the management choices. A dedicated waste management company COVRA, the Central Organisation for Radioactive Waste manages all radioactive waste produced in the Netherlands. For the small volume, but broad spectrum of radioactive waste, a management system was developed based on the principle to isolate, to control and to monitor the waste. Long-term storage is an important element in this management strategy. It is not seen as a 'wait and see' option but as a necessary step in the strategy that will ultimately result in final removal of the waste. Since the waste will remain retrievable for a long time new technologies and new disposal options can be applied when available and feasible. (author)

  4. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging air-flow energy to sustainably power temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Shuhua; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator with dimensions of 6.7 cm × 4.5 cm × 2 cm and a weight of 42.3 g that consists of two triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and two electromagnetic generators (EMGs) for scavenging air-flow energy. Under an air-flow speed of about 18 m/s, the hybridized nanogenerator can deliver largest output powers of 3.5 mW for one TENG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 8.8 mW/g and 14.6 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 3 MΩ and 1.8 mW for one EMG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 0.3 mW/g and 0.4 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 2 kΩ, respectively. The hybridized nanogenerator can be utilized to charge a capacitor of 3300 μF to sustainably power four temperature sensors for realizing self-powered temperature sensor networks. Moreover, a wireless temperature sensor driven by a hybridized nanogenerator charged Li-ion battery can work well to send the temperature data to a receiver/computer at a distance of 1.5 m. This work takes a significant step toward air-flow energy harvesting and its potential applications in self-powered wireless sensor networks.

  5. Rotating-Disk-Based Hybridized Electromagnetic-Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Sustainably Powering Wireless Traffic Volume Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binbin; Chen, Jun; Jin, Long; Deng, Weili; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Zhu, Minhao; Yang, Weiqing; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-28

    Wireless traffic volume detectors play a critical role for measuring the traffic-flow in a real-time for current Intelligent Traffic System. However, as a battery-operated electronic device, regularly replacing battery remains a great challenge, especially in the remote area and wide distribution. Here, we report a self-powered active wireless traffic volume sensor by using a rotating-disk-based hybridized nanogenerator of triboelectric nanogenerator and electromagnetic generator as the sustainable power source. Operated at a rotating rate of 1000 rpm, the device delivered an output power of 17.5 mW, corresponding to a volume power density of 55.7 W/m(3) (Pd = P/V, see Supporting Information for detailed calculation) at a loading resistance of 700 Ω. The hybridized nanogenerator was demonstrated to effectively harvest energy from wind generated by a moving vehicle through the tunnel. And the delivered power is capable of triggering a counter via a wireless transmitter for real-time monitoring the traffic volume in the tunnel. This study further expands the applications of triboelectric nanogenerators for high-performance ambient mechanical energy harvesting and as sustainable power sources for driving wireless traffic volume sensors.

  6. Electromagnetic transient analysis and Novell protective relaying techniques for power transformers

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, X; Tian, Q; Weng, H

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the technical challenges of transformer malfunction analysis as well as protection. One of the current research directions is the malfunction mechanism analysis due to nonlinearity of transformer core and comprehensive countermeasures on improving the performance of transformer differential protection. Here, the authors summarize their research outcomes and present a set of recent research advances in the electromagnetic transient analysis, the application on power transformer protections, and present a more systematic investigation and review in this field. This research area is still progressing, especially with the fast development of Smart Grid. This book is an important addition to the literature and will enhance significant advancement in research. It is a good reference book for researchers in power transformer protection research and a good text book for graduate and undergraduate students in electrical engineering.

  7. Fundamentals of electric power engineering engineering from electromagnetics to power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ceraolo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    At the basis of many sectors of engineering, electrical engineering deals with electricity phenomena involved in the transfer of energy and power. Professionals requiring a refresher course in this interdisciplinary branch need look no further than Fundamentals of Electric Power Engineering, which imparts tools and trade tricks to remembering basic concepts and grasping new developments. Even established engineers must supplement their careers with an invigorated knowledge base, and this comprehensive resource helps non-electrical engineers amass power system information quickly.

  8. State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report

  9. Transport of radioactive droplet moisture from a source in a nuclear power plant spray pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a change in the microclimate in the region surrounding a nuclear power plant resulting from the emission of vapor form a cooling tower, evaporation of water from the water surface of a cooling pond or a spray pond, in the latter case direct radioactive contamination of the underlying surface around the nuclear power plant can also occur due to discharge of process water (radioactive) into the pond and its transport in the air over a certain distance in the form of droplet moisture. A typical example may be the situation at the Zaporozhe nuclear power plant in 1986 when accidental discharge of process water into the cooling pond occurred. Below we present a solution for the problem of transport of droplet moisture taking into account its evaporation, which may be used to estimate the scale of radioactive contamination of the locality

  10. Regulatory inspection: a powerful tool to control industrial radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C.A. da; Leocadio, J.C.; Ramalho, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    An important contribution for Brazilian development, especially for the quality control of products, is the use of radiation sources by conventional industries. There are in Brazil roughly 3,000 radioactive sources spread out among 950 industries. The main industrial practices involved are: industrial radiography, industrial irradiators, industrial accelerators, well logging petroleum and nuclear gauges. More than 1,800 Radiation Protection Officers (RPOs) were qualified to work in these practices. The present work presents a brief description of the safety control over industrial radioactive installations performed by the Brazilian Regulatory Authority, i.e. the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN). This paper also describes the national system for radiation safety inspections, the regulation infrastructure and the national inventory of industrial installations. The inspections are based on specific indicators, and their periodicity depends on the risk and type of installation. The present work discusses some relevant aspects that must be considered during the inspections, in order to make the inspections more efficient in controlling the sources. One of these aspects regards the evaluation of the storage place for the sources, a very important parameter for preventing future risky situations. (author)

  11. Summary of personnel doses and discharge of radioactivity at Swedish nuclear power plants 1971-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmqvist, L.; Persson, Aa.

    1977-01-01

    The report is a summary of personnel doses and activity discharges from Swedish nuclear power plants during the first five years of electric power production by nuclear plants. The personnel doses for the Sweedish plants are lower than the corresponding values for American plants. The highest Swedish value is o,13 manrem per MWE and year. The discharge of radioactivity to the atmosphere from the Swedish plants has been for below the maximum permissible limits. The discharge of radioactivity to the water recipients was less than 1 % of what is permissible

  12. Measurements of the radioactivity of power plant by-products processed into construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowski, S.A.; Dudelewski, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of the recycling of residual products comprising, inter alia, fly ash and slags accuring from the combustion of black and brown coal in modern coal dust boilers in the power industry has been topical for a number of years. Numerous discussions and articles in technical periodicals and the daily press have revolved around the problem of the radioactivity of construction materials or construction elements obtained from fly ash or slags of power plant. In Poland, this was a forbidden subject until the publication in 1980 by the Warsaw institute of construction technology of standard no. 234 entitled: 'Recommendations for establishing the natural radioactivity of products processed into construction materials'. (orig.) [de

  13. Verification of electromagnetic effects from wireless devices in operating nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Song Hae; Kim, Young Sik; Lyou, Ho Sun; Kim, Min Suk [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. (KHNP), Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lyou, Joon [Dept. of Electronics Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Wireless communication technologies, especially smart phones, have become increasingly common. Wireless technology is widely used in general industry and this trend is also expected to grow with the development of wireless technology. However, wireless technology is not currently applied in any domestic operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) because of the highest priority of the safety policy. Wireless technology is required in operating NPPs, however, in order to improve the emergency responses and work efficiency of the operators and maintenance personnel during its operation. The wired telephone network in domestic NPPs can be simply connected to a wireless local area network to use wireless devices. This design change can improve the ability of the operators and personnel to respond to an emergency situation by using important equipment for a safe shutdown. IEEE 802.11 smart phones (Wi-Fi standard), Internet Protocol (IP) phones, personal digital assistant (PDA) for field work, notebooks used with web cameras, and remote site monitoring tablet PCs for on-site testing may be considered as wireless devices that can be used in domestic operating NPPs. Despite its advantages, wireless technology has only been used during the overhaul period in Korean NPPs due to the electromagnetic influence of sensitive equipment and cyber security problems. This paper presents the electromagnetic verification results from major sensitive equipment after using wireless devices in domestic operating NPPs. It also provides a solution for electromagnetic interference/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) from portable and fixed wireless devices with a Wi-Fi communication environment within domestic NPPs.

  14. Verification of electromagnetic effects from wireless devices in operating nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Hae Ye

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wireless communication technologies, especially smartphones, have become increasingly common. Wireless technology is widely used in general industry and this trend is also expected to grow with the development of wireless technology. However, wireless technology is not currently applied in any domestic operating nuclear power plants (NPPs because of the highest priority of the safety policy. Wireless technology is required in operating NPPs, however, in order to improve the emergency responses and work efficiency of the operators and maintenance personnel during its operation. The wired telephone network in domestic NPPs can be simply connected to a wireless local area network to use wireless devices. This design change can improve the ability of the operators and personnel to respond to an emergency situation by using important equipment for a safe shutdown. IEEE 802.11 smartphones (Wi-Fi standard, Internet Protocol (IP phones, personal digital assistant (PDA for field work, notebooks used with web cameras, and remote site monitoring tablet PCs for on-site testing may be considered as wireless devices that can be used in domestic operating NPPs. Despite its advantages, wireless technology has only been used during the overhaul period in Korean NPPs due to the electromagnetic influence of sensitive equipment and cyber security problems. This paper presents the electromagnetic verification results from major sensitive equipment after using wireless devices in domestic operating NPPs. It also provides a solution for electromagnetic interference/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI from portable and fixed wireless devices with a Wi-Fi communication environment within domestic NPPs.

  15. Evaluation of electromagnetic interference environment of the instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Moon-Gi; Lee, Jae-Ki; Ji, Yeong-Haw; Jo, Sung-Han [Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 1312-70 Yuesong-daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Je, E-mail: heeje@pusan.ac.kr [Pusan National University, 2, Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We surveyed the electromagnetic emissions at the location of I&C systems. • We assessed the electromagnetic levels on reactor types from thirteen nuclear plants. • We evaluated the margin between plant emission limits and the highest composite levels. • We presented the formula of radiated susceptibility test levels to non-safety-related I&C systems. - Abstract: The electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated from sources in power units can interfere with digital Instrument and Control (I&C) systems. When EMI is emitted with conducted and radiated noise, it interferes with the signals of the I&C systems. Since the digital I&C systems are efficient and competitively priced, the analogue I&C systems have been upgraded and replaced with digital I&C systems, but these systems have less EMI immunity. When safety-related I&C systems are installed in the units, the verification of equipment EMI should not be done in site-specific tests but in test facilities. There are needs to do the overall site-specific EMI assessment of I&C systems depending on the reactor types from thirteen operating units. This study evaluated the margin between plant emission limits and the highest composite plant emissions of the EMI. When the non-safety-related I&C equipment or systems are placed in the units, there are no individual test levels of the radiated electrical field. If need be, the level should comply with the test levels of the radiated electrical field on the safety-related I&C systems. This paper presents the test levels of radiated electrical fields to non-safety-related I&C equipment or systems.

  16. Verification of electromagnetic effects from wireless devices in operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Song Hae; Kim, Young Sik; Lyou, Ho Sun; Kim, Min Suk; Lyou, Joon

    2015-01-01

    Wireless communication technologies, especially smart phones, have become increasingly common. Wireless technology is widely used in general industry and this trend is also expected to grow with the development of wireless technology. However, wireless technology is not currently applied in any domestic operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) because of the highest priority of the safety policy. Wireless technology is required in operating NPPs, however, in order to improve the emergency responses and work efficiency of the operators and maintenance personnel during its operation. The wired telephone network in domestic NPPs can be simply connected to a wireless local area network to use wireless devices. This design change can improve the ability of the operators and personnel to respond to an emergency situation by using important equipment for a safe shutdown. IEEE 802.11 smart phones (Wi-Fi standard), Internet Protocol (IP) phones, personal digital assistant (PDA) for field work, notebooks used with web cameras, and remote site monitoring tablet PCs for on-site testing may be considered as wireless devices that can be used in domestic operating NPPs. Despite its advantages, wireless technology has only been used during the overhaul period in Korean NPPs due to the electromagnetic influence of sensitive equipment and cyber security problems. This paper presents the electromagnetic verification results from major sensitive equipment after using wireless devices in domestic operating NPPs. It also provides a solution for electromagnetic interference/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) from portable and fixed wireless devices with a Wi-Fi communication environment within domestic NPPs

  17. Management of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Even thought risk assessment is an essential consideration in all projects involving radioactive or hazardous waste, its public role is often unclear, and it is not fully utilized in the decision-making process for public acceptance of such facilities. Risk assessment should be an integral part of such projects and should play an important role from beginning to end, i.e., from planning stages to the closing of a disposal facility. A conceptual model that incorporates all potential pathways of exposure and is based on site-specific conditions is key to a successful risk assessment. A baseline comparison with existing standards determines, along with other factors, whether the disposal site is safe. Risk assessment also plays a role in setting priorities between sites during cleanup actions and in setting cleanup standards for certain contaminants at a site. The applicable technologies and waste disposal designs can be screened through risk assessment

  18. Treatment and disposal of radioactive waste from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, W.

    1981-01-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany and many other European countries, having very high population densities, must make the most efficient use of their soil, their ground and surface waters. In Germany, no method of waste disposal could be used which included direct storage or seepage into the upper strata of the soil or a discharge into rivers or lakes. It has been shown after more than 20 years experience of treatment of low and intermediate level liquid and solid wastes and disposal of solidified residues in a salt mine, that a number of techniques and procedures are available for manageing this kind of waste with a high degree of safety. A complete system of waste collection, treatment methods and controlled disposal of low and intermediate radioactive residues in accordance with legally established rules and regulations offers the best guarantee for environmental protection. (orig./RW)

  19. Low-level radioactive waste processing at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The Solid Radwaste Processing Source Book is presented as a supplement to the Liquid Radwaste Source Book released in 1990 and updated in 1991. The publication is the result of an industry-wide survey, and is intended as a resource for technical and managerial decisions involving of the processing of solid radioactive waste including ''wet'' and ''dry'' active waste as found at both Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactor sites. In addition to information on processes, vendors, volumes, and in-plant management activities, technology under consideration for future use and computer applications are listed. Together with key personnel and contact information contained in the Liquid Source Books, the collected data will be of great use when seeking specific, unbiased experience on which to base decisions related to so processing, disposal policy, or potential economic and regulatory impact

  20. Radioactive waste management for German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weh, R.; Methling, D.; Sappok, M.

    1996-01-01

    In Germany, back-end fuel cycle provisions must be made for the twenty nuclear power plants currently run by utilities with an aggregate installed power of 23.4 GWe, and the four nuclear power plants already shut down. In addition, there are the shut down nuclear power plants of the former German Democratic Republic, and a variety of decommissioned prototype nuclear power plants built with the participation of the federal government and by firms other than utilities. The nuclear power plants operated by utilities contribute roughly one third of the total electricity generation in public power plants, thus greatly ensuring a stable energy supply in Germany. The public debate in Germany, however, focuses less on the good economic performance of these plants, and the positive acceptance at their respective sites, but rather on their spent fuel and waste management which, allegedly, is not safe enough. The spent fuel and waste management of German nuclear power plants is planned on a long-term basis, and executed in a responsible way by proven technical means, in the light of the provisions of the Atomic Act. Each of the necessary steps of the back end of the fuel cycle is planned and licensed in accordance with German nuclear law provisions. The respective facilities are built, commissioned, and monitored in operation with the dedicated assistance of expert consultants and licensing authorities. Stable boundary conditions are a prerequisite in ensuring the necessary stability in planning and running waste management schemes. As producers of waste, nuclear power plants are responsible for safe waste management and remain the owners of that waste until it has been accepted by a federal repository. (orig./DG) [de

  1. An electromagnetic induced transparency-like scheme for wireless power transfer using dielectric resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaggar, Sameh Y.

    2017-02-01

    Similar to the hybridization of three atoms, three coupled resonators interact to form bonding, anti-bonding, and non-bonding modes. The non-bonding mode enables an electromagnetic induced transparency like transfer of energy. Here, the non-bonding mode, resulting from the strong electric coupling of two dielectric resonators and an enclosure, is exploited to show that it is feasible to transfer power over a distance comparable to the operating wavelength. In this scheme, the enclosure acts as a mediator. The strong coupling permits the excitation of the non-bonding mode with high purity. This approach is different from resonant inductive coupling, which works in the sub-wavelength regime. Optimal loads and the corresponding maximum efficiency are determined using two independent methods: Coupled Mode Theory and Circuit modelling. It is shown that, unlike resonant inductive coupling, the figure of merit depends on the enclosure quality and not on the load, which emphasizes the role of the enclosure as a mediator. Briefly after the input excitation is turned on, the energy in the receiver builds up via all coupled and spurious modes. As time elapses, all modes except the non-bonding cease to sustain. Due to the strong coupling between the dielectrics and the enclosure, such systems have unique properties such as high and uniform efficiency over large distances and minimal fringing fields. These properties suggest that electromagnetic induced transparency like schemes that rely on the use of dielectric resonators can be used to power autonomous systems inside an enclosure or find applications when exposure to the fields needs to be minimal. Finite Element computations are used to verify the theoretical predictions by determining the transfer efficiency, field profile, and coupling coefficients for two different systems. It is shown that the three resonators must be present for efficient power transfer; if one or more are removed, the transfer efficiency reduces

  2. Structural radioactive waste from 'retubing/refurbishment' of Embalse nuclear power plant. Regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Daniela E.; Lee Gonzales, Horacio M.; Medici, Marcela A.; Piumetti, Elsa H.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike the building of a new nuclear reactor, the 'retubing / refurbishment' of nuclear reactors that have been in operation for many years, involves the replacement of components in a radioactive environment. This requires a carefully planned radiation protection program to ensure protection of workers, the public and the environment as well as a radioactive waste management program for those radioactive waste generated during the process, which go beyond those generated during the normal operation and maintenance of the plant. Nucleoelectrica Argentina Sociedad Anonima (NA-SA) is scheduled to conduct the Life Extension Process of Embalse Nuclear Power Plant (CNE) which essentially consist of 'retubing / refurbishment' of the installation. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) will then have an important activity related to the above process. In particular, this paper will describe some points of interest related to the generation and management of radioactive waste during the 'retubing / refurbishment' of the CNE, from the regulatory point of view. (author)

  3. Assessment of inhalation risk due to radioactivity released from coal-based thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, S.K.; Pandit, G.G.; Shukla, V.K.; Puranik, V.D.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    In India, the coal based thermal power plants have been the major source of power generation in the past and would continue for decades to come. As the coal contains naturally occurring primordial radionuclides the burning of pulverized coal to produce energy for generation of electricity in thermal power plants will result in the emission of a variety of natural radioactive elements into the environment in the vicinity of thermal power plants. In this paper we have used two different methods for characterization of uncertainty in inhalation risk to the general public around 10 Kms radius in the neighborhood of a coal-fired thermal power plant. (author)

  4. Radioactive waste management in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: 25 years since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskolkov, Boris Y; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Zinkevich, Lubov I; Proskura, Nikolai I; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy

    2011-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities in the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste-related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and, in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program.

  5. A Self-Powered Hybrid Energy Scavenging System Utilizing RF and Vibration Based Electromagnetic Harvesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uluşan, H; Gharehbaghi, K; Külah, H; Zorlu, Ö; Muhtaroğlu, A

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel hybrid system that combines the power generated simultaneously by a vibration-based Electromagnetic (EM) harvester and a UHF band RF harvester. The novel hybrid scavenger interface uses a power management circuit in 180 nm CMOS technology to step-up and to regulate the combined output. At the first stage of the system, the RF harvester generates positive DC output with a 7-stage threshold compensated rectifier, while the EM harvester generates negative DC output with a self-powered AC/DC negative doubler circuit. At the second stage, the generated voltages are serially added, stepped-up with an on-chip charge pump circuit, and regulated to a typical battery voltage of 3 V. Test results indicate that the hybrid operation enables generation of 9 μW at 3 V output for a wide range of input stimulations, which could not be attained with either harvesting mode by itself. Moreover the hybrid system behaves as a typical battery, and keeps the output voltage stable at 3 V up to 18 μW of output power. The presented system is the first battery-like harvester to our knowledge that generates energy from two independent sources and regulates the output to a stable DC voltage. (paper)

  6. Feasible approach of contactless power transfer technology combined with HTS coils based on electromagnetic resonance coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon Do; Yim, Seong Woo; Hwang, Si Dole

    2013-01-01

    The contactless power transfer (CPT) systems have been recently gaining popularity widely since it is an available option to realize the power delivery and storage with connector-free devices across a large air gap. Especially, the CPT with electromagnetic resonance coupling method is possible to exchange energy within 2 m efficiently. However, the power transfer efficiency of CPT in commercialized products has been limited because the impedance matching of coupled coils is sensitive. As a reasonable approach, we combined the CPT system with HTS wire technology and called as, superconducting contactless power transfer (SUCPT) system. Since the superconducting coils have an enough current density, the superconducting antenna and receiver coils at CPT system have a merit to deliver and receive a mass amount of electric energy. In this paper, we present the feasibility of the SUCPT system and examine the transmission properties of SUCPT phenomenon between room temperature and very low temperature at 77 K as long as the receiver is within 1.0 m distance.

  7. On the electromagnetic fields, Poynting vector, and peak power radiated by lightning return strokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krider, E. P.

    1992-01-01

    The initial radiation fields, Poynting vector, and total electromagnetic power that a vertical return stroke radiates into the upper half space have been computed when the speed of the stroke, nu, is a significant fraction of the speed of light, c, assuming that at large distances and early times the source is an infinitesimal dipole. The initial current is also assumed to satisfy the transmission-line model with a constant nu and to be perpendicular to an infinite, perfectly conducting ground. The effect of a large nu is to increase the radiation fields by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -1, where beta = nu/c and theta is measured from the vertical, and the Poynting vector by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -2.

  8. Balanced and optimal bianisotropic particles: maximizing power extracted from electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ra'di, Younes; Tretyakov, Sergei A

    2013-01-01

    Here we introduce the concept of ‘optimal particles’ for strong interactions with electromagnetic fields. We assume that a particle occupies a given electrically small volume in space and study the required optimal relations between the particle polarizabilities. In these optimal particles, the inclusion shape and material are chosen so that the particles extract the maximum possible power from given incident fields. It appears that for different excitation scenarios the optimal particles are bianisotropic chiral, omega, moving and Tellegen particles. The optimal dimensions of resonant canonical chiral and omega particles are found analytically. Such optimal particles have extreme properties in scattering (e.g., zero backscattering or invisibility). Planar arrays of optimal particles possess extreme properties in reflection and transmission (e.g. total absorption or magnetic-wall response), and volumetric composites of optimal particles realize, for example, such extreme materials as the chiral nihility medium. (paper)

  9. Off-shore wind power plant modelling precision and efficiency in electromagnetic transient simulation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaagac, U.; Saad, H.; Mahseredjian, J. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Jensen, S.; Cai, L. [REpower Systems AG, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The large number of switching elements in the modular multilevel converter (MMC) is a challenging problem for modeling the MMC-HVDC systems in electromagnetic transient type (EMT-type) programs. The modeling complexity increases even further when MMC-HVDC systems are used to integrate offshore wind farms (OWFs) with power electronics based wind energy converters, such as doubly-fed induction generators (DFIGs). This paper compares the computational performances of various combinations of MMC-HVDC and OWF models. Practical onshore ac fault scenarios are simulated for an OWF composed of DFIG type wind turbines and connected to a practical ac grid through a point-to-point MMC-HVDC system. (orig.)

  10. Low power radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation for the treatment of pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Santosuosso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Different techniques have been used in some rheumatic diseases to induce a therapeutic effect by heating deep tissues. These techniques are commonly known as ‘thermotherapy’ (1-4. It should be observed that adequate heating of deep tissues cannot be obtained by conduction or convection of heat because the skin and subcutaneous fat are good thermal insulators and because heating is reduced by blood flow in superficial vessels. Heating of deep tissues can instead be obtained by conversion of other forms of energy into heat. Conversion heat is generated by different types of radiations absorbed by deep tissues: when radiation interacts with tissues, some energy is converted into heat. High power radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF, which produces strong thermal energy, has been widely applied in medicine for ablative procedures (5-7.

  11. PAVAN, Atmospheric Dispersion of Radioactive Releases from Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: PAVAN estimates down-wind ground-level air concentrations for potential accidental releases of radioactive material from nuclear facilities. Options can account for variation in the location of release points, additional plume dispersion due to building wakes, plume meander under low wind speed conditions, and adjustments to consider non-straight trajectories. It computes an effective plume height using the physical release height which can be reduced by inputted terrain features. 2 - Method of solution: Using joint frequency distributions of wind direction and wind speed by atmospheric stability, the program provides relative air concentration (X/Q) values as functions of direction for various time periods at the exclusion area boundary (EAB) and the outer boundary of the low population zone (LPZ). Calculations of X/Q values can be made for assumed ground-level releases or evaluated releases from free-standing stacks. The X/Q calculations are based on the theory that material released to the atmosphere will be normally distributed (Gaussian) about the plume centerline. A straight-line trajectory is assumed between the point of release and all distances for which X/Q values are calculated. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - The code cannot handle multiple emission sources

  12. Liquid radioactive waste processing improvement of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nery, Renata Wolter dos Reis; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Monteiro, Jose Luiz Fontes

    2005-01-01

    The study evaluate an inorganic ion exchange to process the low level liquid radwaste of PWR nuclear plants, so that the level of the radioactivity in the effluents and the solid waste produced during the treatment of these liquid radwaste can be reduced. The work compares two types of ion exchange materials, a strong acid cation exchange resin, that is the material typically used to remove radionuclides from PWR nuclear plants wastes, and a mordenite zeolite. These exchange material were used to remove cesium from a synthetic effluent containing only this ion and another effluent containing cesium and cobalt. The breakthrough curves of the zeolite and resin using a fix bed reactor were compared. The results demonstrated that the zeolite is more efficient than the resin in removing cesium from a solution containing cesium and cobalt. The results also showed that a bed combining zeolite and resin can process more volume of an effluent containing cesium and cobalt than a bed resin alone. (author)

  13. Radioactivity in the vicinity of Sizewell nuclear power station: marine environmental monitoring, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Regular monitoring of radioactivity in the aquatic environment of the British Isles has continued. A report presents the results of this program in relation to the Sizewell nuclear power station for 1983, so as to supplement the most recently available full report which is for 1982. (author)

  14. Nuclear power plant decommissioning and radioactive waste management in the U.K.. A regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.M.

    1993-01-01

    Effective control of the decommissioning and radioactive waste management of nuclear power plant in United Kingdom are introduced. The Government established the legislative framework and national strategy, operators provided the necessary skills and equipment for implementation, and the regulators used the legislative controls to ensure a safe system of work is achieved and maintained

  15. Facilities for treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The standard applies to processes applied in facilities for treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants with LWR- and HTR-type reactors. It does not apply to the treatment of concentrates obtained in the decontamination of water. (orig.) [de

  16. The discharge of radioactive effluents from the nuclear power programme into western waters of Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    A brief account is presented of the British nuclear power programme and the types of radioactive effluent that arise from the power stations and from the Windscale reprocessing plant. Routes by which these effluents could affect human populations, and radiation dose limits which have been laid down, are discussed. The discharge of permitted amounts of activity into western coastal waters of Great Britain, and the requirements for monitoring the discharges, are described. (U.K.)

  17. Nuclear power plant providing a function of suppressing the deposition of radioactive substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, T.; Kawakami, T.; Izumiya, M.; Minato, A.; Ohsumi, K.

    1988-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant having a cooling system and radioactive coolant in the cooling system, the cooling system is described including ferrous structural material in contact with the radioactive coolant, wherein the ferrous structural material has a preliminary oxide film formed thereon, by oxidation of the bare surface portion thereof, by contacting bare surfaces of the structural material with flowing water containing an oxidizing agent and no metallic ions. The preliminary oxide film is formed at those portions of the ferrous structural material to be in contact with the radioactive coolant. The preliminary oxide film is formed prior to the structural material contacting the radioactive coolant. The preliminary oxide film consists essentially of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and having a thickness of at least 300 A, whereby later formation of new oxide film while the structural material is in contact with the radioactive coolant is suppressed to thereby suppress deposition of the radioactive substances on the ferrous structural material

  18. Electromagnetic interference-aware transmission scheduling and power control for dynamic wireless access in hospital environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phunchongharn, Phond; Hossain, Ekram; Camorlinga, Sergio

    2011-11-01

    We study the multiple access problem for e-Health applications (referred to as secondary users) coexisting with medical devices (referred to as primary or protected users) in a hospital environment. In particular, we focus on transmission scheduling and power control of secondary users in multiple spatial reuse time-division multiple access (STDMA) networks. The objective is to maximize the spectrum utilization of secondary users and minimize their power consumption subject to the electromagnetic interference (EMI) constraints for active and passive medical devices and minimum throughput guarantee for secondary users. The multiple access problem is formulated as a dual objective optimization problem which is shown to be NP-complete. We propose a joint scheduling and power control algorithm based on a greedy approach to solve the problem with much lower computational complexity. To this end, an enhanced greedy algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of the greedy algorithm by finding the optimal sequence of secondary users for scheduling. Using extensive simulations, the tradeoff in performance in terms of spectrum utilization, energy consumption, and computational complexity is evaluated for both the algorithms.

  19. A research program to assess the impact of the electromagnetic pulse on electric power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, B. W.; Barnes, P. R.

    A strong electromagnetic pulse (EMP) with an electric-field component on the order of tens of kilovolts per meter is produced by a nuclear detonation in or above the atmosphere. This paper presents an overview and a summary of the results to date of a program formulated to address the research and development of technologies and systems required to assess and reduce the impact of EMP on electric power systems. The technologies and systems being considered include simulation models, methods of assessment, definition of required experiments and data, development of protective hardware, and the creation or revision of operating and control procedures. Results to date include the development of relatively simple unclassified EMP environment models, the development of methods for extending EMP coupling models to the large transmission and distribution network associated with the electric power system, and the performance of a parametric study of HEMP induced surges using an appropriate EMP environment. An experiment to investigate the effect of corona on the coupling of EMP to conductors has been defined and has been performed in an EMP simulator. Experiments to determine the response of key components to simulated EMP surges and an investigation of the impact of steep-front, short-duration impulse on a selected number of the insulation systems used in electric power systems apparatus are being performed.

  20. Effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on synchronous stability of the electric power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manweiler, R.W.

    1975-11-01

    The effects of a nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the synchronous stability of the electric power transmission and distribution systems are evaluated. The various modes of coupling of EMP to the power system are briefly discussed, with particular emphasis on those perturbations affecting the synchronous stability of the transmission system. A brief review of the fundamental concepts of the stability problem is given, with a discussion of the general characteristics of transient analysis. A model is developed to represent single sets as well as repetitive sets of multiple faults on the distribution systems, as might be produced by EMP. The results of many numerical stability calculations are presented to illustrate the transmission system's response from different types of perturbations. The important parameters of both multiple and repetitive faults are studied, including the dependence of the response on the size of the perturbed area, the fault density, and the effective impedance between the fault location and the transmission system. Both major load reduction and the effect of the opening of tie lines at the time of perturbation are also studied. We conclude that there is a high probability that EMP can induce perturbations on the distribution networks causing a large portion of the transmission network in the perturbed area to lose synchronism. The result would be an immediate and massive power failure

  1. Power harvesting by electromagnetic coupling from wind-induced limit cycle oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalero, G.; Olivieri, S.; Mazzino, A.; Boragno, C.

    2017-09-01

    Recent developments of low-power microprocessors open to new applications such as wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the consequent problem of autonomous powering. For this purpose, a possible strategy is represented by energy harvesting from wind or other flows exploiting fluid-structure interactions. In this work, we present an updated picture of a flutter-based device characterized by fully passive dynamics and a simple constructive layout, where limit cycle oscillations are undergone by an elastically bounded wing. In this case, the conversion from mechanical to electrical energy is performed by means of an electromagnetic coupling between a pair of coils and magnets. A centimetric-size prototype is shown to harvest energy from low wind velocities (between 2 and 4 m s-1), reaching a power peak of 14 mW, representing a valuable amount for applications related to WSN. A mathematical description of the nonlinear dynamics is then provided by a quasi-steady phenomenological model, revealing satisfactory agreement with the experimental framework within a certain parametric range and representing a useful tool for future optimizations.

  2. Energy Harvesting from the Stray Electromagnetic Field around the Electrical Power Cable for Smart Grid Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farid Ullah

    For wireless sensor node (WSN) applications, this paper presents the harvesting of energy from the stray electromagnetic field around an electrical power line. Inductive and capacitive types of electrodynamic energy harvesters are developed and reported. For the produced energy harvesters, solid core and split-core designs are adopted. The inductive energy harvester comprises a copper wound coil which is produced on a mild steel core. However, the capacitive prototypes comprise parallel, annular discs separated by Teflon spacers. Moreover, for the inductive energy harvesters' wound coil and core, the parametric analysis is also performed. A Teflon housing is incorporated to protect the energy harvester prototypes from the harsh environmental conditions. Among the inductive energy harvesters, prototype-5 has performed better than the other harvesters and produces a maximum rms voltage of 908 mV at the current level of 155 A in the power line. However, at the same current flow, the capacitive energy harvesters produce a maximum rms voltage of 180 mV. The alternating output of the prototype-5 is rectified, and a super capacitor (1 F, 5.5 V) and rechargeable battery (Nickel-Cadmium, 3.8 V) are charged with it. Moreover, with the utilization of a prototype-5, a self-powered wireless temperature sensing and monitoring system for an electrical transformer is also developed and successfully implemented.

  3. Management of Radioactive Waste after a Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, Per; Laurent, Gerard; Rindo, Hiroshi; Georges, Christine; Ito, Eiichiro; Yamada, Norikazu; Iablokov, Iuri; Kilochytska, Tatiana; Jefferies, Nick; Byrne, Jim; Siemann, Michael; Koganeya, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Hiroomi

    2016-01-01

    experience on waste conditioning, reduction and decontamination, and Chapter 8 provides information on the destination of radioactive waste storage and disposal

  4. Management of radioactive wastes at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Design data and operating experience with waste management systems at nuclear power stations in Canada, France, the United Kingdom and the United States of America are described. Although the specific designs and operating practices vary between nations, the underlying philosophies are essentially identical, being based on the protection principles of ICRP. The operating experience with different waste management systems has been excellent in maintaining the radiation exposures in the environment well below the accepted dose standards.

  5. Survey and analysis on environmental and electromagnetic effect on instrumentation and control equipment of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In Koo; Lee, Dong Young; Cha, Kyung Ho

    2001-03-01

    As the instrumentation and control (I and C) equipment suppliers tend to provide digital components rather than conventional analog type components for instrumentation and control systems of nuclear power plants(NPPs), it is unavoidable to adopt digital equipment for safety I and C systems as well as non-safety systems. However, the full introduction of digital equipment for I and C systems of nuclear power plants raises several concerns which have not been considered in conventional analog I and C equipment. The two major examples of the issues of digital systems are environmental/electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and software reliability. This report presents the survey and research results on environmental and electromagnetic effect on I and C equipment of nuclear power plants to give a guideline for aging management and design process. Electromagnetic site surveys were conducted to be used as a part of technical basis to demonstrate that I and C systems are compatible with the ambient electromagnetic noise in Korean nuclear power plants.

  6. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Kyne

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives.

  7. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyne, Dean; Bolin, Bob

    2016-07-12

    Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP) reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives.

  8. Management of abnormal radioactive wastes at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    As with any other industrial activity, a certain level of risk is associated with the operation of nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities. That is, on occasions nuclear power plants or nuclear facilities may operate under conditions which were not specifically anticipated during the design and construction of the plant. These abnormal conditions and situations may cause the production of abnormal waste, which can differ in character or quantity from waste produced during normal routine operation of nuclear facilities. Abnormal waste can also occur during decontamination programmes, replacement of a reactor component, de-sludging of storage ponds, etc. The management of such kinds of waste involves the need to evaluate existing waste management systems in order to determine how abnormal wastes should best be handled and processed. There are no known publications on this subject, and the IAEA believes that the development and exchange of such information among its Member States would be useful for specialists working in the waste management area. The main objective of this report is to review existing waste management practices which can be applied to abnormal waste and provide assistance in the selection of appropriate technologies and processes that can be used when abnormal situations occur. Naturally, the subject of abnormal waste is complex and this report can only be considered as a guide for the management of abnormal waste. Refs, figs and tabs.

  9. Natural radioactivity around the coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, J.; Bajlo, M.

    1996-01-01

    By far the greatest part of the radiation received by the worlds population comes from natural sources, in some situations the exposure to natural radiation sources is enhanced as a result of technological developments. Burning of coal is one source of enhanced radiation exposure to naturally occurring elements, particularly radium, thorium and uranium. Extensive investigations have been performed in the coal-fired power plant (CFPP) Plomin in Croatia, using an anthracite coal with a higher than usual uranium content and normal thorium content. A network of TL dosimeters (TLD), working levels (WL) measurements, air pollution monitoring and monitoring of waste pile were organized. Some of the measurements have been repeated, and the results have shown decreased contamination. (author)

  10. Low-level radioactive waste processing at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This survey was limited to systems and materials used to process waste liquids contaminated with radionuclides. Since the chemical and radiological character of collected liquids may change dramatically, the survey describes waste and cleanup process streams encountered during normal outage or power production conditions. Influents containing specific organic compounds, salts, or solids common to local sources, and the special techniques developed to remove or concentrate these materials are not detailed in this report. The names and phone numbers of the individuals responsible for investigating and solving these problems, however, provides easy access to data which will save time and expense when facing abnormal processing, purchasing, or engineering challenges. The Liquid Radwaste Source Book contains information collected from 31 of 36 BWR's as well as contact information from all licensed commercial units. Since some sites share common radwaste processing facilities, not all units are represented by individual data sheets

  11. Solid radioactive waste management in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Laixi; He Wenxin; Chen Degan

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces the solid radwaste management system, treatment methods and its continuous improvement during the past 9 years in Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS). GNPS has paid great attention and made a lot of efforts to implement the principle of waste minimization with source control, improvement of treatment process and strict management, so the output of solid radwastes has annually decreased since 1994. In 2002, the output of solid radwastes in GNPS was 63.5 m 3 , only 50% of 1995 (127 m 3 ), reached the advanced level as the same type NPPs in France. During the period 1994-2002, the accumulated production of solid radwaste Packages in GNPS is 1563.51 m 3 only 18% of the design value; all the packages meet the standard and requirement for safe disposal. Besides, this paper analyzes some new technical processes and presents some proposals for further decreasing the solid radwaste production

  12. Analysis in environmental radioactivity around Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Woo; Han, Man Jung; Cho, Seong Won; Cho, Hong Jun; Oh, Hyeon Kyun; Lee, Jeong Min; Chang, Jae Sook [KORTIC, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Twelve kinds of environmental samples such as soil, seawater, underground water, etc. around Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs) were collected. Tritium chemical analysis was tried for the samples of rain water, pine-needle, air, seawater, underground water, chinese cabbage, again of rice and milk sampled around NPPs, and surface seawater and rain water sampled over the country. Strontium in the soil that were sampled at 60 point of district in Korea were analyzed. Tritium were analyzed in 21 samples of surface seawater around the Korea peninsular that were supplied form KFRDI(National Fisheries Research and Development Institute). Sampling and chemical analysis environmental samples around Kori, Woolsung, Youngkwang, Wooljin NPPs and Taeduk science town for tritium and strontium analysis was managed according to plans. Succeed to KINS after all samples were tried.

  13. Macroscopic electromagnetic properties of the Irvine Field-Reversed Configuration: Equilibrium, power balance and fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, Erik Harold

    The plasma parameters and characteristics of the Irvine Field-Reversed Configuration (IFRC) are summarized in this thesis. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of the different diagnostics used to make measurements in the experiment, as well as the measurements themselves. Whenever possible, actual measurements are used in lieu of theoretical or analytical fits to data. Analysis of magnetic probes (B-dots) comprises the bulk of what is known about the IFRC. From these B-dot probes, the magnetic field structure in a two dimensional plane at constant toroidal position has been determined, and has been found to be consistent with a field-reversed configuration. Peak reversed fields of approximately 250 Gauss have been observed. Further analyses have been developed to extract information from the magnetic field structure, including components of the electric field, the current density, and plasma pressure in the same two dimensional plane. Electric field magnitudes reach 600 V/m, concurrent with current densities greater than 105 Amps/m2 and thermal pressures over 200 Pa. Spectroscopic analysis of hydrogen lines has been done to make estimates of the electron temperature, while spectroscopic measurements of the Doppler broadening of the Halpha line31 have allowed an estimate of the ion temperature. Particle losses out one axial end plane measured by an array of Faraday cups quantify the how well the configuration traps particles. Spectral information derived from B-dot probes indicates that there is substantial power present at frequencies lying between the hydrogen cyclotron and mean gyrofrequency. These various measurements are used to find the following parameters that characterize the Irvine FRC: (1) Electromagnetic and thermal stored energies as functions of time. (2) Power balance, including input power from the field coils, resistive heating, power lost by particle transport and radiation, and particle and energy confinement times. (3) Strong

  14. Radioactive waste management at Narora atomic power station in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.N.; Gupta, J.P.; Mittal, S.

    2001-01-01

    Modern society creates waste material, which have to be disposed of in nature without disturbing the ecological equilibrium. Hence effective waste management in all industries is a major concern today. Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) generates low and intermediate level liquid, solid and gaseous wastes during its operation and maintenance. The generation of wastes is controlled at the source itself. The wastes are managed by adequate and appropriate treatment before being released into the environment. Different types of liquid wastes are treated by chemical co-precipitation, ion exchange, evaporation, filtration, and dilution techniques. For handling and conditioning of solid wastes, volume reduction techniques such as incineration and baling are employed. The treated wastes are immobilised by incorporation into cement and polymer matrices. Gaseous waste is cleaned by passing through pre-filters and high efficiency particulate (HEPA) filters and diluted with inactive air prior to release to the atmosphere through a 145 m high stack to get further atmospheric dilution. Regular monitoring up to 30 km radius is carried out by fully equipped Environmental Survey and Micrometeorological Laboratory which functions independently under the Directorate of Health and Safety, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai. So far, the annual maximum dose to the public around NAPS is reported to be 0.2 to 0.3% of limit of 1 mSv/year recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). A decade of experience has proved that present practices of nuclear waste management at Narora Atomic Power Station are quite safe and effective with respect to ecological equilibrium. (author)

  15. Development of prediction models for radioactive caesium distribution within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinase, Sakae; Sato, Satoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary prediction models have been studied for the radioactive caesium distribution within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The models were represented by exponential functions using ecological half-life of radioactive caesium in the environment. The ecological half-lives were derived from the changes in ambient dose equivalent rates through vehicle-borne surveys. It was found that the ecological half-lives of radioactive caesium were not constant within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The ecological half-life of radioactive caesium in forest areas was found to be much larger than that in urban and water areas. (authors)

  16. Powering-up Wireless Sensor Nodes Utilizing Rechargeable Batteries and an Electromagnetic Vibration Energy Harvesting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salar Chamanian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a wireless sensor node (WSN system where an electromagnetic (EM energy harvester is utilized for charging its rechargeable batteries while the system is operational. The capability and the performance of an in-house low-frequency EM energy harvester for charging rechargeable NiMH batteries were experimentally verified in comparison to a regular battery charger. Furthermore, the power consumption of MicaZ motes, used as the WSN, was evaluated in detail for different operation conditions. The battery voltage and current were experimentally monitored during the operation of the MicaZ sensor node equipped with the EM vibration energy harvester. A compact (24.5 cm3 in-house EM energy harvester provides approximately 65 µA charging current to the batteries when excited by 0.4 g acceleration at 7.4 Hz. It has been shown that the current demand of the MicaZ mote can be compensated for by the energy harvester for a specific low-power operation scenario, with more than a 10-fold increase in the battery lifetime. The presented results demonstrate the autonomous operation of the WSN, with the utilization of a vibration-based energy harvester.

  17. Novel Frequency Swapping Technique for Conducted Electromagnetic Interference Suppression in Power Converter Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tse Kuo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quasi-resonant flyback (QRF converters have been widely applied as the main circuit topology in power converters because of their low cost and high efficiency. Conventional QRF converters tend to generate higher average conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI in the low-frequency domain due to the switching noise generated by power switches, resulting in the fact they can exceed the EMI standards of the European Standard 55022 Class-B emission requirements. The presented paper develops a novel frequency swapping control method that spreads spectral energy to reduce the amplitude of sub-harmonics, thereby lowering average conducted EMI in the low-frequency domain. The proposed method is implemented in a control chip, which requires no extra circuit components and adds zero cost. The proposed control method is verified using a 24 W QRF converter. Experimental results reveals that conducted EMI has been reduced by approximately 13.24 dBμV at 498 kHz compared with a control method without the novel frequency swapping technique. Thus, the proposed method can effectively improve the flyback system to easily meet the CISPR 22/EN55022 standards.

  18. Future-proof radioactive waste treatment technologies for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettner, Klaus; Braehler, Georg [NUKEM Technologies Engineering Services GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    In order to select the optimal treatment method for radioactive waste three options can be considered. First, to treat the radioactive waste only to allow long term interim storage until the waste acceptance criteria are defined and the disposal sites are operable. Second, to select treatment methods just in compliance with the current state of discussion with the regard to the above. Third, taking also the future development in the field of waste acceptance criteria and disposal into account. When developing waste treatment systems for Nuclear Power Plants NUKEM Technologies follows the following targets, minimisation of the amount of radioactive waste, maximisation of free release material, volume reduction, avoidance of unwanted materials in the waste package, as well as efficient waste treatment solutions (low investment, high volume reduction). With its technologies produced waste packages fulfil the most stringent waste acceptance criteria.

  19. Development of radioactive waste treatment system for nuclear power stations by Toshiba (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, H.; Takahara, T.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuura, H.; Yasumura, K.; Nakayama, Y.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a solidification process with thermosetting resin to satisfy both requirements of volume reduction and quality of solidified products. Volumes of solidified products in drums generated from spent resins and concentrated wastes were reduced respectively to 1/4 and less than 1/6 of those in the conventional cement solidification process. In plants using a simple demineralizing system for condensate polishing, a large amount of waste water with regenerant chemicals is generated from the condensate demineralizer. In general, radioactivity concentration of wastes from this type of nuclear power plant is comparatively high, so the dose rate at the surface of drums containing solidified wastes exceeds 200mR/h. A pelletizing system for radioactive wastes was developed to reduce their volumes and allow their interim storage until the radioactivity decays down to a level at which they can be handled easily

  20. Estimation of radioactive effluents concentrations in the vicinity of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsov, Lj.

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of mathematical prediction of radioactive effluent concentrations around nuclear power plants. This mathematical model which describes the behaviour of the effluent in the atmosphere here in after is expanded and adapted for radioactive effluent treatment. In this way the mathematical model includes the description of the following effects: the rise of plume caused by its vertical momentum and its heat content, wind velocity profile and vertical growth of the coefficient of diffusion, fallout under gravity, ground deposition, precipitation scavenging, and radioactive decay. The advanced computer program DIFFUS has been applied to evaluate the ground concentration of the nuclides of I, which constitute the greatest risk for population.(author)

  1. Hazards from radioactivity of fly ash of Greek coal power plants (CPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, C.; Charalambous, S.

    1980-01-01

    Fly ash and fine dispersion releases from coal combustion in Greek coal power plants were studied. Concentrations in the fly ash up to 20 pCi/g and 10 pCi/g were measured for 238 U and 226 Ra respectively (not in secular equilibrium). Risk from the fly ash derives from its escape in particulate form or fine dispersion and from its use as a substitute for cement in concrete. The new data indicate that coal power plants discharge relatively larger quantities of radioactive material into the atmosphere than nuclear power plants of comparable size, during normal operation. (H.K.)

  2. Electromagnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosanac, Slobodan Danko

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to theoretical methods used in the extreme circumstances of very strong electromagnetic fields. The development of high power lasers, ultrafast processes, manipulation of electromagnetic fields and the use of very fast charged particles interacting with other charges requires an adequate theoretical description. Because of the very strong electromagnetic field, traditional theoretical approaches, which have primarily a perturbative character, have to be replaced by descriptions going beyond them. In the book an extension of the semi-classical radiation theory and classical dynamics for particles is performed to analyze single charged atoms and dipoles submitted to electromagnetic pulses. Special attention is given to the important problem of field reaction and controlling dynamics of charges by an electromagnetic field.

  3. Radioactive waste management at nuclear electric power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordelier, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    After suitable treatment, gaseous and liquid wastes are routinely discharged from Nuclear Electric's stations and are diluted and dispersed in the environment. The discharges are controlled and authorized under UK legislation and the environmental impact is minimal. Most solid wastes were originally accumulated at the site of origin, but since 1978 low level wastes (LLW) have been send to the UK's main disposal site at Drigg. Recent changes at Drigg have resulted in changed arrangements for the transport and disposal of low-level wastes, including volume reduction by supercompaction. Small amounts of intermediate-level waste (ILW) have been conditioned and disposed of in the sea but this route is now effectively closed and there is currently no disposal route for ILW in the UK. Spent ion exchange resins at one power station have been conditioned and are stored pending the availability of a disposal route. Most ILW will continue to be stored in retrievable form on the site of origin until a mobile waste treatment plant can be brought into use. The timing of this will be subject to agreement with the regulators. In the case of Magnox fuel element debris, a demonstration dissolution plant has been constructed and this will significantly reduce the volume of waste being stored while retaining the bulk of the activity on site for later treatment. A further development has been the construction of a new facility which will hold Magnox fuel element debris in 500 liter drums

  4. Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Parallel Wireless Power Transfer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Huang, Xueliang

    2017-02-08

    The scenario of multiple wireless power transfer (WPT) systems working closely, synchronously or asynchronously with phase difference often occurs in power supply for household appliances and electric vehicles in parking lots. Magnetic field leakage from the WPT systems is also varied due to unpredictable asynchronous working conditions. In this study, the magnetic field leakage from parallel WPT systems working with phase difference is predicted, and the induced electric field and specific absorption rate (SAR) in a human body standing in the vicinity are also evaluated. Computational results are compared with the restrictions prescribed in the regulations established to limit human exposure to time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMFs). The results show that the middle region between the two WPT coils is safer for the two WPT systems working in-phase, and the peripheral regions are safer around the WPT systems working anti-phase. Thin metallic plates larger than the WPT coils can shield the magnetic field leakage well, while smaller ones may worsen the situation. The orientation of the human body will influence the maximum magnitude of induced electric field and its distribution within the human body. The induced electric field centralizes in the trunk, groin, and genitals with only one exception: when the human body is standing right at the middle of the two WPT coils working in-phase, the induced electric field focuses on lower limbs. The SAR value in the lungs always seems to be greater than in other organs, while the value in the liver is minimal. Human exposure to EMFs meets the guidelines of the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), specifically reference levels with respect to magnetic field and basic restrictions on induced electric fields and SAR, as the charging power is lower than 3.1 kW and 55.5 kW, respectively. These results are positive with respect to the safe applications of parallel WPT systems working

  5. Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Parallel Wireless Power Transfer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Huang, Xueliang

    2017-01-01

    The scenario of multiple wireless power transfer (WPT) systems working closely, synchronously or asynchronously with phase difference often occurs in power supply for household appliances and electric vehicles in parking lots. Magnetic field leakage from the WPT systems is also varied due to unpredictable asynchronous working conditions. In this study, the magnetic field leakage from parallel WPT systems working with phase difference is predicted, and the induced electric field and specific absorption rate (SAR) in a human body standing in the vicinity are also evaluated. Computational results are compared with the restrictions prescribed in the regulations established to limit human exposure to time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMFs). The results show that the middle region between the two WPT coils is safer for the two WPT systems working in-phase, and the peripheral regions are safer around the WPT systems working anti-phase. Thin metallic plates larger than the WPT coils can shield the magnetic field leakage well, while smaller ones may worsen the situation. The orientation of the human body will influence the maximum magnitude of induced electric field and its distribution within the human body. The induced electric field centralizes in the trunk, groin, and genitals with only one exception: when the human body is standing right at the middle of the two WPT coils working in-phase, the induced electric field focuses on lower limbs. The SAR value in the lungs always seems to be greater than in other organs, while the value in the liver is minimal. Human exposure to EMFs meets the guidelines of the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), specifically reference levels with respect to magnetic field and basic restrictions on induced electric fields and SAR, as the charging power is lower than 3.1 kW and 55.5 kW, respectively. These results are positive with respect to the safe applications of parallel WPT systems working

  6. Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Parallel Wireless Power Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The scenario of multiple wireless power transfer (WPT systems working closely, synchronously or asynchronously with phase difference often occurs in power supply for household appliances and electric vehicles in parking lots. Magnetic field leakage from the WPT systems is also varied due to unpredictable asynchronous working conditions. In this study, the magnetic field leakage from parallel WPT systems working with phase difference is predicted, and the induced electric field and specific absorption rate (SAR in a human body standing in the vicinity are also evaluated. Computational results are compared with the restrictions prescribed in the regulations established to limit human exposure to time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMFs. The results show that the middle region between the two WPT coils is safer for the two WPT systems working in-phase, and the peripheral regions are safer around the WPT systems working anti-phase. Thin metallic plates larger than the WPT coils can shield the magnetic field leakage well, while smaller ones may worsen the situation. The orientation of the human body will influence the maximum magnitude of induced electric field and its distribution within the human body. The induced electric field centralizes in the trunk, groin, and genitals with only one exception: when the human body is standing right at the middle of the two WPT coils working in-phase, the induced electric field focuses on lower limbs. The SAR value in the lungs always seems to be greater than in other organs, while the value in the liver is minimal. Human exposure to EMFs meets the guidelines of the International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP, specifically reference levels with respect to magnetic field and basic restrictions on induced electric fields and SAR, as the charging power is lower than 3.1 kW and 55.5 kW, respectively. These results are positive with respect to the safe applications of parallel WPT systems

  7. Radioactive waste disposal by nuclear power plants in the light of operational economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, H.; Schmidt, D.

    1984-01-01

    The expansion of power generation on the basis of nuclear energy in the Federal Republic of Germany calls for answers also to the questions arising at the level of operating efficiency from the radioactive waste disposal requirements necessarily associated with the operation of nuclear power plants. As these are measures of very long-term consequences and which are, for the greater part, only-coming up in future, not only the effects to be expected on the balance of trade and taxbalance, but also the influence on price calculation will be of paramount importance for public utilities. Moreover, because of the continually increasing financial reserves for radioactive waste disposal the financing aspects are gaining added weight; reliance on foreign capital, anyhow specific to that sector of industry, is much aggravated. (orig.) [de

  8. Removing radio-active wastes from nuclear power stations by the STEAG system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baatz, H.

    1978-01-01

    The mobile STEAG System for conditioning radio-active wastes from nuclear power stations represents a particularly safe and economic method of removing them in present day conditions. Cementation by the FAFNIR System is used for the greater part of the waste, the liquid concentrate (evaporator concentrate and filter slurry). For the special case of the medium active resin balls from the primary circuits, embedding in plastic by the FAMA process has proved to be the only available successful process so far. The highly active solid waste from the reactor core is decomposed by the MOSAIK System, is packed in transportable and storable containers and is removed from the fuel element storage pond. The systems are so safe that faults or interruptions of power station operation due to faults in removing radio-active wastes can be excluded. (orig.) [de

  9. Emission of CO2 Gas and Radioactive Pollutant from Coal Fired Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, N.Finahari; Djati-HS; Heni-Susiati

    2006-01-01

    Energy utilization for power plant in Indonesia is still depending on burning fossil fuel such as coal, oil and gaseous fuel. The direct burning of coal produces CO 2 gas that can cause air pollution, and radioactive pollutant that can increase natural radioactive dosage. Natural radionuclide contained in coal is in the form of kalium, uranium, thorium and their decay products. The amount of CO 2 gas emission produced by coal fired power plant can be reduced by equipping the plant with waste-gas treatment facility. At this facility, CO 2 gas is reacted with calcium hydroxide producing calcium carbonate. Calcium carbonate then can be used as basic material in food, pharmaceutical and construction industries. The alternative method to reduce impact of air pollution is by replacing coal fuel with nuclear fuel or new and renewable fuel. (author)

  10. China's current status and long-term outlook of nuclear power and radioactive waste disposal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhidong

    2015-01-01

    This study identified the current status and long-term outlook of China's nuclear power development and radioactive waste disposal management after the 3.11 FUKUSHIMA accidents. China strengthened the actions for achieving nuclear power safety and cost efficiency as well as safety management of radioactive waste. It is a hard work to expand the capacity to 58 GW, the governmental target in 2020. The long-term development will strongly depend on the progress in safety management of nuclear power and radioactive waste and economic competitiveness. (author)

  11. Analysis of adaptability of radioactive liquid effluent discharge under normal condition of inland nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yueping; Zhang Bing; Chen Yang; Zhu Lingqing; Tao Yunliang; Shangguan Zhihong

    2011-01-01

    The discharge of radioactive liquid effluent from inland nuclear power plant under normal operation is an important part to be considered in environmental impact assessment. Requirements of newly revised and upcoming standards GB 6249 and GB 14587 are introduced in this paper. Through an example of an inland NPP siting in the preliminary feasibility study phase, the adaptability to the relevant regulations in the site selection is analyzed. Also, the concerned problems in the design of AP1000 units are addressed. (authors)

  12. Electromagnetic and thermal analysis of distributed cooled high power millimeter wave windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, S.D.; Reitter, T.; Caplan, M.; Moeller, C.

    1996-01-01

    The sectional high-frequency internally-cooled window, as proposed by General Atomics(1), has unique potential for allowing microwave sources to reach multi-megawatt CW levels with application to ECRH. Designs are being investigated using computational electromagnetic (EM), thermal, and mechanical codes at 110 GHz and 170 GHz to examine the design tradeoffs between RF performance and thermal mechanical safety margins. The EM analyses are for the window, under vacuum at one MW and includes variations in the shapes of the cooling fins, the surface treatment of the window elements themselves, the cooling fin tip treatment, the window pitch angle, and the waveguide effects. One advantage of the distributed cooled window is it close-quote s extensibility to higher power levels. Results in the modeling efforts are presented showing the EM field concentrations (which then will feed into the thermal analysis), the energy scattering/reflection, the transmitted launch angle variation as a function of physical geometry, and the spatial energy distribution and loss as a function of time and position. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. Frequency electromagnetic sounding with industrial power lines on Karelia-Kola geotraverse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Н. Шевцов

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes theory, method and first experimental results of research on the interaction between electromagnetic waves of extremely low and ultra low frequency (0.1-200 Hz, the Earth crust and ionosphere in the field of two mutually orthogonal industrial power lines, 109 and 120 km long, in the course of FENICS experiment (Fennoscandian Electrical conductivity from Natural and Induction Control Source soundings. The main focus was on the observation results along the line of Karelia-Kola geotraverse over a distance of 700 km from the source. High horizontal homogeneity of geoelectrical lithosphere section has been detected in the eastern part of the Baltic shield at depth range from 10-15 to 50-70 km. Parameters of «regular» lithosphere section have been specified to the depth of 60-70 km. As a result of inverse problem solution for the western part of Karelia and Central Finland, a zone of decreased transverse resistivity has been detected at the depth of 50-60 km, corresponding to the area, detected by seismic methods, where Moho boundary reaches the same depth.

  14. Generating high-power short terahertz electromagnetic pulses with a multifoil radiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokurov, Nikolay A; Jeong, Young Uk

    2013-02-08

    We describe a multifoil cone radiator capable of generating high-field short terahertz pulses using short electron bunches. Round flat conducting foil plates with successively decreasing radii are stacked, forming a truncated cone with the z axis. The gaps between the foil plates are equal and filled with some dielectric (or vacuum). A short relativistic electron bunch propagates along the z axis. At sufficiently high particle energy, the energy losses and multiple scattering do not change the bunch shape significantly. When passing by each gap between the foil plates, the electron bunch emits some energy into the gap. Then, the radiation pulses propagate radially outward. For transverse electromagnetic waves with a longitudinal (along the z axis) electric field and an azimuthal magnetic field, there is no dispersion in these radial lines; therefore, the radiation pulses conserve their shapes (time dependence). At the outer surface of the cone, we have synchronous circular radiators. Their radiation field forms a conical wave. Ultrashort terahertz pulses with gigawatt-level peak power can be generated with this device.

  15. Monitoring the radioactivity in the secondary systems of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labno, L.

    1979-01-01

    The direct water/steam circuit and the waste water and exhaust air systems of a nuclear power plant with boiling water reactor are slightly contaminated with radioactive nuclides during normal operation. In addition some auxiliary and subsidiary systems may show evidence of radioactivity as a result of leakages between the systems. These radioactive substances and those which are discharged to the environment in exhaust air or waste water - although present in quantities far below the admissible limits - still require supervision by a comprehensive activity monitoring system. The article sets out the concept and the technical solution adopted for the activity monitoring system for the secondary section of a nuclear power station. The system is so designed that it provides the information and performs the safety functions important for highly reliable plant operation. Particular importance has been attached to the reliability and dependability of the system, so that incorrect interpretations or reports, such as have been experienced, for example, in the nuclear power plants 'Brunsbuettel' (Federal Republic of Germany) and 'Three Mile Island', near Harrisburg (USA), will not be repeated. (Auth.)

  16. Radioactivity level of soil around Baqiao coal-fired power plant in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xinwei; Zhao, Caifeng; Chen, Cancan; Liu, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Natural radioactivity level of soil around Baqiao coal-fired power plant in China was determined using gamma ray spectrometry. The concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in the studied soil samples range from 27.6 to 48.8, 44.4 to 61.4 and 640.2 to 992.2 Bq kg −1 with an average of 36.1, 51.1 and 733.9 Bq kg −1 , respectively, which are slightly higher than the average values of Shaanxi soil. The radium equivalent activity, the air absorbed dose rate and the annual effective dose rate were calculated and compared with the internationally reported or reference values. The radium equivalent activities of the studied samples are below the internationally accepted values. The air absorbed dose rate and the annual effective dose rate received by the local residents due to the natural radionuclides in soil are slightly higher than the mean value of Xi'an and worldwide. - Highlights: ► Natural radioactivity in soil around the coal-fired power plant was determined. ► Radiological parameters were used to assess radiation hazard. ► The coal-fired power plant has affected the local radioactivity level.

  17. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an radioactive waste processing of graphite from graphite moderated nuclear reactors at its decommissioning is discussed. Methods of processing of irradiated graphite are presented. It can be concluded that advanced methods for graphite radioactive waste handling are available nowadays. Implementation of these methods will allow to enhance environmental safety of nuclear power that will benefit its progress in the future

  18. Broadband electromagnetic power harvester from vibrations via frequency conversion by impact oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuksek, N. S.; Almasri, M.; Feng, Z. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an electromagnetic power harvester that uses a transformative multi-impact approach to achieve a wide bandwidth response from low frequency vibration sources through frequency-up conversion. The device consists of a pick-up coil, fixed at the free edge of a cantilever beam with high resonant frequency, and two cantilever beams with low excitation frequencies, each with an impact mass attached at its free edge. One of the two cantilevers is designed to resonate at 25 Hz, while the other resonates at 50 Hz within the range of ambient vibration frequency. When the device is subjected to a low frequency vibration, the two low-frequency cantilevers responded by vibrating at low frequencies, and thus their thick metallic masses made impacts with the high resonance frequency cantilever repeatedly at two locations. This has caused it along with the pick-up coil to oscillate, relative to the permanent magnet, with decaying amplitude at its resonance frequency, and results in a wide bandwidth response from 10 to 63 Hz at 2 g. A wide bandwidth response between 10–51 Hz and 10–58 Hz at acceleration values of 0.5 g and 2 g, respectively, were achieved by adjusting the impact cantilever frequencies closer to each other (25 Hz and 45 Hz). A maximum output power of 85 μW was achieved at 5 g at 30 Hz across a load resistor, 2.68 Ω.

  19. Total gamma activity measurements for determining the radioactivity of residual materials from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auler, I.; Meyer, M.; Stickelmann, J.

    1995-01-01

    Large amounts of residual materials from retrofitting measures and from decommissioning of nuclear power stations shows such a weak level of radioactivity that they could be released after decision measurements. Expenses incurred with complex geometry cannot be taken with common methods. NIS developed a Release Measurement Facility (RMF) based on total gamma activity measurements especially for these kind of residual materials. The RMF has been applied for decision measurements in different nuclear power plants. Altogether about 2,000 Mg of various types of materials have been measured up to now. More than 90 % of these materials could be released 0 without any restriction after decision measurements

  20. Comment on 'On the long-range detection of radioactivity using electromagnetic radiation'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuks, I.M. E-mail: iosif.fuks@noaa.gov; Martynenko, S.I. E-mail: sergey.i.martynenko@univer.kharkov.ua

    2004-05-01

    The fact that the mesosphere is an electrically active element in the global atmospheric electric circuit provides a possible mechanism for troposphere-mesosphere-ionosphere coupling during releases of radioactive materials at the ground level, and this is discussed in this comment.

  1. Radioactive Cs in the estuary sediments near Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Shinya, E-mail: s-yamasaki@ied.tsukuba.ac.jp [Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences and Center for Research in Isotopes and Environmental Dynamics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Imoto, Junpei; Furuki, Genki; Ochiai, Asumi [Department of Chemistry, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Ohnuki, Toshihiko [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sueki, Keisuke [Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences and Center for Research in Isotopes and Environmental Dynamics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Nanba, Kenji [Department of Environmental Management, Faculty of Symbiotic System Science, Fukushima University, Kanayagawa 1, Fukushima, 960-1296 (Japan); Ewing, Rodney C. [Department of Geological Sciences and Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Utsunomiya, Satoshi [Department of Chemistry, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    The migration and dispersion of radioactive Cs (mainly {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs) are of critical concern in the area surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). Considerable uncertainty remains in understanding the properties and dynamics of radioactive Cs transport by surface water, particularly during rainfall-induced flood events to the ocean. Physical and chemical properties of unique estuary sediments, collected from the Kuma River, 4.0 km south of the FDNPP, were quantified in this study. These were deposited after storm events and now occur as dried platy sediments on beach sand. The platy sediments exhibit median particle sizes ranging from 28 to 32 μm. There is increasing radioactivity towards the bottom of the layers deposited; approximately 28 and 38 Bq g{sup −1} in the upper and lower layers, respectively. The difference in the radioactivity is attributed to a larger number of particles associated with radioactive Cs in the lower part of the section, suggesting that radioactive Cs in the suspended soils transported by surface water has decreased over time. Sequential chemical extractions showed that ~ 90% of {sup 137}Cs was strongly bound to the residual fraction in the estuary samples, whereas 60 ~ 80% of {sup 137}Cs was bound to clays in the six paddy soils. This high concentration in the residual fraction facilitates ease of transport of clay and silt size particles through the river system. Estuary sediments consist of particles < 100 μm. Radioactive Cs desorption experiments using the estuary samples in artificial seawater revealed that 3.4 ± 0.6% of {sup 137}Cs was desorbed within 8 h. More than 96% of {sup 137}Cs remained strongly bound to clays. Hence, particle size is a key factor that determines the travel time and distance during the dispersion of {sup 137}Cs in the ocean. - Highlights: • Cs-137 of estuary sediment impacted by the FDNPP was measured. • Physical and chemical properties were measured also.

  2. Radioactive Cs in the estuary sediments near Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Imoto, Junpei; Furuki, Genki; Ochiai, Asumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Sueki, Keisuke; Nanba, Kenji; Ewing, Rodney C.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The migration and dispersion of radioactive Cs (mainly "1"3"4Cs and "1"3"7Cs) are of critical concern in the area surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). Considerable uncertainty remains in understanding the properties and dynamics of radioactive Cs transport by surface water, particularly during rainfall-induced flood events to the ocean. Physical and chemical properties of unique estuary sediments, collected from the Kuma River, 4.0 km south of the FDNPP, were quantified in this study. These were deposited after storm events and now occur as dried platy sediments on beach sand. The platy sediments exhibit median particle sizes ranging from 28 to 32 μm. There is increasing radioactivity towards the bottom of the layers deposited; approximately 28 and 38 Bq g"−"1 in the upper and lower layers, respectively. The difference in the radioactivity is attributed to a larger number of particles associated with radioactive Cs in the lower part of the section, suggesting that radioactive Cs in the suspended soils transported by surface water has decreased over time. Sequential chemical extractions showed that ~ 90% of "1"3"7Cs was strongly bound to the residual fraction in the estuary samples, whereas 60 ~ 80% of "1"3"7Cs was bound to clays in the six paddy soils. This high concentration in the residual fraction facilitates ease of transport of clay and silt size particles through the river system. Estuary sediments consist of particles < 100 μm. Radioactive Cs desorption experiments using the estuary samples in artificial seawater revealed that 3.4 ± 0.6% of "1"3"7Cs was desorbed within 8 h. More than 96% of "1"3"7Cs remained strongly bound to clays. Hence, particle size is a key factor that determines the travel time and distance during the dispersion of "1"3"7Cs in the ocean. - Highlights: • Cs-137 of estuary sediment impacted by the FDNPP was measured. • Physical and chemical properties were measured also. • Increasing radioactivity was

  3. Decontamination process applied to radioactive solid wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Milton B.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G.

    2009-01-01

    The process of decontamination is an important step in the economic operation of nuclear facilities. A large number of protective clothing, metallic parts and equipment get contaminated during the handling of radioactive materials in laboratory, plants and reactors. Safe and economic operation of these nuclear facilities will have a bearing on the extent to which these materials are reclaimed by the process of decontamination. The most common radioactive contaminants are fission products, corrosion products, uranium and thorium. The principles involved in decontamination are the same as those for an industrial cleaning process. However, the main difference is in the degree of cleaning required and at times special techniques have to be employed for removing even trace quantities of radioactive materials. This paper relate decontaminations experiences using acids and acids mixtures (HCl, HF, HNO 3 , KMnO 4 , C 2 H 2 O 4 , HBF 4 ) in several kinds of radioactive solid wastes from nuclear power plants. The result solutions were monitored by nuclear analytical techniques, in order to contribute for radiochemical characterization of these wastes. (author)

  4. Investigation of environmental radioactivity around the mooring port of the atomic power ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Yoshiro

    1977-01-01

    The environmental radio activity around the mooring port of the atomic power ship ''Mutsu'' has been investigated as the continuation of work in the last year. On the continuous measurements at the three monitoring posts in the port premises and at the three monitoring stations in Mutsu City, and on the measurements by monitoring cars and ships, no abnormality has been observed on the spatial radioactive dose-rate also in this year. No abnormality has also been detected on the radioactivity in sea water measured by the sea-water monitor. On the measurements of β-radioactivity of surface soil, river-bed soil, river water, drinking water and milk, there was no difference from that in the last year. The total β-radioactivity measurement by the low background 2 π gas flow counter and the nuclide analysis by the γ-spectrometer with a Ge (Li) semiconductor detector showed no abnormality. Although 137 Cs was detected in almost all samples, this isotope seemed to be the fallout from nuclear explosion experiments, and the activity was almost same as the values in various districts in Japan. (Kobatake, H.)

  5. Situation of the radioactive waste management and the employee radiation exposure in commercial power generation reactor facilities in fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    (1) Situation of the radioactive waste management in commercial power generating reactor facilities: The owners of power generation reactor facilities are obligated not to exceed the target dose around the sites by law in the radioactive waste management. The release of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes and the storage of radioactive solid wastes in respective reactor facilities in fiscal 1980 are presented in tables (for the former, the data since 1971 are also given). The release control values were satisfied in all the facilities. (2) Situation of employe radiation exposure in commercial power generating reactor facilities: The owners of power generation reactor facilities are obligated not to exceed the permissible exposure doses by law. The Employe exposure doses in respective reactor facilities in fiscal 1980 are given in tables. All exposure doses were below the permissible levels. (J.P.N.)

  6. Monitoring of radioactivity in the environs of Finnish nuclear power stations in 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilus, E.; Sjoeblom, K.L.; Aaltonen, H.; Klemola, S.; Arvela, H.

    1987-06-01

    Results of the environmental programmes monitoring radioactivity around the Finnish nuclear power stations in 1986 are reported. After the end of April the fallout nuclides from the Chernobyl accident predominated in all samples taken from the environs of the two power stations Loviisa and Olkiluoto. Radionuclides originating from the Finnish power stations were detected mainly in samples taken from the aquatic environment. The concentrations of the locally discharged nuclides were very low in comparison with the fallout nuclides and their impact on the radiation doses of the population was insignificant. Both nuclear power stations are situated in the main fallout area in Finland. The results of these large monitoring programmes give a good picture of the behaviour of the Chernobyl fallout in the specific areas in Finland

  7. Apparatus and method for depressurizing, degassing, and affording decay of the radioactivity of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.; Plotz, J.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an apparatus for depressurizing, degassing and affording decay of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants having a turbine and a main condenser turbine wherein exhaust steam of the turbine is condensed and forms a main condensate, and includes a collecting tank for the condensate situated below the condenser. A plurality of horizontal degassing channels, each having a lateral overflow, are disposed in the upper part of the condensate collecting tank and are filled with the main condensate up to the level of the overflow. At least one feedwater preheater which is heated by bleeder steam from the turbine provides a secondary condensate. Below the overflow height of the degassing channels extend horizontal feed pipes for the secondary condensate. The feed pipes are connected to the output of pressure relieving expanding devices and are provided on their underside with discharge openings for the bubbling of the secondary condensate into the main condensate to thereby degass the main condensate. The condensate collecting tank has mutually offset partitions therein providing an adequately long path for the decay of the main and secondary condensates. The condensate which is discharged from the condensate collecting tank is returned into the cycle as feedwater. Also disclosed is a method of operating the foregoing apparatus

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic Electromagnetic Pulse (MHD-EMP) Interaction with Power Transmission and Distribution Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tesche, F. M; Barnes, P. R; Meliopoulos, A. P

    1992-01-01

    .... This environment, known as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP , is a very slowly varying electric field induced in the earth's surface, similar to the field induced by a geomagnetic storm...

  9. The state of radioactive waste management and of personnel radiation exposure in nuclear power generating facilities in fiscal 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    (1) The state of radioactive waste management in nuclear power generating facilities: In the nuclear power stations, the released quantities of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes are all below the control objective levels. For the respective nuclear power stations, the released quantities of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes in fiscal 1983 and the objective levels are given in table. And, the quantities of solid wastes taken into storage and the cumulative amounts are given. For reference, the results each year since fiscal 1974 are shown. (2) The state of personnel radiation exposure in nuclear power generating facilities: In the nuclear power stations, the personnel radiation exposures are all below the permissible levels. The dose distribution etc. in the respective nuclear power stations are given in table. For reference, the results each year since fiscal 1974 are shown. (Mori, K.)

  10. Radioactive Waste Management In The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone - 25 Years Since The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures

  11. Engineering electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, David T; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    1973-01-01

    The applications involving electromagnetic fields are so pervasive that it is difficult to estimate their contribution to the industrial output: generation of electricity, power transmission lines, electric motors, actuators, relays, radio, TV and microwave transmission and reception, magnetic storage, and even the mundane little magnet used to hold a paper note on the refrigerator are all electromagnetic in nature. One would be hard pressed to find a device that works without relaying on any electromagnetic principle or effect. This text provides a good theoretical understanding of the electromagnetic field equations but also treats a large number of applications. In fact, no topic is presented unless it is directly applicable to engineering design or unless it is needed for the understanding of another topic. In electrostatics, for example, the text includes discussions of photocopying, ink-jet printing, electrostatic separation and deposition, sandpaper production, paint spraying, and powder coating. In ma...

  12. Overview of insoluble radioactive cesium particles emitted from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satou, Yukihiko

    2017-04-01

    In the early stage of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (F1NPS) accident, number of spot type contamination has been observed in computed autoradiography (Kashimura 2013, Shibata 2013, Satou 2014). It's means presence of radioactive particles, however, insoluble cesium particle was overlooked because cesium, which is dominant radioactive element in the accident, becomes ionized in the environment. Adachi et al. (2013) showed presence of cesium (Cs)-bearing particles within air dust sample collected at Tsukuba, 170 km south from the Fukushima site, in midnight of 14 to morning of 15 March 2011. These particles were micrometer order small particles and Cs was could be detectable as element using an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). However, other radioactive elements such as Co-60, Ru-103 and uranium, which were dominant element of radioactive particles delivered from Chernobyl accident, could not detected. Abe et al. (2014) employed a synchrotron radiation (SR)-micro(μ)-X-ray analysis to the Cs-bearing particles, and they were concluded that (1) contained elements derived from nuclear fission processes and from nuclear reactor and fuel materials; (2) were amorphous; (3) were highly oxidized; and (4) consisted of glassy spherules formed from a molten mixture of nuclear fuel and reactor material. In addition, Satou et al. (2016) and Yamaguchi et al. (2016) disclosed that silicate is main component of Cs-bearing particles. Satou et al. (2015) discovered two types of radioactive particles from soil samples collected in the vicinity of the F1NPS. These particles were remained in the natural environment more than four years, silicate is main component in common of each group particles. Group A particles were very similar to Cs-bearing particles reported by Adachi et al. except particle shape. On the other hand, group B is big particles found in north area from the F1NPS, and the strongest particles contained 20 kBq of Cs-137 within a particle

  13. A general advection-diffusion model for radioactive substance dispersion released from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buske, D.

    2011-01-01

    The present contribution focuses on the question of radioactive material dispersion after discharge from a nuclear power plant in the context of micro-meteorology, i.e. an atmospheric dispersion model. The advection-diffusion equation with Fickian closure for the turbulence is solved for the atmospheric boundary layer where the eddy diffusivity coefficients and the wind profile are assumed to be space dependent. The model is solved in closed form using integral transform and spectral theory. Convergence of the solution is discussed in terms of a convergence criterion using a new interpretation of the Cardinal Theorem of Interpolation theory and Parseval's theorem. The solution is compared to other methods and model adequacy is analyzed. Model validation is performed against experimental data from a controlled release of radioactive material at the Itaorna Beach (Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, 1985). (author)

  14. Report on radioactive discharges and environmental monitoring at nuclear power stations during 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, M.J.; Thomas, D.W.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents the details for 1991 of radioactive discharges and environmental monitoring at Nuclear Electric sites. In addition to the main section which summarises the discharges and monitoring at the Company's nuclear sites as a whole, appendices are presented covering the data in detail for individual sites. In each case the radiological impact on the general public has been estimated. Discharges generally were not substantially different from those of recent years. All radioactive effluent discharges from power stations were within authorised limits. Radiation doses to members of the public resulting from these discharges, and from direct radiation from the Stations, were in all cases less than the limit of 1 mSv per year which has been recommended by ICRP since 1985. (Author)

  15. The effects of lightning and high altitude electromagnetic pulse on power distribution lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uman, M.A.; Rubinstein, M.; Yacoub, Z. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-01-01

    We simultaneously recorded the voltages induced by lightning on both ends of an unenergized 448-meter long unenergized electric power line and the lightning vertical electric and horizontal magnetic fields at ground level near the line. The lightning data studied and presented here were due both to cloud lightning and to very close (about 20 m from the line) artificially initiated lightning. For cloud sources, a frequency-domain computer program called EMPLIN was used to calculate induced line voltages as a function of source elevation, angle of incidence, and wave polarization of the radiated cloud discharge pulses in order to compare with the measurements. For very-close lightning, the measured line voltages could be grouped into two categories, those in which multiple, similarly shaped, evenly spaced pulses were observed, which we call oscillatory, and those dominated by a principal pulse with subsidiary oscillations of much smaller amplitude, which we call impulsive. The amplitude of the induced voltage ranged from tens of kilovolts for oscillatory voltages to hundreds of kilovolts for impulsive voltages. A new technique is derived for the calculation of the electromagnetic fields from nearby lightning to ground above an imperfectly conducting ground. This technique was used in conjunction with an existing time domain coupling theory and lightning return stroke model to calculate voltages at either end of the line. The results show fair agreement with the measured oscillatory voltage waveforms if corona is ignored and improved results when corona effects are modeled. The modeling of the impulsive voltage, for which local flashover probably successful. In an attempt to understand better the sources of the line voltages for very close lightning, measurements of the horizontal and vertical electric fields 30 m from triggered lightning were obtained.

  16. Quantitative analysis of the radioactive wastes to be generated in the Brazilian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Jose Mauro Esteves dos

    1979-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle radioactive waste requiring special treatment (processing, transportation and disposal) is produced. For the implementation of a waste management program, parameters such as volume, specific activity, thermal power, gamma power, (alpha,η) and spontaneous fission neutron production rates are required. In this work, we have calculated: a) The specific activity, thermal power, gamma power and neutron production rate for the irradiated fuel of Angra II; b) The volumes of radioactive waste that will be produced in the nuclear fuel cycle in Brazil; c) The specific activity, thermal power, gamma power and neutron production rate for the high-level waste that will be produced during fuel reprocessing. In the short-term it is concluded that the major problems that will require solution will be the disposal of the low-level waste (volume V L ) and the interim storage of the irradiated fuel elements (volume V F ) generated in the nuclear power plants. For the years 1990 and 2010 these volumes are: (1990) V L = 16149 m 3 ; V F = 1287 m 3 and (2010) V L = 690506 m 3 , V F = 55051 m 3 . In the medium-term the problem of the interim storage of the high-level waste (volume V H ) must be solved. The volumes of this waste we have calculated for the years 2000 and 2010 are: (2000) V H = 50 m 3 and (2010) V H = 1265 m 3 . Long term evaluation of high-level waste disposal must be analysed to aid in initial studies of this problem. Several parameters of this waste have been calculated as a function of time after reprocessing. (author)

  17. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 33: ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY AND PROTECTION FROM ACTION OF POWERFUL ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE OF RADIOELECTRONIC, ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND ELECTRIC POWER EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of basic scientific and technical achievements in area of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC and protection from destabilizing and striking action of powerful electromagnetic interference (PEMI of natural and artificial origin of radioelectronic, electrical engineering and electric power equipment. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information in a sphere EMC and such areas of knowledge’s as radioelectronics, electrical engineering and electric power engineering. Results. A brief scientific and technical review is resulted modern positions problems EMC and protection of equipment from action on them PEMI. It is shown that PEMI can result in failures in-process and death of examined equipment. Annual harm in the industrially developed countries of the world from the striking affecting of PEMI modern equipment with integral microcircuits and semiconductor devices can make ten of milliards of USD. The basic methods of protection of equipment are resulted from PEMI and protective devices (PD, intended for the increase of effectiveness of modern equipment to the action of external PEMI. Principles of work of the resulted PD and their basic technical descriptions are described. Originality. On the basis of materials of scientific monographs, journal publications, normative documents and internet-reports systematization of basic PD, in-use presently in an area EMC and protection of different equipment from the hazard agency of external PEMI is executed. Practical value. Popularization of scientific and technical knowledge’s in an area EMC and protection of modern equipment from a dangerous action on them PEMI. Formulation of important for society scientific and technical problems and tasks, arising up in an area EMC and providing of the reliable functioning of modern equipment in power electromagnetic interference.

  18. Management of radioactive waste from a major core damage in a BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkert, J.; Christensen, H.; Torstenfelt, B.

    1990-01-01

    Large amounts of fission products would be released in case of a major core damage in a nuclear power reactor. In this theoretical study the core damage is caused by a loss of coolant accident followed by a complete loss of all electric power for about 30 minutes resulting in the release of 10% of the core inventory of noble gases. A second case has also been briefly studied, in which the corresponding core damage is supposed to be created merely by the complete loss of electric power during a limited time period. It appears from the study that the radioactive waste generated as a consequence of an accident of the extent can be managed in the reference reactor with only minor modifications required in the waste plant. The detailed results of the study are reactor specific, but many of the findings and recommendations are generally applicable. (author) 28 refs

  19. Monitoring of radioactivity in the environs of Finnish nuclear power stations in 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, K.-L.; Klemola, S.; Ilus, E.; Arvela, H.; Blomqvist, L.

    1989-06-01

    Results of the environmental programmes for monitoring radioactive contamination around Finnish nuclear power plants in 1987 are reported. Fallout from the Chernobyl accident, which took place in April 1986, was still dominating the artificial radiation situation in Finland. Thus, large amounts of 137 Cs and other long-lived fallout nuclides predominated in the environmental samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants. The extremely small airborne releases from Finnish nuclear power plants were almost totally covered by fallout nuclides. The somewhat higher aquatic releases were easier to distinguish, and it was possible to follow their spread in the marine environment. The contribution of locally discharged nuclides to radiation doses of the population was insignificant

  20. Evaluation of radioactive emissions of lignite-fired power plants in Turkey using the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueke, Tayfun

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive emissions of 13 lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are of great concern to the public and to scientists alike. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these power plants, according to their radioactive emissions by using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Control criteria are in particular 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 238 U emissions from the power plants. These control criteria are weighted according to the objective assessment. The calculations are repeated for three different objective assessments of control criteria namely the mortality risk coefficients for inhalation, ingestion, external exposure of 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 238 U. It has been calculated that the Can lignite-fired power plant is ranking first while the Soma-B plant is ranking last according to the radioactive emissions of the power plants when the average of three different objective control criteria are used in the calculations. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of radioactive emissions of lignite-fired power plants in Turkey using the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueke, Tayfun [Mugla Sitki Kocman Univ., Mugla (Turkey). Dept. of Energy Systems Engineering

    2013-11-15

    Radioactive emissions of 13 lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are of great concern to the public and to scientists alike. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these power plants, according to their radioactive emissions by using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Control criteria are in particular {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 238}U emissions from the power plants. These control criteria are weighted according to the objective assessment. The calculations are repeated for three different objective assessments of control criteria namely the mortality risk coefficients for inhalation, ingestion, external exposure of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 238}U. It has been calculated that the Can lignite-fired power plant is ranking first while the Soma-B plant is ranking last according to the radioactive emissions of the power plants when the average of three different objective control criteria are used in the calculations. (orig.)

  2. Options for Management of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste for Countries Developing New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. Today, numerous countries are considering construction of their first nuclear power plant or the expansion of a small nuclear power programme, and many of these countries have limited experience in managing radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. They often have limited information about available technologies and approaches for safe and long term management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel arising from power reactors. The lack of basic know-how and of a credible waste management strategy could present a major challenge or even an obstruction for countries wishing to

  3. Radioactivity of coals and ash and slag wastes at coal-fired thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, D. A.; Sidorova, G. P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of published data on the content of radioactive nuclides in coals originating from various coal deposits, and in ash and slag wastes produced at coal-fired thermal power plants, as well as in fly ash emitted from thermal power plants into the atmosphere. Problems related to the use of coals with an elevated content of natural radionuclides (NRNs) and methods of their solution implemented at the Urtuyskoe coalfield are dealt with. Data on the analysis of Transbaikal coals for the NRN content, as well as weighted mean content of uranium and thorium in coals from the Siberian Region, are given. In order to reduce irradiation of plant personnel and the population of the areas where coal producers and coal-fired thermal power plants are located, it is necessary to organize very careful control of the NRN content in both coals and products of their combustion that are released into the environment. To solve the problem related to the control of radioactivity, the centralized approach and creation of a proper normative base are needed. Experience gained in developing the Urtuyskoe coalfield shows that it is possible to create an efficient system of coal quality control with respect to the radiation hygiene factor and provide protection of the environment and health of the population.

  4. Dissipation of a power electromagnetic wave in an inhomogeneous plasma and ''superstrong'' plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagdeev, R.Z.; Shapiro, V.D.; Shevchenko, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    An attempt is made to analyze two assumptions of the present theory of plasma turbulence, initiated by an electromagnetic wave, as applied to the problem of heating the plasma target. It has been assumed that in the long-scale region (the region of an electromagnetic wave source) and in the inertia range, separating the source region and the short-wave absorption region, there is a permanent pumping. The first assumption consists in simulating a situation in a plasma target when the Langmuir turbulence arises due to an electromagnetic wave incident on the target. The second assumption is valid only at a very high intensity of plasma waves when their energy is significantly less than the thermal energy of plasma W/nsub(c)T 0 is the frequency of an incident electromagnetic wave). At W approximately equal to nsub(c)T the plasma oscillations, arising due to modulation instability from the electromagnetic pumping wave, fall immediately into the absorption region. A phenomenological theory of such a turbulence, called ''superstrong'', is formulated on the assumption that there is a mechanism of ''mixing up'' plasmon phases as a result of their populating the long-wave density fluctuations

  5. Hydrological dispersion of radioactive material in relation to nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This Guide discusses the dispersion of normal and accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear power plants into surface water, including the washout of airborne radionuclides, and gives recommendations on information to be collected during the various stages of the siting procedure, a minimum measurement programme and the selection and validation of appropriate mathematical models for predicting dispersion. Guidelines are also provided for the optimal use of models for a specific site situation and for defining the necessary input parameters. Results of existing validation studies are given

  6. Radioactive waste management in nuclear power plants with WWER-type reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dlouhy, Z; Napravnik, J; Safar, O

    1975-05-01

    The possibilities of radioactive waste solidification in nuclear power plants with LWR reactors (of the WWER type) and the problems of their safe storage in Czechoslovakia are discussed. The most suitable method for the treatment of emitted sorbents and concentrates seems to be their incorporation in bitumen or concrete. In the disposal of solidified blocks all requirements should be met including the selection of suitable sites and of convenient methods of transportation. A preliminary economic estimate shows that the storage of bitumen-incorporated wastes in trenches seems to be less expensive from the point of view of exploitation of the storage facility as well as from the point of view of investment.

  7. Three-dimensional simulation of radioactive pollutant in the atmosphere from nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buske, Daniela; Vilhena, Marco Tullio de

    2008-01-01

    In this work we report numerical simulations using the GILTT (Generalized Integral Laplace Transform Technique) approach to simulate radioactive pollutant dispersion in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). To study the dispersion and the possible scenarios arising from accidental emissions, the results obtained with the GILTT method are compared with experimental data obtained at the Nuclear Power Plant of Angra dos Reis under neutral/moderately unstable conditions. Furthermore, to a better description of the wind profile for the irregular ground level terrain, we consider the wind profile as solution of the MM5 mesoscale model. The statistical indices point out a reasonable good agreement is obtained between experimental data and GILTT model. (author)

  8. Legal and technical problems in the management of radioactive waste from the nuclear power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesworth, F.R.; Driscoll, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear power generation like all other industrial activities results in the production of wastes, the principal difference between radioactive wastes and other wastes being that it is at present impossible to dispose of significant quantities of the former in the environment. However, the possibility of their disposal without having to control them remains a long-term objective and numerous countries are pursuing detailed scientific research on the subject. In the meantime storage and control in a manner appropriate to their nature and aimed at preventing all accidental dispersal to the environment is the only solution. (NEA) [fr

  9. Multidimensional flow of radioactive gases through the soil surrounding an underground nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkelacker, A.

    1980-01-01

    In connection with the underground siting of nuclear power plants the spreading of radioactive gases that are released into the soil coverage after a hypothetical accident is investigated. A physical model is presented that includes the isothermal one- and two-component flow of ideal gases through an inhomogeneous porous medium on the basis of Darcy's law. Based on this model a computer code has been developed that permits the calculation of transient pressure and concentration distributions in inhomogeneous porous media in one to three dimensions, as well as the determination of retention times. (orig.) [de

  10. Predicting the environmental risks of radioactive discharges from Belgian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, H.; Sweeck, L.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Wannijn, J.; Van Hees, M.; Camps, J.; Olyslaegers, G.; Miliche, C.; Lance, B.

    2013-01-01

    An environmental risk assessment (ERA) was performed to evaluate the impact on non-human biota from liquid and atmospheric radioactive discharges by the Belgian Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) of Doel and Tihange. For both sites, characterisation of the source term and wildlife population around the NPPs was provided, whereupon the selection of reference organisms and the general approach taken for the environmental risk assessment was established. A deterministic risk assessment for aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems was performed using the ERICA assessment tool and applying the ERICA screening value of 10 μGy h −1 . The study was performed for the radioactive discharge limits and for the actual releases (maxima and averages over the period 1999–2008 or 2000–2009). It is concluded that the current discharge limits for the Belgian NPPs considered do not result in significant risks to the aquatic and terrestrial environment and that the actual discharges, which are a fraction of the release limits, are unlikely to harm the environment. -- Highlights: • Impact of radioactive discharges by the Belgian NPPs of Doel and Tihange on wildlife was evaluated. • Deterministic risk assessment for aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems performed with the ERICA tool. • NPP discharge limits do not result in significant risks to the aquatic and terrestrial environment. • Actual discharges, a fraction of the release limits, are unlikely to harm the environment

  11. Simultaneous sampling of indoor and outdoor airborne radioactivity after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Janik, Miroslaw; Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-02-18

    Several studies have estimated inhalation doses for the public because of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Most of them were based on measurement of radioactivity in outdoor air and included the assumption that people stayed outdoors all day. Although this assumption gives a conservative estimate, it is not realistic. The "air decontamination factor" (ratio of indoor to outdoor air radionuclide concentrations) was estimated from simultaneous sampling of radioactivity in both inside and outside air of one building. The building was a workplace and located at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba Prefecture, Japan. Aerosol-associated radioactive materials in air were collected onto filters, and the filters were analyzed by γ spectrometry at NIRS. The filter sampling was started on March 15, 2011 and was continued for more than 1 year. Several radionuclides, such as (131)I, (134)Cs, and (137)Cs were found by measuring the filters with a germanium detector. The air decontamination factor was around 0.64 for particulate (131)I and 0.58 for (137)Cs. These values could give implications for the ratio of indoor to outdoor radionuclide concentrations after the FDNPP accident for a similar type of building.

  12. Safe management of sealed radioactive sources at Karachi nuclear power complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, T.B.; Qamar, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the conditioning of sealed radioactive sources, carried out at the Karachi Nuclear Power Complex (KNPC) in co-operation with the IAEA. The radioactive sources were radium needles of various size, used by various radiotherapy units in different hospitals throughout the country. For some time the use of radium needles had been abandoned and they were stored in hospitals awaiting proper disposal. Since their storage conditions were not ideal and there was a potential of leakage of radioactive material into the environment, it was decided to condition and store them safely. A significant logistic effort was required to identify these sources, bring them to a central facility and condition them according to current international standards. Various steps were involved in conditioning the sources: place it in a stainless steel capsule, weld the capsule, test it for a leak, place the capsule in a lead shielded package, put and seal the shielded package in a concrete-lined steel drum and finally store it at the waste storage facility. A total amount of about 1500 mg of Radium needles were conditioned. Radiation exposure during the entire operation was within acceptable limits. (author)

  13. Radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The report presents the available data on radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents discharged by nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community from 1972 to 1976. Discharges are expressed both in absolute terms and relative to the net production of electricity from the fuel. On the basis of the discharges recorded for 1976 the resulting maximum exposure of members of the population is quantified and compared with the dose limits prescribed by Euratom radiological protection standards and with the exposure resulting from natural radioactivity. It is concluded that there is no case in which a discharge could have given rise to an exposure exceeding the relevant prescribed limit. Not only did the possible maximum exposures incurred by individuals leave an appreciable safety margin relative to that limit but, for the vast majority of installations, they were comparable with or were considerably lower than the geographical and temporal variations in exposures resulting from natural radioactivity. Where environmental levels have been detectable the measured results have of course been used but, with few exceptions, the levels have remained less than the very low limits of detection currently possible. In general, where theoretical models are used to evaluate exposure, they are designed to give conservative results and hence it is likely that the true exposures are even less than those calculated

  14. Plan 96 - Costs for management of the radioactive waste from nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    This report presents a calculation of the costs for implementing all measures needed to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes from the Swedish nuclear power reactors. The cost calculations include costs for R,D and D as well as for decommissioning and dismantling the reactor plants etc. The following facilities and systems are already in operation: Transportation system for radioactive waste products, Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, Final repository for radioactive operational wastes. Plans exist for: Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel, Deep repository for spent fuel and other long-lived waste, Final repository for decommissioning waste. The total future costs, in Jan 1996 prices, for the Swedish waste system from 1997 have been calculated to be 42.2 billion SEK (about 6.4 billion USD). The total costs apply for the waste obtained from 25 years of operation of all Swedish reactors. It is estimated that 10.6 billion SEK in current money has been spent through 1996. Costs based on waste quantities from operation of the reactors for 40 years are also reported. 6 refs

  15. The role of wastes from nuclear power plants in the overall management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, H.

    1983-01-01

    The wastes arising from nuclear power plants (NPP) are rather low in activity and the radionuclides contained therein have a low radiotoxicity and short half-life as a rule. However, NPPs are the largest in number among all nuclear facilities and produce the greatest amount of radioactive wastes. All NPPs have been able to keep the radiation doses in the environment below the permissible values, in most cases at 1 mrem/a or even lower. The methods applied for the treatment of liquid radioactive effluents have reached a high degree of effectivity and reliability. For the solidification of the residues several appropriate methods are available. However, some improvements are still desirable. Although methods exist for incineration, cutting and baling of solid wastes, only the last method is employed at NPPs as a rule. Central treatment facilities could improve this situation. The exhaust air treatment has reached a state that satisfies high standards during normal operation and in design base accidents. Improvements seem indicated regarding the in situ-inspection of HEPA-filters and the protection of filters against excess humidity and droplets. The partial and total decommissioning of NPPs has already been demonstrated. The problems caused by the wastes arising from such actions are in the same range as those from routine operation and maintenance of NPPs. Large amounts of radioactive wastes have already been disposed of by shallow land burial, disposal into deep geological formations or dumping into the deep sea. Specific standards could probably facilitate the disposal of wastes from NPPs. The present management of radioactive wastes from NPPs satisfies all actual needs. Therefore, spectacular new developments are neither required nor to be expected. However, by the continuous improvement of details and by optimization of the whole system progress can still be achieved and useful contributions to the further development of nuclear energy be made. (author)

  16. The state of radioactive waste management and personnel radiation exposure in commercial nuclear power plants in fiscal 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive waste management: The owners of commercial nuclear power plants are obligated to control the release of gaseous and liquid radioactive wastes below the objective release levels, and to store solid wastes in containers on the site. As for the former, the released (radioactive) quantity in fiscal 1981 (from April, 1981, to March, 1982,) together with the objective levels are given for respective nuclear power stations; and as for the latter, the stored quantity and also the cumulative quantity up to the year are given. Radiation exposure: The owners of commercial nuclear power plants are obligated to control the personnel exposure below the permissible level. The personnel exposure dose in fiscal 1981 is given for respective nuclear power station. (Mori, K.)

  17. Biological hazards of radioactivity and the biological consequences of radionuclide emissions from routine operation of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stendig-Lindberg, G.

    1978-01-01

    The biological hazards of radioactivity and the biological consequences of radionuclide emissions from the routine operation of nuclear power reactors are reviewed. ICRP and Scandinavian recommendations for the limitation of annual radiation doses are presented. The contribution of environmental conditions to radiation hazard is also discussed. It is concluded that a review of the justification of nuclear power is urgently needed. (H.K.)

  18. Assessment and prediction of the scales of radioactive contamination of the environment by emissions from a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.; Solovei, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    The assessment of radioactive contamination of the air basin and underlying surface in the direction of emission reduces to determining the volume activity of the radioactive impurity in air, the surface activity on the underlying surface of the radioactive impurity is known at least approximately (for example, it can be set on the basis of the technological regulations at the nuclear power plant or according to the criterion of levels during an accident), by using exposure-dose-rate sensors in a network of posts of the automatic system for monitoring the radiation environment (ASMRE), which are placed on the industrial area of the nuclear power plant, in the shielded zone and in the observation zone, it is possible to determine more accurately the magnitude of the emission and, therefore, to estimate the scale of the radioactive contamination of the medium

  19. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu.

    1996-01-01

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  20. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Megumu

    1996-12-03

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  1. Development of automatic smear testing sampler for radioactive contamination of floor in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Katsuro; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Yohtaro; Iwaki, Kiyotaka

    1980-01-01

    The floor contamination with radioactive substances in the controlled area of nuclear power stations is strictly controlled, and it is tested by the smear method, wiping the contaminants on floors with filter papers or cloths and measuring the radioactive intensity to obtain contamination density. The works are very laborious, therefore the automatic smear sampler was developed. Simple operation, shortening of time required for wiping, constant and high efficiency of wiping, and easy numbering of samples were the aims in the development. The method of wiping, the mechanisms of wiping, cloth feeding and running, the surface pressure at the time of wiping, the number of times of wiping and required motor torque were studied. The outline of the developed sampler is explained. The performance of the sampler was compared with manual wiping. The efficiency of wiping with the sampler was 92%, assuming manual wiping as 100. Difference was not observed between careful manual wiping and the wiping with the sampler, therefore it was confirmed that this automatic floor smear sampler can be put in practical use. By conventional manual sampling, the maximum limit was about 400 samples/man-day, but when this sampler is used, about 1000 samples/sampler-day is possible. At present, this sampler is operated in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station. (Kako, I.)

  2. Ultra sensitive sea water radioactivity monitoring system. Autonomous low power consumption equipped with wireless data communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonet, H.; Debauche, A.; Lellis, C. de; Adam, V.; Lacroix, J.P.; Put, P. van

    2003-01-01

    Following the recognition of their usefulness by the States and the scientific community, the automatic water monitoring networks were developed again to be able to measure sea water. For that purpose they had to be fully autonomous, have low power consumption (solar panels power supply), use wireless communicating (satellite, GSM, Radio) and be very sensitive (few Bq/m 3 ). It is important to note that radioactivity detection in sea has many constraints: The detection system sensitivity must be very high because of the dilution factor of the ocean. The analysis method has to be adapted: the detection of very low levels of artificial contamination is made difficult due to the natural radioactivity in seawater (i.e., more than 10 kBq of 40 K/m 3 ). The system has to be completely autonomous, 'wireless'. Additional conventional measuring probes must be connected to the system to increase its interest (pH, t deg, salinity, position, meteorology). The system maintenance must be very limited (1/year). Wind and corrosion resistance must be high. The probe must be installed on a buoy. Moreover, some improvements are needed to allow: Amplification Gain drifts due to NaI sensitivity to t deg to be compensated. Net peak area computation in a specific energy range. Interference correction to prevent false alarms due to natural radiation. Very long counting time. (author)

  3. Method of inhibiting concentration of radioactive corrosion products in cooling water or nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabayashi, Jun-ichi; Hishida, Mamoru; Ishikura, Takeshi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the increase in the concentration of the radioactive corrosion products in cooling water, which increase is accompanied by the transference of the corrosion products activated and accumulated in the core due to dissolution and exfoliation into the core water, and inhibit the flowing of said products out of the core and the diffusion thereof into the cooling system, thereby to prevent the accumulation of said products in the cooling system and prevent radioactive contaminations. Method: In a nuclear power plant of a BWR type light water reactor, when the temperature of the pile water is t 0 C, hydrogen is injected in cooling water in a period of time from immediately before starting of the drive stopping operation of the nuclear power plant to immediately after the termination of restarting operation, whereby the concentration of hydrogen in the reactor water through said period is maintained at a value more than 2exp (0.013 t) cm 3 N.T.P./kg H 2 O. (Aizawa, K.)

  4. Recovery from the radioactive pollution due to Fukushima first nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K.; Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fujishiro, F.; Ishizaki, A.; Osada, N.; Arai, H.; Sugai, K.; Nagakubo, K.; Sakurada, T. [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The great East Japan earthquake happened at 14:46 11{sup th} March 2011. After the earthquake, the huge tsunamis of above 16m height hit the east coast of Northeastern Japan. About 20,000 peoples died or went missing and many houses were lost. The tsunamis caused the nuclear accident of Fukushima first nuclear power plant. Three nuclear reactors hydrogen-exploded 12{sup th}, 14{sup th} and 15{sup th} March, one after another, and scattered the huge amount of radioisotopes of {sup 131}I and {sup 134,137}Cs on the prefectures in the eastern region of Japan. Especially, Fukushima prefecture where the nuclear plant is located was contaminated very much. This radiation catastrophe worried about the internal exposure by taking contaminated foods and the external exposure by surrounding radioactivity. The radiation exposure was mainly caused by {sup 131}I the earlier stage of the accident and then by {sup 134,137}Cs. Now, the radiation doses on the asphalt or concrete places and some areas are gradually decreasing and become around a half value of the earlier one. This is well known as the weathering effect. We found that the density of cesium radioisotopes decreases with a function of depth from the ground surface, and almost of all cesium radioisotopes were distributed in the thickness of 1 cm. We washed the contaminated soil 3 times. The radioactivity of soil reduced one twenty fifth of original one. Almost all cesium radioisotopes were contained in remains liquid. Depositing muddy water, we separated clay from water. It was confirmed that the water was no radioactive. This resulted cesium radioisotopes were not ionic in soil and water, and adhered mainly to clay on the ground. Therefore, cesium radioisotopes have not been detected in river water and city water from the early stages of the accident. The volume of clay was about one tenth of the contaminated soil. We applied this idea to decontaminate the school yards (about 7000m{sup 2}) of elementary

  5. Recovery from the radioactive pollution due to Fukushima first nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, K.; Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fujishiro, F.; Ishizaki, A.; Osada, N.; Arai, H.; Sugai, K.; Nagakubo, K.; Sakurada, T.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The great East Japan earthquake happened at 14:46 11 th March 2011. After the earthquake, the huge tsunamis of above 16m height hit the east coast of Northeastern Japan. About 20,000 peoples died or went missing and many houses were lost. The tsunamis caused the nuclear accident of Fukushima first nuclear power plant. Three nuclear reactors hydrogen-exploded 12 th , 14 th and 15 th March, one after another, and scattered the huge amount of radioisotopes of 131 I and 134,137 Cs on the prefectures in the eastern region of Japan. Especially, Fukushima prefecture where the nuclear plant is located was contaminated very much. This radiation catastrophe worried about the internal exposure by taking contaminated foods and the external exposure by surrounding radioactivity. The radiation exposure was mainly caused by 131 I the earlier stage of the accident and then by 134,137 Cs. Now, the radiation doses on the asphalt or concrete places and some areas are gradually decreasing and become around a half value of the earlier one. This is well known as the weathering effect. We found that the density of cesium radioisotopes decreases with a function of depth from the ground surface, and almost of all cesium radioisotopes were distributed in the thickness of 1 cm. We washed the contaminated soil 3 times. The radioactivity of soil reduced one twenty fifth of original one. Almost all cesium radioisotopes were contained in remains liquid. Depositing muddy water, we separated clay from water. It was confirmed that the water was no radioactive. This resulted cesium radioisotopes were not ionic in soil and water, and adhered mainly to clay on the ground. Therefore, cesium radioisotopes have not been detected in river water and city water from the early stages of the accident. The volume of clay was about one tenth of the contaminated soil. We applied this idea to decontaminate the school yards (about 7000m 2 ) of elementary schools of Marumori town adjacent to Fukushima

  6. Natural radioactivity level in coal and ash collected from Baoji coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xiaodan; Lu Xinwei

    2006-01-01

    Specific activities of natural radionuclides 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were assessed in coal (3 samples), fly ash (17 samples) and bottom ash (6 samples) collected from Baoji coal-fired power plant. This paper analyzed the characteristics of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K contents in bottom ash and fly ash, and studied the concentration factors of these radionuclides in ash in relation to those in coal. The level of natural radionuclides 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K of coal collected from Baoji coal-fired power plant are in the range of radionuclides contents of Chinese coal. The natural radioactivity level of fly ash collected from Baoji coal-fired power plant is close to Beijing and Shanghai coal-fired power plants. The paper farther assessed the possibility of fly ash of Baoji coal-fired power plant used as building materials according to the state standard. The results show that there are 29% samples exceeding the state limit when fly ash used as building materials. So the usage of fly ash in building material should be controlled. (authors)

  7. Mathematical model use for evaluation of radioactivity spreading in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubik, I.; Gladki, Eh.; Yanchik, O.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of knowledges of radioactive products behaviour and their spreading in nuclear power plant under normal and accident conditions a KOMPLEX program is developed in the FORTRAN 4 language, permitting to calculate the activity in separate parts of the nuclear power plant with WWR type reactor. The COMPLEX program includes the following subprograms: AZ - PRIM - for estimating active products in fuel, coolant, on the surfaces of fuel element cans and the primary circuit. The subprogram permits to estimate the coolant activity at the expense of fission fragments for 4 different leakage mechanisms: due to diffusion, considerable fuel element damage, contamination of fuel element can surface and fuel washout by coolant; KOR - the program for estimating active corrosion products; ACT - the program for estimating the activity of activation products; CONT - the program for estimating the activity in the nuclear power plant premises (protection envelop) and ventilating pipe. The desciption of the above subprograms is given. For testing of the mathematical model applicability and the possibilities of the corresponding programs the checking calculations for operating parameters of nuclear power plant with WWR type reactor were carried out. The calculation results obtained have shown the applicability of the model suggested and the corresponding programes for nuclear power plant under normal operation and accident conditions [ru

  8. Electromagnetic problems in nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eloranta, E.H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper reviews the electromagnetic characterization of fractured rock during various phases of radioactive waste disposal investigations and construction, and also discusses the methods of the electromagnetic safeguards monitoring

  9. Treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. Research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The report presents programs for research, development and demonstration concerning radioactive waste disposal in underground facilities. The main topics are: Radioactive waste management, radioactive waste storage, capsules, environmental impacts, risk assessment, radionuclide migration, radioactive waste disposal, decommissioning, cost, and international cooperation. (129 refs.)

  10. Computer aided method of low voltage power distribution networks protection system against lightning and electromagnetic pulse generated by high altitude nuclear burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroubine, J.

    1989-01-01

    The lightning creates an electromagnetic field which produces a slow duration and high energy pulse of current on low voltage power distribution networks. On the other hand an high altitude nuclear burst generates an electromagnetic pulse which causes fast and intense interferences. We describe here the specifications of a passive filter that can reject these interferences. We used a computer aided method of simulation to create a prototype. Experimental results confirm the validity of the model used for simulation [fr

  11. Underground disposal techniques of radioactive wastes and wind power generation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The 25th business report on foreign survey of electric power civil engineering technology. On the 25th foreign survey held by the Society of Electric Power Civil Engineering, Technology, disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLRWs) in Switzerland and Sweden, and wind power generation in Spain and Denmark were focused. As a result, it was found that opalinas clay and calcite under survey and investigation of host rock candidates for disposal of HLRWs are stable rock stratum with extremely low water permeability and without groundwater stream. At present, basic research and concrete disposing method are under advancement through actual scale tests. To obtain peoples' understanding on necessity, safety, cost-sharing, and so on of this business, it is essential to easily and precisely technical contents with high level generation specialty. And, on wind power generation, it is necessary to install wind wheels at a position enough to become maximum in wind energy usable from wind observation data and to maintain the wheel mechanically and electrically. Here were described outlines on the survey with its members and schedules. (G.K.)

  12. Prediction and measurement of the electromagnetic environment of high-power medium-wave and short-wave broadcast antennas in far field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhanghong; Wang, Qun; Ji, Zhijiang; Shi, Meiwu; Hou, Guoyan; Tan, Danjun; Wang, Pengqi; Qiu, Xianbo

    2014-12-01

    With the increasing city size, high-power electromagnetic radiation devices such as high-power medium-wave (MW) and short-wave (SW) antennas have been inevitably getting closer and closer to buildings, which resulted in the pollution of indoor electromagnetic radiation becoming worsened. To avoid such radiation exceeding the exposure limits by national standards, it is necessary to predict and survey the electromagnetic radiation by MW and SW antennas before constructing the buildings. In this paper, a modified prediction method for the far-field electromagnetic radiation is proposed and successfully applied to predict the electromagnetic environment of an area close to a group of typical high-power MW and SW wave antennas. Different from currently used simplified prediction method defined in the Radiation Protection Management Guidelines (H J/T 10. 3-1996), the new method in this article makes use of more information such as antennas' patterns to predict the electromagnetic environment. Therefore, it improves the prediction accuracy significantly by the new feature of resolution at different directions. At the end of this article, a comparison between the prediction data and the measured results is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Radioactive Control of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant Environment in the Year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulic, S.; Miklavzic, U.; Franic, Z.; Kanduc, M.

    1998-01-01

    Regular Krsko Nuclear Power Plant (NPPK) radioactivity control comprises the supervisions of the inventory of liquid and gaseous emissions at the source, and the independent supervisions of the input of radionuclides into larger environment (imisson). The controlled environment area consists primarily of a 12 kilometers large circle around the object, where the largest values of imission could be expected, and where possible changes in the Sava river and the underground waters could first be noticed. The circle has been enlarged upon the territory of the Republic of Croatia (RC) from Jesenice on Dolenjsko until Podsused (30 km of air - line distance). As reference points relevant for the readiness in the case of accident, especially for detection of iodine and aerosol air transport, the program comprises also measuring points in the RC at larger distances (from 14 to 27 km) in the direction of Zagreb its larger western surroundings (passive Thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in the each 42 km long). Continuous control of emission is performed by the radiological service of KNPP by routine procedures, supplemented by adequate measurements from other authorized institutions (intercomparisons, parallel measurements of representative and other samples). Summarised results of radioactive measurements for man-made and natural radionuclides are presented for different transfer media and exposure pathways in the form of assessed effective doses. Conservatively estimated dose burdens received by a member of the reference (critical) population group as the result of NPP emissions amount to a value of the committed effective dose equivalent smaller than 20 μSv/year. This value represents less than 1 % of the annual dose received on average from natural and artificial sources by a member of the general public in the normal environment. The yearly doses from natural radioactivity, global contamination (Chernobyl, atmospheric nuclear explosions), non-nuclear industries and

  14. Radioactive control of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant in the year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulic, S.; Miklavzic, U.; Franic, Z.; Kanduc, M.

    1996-01-01

    Regular Krsko Nuclear Power Plant (NPPK) radioactivity control comprises the supervisions of the inventory of liquid and gaseous emissions at the source, and the independent supervisions of the input of radionuclides into larger environment. The controlled environment area consist primarily of a 12 kilometers large circle around the object, where the largest values of immission could be expected, and where possible changes in the Sava river and the underground waters could first be noticed. The circle has been enlarged upon the territory of the Republic of Croatia (RC) from Jesenice on Dolenjsko until Podsused (30 km of air-line distance). As reference points relevant for the readiness in the case of accident, especially for detection of iodine and aerosol air transport, the program comprises also measuring points in the RC at larger distances (from 14 to 27 km) in the direction of Zagreb its larger western surroundings (passive Thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in each 42 km long). Continuous of control of emission is performed by the radiological service of (KNPP) by routine procedures, supplemented by adequate measurements from other authorized institutions. Summarized results of radioactive measurements for man-made and natural radionuclides are presented for different transfer media and exposure pathways in the form of assessed effective doses. Conservatively estimated dose burdens received by a member of the reference (critical) population group as the result of NPP emissions amount to a value of the committed effective dose equivalent smaller than 20 μSv/year. This value represents less than 1% of the annual dose received on average from natural and artificial sources by a member of the general public in the normal environment. The yearly doses from natural radioactivity, global contamination , non-nuclear industries and hospitals are also estimated from the measured data in some media. (author)

  15. PLAN 98 - Costs for management of the radioactive waste from nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The nuclear utilities in Sweden are responsible for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from the nuclear power reactors in a safe manner. The most important measures are to plan, build and operate the facilities and systems needed, and to conduct related R and D. This report presents a calculation of the costs for implementing all of these measures. The following facilities and systems are in operation: Transportation system for radioactive waste products. Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB. Final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR I. Plans also exist for: Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel. Deep repository for spent fuel and other long-lived waste. Final repository for decommissioning waste. The cost calculations also include costs for research, development and demonstration, as well as for decommissioning and dismantling the reactor plants etc. At the end of 1995, certain amendments were made in the Financing Act which influence the calculations presented in this report. The most important amendment is that the reactor owners, besides paying a fee or charge on nuclear energy production, must also give guarantees as security for remaining costs. In this way the fee can be based on a probable cost for waste management. This cost includes uncertainties and variations that are normal for this type of project. Cost increases as a consequence of major changes, disruptions etc. can instead be covered via the given guarantees. The total future costs, in January 1998 prices, for the Swedish waste management system from 1999 onward has been calculated to be SEK 45.8 billion. The total costs apply for the waste obtained from 25 years of operation of all Swedish reactors. They will fall due over a total period of approximately 50 years up to the middle of the 2l st century, but the greater part will fall due during the next 20 years. It is estimated that SEK 12.1 billion in current money terms

  16. Initial assessment: electromagnetic compatibility aspects of proposed SPS Microwave Power Transmission System (MPTS) operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-02-01

    An analysis of major concerns with regard to the effects on radio and electronic systems by the proposed Microwave Power Transmission System for transmitting power from a satellite solar power station to earth is presented. (LCL)

  17. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous effluents from nuclear-powered merchant ships (NMS-GEFF code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardile, F.P.; Bangart, R.L.; Collins, J.T.

    1978-06-01

    The Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization IMCO) is currently preparing guidelines concerning the safety of nuclear-powered merchant ships. An important aspect of these guidelines is the determination of the releases of radioactive material in effluents from these ships and the control exercised by the ships over these releases. To provide a method for the determination of these releases, the NRC staff has developed a computerized model, the NMS-GEFF Code, which is described in the following chapters. The NMS-GEFF Code calculates releases of radioactive material in gaseous effluents for nuclear-powered merchant ships using pressurized water reactors

  18. Hazards from radioactivity of fly ash of Greek coal power plants (CPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, C.; Charalambous, C.

    1980-01-01

    Fly ash and fine dispersion releases by coal combustion in Greek coal power plants are radioactive. Concentrations in the fly ash up to 20 pCi/g and 10 pCi/g were measured for 238 U and 226 Ra respectively (not in secular equilibrium). The radioactivity of fly ash deduces risks in two ways: a) from the escaping fly ash in particulate form or fine dispersion and b) from using fly ash as substitute for cement in concrete. In a room of dimensions 10 x 10x4 m 3 the concentration of Radon in the air will be about 10 -9 μCi/cm 3 . For the above estimation a concrete porosity of 5% and a wall thickness of 20 cm was used. The estimated concentration of Radon was about two orders of magnitude lower than that of the MPC of Radon in the air, which is about 10 -9 μCi/cm 3 . It is pointed out that if a 25% porosity were used, the Radon concentration will be an order of magnitude higher. (U.K.)

  19. Reducing logistical barriers to radioactive soil remediation after the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K., E-mail: keizo.ishii@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fujishiro, F.; Ishizaki, A.; Osada, N.; Arai, H.; Sugai, H.; Takahashi, H.; Nagakubo, K.; Sakurada, T. [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Yamazaki, H.; Kim, S. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated assessment of soil contamination due to the nuclear accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant on 11 March 2011. A safe limit for the spatial dose rate (micro-Sv/h) of gamma rays from {sup 134,137}Cs has been established in this work. Based on this value, the highly contaminated region within Fukushima Prefecture that must be decontaminated could be defined. Moreover, a conceptual model for the chemical speciation that occurred during the accident has been delineated. The compound model Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} was found to be meaningful and practical (non-radioactive) to simulate contamination in our decontamination experiments. Finally, we explain the mechanism of action of our soil remediation technique, which effectively reduces the total volume of contaminated soil by isolating the highly Cs-adsorptive clay fraction. The adsorption of non-radioactive Cs atoms on clay particles with diameters <25 μm were analyzed using micro-particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

  20. Radioactive contamination of fishes in lake and streams impacted by the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Mayumi; Yokoduka, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 emitted radioactive substances into the environment, contaminating a wide array of organisms including fishes. We found higher concentrations of radioactive cesium ( 137 Cs) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) than in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus nerka), and 137 Cs concentrations in brown trout were higher in a lake than in a stream. Our analyses indicated that these differences were primarily due to differences in diet, but that habitat also had an effect. Radiocesium concentrations ( 137 Cs) in stream charr (Salvelinus leucomaenis) were higher in regions with more concentrated aerial activity and in older fish. These results were also attributed to dietary and habitat differences. Preserving uncontaminated areas by remediating soils and releasing uncontaminated fish would help restore this popular fishing area but would require a significant effort, followed by a waiting period to allow activity concentrations to fall below the threshold limits for consumption. - Highlight: • Concentration of 137 Cs in brown trout was higher than in rainbow trout. • 137 Cs concentration of brown trout in a lake was higher than in a stream. • 137 Cs concentration of stream charr was higher in region with higher aerial activity. • Concentration of 137 Cs in stream charr was higher in older fish. • Difference of contamination among fishes was due to difference in diet and habitat

  1. Radioactive contamination of fishes in lake and streams impacted by the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Mayumi, E-mail: yoshi887@ffpri.affrc.go.jp [Kansai Research Center, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Nagaikyuutaro 68, Momoyama, Fushimi, Kyoto 612-0855 (Japan); Yokoduka, Tetsuya [Tochigi Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Sarado 2599, Ohtawara, Tochigi 324-0404 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 emitted radioactive substances into the environment, contaminating a wide array of organisms including fishes. We found higher concentrations of radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) than in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus nerka), and {sup 137}Cs concentrations in brown trout were higher in a lake than in a stream. Our analyses indicated that these differences were primarily due to differences in diet, but that habitat also had an effect. Radiocesium concentrations ({sup 137}Cs) in stream charr (Salvelinus leucomaenis) were higher in regions with more concentrated aerial activity and in older fish. These results were also attributed to dietary and habitat differences. Preserving uncontaminated areas by remediating soils and releasing uncontaminated fish would help restore this popular fishing area but would require a significant effort, followed by a waiting period to allow activity concentrations to fall below the threshold limits for consumption. - Highlight: • Concentration of {sup 137}Cs in brown trout was higher than in rainbow trout. • {sup 137}Cs concentration of brown trout in a lake was higher than in a stream. • {sup 137}Cs concentration of stream charr was higher in region with higher aerial activity. • Concentration of {sup 137}Cs in stream charr was higher in older fish. • Difference of contamination among fishes was due to difference in diet and habitat.

  2. Safety assurance in radioactive waste management at nuclear power plants of the Northwest region of Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safonov, Igor

    1999-07-01

    This presentation describes the two large operating nuclear power plants (NPP) in Northwest Russia, the Kola NPP and the Leningrad NPP. The four units at Kola are tank-type pressurised water reactors of 440 MW (electric) while the four Leningrad reactors are 1000 MW (electric) of RBMK type. Gosatomnadzor of Russia regularly conducts so-called target inspections on safety assurance for radioactive waste management at NNP. Among the many items checked during such inspections are the existence and realisation of an action plan for waste reduction, the technical state of equipment and the compliance with previous directions. The management of liquid, solid and gaseous radioactive wastes is described in some detail, and so are the violations revealed at both sites. There is also some discussion of modernisation plans for waste management. It is stated that the ecological impact of the plants is negligible and there is no hazard to people or environment. The presentation concludes with some suggestions for improving the licensing requirements for waste management.

  3. Safety assurance in radioactive waste management at nuclear power plants of the Northwest region of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safonov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    This presentation describes the two large operating nuclear power plants (NPP) in Northwest Russia, the Kola NPP and the Leningrad NPP. The four units at Kola are tank-type pressurised water reactors of 440 MW (electric) while the four Leningrad reactors are 1000 MW (electric) of RBMK type. Gosatomnadzor of Russia regularly conducts so-called target inspections on safety assurance for radioactive waste management at NNP. Among the many items checked during such inspections are the existence and realisation of an action plan for waste reduction, the technical state of equipment and the compliance with previous directions. The management of liquid, solid and gaseous radioactive wastes is described in some detail, and so are the violations revealed at both sites. There is also some discussion of modernisation plans for waste management. It is stated that the ecological impact of the plants is negligible and there is no hazard to people or environment. The presentation concludes with some suggestions for improving the licensing requirements for waste management

  4. Preliminary risk assessment of Power Plant Plomin site contaminated by radioactive slag and ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanata, D.; Sinka, D.; Lokner, V.; Schaller, A.

    1996-01-01

    There is a certain number of radioactively contaminated sites in the Republic of Croatia, one of them being known as Power Plant Plomin site, which contains radioactive slag and ash. Due to a relatively high quantity of the deposited material, as well as relatively high population density of the neighbouring area, it is very important to assess the impact of the site on human health and environment. Using RESRAD computer code and PATHRAE method a preliminary assessment of doses and radiation risks for the workers who spend most of their working day at the pile has been performed. PATHRAE method has also been used for the assessment of radiation risks for the neighbouring population. The assessment is preliminary in its character due to the lack of input data. On the basis of assessment results, recommendations are being given comprising measurements to be taken with a view to coming up with the final risk assessment, as well as protective measures which should be undertaken in the meantime. (author)

  5. Clearance of very low level radioactive waste in spanish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Mir, F.

    2001-01-01

    According to present Spanish legislation a radioactive waste is defined as any material or waste product, without any possible planned use, that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides in concentrations or activity levels higher than those established by the Regulatory Authorities. Legally, this situation allows to develop a conventional management of very low level radioactive waste, by checking the negligibility of their radiological impact, and thus obtaining the corresponding Authorization to treat them as conventional waste. This presentation describes the clearance project of contaminated oils from spanish nuclear power plants. The on-site management includes: -) preliminary settling, centrifugation and filtration; -) oil purification; and -) radiological characterization. The off-site management includes the following operations: -) transportation to the facility where treatment is developed (dilution); -) temporary storage (decay); -) transportation to the place where final management is carried out; -) oil burning (dilution); and management of ashes and other combustion products. An annual amount of 70 m 3 /year (63 MBq) of very low contaminated oil with a specific concentration of 1 Bq/g could be disposed off. (A.C.)

  6. Predicting the environmental risks of radioactive discharges from Belgian nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhove, H; Sweeck, L; Vives I Batlle, J; Wannijn, J; Van Hees, M; Camps, J; Olyslaegers, G; Miliche, C; Lance, B

    2013-12-01

    An environmental risk assessment (ERA) was performed to evaluate the impact on non-human biota from liquid and atmospheric radioactive discharges by the Belgian Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) of Doel and Tihange. For both sites, characterisation of the source term and wildlife population around the NPPs was provided, whereupon the selection of reference organisms and the general approach taken for the environmental risk assessment was established. A deterministic risk assessment for aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems was performed using the ERICA assessment tool and applying the ERICA screening value of 10 μGy h(-1). The study was performed for the radioactive discharge limits and for the actual releases (maxima and averages over the period 1999-2008 or 2000-2009). It is concluded that the current discharge limits for the Belgian NPPs considered do not result in significant risks to the aquatic and terrestrial environment and that the actual discharges, which are a fraction of the release limits, are unlikely to harm the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tianwan nuclear power station radioactive waste treatment and automatic conveying and temporary store system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Chengyi; Tang Yifeng; Yang Zhida

    2012-01-01

    The treatment method of middle, low radioactive waste and the system of convey and temporal store in Tianwan nuclear power station were introduced. The primary system has some shortcoming, for example, the orientation precision isn't high, the work intensity is large, the operator is under superfluous nuclear radiation, and the capacity of storehouse isn't large, so the system need rebuild. In the premise of holding present house and facility, frequency conversion system was installed in the crane. In virtue of two laser telemeters and one revolving coder, three-dimensional coordinate parameter of crane can be measured. The application of IPC and PLC make the convey progress automatization, and the progress can be monitored by monitor system. After rebuild, the radioactivity to operator was reduced. Because of function of velocity regulating, the startup, running and braking of the crane is smooth, and the shake range of waste barrel was reduced. The crane orientation precision reach 1 mm, that reduce single waste barrel space, so the capacity of storehouse is evidently improved. (authors)

  8. Scaling factors for the activity determination of radioactive waste from nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medici, Marcela A.; Piumetti, Elsa H.

    2007-01-01

    Specific information of the total activity and activity concentration of the radionuclides contained is required for conditioning, transporting and final disposal of radioactive waste. Due to the complexity associated to alpha and beta measurements for these emitters it is worldwide used, particularly in the case of heterogeneous radioactive waste, the Scaling Factor Method. As in other cases, inputs of the results of the analysis of waste samples taking from waste streams are necessary. The Scaling Factor Method is based on the determination of averaged correlations between the activity concentrations of Difficult to Measure (DTM) nuclides (i.e. alpha and beta emitters) and the activity concentration of easy to measure nuclides (i.e. strong gamma emitters) called Key Nuclides (KN). In the application of this method two phases may be identified: in the first one the degree of correlation between averaged activities of DTM and a given KN is verified, and specific Scaling Factors are derived for every DTM radionuclide. In the second stage the total activity and the activity concentration of the selected KN is determined in each waste item and, by applying the SFs obtained previously, the activities of DTM nuclides are calculated. It is concluded that this method is appropriate and cost-effective and it is stressed that it is only applicable while the Nuclear Power Reactor is in operation. (author)

  9. Results of test operation of the thyristor power supply for the BU-70 proton synchrotron ring electromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, S.N.; Gusev, G.I.; Dan'shin, V.P.; Eliseenko, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The thyristor converter put into operation in the course of reconstruction of the power supply of the BU-70 synchrotron ring electromagnet is described. The converter is designed for maximum current I=5 kA and voltage 2x10 kV and consists of four three-phase bridge rectifiers connected in parallel in the equivalent twelve-phase circuit. The total number of thyristors - 2304. The thyristor power supply operated over 7000 h. The conclusion is drawn that the use of thyristors allows one to sharply reduce the time of system tuning for nominal operation mode, reduce water consumption for convertercooling and considerably improve the working conditions ofthe maintenance personnel

  10. Radioactive Cs in the Severely Contaminated Soils Near the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Makoto; Iwata, Hajime; Shiotsu, Hiroyuki; Masaki, Shota; Kawamoto, Yuji; Yamasaki, Shinya; Nakamatsu, Yuki; Imoto, Junpei; Furuki, Genki; Ochiai, Asumi [Department of Chemistry, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nanba, Kenji [Department of Environmental Management, Faculty of Symbiotic System Science, Fukushima University, Fukushima (Japan); Ohnuki, Toshihiko [Advanced Science Research Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai (Japan); Ewing, Rodney C. [Department of Geological Sciences, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Utsunomiya, Satoshi, E-mail: utsunomiya.satoshi.998@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Radioactive Cs isotopes ({sup 137}Cs, t{sub 1/2} = 30.07 years and {sup 134}Cs, t{sub 1/2} = 2.062 years) occur in severely contaminated soils within a few kilometer of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant at concentrations that range from 4 × 10{sup 5} to 5 × 10{sup 7} Bq/kg. In order to understand the mobility of Cs in these soils, both bulk and submicron-sized particles elutriated from four surface soils have been investigated using a variety of analytical techniques, including powder X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and analysis of the amount of radioactivity in sequential chemical extractions. Major minerals in bulk soil samples were quartz, feldspar, and minor clays. The submicron-sized particles elutriated from the same soil consist mainly of mica, vermiculite, and smectite and occasional gibbsite. Autoradiography in conjunction with SEM analysis confirmed the association of radioactive Cs mainly with the submicron-sized particles. Up to ~3 MBq/kg of {sup 137}Cs are associated with the colloidal size fraction (<1 μm), which accounts for ~78% of the total radioactivity. Sequential extraction of the bulk sample revealed that most Cs was retained in the residual fraction, confirming the high binding affinity of Cs to clays, aluminosilicate sheet structures. The chemistry of the fraction containing submicron-sized particles from the same bulk sample showed a similar distribution to that of the bulk sample, again confirming that the Cs is predominantly adsorbed onto submicron-sized sheet aluminosilicates, even in the bulk soil samples. Despite the very small particle size, aggregation of the particles prevents migration in the vertical direction, resulting in the retention of >98% of Cs within top ~5 cm of the soil. These results suggest that the mobility of the aggregates of submicron-sized sheet aluminosilicate in the surface environment is a key factor controlling the current Cs

  11. Spatiotemporal distribution of radioactive cesium released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in the sediment of Tokyo Bay, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Ryota; Ishida, Masanobu; Baba, Daisuke; Tanimoto, Satomi; Okamoto, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of "1"3"4Cs and "1"3"7Cs released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in the Tokyo Bay sediments were investigated. The total radioactivity of "1"3"4Cs and "1"3"7Cs detected in the Tokyo Bay sediment ranged from 240 to 870 Bq/kg-dry in the estuary of Arakawa River, but the activities detected in other sites were about 90 Bq/kg-dry or less. These results suggested that radioactive cesium, which precipitated to the ground, was carried to the river along with clay particles by rainfall and transported to the estuary. The vertical distribution of radioactive cesium showed that it invaded deeper than estimated based on the accumulation rate of the sediment. It was described that the vertical distribution of radioactive cesium was affected by physical mixing of sediments by tidal current, flood, and bioturbation of benthos. (author)

  12. Determination of 89Sr and 90Sr in highly radioactive water from a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojanowski, R.; Radecki, Z.; Duniec, S.

    1994-01-01

    The main criterion in assaying strontium radionuclides is to obtain radiochemically pure strontium sources for beta-particle counting. Nuclear power plant waters contain both 89 Sr and 90 Sr accompanied by many beta-particle and gamma-ray emitting fission and neutron-activation products. The latter activities can sometimes exceed those of strontium by a factor of 10 7 . Efficient purification procedures must be used to remove these products, preferably at an initial stage of analysis to reduce the radiation risk to personnel. A method has been developed in which a water sample is passed through a prefilter installed on top of an ion-exchange column filled with Dowex-50 resin in H + form. This prefilter is impregnated with ferrocyanides and manganese dioxide and retains most of the interfering radionuclides while the underlying cation-exchanger takes up strontium ions. A few additional purification steps result in a strontium salt that is free from other radioactivity. (orig.)

  13. Effect of thermal and radioactive waste waters from nuclear power plant on recipient biocenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veresikova, M; Csupka, S; Tomanova, E [Krajska Hygienicka Stanica, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia)

    1979-01-01

    During the years 1974 to 1976 the effect was studied of thermal and radioactive effluents from the A-1 nuclear power plant on aquatic microorganisms. The values obtained from the waste water canal and the river Dudvah after the canal discharged into the river were compared with the values found in the Dudvah before the discharge. The correlation between aquatic microorganisms and water temperature was found to be closest in the waste water canal and between microorganisms and /sup 137/Cs content in the Dudvah after sewer emptying. With increasing water temperature the populations of aquatic microorganisms decrease, with the exception of producers whose numbers will increase with rising water temperature. The content of /sup 137/Cs in water had an effect similar to that of water temperature.

  14. Contamination of persons occupationally exposed to natural radioactivity in a coal fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, A.; Horvat, D.

    1980-01-01

    Contamination of occupationally exposed subjects with natural radioactivity in a coal fired power plant at levels of 500 mrem/year was detected. The level of 210 Pb in urine varied from 2.29-14.47 pCi/l. These values were arrived at after subtracting a blank value of 1.05 pCi 210 Pb obtained from a control group. Structural chromosomal aberrations, completely missing in the control group, were detected in the exposed subjects. Approximately 6-10% of the metaphases of occupationally exposed subjects were found to have aberrations which were probably radiation induced. These included symmetrical and asymmetrical exchanges and numerical aberrations. In the control aroup aberrations were found in 1.4-4% of the metaphases, but these were only deletions. (H.K.)

  15. Summarization of radioactive effluent monitoring in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station 1994-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Junjie; Chen Yue

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces the radioactive effluent monitoring systems, measurement and quality control methods used in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station from its commercial operation in 1994. The main work and experiences for the management of effluent release are discussed and analyzed. The radwaste data appear declining trend and are far blow the annual limit approved by the national Environmental Protection Bureau since 1995. The normalized release (unit GBq/GWa) of 9 years is as follows: liquid nuclides (except tritium) 11.1, liquid tritium 1.91 x 10 4 , noble gas 2.03 x 10 4 , halogen 0.13, aerosol 7.57 x 10 -3 . For 110m Ag, the average release from 1998 to 2002 has been reduced to 1/7 of the quantity in 1997

  16. Application of ion exchange in liquid radioactive waste management of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Puskar; Chopra, S K; Sharma, P D [Nuclear Power Corporation, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The operation of nuclear power plants would necessarily result in generation of gaseous, liquid and solid radioactive wastes. The wastes are treated/conditioned to ensure that the permissible discharge limits laid down by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board of India are complied with. The wastes are segregated on activity levels, types of radioisotopes present and chemical nature of liquid streams. The basic philosophy of various treatment techniques is to concentrate and contain as much activity as possible. It is of utmost importance that the wastes are effectively treated by proven methods/processes. The radiochemical nature of waste generated is one of the parameters to select a treatment/conditioning method. The paper presents an outline of various processes adopted for treatment of liquid waste and ion exchange processes, their application in liquid waste management in detail. Projected quantities of liquid wastes for the current designs are included. (author). 2 tabs.

  17. Managing radioactive wastes of nuclear power plants in operation and site decommissioning phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardalani, E.; Khadivi, S.

    2008-01-01

    A large nuclear reactor annually produces about 25-50 tons consumed Uranium. These consumed materials consist of Uranium and also Plutonium and Curium. In total, about three percent of these materials are remained from fission. Existing actinides (Uranium, Plutonium, and Curium) cause long-term and short-term radiation that could have harmful effects on the environment. In order to reduce the diverse effects of radioactive wastes in Nuclear Power Plants, different procedures are employed such as compaction, chemical treatment, vitrification, canning and sealing with concrete and safe storage. In this paper, the harmful effects of nuclear wastes on the environment are introduced and a management procedure is presented to minimize its diverse effects

  18. Radioactivity level of the ambient environment of Anren bone-coal power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Jida; Liu Hongshi; Wu Zongmei; Wu Xiaofei

    2002-01-01

    The radioactivity level of the ambient environment of Anren Bone-coal Power Station (BCPS) was investigated systematically. The γ radiation dose rate level in the environment, the content of 238 U and 226 Ra in the ambient soil and the farmland in the direction of downwind, the concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra, 40 K and 222 Rn, as well as α potential energy in air, and the concentrations of natural U and Th in effluent are all higher than the corresponding values of the reference site. The additional annual effective dose equivalent to the residents living in the houses made of bone-coal cinder brick is 2.7 mSv

  19. Best Available Technique (BAT) as an Instrument for the Limitation of Radioactive Substances from Nuclear Power Reactors in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moberg, L.; Sundell-Bergman, S.; Sandwall, J.

    2004-01-01

    Traditionally, the concept of ALARA has been the basis for limitation and optimisation of releases of radioactive substances from nuclear power reactors in order to protect human health. In recent years, it has been discussed whether the ALARA principle can be applied also to protect the environment. For the protection of the environment, in particular for non-nuclear pollutants, the precautionary principle and the concept of Best Available Technique (BAT) have been applied. New Swedish regulations concerning the protection of human health and the environment from radioactive discharges from certain nuclear installations entered into force January 1st, 2002. The prime purpose of the regulations is to limit the radioactive releases. This limitation shall be based on the optimisation of radiation protection and shall be achieved by using BAT. In order to show compliance with the regulation and BAT, the concepts of reference values and target values have been introduced for nuclear power reactors. The reference value should be the release that is representative for optimum use and full functioning of systems of importance to the occurrence and limitation of radioactive releases from nuclear power reactors. The target value should show the level to which radioactive releases from nuclear power reactors can be reduced during a certain given period of time. Reference and target values have been determined for each nuclear power reactor in Sweden. Each year, the reactor licensees shall report to the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) the measures that have been adopted or that are planned to be adopted to limit radioactive releases with the aim of achieving the target values. The first report has been submitted to the SSI in 2003. (Author) 8 refs

  20. Main characteristics of the radioactive enrichment in ashes produced in coal-fired power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, Antonio; Corbacho, Jose A.; Cancio, David; Robles, Beatriz; Mora, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Under contract with the Spain's 'Nuclear Safety Council', a study is being conducted of the nation's largest nominal output coal-fired power stations. Its purpose is to assess the radiological impact on workers and local populations due to this source of NORM activity. One of the aspects of particular interest is the study of the radioactive enrichment in the combustion wastes relative to the different coals used as fuel (usually local bituminous coal or lignite, or imported coal). These wastes consist of fly ash (mostly fine particles collected in electrostatic precipitators), and bottom ash (larger in size, and collected wet or dry in hoppers below the boilers). In general terms, the enrichment factors measured were between 2 and 18 for the radionuclides 40 K, 226 Ra, 232 Th, and 210 Po. The magnitude of this enrichment factor depended mainly on the ash content of each coal, and hence on the type of coal used as fuel and the specific operation cycle in the different power stations. For the radionuclides 40 K, 226 Ra, and 232 Th, the enrichment was relatively similar in value in the fly and bottom ashes produced by the different types of coal used in the power stations studied. For 210 Po, however, as was expected, the enrichment was much greater in the fly ash than in the bottom ash for each coal analyzed. (author)

  1. Environmental aspects and public exposure doses of airborne radioactive effluents from a PWR-power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Miaofa; Zhang Jin; Fu Rongchu; Hu Yinxiu

    1989-04-01

    It is estimated that the environmental aspects and public exposure doses of airborne radioactive effluents from a imaginary 0.3 GW PWR-power plant which sited on the site of a large coalfired power plant estimated before. The major contributor to public exposure is found to be the release of 14 C and the critical pathway is food ingestion. A maximum annual individual body effective dose equivalent of 7.112 x 10 -6 Sv · (GW · a) -1 is found at the point of 0.5 km southeast of the source. The collective dose equivalent in the area around the plant within a radius of 100 km is to be 0.5974 man-Sv · a) -1 . Both maximum individual and collective effective dose equivalents of the PWR-power plant are much lower than those of the coal-fired one. If the ash emission ratio of the latter decreases from 24.6% to 1%, public exposure doses of the two plants would be nearly equal

  2. Development of an air flow calorimeter prototype for the measurement of thermal power released by large radioactive waste packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razouk, R; Beaumont, O; Failleau, G; Hay, B; Plumeri, S

    2018-03-01

    The estimation and control of the thermal power released by the radioactive waste packages are a key parameter in the management of radioactive waste geological repository sites. In the framework of the European project "Metrology for decommissioning nuclear facilities," the French National Agency of Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA) collaborates with Laboratoire National de Métrologie et D'essais in order to measure the thermal power up to 500 W of typical real size radioactive waste packages (of at least 0.175 m 3 ) with an uncertainty better than 5% by using a measurement method traceable to the international system of units. One of the selected metrological approaches is based on the principles of air flow calorimetry. This paper describes in detail the development of the air flow calorimeter prototype as well as the design of a radioactive waste package simulator used for its calibration. Results obtained from the calibration of the calorimeter and from the determination of thermal powers are presented here with an investigation of the measurement uncertainties.

  3. Development of an air flow calorimeter prototype for the measurement of thermal power released by large radioactive waste packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razouk, R.; Beaumont, O.; Failleau, G.; Hay, B.; Plumeri, S.

    2018-03-01

    The estimation and control of the thermal power released by the radioactive waste packages are a key parameter in the management of radioactive waste geological repository sites. In the framework of the European project "Metrology for decommissioning nuclear facilities," the French National Agency of Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA) collaborates with Laboratoire National de Métrologie et D'essais in order to measure the thermal power up to 500 W of typical real size radioactive waste packages (of at least 0.175 m3) with an uncertainty better than 5% by using a measurement method traceable to the international system of units. One of the selected metrological approaches is based on the principles of air flow calorimetry. This paper describes in detail the development of the air flow calorimeter prototype as well as the design of a radioactive waste package simulator used for its calibration. Results obtained from the calibration of the calorimeter and from the determination of thermal powers are presented here with an investigation of the measurement uncertainties.

  4. Nuclear power in space. Use of reactors and radioactive substances as power sources in satellites and space probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoestbaeck, Lars

    2008-11-01

    Today solar panels are the most common technique to supply power to satellites. Solar panels will work as long as the power demand of the satellite is limited and the satellite can be equipped with enough panels, and kept in an orbit that allows enough sunlight to hit the panels. There are various types of space missions that do not fulfil these criteria. With nuclear power these types of missions can be powered regardless of the sunlight and as early as 1961 the first satellite with a nuclear power source was placed in orbit. Out of seventy known space missions that has made use of nuclear power, ten have had some kind of failure. In no case has the failure been associated with the nuclear technology used. This report discusses to what degree satellites with nuclear power are a source for potential radioactive contamination of Swedish territory. It is not a discussion for or against nuclear power in space. Neither is it an assessment of consequences if radioactive material from a satellite would reach the earth's surface. Historically two different kinds of Nuclear Power Sources (NPS) have been used to generate electric power in space. The first is the reactor where the energy is derived from nuclear fission of 235 U and the second is the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) where electricity is generated from the heat of naturally decaying radionuclides. NPS has historically only been used in space by United States and the Soviet Union (and in one failing operation Russia). Nuclear Power Sources have been used in three types of space objects: satellites, space probes and moon/Mars vehicles. USA has launched one experimental reactor into orbit, all other use of NPS by the USA has been RTG:s. The Soviet Union, in contrast, only launched a few RTG:s but nearly forty reactors. The Soviet use of NPS is less transparent than the use in USA and some data published on Soviet systems are more or less well substantiated assessments. It is likely that also future

  5. Model for electromagnetic field analysis of superconducting power transmission cable comprising spiraled coated conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Katsutoku; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Taketsune; Maruyama, Osamu; Ohkuma, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Since the superconductor layers of YBCO-coated conductors are very thin, the ac loss of coated conductors is dominated by the magnetic flux density normal to the conductor face. In cables, most of the normal magnetic flux component is generated near gaps between coated conductors. Although the effects of gaps are significant, there are few reports on the electromagnetic field analysis of cables with spiral structures carried out while taking the gap effect into consideration. In a finitely long cable with a spiral structure, the electromagnetic field is naturally periodic along the cable axis. In a two-layer cable, the simplest period along the cable axis is the least common multiple of the spiral pitches in the inner and outer layers. However, we verified that there is a shorter period, and the same electromagnetic field distribution appears in all conductors of the same layer. Using these periodicities, we developed a three-dimensional model for the analysis of two-layer cables with a spiral structure. Current distributions of cables were analyzed using this model, and ac losses were calculated. In addition, these results were compared with ac losses calculated by two-dimensional analysis performed on the cross section of a cable. It was verified that the ac loss in a cable is correctly calculated by the 2D model when the spiral pitch is long enough. However, in the case of a tightly twisted cable, the ac losses calculated by the 2D model include some errors caused by an approximation in which the spiral structure is ignored.

  6. High temperature electromagnetic extraction of corrosion products in electronuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.; Chenouard, J.; Fauvet, P.; Darras, R.; Dubourg, M.

    1981-01-01

    The high potential of an electromagnetic filter application, in the peculiar case of a primary circuit at its operating temperature, appears in estimative calculations, and appreciated in relation with the dimensions of an industrial plant. The physical characteristics of the filter which exert the greatest effects on the efficiency factor, on the critical velocity and likewise on the utilizable capacity of the matrix, are determined. A semi-empirical operating equation is derived from systematic measurements with a reduced scale filter, and its relation with the fundamental equation of efficiency is brought out. (author)

  7. PLAN 2003. Costs for management of the radioactive waste products from nuclear power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    The companies that own nuclear power plants in Sweden are responsible for adopting measures needed to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from the Swedish nuclear power reactors in a safe manner. The so-called Financing Act (1992:1537) is linked to this responsibility and prescribes that a reactor owner, in consultation with other reactor owners, shall calculate the cost for management and disposal of the spent fuel and radioactive waste and for decommissioning and dismantling of the reactor plant. The reactor owner shall annually submit to the regulatory authority the cost data that are required for calculation of the fees to be imposed on electricity production during the ensuing year and of the guarantees that must be given as security for costs not covered by paid-in fees. The reactor owners have jointly commissioned SKB to calculate and compile these costs. This report presents a calculation of the costs for implementing all of these measures. The cost calculations are based on the plan for management and disposal of the radioactive waste that has been prepared by SKB and is described in this report. The following facilities and systems are in operation: Transportation system for radioactive waste products; Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB; Final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR 1. Plans also exist for: Canister factory and encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel; Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel; Final repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste; Final repository for decommissioning waste. The cost calculations also include costs for research, development and demonstration, as well as for decommissioning and dismantling the reactor plants. This report is based on the proposed strategy for the activities which is presented in SKB's RD and D-Programme 2001 and in the supplementary account to RD and D-Programme 98 which SKB submitted to the regulatory authority

  8. PLAN 2003. Costs for management of the radioactive waste products from nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    The companies that own nuclear power plants in Sweden are responsible for adopting measures needed to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from the Swedish nuclear power reactors in a safe manner. The so-called Financing Act (1992:1537) is linked to this responsibility and prescribes that a reactor owner, in consultation with other reactor owners, shall calculate the cost for management and disposal of the spent fuel and radioactive waste and for decommissioning and dismantling of the reactor plant. The reactor owner shall annually submit to the regulatory authority the cost data that are required for calculation of the fees to be imposed on electricity production during the ensuing year and of the guarantees that must be given as security for costs not covered by paid-in fees. The reactor owners have jointly commissioned SKB to calculate and compile these costs. This report presents a calculation of the costs for implementing all of these measures. The cost calculations are based on the plan for management and disposal of the radioactive waste that has been prepared by SKB and is described in this report. The following facilities and systems are in operation: Transportation system for radioactive waste products; Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB; Final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR 1. Plans also exist for: Canister factory and encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel; Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel; Final repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste; Final repository for decommissioning waste. The cost calculations also include costs for research, development and demonstration, as well as for decommissioning and dismantling the reactor plants. This report is based on the proposed strategy for the activities which is presented in SKB's RD and D-Programme 2001 and in the supplementary account to RD and D-Programme 98 which SKB submitted to the regulatory authority. The

  9. [Apoptosis of human lung carcinoma cell line GLC-82 induced by high power electromagnetic pulse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-zhe; Zhao, Mei-lan; Wang, De-wen; Dong, Bo

    2002-09-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) could be used for sterilization of food and the efficiency is higher than 2450 MHz continuous microwave done. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on apoptosis of human lung carcinoma cell line GLC-82, so that to explore and develop therapeutic means for cancer. The injury changes in GLC-82 cells after irradiated with EMP (electric field intensity was 60 kV/m, 5 pulses/2 min) were analyzed by cytometry, MTT chronometry, and flow cytometry. The immunohistochemical SP staining was used to determine the expressions of bcl-2 protein and p53 protein. The stained positive cells were analyzed by CMIAS-II image analysis system at a magnification 400. All data were analyzed by SPSS8.0 software. EMP could obviously inhibited proliferation and activity of lung carcinoma cell line GLC-82. The absorbance value (A570) of MTT decreased immediately, at 0 h, 1 h, and 6 h after the GLC-82 cells irradiated by EMP as compared with control group. The highest apoptosis rate was found to reach 13.38% by flow cytometry at 6 h after EMP irradiation. Down-regulation of bcl-2 expression and up-regulation of p53 expression were induced by EMP. EMP promotes apoptosis of GLC-82 cells. At same time, EMP can down-regulate bcl-2 expression and up-regulate p53 expression in GLC-82 cells. The bcl-2 and the p53 protein may involve the apoptotic process.

  10. The Analysis of the Field Application Methodology of Electromagnetic Ultrasonic Testing for Piping in Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chi Seung; Joo, Keum Jong; Choi, Jung Kweun; Um, Byung Kook; Park, Jea Suk [Korea Advanced Ispection Technology Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    Nuclear plant piping is classified as the safety class and non-safety class piping in usual. Safety class piping has been examined in accordance with ASME Section XI and V during PSI/ISI using RT, UT, PT, ECT, etc and evaluated periodically for integrity. But failures in piping had reported at non-welded parts and non-safety class pipings as well as the safety class pipings. The existing NDT methods are suitable for the specific parts for instance weldments to inspect but difficult to examine all parts (total coverage) of pipe line and very expensive in cost and consume the time. And also inspection using those methods is difficult and limited for the parts which are complex configuration, embedded under ground and installed at high radiation area in nuclear power plants. In order to inspect all parts of long range piping systems and reduce the inspection time and cost, the electromagnetic ultrasonic inspection technology is suitable and effective. The electromagnetic ultrasonic method can cover more than 50 m apart from sensor at one time without moving the sensor and examined the parts which are in difficulties for accessibility, for example, high radiation area, insulated components and embedded under ground.

  11. A survey of low-level radioactive waste treatment methods and problem areas associated with commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    A survey was made (June 1985) of technologies that were currently being used, those that had been discontinued, and those that were under consideration for treatment of low-level radioactive waste from the commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. The survey results included information concerning problems areas, areas needing research and development, and the use of mobile treatment facilities

  12. Radioactive characterization of the terrestrial ecosystem in the area of location of the Juragua Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibello Hernandez, R.Y.; Alonso Hernandez, C.M.; Diaz Asencio, M.; Cartas Aguila, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the results are exposed obtained by the Laboratory of Environmental Surveillance in the radioactive characterization of the existent terrestrial ecosystem in the area of location of the Juragua Nuclear Power Plants in Cienfuegos, Cuba, starting from 1986 and up to 1993

  13. Proposed new regulations for the limitation of releases of radioactive substances from nuclear power stations with light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    In this publication the Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection presents a proposed version of new regulations concerning the way in which the release of radioactive substances from nuclear power stations is to be limited. The regulations come into force on 1st January 1976. (Auth.)

  14. Analysis of transport logistics and routing requirements for radioactive waste management systems with respect to a minimum power scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, I.A.

    1984-10-01

    This report assesses the transport logistics associated with disposal of intermediate-level radioactive waste, as generated by CEGB, SSEB, UKAEA and BNFL, in accordance with a 'Minimum Power Scenario'. Transport by road and rail is analysed, as in previous reports; use of coastal shipping however has not been included but has been replaced with a combined road/rail option. (author)

  15. The Establishment of Object Selection Criteria for Effect Analysis of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) in Operating Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Song Hae; Ryu, Hosun; Kim, Minyi; Lee, Euijong [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) can be used as a strategic weapon by inducing damaging voltage and currents that the electrical circuits are not designed to withstand. EMPs are lethal to electronic systems. All EMP events have three common components: a source, coupling path, and receptor. It can also travel across power grids, destroying electronics as it passes in less than a second. There have been no research studies on the effect analysis for EMP in domestic nuclear power plants and power grids. To ensure the safety of operating nuclear power plants in this environment, the emission of EMP is needed for the effect analysis and safety measures against EMPs. Actually, it is difficult and inefficient to conduct the effect analysis of EMP with all the equipment and systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Therefore, this paper presents the results of establishing the object selection criteria for the effect analysis of EMP in operating nuclear power plants through reviewing previous research in the US and the safety related design concepts in domestic NPPs. It is not necessary to ensure the continued operation of the plant in intense multiple EMP environments. The most probable effect of EMP on a modern nuclear power plant is an unscheduled shutdown. EMP may also cause an extended shutdown by the unnecessary activation of some safety related systems. In general, EMP can be considered a nuisance to nuclear plants, but it is not considered a serious threat to plant safety. The results of EMP effect analysis show less possibility of failure in the tested individual equipment. It was also confirmed that there is no possibility of simultaneous failure for devices in charge of the safety shutdown in the NPP.

  16. Coincidence of features of emitted THz electromagnetic wave power form a single Josephson junction and different current components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdipour, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    By applying a voltage to a Josephson junction, the charge in superconducting layers (S-layers) will oscillate. Wavelength of the charge oscillations in S-layers is related to external current in junction, by increasing the external current, the wavelength will decrease which cause in some currents the wavelength be incommensurate with width of junction, so the CVC shows Fiske like steps. External current throwing along junction has some components, resistive, capacitive and superconducting current, beside these currents there is a current in lateral direction of junction, (x direction). On the other hand, the emitted electromagnetic wave power in THz region is related to AC component of electric field in junction, which itself is related to charge density in S-layers, which is related to currents in the system. So we expect that features of variation of current components reflect the features of emitted THz power form junction. Here we study in detail the superconductive current in a long Josephson junction (JJ), the current voltage characteristics (CVC) of junction and emitted THz power from the system. Then we compare the results. Comparing the results we see that there is a good qualitative coincidence in features of emitted THz power and supercurrent in junction.

  17. Radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Yoshio; Shimizu, Makoto.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of radioactivity in the ocean with marine life are various. Activities in this field, especially the measurements of the radioactivity in sea water and marine life are described. The works first started in Japan concerning nuclear weapon tests. Then the port call to Japan by U.S. nuclear-powered naval ships began. On the other hand, nuclear power generation is advancing with its discharge of warm water. The radioactive pollution of sea water, and hence the contamination of marine life are now major problems. Surveys of the sea areas concerned and study of the radioactivity intake by fishes and others are carried out extensively in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  18. Radioactive Pollution Estimate for Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant by a Particle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Keisuke; Ogawa, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    On Mar 12, 2011, very wide radioactive pollution occurred by a hydrogen explosion in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. A large amount of radioisotopes started with four times of explosions. With traditional atmospheric diffusion models could not reconstruct radioactive pollution in Fukushima. Then, with a particle model, this accident was reconstructed from meteorological archive and Radar- AMeDAS. Calculations with the particle model were carried out for Mar 12, 15, 18 and 20 when east southeast winds blew for five hours continuously. Meteorological archive is expressed by wind speeds and directions in five-km grid every hour with eight classes of height till 3000 m. Radar- AMeDAS is precipitation data in one-km grid every thirty minutes. Particles are ten scales of 0.01 to 0.1 mm in diameter with specific weight of 2.65 and vertical speeds given by Stokes equation. But, on Mar 15, it rained from 16:30 and then the particles fell down at a moment as wet deposit in calculation. On the other hand, the altitudes on the ground were given by DEM with 1 km-grid. The spatial dose by emitted radioisotopes was referred to the observation data at monitoring posts of Tokyo Electric Power Company. The falling points of radioisotopes were expressed on the map using the particle model. As a result, the same distributions were obtained as the surface spatial dose of radioisotopes in aero-monitoring by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. Especially, on Mar 15, the simulated pollution fitted to the observation, which extended to the northwest of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused mainly sever pollution. By the particle model, the falling positions on the ground were estimated each particle size. Particles with more than 0.05 mm of size were affected by the topography and blocked by the mountains with the altitudes of more than 700 m. The particle model does not include the atmospheric stability, the source height, and deposit speeds. The

  19. A new option for exploitage of future nuclear energy. Accelerator driven radioactive clean nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Dazhao

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear energy is an effective, clean and safe energy resource. But some shortages of the nuclear energy system presently commercial available obstruct further development of the nuclear energy by heavy nuclear fission. Those are final disposal of the high level radioactive waste, inefficient use of the uranium resource and safety issue of the system. Innovative technical option is seeking for by the nuclear scientific community in recent ten years in aiming to overcome these obstacles, namely, accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS). This hybrid system may bridge over the gap between presently commercial available nuclear power system and the full exploitation of the fusion energy. The basic principle of ADS is described and its capability in waste transmutation, conversion of the nuclear fuel are demonstrated by two examples--AD-fast reactor and AD-heavy water thermal reactor. The feasibility of ADS and some projects in US, Japan, etc are briefly discussed. The rationale in promoting the R and D of ADS in China is emphasized as China is at the beginning stage of its ambitious project in construction of the nuclear power

  20. The management of the radioactive waste generated by the EDF nuclear power plants in service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantes, B.; Beguin, St.

    2011-01-01

    From the very beginning of France's nuclear power programme, EDF has developed industrial-scale management of the waste it produces, which has constantly progressed in line with changes in the regulations and the available technology. This management process, improved thanks to feedback and experience, ensures that any risk of exposure, at every stage, from production to final disposal, is controlled. The guidelines adopted by EDF for sustainable management of its waste are as follows: -) reduce the quantity of waste, from the production stage and then through recycling and reprocessing; -) sort waste according to its nature and activity level, so that it can be processed and packaged appropriately and the appropriate long-term management solution implemented; -) package waste as soon as it is produced to prevent any risk of dispersion; -) store waste, pending decay or the availability of an appropriate disposal solution; -) transport and place waste in repositories, keeping it away from Man and the environment by means of engineered or natural barriers for as long as required for the radioactivity to decay to an acceptable level. Regarding short-lived waste produced during operating and maintenance activities at power plants in service, EDF currently implements fully-integrated industrial management solutions which are constantly being optimised in conjunction with its industrial partners. (authors)

  1. Determination of 93Zr in medium and low level radioactive wastes from Brazilian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Thiago C.; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of long-lived radionuclides produced in the nuclear power plants can be regarded as difficult-to-measure radionuclides (RDM), hence chemical separation is necessary before the nuclear measurement of them. The zirconium isotope 93 Zr is a long-lived pure β-particle-emitting radionuclide produced from 235 U fission and from neutron activation of the stable isotope 92 Zr and thus occurring as one of the radionuclides found in nuclear reactors. Due to its long half-life, 93 Zr is one of the radionuclides of interest for the performance of assessment studies of waste storage or disposal. Two different methodologies based on extractive resins and LSC and ICP-MS techniques that enables the 93 Zr determination in medium (ILW) and low level (LLW) radioactive wastes samples from Brazilian nuclear power plants has been developed in our laboratory. Analyzing real samples 65% and 75% chemical yields for 93 Zr recovery were achieved for ICP-MS and LSC techniques, respectively. The detection limits were 0.045 μg.L -1 for ICP-MS and 0.05 Bq.L -1 for LSC techniques. (author)

  2. International conference on management of radioactive waste from non-power applications - Sharing the experience. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of the conference is to provide an opportunity for experts in this field to meet and exchange information, and to discuss experience, specific practices and technical solutions used in the management of radioactive waste derived from different non-power applications. This includes waste from the operation of research reactors, and from the production and application of radioisotopes, labelled compounds and sealed radioactive sources in industry, medicine, agriculture, research and education. The discussion may also include management of specific waste types, such as waste from radiological accidents, waste from remediation activities connected with old, inadequate waste management facilities, etc. The conference may also address the issues of management of very low level radioactive waste (VLLRW) and of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORMs) to identify the existing scale of the problems and to analyse current approaches of Member States to their solution. The conference is also intended to identify the most important and problematic components of the subject and to facilitate the sharing of experience in improving efficiency, safety and economy in the management of radioactive waste from non-power nuclear applications. This publication contains 89 extended synopses of the oral and poster presentations delivered at the conference. Each of them was indexed separately

  3. Radioactive airborne effluents and the environmental impact assessment of CAP1400 nuclear power plant under normal operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qiong; Guo, RuiPing; Zhang, ChunMing; Chen, XiaoQiu; Wang, Bo, E-mail: wangbo@chinansc.cn

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Typical radionuclides dispersion from CAP1400 under normal operation was simulated. • Modified Gaussian model considered radioactive decay, dry and wet deposition and so on. • The radioactive impact pathways on the public through atmosphere were compared. • The maximum individual effective dose was lower than the public irradiation limit. - Abstract: China Advanced Passive nuclear power plant with installed capacity reaching to 1400 MW (CAP1400) is independently designed as the China's state-of-the-art third generation nuclear power brand based on AP1000 technology digestion and absorption. The concentration of typical radionuclides dispersed from CAP1400 under normal operation was calculated with modified Gaussian model, considering mixed layer height, dry deposition, wet deposition, radioactive decay and so on. The atmospheric dispersion factors, ground deposition rate, individual dose and public dose were also investigated to estimate the radioactive effects of CAP1400 under normal operation on surrounding environment and human beings. The radioactive impact pathways on the public through atmosphere, such as immersion irradiation in the smoke plume, internal irradiation from ingestion and inhalation and external irradiation from surface deposition were briefly introduced with focus on the comparison of the maximum individual effective dose to different group from atmospheric dispersion. All computation results show that the maximum individual irradiation dose happened to children with total effective irradiation dose of 4.52E−03 mSv/y, which was lower than the public irradiation limit of 0.25 mSv/y.

  4. Radioactive airborne effluents and the environmental impact assessment of CAP1400 nuclear power plant under normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Guo, RuiPing; Zhang, ChunMing; Chen, XiaoQiu; Wang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Typical radionuclides dispersion from CAP1400 under normal operation was simulated. • Modified Gaussian model considered radioactive decay, dry and wet deposition and so on. • The radioactive impact pathways on the public through atmosphere were compared. • The maximum individual effective dose was lower than the public irradiation limit. - Abstract: China Advanced Passive nuclear power plant with installed capacity reaching to 1400 MW (CAP1400) is independently designed as the China's state-of-the-art third generation nuclear power brand based on AP1000 technology digestion and absorption. The concentration of typical radionuclides dispersed from CAP1400 under normal operation was calculated with modified Gaussian model, considering mixed layer height, dry deposition, wet deposition, radioactive decay and so on. The atmospheric dispersion factors, ground deposition rate, individual dose and public dose were also investigated to estimate the radioactive effects of CAP1400 under normal operation on surrounding environment and human beings. The radioactive impact pathways on the public through atmosphere, such as immersion irradiation in the smoke plume, internal irradiation from ingestion and inhalation and external irradiation from surface deposition were briefly introduced with focus on the comparison of the maximum individual effective dose to different group from atmospheric dispersion. All computation results show that the maximum individual irradiation dose happened to children with total effective irradiation dose of 4.52E−03 mSv/y, which was lower than the public irradiation limit of 0.25 mSv/y

  5. Propagation of high power electromagnetic beam in relativistic magnetoplasma: Higher order paraxial ray theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Tarsem Singh; Kaur, Ravinder; Mahajan, Ranju

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of self-consistent, steady-state, theoretical model, which explains the ring formation in a Gaussian electromagnetic beam propagating in a magnetoplasma, characterized by relativistic nonlinearity. Higher order terms (up to r4) in the expansion of the dielectric function and the eikonal have been taken into account. The condition for the formation of a dark and bright ring derived earlier by Misra and Mishra [J. Plasma Phys. 75, 769 (2009)] has been used to study focusing/defocusing of the beam. It is seen that inclusion of higher order terms does significantly affect the dependence of the beam width on the distance of propagation. Further, the effect of the magnetic field and the nature of nonlinearity on the ring formation and self-focusing of the beam have been explored.

  6. Propagation of high power electromagnetic beam in relativistic magnetoplasma: Higher order paraxial ray theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, Tarsem Singh; Kaur, Ravinder; Mahajan, Ranju

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of self-consistent, steady-state, theoretical model, which explains the ring formation in a Gaussian electromagnetic beam propagating in a magnetoplasma, characterized by relativistic nonlinearity. Higher order terms (up to r 4 ) in the expansion of the dielectric function and the eikonal have been taken into account. The condition for the formation of a dark and bright ring derived earlier by Misra and Mishra [J. Plasma Phys. 75, 769 (2009)] has been used to study focusing/defocusing of the beam. It is seen that inclusion of higher order terms does significantly affect the dependence of the beam width on the distance of propagation. Further, the effect of the magnetic field and the nature of nonlinearity on the ring formation and self-focusing of the beam have been explored.

  7. Power and Signal Integrity and Electromagnetic Emission; the balancing act of decoupling, planes and tracks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2007-01-01

    The noise voltage in the reference or ground of a printed circuit board is often the cause of unwanted radiated emission. Power supply planes attribute to the noise voltage. By replacing the power supply planes by tracks, the noise voltage in the reference or ground can be considerably reduced,

  8. Radioactive dispersion analysis for hypothetical nuclear power plant (NPP) candidate site in Perak state, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuddin, Shazmeen Daniar; Basri, Nor Afifah; Omar, Nurlyana; Koh, Meng-Hock; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saridan Wan Hassan, Wan Muhamad

    2017-10-01

    Malaysia is planning to build a nuclear power plant (NPP) by 2030 to diversify the national electricity supply and resources. Selection of an NPP site must consider various factors, especially nuclear safety consideration to fulfil the nuclear safety objectives. Environmental Risk Assessment Analysis is a part of safety requirements by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) prior to the NPP commissioning process. Risk Assessments Analysis (RIA) is compulsory for the NPP site evaluation. One of RIA methods are Radioactive Dispersion Analysis using probabilistic risk analysis software. It is also important to perform studies to estimate the impact to the neighbouring population in the case of a nuclear accident at the power plant. In the present work, aimed to study the impact of a hypothetical nuclear accident by simulating the dispersion pattern of radionuclides originated from a candidate site at Manjung, Perak. The work has been performed using the HotSpot Health Physics codes. Two types of radionuclides have been considered namely 137Cs and 131I. In calculations, the initial concentration of radioactive materials of Fukushima Daiichi accident data are used which are 2.06 x 1016 Bq and 1.68 x 1017 Bq respectively for the two radionuclides. The result shows that the dispersion distance obtained from both software are not the same. It shows that 137Cs and 131I can be dispersed as far as 16 km and 80 km away from the site during radiological accident respectively, reaching major towns in Perak. Using HOTSPOT, the estimated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) for 137Cs and 131I at major towns in Perak such as Lumut and Sitiawan are 1.2 mSv and 9.9 mSv. As for Taiping, Ipoh, Kampar, and Teluk Intan the estimated TEDE is around 0.2 mSv and 1.6 mSv respectively. In conclusion, the dispersion can reach as far as 80 km from the site. However, estimated annual effective dose is not more than 1 mSv limit, which is considered acceptable in the point of view of

  9. Radioactive dispersion analysis for hypothetical nuclear power plant (NPP candidate site in Perak state, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsuddin Shazmeen Daniar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is planning to build a nuclear power plant (NPP by 2030 to diversify the national electricity supply and resources. Selection of an NPP site must consider various factors, especially nuclear safety consideration to fulfil the nuclear safety objectives. Environmental Risk Assessment Analysis is a part of safety requirements by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA prior to the NPP commissioning process. Risk Assessments Analysis (RIA is compulsory for the NPP site evaluation. One of RIA methods are Radioactive Dispersion Analysis using probabilistic risk analysis software. It is also important to perform studies to estimate the impact to the neighbouring population in the case of a nuclear accident at the power plant. In the present work, aimed to study the impact of a hypothetical nuclear accident by simulating the dispersion pattern of radionuclides originated from a candidate site at Manjung, Perak. The work has been performed using the HotSpot Health Physics codes. Two types of radionuclides have been considered namely 137Cs and 131I. In calculations, the initial concentration of radioactive materials of Fukushima Daiichi accident data are used which are 2.06 x 1016 Bq and 1.68 x 1017 Bq respectively for the two radionuclides. The result shows that the dispersion distance obtained from both software are not the same. It shows that 137Cs and 131I can be dispersed as far as 16 km and 80 km away from the site during radiological accident respectively, reaching major towns in Perak. Using HOTSPOT, the estimated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE for 137Cs and 131I at major towns in Perak such as Lumut and Sitiawan are 1.2 mSv and 9.9 mSv. As for Taiping, Ipoh, Kampar, and Teluk Intan the estimated TEDE is around 0.2 mSv and 1.6 mSv respectively. In conclusion, the dispersion can reach as far as 80 km from the site. However, estimated annual effective dose is not more than 1 mSv limit, which is considered acceptable in the point

  10. Probabilistic siting analysis of nuclear power plants emphasizing atmospheric dispersion of radioactive releases and radiation-induced health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savolainen, Ilkka

    1980-01-01

    A presentation is made of probabilistic evaluation schemes for nuclear power plant siting. Effects on health attributable to ionizing radiation are reviewed, for the purpose of assessment of the numbers of the most important health effect cases in light-water reactor accidents. The atmospheric dispersion of radioactive releases from nuclear power plants is discussed, and there is presented an environmental consequence assessment model in which the radioactive releases and atmospheric dispersion of the releases are treated by the application of probabilistic methods. In the model, the environmental effects arising from exposure to radiation are expressed as cumulative probability distributions and expectation values. The probabilistic environmental consequence assessment model has been applied to nuclear power plant site evaluation, including risk-benefit and cost-benefit analyses, and the comparison of various alternative sites. (author)

  11. Design and implementation of improved LsCpLp resonant circuit for power supply for high-power electromagnetic acoustic transducer excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zao, Yongming; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Jiawei; Zhang, Xinglan; Hou, Shuaicheng

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the design and implementation of an improved series-parallel inductor-capacitor-inductor (LsCpLp) resonant circuit power supply for excitation of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs). The main advantage of the proposed resonant circuit is the absence of a high-permeability dynamic transformer. A high-frequency pulsating voltage gain can be achieved through a double resonance phenomenon. Both resonant tailing behavior and higher harmonics are suppressed by the improved resonant circuit, which also contributes to the generation of ultrasonic waves. Additionally, the proposed circuit can realize impedance matching and can also optimize the transduction efficiency. The complete design and implementation procedure for the power supply is described and has been validated by implementation of the proposed power supply to drive a portable EMAT. The circuit simulation results show close agreement with the experimental results and thus confirm the validity of the proposed topology. The proposed circuit is suitable for use as a portable EMAT excitation power supply that is fed by a low-voltage source.

  12. Design and implementation of improved LsCpLp resonant circuit for power supply for high-power electromagnetic acoustic transducer excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zao, Yongming; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Jiawei; Zhang, Xinglan; Hou, Shuaicheng

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the design and implementation of an improved series-parallel inductor-capacitor-inductor (L s C p L p ) resonant circuit power supply for excitation of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs). The main advantage of the proposed resonant circuit is the absence of a high-permeability dynamic transformer. A high-frequency pulsating voltage gain can be achieved through a double resonance phenomenon. Both resonant tailing behavior and higher harmonics are suppressed by the improved resonant circuit, which also contributes to the generation of ultrasonic waves. Additionally, the proposed circuit can realize impedance matching and can also optimize the transduction efficiency. The complete design and implementation procedure for the power supply is described and has been validated by implementation of the proposed power supply to drive a portable EMAT. The circuit simulation results show close agreement with the experimental results and thus confirm the validity of the proposed topology. The proposed circuit is suitable for use as a portable EMAT excitation power supply that is fed by a low-voltage source.

  13. Options for the ultimate storage of low and medium level radioactive wastes produced at Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emeterio, Miguel

    1991-01-01

    The devoted time and still to be expend in prepare, execute and teach permanent and safe solutions to the problem of the evaluation of radioactive wastes reflects the political, economic and environmental importance with respect to public health and safety invested in this task, as well as, its technological challenges. In the case of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, its low and medium level radioactive wastes are stored in the beginning in a temporal store with a capacity of 2000 m 3 sufficient to four years of normal operation; according to what it is necessary to select one of different ways of waste storage. Different technologies has been evaluated and the preliminary conclusion is that for Mexico the more feasible way to store radioactive wastes is in tumulus (Author)

  14. Environmental safety aspects of the new solid radioactive waste management and storage facility at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragaisis, Valdas; Poskas, Povilas; Simonis, Vytautas; Adomaitis, Jonas Erdvilas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania). Nuclear Engineering Lab.

    2011-11-15

    New solid radioactive waste management and interim storage facilities will be constructed for the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant to support ongoing decommissioning activities, including removal and treatment of operational waste from the existing storage buildings. The paper presents approach and methods that have been used to assess radiological impacts to the general public potentially arising under normal operation and accident conditions and to demonstrate compliance with regulations in force. The assessment of impacts from normal operation includes evaluation of exposure arising from release of airborne radioactive material and from facilities and packages containing radioactive material. In addition, radiological impacts from other nearby operating and planned nuclear facilities are taken into consideration. The assessment of impacts under accident conditions includes evaluation of exposure arising from the selected design and beyond design basis accidents. (orig.)

  15. Facility for remote filling and discharging of containers and tanks in nuclear power plants with radioactive concentrates and sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucharik, D.

    1987-01-01

    The facility consists of a remote controlled filling and discharge head pressed with a pneumatic cylinder to the container adapters. The head is provided with hoses for the feeding and/or withdrawal of the concentrate and for container ventilation. It is suspended on the pneumatic cylinder which is mounted on a revolving arm. On the pin of the revolving arm there is a drip tray which captures drops of the concentrate when the container has been filled and the head unsealed. The ball valves in the container adapters are electromagnetically controlled. The machine serves to mechanize certain manual operations, improves work safety and reduces contact of personnel with radioactive concentrates. (J.B.). 1 fig

  16. Nuclear power and radioactive waste: a sub-seabed disposal option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deese, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    The radioactive waste disposal programs of most countries are still focused on investigation of land-based geologic formations as possible containment media for radioactive wastes. Important discoveries in geological oceanography and amazing advances in ocean engineering over the past decade have, however, led several countries to investigate another promising possibility for geologic disposal of radioactive waste--isolation within the deep seabed or sub-seabed disposal. Beyond the various technical advantages and disadvantages involved, use of the international seabed for radioactive waste disposal raises a multitude of social, economic, political, legal, institutional, and ethical issues. These issues are analyzed in this volume

  17. High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) and High Power Microwave (HPM) Devices: Threat Assessments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Clay

    2006-01-01

    .... This method is called High Power Microwave (HPM). Several nations, including sponsors of terrorism, may currently have a capability to use EMP as a weapon for cyberterrorism to disrupt communications and other parts of the U.S...

  18. High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) and High Power Microwave (HPM) Devices: Threat Assessments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Clay

    2005-01-01

    .... This method is called High Power Microwave (HPM). Several nations, including reported sponsors of terrorism, may currently have a capability to use EMP as a weapon to disrupt communications and other parts of the U.S...

  19. Classification of low-level radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, R.E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The NRC regulation, 10 CFR Part 61, establishes three classes of wastes designated A, B, and C based on listed concentrations of specific nuclides. The NRC Branch Technical Position (BTP) relative to the required compliance program focused on extensive waste stream sampling and analysis as a means of compliance. To meet the above regulatory requirements, an engineering analysis approach for quantifying the concentrations and amounts of radionuclides of classification concern was developed as an alternative to an extensive and difficult waste sampling and analysis program. Essentially this methodology involves a material balance of radionuclides which for the most part originate in the reactor core and are transported to the waste streams by reactor coolants and whose concentration in the coolant is primarily a function of fuel performance. The use of scaling factors between readily measured key radionuclides and others required for classification have been published in Report AIF/NESP-027 entitled, Methodologies for Classification of Low-Level Radioactive Wastes from Nuclear Power Plants. Since then data from about 1000 samples on nuclide concentrations in various reactor waste streams from 65 units at 40 sites was collated, analyzed and evaluated to confirm the calculational methodology in AIF/NESP-027. In summary, the approach and results of the engineering analysis methodology were validated

  20. Determination of safe radioactive releases to the atmosphere from the nuclear power site, Dynefontein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basson, J.K.; Van As, D.

    1976-01-01

    South Africa's first nuclear power station, Koeberg A, is to be built by Escom at Dynefontein, 28 km north of Cape Town, and the experience gained at the National Nuclear Research Centre, Pelindaba, has been used by the AEB as basis for the pre-operational investigation. The capacity of the environment to accept airborne radioactive effluent safely depends on various local factors such as dispersion conditions, the ecology, the habits of the local population and the accumulation, through critical pathways, of pertinent radionuclides. Long-term average dilution factors at varying distances from a 100m stack have been calculated by ESCOM from mesometeorological data collected by the CSIR. On the basis of available data, permissible release rates are derived for radioisotopes of the noble gases (critical pathway:external cloud exposure), 131 I, 137 Cs, 106 Ru, 125 Sb and 114 Ce and tritium. Although final confirmation of these values can only be obtained after operation, such a pre-operational survey may serve as an example to conventional industry [af

  1. Radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luykx, F.; Fraser, G.

    1983-01-01

    The report covers operational nuclear power stations of capacity greater than 5C MWe and nucler fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community. Radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent discharges from these installations are given for the period 1976 to 1980, expressed both in absolute terms and normalized to net electricity production from the fuel. An assesssment is then made of exposure of members of the public consequent to the 1980 discharges. Where environmental contamination levels were detectable the results have been taken into account in the dose assessment; however, environmental contamination was in general below the limit of detection. In these circumstances the dose estimates rely entirely on theoretical models which frequently incorporate conservative assumptions; hence these estimates are likely to be greater than the doses actually received. The estimated exposures have then been compared with the dose limits set out in the Euratom Directive of 15th July, 1980. It is concluded that the exposure of members of the public always left an appreciable safety margin relative to the limits and indeed lay within the variations in exposure which result from natural background

  2. Radioactivity. Centenary of radioactivity discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Tubiana, M.; Bimbot, R.

    1997-01-01

    This small booklet was edited for the occasion of the exhibitions of the celebration of the centenary of radioactivity discovery which took place in various locations in France from 1996 to 1998. It recalls some basic knowledge concerning radioactivity and its applications: history of discovery, atoms and isotopes, radiations, measurement of ionizing radiations, natural and artificial radioactivity, isotope dating and labelling, radiotherapy, nuclear power and reactors, fission and fusion, nuclear wastes, dosimetry, effects and radioprotection. (J.S.)

  3. Standard criteria for disposal of liquid radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants into surface waters (river systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, V.V.; Tsybizov, I.S.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive products discharge into natural water streams results in the necessity to regulate nuclear power plant discharges to ensure radiation safety (RS) for population using a river and surrounding river territory. To ensure RS it is necessary to set scientific-founded standards of permissible discharge level of liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) from nuclear power plant assuring observance of hygienic requirements for surface water puring. Volume of permissible LRW discharge into river systems must be set both with provision for concrete physical-geographycal conditions, specficity of utilizing the river and river valley and social-economical peculiarities of crtical population groups. The value of permissible LRW discharge into river systems is determined by three criterion groups: radiological, ecological and hydrological ones. By means of radiological group the internal and external irradiation doses for the whole body and its separate organs are set and RS of population is determined. Ecological criteria include a number of parameters (coefficients of accumulation, distribution and transition) determining quantitative ratios between radioactive element contents in water and separate links of biological chains: soil/water, fish/water, vegetables/water and others. Hydrological criteria determine the degree of waste dilution in rivers, control radioactive contamination of flood-lands areas and in common with ecological criteria determine radionuclide contents in soil and food products. A method of determining average annual values of LRW dilution in river waters is presented [ru

  4. Radioactivity level of airplane to Guangzhou Baiyun international airport during the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haiqing; Chen Wentao; Cheng Xiaobo; Liao Tong; Deng Fei; Chen Fuliang; Zhang Yanjin; Li Lingjuan; Liang Guiyuan; Wu Guibiao

    2014-01-01

    The radioactivity level of airplanes to Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport (GBIAC) during the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was monitored by Guangdong Environmental Radiation Monitoring Center (GERC) on March 15 and 16, 2011. The artificial radionuclide "1"3"1I, "1"3"4Cs, "1"3"7Cs, "l"3"6Cs, "1"3"2I, "1"3"2Te were detected in the wipe samples of the outer surface of airplanes from Japan to GBIAC. The radioactivity ration of "1"3"7Cs/"1"3"4Cs was calculated as (1.12 ± 0.06) in the wipe samples, which similar to the result in the wipe sample of the outer surface of airplanes from Japan to Hangzhou airport obtained by Zhejiang Province Environmental Radiation Monitoring Center (l.lO ± 0.08), but slightly higher than results in the aerosol monitoring at Guangzhou (0.99 ± 0.30) and Shenzhen (0.94 ± 0.30) by GERC, the data (0.83) published by Japan Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and the result (1.00 ± 0.13) measured by Tokyo Electric Power Company. A slight radioactive contamination was detected on the surface of outer airplanes and internal cabin. The practice suggested that the wipe sample of the outer surface of airplane was a fast , simple and sensitive approach for emergency monitoring of radioactive contamination. (authors)

  5. Radioactivity Monitoring In Surroundings Of The Coal - Fired Power Plant Tuzla, Bosnia And Herzegovina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saracevic, L.; Gradascevic, N.; Mujic, N.; Samek, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the influence of 12-year operation of coal power plant (CPP) Tuzla on radioactive contamination of soil in its vicinity was investigated. Coal, ash, slag and soil inside of CPP as well as soil were sampled for analysis during 12 years period, twice a year. Sampling of soil in expected zone of influence was performed at points 5 km before and after CPP along the dominating wind direction. Mean values of specific activities in samples of coal used in CPP Tuzla were 23.41 Bq kg-1 for 238U, 11.51 Bq/kg for 232Th, 17.03 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra and 94.72 Bq/kg for 40K, and they showed no indication on increase of observed radionuclides in coal. Mean values of specific activities in samples of ash for 238U, 232Th, 226Ra and 40K were 65.24, 37.59, 61.36 and 313.96 Bq/kg, respectively, and 47.32, 27.33, 38.11 and 237.15 Bq/kg, respectively, in samples of slag. Values of observed radionuclides in samples of soil inside CPP as well as on the point at 5 km before CPP in dominating wind direction were lower than those measured 5 km after CPP. On the base of obtained results we concluded that this was caused by the deposition of ash along the dominant wind direction. Ratios of specific activities after and before CPP for observed radionuclides in soil were 1.66 for 238U, 1.54 for 232Th, 1.52 for 226Ra and 1.43 for 40K. Mean value of this ratios was 1.54 with standard deviation of 0.09. Given ratios showed that dominant wind direction was probably the main cause of recorded increase of specific activities in soil after CPP Tuzla. Deposition of flying ash cause no significant increase of natural radioactivity in soil mainly because of low average activities of this radionuclides in coal. (author).

  6. Treatment and storage of radioactive waste at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide gives the general principles that shall be followed when planning and implementing the treatment, storing, transfer, activity monitoring and record keeping of radioactive wastes. The guide does not include provisions for spent fuel or for treatment and discharges of liquids or gases containing radioactive substances. Neither does the guide include any detailed design criteria for treatment facilities or storages. (4 refs.)

  7. Experience in the management of radioactive wastes from power reactors - scope for regional cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.T.; Khan, A.A.

    The paper presents the R and D and operational experience of India in the development of a viable technology in the field of radioactive waste management and examines the scope for regional cooperation between countries with comparable conditions with a view to minimise the discharge of radioactivity to the environment. (author)

  8. Wideband metamaterial array with polarization-independent and wide incident angle for harvesting ambient electromagnetic energy and wireless power transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hui-Teng; Yang, Xue-Xia; Song, Xing-Tang; Guo, Zhen-Yue; Yu, Fan

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we introduced the design, demonstration, and discussion of a wideband metamaterial array with polarization-independent and wide-angle for harvesting ambient electromagnetic (EM) energy and wireless power transfer. The array consists of unit cells with one square ring and four metal bars. In comparison to the published metamaterial arrays for harvesting EM energy or wireless transfer, this design had the wide operation bandwidth with the HPBW (Half Power Band Width) of 110% (6.2 GHz-21.4 GHz), which overcomes the narrow-band operation induced by the resonance characteristic of the metamaterial. On the normal incidence, the simulated maximum harvesting efficiency was 96% and the HPBW was 110% for the random polarization wave. As the incident angle increases to 45°, the maximum efficiency remained higher than 88% and the HPBW remained higher than 83% for the random polarization wave. Furthermore, the experimental verification of the designed metamaterial array was conducted, and the measured results were in reasonable agreement with the simulated ones.

  9. Protecting power equipment against magnetohydrodynamic effects (MHD of electromagnetic pulses (EMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurevich Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the effects of geomagnetic-induced currents (GIC on electrical equipment of power systems and analyzes technical measures for protection against such effects. It is noted that the difference between highaltitude nuclear detonation and solar storm GICs forces applying different methods of electrical equipment protection. It also illustrates that enhancement of transformer immunity to GICs without saturation prevention is not an effective measure to protect the power system. The article offers a special relay designed for fast disconnection of the transformer under GICs.

  10. Inertia effects in the laminar radial flow of a power law fluid with an electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Chen, K.-H.; Wu, C.-Y.

    1984-01-01

    An approximate study of the pressure distribution for the radial flow of a non-newtonian (power law) fluid between two parallel disks in the presence of an axial electrical field is obtained by using the momentum and energy integral methods. For a non-newtonian fluid it is shown that the inertia effect must be considered to be significant for the pressure distribution, especially for the power law fluids with n >= 1. Furthermore, it is seen that the inertia effect will also lower the load capacity of the disks. (Auth.)

  11. The environmental impact of radioactive releases from accidents in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beattie, J.R.; Griffiths, R.F.; Kaiser, G.D.; Kinchin, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of accidental releases of radioactivity from thermal and fast reactors is presented. Following a general discussion on the hazards involved, the nature of the environmental impact of radioactive releases is examined. This includes a brief review of the natural radiation background, the effect on human health of various levels of radiation and radioactivity, permissible and reference levels, and the type of hazards from both passing clouds of airbourne radioactive material and from ground deposited material. The problem of atmospheric dispersion and methods of calculations of radioactive materials in the atmosphere are examined in order for the consequences of accidental release to be analysed. National accidents and their environmental consequences are then examined. Finally there is a review of the risks to which man is always exposed because of his environment. Common and collective risks are also considered. Conclusions are reached as to the acceptibility or otherwise of the environmental impact of reactor accidents. (U.K.)

  12. Probabilistic Prognosis of Environmental Radioactivity Concentrations due to Radioisotopes Discharged to Water Bodies from Nuclear Power Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás Zerquera, Juan; Mora, Juan C; Robles, Beatriz

    2017-11-15

    Due to their very low values, the complexity of comparing the contribution of nuclear power plants (NPPs) to environmental radioactivity with modeled values is recognized. In order to compare probabilistic prognosis of radioactivity concentrations with environmental measurement values, an exercise was performed using public data of radioactive routine discharges from three representative Spanish nuclear power plants. Specifically, data on liquid discharges from three Spanish NPPs: Almaraz, Vandellós II, and Ascó to three different aquatic bodies (river, lake, and coast) were used. Results modelled using generic conservative models together with Monte Carlo techniques used for uncertainties propagation were compared with values of radioactivity concentrations in the environment measured in the surroundings of these NPPs. Probability distribution functions were inferred for the source term, used as an input to the model to estimate the radioactivity concentrations in the environment due to discharges to the water bodies. Radioactivity concentrations measured in bottom sediments were used in the exercise due to their accumulation properties. Of all the radioisotopes measured in the environmental monitoring programs around the NPPs, only Cs-137, Sr-90, and Co-60 had positive values greater than their respective detection limits. Of those, Sr-90 and Cs-137 are easily measured in the environment, but significant contribution from the radioactive fall-out due to nuclear explosions in the atmosphere exists, and therefore their values cannot be attributed to the NPPs. On the contrary, Co-60 is especially useful as an indicator of the radioactive discharges from NPPs because its presence in the environment can solely be attributed to the impact of the closer nuclear facilities. All the modelled values for Co-60 showed a reasonable correspondence with measured environmental data in all cases, being conservative in two of them. The more conservative predictions obtained with

  13. 3D electromagnetic design and electrical characteristics analysis of a 10-MW-class hightemperature superconducting synchronous generator for wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Park, S. I.; Le, T. D.; Kim, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the general electromagnetic design process of a 10-MW-class high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous generator that is intended to be utilized for large scale offshore wind generator is discussed. This paper presents three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic design proposal and electrical characteristic analysis results of a 10-MW-class HTS synchronous generator for wind power. For more detailed design by reducing the errors of a two-dimensional (2D) design owing to leakage flux in air-gap, we redesign and analyze the 2D conceptual electromagnetic design model of the HTS synchronous generator using 3D finite element analysis (FEA) software. Then electrical characteristics which include the no-load and full-load voltage of generator, harmonic contents of these two load conditions, voltage regulation and losses of generator are analyzed by commercial 3D FEA software.

  14. Engineering Electromagnetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Se Yun

    2009-01-01

    This book deals with engineering electromagnetics. It contains seven chapters, which treats understanding of engineering electromagnetics such as magnet and electron spin, current and a magnetic field and an electromagnetic wave, Essential tool for engineering electromagnetics on rector and scalar, rectangular coordinate system and curl vector, electrostatic field with coulomb rule and method of electric images, Biot-Savart law, Ampere law and magnetic force, Maxwell equation and an electromagnetic wave and reflection and penetration of electromagnetic plane wave.

  15. On the Feasibility of Gap Detection of Power Transformer Partial Discharge UHF Signals: Gap Propagation Characteristics of Electromagnetic Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxing Zhang; Guozhi Zhang; Yalong Li; Jian Zhang; Rui Huang

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed the transformer electromagnetic gap propagation characteristics. The influence of gap size is also analyzed, and the results experimentally verified. The obtained results indicated that the gap propagation characteristics of electromagnetic wave signals radiated by the partial discharge (PD) source in different directions are substantially different. The intensity of the electromagnetic wave in the gap reaches a maximum at a gap height of 1 cm; and inside the gap, the inte...

  16. A thermoelectric-conversion power supply system using a strontium heat source of high-level radioactive nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikazawa, Yoshitaka

    2011-01-01

    A thermoelectric-conversion power supply system with radioactive strontium in high-level radioactive waste has been proposed. A combination of Alkali Metal Thermo-Electric Conversion (AMTEC) and a strontium fluoride heat source can provide a compact and long-lived power supply system. A heat source design with strontium fluoride pin bundles with Hastelloy cladding and intermediate copper has been proposed. This design has taken heat transportation into consideration, and, in this regard, the feasibility has been confirmed by a three-dimensional thermal analysis using Star-CD code. This power supply system with an electric output of 1 MW can be arranged in a space of 50 m 2 and approximately 1.1 m height and can be operated for 15 years without refueling. This compact and long-lived power supply is suitable for powering sources for remote places and middle-sized ships. From the viewpoint of geological disposal of high-level waste, the proposed power supply system provides a financial base for strontium-cesium partitioning. That is, a combination of minor-actinide recycling and strontium-cesium partitioning can eliminate a large part of decay heat in high-level waste and thus can save much space for geological disposal. (author)

  17. Energy conversion by ‘T-shaped’ cantilever type electromagnetic vibration based micro power generator from low frequency vibration sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddique, Abu Raihan Mohammad; Mahmud, Shohel; Van Heyst, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A T-shaped cantilever type electromagnetic vibration based MPG has been described. • The designed EVMPG is useful for low frequency based vibration sources. • Both experimental tests and theoretical analysis have been performed. • The final compact prototype was tested at different conditions of human movements. • The prototype can generate 35.2 mV and 0.22 mW at 7 Hz with 5.6 Ω. - Abstract: The design, development, and analyses of low-frequency vibration based T-shaped cantilever type electromagnetic micro power generators (EVMPGs) are presented in this paper. Four different configurations (Configurations A to D) of EVMPGs were designed and fabricated and subsequently characterized using detailed experimental and limited analytical techniques. Configuration A and B consisted of a single and a double cylindrical moving magnets (NdFeB), respectively, while Configuration C consisted of four rectangular moving magnets with respect to a fixed copper coil. In contrast, Configuration D used a moving coil between four rectangular magnets with a back-iron bar. The open circuit RMS voltage output was observed to be a maximum from Configuration D (98.2 mV at 6.29 Hz) with a base vibration acceleration of 0.8 m s"−"2. Therefore, Configuration D was selected for further experimental investigations, which included changing the back-iron bar thickness, changing the base acceleration level, and changing the air gap separation between the magnets in order to optimize this configuration. The maximum load RMS voltage and power outputs of Configuration D were 105.4 mV and 1.35 mW at 6.29 Hz for load resistance 8.2 Ω and a base acceleration of 0.8 m s"−"2 with a 4.2 mm back-iron bar when the air gap between the magnets was 20 mm. Finally, a small portable EVMPG prototype was developed based on the Configuration D and was tested at different human movement conditions (i.e., walking, quick walking, and running). The developed EVMPG prototype was capable of

  18. Radiation Protection and Radioactive Waste Management in the Operation of Nuclear Power Plants. Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations to the regulatory body, focused on the operational aspects of radiation protection and radioactive waste management in nuclear power plants, and on how to ensure the fulfilment of the requirements established in the relevant Safety Requirements publications. It will also be useful for senior managers in licensee or contractor organizations who are responsible for establishing and managing programmes for radiation protection and for the management of radioactive waste. This Safety Guide gives general recommendations for the development of radiation protection programmes at nuclear power plants. The issues are then elaborated by defining the main elements of a radiation protection programme. Particular attention is paid to area classification, workplace monitoring and supervision, application of the principle of optimization of protection (also termed the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle), and facilities and equipment. This Safety Guide covers all the safety related aspects of a programme for the management of radioactive waste at a nuclear power plant. Emphasis is placed on the minimization of waste in terms of both activity and volume. The various steps in predisposal waste management are covered, namely processing (pretreatment, treatment and conditioning), storage and transport. Releases of effluents, the application of authorized limits and reference levels are discussed, together with the main elements of an environmental monitoring programme

  19. Study on electromagnetic characteristics of the magnetic coupling resonant coil for the wireless power transmission system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxian; Liu, Yiping; Wei, Yonggeng; Song, Yilin

    2018-01-01

    The resonant coil design is taken as the core technology in the magnetic coupling resonant wireless power transmission system, which achieves energy transmission by the coupling of the resonant coil. This paper studies the effect of the resonant coil on energy transmission and the efficiency of the system. Combining a two-coil with a three-coil system, the optimum design method for the resonant coil is given to propose a novel coil structure. First, the co-simulation methods of Pspice and Maxwell are used. When the coupling coefficient of the resonant coil is different, the relationship between system transmission efficiency, output power, and frequency is analyzed. When the self-inductance of the resonant coil is different, the relationship between the performance and frequency of the system transmission is analyzed. Then, two-coil and three-coil structure models are built, and the parameters of the magnetic field of the coils are calculated and analyzed using the finite element method. In the end, a dual E-type simulation circuit model is used to optimize the design of the novel resonance coil. The co-simulation results show that the coupling coefficients of the two-coil, three-coil, and novel coil systems are 0.017, 0.17 and 0.0126, respectively. The power loss of the novel coil is 16.4 mW. There is an obvious improvement in the three-coil system, which shows that the magnetic leakage of the field and the energy coupling are relatively small. The new structure coil has better performance, and the load loss is lower; it can improve the system output power and transmission efficiency.

  20. A pilot plant demonstration of the vitrification of radioactive solutions using microwave power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, M.S.; Hardwick, W.H.; Murphy, V.; Wace, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    A process has been developed that exploits the characteristics of microwave heating for the vitrification of high-level radioactive liquid waste. This process, microwave vitrification, has been successfully operated at pilot plant scale in an active cell using simulated liquid waste containing several curies of radioactivity. Excellent decontamination factors have been achieved for both volatiles and nonvolatiles with an average ruthenium decontamination factor of 490 and a gross alpha emitter decontamination factor of 100,000. Almost all the radioactivity is incorporated in a glass block

  1. Micro-organisms and divers exposure to radioactivity in spent fuel pools at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz de A, D. [Underwater Construction Corporation, Latin America, Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Silva, R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, 21941-902 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Gomes N, C. A., E-mail: dmuniz@uccdive.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia, Environmental Engineering Program, 21941-902 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-09-15

    Many nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world are in the process of extending their lifespan from 40 to 60 years of operation. The NPP; Angra 1 (Brazil) has performed a thorough evaluation of its Life Extension Engineering project. In this context, the spent fuel pool (SFP) was one of the areas studied in order to demonstrate the plants integrity for a life extension. Micro-organisms growing on the liner of the fuel transfer channel (Ftc) and SFP can form a film of bacteria, which is highly resistant to radiation. This paper aims to compare the micro-organisms found in NPP Angra 1 with those reported to other NPPs and also relates their occurrence with the radiation levels at the sites. It also compares divers exposure to radioactivity during underwater activities in the SFP. Fourteen samples were collected on the surface of the liners of the Ftc, the SFP and the drains within the fuel building (FB) of Angra 1. For the identification of the micro-organisms, a metagenomics analysis was performed by random sequencing (Shotgun) and the use of Ion Torrent PGM Sequence r. Twelve micro-organisms phyla were identified; Acido-bacteria, Actino-bacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydiae, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Cyano-bacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Proteo-bacteria, and Verrucomicrobia as well as organisms not classified. In the SFP of Angra 1, the bacteria survived the exposure to a radiation of 0.416 Gy/h (high radiation). Deinococcus-thermus, bacteria identified in Angra 1, has resisted an exposure to 30,000 Gy/h in another plant. (Author)

  2. Micro-organisms and divers exposure to radioactivity in spent fuel pools at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz de A, D.; Silva, R.; Gomes N, C. A.

    2017-09-01

    Many nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world are in the process of extending their lifespan from 40 to 60 years of operation. The NPP; Angra 1 (Brazil) has performed a thorough evaluation of its Life Extension Engineering project. In this context, the spent fuel pool (SFP) was one of the areas studied in order to demonstrate the plants integrity for a life extension. Micro-organisms growing on the liner of the fuel transfer channel (Ftc) and SFP can form a film of bacteria, which is highly resistant to radiation. This paper aims to compare the micro-organisms found in NPP Angra 1 with those reported to other NPPs and also relates their occurrence with the radiation levels at the sites. It also compares divers exposure to radioactivity during underwater activities in the SFP. Fourteen samples were collected on the surface of the liners of the Ftc, the SFP and the drains within the fuel building (FB) of Angra 1. For the identification of the micro-organisms, a metagenomics analysis was performed by random sequencing (Shotgun) and the use of Ion Torrent PGM Sequence r. Twelve micro-organisms phyla were identified; Acido-bacteria, Actino-bacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydiae, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Cyano-bacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Proteo-bacteria, and Verrucomicrobia as well as organisms not classified. In the SFP of Angra 1, the bacteria survived the exposure to a radiation of 0.416 Gy/h (high radiation). Deinococcus-thermus, bacteria identified in Angra 1, has resisted an exposure to 30,000 Gy/h in another plant. (Author)

  3. Radioactive contamination of Danish territory after core-melt accidents at the Barsebaeck power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoerup, H.L.; Jensen, N.O.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Kristensen, L.; Nielsen, O.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Petersen, T.; Roed, J.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Heikel Vinter, F.; Warming, L.; Aarkrog, A.

    1982-03-01

    An assessment is made of the radioactive contamination of Danish territory in the event of a core-melt accident at the Barsebaeck nuclear power plant in Sweden. Accidents including both core melt-down and containment failure are considered. Consequences are calculated for a BWR-3 release under common meteorological conditions and for a BWR-2 release under extreme meteorological conditions. Calculations are based on experiments and theoretical work relating to deposition velocities for different types of surface, shielding effect of structures, and weathering. The effects are described of different dose-reducing measures, e.g., decontamination, relocation, destruction of contaminated foodstuffs. The collective effective dose equivalent from external gamma radiation from deposited activity integrated over a time period of 30 years, is calculated to be 3.6 Megamanrem in the BWR-3 case without dose-reducing measures. For the BWR-2 case, the corresponding dose is approx. 41 Megamanrem. A combination of temporary relocation, hosing of roads etc. and digging of gardens is estimated to reduce these doses to approx. 2.5 Megamanrem and approx. 15 Megamanrem, respectively. The collective committed effective dose equivalent from the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs is calculated to 23 Megamanrem in the BWR-3 case without dose-reducing measures. This dose could be reduced to 0.2 Megamanrem if contaminated crops are destroyed during the first year after the accident and if changes are made in agricultural production in the contaminated area. The corresponding doses in the BWR-2 case would be 197 Megamanrem and 1.4 Megmanrem, respectively. (author)

  4. Electromagnetic fields originated by transmission power lines and the electromagnetic compatibility in shared rights of way; Campos electromagneticos producidos por lineas de transmision y la compatibilidad electromagnetica en derechos de via compartidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Rebolledo, Hugo; Zavala Silva, Moises; Galvan Diego, Arturo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1999-12-31

    This article describes the different types of electromagnetic interference by power lines in rights of way areas. The calculations of the electromagnetic fields obtained under a power line with the purpose of establishing acceptable interference limits, are shown. These calculations were conducted for different transmission power lines configurations. A good correlation was obtained among the measured magnetic fields and the calculated one under a power transmission line. For cases of fault currents to ground the ground potentials were estimated in order to obtain the minimum distance where buried pipes can be installed to operate in a safe way. [Espanol] Este articulo describe los diferentes tipos de interferencia electromagnetica producida por lineas de potencia en derechos de via. Se muestran los calculos de los campos electromagneticos obtenidos bajo una linea de potencia, con la intencion de establecer los limites aceptables de interferencia. Estos calculos se efectuaron para diferentes configuraciones de lineas de transmision. Se obtuvo una buena correlacion entre los campos magneticos medidos y el calculado bajo una linea de transmision. Para casos de corriente de falla a tierra se determinaron los potenciales a tierra, a fin de obtener la distancia minima en donde se pueden instalar las tuberias enterradas para operar de manera segura.

  5. Electromagnetic fields originated by transmission power lines and the electromagnetic compatibility in shared rights of way; Campos electromagneticos producidos por lineas de transmision y la compatibilidad electromagnetica en derechos de via compartidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Rebolledo, Hugo; Zavala Silva, Moises; Galvan Diego, Arturo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    This article describes the different types of electromagnetic interference by power lines in rights of way areas. The calculations of the electromagnetic fields obtained under a power line with the purpose of establishing acceptable interference limits, are shown. These calculations were conducted for different transmission power lines configurations. A good correlation was obtained among the measured magnetic fields and the calculated one under a power transmission line. For cases of fault currents to ground the ground potentials were estimated in order to obtain the minimum distance where buried pipes can be installed to operate in a safe way. [Espanol] Este articulo describe los diferentes tipos de interferencia electromagnetica producida por lineas de potencia en derechos de via. Se muestran los calculos de los campos electromagneticos obtenidos bajo una linea de potencia, con la intencion de establecer los limites aceptables de interferencia. Estos calculos se efectuaron para diferentes configuraciones de lineas de transmision. Se obtuvo una buena correlacion entre los campos magneticos medidos y el calculado bajo una linea de transmision. Para casos de corriente de falla a tierra se determinaron los potenciales a tierra, a fin de obtener la distancia minima en donde se pueden instalar las tuberias enterradas para operar de manera segura.

  6. Radioactivity of food products in the region of the ''Kozloduj'' atomic power station in the pre-exploitation period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jotov, M.; Petkov, T.; Zlatanova, R.; Boyadzhiev, A.

    1976-01-01

    The pre-exploitation status of the region of the ''Kozloduj'' atomic power stationand its torch zone, regarding the concentration of the biologically most dangerous artificial isotopes in the basic food products was determined. The tested foods were milk, meat, wheat, fish and grapes produced at the most important and basic production regions in the controled region. The radioactive isotope concentrations in the analyzed food produxts are reported. They will serve as a basis in assessing any eventual additional contamination of the region as a result of the work of the ''Kozloduj'' electric power station. (author)

  7. Study of movement of fly ash by radioactive tracer studies at Ennore Thermal Power Station (Tamil Nadu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, L K; Dange, A P

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the movement of fly ash from the Thermal Power Station at Ennore dumped in the ocean. The purpose of the study was to ensure that the ash dumped in the sea does not find its way to intake of the power station through the mouth of the river situated at a distance of 2 kms north. In such situations the use of radioactive tracer studies is found to be very effective and these studies indicated the necessity of dumping the fly ash beyond 6 m depth in the sea.

  8. Study of movement of fly ash by radioactive tracer studies at Ennore Thermal Power Station (Tamil Nadu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, L K; Dange, A P [Central Water and Power Research Station, Pune (India)

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the movement of fly ash from the Thermal Power Station at Ennore dumped in the ocean. The purpose of the study was to ensure that the ash dumped in the sea does not find its way to intake of the power station through the mouth of the river situated at a distance of 2 kms north. In such situations the use of radioactive tracer studies is found to be very effective and these studies indicated the necessity of dumping the fly ash beyond 6m depth in the sea.

  9. Mathematical modelling of immobilization of radioactive evaporator concentrate from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.B.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods of processing evaporator concentrates from NPP are evaporation and cementation.These methods allow to transform a liquid radioactive waste into the rather inert form, suitable for a final disposal. To assess the safety for disposal of radioactive mortar-waste composition, the leaching of 137 Cs from immobilized radioactive evaporator concentrate into a surrounding fluid has been studied. Leaching tests were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Determination of retardation factors, K F and coefficients of distribution, k d , using a simplified mathematical model for analyzing the migration of radionuclides, has been developed. In our experiment we have achieved the lowest leaching values after 60 days in samples. Results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 20 year mortar and concrete testing project, which will influence the design of the engineered trenches system for a future central Serbian radioactive waste disposal center. (author)

  10. Highest manageable level of radioactivity in the waste storage facilities of power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkert, J.; Lennartsson, R.

    1991-01-01

    This project presents and discusses an investigation of the highest level of radioactivity possible to handle in the waste storage facilities. The amount of radioactivity, about 0.1% of the fuel inventory, is the same in both of the cases but the amount of water is very different. The hypothetical accident was supposed to be damage of the reactor fuel caused by loss of coolant. (K.A.E.)

  11. Outlook of the accident at Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plants and issues concerning radioactive materials in environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) affected by a great earthquake finally suffered reactor core meltdown with loss of all cooling capability and discharged a large amount of radioactive materials to the environment. Local areas in the northwest direction from NPPs were highly contaminated with radioactive materials. In order to reduce radiation exposure, several kinds of decontamination works had been tested in contaminated areas of primary school and kindergarten or residential houses with no evacuation. Radiation mini-hotspots were scattered. Contaminated soils and rubbles having cesium of high concentration in the order of several ten or hundreds kBq/kg were accumulated in large amounts of radioactive wastes and their disposal became a big issue. Related safety guidelines were proposed based on radioactive waste disposal for nuclear facilities as well as radiation dose control of neighboring residents and disposal workers, which would not be applicable to current state of Fukushima in a high radiation background. Establishment of new radiation protection rule was highly needed to deal with this emergency based on reality within and outside the Fukushima NPPs. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Geographical distribution of radioactive nuclides released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident in eastern Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Masanobu; Umetsu, Kohei; Sugimoto, Miyabi; Yamaguchi, Yuta; Yamazaki, Hideo; Nakagawa, Ryota

    2013-01-01

    The geographical distribution of radioactive nuclides released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident in metropolitan areas located in eastern Japan was investigated. The radioactive contamination of environmental samples, including soil and biological materials, was analyzed. The concentrations of 131 I, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs in the soil samples collected from Fukushima City were 122000, 11500 and 14000 Bq/kg on 19th March 2011 and 129000, 11000 and 13700 Bq/kg on 26th March 2011, for the three nuclides respectively. The concentrations of 131 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs in the soil samples collected from March-June 2011 from study sites ranged from 240 to 101000, 28 to 26200, and 14 to 33700 Bq/kg, respectively. In Higashiosaka City, it began to detect those radioactive nuclides in the atmospheric airborne dust from 25th March. Radioactive fission products 95 Zr- 95 Nb were detected on 18th April 2011. Biological samples collected from Tokyo Bay were studied. The maximum concentrations of 134 Cs and 137 Cs detected in the biological samples were 12.2 and 19.2 Bq/kg, which were measured in goby. 131 I was not detected in the biological samples however, trace amounts of the short half-life nuclide 110m Ag were found in the shellfish samples. (author)

  13. Index extraction for electromagnetic field evaluation of high power wireless charging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, SangWook

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the precise dosimetry for highly resonant wireless power transfer (HR-WPT) system using an anatomically realistic human voxel model. The dosimetry for the HR-WPT system designed to operate at 13.56 MHz frequency, which one of the ISM band frequency band, is conducted in the various distances between the human model and the system, and in the condition of alignment and misalignment between transmitting and receiving circuits. The specific absorption rates in the human body are computed by the two-step approach; in the first step, the field generated by the HR-WPT system is calculated and in the second step the specific absorption rates are computed with the scattered field finite-difference time-domain method regarding the fields obtained in the first step as the incident fields. The safety compliance for non-uniform field exposure from the HR-WPT system is discussed with the international safety guidelines. Furthermore, the coupling factor concept is employed to relax the maximum allowable transmitting power. Coupling factors derived from the dosimetry results are presented. In this calculation, the external magnetic field from the HR-WPT system can be relaxed by approximately four times using coupling factor in the worst exposure scenario.

  14. Electromagnetic Fields Associated with Commercial Solar Photovoltaic Electric Power Generating Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, R A; Hooper, H C; Sias, G G; Mezei, G; Hung, P; Kavet, R

    2015-01-01

    The southwest region of the United States is expected to experience an expansion of commercial solar photovoltaic generation facilities over the next 25 years. A solar facility converts direct current generated by the solar panels to three-phase 60-Hz power that is fed to the grid. This conversion involves sequential processing of the direct current through an inverter that produces low-voltage three-phase power, which is stepped up to distribution voltage (∼12 kV) through a transformer. This study characterized magnetic and electric fields between the frequencies of 0 Hz and 3 GHz at two facilities operated by the Southern California Edison Company in Porterville, CA and San Bernardino, CA. Static magnetic fields were very small compared to exposure limits established by IEEE and ICNIRP. The highest 60-Hz magnetic fields were measured adjacent to transformers and inverters, and radiofrequency fields from 5-100 kHz were associated with the inverters. The fields measured complied in every case with IEEE controlled and ICNIRP occupational exposure limits. In all cases, electric fields were negligible compared to IEEE and ICNIRP limits across the spectrum measured and when compared to the FCC limits (≥0.3 MHz).

  15. Measurement of electromagnetic pulses generated during interactions of high power lasers with solid targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Marco, Massimo; Krása, Josef; Cikhardt, Jakub; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Krouský, Eduard; Margarone, Daniele; Ahmed, H.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Vrána, Roman; Velyhan, Andriy; Limpouch, J.; Korn, Georg; Weber, Stefan A.; Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, Jun (2016), 1-8, č. článku C06004. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02964S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : lasers * pulsed power Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  16. Power correction to the asymptotics of the pion electromagnetic form factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geshkenbein, B.V.; Terentyev, M.V.

    1982-01-01

    The contribution of the power correction approximately (μ 2 /Q 2 ) 2 enhanced by the factor approximately μ 2 /anti m 2 , to the pion form factor (FF) is calculated (here μ is the pion mass, anti m=1/2(msub(u)+msub(α)) is the mean value of the u- and d-quark masses, Q 2 =-(p-p') 2 > 0, where p, p' are meson momenta at initial and final state. It is shown that the only source of large corrections is due to the contribution of the local pseudoscalar current. The main (approximately 1/Q 2 ) asymptotics of FF associated with the axial current contribution, is derived. The contribution (approximately 1/Q 4 ) of the pseudoscalar current is calculated

  17. Electromagnetic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is dedicated to various aspects of electromagnetic wave theory and its applications in science and technology. The covered topics include the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves, theory of electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, methods of computational analysis......, material characterization, electromagnetic properties of plasma, analysis and applications of periodic structures and waveguide components, etc....

  18. Effects of electromagnetic fields exposure on plasma hormonal and inflammatory pathway biomarkers in male workers of a power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaopin; Fei, Ying; Liu, Hui [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Epidemiology and Health Statistics; Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Chronic Disease Research Inst.; and others

    2016-01-15

    The potential health risks of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have currently raised considerable public concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of EMF exposure on levels of plasma hormonal and inflammatory pathway biomarkers in male workers of an electric power plant. Seventy-seven male workers with high occupational EMF exposure and 77 male controls with low exposure, matched by age, were selected from a cross-sectional study. Moreover, high EMF exposure group was with walkie-talkies usage and exposed to power frequency EMF at the work places for a longer duration than control group. A questionnaire was applied to obtain relevant information, including sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, and EMF exposures. Plasma levels of testosterone, estradiol, melatonin, NF-KB, heat-shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP27, and TET1 were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. EMF exposure group had statistically significantly lower levels of testosterone (β = -0.3 nmol/L, P = 0.015), testosterone/estradiol (T/E2) ratio (β = -15.6, P = 0.037), and NF-KB (β = -20.8 ng/L, P = 0.045) than control group. Moreover, joint effects between occupational EMF exposure and employment duration, mobile phone fees, years of mobile phone usage, and electric fees on levels of testosterone and T/E2 ratio were observed. Nevertheless, no statistically significant associations of EMF exposures with plasma estradiol, melatonin, HSP70, HSP27, and TET1 were found. The findings showed that chronic exposure to EMF could decrease male plasma testosterone and T/E2 ratio, and it might possibly affect reproductive functions in males. No significant associations of EMF exposure with inflammatory pathway biomarkers were found.

  19. 37-Active rods fuel element for Atucha 1 nuclear power plant. Effects of this change in design over the neutronic behavior, decay power and radioactive inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, Javier E.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the use of 37-rods fuel element on the behavior of the Atucha 1 nuclear power plant homogeneous core with slightly enriched fuel to 0.85 w % were studied through representative parameters such as average discharge burnup, channel powers, reactivity coefficients, kinetic parameters, radioactive inventory and decay power. In general, the values of mentioned parameters are similar to those corresponding to a core with the 36-rods fuel element actually in use, although it must be emphasized a decrease both in linear power and, in minor degree, in the efficiency of shut-off and control rods and a slight increase in the discharge burnup. The fuel management strategy developed for a core with 36-rods elements can be maintained. (author)

  20. Management of radioactive wastes from non-power applications. The Cuban experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, J.C.; Salgado, M.; Jova, L.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Origin of Radioactive Wastes. The wastes arisen from the applications of radioisotopes in medicine are mainly liquids and solid materials contaminated with short lived radionuclides and sealed sources used in radiotherapy and for sterilization of medical materials. Radioactive wastes from industrial applications are generally disused sealed sources used in level detection, quality control, smoke detection and non-destructive testing. The principal forms of wastes generated by research institutes are miscellaneous liquids, trash, biological wastes, and scintillation vials, sealed sources and targets. Solid radioactive wastes are mainly produced during research works, cleaning and decontamination activities and they consist of rags, paper, cellulose, plastics, gloves, clothing, overshoes, etc. Laboratory materials such as cans, polyethylene bags and glass bottles also contribute to the solid waste inventory. Small quantities of non-compactable wastes are also collected and received for treatment. They include wood pieces, metal scrap, defective components and tools. Radioactive Waste Management Policy and Infrastructure. Since 1994 the Cuban integral policy of nuclear development is entrusted to the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment (CITMA). The National Center for Nuclear Safety (CNSN) is responsible for the licensing and supervision of radioactive and nuclear installations. The CPHR is in charge of waste management policy and therefore is responsible for centralized collection, transportation, treatment, conditioning, long term storage, and disposal of radioactive waste, as well as for developing new waste conditioning and containment methods. Radioactive Waste Management Facilities. Waste Treatment and Conditioning Plant (WTCP). The present facility is a building that includes a technological area of 100 m 2 and a laboratory area with a surface of around 30 m 2 . Other areas to be distinguished inside the

  1. Polymeric Materials for Conversion of Electromagnetic Waves from the Sun to Electric Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Manirul Haque

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar photoelectric energy converted into electricity requires large surface areas with incident light and flexible materials to capture these light emissions. Currently, sunlight rays are converted to electrical energy using silicon polymeric material with efficiency up to 22%. The majority of the energy is lost during conversion due to an energy gap between sunlight photons and polymer energy transformation. This energy conversion also depends on the morphology of present polymeric materials. Therefore, it is very important to construct mechanisms of highest energy occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and the lowest energy unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs to increase the efficiency of conversion. The organic and inorganic solar cells used as dyes can absorb more photons from sunlight and the energy gap will be less for better conversion of energy to electricity than the conventional solar cells. This paper provides an up-to-date review on the performance, characterization, and reliability of different composite polymeric materials for energy conversion. Specific attention has been given to organic solar cells because of their several advantages over others, such as their low-energy payback time, conversion efficiency and greenhouse emissions. Finally, this paper provides the recent progress on the application of both organic and inorganic solar cells for electric power generations together with several challenges that are currently faced.

  2. Estimation of mean time to failure of a near surface radioactive waste repository for PWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Lais A. de; Frutuoso e Melo, P.F.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2007-01-01

    This work aims at estimating the mean time to failure (MTTF) of each barrier of a near surface radioactive waste repository. It is assumed that surface water infiltrates through the barriers, reaching the matrix where radionuclides are contained, releasing them to the environment. Radioactive wastes considered in this work are low and medium level wastes (produced during operation of a PWR nuclear power station) fixed on cement. The repository consists of 6 saturated porous media barriers (top cover, upper layer, packages, basis, repository walls and geosphere). It has been verified that the mean time to failure (MTTF) of each barrier increases for radionuclides having higher retardation factor (Fr) and also that the MTTF for concrete is larger for Nickel , while for the geosphere, Plutonium gives the largest MTTF. (author)

  3. Chemical mode control in nuclear power plant decommissioning during operation of technologies in individual radioactive waste processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, J.; Dugovic, L.

    1999-01-01

    Sewage treatment of nuclear power plant decommissioning is performed by system of sewage concentration in evaporator with formation of condensed rest, it means radioactive waste concentrate and breeding steam. During sewage treatment plant operation department of chemical mode performs chemical and radiochemical analysis of sewage set for treatment, chemical and radiochemical analysis of breeding steam condensate which is after final cleaning on ionization filter and fulfilling the limiting conditions released to environment; chemical and radiochemical analysis of heating steam condensate which is also after fulfilling the limiting conditions released to environment. Condensed radioactive concentrate is stored in stainless tanks and later converted into easy transportable and chemically stable matrix from the long term storage point of view in republic storage Mochovce. The article also refer to bituminous plant, vitrification plant, swimming pool decontamination plant of long term storage and operation of waste processing plant Bohunice

  4. Topic of nuclear power plant wastes at fifth CMEA symposium on research of fuel and radioactive solution reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrs, M.; Napravnik, J.

    1982-01-01

    A survey is presented of the results of the work of Session 3 of the Symposium held in Marianske Lazne from April 7 to 10, 1981. The participants heard 44 papers mainly related to the following problem areas: existing methods and methods being developed of handling radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants; improvements in the technology of the concentration of liquid wastes by evaporation and other methods; solidification of concentrated liquid wastes into suitable form; methods of the treatment of solid (combustible, non-combustible and compactable) wastes; improvements in methods of the treatment of gaseous effluents. A survey was organized on criteria applied to methods used for radioactive waste processing. The inquiry showed that the principal criteria are the product Quality, costs for waste processing and the release of harmful substances into the environment. (Ha)

  5. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public inquiry: proof of evidence on on-site radioactive waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passant, F.H.

    1988-09-01

    A public inquiry has been set up to examine the planning application made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the construction of a 1200 MW Pressurized Water Reactor power station at Hinkley Point (Hinkley Point ''C'') in the United Kingdom. The CEGB evidence to the Inquiry presented here provides information on the on-site management of solid, liquid and gaseous radioactive wastes both during station operation and during decommissioning. Estimates are given of current and projected future discharges of liquid and gaseous wastes from the site and packaging and transport arrangements for solid radioactive wastes are described. The framework of waste management policy, disposal strategy and legislation in the United Kingdom which will determine procedure at Hinkley Point ''C'' is given. (UK)

  6. The combined hybrid system: A symbiotic thermal reactor/fast reactor system for power generation and radioactive waste toxicity reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollaway, W.R.

    1991-08-01

    If there is to be a next generation of nuclear power in the United States, then the four fundamental obstacles confronting nuclear power technology must be overcome: safety, cost, waste management, and proliferation resistance. The Combined Hybrid System (CHS) is proposed as a possible solution to the problems preventing a vigorous resurgence of nuclear power. The CHS combines Thermal Reactors (for operability, safety, and cost) and Integral Fast Reactors (for waste treatment and actinide burning) in a symbiotic large scale system. The CHS addresses the safety and cost issues through the use of advanced reactor designs, the waste management issue through the use of actinide burning, and the proliferation resistance issue through the use of an integral fuel cycle with co-located components. There are nine major components in the Combined Hybrid System linked by nineteen nuclear material mass flow streams. A computer code, CHASM, is used to analyze the mass flow rates CHS, and the reactor support ratio (the ratio of thermal/fast reactors), IFR of the system. The primary advantages of the CHS are its essentially actinide-free high-level radioactive waste, plus improved reactor safety, uranium utilization, and widening of the option base. The primary disadvantages of the CHS are the large capacity of IFRs required (approximately one MW e IFR capacity for every three MW e Thermal Reactor) and the novel radioactive waste streams produced by the CHS. The capability of the IFR to burn pure transuranic fuel, a primary assumption of this study, has yet to be proven. The Combined Hybrid System represents an attractive option for future nuclear power development; that disposal of the essentially actinide-free radioactive waste produced by the CHS provides an excellent alternative to the disposal of intact actinide-bearing Light Water Reactor spent fuel (reducing the toxicity based lifetime of the waste from roughly 360,000 years to about 510 years)

  7. Natural radioactivity of raw materials and products of cement manufacturing and of power plant fly ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallyas, Miklos

    1984-01-01

    The natural radioactivity was investigated for several building materials used in Hungary, including cement, concrete, glasses, fine ceramic products, insulation materials, and also for some industrial wastes utilized as building material aggregates like slags, fly ashes etc., from their radiation health aspect. The dose commitments of the population from building materials standardized in several countries are presented. The 232 Th, 226 Ra, and 40 K contents of building materials were measured by gamma spectrometry, using NaI/Tl/scintillation detectors. The results were used to qualify cement materials and fly ash aggregates according to their origin in Hungary, from the point of view of their natural radioactivity. It was concluded that the radioactivity level of the majority of Hungarian cements are below the adopted international standards. (R.P.)

  8. Determination of Isotopes Types and Activities in Radioactive Waste of Kosovo A Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    , B Cena; , K Dollani; , G Hodolli

    2013-01-01

    The second nnportant event after the 1nventory of rad10act1ve waste 1n Kosovo, their location and the number of radioactive sources, is the determination of the type of radioisotope and their activities. This activity was conducted entirely in difŞcult terrain and was taken due to the absence in most cases of resource certiŞcates or any other document with the necessary information that will enable the identiŞcation of radioactive sources and their activity. In this way the activity was under...

  9. Electromagnetic shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji.

    1994-01-01

    As an electromagnetic shaft seal, there are disposed outwarding electromagnetic induction devices having generating power directing to an electroconductive fluid as an object of sealing, and inwarding electromagnetic induction device added coaxially. There are disposed elongate rectangular looped first coils having a predetermined inner diameter, second coils having the same shape and shifted by a predetermined pitch relative to the first coil and third coil having the same shape and shifted by a predetermined pitch relative to the second coil respectively each at a predetermined inner diameter of clearance to the outwarding electromagnetic induction devices and the inwarding electromagnetic induction device. If the inwarding electromagnetic induction device and the outwarding electromagnetic induction device are operated, they are stopped at a point that the generating power of the former is equal with the sum of the generating power of the latter and a differential pressure. When three-phase AC is charged to the first coil, the second coil and the third coil successively, a force is generated in the advancing direction of the magnetic field in the electroconductive fluid by the similar effect to that of a linear motor, and the seal is maintained at high reliability. Moreover, the limit for the rotational angle of the shaft is not caused. (N.H.)

  10. On the Feasibility of Gap Detection of Power Transformer Partial Discharge UHF Signals: Gap Propagation Characteristics of Electromagnetic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the transformer electromagnetic gap propagation characteristics. The influence of gap size is also analyzed, and the results experimentally verified. The obtained results indicated that the gap propagation characteristics of electromagnetic wave signals radiated by the partial discharge (PD source in different directions are substantially different. The intensity of the electromagnetic wave in the gap reaches a maximum at a gap height of 1 cm; and inside the gap, the intensity of the electromagnetic wave depicted an increasing trend at the tail area of the gap. Finally, from the obtained results, some suggestions on where to install sensors in practical systems for ultra high frequency (UHF PD signal detection in the transformer gap are provided. The obtained results confirmed the feasibility of using this approach. These results can be seen as a benchmark and a challenge for further research in this field.

  11. Radioactive caesium contamination due to Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants accident in Osaka city. Evaluation of accumulation and decontamination of radioactive materials via reverse logistics function of a city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Takayuki; Kitano, Masaaki; Sakai, Mamoru; Takakura, Akito; Katahira, Kenshi; Nishitani, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed background level of radioactive contamination in city area of Osaka before combusting the wide area disposal of disastrous debris at a municipal waste incineration plant of Osaka city. The debris was caused by Tohoku district great earthquake disaster and suspected to be contaminated with radionuclides released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants. We also investigated radioactivity in incineration ash of municipal waste incineration plants and of sewage treatment plants, as well as in water clarifier sludge of potable water treatment plants, and evaluated the accumulation and cleansing of radioactive materials via the reverse logistic function of the city. Radioactive caesium deposited in Osaka city area was estimated to be approximately 4.3 GBq from the concentrations observed in the monthly fallout, whereas that collected as municipal wastes and sewage was estimated to be approximately 0.9 GBq a year in 2011. Even two years after the accident, "1"3"4Cs, which is the evidence of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, had been detected in the municipal wastes at a level comparable to the activities found just after the accident, however, the radioactive caesium concentration in fallout measured in the Osaka city area had decreased below a detection limit after May 2012. Introduction of materials contaminated with radioactive caesium from outside the city area was suspected because the observed contamination level was inexplicable by that of observed in the environmental wastes such as pruned branches which are contaminated by with the fallout in city area of Osaka. (author)

  12. Impacts of accidental radioactive releases to the hydrosphere from floating and land-based nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    To assess the impacts of accidental radioactive releases to the hydrosphere from floating and land-based nuclear power plants, the Liquid Pathway Generic Study was initiated. The objective of this study was to compare the risks associated with releases through the liquid pathway from accidents that may reasonably be expected and those that are very improbable. Consequences were estimated in terms of radiation dose to man from drinking water ingestion, shell-fish and fish flesh consumption, and direct exposure (swimming, beach) as well as long-term effects, such as genetic effects or aquatic species degradation. (author)

  13. Two super plumes of radioactive geopollution due to melt down of the reactor of Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirei, Hisashi; Kimura, Kazuya; Uesuna, Shoichi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we can show the two points as the following: Radioactive emission materials from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant melt down were distributed widely as two plumes in the north east Japan: FukuToGun Plume and ChibaRakiTo Plume, the former shape is the same type as reverse L character and the later is S. Vales of Cs134 and Cs137 show high in convex side of Tone river bed and low in concave side respectively and radioisotope-ratio vales (Cs134/Cs137) show high in convex of river and low in concave respectively. (author)

  14. From information and consultation to citizen influence and power. 10-Year Evolution in Public involvement in Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    The OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created in 2000 to promote the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue amongst all stakeholders and to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. The working definition given to the term 'stakeholder' is: Any actor - institution, group or individual - with an interest or with a role to play in the process. The FSC has documented a wealth of experience through topical sessions and studies and, in particular, through its many national workshops and community visits. The present flyer highlights the growing stakeholder empowerment in radioactive waste management observed since the inception of the Forum ten years ago. Important changes have taken place in citizen participation for radioactive waste management in the past decade: a shift from information and consultation towards citizen influence and power, and a shift from overt conflict or resigned acceptance to volunteering and collaboration by local communities. Overall, there is recognition of the legitimacy of community empowerment measures and socio-economic benefits, and there exist now a great variety of administrative formats for collaboration. New ideals and bases for collaboration have also emerged. These are: mutual learning, adding value to the host community/region, and sustainable development

  15. Small zeolite column tests for removal of cesium from high radioactive contaminated water in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijikata, Takatoshi; Uozumi, Koichi; Tukada, Takeshi; Koyama, Tadafumi; Ishikawa, Keiji; Ono, Shoichi; Suzuki, Shunichi; Denton, Mark; Raymont, John

    2011-01-01

    After the earthquake on March 11th 2011, a large amount (more than 0.12 million m 3 ) of highly radioactive contaminated water had pooled in Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. As an urgent issue, highly radioactive nuclides should be removed from this contaminated water to reduce radioactivity in the turbine buildings and nuclear reactor buildings. Removal of Cs from this contaminated water is a key issue, because 134 Cs and 137 Cs are highly radioactive γ-emitting nuclides. The zeolite column system was used for Cs and Sr removal from the radioactive water of Three-Mile Island Unit 2, and modified columns were then developed as a Cs removal method for high-level radioactive water in US national laboratories (WRSC, ORNL, PNNL, Hanford, etc.). In order to treat Fukushima's highly contaminated water with a similar system, it was necessary to understand the properties of zeolite to remove Cs from sea salt as well as the applicability of the column system to a high throughput of around 1200 m 3 /d. The kinetic characteristics of the column were another property to be understood before actual operation. Hence, a functional small-scale zeolite column system was installed in CRIEPI for conducting the experiments to understand decontamination behaviors. Each column has a 2- or 3-cm inner diameter and a 12-cm height, and 12 g of zeolite-type media was packed into the column. The column experiments were carried out with Kurion-zeolite, Herschelite, at different feed rates of simulated water with different concentrations of Cs and sea salt. As for the water with 4 ppm Cs and 0 ppm sea salt, only a 10% Cs concentration was observed in the effluent after 20,000 bed volumes were fed at a rate of 33 cm/min, which corresponds to the actual system. On the other hand, a 40% Cs concentration was observed in the effluent after only 50 bed volumes were passed for water with 2 ppm Cs and 3.4 wt.% sea salt at a feed rate of 34 cm/min. As the absorption of Cs is hampered by the

  16. The iron waste from thermal power plant (t.p.p.) as the source of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacevic, M.; Todorovic, D.; Radenkovic, M.; Joksic, J.; Vukcevic, M.

    2006-01-01

    The radioactivity control of the iron waste (tubes) raised from the regular maintenance of the Gacko thermo power plant has shown the allocated spots of relatively high surface contamination, mainly beta, and no enhanced levels of absorbed radiation dose in the air. Further laboratory examination of the contaminated tube samples (10- 15 cm length) determined the level and source of contamination. Gamma spectrometry (H.P. Ge, efficiency 23%) has shown the presence of 210 Pb isotope, beta-emitting radionuclide with 47 keV X-ray emission, the member of the 238 U series. The surface contamination and concentration values, determined after samples dissolution in mineral acids, are 2.4 Bq/cm 2 and 0.6 Bq/g, respectively. The radioactivity of the tubes originate from the naturally occurring radionuclides in coal, with 210 Pb activities mostly within 0.01-0.05 Bq/g. During the T.P.P. work, radioactivity is deposed with ash, flying ash and slag and partly released into atmosphere. But, the part of radioactivity is deposited at the tubes and cauldron with gases emanated during the coal combustion. In this way, the iron becomes contaminated by the natural radionuclide during the technological process. Since there are no legislative stipulations about such cases, we have applied the international recommendations saying that dose limit should not be higher than 10 Micro Sv/year for individuals. On this basis T.E.C.D.O.C. 855 define different use of metals contaminated with natural or man-made radionuclides. According this document the contaminated iron with activity lower than 0.7 Bq/g may be further processed in the steel works that is the case with the iron waste produced in the T.P.P. Gacko. (authors)

  17. A strategy for upgrading management of spent fuel and radioactive waste at the Ignalina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balan, V.; Penkov, V.; Bergman, C.; Gustafsson, B.

    2001-01-01

    The waste management strategy of the former Soviet Union, based on its Norms and Rules, was implemented at Ignalina nuclear power Plant (INPP). This means in brief that the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) should be reprocessed in the Soviet Union and the management of radioactive waste should be done in connection with the eventual decommissioning of the reactors, The major facilities for management of radioactive waste were evaporation of liquid waste and subsequent bitumenisation of the sludge, treatment of liquid with ion-exchange techniques and subsequent storage of the resins in tanks. Solid waste was sorted according to its activity content and stored on site. Following the independence of Lithuania in 1990, Lithuania is successively replacing the former Norms and Rules with Lithuanian laws and regulations. Lithuania has signed both the Convention of Nuclear Safety and the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The paper will give an overview of the work done, in progress and planned, primarily from an operational point of view. It will give examples of practical problems which have to be overcome and how very tough prioritisation has to be made because of lack of resources. Many of the problems are associated with the fact that the waste management strategy successively has to be changed at the same time as the generation of SNF and radioactive waste is continued. A lot has already been achieved, especially regarding the SNF. However, the main work is still to be done until the INPP can declare that its waste is properly managed in full compliance with a national waste management strategy which eventually will end with the disposal in licensed repositories. (author)

  18. Management of liquid radioactive waste from non-power applications at MosNPO 'Radon'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlin, Yu.; Barinov, A.; Volkov, A.; Dmitriev, S.; Iljin, V.; Savkin, A.; Sobolev, I.; Flit, V.

    2001-01-01

    MosNPO 'Radon', founded in 1961, is an enterprise intended for the collecting, transportation, treatment, conditioning and disposal of radioactive waste formed outside of the nuclear fuel cycle, in the central part of Russia. Besides the main activity, MosNPO 'Radon' carries out a lot of research and design efforts in the field of management with solid radioactive waste (SRW) and liquid radioactive waste (LRW). Up to 10% LRW, being formed at Zagorsk branch of MosNPO 'Radon', are directed to the cementation without any concentrating. These are mainly radioactive waters with salt content more than 20 g/l. The rest LRW are concentrated in stationary and mobile installations. Concentrates (regenerates of ion-exchange filters, brine and spent sorbents) are also directed to the cementation. The cleaned waters (according to MosNPO 'Radon' radiation safety norms) are dropped out into the sewage. The cement compound, obtained on the base of LRW, is used for filling cavities in SRW tanks and metal barrels, which are used as packing of radioactive waste. The waters of surface flow are not LRW, as the common contents of radionuclides in these waters more often are less than 1 Bk/l. The technologies for the management with these waters at MosNPO 'Radon' are described in the paper. The experience of MosNPO 'Radon' on LRW cleaning-up at other organizations is described in the paper. For the realization of such works MosNPO 'Radon' has a mobile installation 'ECO-2' and modular water-cleaning complexes 'Aqua-Express' (it is located at Zagorsk branch of MosNPO 'Radon') and 'ECO-3M' (it is located at GMP 'Zvezdochka', in Severodvinsk, for cleaning radioactive waters formed during repairs of atomic submarines). Productivity of any installations by the cleaned water is from 0,2 m 3 /h up to 1 m 3 /h, depending on the LRW composition. The concentration degree of LRW is not less than 10, but more often is from 30 up to 100. Development of perspective technologies and elaboration of new

  19. Applications of the computer codes FLUX2D and PHI3D for the electromagnetic analysis of compressed magnetic field generators and power flow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgdon, M.L.; Oona, H.; Martinez, A.R.; Salon, S.; Wendling, P.; Krahenbuhl, L.; Nicolas, A.; Nicolas, L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present the results of three electromagnetic field problems for compressed magnetic field generators and their associated power flow channels. The first problem is the computation of the transient magnetic field in a two-dimensional model of a helical generator during loading. The second problem is the three-dimensional eddy current patterns in a section of an armature beneath a bifurcation point of a helical winding. The authors' third problem is the calculation of the three-dimensional electrostatic fields in a region known as the post-hole convolute in which a rod connects the inner and outer walls of a system of three concentric cylinders through a hole in the middle cylinder. While analytic solutions exist for many electromagnetic filed problems in cases of special and ideal geometries, the solution of these and similar problems for the proper analysis and design of compressed magnetic field generators and their related hardware require computer simulations

  20. Experimental study of radioactive aerosols in the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Lomonosova, E.M.; Zhuk, I.V.; Yaroshevich, O.I.; Kudrjashov, V.P.; Mironov, V.P

    1999-12-01

    Study of radioactive aerosols in the relocation zone and in the populated areas have been carried out for a number of years. The experiments on modelling resuspension were performed while conducting agricultural work. Nuclear track radiography and alpha spectrometry with radiochemical extraction of plutonium were used as analytical methods for the determination of the transuranium elements contents. The distributions of radioactive particles were obtained as to activity and sizes. Specific activity of 'hot particles' increases with decreasing diameter. In aerosols selected at a distance of more than 10 km from the Chernobyl NPP pure fuel particles with sizes of more than 5 {mu}m were not found. The activity of the finely dispersed fraction of aerosols, which is more dangerous when inhaled by the organism, is comparable with a total activity of large particles.

  1. Experimental study of radioactive aerosols in the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Lomonosova, E.M.; Zhuk, I.V.; Yaroshevich, O.I.; Kudrjashov, V.P.; Mironov, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    Study of radioactive aerosols in the relocation zone and in the populated areas have been carried out for a number of years. The experiments on modelling resuspension were performed while conducting agricultural work. Nuclear track radiography and alpha spectrometry with radiochemical extraction of plutonium were used as analytical methods for the determination of the transuranium elements contents. The distributions of radioactive particles were obtained as to activity and sizes. Specific activity of 'hot particles' increases with decreasing diameter. In aerosols selected at a distance of more than 10 km from the Chernobyl NPP pure fuel particles with sizes of more than 5 μm were not found. The activity of the finely dispersed fraction of aerosols, which is more dangerous when inhaled by the organism, is comparable with a total activity of large particles

  2. Objectives, concepts and strategies for the management of radioactive waste arising from nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This Report (also referred to as the Polvani Report) provides a comprehensive description of problems, current practices and policies in the field of radioactive waste management. The day to day management of radioactive waste is, according to the Report, in general satisfactorily covered, both from the point of view of licensing and control and liability and insurance. It points out, however, that the third party liability regime established by the Paris Convention and corresponding national legislation, would seem to be ill-adapted to cover damage resulting from waste ultimately disposed of because it would necessitate the operator's liability and corresponding insurance being maintained for an indefinite period of time. Solutions should therefore be sought providing for compensation by governments. (NEA) [fr

  3. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report, 1982. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.

    1986-02-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1982 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1982 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  4. Reduction of releases of radioactive effluents from light-water-power-reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Itakura, T.; Kanai, T.

    1977-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Commission established the dose objectives to the population around the light-water-reactors in May, 1975, based on the ''ALAP'' concept. These values are respectively, 5 mrems per year for total body and 15 mrems per year for thyroid of an individual in the critical group in the environs, due to both gaseous and liquid effluents from LWRs in one site. The present paper describes the implications of the dose objective values, control measures which have been adopted to reduce releases of radioactive materials and related technical developments in Japan. The main control measures for reduction of radioactive gaseous effluents are an installation of a charcoal gas holdup system for decay of noble gases and a supply of clean steam for the gland seal of a turbine in BWR, and a storage tank system allowing decay of noble gases in PWR. For liquid effluents are taken measures to re-use them as the primary coolant. Consequently, the amounts of radioactivity released to the environment from any LWR during normal operation have been maintained under the level to meet the above dose objective values. For research reactors, reduction of release of effluents has also been carried out in a similar way to LWRs. In order to establish the techniques applicable for further reduction, studies are being made on the control measures to reduce leakage of radioiodine, an apparatus for removal of krypton, the treatment of laundry waste and measures to remove the crud in the primary coolant. Presentation is also made on the energy-integrated gas monitor for gaseous effluent and systems of measuring γ dose from radioactive cloud descriminating from natural background, which have been developed for effective monitoring thus reduced environmental dose

  5. Evaluation of the radioactive waste characterisation at the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kekki, T.; Titta, A.

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the physical, chemical and radiological characterisation, handling and documentation of the radioactive waste packages to be disposed of in the VLJ-repository at the Olkiluoto NPP. A comparison with the current practices in Europe, based on information from Sweden, Spain and Czech Republic, is made. The report presents recommendations for STUK to harmonise the LILW waste management practises in Finland with those in Europe. (orig.)

  6. Attainment of radiation equivalency in nuclear power plant radioactive product management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Ganev, I.Kh.; Orlov, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Basic provisions for radiation equivalent radioactive waste disposal are formulated and conditions for its realization are considered. They include simultaneous removal of uranium and long-living products of its decay from the ore, separation of actinides from the fuel in the course of chemical reprocessing for burning in reactors, and possibly strontium and cesium with the purpose of their useful utilization and long-term controlled waste storage in the near-surface facilities

  7. Management of radioactive wastes from nuclear fuels and power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, M.; Mayman, S.A.; Tammemagi, H.Y.; Gale, J.; Sanford, B.

    1977-05-01

    The nature of Canadian nuclear fuel and nuclear generating plant radioactive wastes is summarized. Principles of a scheme for disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes deep underground in isolation from man and the biosphere are outlined. The status of the development and construction program is indicated. We have demonstrated incorporation of fission products in solids that in the short term (17 years) dissolve more slowly than plutonium decays. Investigations of long-term stability are in hand. Additional capacity for storage of used fuel prior to reprocessing and disposal is required by 1986 and a preliminary design has been prepared for a pool facility to be located at a central fuel recycling and disposal complex. A demonstration of dry storage of fuel in concrete containers is in progress. The quantities of CANDU generating-station wastes and the principles and methods for managing them are summarized. A radioactive-waste operations site is being developed with several different types of surface storage, each with multiple barriers against leakage. A reactor decommissioning study has been completed. Estimated costs of the various waste management operations are summarized. (author)

  8. Radioactive recontamination on mechanically polished piping at Shimane-1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, K.; Komoto, I.; Imamura, K.; Kataoka, I.; Uchida, S.

    1998-01-01

    In a series of preventive maintenance tasks for an aging plant, recirculation pipes of Shimane-1 NPP have been replaced by newly fabricated type 316 NG stainless steel pipes. Suppression of shutdown dose rate caused by 60 Co recontamination on the newly replaced piping was one of the major concerns in the recirculation pipe replacement. In order to suppress the shutdown dose rate, control of the 60 Co deposition rate coefficient as well as 60 Co radioactivity in the reactor water are essential. The deposition rate coefficient depends on surface roughness. The coefficient is suppressed by reduction of the effective surface area of pipes through mechanical polishing. Then the inner surface of the pipes was polished mechanically to reduce roughness prior to application in the plant. After measuring and evaluating radioactive recontamination, it was estimated that deposited amounts of radioactive corrosion products on the pipe inner surface would reach the saturated value in a few years, and would not exceed the level before replacement unless water chemistry is degraded. (author)

  9. The Study Of Environment Radioactivity At Pltu Saralaya And PLTU Paiton Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udiyani, P. Made; Tri Sanyoto, Nugroho; Subiharto; Akhmad, Yus Rusdian

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of environment radioactivity and exposure from the natural radiation in the region of the radius 3 km from PLTU Suralaya and PLTU Paiton have been done. The objectives of this environment radioactivity at PLTU Suralaya and PLTU Paiton. The result showed that the concentration of natural radioactivity varies depending the location. Thorium is dominant in both PLTU, Which average concentration is 11.648 + 0.564 ppm at Suralaya, and 10.711 + 0.964 ppm at PLTU Paiton. The uranium concentration is 1.176 + 0,016 ppm at PLTU Suralaya, and PLTU Paiton is 0.546 + 0.046 ppm. The average concentration of potassium is (0.86 + 0.38). 103 ppm at PLTU Suralaya and PLTU Paiton is (0.147 + 0.038) .104 ppm. The average dose at the community around PLTU Suralaya is 2,74 mSv/year; and around PLTU Paiton is 2,68 mSv/year. Compared to natural exposure in the PUSPIPTEK region, the difference in concentration is not significant

  10. Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT): The Powerful Industrial Radiotracer Techniques for Hydrodynamics and Flow Visualization Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Amirul Syafiq Mohd Yunos

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Radioactive particle tracking (RPT) techniques have been widely applied in the field of chemical engineering, especially in hydrodynamics in multiphase reactors. This technique is widely used to monitor the motion of the flow inside a reactor by using a single radioactive particle tracer that is neutrally buoyant with respect to the phase is used as a tracker. The particle moves inside the volume of interest and its positions are determined by an array of scintillation detectors counting in coming photons. Particle position reconstruction algorithms have been traditionally used to map measured counts rate into the coordinates by solving a minimization problem between measured events and calibration data. RPT have been used to validate respective-scale CFD models to partial success. This presentation described an introduction to radioactive particle tracking and summarizing a history of such developments and the current state of this method in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, with a perspective towards the future and how these investigations may help scale-up developments. (author)

  11. Role of radon in comparisons of effects of radioactivity releases from nuclear power, coal burning and phosphate mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B L [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA))

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that radon emissions are the predominant source of radiation exposure from nuclear power, coal burning or phosphate mining. For very long time spans, erosion of the continents must be considered, and in this perspective bringing uranium to the earth's surface has no effect since it would eventually reach the surface anyhow, so coal burning and phosphate mining have no net effect; however, nuclear power saves lives by removing the radon source, the net effect ultimately being a saving of 350 lives/GWe-yr. If only effects over 500 yr are considered, lives saved by removal of uranium in mining exceed lives lost due to radon emissions from the nuclear industry under regulations now being instituted, and the net fatalities per GWe-yr caused by all radioactivity releases are 0.017 for nuclear vs 0.045 for coal burning; the effects of radioactivity releases by 1-yr of present annual operations are 10 times larger for phosphate mining than for coal burning.

  12. Development of radioactive wastewater treatment systems at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and Toshiba's efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Yuki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yoshino, Akira

    2012-01-01

    In keeping the condition of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) of The Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. under control, following the serious damage to the NPS as a result of the Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent tsunami on March 11, 2011, both stable cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools and control of the radioactive wastewater to prevent release have been crucial issues. The reactor cooling has depended on the injection of water from outside, with seawater used first for approximately one month, after which the supply was changed to filtered water. In both cases, however, the water flowed into the reactor buildings and turbine buildings. Toshiba contributed to the realization of circulating water injection cooling at the NPS by supplying a radioactive wastewater transferral system and the first purification system in the initial three months, followed by a second purification system, called SARRY TM , which provided stable treatment capability. These systems make it possible to reuse injected water by purification for further injection, eliminating the need for additional water from the outside. These systems also decrease wastewater generation in the NPS and minimize the risk of spills into the environment. (author)

  13. Development of a graded approach to natural phenomena hazard design and evaluation of radioactive waste and spent fuel stored at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear safety related structures, systems and components, SSC, at large commercial nuclear power plants other than those applicable to reactor safety have in general not received the attention and detailed loading and behavior criteria use for reactor design safety. Such systems include spent fuel storage and radioactive waste storage and processing. In this paper is a suggested grading of design bases for natural hazards to be applied to such facilities commensurate with their radioactive risk. They are applicable to the full range of safety related SSC which are determined by the inventory of radioactive isotopes and the unmitigated doses at appropriate plant and site boundaries. (author)

  14. Natural radioactivity of ground waters and soil in the vicinity of the ash repository of the coal-fired power plant. Nikola Tesla A in Obrenovac, Yugoslavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, Z.; Madic, M.; Vukovic, D. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1996-11-01

    Radioactivity of U, Th and {sup 40}K has been investigated in the vicinity of the ash repository of coal-fired Nikola Tesla A power plant in Obrenovac (Yugoslavia). Using alpha and gamma spectrometry, luminescence spectrophotometry, it was found that the ash repository is a source of radionuclides of the uranium and thorium series; and these radionuclides were found in the ground water up to a distance of several hundred metres. The influence of the repository on the soil radioactivity was minimal.

  15. The IRSN publishes an assessment of doses received in Japan by external irradiation due to radioactive deposits caused by the Fukushima-Daiichi power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document first describes how dry and wet radioactive deposits are formed. It also indicates their main components: iodine 131 and 132, caesium 134, 136 and 137, tellurium 132, and barium 140. It describes the different exposure ways due to radioactive deposits in the environment. A map indicates dose level assessments few tens of kilometres around the Fukushima power plant. A brief comment of this map is proposed

  16. A research on the environmental impact on nearby waters range at low-level radioactive waste water drain from the Dayawan nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunling; Xu Zitu; Xiao Zhang.

    1987-01-01

    The possible influence of the low-level radioactive waste water drain from the Dayawan nuclear power station upon nearby waters range is discussed. The contents of the article contains the numerical simulation on tidal currents and pollutant diffusion, the calculation of concentration distribution of radioactive contaminants in the water area and of polluted field, and the criterion on radioactive contaminant influence on nearby residents and aquatic biologicals. The result shows that when the Dayawan nuclear power station is on normal operation and after the low-level radioactive waste water has been drained off into the sea, the radioactive concentration is even lower than the natural background radiation just out-side the area of about 4 km 2 round the water outlet. As a result, it won't cause any danger to the water environment. Due to the fact that the concentration of the low-level radioactive waste water from the nuclear power station fully accords with the national standard GB4792-84 and the sea water quality sandard GBH2, 3-82. It is no harm to either residents and aquatic biologicals or ecological balance

  17. Power production from radioactively contaminated biomass and forest litter in Belarus - Phase 1b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Jørn; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Fogh, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident has led to radioactive contamination of vast Belarussian forest areas. A total scheme for remediation of contaminated forest areas and utilisation of the removed biomass in safe energy production is being investigated in aBelarussian-American-Danish collaborative project....... Here the total radiological impact of the scheme is considered. This means that not only the dose reductive effect of the forest decontamination is taken into account, but also the possible adverse healtheffects in connection with the much needed bio-energy production. This report presents the results...

  18. Post-accident cleanup of radioactivity at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; Armento, W.J.

    1980-02-01

    The technical staff of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) prepare documentation concerned with the cleanup of radioactivity on the Three Mile Island site following the March 28, 1979 accident. The objective of this report is to provide information in a summarized form, which will be of direct usefulness to the commissioners. The information contained herein includes discussion of on-site assistance and accomplishments following the accident, flowsheet development for the TMI recovery team (by the Technical Advisory Group), and the numerous reports already generated on the TMI cleanup and recovery

  19. Management of radioactive wastes from nuclear fuels and power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, M.; Mayman, S.A.; Tammemagi, H.Y.; Gale, J.; Sanford, B.; Dyne, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    The nature of Canadian nuclear fuel and nuclear generating plant radioactive wastes are summarized. Full exploitation of fission energy resources entails recovery of all fissile and fertile material from spent fuel and separating the fission products as wastes for disposal. A plan for final disposal of all the radioactive wastes is a key component of the waste management scheme. Principles of a scheme for safe, responsible disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes deep underground in isolation from man and the biosphere are outlined. The status of the development and construction program is indicated. We plan to select a site in either a hard rock formation or in a suitable salt bed by 1981 so that a repository can be constructed to begin a demonstration phase in 1986. The repository is to be capable of eventual expansion to accomodate all Canadian nuclear wastes to at least 2050 when in full-scale operation. Extensive geotechnical studies have been initiated in order to select a site, and design and test the repository. We have demonstrated incorporation of fission products in solids that in the short term (17 years) dissolve more slowly than plutonium decays. Investigations of long-term stability are in hand. The principle of retardation of migration of fission products, so that they decay before surfacing, has been tested. Additional capacity for storage of used fuel prior to reprocessing and disposal is required by 1986 and a preliminary design has been prepared for a pool facility to be located at a central fuel recycling and disposal complex. A demonstration of dry storage of fuel in concrete containers is in progress. The quantities of CANDU generating-station wastes and the principles and methods for managing them are summarized. Methods for volume reduction and immobilization by solidification are well advanced. A radioactive-waste operations site is being developed with several different types of surface storage, each with multiple barriers against

  20. Management of radioactive wastes from nuclear fuels and power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, M.; Mayman, S.A.; Tammemagi, H.Y.; Gale, J.; Sanford, B.

    1977-01-01

    The nature of Canadian nuclear fuel and nuclear generating plant radioactive wastes is summarized. Full exploitation of fission energy resources entails recovery of all fissile and fertile material from spent fuel and separating the fission products as wastes for disposal. A plan for final disposal of all the radioactive wastes is a key component of the waste management scheme. Principles of a scheme for safe, responsible disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes deep underground, in isolation from man and the biosphere, are outlined. The status of the development and construction programme is indicated. It is planned to select a site in either a hard rock formation or in a suitable salt bed by 1981 so that a repository can be constructed to begin a demonstration phase in 1986. The repository is to be capable of eventual expansion to accomodate all Canadian nuclear wastes to at least 2050 when in full-scale operation. Extensive geotechnical studies have been initiated in order to select a site, and design and test the repository. The incorporation of fission products in solids that in the short term (17 years) dissolve more slowly than plutonium decays has been demonstrated. Investigations of long-term stability are in hand. The principle of retardation of migration of fission products, so that they decay before surfacing, has been tested. Additional capacity for storage of used fuel prior to reprocessing and disposal is required by 1986 and a preliminary design has been prepared for a pool facility to be located at a central fuel recycling and disposal complex. A demonstration of dry storage of fuel in concrete containers is in progress. The quantities of CANDU generating-station wastes and the principles and methods for managing them are summarized. Methods for volume reduction and immobilization by solidification are well advanced. A radioactive-waste operations site is being developed with several different types of surface storage, each with multiple barriers

  1. Clearance, a powerful tool in optimizing the volume of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blommaert, W.; Teunckens, L.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework its activities in decommissioning nuclear installations, Belgoprocess applies the clearance practice in optimizing the volume of radioactive wastes. The applied clearance methodology is discussed with special emphasis to different types of materials and to the associated measurements. Four practical cases are elaborated, dealing with the decommissioning and decontamination of two small buildings up to green field conditions, the unconditional release of large quantities of slightly contaminated active carbon, the melting and clearance of stainless steel fuel racks and of aluminium heat exchangers. The attention is drawn on practical problems associated with sampling and measurement strategies, in relation to the proposed low limits for unconditional release. (author)

  2. Effect of the foodchain in radioactivities released from thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    Food chains involving 210 Pb and 210 Po have been investigated in Japan, with special reference to the vegetable and sea food chain. Although much smaller than the natural background, the collective dose of coal burning including this food chain was 100 to 1000 times larger than that excluding it, the Suess effect being too small to cancel it. The dose due to coal burning was comparable to or even greater than that of nuclear energy. The need for further investigation of radioactive release due to the oil and natural gas industries is also emphasised, with particular reference to radon and its daughters 210 Pb and 210 Po. (U.K.)

  3. Monitoring of electromagnetic pollution inside switchyard substation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrateur

    selected circuit of two 220Kv power lines inside El- Hadjar electrical post often requiring ... human body exposure to the electromagnetic radiation .... electromagnetic behavior at the industrial .... partnership with Algerian company of electricity.

  4. Analysis for low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal of AP1000 nuclear power in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bin; Ren Li; Hua Wei; Ma Xiaoqiang; Ma Ruoxia; Fang Xianghong

    2014-01-01

    AP1000 nuclear power is adopted in Sanmen Nuclear Power Plant, Zhejiang province and Haiyang Nuclear Power Plant, Shandong province. The filter and resin generated by the operation of nuclear power plants are handled by cement cured process and compression technology in Sanmen Nuclear Power Plant, while they are loaded in polyethylene HIC in Haiyang Nuclear Power Plant. At present, there were not engineering practice for dispose polyethylene HIC in China. The document discusses three disposal options of polyethylene HIC: one is that polyethylene HIC placed in over pack, another is that polyethylene HIC mixed with other drum, the third is that polyethylene HIC placed in disposal unit which is divided into small units. (authors)

  5. Airfoil-based electromagnetic energy harvester containing parallel array motion between moving coil and multi-pole magnets towards enhanced power density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chung Ming; Wang, Ya; Chen, Wusi

    2016-11-01

    In this letter, the airfoil-based electromagnetic energy harvester containing parallel array motion between moving coil and trajectory matching multi-pole magnets was investigated. The magnets were aligned in an alternatively magnetized formation of 6 magnets to explore enhanced power density. In particular, the magnet array was positioned in parallel to the trajectory of the tip coil within its tip deflection span. The finite element simulations of the magnetic flux density and induced voltages at an open circuit condition were studied to find the maximum number of alternatively magnetized magnets that was required for the proposed energy harvester. Experimental results showed that the energy harvester with a pair of 6 alternatively magnetized linear magnet arrays was able to generate an induced voltage (V o ) of 20 V, with an open circuit condition, and 475 mW, under a 30 Ω optimal resistance load operating with the wind speed (U) at 7 m/s and a natural bending frequency of 3.54 Hz. Compared to the traditional electromagnetic energy harvester with a single magnet moving through a coil, the proposed energy harvester, containing multi-pole magnets and parallel array motion, enables the moving coil to accumulate a stronger magnetic flux in each period of the swinging motion. In addition to the comparison made with the airfoil-based piezoelectric energy harvester of the same size, our proposed electromagnetic energy harvester generates 11 times more power output, which is more suitable for high-power-density energy harvesting applications at regions with low environmental frequency.

  6. Activities of Hydrometeorologic Institute of Serbia - Belgrade, during the case of radioactive pollution of environment caused by the accident of nuclear power plant 'Chernobyl' in 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, Dj.

    2002-01-01

    The programme of 'Systematic testing of water quality' performed by Hydrometeorologic Institute of Serbia - Belgrade includes the measurement of total beta radioactivity on 33 sampling points. The measurement of total beta radioactivity is performed with instrument 'Lola - 4' produced by 'Institute for Nuclear Science - Vinca'. During the accident of Nuclear Power Plant 'Chernobyl' in 1986 arose the need to investigate the influence of this case on the environment of Belgrade and Serbia. In that respect a series of measurement of total beta radioactivity of rain water, surface waters, tap water and air were performed. Those measurements showed an increase of radioactivity of river waters. River Sava had radioactivity of 3,4 Bq/l (0,08 Bq/l in 1 9850 and river Danube 3-5 Bq/l (0,09 Bq/l in 1 985). High values of radioactivity were measured in the waters of highland accumulation lakes over 30 Bq/l. Rain water showed it's maximum of 52 Bq/l on 1 st and 2nd May l986 and it drooped to 0,3 Bq/l until 5th of June. Tap water showed it's maximum of 35,2 Bq/l on 12th May and it was reduced to 1 ,0 Bq/l on 2nd of June. Radioactivity of air showed it's maximum of 2,64 Bq/m 3 in the period 1 -3 May and in the period 5-8 May, 1 . - 1 ,57 Bq/m 3 . Measurement of river water radioactivity on 33 regular sampling points at the end of the year 1 986 showed that was no increase in comparison with the same measurements in 1 985. All mentioned results of the radioactivity of river waters and the waters of highland accumulations used to fall into ranges predicted by the model of the radioactive pollution distribution developed on the Imperial College -London. (author)

  7. Acute care of radioactively contaminated or externally radiated personnel at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Practical advice is given concerning the treatment of persons injure at nuclear power plant accidents, in particular accidents resulting in contamination or external radiation of man. The folder is primarily directed to persons responsible for the local plannning and supervision of emergency care at the power plant. (L.E.)

  8. Evolution of Technology Laser Scanner. Implications for use in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarti Fernandez, F.; Bonet, J.

    2012-01-01

    The main technical factors affecting these teams their actual implementation in nuclear power plants will be analyzed: data acquisition speed, sensitivity, laser power, autonomy, contamination of equipment, radiation effect, etc. In conclusion, the real difference is displayed in the data collection in function of various technologies, embodied in field time, and costs.

  9. Atmospheric behavior, deposition, and budget of radioactive materials from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Y.; Ohara, T.; Nishizawa, M.

    2011-12-01

    To understand the atmospheric behavior of radioactive materials emitted from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant after the nuclear accident that accompanied the great Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011, we simulated the transport and deposition of iodine-131 and cesium-137 using a chemical transport model. The model roughly reproduced the observed temporal and spatial variations of deposition rates over 15 Japanese prefectures (60-400 km from the plant), including Tokyo, although there were some discrepancies between the simulated and observed rates. These discrepancies were likely due to uncertainties in the simulation of emission, transport, and deposition processes in the model. A budget analysis indicated that approximately 13% of iodine-131 and 22% of cesium-137 were deposited over land in Japan, and the rest was deposited over the ocean or transported out of the model domain (700 × 700 km2). Radioactivity budgets are sensitive to temporal emission patterns. Accurate estimation of emissions to the air is important for estimation of the atmospheric behavior of radionuclides and their subsequent behavior in land water, soil, vegetation, and the ocean.

  10. Experiences in the treatment of radioactive wastes in nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambros, R.; Rittscher, D.

    1983-01-01

    The liquid, gaseous and solid radioactive wastes arising from the operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) have - if they cannot be reused - to be disposed of according to rules set up by the competent authorities. In this paper the treatment of wastes from NPP is described as it is carried out today due to the actual lack of a waste repository in the FRG. As most NPP have only an interim storage capacity for 1 year, measures for a further reduction of waste arisings, for volume reduction of the waste and for extension of the storage capacity have become necessary. The reduction of the waste arisings to the possible minimum is being achieved by administrative measures. A volume reduction of the waste is achieved by improvement of already existing methods and by development of new methods. Mixed solid wastes are reduced in volume by baling at high pressure. Burnable wastes can be reduced in volume by incineration. Liquid radioactive concentrates are reduced in volume by water separation, evaporation or drying. The volume reduction factors achieved are large as compared to the formerly applied cementation. The products arising are put into cast-iron containers which following the actual knowledge, should meet the requirements for final disposal with respect to the pressure stability, corrosion resistance and leach resistance. Due to the high density of the container material and the great wall thickness the specific activity of the waste can be increased without exceeding the dose rate limits at the outside of the containers. (author)

  11. Environmental radioactivity monitoring at Kakuma campus of Kanazawa University after the accident of Fukushima nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Miki; Kimura, Hajime; Yokoyama, Akihiko; Nagamura, Yuichiro; Nakanishi, Takashi; Uesugi, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima caused by the earthquake and tsunami disaster in March, 2011 led the public to fear the considerable-range contamination with radioactivity. For the reason, we started environmental monitoring on radioactivity just outside of the RI facility in the Kakuma campus of Kanazawa Univ. A high-volume dust sampler (SHIBATA, HV-1000) was used to collect air dust onto a filter and rain water was collected in a plastic container placed on the rooftop of the facility as well. The samples were assayed by gamma-ray spectrometer with germanium detectors to obtain the concentrations of I-131, Cs-134, and Cs-137. The data were compared with those measured in the other areas in Japan to discuss how the activities diffused and migrated from the plant to many places in Japan. The peaking dates of the activities coincided with those by a trajectory calculation of air from Fukushima. The trend was confirmed for the other data in other areas. (author)

  12. The ability to use FLEXPART in simulation of the long-range radioactive materials dispersed from nuclear power plants near Vietnam border

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Kim Long; Pham Duy Hien; Nguyen Hao Quang; Do Xuan Anh; Duong Duc Thang; Doan Quang Tuyen

    2016-01-01

    FLEXPART is a Lagrangian transport and dispersion model suitable for the simulation of a large range of atmospheric transport processes. FLEXPART has been researched and applied in simulation of the long-range dispersion of radioactive materials. It can be applicable to the problem of radioactive materials released from the nuclear power plants impact on Vietnam. This report presents simulation of radioactive dispersion from the accident assumed Fangchenggang and Changjiang nuclear power plants in China with the FLEXPART, using meteorological data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The results of simulations and analyzing showed good applicability of FLEXPART for a long-range radioactive materials dispersion. The preliminary simulation results show that the impact of the radioactive material dispersion in Vietnam varies by the well-known characteristics of the monsoon of our country. Winter is the time when the dominant northeast winds up radioactive dispersion most towards our country, its sphere of influence extends from the Northeast (Quang Ninh) to North Central (Da Nang). (author)

  13. Detailed deposition density maps constructed by large-scale soil sampling for gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kimiaki; Tanihata, Isao; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Saito, Takashi; Shimoura, Susumu; Otsuka, Takaharu; Onda, Yuichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Saegusa, Jun; Seki, Akiyuki; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Shibata, Tokushi

    2015-01-01

    Soil deposition density maps of gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident were constructed on the basis of results from large-scale soil sampling. In total 10,915 soil samples were collected at 2168 locations. Gamma rays emitted from the samples were measured by Ge detectors and analyzed using a reliable unified method. The determined radioactivity was corrected to that of June 14, 2011 by considering the intrinsic decay constant of each nuclide. Finally the deposition maps were created for (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (131)I, (129m)Te and (110m)Ag. The radioactivity ratio of (134)Cs-(137)Cs was almost constant at 0.91 regardless of the locations of soil sampling. The radioactivity ratios of (131)I and (129m)Te-(137)Cs were relatively high in the regions south of the Fukushima NPP site. Effective doses for 50 y after the accident were evaluated for external and inhalation exposures due to the observed radioactive nuclides. The radiation doses from radioactive cesium were found to be much higher than those from the other radioactive nuclides. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of local-area distribution and relocation of radioactive cesium in trees from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant by autoradiography analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Fuminori; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yoshida, Zenko; Nanba, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    The local area distribution and relocation of radioactive cesium deposited in trees after the 2011 tsunami-related accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) have been studied by measuring the spatial distribution of cesium on/in trees by autoradiography analysis. Samples of trees were collected from places located between 4 and 55 km from FDNPP approximately 2, 8, 20, and 22 months after the accident. The autoradiography analyses of Cryptomeria japonica, Torreya nucifera, and Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondae samples collected approximately 2 and 8 months after the accident showed that radioactive Cs was mainly distributed as spots on the branches and leaves of the trees emerged before the accident, and was detected in negligible amounts in new branch and leaves that emerged after the accident. On the contrary, radioactive Cs was detected at the outermost tip of the branches in the trees collected 20 months after the accident. Morus alba samples collected 22 months after the accident contained radioactive Cs inside and outside their stems, even though no radioactive Cs was detected in their roots, strongly suggesting that a certain amount of radioactive Cs was translocated from the outside to the inside of stems. These results indicate that the distribution of radioactive Cs deposited on/in the trees gradually changes with time (scale: year). (author)

  15. Magnetorheological suspension electromagnetic brake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bica, Ioan

    2004-01-01

    The magnetorheological suspension (MRS) brake is of the monoblock type. The main part of the electromagnetic brake is an electromagnet, between whose poles two MRS disks are placed. For distances between disks of 0.65x10 -3 m±10%, revolutions of the electric motor, coupled to the electromagnetic brake, ranging between 200 and 1600 rev/min and braking powers of up to 85 W, there are no differences in revolutions between the disks of the electromagnetic brake. For fixed revolutions of the electric motor, the revolution of the parallel disk can be modified continuously by means of the intensity of the magnetic field. In all cases, the quantity of MRS is of 0.35x10 -3 kg

  16. Transfer of radioactive waste management expertise from Switzerland to other countries with small nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.; Birkhaeuser, Ph.; Kickmaier, W.; Vomvoris, S.; Zuidema, P.

    2000-01-01

    A legal requirement which coupled demonstration of the feasibility of nuclear waste disposal to the extension of reactor operational licenses beyond 1985 acted to force rapid development of the Swiss radioactive waste management programme. Over a period of almost 30 years and at a cost of approximately 800 M CHF Nagra has become established as a centre of excellence in this field. Resources include highly experienced manpower, literature and databases supporting development of national repositories for L/ILW and HLW/TRU and state-of-the-art R and D infrastructure (including 2 underground laboratories, hot-laboratory facilities at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute), modelling groups at universities etc.). This paper reviews Nagra's experience and considers various ways in which expertise can be transferred to other small countries to minimise duplication of effort and optimise development of their own national programmes. (author)

  17. Power production from radioactively contaminated biomass and forest litter in Belarus - Phase 1b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roed, J.; Andersson, K.G.; Fogh, C.L. [and others

    2000-03-01

    The Chernobyl accident has led to radioactive contamination of vast Belarussian forest areas. A total scheme for remediation of contaminated forest areas and utilisation of the removed biomass in safe energy production is being investigated in a Belarussian-American-Danish collaborative project. Here the total radiological impact of the scheme is considered. This means that not only the dose reductive effect of the forest decontamination is taken into account, but also the possible adverse health effects in connection with the much needed bio-energy production. This report presents the results of an in-country, commercial-scale investigation of the effect of a baghouse filter in retaining contaminants so that they are not released to the atmosphere in the biomass energy production process. Approximately 99,5 % of the activity of a commercially representative, dust-laden boiler flue gas was removed from the stream by using a combination of a cyclone and a baghouse filter. (au)

  18. Variation of radioactivity in the environmental media and dose evaluation in Suzhou city after normal operation of Qinshan Nuclear Power Station condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Rongchu; Liu Li

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the radioactive monitoring in environmental media of Suzhou City when Qinshan Nuclear Power Station was in normal operational condition (from 1992-2001). Methods: The radiochemical method was used for monitoring the radioactivity level in air, soil and food. Results: The total radioactivity, concentrations of 134 I and 134,137 Cs in environmental media was far lower than the limit values specified by the national standard GB. Conclusion: The radioactivity level in Suzhou City is at the natural background level. The individual annual average effective dose for adults in that period caused by ingestion 134,137 Cs in food is 4.41 x 10 -4 mSv/a

  19. A numerical study on oceanic dispersion and sedimentation of radioactive cesium-137 from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Hironori; Morino, Yu; Ohara, Toshimasa

    2014-01-01

    We discussed a numerical model for oceanic dispersion and sedimentation of radioactive cesium-137 (Cs-137) in shallow water regions to clarify migration behavior of Cs-137 from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Our model considered oceanic transport by three dimensional ocean current, adsorption with large particulate matter (LPM), sedimentation and resuspension. The simulation well reproduced the spatial characteristics of sea surface concentration and sediment surface concentration of Cs-137 off Miyagi, Fukushima, and Ibaraki Prefectures during May-December 2011. The simulated results indicated that the adsorption-sedimentation of Cs-137 significantly occurred during strong wind events because the large amount of LPM was transported to upward layer by resuspension and vertical mixing. (author)

  20. Effects of radioactive fallout on soil animal populations in the 30 km zone of the Chernobyl atomic power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivolutzkij, D.A.; Pokarzhevskij, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were carried out during July and September 1986, April 1987 and October 1988. Radioactive fallout after the Chernobyl atomic power station (APS) accident induced catastrophic effects on populations of small pine-litter faunae within the 30km zone around the station. Effects on soil faunae were not so marked due to shielding by the soil, or on litter faunae at the edge of the 30km zone due to distance from the source. Thirty-gray doses did not directly affect adult animals in the soil and litter, but impacted their eggs and juveniles. Resident populations recovered slowly during the first year after the accident. Insect migration into the contaminated area was the primary source of soil animal population recovery. After 2-2.5 year, marked differences between populations in the contaminated and control areas were no longer found. (author). 5 refs.; 6 tabs

  1. Evidence Theory Based Uncertainty Quantification in Radiological Risk due to Accidental Release of Radioactivity from a Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingale, S. V.; Datta, D.

    2010-01-01

    Consequence of the accidental release of radioactivity from a nuclear power plant is assessed in terms of exposure or dose to the members of the public. Assessment of risk is routed through this dose computation. Dose computation basically depends on the basic dose assessment model and exposure pathways. One of the exposure pathways is the ingestion of contaminated food. The aim of the present paper is to compute the uncertainty associated with the risk to the members of the public due to the ingestion of contaminated food. The governing parameters of the ingestion dose assessment model being imprecise, we have approached evidence theory to compute the bound of the risk. The uncertainty is addressed by the belief and plausibility fuzzy measures.

  2. Objective and subjective evaluation of power plants and their non-radioactive emissions using the analytic hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzimouratidis, Athanasios I.; Pilavachi, Petros A.

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear power plant emissions are of great concern to the public and to scientists alike. As energy demand tends to rise rapidly, especially in the developing countries, the negative effects to human health and to the environment from gaseous emissions together with hazardous particulate matter released by power plants can no longer be ignored. In this study, the impact of non-radioactive emissions is evaluated with the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) by synthesizing objective and subjective criteria. There are five main emissions to be evaluated, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC), carbon dioxide equivalent (CO 2 -eq), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and particulates or particulate matter (PM). Objective evaluation is achieved by expressing the impact of each emission released in monetary terms following generally accepted market rules, international agreements and protocols. That is, the Euro per kilogram of each emission exceeding a specific limit that should be paid as a penalty for environmental pollution and human health damage. Subjective assessment requires an intuitive expression of the percentage of damage to human health and to the ecosystem that each emission causes. Sensitivity analysis is then used in order to examine how change of input data affects final results. Finally, 10 main types of power plant are evaluated according to the level and kind of emissions they release. These types are coal/lignite, oil, natural gas turbine, natural gas combined cycle (NGCC), nuclear, hydro, wind, photovoltaic, biomass and geothermal

  3. An evaluation of the production of solid radio-active waste in the Tricastin nuclear power station and, more generally, in the other French nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuisenier, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The importance of the effect of processing and packaging of solid radio-active wastes on the necessary staff, on the dosimetry acquired by this personnel and on the running costs will be presented, thus permitting a quantitative evaluation of the different types of waste produced, not only for the Tricastin plant but also for any typical French nuclear plant. Experience in the Tricastin power plant has shown that the volume of solid wastes can vary considerably depending on the different problems which can arise during production (cooling system leaks or less regular incidents). The different techniques used will be relooked at in order to facilitate the explanation of these fluctuations in the volume of waste produced and the measures which can be taken to limit them. The different measures which have been taken to improve performance in this domain will be presented: improvements in equipment, in methods, and in the increased awareness of the personnel concerning these problems

  4. Radioactivity leakage accidents in the feed water heater and the general drainage of the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station of Japan Atomic Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station, JAPC on the shell on extracted-steam side in B system of No. 4 feed water heater, drain water leakage occurred twice in January, 1981. Then, 61 pCi/g cobalt-60 and 10 pCi/g manganese-54 were detected in soil at the outlet of general drainage on April 17, 1981. The cause was found to be the overflow of radioactive liquid waste in the filter sludge storage tank on March 8, the same year. On-the-spot inspection was subsequently made by the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy on both leakage accidents. The results of inspections are described as follows: the course of leakage accident, and also the measures taken to JAPC in connection with the two leakage accidents. (J.P.N.)

  5. IAEA provisional code of practice on management of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    This Code of Practice defines the minimum requirements for operations and design of structures, systems and components important for management of wastes from thermal nuclear power plants. It emphasizes what safety requirements shall be met rather than specifies how these requirements can be met; the latter aspect is covered in Safety Guides. The Code defines the need for a Government to assume responsibility for regulating waste management practices in conjunction with the regulation of a nuclear power plant. The Code does not prejudge the organization of the regulatory authority, which may differ from one Member State to another, and may involve more than one body. Similarly, the Code does not deal specifically with the functions of a regulatory authority responsible for such matters, although it may be of value to Member States in providing a basis for consideration of such functions. The Code deals with the entire management system for all wastes from nuclear power plants embodying thermal reactors including PWR, BWR, HWR and HTGR technologies. Topics included are: design, normal and abnormal operation, and regulation of management systems for gaseous, liquid and solid wastes, including decommissioning wastes. The Code includes measures to be taken with regard to the wastes arising from spent fuel management at nuclear power plants. However, the options for further management of spent fuel are only outlined since it is the subject of decisions by individual Member States. The Code does not require that an option(s) be decided upon prior to construction or operation of a nuclear power plant

  6. Electromagnetic actuation in MEMS switches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Mária; Chemnitz, Steffen

    . Electromagnetic actuation is a very promising approach to operate such MEMS and Power MEMS devices, due to the long range, reproducible and strong forces generated by this method, among other advantages. However, the use of electromagnetic actuation in such devices requires the use of thick magnetic films, which...

  7. High Power Molten Targets for Radioactive Ion Beam Production: from Particle Physics to Medical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    De Melo Mendonca, T M

    2014-01-01

    Megawatt-class molten targets, combining high material densities and good heat transfer properties are being considered for neutron spallation sources, neutrino physics facilities and radioactive ion beam production. For this last category of facilities, in order to cope with the limitation of long diffusion times affecting the extraction of short-lived isotopes, a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) target loop equipped with a diffusion chamber has been proposed and tested offline during the EURISOL design study. To validate the concept, a molten LBE loop is now in the design phase and will be prototyped and tested on-line at CERN-ISOLDE. This concept was further extended to an alternative route to produce 1013 18Ne/s for the Beta Beams, where a molten salt loop would be irradiated with 7 mA, 160 MeV proton beam. Some elements of the concept have been tested by using a molten fluoride salt static unit at CERNISOLDE. The investigation of the release and production of neon isotopes allowed the measurement of the diffu...

  8. Transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuller, C.

    2003-01-01

    In this article author describes the system of transport and processing of radioactive wastes from nuclear power of Slovenske elektrarne, plc. It is realized the assurance of transport of liquid and solid radioactive wastes to processing links from places of their formation, or of preliminary storage and consistent transports of treated radioactive wastes fixed in cement matrix of fibre-concrete container into Rebublic storage of radioactive wastes in Mochovce

  9. Focus on radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M

    1989-01-01

    Written for children, this book looks at the nature of radioactive materials, how they were discovered, what they are used for and how they affect the environment around us. The emphasis is on the benefits of radioactive materials, particularly in nuclear power stations, in medical diagnostics and radiotherapy, in industry and in agriculture. Nuclear fission and fusion are explained, how radioactive materials are handled and naturally occurring radioactivity are included. (UK).

  10. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1994-01-01

    This booklet is a publication by International Atomic Energy Agency for general awareness of citizens and policy-makers to clarify their concept of nuclear wastes. In a very simple way it tells what is radioactivity, radiations and radioactive wastes. It further hints on various medial and industrial uses of radiations. It discusses about different types of radioactive wastes and radioactive waste management. Status of nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern European countries are also discussed

  11. Applied Electromagnetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, H; Marinova, I; Cingoski, V [eds.

    2002-07-01

    These proceedings contain papers relating to the 3rd Japanese-Bulgarian-Macedonian Joint Seminar on Applied Electromagnetics. Included are the following groups: Numerical Methods I; Electrical and Mechanical System Analysis and Simulations; Inverse Problems and Optimizations; Software Methodology; Numerical Methods II; Applied Electromagnetics.

  12. Applied Electromagnetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, H.; Marinova, I.; Cingoski, V.

    2002-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers relating to the 3rd Japanese-Bulgarian-Macedonian Joint Seminar on Applied Electromagnetics. Included are the following groups: Numerical Methods I; Electrical and Mechanical System Analysis and Simulations; Inverse Problems and Optimizations; Software Methodology; Numerical Methods II; Applied Electromagnetics

  13. Compilation of data on the release of radioactive substances in the vent air of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.; Endrulat, H.J.; Haubelt, R.; Westpfahl, U.

    1976-04-01

    The present compilation of data on the release of radioactive substances in the vent air of nuclear power plants in the FRG is a continuation of a report series on aerosol filter and iodine filter samples from the exhaust air control systems of the nuclear power plants Gundremmingen, Obrigheim, Wuergassen, Stade, Lingen and Biblis A. The reports have been issued by the Federal public health office since 1972. This report is supplemented by annual release values on radioactive noble gases, on short- and long-lived aerosols, and on gaseous 131 I, supplied by the individual nuclear power plants as in previous years on uniform questionnaires. Data on the release of tritium are also available from some nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  14. Benchmarking on the management of radioactive waste in the Spanish Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M. A.; Gonzalez, R.; Gomez, N.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to perform a comparative evaluation of the practices carried out in the field of waste management in the Spanish nuclear power plants. Once compared such practices have been established recommendations that may be of interest for application in other plants.

  15. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim; Meira Castro, Ana Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  16. Low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power generating stations: Characterization, classification and assessment of activated metals and waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.W.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.

    1993-02-01

    Since the enactment of 10 CFR Part 61, additional difficult-to-measure long-lived radionuclides, not specified in Tables 1 2 of Part 61, have been identified (e.g., 108m Ag, 93 Mo, 36 Cl, 10 Be, 113m Cd, 121m Sn, 126 Sn, 93m Nb) that may be of concern in certain types of waste. These nuclides are primarily associated with activated metal and perhaps other nuclear power low-level waste (LLW) being sent to disposal facilities. The concentration of a radionuclide in waste materials is normally determined by direct measurement or by indirect calculational methods, such as using a scaling factor to relate inferred concentration of a difficult-to-measure radionuclide to another that is easily measured. The total disposal site inventory of certain difficult-to-measure radionuclides (e.g., 14 C, 129 I, and 99 Tc) often control the total quantities of radioactive waste permitted in LLW burial facilities. Overly conservative scaling factors based on lower limits of detection (LLD), often used in the nuclear power industry to estimate these controlling nuclides, could lead to premature closure of a disposal facility. Samples of LLW (Class B and C activated metals [AM] and other waste streams) are being collected from operating nuclear power stations and analyzed for radionuclides covered in 10 CFR Part 61 and the additional difficult-to-measure radionuclides. This analysis will enhance the NRC's understanding of the distribution and projected quantities of radionuclides within AM and LLW streams from commercial nuclear power stations. This research will also provide radiological characterization of AM specimens for others to use in leach-rate and lysimeter experiments to determine nuclide releases and subsequent movement in natural soil environments

  17. Covariant electromagnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Y.; Cohen, E.; Kaminer, I.; Elitzur, A. C.

    2017-08-01

    Faraday introduced electric field lines as a powerful tool for understanding the electric force, and these field lines are still used today in classrooms and textbooks teaching the basics of electromagnetism within the electrostatic limit. However, despite attempts at generalizing this concept beyond the electrostatic limit, such a fully relativistic field line theory still appears to be missing. In this work, we propose such a theory and define covariant electromagnetic field lines that naturally extend electric field lines to relativistic systems and general electromagnetic fields. We derive a closed-form formula for the field lines curvature in the vicinity of a charge, and show that it is related to the world line of the charge. This demonstrates how the kinematics of a charge can be derived from the geometry of the electromagnetic field lines. Such a theory may also provide new tools in modeling and analyzing electromagnetic phenomena, and may entail new insights regarding long-standing problems such as radiation-reaction and self-force. In particular, the electromagnetic field lines curvature has the attractive property of being non-singular everywhere, thus eliminating all self-field singularities without using renormalization techniques.

  18. Environmental effects of thermal and radioactive discharges from nuclear power plants in the boreal brackish-water conditions of the northern Baltic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Ilus, Erkki

    2009-01-01

    During recent decades, thermal and radioactive discharges from nuclear power plants into the aquatic environment have become the subject of lively debate as an ecological concern. The target of this thesis was to summarize the large quantity of results obtained in extensive monitoring programmes and studies carried out in recipient sea areas off the Finnish nuclear power plants at Loviisa and Olkiluoto during more than four decades. The Loviisa NPP is located on the coast of the Gulf of Finla...

  19. Removal of high-level radioactive substances contained with water from the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Stations. Some technical problems in waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Mimura, Hitoshi; Sato, Nobuaki; Kirishima, Akira; Hattori, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese government and plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. announced to process the highly radioactive water amounting to about 250,000 cubic meters by the end of fiscal year 2011. Radiation-contaminated water will be moved to the waste facility to remove oil and radioactive cesium using zeolite. The process using Prussian Blue is expected for the effectiveness. Other radioactive substances will be removed through precipitation using special chemicals and radioactivity in the water will be reduced to 10 -6 of its original level. The water will be then be returned to the reactors and used to cool them after going through a desalination process. The facility can process about 1,200 tons of contaminated water a day. TEPCO will store radioactive materials and other waste from the cleansing process at the Fukushima plant. They need to decide how the waste will finally be disposed of and to figure out what to do with the highly radioactive waste produced in the above process. Kurion Inc., Areva SA, and some domestic firms provide equipment and technology, but all the Japanese facilities and institutions should join to settle the problems. (S. Ohno)

  20. Borate compound content reduction in liquid radioactive waste from nuclear power plants with VVER reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalo, A.; Zatkulak, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of liquid waste (evaporator concentrates) inventory at V-1 and V-2 NPPs in Jaslovske Bohunice and the intention to separate boron from them with respect to waste minimisation and improvement of physical and chemical properties for further waste treatment and conditioning. Preliminary results of laboratory experiments concerned to borate crystallisation after pH adjustment with nitric or formic acid performed in the 1998 are given. At the present time laboratory experiments continuing - next acids, coagulation with carbon oxide, electrolytic process, ion exchange resin, study of decontamination factors, immobilization of boric acid, decrease radioactivity, purification of boron-contained compounds. Slovenske Elektrarne have accumulated 7,000 m 3 of evaporator concentrates containing 100-180 g/l borate. In order to make more storage space available, it is proposed to remove some of the borate in the liquor by precipitation as sodium tetraborate and immobilise in either cement of bitumen. The supernate can be further volume reduced by evaporation and returned to the tanks. Slovenske Elektrarne are currently evaluating acid addition to the pH 12-13 concentrate to reduce the borate solubility. However, this adds to the salt burden of the waste through this chemical addition -thus creating future increases in conditioning and disposal costs. Boric acid is used in pressurized water as a soluble neutron poison to control reactivity and also to assure a safety margin in the spent fuel pool and during refuelling operations. Boric acid is also present in the water reserved for injection into the reactor in the event of postulated accidents. (author)