WorldWideScience

Sample records for radioactive sources requisitos

  1. Requirements for the register of physical persons for the preparation, use and handling radioactive sources; Requisitos para o registro de pessoas fisicas para o preparo, uso e manuseio de fontes radioativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-15

    This norm establishes the process for register of superior level profession nals enabled to the preparation, using, and handling of radioactive sources. This norm applies to the physical persons candidates applying to the register for preparation, use and handling of radioactive sources in radioactive installations at the industry, agriculture, teaching and researching.

  2. Radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkina, L.E.; Mazurek, V.; Myascedov, D.N.; Prokhorov, P.; Kachalov, V.A.; Ziv, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioactive layer in a radioactive source is sealed by the application of a sealing layer on the radioactive layer. The sealing layer can consist of a film of oxide of titanium, tin, zirconium, aluminum, or chromium. Preferably, the sealing layer is pure titanium dioxide. The radioactive layer is embedded in a finish enamel which, in turn, is on a priming enamel which surrounds a substrate

  3. El proceso de requisitos en el desarrollo de open source software

    OpenAIRE

    Muruzábal Ishigetani, Olympia

    2014-01-01

    El propósito de este trabajo es determinar si las actividades que se llevan a cabo en el proceso de requisitos en comunidades OSS, a diferencia del proceso de requisitos de la Ingeniería del Software tradicional, es una de las claves del éxito del software de código abierto. El proceso de requisitos forma parte de la etapa inicial de un proyecto y es imprescindible puesto que define las funcionalidades del software a desarrollar y da soporte a la adaptación y evolución del proy...

  4. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  5. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  6. Miniature radioactive light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffarella, T.E.; Radda, G.J.; Dooley, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    A miniature radioactive light source for illuminating digital watches is described consisting of a glass tube with improved laser sealing and strength containing tritium gas and a transducer responsive to the gas. (U.K.)

  7. Sealed radioactive source management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources have been used in a wide range of application in medicine, agriculture, geology, industry and other fields. Since its utilization many sources have become out of use and became waste but no proper management. This has lead to many accidents causing deaths and serious radiation injuries worldwide. Spent sources application is expanding but their management has seen little improvements. Sealed radioactive sources have become a security risk calling for prompt action. Source management helps to maintain sources in a good physical status and provide means of source tracking and control. It also provides a well documented process of the sources making any future management options safe, secure and cost effective. Last but not least good source management substantially reduces the risk of accidents and eliminates the risk of malicious use. The International Atomic Energy Agency assists Member States to build the infrastructure to properly manage sealed radioactive sources. The assistance includes training of national experts to handle, condition and properly store the sources. For Member States that do not have proper facilities, we provide the technical assistance to design a proper facility to properly manage the radioactive sources and provide for their proper storage. For Member States that need to condition their sources properly but don't have the required infrastructure we provide direct assistance to physically help them with source recovery and provide an international expert team to properly condition their sources and render them safe and secure. We offer software (Radioactive Waste Management Registry) to properly keep a complete record on the sources and provide for efficient tracking. This also helps with proper planning and decision making for long term management

  8. Radioactive Sources Service

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Please note that the radioactive sources service will be open by appointment only every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during CERN working hours (instead of alternate weeks). In addition, please note that our 2007 schedule is available on our web site: http://cern.ch/service-rp-sources

  9. Radioactive sources in brachytherapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Janez

    2003-01-01

    Background. In modern brachytherapy, a greast step forward was made in the 1960s in France with the introduction of new radioactive isotopes and new techniques. These innovations spread rapidly across Europe, though no single dosimetry standard had been set by then. In the new millennium, the advances in brachytherapy are further stimulated by the introduction of 3-D imaging techniques and the latest after loading irradiation equipment that use point sources. The international organiyation IC...

  10. Radioactive sources service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note that, as of 1st May, the Radioactive Sources Service will be open full-time, i.e. from 8.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m., on alternate weeks (rather than part-time, from 8.00 a.m. to 11.00 a.m., every day, as at present). The weeks in which the Service will be open during the coming month are listed below: week No. 18: from 01/05 to 05/05 week No. 20: from 15/05 to 19/05 week No. 22: from 29/05 to 02/06 http://cern.ch/service-rp-sources

  11. Handling of radioactive sources in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the following aspects: sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, radiation detectors, personnel and area monitoring, surface pollution, radioactive wastes control and radioactive sources transferring. (The author)

  12. Housing for a radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domnanovich, J. R.; Erwin, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The radioactive structure comprises a radioactive source surrounded by a housing. The housing contains a first and second shielding body and a connecting device. The first shielding body has a protrusion which contains a first recess for receiving the radioactive source. The second shielding body has a second recess in one face end which accommodates the protrusion and a conical aperture communicating with the second recess in another face end. The connecting device connects the first shielding body to the second shielding body. When the radioactive source is inserted into the first recess and when the protrusion is located in the second recess, the radioactive source emits radiation primarily through the conical aperture into the environment. The source preferably contains americium which emits gamma radiation. The structure may be used as a motion correction sensor or as a marker in a nuclear diagnostic imaging

  13. PORTABLE SOURCE OF RADIOACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, R.C.; Ferguson, K.R.; Rylander, E.W.; Safranski, L.M.

    1959-06-16

    A portable source for radiogiaphy or radiotherapy is described. It consists of a Tl/sup 170/ or Co/sup 60/ source mounted in a rotatable tungsten alloy plug. The plug rotates within a brass body to positions of safety or exposure. Provision is made for reloading and carrying the device safely. (T.R.H.)

  14. Radioactive sources in chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive sources including all radioactive materials exceeding exemption levels have to be registered in national databases according to international standards based on the recommendations ICRP 60 and a proper licensing should take place as described for example in the 96/29/EURATOM. In spite of that, unregistered sources could be found, usually due to the fact that the owner is not aware of radiation characteristics of sources. The material inventories of chemical laboratories are typical and most frequent example where radioactive sources could be found. Five different types of sources could be identified. The most frequent type are chemicals, namely thorium and uranium compounds. They are used not due to their radioactivity but due to their chemical properties. As for all other sources a stringent control is necessary in order to assure their safe use. Around hundred of stored radioactive chemical items were found during inspections of such laboratories performed by the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration or qualified experts in a period December 2006 - July 2007. Users of such chemicals are usually not aware that thorium and uranium chemicals are radioactive and, as unsealed sources, they could be easily spilled out and produce contamination of persons, surfaces, equipment etc. The external exposure as well as the internal exposure including exposure due to inhalation could be present. No knowledge about special precautions is usually present in laboratories and leads to underestimating of a potential risk and unintentional exposure of the laboratory personnel, students etc. Due to the long decay times in decay series of Th -232, U-238 and U- 235 the materials are also radioactive today. Even more, in case of thorium chemicals the radioactivity increased substantially from the time of their production. The implementation of safety measures has been under way and includes a survey of the qualified experts, establishment of organizational structure in a

  15. Radioactive source management in Daya Bay NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Chun Yang

    2000-01-01

    'Small sources causes big accidents' had occurred worldwide many times. Radioactive source management in Nuclear Power Plant in very important for its safety record. This paper introduces the way and experience of radioactive source management in Daya Bay NPP from aspects of clarifying the responsibilities, centralizing the management of high radioactivity sources, work process management and experience feedback etc. (author)

  16. Reducing the risk from radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, C.

    2006-01-01

    Each year the IAEA receives reports of serious injuries or deaths due to misuse or accidents involving sealed radioactive sources. Sealed radioactive sources are used widely in medicine, industry, and agriculture - by doctors to treat cancer, by radiographers to check welds in pipelines, or by specialists to irradiate food to prevent it from spoiling, for example. If these sources are lost or improperly discarded, a serious accident may result. In addition, the security of sealed sources has become a growing concern, particularly the potential that such a source could be used as a radioactive dispersal device or 'dirty bomb'. Preventing the loss or theft of sealed radioactive sources reduces both the risk of accidents and the risk that such sources could become an instrument of misuse. In most countries, radioactive materials and activities that produce radiation are regulated. Those working with sealed radioactive sources are required not just to have proper credentials, but also the needed training and support to deal with unexpected circumstances that may arise when a source is used. Despite these measures, accidents involving sealed sources continue to be reported to the IAEA. Among its many activities to improve the safety and security of sealed sources, the IAEA has been investigating the root causes of major accidents since the 1980s and publishing the findings so that others can learn from them. This information needs to be in the hands of those whose actions and decisions can reduce accidents by preventing a lost source from making it's way into scrap metal. The IAEA has also developed an international catalogue of sealed radioactive sources, and provides assistance to countries to safely contain sources no longer in use. To raise awareness, a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit was issued that focuses on the long-term issues in safely and securely managing radioactive sealed sources. The target audiences are government agencies, radioactive sealed source

  17. Radioactive source manipulator and stowage device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, C.

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of a radioactive source manipulator and stowage device comprising: a cylindrical body; a transversely disposed socket formed near one end of said cylindrical body for receiving a radioactive source; a cylindrical sleeve rotatably mounted on said cylindrical body; and an aperture formed in the wall of said sleeve whereby rotation of said sleeve to axially align said aperture with said socket will permit a radioactive source to be inserted into and removed from said socket and rotation of said sleeve to move said aperture out of alignment with said socket when the socket contains a radioactive source readies the device for manipulation and stowage

  18. Procurement and use of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.S.; Sumathi, E.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive sources are used throughout the world for a wide variety of peaceful purposes in industry, medicine, agriculture, research and education. It has been recognized that unsecured radioactive sources can cause serious radiological accidents involving radiation injuries and fatalities. Radioactive source after its useful life, although considered waste, can still pose a security threat if not managed properly. Today, there is a growing concern that terrorist or criminal groups could gain access to disused high activity radioactive sources and use it with harmful intent. Consequently, there has been a global trend towards increased control, accounting, and security measures to prevent such incidents. Particular concern is expressed regarding radioactive sources that have become orphaned (not under regulatory control) or vulnerable (under weak regulatory control and about to be orphaned). The International Basic Safety Standards published by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provide an internationally harmonized basis for ensuring the safe and secure use of sources of ionizing radiation

  19. International directory of certified radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, G.; Bambynek, W.

    1983-01-01

    This directory lists the products of 16 suppliers of certified reference materials (CRM) of radioactivity as given in their catalogues. Included are only products for which certificates are delivered and whose uncertainties are given according to the rules defined in ICRU Report No. 12, ''Certification of Standardized Radioactive Sources'' (International Commission on Radiation and Measurements, Washington, 1968). Only those products are included of which the standard uncertainties according to the above rules are less than 10%. Prices of the products are not mentioned since they frequently change. The products are divided into four groups: Radioactive Solutions, Radioactive Gases, Solid Sources and Sources for Liquid Scintillation Counting). (orig./WL)

  20. International directory of certified radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, G; Bambynek, W

    1983-01-01

    This directory lists the products of 16 suppliers of certified reference materials (CRM) of radioactivity as given in their catalogues. Included are only products for which certificates are delivered and whose uncertainties are given according to the rules defined in ICRU Report No. 12, ''Certification of Standardized Radioactive Sources'' (International Commission on Radiation and Measurements, Washington, 1968). Only those products are included of which the standard uncertainties according to the above rules are less than 10%. Prices of the products are not mentioned since they frequently change. The products are divided into four groups: Radioactive Solutions, Radioactive Gases, Solid Sources and Sources for Liquid Scintillation Counting).

  1. Continuous Tracking of RFID Tagged Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broide, A.; Marcus, E.; Gabay, Y.; Miron, E.; Seif, R.; Wengrowicz, U.; Kadmon, Y.; Tirosh, D.

    2008-01-01

    The prevention of radiation hazards due to radioisotopes is one of the concerns of the Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In a series of international conferences held in the last five years) this issue was discussed thoroughly. One of the conclusions was that strict management of radioactive sources is essential. The management of radioactive sources would help to prevent transference of radioactive materials to unauthorized personal. For this purpose, states should make a concerted effort to follow the principles of the Code of Conduct on the Security of Radioactive Sources(2). In this context, the identification of roles and responsibilities of governments, licensees and international organizations is vital(3). The referred activities are primarily related to control over radioactive sources and enhance the tracking ability of radiation sources . In this paper, a proposed Radioactive Sources Tracking System is presented. This system facilitates real time monitoring capability of fixed and mobile radiation sources. The system provides the location of the source and indication whether the source is inside or outside the shielding container. The information about the sources location and condition can be used to coordinate a fast response in case of any attempt to steal or tamper with a source. These goals are achieved by using GPS (Global Positioning System), RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) and control and management software

  2. Sistemas Integrados de energías con fuentes renovables, requisitos y opciones. Integrated systems of energy with renewable sources, requirements and options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sarmiento Sera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available En el presente reporte se consideró una instalación conectada a la red eléctrica en la isla de Cuba. Se tenía el interés de introducir un determinado % de energía a partir de fuentes renovables, y se poseía un determinado potencial de energía eólica y fotovoltaica. Se analizaron los requisitos y opciones energéticas, se realizaron simulaciones de alternativas con el programa HOMER y se concluyó con la determinación de las condiciones o potenciales de las fuentes renovables para la recomendación de cada opción energética, y se presentaron los resultados de forma gráfica y fácil comprensión. Se ofreció un análisis de las posibilidades reales que en el ámbito de una localidad, pueden aprovecharse en función de diversificar de manera sostenible, el esquema energético comunitario  con la utilización de las fuentes renovables de energía, utilizando la variante que desde el punto económico y ambiental resulte de más conveniencia.  In this report was considered an electric net connected installation in the island of Cuba. It had the interest of introducing a certain % of energy starting from renewable sources, and a certain potential of wind and photovoltaic energy was possessed. The requirements and energy options were analyzed, and it were carried out simulations of alternative with the HOMER program and it was concluded with the determination of the conditions or potentials of the renewable sources for the recommendation of each energy option, and the results were presented in graphic way and easy understanding. It was offered an analysis of the real possibilities in the environment of a town. It can take advantage in function of diversifying from a sustainable way, with the community energy outline using the renewable sources of energy, and taking the variant of more convenience from the economic and environmental point of view.

  3. Control of sealed radioactive sources in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Quijada, R.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the inventory of radioactive sources in Peru and assesses the control. Three groups of source conditions are established: controlled sources, known sources, and lost and orphan sources. The potential risk, described as not significant, for producing accidents is established and the needed measures are discussed. The paper concludes that, while the control on sealed sources is good, there is still room for improvement. (author)

  4. Environmental requirements for radioactive wastes final disposal in shallow ground repositories; Requisitos ambientais para disposicao final de rejeitos radioativos em repositorios de superficie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raduan, Rosane Napolitano

    1994-12-31

    Low and intermediate level radioactive waste confinement have been a well know practice for about five decades. Wastes disposal in shallow ground repositories are originated in the nuclear fuel cycle and the application of isotopes in medicine, industry, research and education and other activities. An adequate choice of sites for repositories constructions is based on a criterions analysis of a series of requirements for environmental impact assessment. This analysis allows, together with physical and chemical parameters of the immobilized and packed radioactive wastes, to carry out this choice. The main objective of this work is to have an overview of principal topics that allows an environment impact analysis resulting from a controlled radioactive waste disposal. (author). 68 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. DEPO-related to Radioactive Sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-24

    Design and Evaluation Process Outline (DEPO) is discussed as it pertains to protection of radioactive sources. The bulk of the report describes features of various kinds of detection systems, and follows this with systems for entry control and personnel identification.

  6. Electrodeless light source provided with radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive materials are used to assist in starting a discharge in an electrodeless light source. The radioactive emissions predispose on the inner surface of the lamp envelope loosely bound charges which thereafter assist in initiating discharge. The radioactive material can be enclosed within the lamp envelope in gaseous or non-gaseous form. Preferred materials are krypton 85 and americium 241. In addition, the radioactive material can be dispersed in the lamp envelope material or can be a pellet imbedded in the envelope material. Finally, the radioactive material can be located in the termination fixture. Sources of alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays are suitable. Because charges accumulate with time on the inner surface of the lamp envelope, activity levels as low as 10 -8 curie are effective as starting aids. (Auth.)

  7. Source, transport and dumping of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    The results of an examination into the problems of radioactive waste are presented, in particular the sources, transport and dumping and the policy considerations in favour of specific methods. The theoretical background of radioactive waste is described, including the physical and chemical, ecological, medical and legal aspects. The practical aspects of radioactive waste in the Netherlands are considered, including the sources, the packaging and transport and dumping in the Atlantic Ocean. The politics and policies involved in this process are outlined. (C.F.)

  8. Radioactive starting aids for electrodeless light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proud, J.M.; Regan, R.J.; Haugsjaa, P.O.; Baird, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of radioactive sources of α particles, β particles or γ rays as aids in starting a discharge in an electrodeless light source is discussed. The advantages of siting the sources at various positions in the device are discussed. Preferred materials are 85 Kr and 241 Am. (U.K.)

  9. The IAEA and Control of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation discusses the authoritative functions and the departments of the IAEA, especially the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security and its Safety and Security of Radiation Sources Unit. IAEA safety series and IAEA safety standards series inform about international standards, provide underlying principles, specify obligations and responsibilities and give recommendations to support requirements. Other IAEA relevant publications comprise safety reports, technical documents (TECDOCs), conferences and symposium papers series and accident reports. Impacts of loss of source control is discussed, definitions of orphan sources and vulnerable sources is given. Accidents with orphan sources, radiological accidents statistic (1944-2000) and its consequences are discussed. These incidents lead to development of the IAEA guidance. The IAEA's action plan for the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive material was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors and the General Conference in September 1999. This led to the 'Categorization of Radiation Sources' and the 'Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources'. After 0911 the IAEA developed a nuclear security plan of activities including physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities, detection of malicious activities involving nuclear and other radioactive materials, state systems for nuclear material accountancy and control, security of radioactive material other than nuclear material, assessment of safety and security related vulnerability of nuclear facilities, response to malicious acts, or threats thereof, adherence to and implementation of international agreements, guidelines and recommendations and nuclear security co-ordination and information management. The remediation of past problems comprised collection and disposal of known disused sources, securing vulnerable sources and especially high-risk sources (Tripartite initiative), searching for

  10. Disposal options for disused radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a review of relevant information on the various technical factors and issues, as well as approaches and relevant technologies, leading to the identification of potential disposal options for disused radioactive sources. The report attempts to provide a logical 'road map' for the disposal of disused radioactive sources, taking into consideration the high degree of variability in the radiological properties of such types of radioactive waste. The use of borehole or shaft type repositories is highlighted as a potential disposal option, particularly for those countries that have limited resources and are looking for a simple, safe and cost effective solution for the disposal of their radioactive source inventories. It offers information about usage and characteristics of radioactive sources, disposal considerations, identification and screening of disposal options as well as waste packaging and acceptance criteria for disposal. The information provided in the report could be adapted or adopted to identify and develop specific disposal options suitable for the type and inventory of radioactive sources kept in storage in a given Member State

  11. Regulatory Control of Radioactive Sources in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M.; Martin, J.L., E-mail: mrm@csn.es [Nuclear Safety Council, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    The arrangements for the regulatory control of the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources in Spain are described. Emphasis is given to the situations which are most likely to result in the loss of control of sources and on the procedures introduced to reduce the likelihood of losses in these cases. Finally, the strategy for locating sources which have been lost from control (orphan sources) is described. (author)

  12. Source of radioactivity in the ocean environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper summarizes both natural and man-made radioactivity in the marine environment. Radioactivity occurs naturally in both the sea water and in the ocean sediment. Radioactivity in the sea water is fairly uniform geographically and is dominated by the naturally occurring isotope 40/K (potassium-40). Unlike sea water, sediment radiation levels vary with sediment type and location. The primary source of natural radiation in the sediment results from deposition of insoluble thorium isotopes formed by the decay of water-soluble uranium. Man-made sources of radioactivity arise from, in descending order of importance: - sinking of two U.S. and two Soviet nuclear submarines; fallout from nuclear weapons testing; dumping of primarily British and Americal low-level nuclear waste; and dumping of reprocessing plant radiated effluents from the British Windscale facility and other European and Indian reprocessing facilities. 1 table

  13. Radioactive source security: the cultural challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englefield, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive source security is an essential part of radiation protection. Sources can be abandoned, lost or stolen. If they are stolen, they could be used to cause deliberate harm and the risks are varied and significant. There is a need for a global security protection system and enhanced capability to achieve this. The establishment of radioactive source security requires 'cultural exchanges'. These exchanges include collaboration between: radiation protection specialists and security specialists; the nuclear industry and users of radioactive sources; training providers and regulators/users. This collaboration will facilitate knowledge and experience exchange for the various stakeholder groups, beyond those already provided. This will promote best practice in both physical and information security and heighten security awareness generally. Only if all groups involved are prepared to open their minds to listen to and learn from, each other will a suitable global level of control be achieved. (authors)

  14. Radioactive sources in trade and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vroom, H.; Bolt, R.; Lange, H. de.

    1989-04-01

    An inventory has been drawn up of the most important applications of radioactive sources in the Netherlands, with emphasis on nuclear measuring instruments for industrial use. This inventory has been supplemented with a brief survey of the most important legal demand (among which, the 'decree radiation protection') with regard to the use of such instruments and some data about the construction of the radioactive source present in the instrument. Also the processing of exhausted sources is discussed briefly. (author). 14 refs.; 3 figs.; 6 tabs

  15. Managing the security of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    2003-01-01

    The issue of security of radioactive sources had arisen as a result of incidents where people were unintentionally exposed in various parts of the world. However after 11 September 2001, the focus on security was intensified by concerns over those who might wish to use radioactive sources for malevolent purposes. This paper will discuss the questions of the type and nature of these concerns and outline a process for assessing the threat and then assigning security measures for sources. The paper is based on work done by the author while at the IAEA and published as part of IAEATecdoc-1355

  16. Thermosensitive shutter for radioactive source housing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullagar, H.

    1986-01-01

    A shutter apparatus for a radioactive source housing comprises a movable member and a thermosensitive releasing means operative normally to hold the movable member in an open position but to release the movable member to move to a position closing the housing to contain the source when the temperature exceeds a predetermined value, for example as a result of fire. (author)

  17. Development of an application simulating radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riffault, V.; Locoge, N.; Leblanc, E.; Vermeulen, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an application simulating radioactive gamma sources developed in the 'Ecole des Mines' of Douai (France). It generates raw counting data as an XML file which can then be statistically exploited to illustrate the various concepts of radioactivity (exponential decay law, isotropy of the radiation, attenuation of radiation in matter). The application, with a spread sheet for data analysis and lab procedures, has been released under free license. (authors)

  18. Security of radioactive sources and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.; D'Amato, E.; Fernandez Moreno, S.

    1998-01-01

    The activities involving the use of radiation sources and radioactive materials are subject to the control of the national bodies dedicated to the nuclear regulation. The main objective of this control is to assure an appropriate level of radiological protection and nuclear safety. In Argentina, this function is carried out by the 'Nuclear Regulatory Authority' (ARN) whose regulatory system for radiation sources and radioactive materials comprises a registration, licensing and inspection scheme. The system is designed to keep track of such materials and to allow taking immediate corrective actions in case some incident occurs. Due to the appearance of a considerable number of illicit traffic events involving radiation sources and radioactive materials, the specialized national and international community has begun to evaluate the adoption of supplementary measures to those of 'safety' guided to its prevention and detection (i.e. 'security measures'). This paper presents a view on when the adoption of complementary 'security' measures to those of 'safety' would be advisable and which they would be. This will be done through the analysis of two hypothesis of illicit traffic, the first one with sources and radioactive materials considered as 'registered' and the second, with the same materials designated as 'not registered'. It will also describe succinctly the measures adopted by the ARN or under its analysis regarding the 'security' measures to sources and radioactive materials. (author)

  19. Keeping Sealed Radioactive Sources Safe and Secure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potterton, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive sources are used in a wide variety of devices in medical, industrial, agricultural and research facilities worldwide. These sources, such as cobalt-60 and caesium-137, emit high levels of ionizing radiation, which can treat cancer, measure materials used in industry and sterilize food and medical appliances. Problems may arise when these sources are no longer needed, or if they are damaged or decayed. If these sources are not properly stored they can be a threat to human health and the environment and pose a security risk. Procedures to secure these spent or 'disused' sources are often highly expensive and need specialized assistance. The IAEA helps its States find long term solutions for the safe and secure storage of disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRSs)

  20. Device for closing the radioactive sources shutters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Everaldo; Santos, Enderson Silvino; Vieira, Carlaine M.; Torquato, Nivaldo Reis; Santos, Evando Ramalho; Castro, Luciano Sampaio

    2002-01-01

    A device for nuclear measurement used at the industrial installation is composed of a radioactive source (Cs 137), the ionization or scintillation chamber and the circuitry parts. The ionization and scintillation chambers are mounted at the industrial piping and monitoring the density of the material inside the piping, based on radiation quantity which comes to receiving chamber. This information is sending to the electronic unity which is responsible for the calculations and remote and local indications of the measured density. Based on the recommendation of the radioactive sources must have the shutters closed when they are inactive, an automatic device composed by solenoid valve, a support and a mechanical shaft which when connected to the supervisory system (CLP's) cause the automatic closing of the shutter of the radioactive sources during the shutting down of the process

  1. Radioactive wastes: sources, treatment, and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wymer, R.G.; Blomeke, J.O.

    1975-01-01

    Sources, treatment, and disposal of radioactive wastes are analyzed in an attempt to place a consideration of the problem of permanent disposal at the level of established or easily attainable technology. In addition to citing the natural radioactivity present in the biosphere, the radioactive waste generated at each phase of the fuel cycle (mills, fabrication plants, reactors, reprocessing plants) is evaluated. The three treatment processes discussed are preliminary storage to permit decay of the short-lived radioisotopes, solidification of aqueous wastes, and partitioning the long-lived α emitters for separate and long-term storage. Dispersion of radioactive gases to the atmosphere is already being done, and storage in geologically stable structures such as salt mines is under active study. The transmutation of high-level wastes appears feasible in principle, but exceedingly difficult to develop

  2. Securing radioactive sources through a proper management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio Pimenta

    2009-01-01

    The safety and security of radioactive sources have become a hot issue for the nuclear community in the last two decades. The Goiania accident in Brazil and the September 11th attack alerted governments and nuclear agencies around the world to the vulnerability of the thousands of disused radioactive sources ill-stored or misplaced in a myriad of ways, especially in countries with less developed infra-structure. Once the threat of environmental contamination or malevolent use of these sources became clear, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the American Government spawned initiatives to reduce this risk, basically stimulating the proper conditioning of the sources and, whenever possible, seeking their repatriation to the countries of origin. Since 1996 Brazil has been participating actively in this effort, having carried out hands-on operations to condition old radium sources in Latin American and Caribbean countries and also repatriated its own neutron sources to the United States. A new operation is presently being organized: the reconditioning of the high activity sources contained in teletherapy units stored in the country using a mobile hot cell developed in South Africa. Also an agreement is being negotiated between the US National Nuclear Security Agency and the Brazilian CNEN to repatriate hundreds of radioactive gauges presently stored at CNEN's source storage buildings. (author)

  3. Security of radioactive sources in radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    Safety codes and safety standards are formulated on the basis of internationally accepted safety criteria for design, construction and operation of specific equipment, systems, structures and components of nuclear and radiation facilities. Safety codes establish the objectives and set requirements that shall be fulfilled to provide adequate assurance for safety. Safety guides and guidelines elaborate various requirements and furnish approaches for their implementation. Safety manuals deal with specific topics and contain detailed scientific and technical information on the subject. These documents are prepared by experts in the relevant fields and are extensively reviewed by advisory committees of the Board before they are published. The documents are revised when necessary, in the light of experience and feedback from users as well as new developments in the field. In India, radiation sources are being widely used for societal benefits in industry, medical practices, research, training and agriculture. It has been reported from all over the world that unsecured radioactive sources caused serious radiological accidents involving radiation injuries and fatalities. Particular concern was expressed regarding radioactive sources that have become orphaned (not under regulatory control) or vulnerable (under weak regulatory control and about to be orphaned). There is a concern about safety and security of radioactive sources and hence the need of stringent regulatory control over the handling of the sources and their security. In view of this, this guide is prepared which gives provisions necessary to safeguard radiation installations against theft of radioactive sources and other malevolent acts that may result in radiological consequences. It is, therefore, required that the radiation sources are used safely and managed securely by only authorised personnel. This guide is intended to be used by users of radiation sources in developing the necessary security plan for

  4. Environmental Assessment Radioactive Source Recovery Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In a response to potential risks to public health and safety, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the recovery of sealed neutron sources under the Radioactive Source Recovery Program (RSRP). This proposed program would enhance the DOE's and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) joint capabilities in the safe management of commercially held radioactive source materials. Currently there are no federal or commercial options for the recovery, storage, or disposal of sealed neutron sources. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to implement a program for the receipt and recovery at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico, of unwanted and excess plutonium-beryllium ( 238 Pu-Be) and americium-beryllium ( 241 Am-Be) sealed neutron sources. About 1 kg (2.2 lb) plutonium and 3 kg (6.6 lb) americium would be recovered over a 15-year project. Personnel at LANL would receive neutron sources from companies, universities, source brokers, and government agencies across the country. These neutron sources would be temporarily stored in floor holes at the CMR Hot Cell Facility. Recovery reduces the neutron emissions from the source material and refers to a process by which: (1) the stainless steel cladding is removed from the neutron source material, (2) the mixture of the radioactive material (Pu-238 or Am-241) and beryllium that constitutes the neutron source material is chemically separated (recovered), and (3) the recovered Pu-238 or Am-241 is converted to an oxide form ( 238 PuO 2 or 241 AmO 2 ). The proposed action would include placing the 238 PuO 2 or 241 AmO 2 in interim storage in a special nuclear material vault at the LANL Plutonium Facility

  5. Concretes characterization for spent radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez B, J.; Monroy G, F. P.

    2013-10-01

    The present work includes the preparation and characterization of the concrete used as conditioning matrix of spent radioactive sources in the Treatment Plant of Radioactive Wastes of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). The concrete tests tubes were subjected to resistance assays to the compression, leaching, resistance to the radiation and porosity, and later on characterized by means of X rays diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectrometry, with the purpose of evaluating if this concrete accredits the established tests by the NOM-019-Nucl-1995. The results show that the concrete use in the Treatment Plant fulfills the requirements established by the NOM-019-Nucl-1995. (author)

  6. Inadequate control of world's radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The radioactive materials needed to build a 'dirty bomb' can be found in almost any country in the world, and more than 100 countries may have inadequate control and monitoring programs necessary to prevent or even detect the theft of these materials. The IAEA points out that while radioactive sources number in the millions, only a small percentage have enough strength to cause serious radiological harm. It is these powerful sources that need to be focused on as a priority. In a significant recent development, the IAEA, working in collaboration with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Russian Federation's Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM), have established a tripartite working group on 'Securing and Managing Radioactive Sources'. Through its program to help countries improve their national infrastructures for radiation safety and security, the IAEA has found that more than 100 countries may have no minimum infrastructure in place to properly control radiation sources. However, many IAEA Member States - in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe - are making progress through an IAEA project to strengthen their capabilities to control and regulate radioactive sources. The IAEA is also concerned about the over 50 countries that are not IAEA Member States (there are 134), as they do not benefit from IAEA assistance and are likely to have no regulatory infrastructure. The IAEA has been active in lending its expertise to search out and secure orphaned sources in several countries. More than 70 States have joined with the IAEA to collect and share information on trafficking incidents and other unauthorized movements of radioactive sources and other radioactive materials. The IAEA and its Member States are working hard to raise levels of radiation safety and security, especially focusing on countries known to have urgent needs. The IAEA has taken the leading role in the United Nations system in establishing standards of safety, the most significant of

  7. Radioactive sealed sources inventory and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez C, G.; Mallaupoma G, M.; Cruz C, W.

    1996-01-01

    This report is related to the management of radioactive wastes, that is to say, related to the sealed sources utilized in industry, medicine and research jobs, that can not be used anymore, because of their life time termination or their activity decay to useless limits. Owing to this fact, it is necessary to take them to the Management Plant of Radioactive waste in the 'RACSO' Nuclear Center, as it is specified by the National Authority Technical Office (OTAN) regulations in Peru. The experience gained by IPEN in the sealed source management is shown in the table which informs about the radionuclide types, activity and volume amount for years. In the 'RACSO' Nuclear Center, 63 sealed sources are stored and right measures are being adopted in order to be conditioned by cementation in 200 lt steel reinforced cylinders, which are proper to their transportation and storage. A flow-chart shows the steps that the national users should follow in order to manage radioactive sealed sources and so that minimize the risks. Resulting from the agreement between the users and managers, a systematic coordination is developed, verifying the information related to the source characterization, the way of transportation and the future conditioning. It also involves the cost aspects, which in some cases, represent a big problem in the management. (authors). 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  8. Natural radioactivity in groundwater sources in Ireland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currivan, L.; Dowdall, A.; Mcginnity, P.; Ciara, M. [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (Ireland); Craig, M. [Environmental Protection Agency (Ireland)

    2014-07-01

    The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) in collaboration with the Irish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) undertook a national survey of radioactivity in groundwater sources for compliance with parameters set out in the European Communities Drinking Water Directive. The Directive outlines the minimum requirements for the quality of drinking water and water intended for human consumption. Over two hundred samples were screened for radioactivity. Where indicated, analysis for individual radionuclide activity was undertaken and the radiation dose arising calculated. Furthermore, samples were analysed for radon concentration. This survey is the first comprehensive national survey of radioactivity in groundwater sources in Ireland. Approximately 18 per cent of drinking water in Ireland originates from groundwater and springs with the remainder from surface water. Between 2007 and 2011, water samples from a representative network of groundwater sources were analysed and assessed for compliance with the radioactivity parameters set out in the Drinking Water Directive. The assessment was carried out using the methodology for screening drinking water set out by the WHO. For practical purposes the WHO recommended screening levels for drinking water below which no further action is required of 100 mBq/l for gross alpha activity and 1000 mBq/l for gross beta activity were applied. Of the 203 groundwater sources screened for gross alpha and gross beta all met the gross beta activity criteria of less than 1000 mBq/l and 175 supplies had gross alpha activity concentrations of less than 100 mBq/l. For these sources no further analysis was required. The remaining 28 sources required further (radionuclide-specific) analysis from an alpha activity perspective. Results on ranges and distributions of radionuclide concentrations in groundwater as well as ingestion doses estimated for consumers of these water supplies will be presented. Document available in abstract

  9. Radioactive source security: the cultural challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englefield, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Radioactive source security is an essential part of radiation protection. Sources can be abandoned, lost or stolen. If they are stolen, they could be used to cause deliberate harm and the risks are varied and significant. There is a need for a global security protection system and enhanced capability to achieve this. The establishment of radioactive source security requires 'cultural exchanges'. These exchanges include collaboration between: radiation protection specialists and security specialists; the nuclear industry and users of radioactive sources; training providers and regulators/users. This collaboration will facilitate knowledge and experience exchange for the various stakeholder groups, beyond those already provided. This will promote best practice in both physical and information security and heighten security awareness generally. Only if all groups involved are prepared to open their minds to listen to and learn from, each other will a suitable global level of control be achieved. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Sources of Radioactive Isotopes for Dirty Bombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubenau, Joel

    2004-05-01

    From the security perspective, radioisotopes and radioactive sources are not created equal. Of the many radioisotopes used in industrial applications, medical treatments, and scientific research, only eight, when present in relatively large amounts in radioactive sources, pose high security risks primarily because of their prevalence and physical properties. These isotopes are americium-241, californium-252, cesium-137, cobalt-60, iridium-192, radium-226, plutonium-238, and strontium-90. Except for the naturally occurring radium-226, nuclear reactors produce the other seven in bulk commercial quantities. Half of these isotopes emit alpha radiation and would, thus, primarily pose internal threats to health; the others are mainly high-energy gamma emitters and would present both external and internal health hazards. Therefore, the response to a "dirty bomb" event depends on what type of radioisotope is chosen and how it is employed. While only a handful of major corporations produce the reactor-generated radioisotopes, they market these materials to thousands of smaller companies and users throughout the world. Improving the security of the high-risk radioactive sources will require, among other efforts, cooperation among source suppliers and regulatory agencies.

  11. Responsibility on using Radioactive Sources in Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Baroudy, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Present study aims at explaining the role of the state, through legislations and regulatory decisions, in defining the responsible for implementing the Basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiations, which should be followed when applying radioactive sources in industry. This study deals with the objectives of protection of the workers, the public and the environment against radiation hazards, as well as the role of the International community and the national legislations in providing for such protection. The study also addressed the responsibility, defining the responsible parties in the different practices. Finally, some radiation accidents in foreign countries and some cases handled in Egyptian courts are discussed concerning accidents that occurred on using radioactive sources in industry. The study concluded that unification of regulatory bodies in Egypt is needed and that the regulatory body should be completely separated from the applications facilities in such a way that the regulators would be completely independent in their judgement and in decision making. (Author)

  12. The control of radioactive sources in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, S.M.V.; Menezes, C.F.; Alves Filho, A.D.; Xavier, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The radiological accident of Goiania in 1987 brought to light several deficiencies in the licensing of medical, industrial and research facilities, which handle radioisotopes, as well as in the control of radioactive sources in Brazil. The article describes some of the technical and administrative measures taken to ensure the adoption of appropriate radiological safety standards throughout the country and thereby reduce the incidence of radiological accidents. (author)

  13. Security of highly radioactive sources in Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Kamal K.

    2010-01-01

    Subsequent to 9/11, concerned countries and UN agencies have taken especial interest in the security of highly radioactive sources throughout the world. The IAEA Nuclear Security Plan (2006-2009) consequently made as a result of UN Security Council Resolution 1540 is binding to all States. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) of the US and the Global Threat Reduction Programme (GTRP) of UK have assisted the four hospitals in Nepal having more than 1,000 Curies of radioactivity in their Cobalt-60 sources used for teletherapy. The physical upgrade of the security of the nuclear materials has also been launched in Nepal for prevention of theft with malicious intention or threats. In this presentation, the radioisotopes in Nepal that comes under different categories according to TECDOC-1355 of IAEA will be described. Problems and issues regarding the security and protection of radioactive sources at hospitals, academic and research institutions that could be prevalent in many developing counties too will be discussed by taking a case study of one of the cancer hospitals in Kathmandu valley. (author)

  14. Safety and security of radioactive sources in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsay Yeousong; Guan Channan; Cheng Yungfu

    2008-01-01

    In Taiwan, the safety and security of radioactive sources is a high priority issue. Ionizing Radiation Protection Act (IRPA) and correlating regulations had been in place for effective control of the safety and security of radioactive sources since 2003. For increased control of sealed radioactive sources, Atomic Energy Council (AEC) established in March 2004 an online reporting system through the Internet, assisting source owners in reporting their sources every month. To conform to the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and the Categorization of radioactive sources, published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), AEC has taken the following actions: 1. Established an inventory of Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sources, and implemented the Import/Export Provisions of the Code. 2. Required that each licensee shall control access to Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sources, and AEC will conduct project inspection on Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sources. 3. Using a new radiation warning symbol by ISO for Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sources. The reinforcement of orphaned source control was implemented as early as 1995. All steel mills have installed radiation detectors to scan incoming metal scrap to prevent accidental smelting of radioactive sources. The results of this effort will be discussed in the paper. The above measures are examples for demonstrating AEC's commitment to reinforced control of radioactive sources. AEC will continue to protect public safety and security, ensuring that Taiwan's regulatory system in radiation protection conforms to international standards. (author)

  15. Safety of radioactive sources in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro de Carvalho, A.

    2001-01-01

    The safety of radioactive sealed sources is assured in Portugal through a control system with a main goal of prevention of lost of control and inappropriate waste. The legal tools of the regulatory system are: authorization to use, keep, transfer or transport; a deposit of money as a guarantee; civil liability insurance; periodical information. The competent authority shall keep a national inventory of sealed sources. About 50% of the new sources authorized in 1999 were to be used in medical brachytherapy and industrial radiography. The radionuclide Ir-192 contributed with 99.6 % to the total amount of activity. The control system implemented in the country appears to be effective for activities over some GBq but quite ineffective for lower activities. It is supposed that the law will be revised in the near future to increase the effectiveness of the sealed source control system. (author)

  16. Implantation of a databank of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Joana D'Arc Moraes dos

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclides are isotopes that emit radiation. They can be safely applied in medicine, industry, basic research, for metrology and for environmental control. In most applications each radionuclide needs to be characterized regarding their activity concentration (AC) in Becquerel per gram (Bq / g) and also their measurement uncertainty. The Radionuclide Laboratory in the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry, belonging to the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), has a number of standardization systems, where the activity concentrations and the measurement uncertainty are determined. Some radionuclides are stored in glass vials for later use; they have billions of years’ half-lives. These standard solutions are identified by their symbol radioactive element followed by a number. There are hundreds of light bulbs with radioactive sources that periodically need their concentration of activity to be inventoried. The previously deployed control system only allowed access from a unique laboratory point. The inventory was done individually and then was integrated to individual activities in order to determine the overall activity of each radionuclide. This work aims to implement an integrated standards database to an information system that allows users to gain access from various lab points. Thus, the inventory of radioactive sources can be performed in order to signal the need to acquire new solutions. Also, it can indicate, through new activities concentrations, after decay, when different solutions may be discarded in accordance with legal standards of radiation protection and management of the CNEN waste, in order to protect the population and the environment. The adjustment of the existing deficiencies in the system previously used will allow better control related to the use of radioactive materials, minimizing the risks of improper disposal of radionuclides in the environment and can be considered the greatest contribution this work. (author)

  17. Reduction of Radioactive Waste Through the Reuse and Recycle Policy of the Sealed Radioactive Sources Management

    OpenAIRE

    Marpaung, T

    2012-01-01

    In the past few years, the utilization of sealed source for medical, industrial and research purposes has shown an accelerating increase. This situation will lead to increases in the amount of sealed radioactive. During its use, a sealed radioactive waste will eventually become either a spent sealed source or disused sealed radioactive source (DSRS), due to certain factors. The reduction of the amount of radioactive waste can be executed through the application of reuse and recycle of sealed ...

  18. Import/Export Service of Radioactive Material and Radioactive Sources Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Please note that the Import/Export Service of radioactive material (http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping/ - e-mail : service-rp-shipping@cern.ch) and the Radioactive Sources Service (http://cern.ch/service-radioactive-sources - e-mail : service-radioactive-sources@cern.ch) at bldg. 24/E-024 will be closed on FRIDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 2004. Tel. 73171

  19. Management of spent sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, Roberto; Sordei, Gian-Maria; Hiromoto, Goro

    2002-01-01

    The number of sealed radiation sources used in industrial, medical, and research applications in Brazil amounts to hundreds of thousands. Spent or disused sources are being collected and stored as radioactive waste in nuclear research centers, awaiting for a decision on their final disposal. However, a safe and economically feasible disposal technology is unavailable. The aim of this paper is to report the development of the concept of a repository and a treatment process that will allow the final disposal of all the spent sealed sources in a safe, dedicated, and exclusive repository. The concept of the disposal system is a deep borehole in stable geologic media, meeting the radiological performance standards and safety requirements set by international organizations. (author)

  20. Security of radioactive sources in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, Andrew; Murray, Allan

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the need and new requirements to ensure the security of radioactive sources used in the practice of industrial radiography. We describe the discussions and issues arising during the september 2010 regional workshop held in Sydney on the application of security measures to industrial radiography practices. The workshop provided the perspectives of both radiation regulators and industry practitioners, including those from the Philippines. We describe the outputs of the workshop, and how they were developed, and make suggestions for further consideration and applications of security measures in the practice of industrial radiography. (author)

  1. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, D.G.

    1993-03-30

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  2. Licenses for possessing and applying radioactive sources, materials, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Commercial and governmental institutions have been licensed by Dutch authorities to possess and apply radioactive sources, materials, etc. A summary is given and the list is subdivided into a number of sections such as radioactive sources, radioactive materials, X-ray equipment and technetium-generators

  3. Regulatory requirements of radiation and radioactive sources in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundara Rao, I.S.

    1993-01-01

    Manufacture and supply of radiation sources, their use and the disposal of radioactive materials are regulated through the application of Safe Disposal Radioactive Wastes Rules 1987. Salient aspects of these are discussed

  4. Environmental Radioactive Pollution Sources and Effects on Man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    The sources of environmental radioactivity are essentially the naturally occurring radionuclides in the earth,s crust and the cosmogenic radionuclides reaching the environmental ecosystems. The other sources of environmental radioactivity are the man made sources which result from the radioactive materials in human life. The naturally occurring environmental radioactivity is an integral component of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial creation, and therefore it is not considered a source of radioactive pollution to the environment. The radioactive waste from human activities is released into the environment, and its radionuclide content becomes incorporated into the different ecosystems. This results in a situation of environmental radioactive pollution. This review presents the main features of environmental radioactive pollution, the radionuclide behaviour in the ecosystems, pathway models of radionuclides in the body and the probability of associated health hazards. The dose effect relationship of internal radiation exposure and its quantitative aspects are considered because of their relevance to this subject

  5. Sources of radioactive contamination inside houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajet, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    People may be exposed at home to multiple sources of nuclear radiation such as gamma, beta and alpha rays emitters. House atmosphere is polluted with nuclear radiation from water pollutants and rocks used in the construction. Radon is the only radioactive non-metallic element. Environmental organizations estimated that all houses contain varying concentrations of radon gas, and the residents are exposed to levels of radon over the years. The source of radon in houses is uranium, which may be found in rocks of the house, soil of the garden, water of the deep artesian wells and building materials, especially granite rocks. Breathing air that contains high levels of radon causes lung cancer. Radon is the second cause of lung disease after smoking. There are many means to reduce house pollution including: utilisation of air filters to remove contaminated dust particles, keep residential areas away from the establishments that use nuclear technology or embedded by nuclear waste, avoid using materials made from asbestos in construction works and proper use and disposal of chemicals and medicines containing radioactive isotopes. (author)

  6. Radioactive sources astray; Radioaktive kilder på avveier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-01

    In Norway, every year 2-3 incidents where radioactive sources are going astray happens. This can lead to serious consequences with the risk to both humans and the environment. Radioactive sources out of control are often ancient sources no longer in use and will be sent back to the dealer or an approved waste disposal facility.Radiation safety regulations has provisions for the acquisition, management and disposal of radioactive sources to assure proper use and handling of radioactive sources in the community. It is given here information about how businesses should deal with radioactive sources which have been taken out of use, and what should be done by discovery or suspected discovery of radioactivity in return metal industry.(eb)

  7. International Catalogue of Sealed Radioactive Sources and Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The international catalogue of sealed radioactive sources and devices have two major objectives. The first objective is to provide vital information for a wide range of individuals and organizations on industrially manufactured radioactive sources and devices. The second objective is to facilitate identification of design specifications based on limited information from orphan sources and devices to allow safe handling of these items.

  8. Tracking of Radioactive Sources in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fazlie Abdul Rashid; Noor Fadilla Ismail; Khairuddin Mohamad Kontol; Hairul Nizam Idris; Azimawati Ahmad; Suzilawati Muhd Sarowi; Raymond, Y.T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive materials are used in Malaysian Nuclear Agency for various purposes such as research and development, calibration, tracer and irradiation. Inventory of radioactive materials is crucial for ensuring the security and control of all radioactive materials owned and used so as not to be lost or fall into the hands of people who do not have permission to possess or use it. Experience in many countries around the world proves that the improper inventory of radioactive material would lead to loss of control of radioactive materials and will eventually cause an accident of radiation exposure. Radioactive material database has been developed for the need to ensure traceability of radioactive materials in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Records of radioactive materials are regularly updated based on the classification of the type of radionuclide, the total distribution in each building and the initial activity of radioactive sources. (author)

  9. Aspects related to the testing of sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olteanu, C. M.; Nistor, V.; Valeca, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are commonly used in a wide range of applications, such as: medical, industrial, agricultural and scientific research. The radioactive material is contained within the sealed source and the device allows the radiation to be used in a controlled way. Accidents can result if the control over a small fraction of those sources is lost. Sealed nuclear sources fall under the category of special form radioactive material, therefore they must meet safety requirements during transport according to regulations. Testing sealed radioactive sources is an important step in the conformity assessment process in order to obtain the design approval. In ICN Pitesti, the Reliability and Testing Laboratory is notified by CNCAN to perform tests on sealed radioactive sources. This paper wants to present aspects of the verifying tests on sealed capsules for Iridium-192 sources in order to demonstrate the compliance with the regulatory requirements and the program of quality assurance of the tests performed. (authors)

  10. Guidance on the import and export of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, published in January 2004 with the symbol IAEA/CODEOC/2004, provides guidance on how States can safely and securely manage radioactive sources that may pose a significant risk. The concept of such an international undertaking on the safety and security of radioactive sources was highlighted in the major findings of the International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and Security of Radioactive Materials held in Dijon, France, in September 1998. Following that conference, the IAEA Board of Governors requested the Director General to initiate exploratory discussions relating to an international undertaking in the areas of the safety and security of radiation sources. This request was reflected in an Action Plan on the Safety of Radiation Sources and Security of Radioactive Materials, with the Secretariat organizing a series of open-ended meetings of technical and legal experts nominated by Member States to further explore the concept of such an undertaking. Noting comments made in the Board of Governors, the experts agreed that any international undertaking should, for the present, be in the form of a 'code of conduct'. The text of a Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources was accordingly developed. Steps to strengthen the provisions of the Code were subsequently initiated following the International Conference of National Regulatory Authorities with Competence in the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Material held in Buenos Aires in December 2000. Moreover, growing international concern about the security of radioactive sources after the events of 11 September 2001 led to a number of issues being considered further by technical and legal experts. Furthermore, the International Conference on Security of Radioactive Sources held in Vienna in March 2003 made recommendations regarding additional actions that might be needed. In June

  11. Radioactive waste management in sealed sources laboratory production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Gilberto

    2001-01-01

    The laboratory of sealed sources production, of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, was created in 1983 and since then, has produced radioactive sources for industry and engineering in general, having specialization in assembly of radiation sources for non destructive testings, by gammagraphy, with Iridium-192, that represents 98% of the production of laboratory and 2% with the Cobalt-60, used in nuclear gages. The aim of this work, is to quantify and qualify the radioactive wastes generated annually, taking into account, the average of radioactive sources produced, that are approximately 220 sources per year

  12. Reducing Risks from Sealed Radioactive Sources in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are commonly used in a variety of medical applications for both diagnosis and therapy. The sources used in medical applications usually have high levels of radioactivity and, therefore, have the potential to cause serious and life threatening injuries if used improperly or maliciously, or risky if they become lost or are stolen

  13. Provision of RPA advice to users of minor radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, A.P.; Anderson, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    The problems of providing cost effective Radiation Protection Supervisor (RPS) training and appropriate storage for minor radioactive sources are discussed. Threshold limits of radioactive holdings are proposed, above which an RPS should be formally trained and specialised source storage facilities provided. Proposals are made for the provision of practical radiation protection advice without need of a detailed hazard assessment. (author)

  14. Categorization of In-use Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.A.; Mohamed, Y.T.; El Haleim, K.A.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive sealed sources have widespread applications in industry, medicine, research and education. While most sources are of relatively low activity, there are many of medium or very high activity. The mismanagement of high activity sources is responsible for most of the radiological accidents that result in loss of life or disabling injuries. Because of the variety of applications and activities of radioactive sources, a categorization system is necessary so that the controls that are applied to the sources are adequate with its radiological risk. The aim of this work is to use the international Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) categorization system to provide a simple, logical system for grading radioactive sealed sources in Egypt. The categorizations of radioactive sealed sources are based on their potential to cause harm to human health. This study revealed that total of 1916 sources have been used in Egypt in the different applications with a total activity of 89400 Ci according to available data in October 2005. (authors)

  15. Review of Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiti, Shadrack Anthony; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive materials are used worldwide for peaceful applications in medicine, industry, agriculture, environmental science, education and research and military applications. Most of these radioactive sources used are imported therefore trans-boundary movement is a significant factor in consideration of safety and security measures during movement of these sources. It is estimated that 20 million packages of radioactive materials are transported annually worldwide and this number of shipments is expected to increase due to the renaissance of nuclear power generation. The African continent has shown considerable leadership in its advocacy for the safety and security of radioactive sources. The First Africa Workshop on the Establishment of a Legal Framework governing Radiation Protection, the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Safe Management of Radioactive Waste held in Ethiopia in 2001 called upon the IAEA to form a forum for African countries to consider the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and give it a legally binding effect so that the peaceful use of nuclear technology is not compromised. Despite these laudable efforts, Africa still faces considerable challenges in the implementation of safety and security of radioactive sources because of weak regulatory control and lack of infrastructure to properly control, manage and secure radiation sources 1 . The purpose of this paper was therefore, to analyze, review, address and share knowledge and experience with regard to safety and security measures of radioactive materials in Africa. This project will benefit IAEA's African member states in creating nuclear safety and security networking in the region

  16. Reduction of Radioactive Waste Through the Reuse and Recycle Policy of the Sealed Radioactive Sources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marpaung

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, the utilization of sealed source for medical, industrial and research purposes has shown an accelerating increase. This situation will lead to increases in the amount of sealed radioactive. During its use, a sealed radioactive waste will eventually become either a spent sealed source or disused sealed radioactive source (DSRS, due to certain factors. The reduction of the amount of radioactive waste can be executed through the application of reuse and recycle of sealed source. The reuse and recycle policy for spent and disused sealed sources are not already specified yet. The reuse of spent sealed sources can be applied only for the sources which had been used in the medical field for radiotherapy, namely the reuse of a teletherapy Co-60 source in a calibration facility. The recycle of a spent sealed source can be performed for radioactive sources with relatively high activities and long half-lives; however, the recycling activity may only be performed by the manufacturer. To avoid legal conflicts, in the amendment to the Government Regulation No.27 Year 2002 on Management of Radioactive Waste, there will be a recommendation for a new scheme in the management of radioactive waste to facilitate the application of the principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle

  17. Reduction of Radioactive Waste Through the Reuse and Recycle Policy of the Sealed Radioactive Sources Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marpaung, T.

    2012-01-01

    In the past few years, the utilization of sealed source for medical, industrial and research purposes has shown an accelerating increase. This situation will lead to increases in the amount of sealed radioactive. During its use, a sealed radioactive waste will eventually become either a spent sealed source or disused sealed radioactive source (DSRS), due to certain factors. The reduction of the amount of radioactive waste can be executed through the application of reuse and recycle of sealed source. The reuse and recycle policy for spent and disused sealed sources are not already specified yet. The reuse of spent sealed sources can be applied only for the sources which had been used in the medical field for radiotherapy, namely the reuse of a teletherapy Co-60 source in a calibration facility. The recycle of a spent sealed source can be performed for radioactive sources with relatively high activities and long half-lives; however, the recycling activity may only be performed by the manufacturer. To avoid legal conflicts, in the amendment to the Government Regulation No.27 Year 2002 on Management of Radioactive Waste, there will be a recommendation for a new scheme in the management of radioactive waste to facilitate the application of the principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle (author)

  18. Implementation of a database for the management of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOHAMAD, M.

    2012-01-01

    In Madagascar, the application of nuclear technology continues to develop. In order to protect the human health and his environment against the harmful effects of the ionizing radiation, each user of radioactive sources has to implement a program of nuclear security and safety and to declare their sources at Regulatory Authority. This Authority must have access to all the informations relating to all the sources and their uses. This work is based on the elaboration of a software using python as programming language and SQlite as database. It makes possible to computerize the radioactive sources management.This application unifies the various existing databases and centralizes the activities of the radioactive sources management.The objective is to follow the movement of each source in the Malagasy territory in order to avoid the risks related on the use of the radioactive sources and the illicit traffic. [fr

  19. Identification of radioactive sources and devices. Reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This publication is intended to be a basic guide and not a comprehensive tool kit to identify and provide detailed emergency handling instructions for radioactive sources, devices and transport containers. In addition, this publication helps to identify sources and highlight the risks they present, and provides information on appropriate action. It is a small but significant step in the international community's continuing efforts to strengthen control of radioactive sources and nuclear material, increase safety and security, and thereby make the benefits of radioactive sources ever more broadly accessible. This publication was partly funded through the Nuclear Security Fund established under the Nuclear Security Plan

  20. Management of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt - 13512

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Y.T.; Hasan, M.A.; Lasheen, Y.F.

    2013-01-01

    The future safe development of nuclear energy and progressive increasing use of sealed sources in medicine, research, industry and other fields in Egypt depends on the safe and secure management of disused radioactive sealed sources. In the past years have determined the necessity to formulate and apply the integrated management program for radioactive sealed sources to assure harmless and ecological rational management of disused sealed sources in Egypt. The waste management system in Egypt comprises operational and regulatory capabilities. Both of these activities are performed under legislations. The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center HLWMC, is considered as a centralized radioactive waste management facility in Egypt by law 7/2010. (authors)

  1. Safe management of smoke detectors containing radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, M.; Benitez, J.C.; Castillo, R.A.; Berdellans, A.; Hernandez, J.M.; Pirez, C.J.; Soto, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Ionic smoke detectors contain radioactive sources that could be Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239, Kr-85, etc. According to Cuban regulations (Resolution 96 /2003 of the Minister of Science Technology and Environment), smoke detectors, once become disused, should be managed as radioactive waste. For this reason, disused smoke detectors should be transferred to the Centre for Radiation Protection and Hygiene, the organization responsible for radioactive waste management in the country. More than 20 000 smoke detectors have been collected by the CPHR and stored at the Centralized Waste Management Facility. There are 28 different models of smoke detectors of different origin. They contain between 18 - 37 kBq of Am-241 or between 0.37 - 37 MBq of Plutonium or around 37 MBq of Kr-85. The safe management of ionic smoke detectors consists in dismantling the devices, recovering the radioactive sources and conditioning them for long term storage and disposal. The rest of non-radioactive materials should be segregated (plastic, metal and electronic components) for recycling. A technical manual was developed with specific instructions for dismantling each model of smoke detector and recovering the radioactive sources. Instructions for segregation of non-radioactive components are also included in the manual. Most of smoke detectors contain long lived radioactive sources (Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239), so especial attention was given to the management of these sources. A methodology was developed for conditioning of radioactive sources, consisting in encapsulating them for long term storage. The retrievability of the sources (sealed capsules with radioactive sources) for future disposal was also considered. A documented procedure was elaborated for these operations. (author)

  2. Introduction on the recycling of spent and disused radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Mingqiang; Zang Ruihua

    2011-01-01

    It is not only a stress of environment safety, but also a waste of huge resources to send directly to store spent and disused radioactive sources. This article reviews some important aspects of management suggestions recommended by IAEA and requirements of regulations in China for disposing the spent and disused radioactive sources. The present condition and benefit of recycling spent and disused sources are analyzed. Some suggestions on carrying out recycling in China are put forward too. (authors)

  3. Radioactive source monitoring system based on RFID and GPRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haiyang; Zhou Hongliang; Zhang Hongjian; Zhang Sheng; Zhou Junru; Weng Guojie

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear radiation produced by radioactive source is harmful to the health of human body, and the lost and theft of radioactive source will cause environmental pollution and social panic. In order to solve the abnormal leaks, accidental loss, theft and other problems of the radioactive source, a radioactive source monitoring system based on RFID, GPS, GPRS and GSM technology is put forward. Radiation dose detector and GPS wireless location module are used to obtain the information of radiation dose and location respectively, RFID reader reads the status of a tag fixed on the bottom of the radioactive source. All information is transmitted to the remote monitoring center via GPRS wireless transmission. There will be an audible and visual alarm when radiation dose is out of limits or the state of radioactive source is abnormal, and the monitoring center will send alarming text messages to the managers through GSM Modem at the same time. Thus, the functions of monitoring and alarming are achieved. The system has already been put into operation and is being kept in functional order. It can provide stable statistics as well as accurate alarm, improving the supervision of radioactive source effectively. (authors)

  4. Safety and security of radioactive sources - international provisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarwinski, R.; Weiss, W.

    2005-01-01

    For more than 50 years radioactive sources are used beneficially world-wide in medicine, industry, research and teaching. In the early 50ies mainly Ra-226 sources were used especially for medical applications. In the mean time a great number of radionuclides with more or less risk to individuals, society and environment are used. The number of these sources is increasing. The available experience with the application of sealed sources in industry, medicine, research and teaching shows that despite the widespread use of such sources a high level of safety can be achieved. One precondition is that the regulatory control of a radioactive source has to be carried out consistently during the life cycle of the sources - 'from cradle to grave'. Particular attention has to be given to the so-called orphan sources which are not subject to regulatory control, either because they have never been under control, or because they have been lost, misplaced, abandoned, stolen or transferred without proper authorisation. The concern about orphan sources arising from poor safety and security standards of radioactive material around the world resulted in intensive global actions especially in the light of the security situation after the 11 th September 2001. The improvement of regulatory control is one of the key elements in preventing people, goods and environment from being exposed exceptionally by the misuse of radioactive sources. Important steps toward the improvement of the safety and security of high radioactive sources are the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and the European Directive on the Control of High Activity Sealed Radioactive Sources and Orphan Sources. (orig.)

  5. Development of radioactive source scanner based on PLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guogui; Gao Xiang; Guo Hongli

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive radial uniformity of 68 Ge line radioactive sources is a critical quality parameter. The radioactive source scanner with linear scanning function is developed by making use of high-speed pulse counters, high-speed pulse output ports, and the powerful instruction system of Siemens S7-200 series programmable logic controller (PLC). A computer used as a host computer of the instrument communicate with. the PLC by point to point interface (PPI) protocol, The instrument with functions of data collection, transmission, displaying, saving, motion control and instrument parameter settings, can be used to measure the radioactive radial uniformity and total activity of line radioactive source. The advantages of Using the PLC to develop nuclear instrumentation are development speed, strong anti-interference ability, and low-cost. This paper mainly describes the control system implementation and feature of the instrument. (authors)

  6. Set of devices for producing radioactive 60Co-sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, P.; Tobisch, F.

    1982-01-01

    A set of devices for producing radioactive 60 Co-sources was developed. A single source has a radioactivity of 445x10 10 GBq. It consists of a double envelope of stainless steel filled with a mixture of small pieces of cobalt and stainless steel wire. The diameter of a source is 11 mm; the length 80 mm. Cobalt wires of different radioactivity with a length of about 110 mm and 0,8 mm diameter are the raw material. The set is located in a hot cell. Construction, functions and operation of the set are described in detail. (author)

  7. USA perspectives. Safety and security of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicus, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to the 103 licensed nuclear power plants in the United States, there are about 157,000 licenses that authorize the use of radioactive materials subject to US Atomic Energy Act. as amended. Each year the NRC receives about 200 reports of lost, stolen or abandoned radioactive sources and devices. The NRC has established a programme to review and analyze reports and other information on losses, thefts, abandonments, and discoveries of radioactive sources that helped to identify and characterize the problem with safety and security of radioactive sources in devices used under the general license programme. In summary, a large number of radioactive sources in use in the USA have a very good safety record. When used properly by trained personnel with effective regulatory oversight, the many uses of radioactive sources are safe and provide a net benefit to society. If problems occur such as overexposures or contamination of property, it is essential that hey are promptly reported to the regulatory authority. If necessary appropriate emergency response measures can be taken, and the problems analysed. In that way, effective risk-informed regulatory measures can be activated to assure the continued safety and security of radioactive sources

  8. The preparation of radioactive sources with radioactivities of less than 110 kilobecquerels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyllie, H.A.

    1989-03-01

    A description is given of the various radioactive sources prepared in the ANSTO Radioisotope Standards Laboratory and the procedures associated with their preparation. ANSTO is authorised by CSIRO to maintain the Commonwealth standard of activity of radionuclides. Counting sources are required for the standardisation of solutions of radionuclides. Calibration sources are required for equipment used to detect radioactivity, such as gamma-ray spectrometers, and can be supplied to clients in other organisations. The maximum radioactivity supplied is 110 kBq. 7 refs., 65 figs

  9. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojkind, Roberto Hector [Autoridade Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-12-31

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and as early as in 1956 established a Regulatory Authority. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations had been set in Argentina, before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from that accident encouraged in Argentina the improvement of some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. Therefore, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain improved. Some lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania and the main characteristics of an effective enforcement program helpful to prevent radiological accidents in industrial, medical, research and teaching uses of radioactive sources are presented. (author) 9 refs; e-mail: rrojkind at sede.arn.gov.br

  10. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojkind, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and had established a Regulatory Authority as early as in 1956. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations were in force in Argentina before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from the Goiania accident encouraged the Argentine authorities to improve some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. As a result, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain have improved. Lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania are presented as well as the main characteristics of an effective enforcement programme to prevent radiological accidents when radioactive sources are used for industrial, medical, research and teaching purposes. (author)

  11. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojkind, Roberto Hector

    1997-01-01

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and as early as in 1956 established a Regulatory Authority. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations had been set in Argentina, before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from that accident encouraged in Argentina the improvement of some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. Therefore, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain improved. Some lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania and the main characteristics of an effective enforcement program helpful to prevent radiological accidents in industrial, medical, research and teaching uses of radioactive sources are presented. (author)

  12. Radioactive target and source development at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Ahmad, I.; Thomas, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    An increased demand for low-level radioactive targets has created the need for a laboratory dedicated to the production of these foils. A description is given of the radioactive target produced as well as source development work being performed at the Physics Division target facility of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Highlights include equipment used and the techniques employed. In addition, some examples of recent source preparation are given as well as work currently in progress

  13. Obtaining and Investigating Unconventional Sources of Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, David R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides examples of naturally radioactive items that are likely to be found in most communities. Additionally, there is information provided on how to acquire many of these items inexpensively. I have found that the presence of these materials in the classroom is not only useful for teaching about nuclear radiation and debunking the…

  14. Radioactive sealed sources production process for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paulo de S.; Ngunga, Daniel M.G.; Camara, Julio R.; Vasquez, Pablo A.S.

    2017-01-01

    providing products and services to the private and governmental Brazilian users of industrial radiography and nucleonic control systems. Radioactive sealed sources are commonly used in nondestructive tests as radiography to make inspections and verify the internal structure and integrity of materials and in nucleonic gauges to control level, density, viscosity, etc. in on-line industrial processes. One of the most important activities carried out by this laboratory is related to the inspection of source projectors devices used in industrial radiography and its constituent parts as well as remote handle control assembly drive cable and guide tube systems. The laboratory also provide for the users iridium-192, cobalt-60 and selenium-75 sealed sources and performs quality control tests replacing spent or contaminated radiative sources. All discard of radioactive source is treated as radioactive waste. Additionally, administrative and commercial processes and protocols for exportation and transport of radioactive material are developed by specialized departments. In this work are presented the mean processes and procedures used by the Sealed Source Production Laboratory such as the arrival of the radioactive material to the laboratory and the source projectors, mechanical inspections, source loading, source leaking tests, etc. (author)

  15. Radioactive sealed sources production process for industrial radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Paulo de S.; Ngunga, Daniel M.G.; Camara, Julio R.; Vasquez, Pablo A.S., E-mail: psantos@ipen.br, E-mail: hobeddaniel@gmail.com, E-mail: jrcamara@ipen.br, E-mail: pavsalva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    providing products and services to the private and governmental Brazilian users of industrial radiography and nucleonic control systems. Radioactive sealed sources are commonly used in nondestructive tests as radiography to make inspections and verify the internal structure and integrity of materials and in nucleonic gauges to control level, density, viscosity, etc. in on-line industrial processes. One of the most important activities carried out by this laboratory is related to the inspection of source projectors devices used in industrial radiography and its constituent parts as well as remote handle control assembly drive cable and guide tube systems. The laboratory also provide for the users iridium-192, cobalt-60 and selenium-75 sealed sources and performs quality control tests replacing spent or contaminated radiative sources. All discard of radioactive source is treated as radioactive waste. Additionally, administrative and commercial processes and protocols for exportation and transport of radioactive material are developed by specialized departments. In this work are presented the mean processes and procedures used by the Sealed Source Production Laboratory such as the arrival of the radioactive material to the laboratory and the source projectors, mechanical inspections, source loading, source leaking tests, etc. (author)

  16. Radioactive sources for ATLAS hadron tile calorimeter calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Ivanyushenkov, Yu.

    1997-01-01

    The main requirements for radioactive sources applied in the TileCal calibration systems are formulated; technology of the sources production developed in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR is described. Design and characteristics of the prototype sources manufactured in Dubna and tested on ATLAS TileCal module 0 are presented

  17. The regulatory actions in the management of disuse radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, W.A.; Cordoba, M.F.; Poletti, M.; Calabria, M.A.; Pirez, C.

    2010-01-01

    During the last years, different incidents related to the discovery of inadvertent radioactive material have been reported through the international information systems available. From the analysis of the information received it can be concluded that those situations are derived from the inadequate application of concepts such as 'safety culture' and 'risk perception' or inadequate physical safety measures towards radioactive sources by the licensee. Among the activities that the regulators perform during the use of radioactive material, the most important are the ones related to avoiding the existence of disused radioactive sources. In this regard, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) has implemented, through its Standards, regulatory mechanisms to adequately control and dispose of radioactive material. Concerning this matter, actions were taken in Argentina with the aim of disposing or keeping the custody in an authorized long term storage of every radioactive source used to measure thickness, humidity, level, weight, etc. that remained within the facilities without use and/or a suitable program to be reutilized within a period larger than six months. The objective of the present piece of work is to present the analysis and results of the actions fulfilled between 2002 and 2009, giving details about the regulatory activities performed in relation to the disposal and withdrawal of radioactive sources and the physical safety measures taken. (authors) [es

  18. Guide for disposition of radioactive-material sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.; Selby, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    This guide has been prepared to assist DOE Energy Technology Centers in disposing of radioactive-material sources. The guide describes the steps and requirements necessary to dispose of unwanted sources. The steps include obtaining approvals, source characterization, source disposition, packaging requirements, and shipment preparation. A flow chart is provided in the guide to assist the user in the necessary sequential steps of source disposition

  19. Security of Radioactive Sources. Implementing Guide (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    There are concerns that terrorist or criminal groups could gain access to high activity radioactive sources and use these sources maliciously. The IAEA is working with Member States to increase control, accounting and security of radioactive sources to prevent their malicious use and the associated potential consequences. Based on extensive input from technical and legal experts, this implementation guide sets forth guidance on the security of sources and will serve as a useful tool for legislators and regulators, physical protection specialists and facility and transport operators, as well as for law enforcement officers.

  20. Effective Regulatory Control of Radioactive Sources in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.; Yuan, C.; Fan, S.; Su, S.

    2004-01-01

    Since the incident of radioactively contaminated buildings first surfaced in Taiwan in 1992, efforts have been made by AEC (Atomic Energy Council) of Taiwan to prevent recurrence of similar incidents involving radioactive materials and to achieve effective regulatory control over radioactive sources. The most important milestone is when AEC began to enforce IRPA he Ionizing Radiation Protection Act with the promulgation of 18 relevant regulations on Feb. 1, 2003. In order to enhance accountability of radioactive material and equipment capable of producing ionizing radiation, AEC develops and begins implementing a RPCS Radiation Protection Control System which is a powerful tool in controlling radiation safety and security. In addition, AEC develops a monthly registration program via internet, an o n-line reporting system f or owners/operators of radioactive sources, to improve monitoring of sealed sources (in-use and not-in-use). The registration requirement applies to 469 licensees possessing about 3,000 sealed sources in Taiwan. Because of the threat of orphan sources, AEC has made great efforts in preventing their contamination of construction steel material by establishing and enforcing the RPMMPIRCB Regulation for Preventive Measures and Management Plans for Incident of Radioactively Contaminated Buildings. To comply with this regulation, all 19 of Taiwan's steel factories with melting furnace have installed portal-type radiation detection system to monitor incoming scrap metal. (Author)

  1. Challenges in Regulating Radiation Sources and Radioactive Waste in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngwakwe, C.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying challenges that hamper the efficiency and efficacy of Regulatory Infrastructure (People and Processes) as regards ensuring safety & security of radiation sources and radioactive waste is a major step towards planning for improvement. In a world constantly motivated by technological advancements, there has been considerable increase in the use of new technologies incorporating radioactive sources in both medical and industrial applications due to its perceived benefits, hence changing the dynamics of regulation. This paper brings to the fore, contemporary challenges experienced by regulators in the course of regulating radiation sources and radioactive waste in Nigeria. These challenges encountered in the business of regulating radiation sources and radioactive waste in Nigeria amongst others include; knowledge gap in the use of novel technologies for industrial applications (e.g. radiotracers in oil & gas and wastewater management), inadequate collaboration with operators to ensure transparency in their operations, inadequate cooperation from other government agencies using ionizing radiation sources, lack of synergy between relevant government agencies, difficulty in establishing standard radioactive waste management facility for orphan & disused sources, and inadequate control of NORMS encountered in industrial activities (e.g. well logging, mining). Nigerian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NNRA), the body saddled with the responsibility of regulating the use of ionizing radiation sources in Nigeria is empowered by the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Act to ensure the protection of life, property, and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, hence are not immune to the aforementioned challenges. (author)

  2. Instructions for use of radioactive sources; Notices d'utilisation des sources radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-01-15

    In the industrial and research domain, article L.1333-4, R.1333-26 and R.1333-27 of the public health code submit to authorization of the minister of health the 'nuclear following activities ': the manufacturing of radionuclides; the manufacturing of products or devices by containing; the import, the export of radionuclides, products or devices that contain some; the distribution of radionuclides, of products or devices that contain some; the use of devices emitting X-rays or radioactive sources and the use of accelerators others than electron microscopes; the irradiation of products whatever nature it is, including food products. The activity bringing to plan the manufacturing or the use of radionuclides (in the form of sealed or not sealed sources) there is, in the terms of the public health code (C.S.P.) and except in the cases of exemption which are mentioned there, the obligation to obtain an authorization to hold and to make or to use these radionuclides. The regulations in radioprotection being in full evolution, one will find in these notices the main evolutions relative to the regime of authorizations. (N.C.)

  3. The prototype of radioactive ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, A V; Kot, N K; Andrighetto, A; Stroe, L

    2001-01-01

    The design and experimental results of the RIB source prototype are presented.A source will have the container of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U compounds heated up to 2200-2500 degree C. Vapors of uranium fission obtained when the ion source is irradiated by the high-energy neutron flux, are then ionized and extracted from the source. In the experiments with the prototype loaded by sup 1 sup 2 C the source working temperature 2700 degree C was reached, the carbon ion current 10 nA was obtained. The total operation time of more than 100 hours with no performance degradation was demonstrated.

  4. Safety of radiation sources and other radioactive materials in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majali, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Since joining the IAEA Model Project for upgrading radiation protection infrastructure in countries of West Asia, Jordan has amended its radiation safety legislation. The Regulatory Authority is improving its inventory system for radiation sources and other radioactive materials and also its notification, registration, licensing, inspection and enforcement systems. It has established national provisions for the management of orphan sources after they have been found. The system for the control of the radiation sources and other radioactive materials entering the country has been improved by the Regulatory Authority. (author)

  5. Strengthening the control on radioactive sources - Cernavoda NPP operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daian, I.; Simionov, V.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the national legal frame governing the radioactive source management, legislative requirements introduced during last years and current status of controlled radioactive sources program at Cernavoda NPP. Romania has only one nuclear power plant, Cernavoda NPP, equipped with five PHWR - CANDU-6 Canadian type reactors - with a 700 MW(e) gross capacity each, in different implementation stages. The legal representative of the nuclear power production sector in Romania is 'Nuclearelectrica' S.A. National Company (SNN). SNN is a governmental company controlled by the Ministry of Industry and Trade. The company has headquarters in Bucharest and three subsidiaries: - CNE-PROD Cernavoda (CNE-PROD), operating the Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1; - CNE-INVEST Cernavoda, in charge with the completion of Unit 2 and with the preservation of Units 3,4,5; - Nuclear Fuel Plant in Pitesti (FCN). Unit 1 is in commercial operation since December 2, 1996, Unit 2 is under construction (80% completed) and Units 3, 4, 5 are under preservation. The operation of Cernavoda NPP implies use of radioactive sources that may present a significant risk to health, property and the environment when control is lost. Within the last years CNCAN issued new regulations stating clear responsibilities for the different institutions involved in radioactive materials control programs. To manage radioactive sources in a safe way CNE-PROD established and revised the Controlled Radioactive Sources Program, as part of Station Radiation Protection Regulation, ensuring strict recording of the radioactive sources and their usage, ensuring physical and radiological security, protecting the personnel, members of the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation during the life cycle of the plant, including decommissioning. (authors)

  6. Strengthening the control on radioactive sources - Cernavoda NPP operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daian, I.; Simionov, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents the national legal frame governing the radioactive source management, legislative requirements introduced during last years and current status of controlled radioactive sources program at Cernavoda NPP. Romania has only one nuclear power plant, Cernavoda NPP, equipped with five PHWR - CANDU-6 Canadian type reactors - with a 700 MW(e) gross capacity each, in different implementation stages. The legal representative of the nuclear power production sector in Romania is 'Nuclearelectrica' S.A. National Company (SNN). SNN is a governmental company controlled by the Ministry of Industry and Trade. The company has headquarters in Bucharest and three subsidiaries: - CNE-PROD Cernavoda (CNE-PROD), operating the Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1; - CNE-INVEST Cernavoda, in charge with the completion of Unit 2 and with the preservation of Units 3,4,5; - Nuclear Fuel Plant in Pitesti (FCN). Unit 1 is in commercial operation since December 2, 1996, Unit 2 is under construction (80% completed) and Units 3, 4, 5 are under preservation. The operation of Cernavoda NPP implies use of radioactive sources that may present a significant risk to health, property and the environment when control is lost. Within the last years CNCAN issued new regulations stating clear responsibilities for the different institutions involved in radioactive materials control programs. To manage radioactive sources in a safe way CNE-PROD established and revised the Controlled Radioactive Sources Program, as part of Station Radiation Protection Regulation, ensuring strict recording of the radioactive sources and their usage, ensuring physical and radiological security, protecting the personnel, members of the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation during the life cycle of the plant. (authors)

  7. Radioactive source simulation for half-life experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanitsuksombut, Warapon; Decthyothin, Chanti

    1999-01-01

    A simulation of radioactivity decay by using programmable light source with a few minutes half-life is suggested. A photodiode with digital meter label in cps is use instead of radiation detector. Both light source and photodiode are installed in a black box to avoid surrounding room light. The simulation set can also demonstrate Inverse Square Law experiment of radiation penetration. (author)

  8. Development of methodology for the characterization of radioactive sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Robson de Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are widely used in many applications of nuclear technology in industry, medicine, research and others. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) estimates tens of millions sources in the world. In Brazil, the number is about 500 thousand sources, if the Americium-241 sources present in radioactive lightning rods and smoke detectors are included in the inventory. At the end of the useful life, most sources become disused, constitute a radioactive waste, and are then termed spent sealed radioactive sources (SSRS). In Brazil, this waste is collected by the research institutes of the Nuclear Commission of Nuclear Energy and kept under centralized storage, awaiting definition of the final disposal route. The Waste Management Laboratory (WML) at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute is the main storage center, having received until July 2010 about 14.000 disused sources, not including the tens of thousands of lightning rod and smoke detector sources. A program is underway in the WML to replacing the original shielding by a standard disposal package and to determining the radioisotope content and activity of each one. The identification of the radionuclides and the measurement of activities will be carried out with a well type ionization chamber. This work aims to develop a methodology for measuring or to determine the activity SSRS stored in the WML accordance with its geometry and determine their uncertainties. (author)

  9. Study of two different radioactive sources for prostate brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula; Souza Santos, William de; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Belinato, Walmir

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluated two radioactive sources for brachytherapy treatments. Our main goal was to quantify the absorbed doses on organs and tissues of an adult male patient, submitted to a brachytherapy treatment with two radioactive sources. We evaluated a 192 Ir and a 125 I radioactive sources. The 192 Ir radioactive source is a cylinder with 0.09 cm in diameter and 0.415 cm long. The 125 I radioactive source is also a cylinder, with 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.45 cm long. To evaluate the absorbed dose distribution on the prostate, and other organs and tissues of an adult man, a male virtual anthropomorphic phantom MASH, coupled in the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0, was employed.We simulated 75, 90 and 102 radioactive sources of 125 I and one of 192 Ir, inside the prostate, as normally used in these treatments, and each treatment was simulated separately. As this phantom was developed in a supine position, the displacement of the internal organs of the chest, compression of the lungs and reduction of the sagittal diameter were all taken into account. For the 192 Ir, the higher doses values were obtained for the prostate and surrounding organs, as the colon, gonads and bladder. Considering the 125 I sources, with photons with lower energies, the doses to organs that are far from the prostate were lower. All values for the dose rates are in agreement with those recommended for brachytherapy treatments. Besides that, the new seeds evaluated in this work present usefulness as a new tool in prostate brachytherapy treatments, and the methodology employed in this work may be applied for other radiation sources, or treatments. (authors)

  10. Study of two different radioactive sources for prostate brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Souza Santos, William de; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, IPENCNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this study we evaluated two radioactive sources for brachytherapy treatments. Our main goal was to quantify the absorbed doses on organs and tissues of an adult male patient, submitted to a brachytherapy treatment with two radioactive sources. We evaluated a {sup 192}Ir and a {sup 125}I radioactive sources. The {sup 192}Ir radioactive source is a cylinder with 0.09 cm in diameter and 0.415 cm long. The {sup 125}I radioactive source is also a cylinder, with 0.08 cm in diameter and 0.45 cm long. To evaluate the absorbed dose distribution on the prostate, and other organs and tissues of an adult man, a male virtual anthropomorphic phantom MASH, coupled in the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0, was employed.We simulated 75, 90 and 102 radioactive sources of {sup 125}I and one of {sup 192}Ir, inside the prostate, as normally used in these treatments, and each treatment was simulated separately. As this phantom was developed in a supine position, the displacement of the internal organs of the chest, compression of the lungs and reduction of the sagittal diameter were all taken into account. For the {sup 192}Ir, the higher doses values were obtained for the prostate and surrounding organs, as the colon, gonads and bladder. Considering the {sup 125}I sources, with photons with lower energies, the doses to organs that are far from the prostate were lower. All values for the dose rates are in agreement with those recommended for brachytherapy treatments. Besides that, the new seeds evaluated in this work present usefulness as a new tool in prostate brachytherapy treatments, and the methodology employed in this work may be applied for other radiation sources, or treatments. (authors)

  11. Characterization of radioactive orphan sources by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz W, H.

    2013-01-01

    The sealed radioactive sources are widely applicable in industry. They must have a permanent control and must be registered with the Technical Office of the National Authority (OTAN). However, at times it has identified the presence of abandoned sealed sources unknown to the owner. These sources are called 'orphan sources'. Of course these sources represent a high potential risk because accidents can trigger dire consequences depending on your activity and chemical form in which it presents the radioisotope. This paper describes the process and the actions taken to characterize two orphan radioactive sources from the smelter a Aceros Arequipa. For characterization we used a gamma spectrometry system using a detector NaI(Tl) 3″ x 3″ with a multichannel analyzer Nucleus PCA-II. The radioisotope identified was cesium - 137 ( 137 Cs) in both cases. Fortunately, the sources maintained their integrity would otherwise have generated significant pollution considering the chemical form of the radioisotope and easy dispersion. (author)

  12. Organisation of the disposal of radioactive sources from Scottish hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrigall, R S; Martin, C J; Watson, I

    2004-01-01

    An amnesty for disposal of sealed radioactive sources from Scottish hospitals has been funded by the Scottish Executive to address problems arising from accumulation of sources. The contract was awarded to a company involved in radioactive source recycling. Coordination of uplifts from several hospitals allowed considerable financial savings to be made, so source amnesties could offer monetary advantages to Health and Education Departments elsewhere in the UK, as well as alleviating the problem from security and storage of sources that are no longer required. The sources originated in 14 hospitals, but were uplifted from five pick-up points. There were a total of 246 sources with 167 of these being caesium-137. The total activity was 16.2 TBq with one large 16.1 TBq blood irradiator source and the activities of all the other sources adding up to 167 GBq. This paper describes organisation of the collection. Options for achieving compliance with the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 are discussed, although in the event, special authorisations were obtained for each hospital. Arrangements for transport of the sources and source security were drawn up including emergency procedures for dealing with foreseeable incidents. The police provided secure overnight storage for the loaded truck and assistance in directing and monitoring progress of the load

  13. Help guide for the application of regulatory requirements on the transport of radioactive material; Guia de ayuda para la aplicacion de requisitos reglementarios sobr el transporte de material radiactivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Rodriguez, S.; Acena Moreno, V.; Zamora Martin, F.; Rubio de Juan, E.

    2011-07-01

    The regulation of transport of radioactive material by road in Spain refers to compliance with the requirements of the European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) in force. The structure presented by this legislation, which is international, and the inclusion in it of requirements that apply to other dangerous goods makes it difficult to consult the requirements that specifically apply to the transport of radioactive material. Therefore, the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) has found it necessary to publish a guide that facilitates users to comply with its provisions and, consequently, this transport security.

  14. Dismantling, conditioning and repatriation of disused sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, S.L.; Miranda, C.A.; Saire, A.E.; Ontiveros, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    In Bolivia sealed radioactive sources for medical, industrial and research applications are used; radioactive sources containing a wide range of radionuclides and have different levels of activity and half-lives, they generated a problem when they stop being used. At the end of its useful life these sources are considered obsolete. However, residual levels of radioactivity, which have these sources can be high constituting a potential hazard to personnel and applies to those who benefit from its use and the general public. The aim of this work has been focused mainly on safety issues in the safe handling and management of disused sealed sources. Assignments listed below: 1. Dismantling; 2. Packaging; 3. Return of disused sealed radioactive sources. The actions taken were carried out by the technical teams of the Bolivian Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (IBTEN) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANS) which supports the program 'Global Threat Reduction Initiative's' (GTRI) in the implementation of 'Off -site Source Recovery Program' (OSRP). [es

  15. Generation projection of solid and liquid radioactive wastes and spent radioactive sources in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia A, E.; Hernandez F, I. Y.; Fernandez R, E.; Monroy G, F.; Lizcano C, D.

    2014-10-01

    This work is focused to project the volumes of radioactive aqueous liquid wastes and spent radioactive sources that will be generated in our country in next 15 years, solids compaction and radioactive organic liquids in 10 years starting from the 2014; with the purpose of knowing the technological needs that will be required for their administration. The methodology involves six aspects to develop: the definition of general objectives, to specify the temporary horizon of projection, data collection, selection of the prospecting model and the model application. This approach was applied to the inventory of aqueous liquid wastes, as well as radioactive compaction organic and solids generated in Mexico by non energy applications from the 2001 to 2014, and of the year 1997 at 2014 for spent sources. The applied projection models were: Double exponential smoothing associating the tendency, Simple Smoothing and Lineal Regression. For this study was elected the first forecast model and its application suggests that: the volume of the compaction solid wastes, aqueous liquids and spent radioactive sources will increase respectively in 152%, 49.8% and 55.7%, while the radioactive organic liquid wastes will diminish in 13.15%. (Author)

  16. Sources to radioactive contamination in Murmansk and Arkhangelsk counties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, T.; Boehmer, N.

    1994-02-01

    The report gives a general view of information gathered by the Bellona Foundation on the use of nuclear energy, as well as storage and processing of radioactive waste in the region. Information has been collected since 1989 through extensive field work in the Russian Federation. During the gathering of source material for the report, crucial importance has been attached to Russian sources encountered during the field work. The report intends to present a survey of the various sources of possible radioactive pollution, and the historical background for placing the sources in the region. As it appears from the report, the most significant contamination source is the military activity. The Bellona Foundation has made a point of describing the sources only on a technical base, and no attempts have been made to evaluate risks and consequences of conceivable accidents. 78 refs

  17. Control of radioactive sources in industry through regulatory inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leocadio, J.C.; Ramalho, A.T.; Pinho, A.S.; Lourenco, M.M.J.; Nicola, M.S.; D'Avila, R.L.; Melo, I.F.; Cucco, A.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    In Brazil, the applications of ionizing radiation in industry are accomplished about 900 radioactive facilities, which handle approximately 3.000 radiation sources. The control of radioactive sources used in industrial installations authorized by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) is accomplished by Servico de Radioprotecao na Industria Radiativa (SERIR) of the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. This service carries out regulatory inspections in the practices of industrial radiography, nuclear gauges, industrial irradiators and oil wells logging. The frequency of inspections depends on the type of practice, ranging from a year to 5 years, depending on the risk involved. This paper presents a brief description of the situation of radiation safety in the use of radioactive sources in the industries of the country. The results obtained with regulatory inspections at industrial installations demonstrate that the conditions of safety and radiation protection in these facilities are satisfactory when compared with the technical regulations, both national and international

  18. Certified training for nuclear and radioactive source security management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive sources are used by hospitals, research facilities and industry for such purposes as diagnosing and treating illnesses, sterilising equipment and inspecting welds. Unfortunately, many States, regulatory authorities and licensees may not appreciate how people with malevolent intentions could use radioactive sources, and statistics confirm that a number of security incidents happen around the globe. The adversary could be common thieves, activists, insiders, terrorists and organised crime groups. Mitigating this risk requires well trained and competent staff who have developed the knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to successfully discharge their security responsibilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Institute for Nuclear Security are leading international training efforts. The target audience is a multi-disciplinary group of professionals with management responsibilities for security at facilities with radioactive sources. These efforts to promote training and competence amongst practitioners have been recognised at the 2014 and 2016 Nuclear Security and Nuclear Industry Summits. (author)

  19. Characterization and packaging of disused sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, S.L.

    2013-01-01

    In Bolivia are generated disused sealed sources and radioactive waste resulting from the use of radioactive materials in industrial, research and medicine. The last includes the diagnosis and treatment. Whereas exposure to ionizing radiation is a potential hazard to personnel who applies it, to those who benefit from its use or for the community at large, it is necessary to control the activities in this field. The Instituto Boliviano de Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear - IBTEN is working on a regional project from International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, RLA/09/062 Project - TSA 4, Strengthening the National Infrastructure and Regulatory Framework for the Safe Management of Radioactive waste in Latin America. This Project has strengthened the regulatory framework regarding the safe management of radioactive waste. The aim of this work was focused primarily on the security aspects in the safe management of disused sealed sources. The tasks are listed below: 1. Characterization of disused sealed sources 2. Preparation for transport to temporary storage 3. Control of all disused radioactive sources. (author)

  20. Development of an application simulating radioactive sources; Conception d'une application de simulation de sources radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riffault, V.; Locoge, N. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Dept. Chimie et Environnement, 59 - Douai (France); Leblanc, E.; Vermeulen, M. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, 59 (France)

    2011-05-15

    This paper presents an application simulating radioactive gamma sources developed in the 'Ecole des Mines' of Douai (France). It generates raw counting data as an XML file which can then be statistically exploited to illustrate the various concepts of radioactivity (exponential decay law, isotropy of the radiation, attenuation of radiation in matter). The application, with a spread sheet for data analysis and lab procedures, has been released under free license. (authors)

  1. Effective regulatory control of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meserve, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the situation in the USA regarding government control over use of radiation sources, the challenges it faces and the potential paths to their resolution. In the light of the large number of radiation sources in use worldwide, the safety record on balance is remarkably good. But there is still considerable room for improvement. The IAEA has an important role to play, and it is playing it effectively

  2. The new orphaned radioactive sources program in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraine, N.; Karhnak, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of the public to uncontrolled radioactive sources has become an significant concern to the United States (US) Government because of the continuous increase in the number of sources that are being found, sometimes without proper radiation markings. This problem is primarily due to inadequate control, insufficient accountability, and improper disposal of radioactive materials. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a cooperative 'orphaned' source initiative with the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) to bring under control unwanted sources and thus reduce the potential for unnecessary exposure to the public, workers and the environment. The program is being developed through the cooperative efforts of government agencies and industry, and will provide a quick and efficient method to bring orphaned sources under control and out of potentially dangerous situations. (author)

  3. Security of radioactive sources. The evolving new international dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Abel J.

    2001-01-01

    Security of radioactive sources has become an issue of serious public concern after the devastating terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001. Yet it is worth asking how serious the the problem actually is, given the fact that hundreds of dangerous chemicals and biological agents pose perhaps greater terrorist threats that need to be urgently reduced. Radioactive sources do not contain the type of nuclear materials that would allow someone to build a nuclear bomb and trigger a major catastrophe. Though radioactive sources can be potentially dangerous for anyone coming into close contact with them, they are safely used in everyday life for medical care and treatment, among other applications in fields of industry, agriculture, and science. However, there is increasing apprehension that radioactive sources could be turned into a terrorist tool what the media call a 'dirty bomb'. To increase the protection of radiation sources, the IAEA proposes a number of measures to strengthen regulatory control and to update its standards and expanding programmes in respect to terrorism threats. The proposals include: introducing a peer review service to appraise State regulatory infrastructures for the security of radioactive sources, including protection during transport; examining the feasibility of helping States to locate large orphan sources to bring them under regulatory control; reviewing and eventually revising the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources to make it more comprehensive in relation to security and to determine how compliance might be monitored; reviewing the requirements on the security of radioactive sources contained in the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radioactive Sources on and updating other relevant documents; exploring the practicability of an international marking system for large significant sources and of establishing a norm for a more secure physical form

  4. Security of radioactive sources. Interim guidance for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    In previous IAEA publications, there have been only rather general security requirements for non-nuclear radioactive material. These requirements were primarily directed to such issues as unintentional exposure to radiation, negligence and inadvertent loss. However, it is clear that more guidance is needed to not only try and prevent further events involving orphan sources, but also to prevent the deliberate attempt to acquire radioactive sources for malevolent purposes. Member States have requested guidance on the type and nature of security measures that might be put in place and on the methodology to be used in choosing such measures. These requests were also endorsed in the findings of the international conference on 'Security of Radioactive Sources' held in March 2003. Practical advice on assessing and implementing security measures complements the general commitments in the proposed Revised Code of Conduct on Safety and Security of radioactive Sources. A Safety Guide entitled 'Safety and Security of Radiation Sources' that, amongst other things, discusses these issues is being drafted. However, it is recognized that guidance material is required before this document will be finalized in order to allow Member States opportunity to put in place appropriate actions and planning to address current issues. Hence the purpose of the current document is to provide advice on security approaches and to allow comment on detailed recommendations for levels of security on radioactive sources that may be incorporated within the Safety Guide. This report is primarily addressed to Regulatory Authorities but it is also intended to provide guidance to manufacturers, suppliers and users of sources. Its objective is to assist Member States in deciding which security measures are needed to ensure consistency with the International Basic Safety Standards and the Revised Code of Conduct for the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. It is recognized that there must be a

  5. The United States initiative for international radioactive source management (ISRM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraine, N.; Karhnak, J.

    1999-01-01

    The United States takes seriously the potential problems from uncontrolled radioactive sources. To address these problems, the United States Department of State is leading the development of an initiative for International Radioactive Source Management (ISRM). The Department of State, through a number of Federal and state agencies, regulatory bodies and private industry, will endeavor to provide coordinated support to the international community, particularly through IAEA, to assist in the development and implementation of risk-based clearance levels to support import/export of radioactive contaminated metals and the tracking, management, identification, remediation, and disposition of 'lost sources' entering nation states and targeted industries. The United States believes that the international control of radioactive sources is critical in avoiding wide-spread contamination of the world metal supply. Thus the initiative has four objectives: (1) Protect sources from becoming lost (Tracking management); (2) Identify primary locations where sources have been lost (Stop future losses); (3) Locate lost sources (monitor and retrieve); and (4) Educate and train (deploy knowledge and technology). A number of efforts already underway in the United States support the overall initiative. The EPA has provided a grant to the Conference of Radiation Program Control Directors (CRCPD) to develop a nation-wide program for the disposition of orphaned radioactive sources. This program now has internet visibility and a toll-free telephone number to call for assistance in the disposal of sources. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Department of Energy (DOE), and other government agencies as well as private companies are assisting CRCPD in this program. The NRC has begun a program to improve control of radioactive sources in the United States, and also intends to promulgate a regulation defining conditions for the release of materials from licensed facilities. The DOE is

  6. Malicious acts involving radioactive sources: prevention and preparedness for response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The increasing concern over the malevolent use of radioactive sources and radiological terrorism demands strengthening the preparedness for response to radiological emergencies. In spite of various security measures adopted internationally, availability of orphan sources cannot be completely ruled out. The trends in terrorism also indicates the possibility of various means which may be adopted by terrorists especially if they are aware of the challenges of radioactive contamination in public domain and the capability of 'denial of area' and the fear factor which can be injected during such radiological emergencies. It is to be well understood that whatever measures are taken by some countries in preventing the sources from getting stolen or smuggled in/out of their country are not adequate to eliminate radiological terrorism in a global level unless all nations collectively address and ensure the security of radioactive sources, hence preventing the generation of any orphan sources. While preparedness for response to various radiological emergency scenario have many common factors, the challenges involved in responding to radiological terrorism involves understanding the fear factor due to the presence of radioactive contamination after the blast and thermal effects on the victims and issues like handling of contaminated and seriously injured persons, restriction on the movement of responders and forensic teams in a contaminated field etc. Hence an understanding and anticipation of all possible means of radiological terrorism is very essential to prevent and to reduce the consequences. There are many deterrents, which are to be developed and maintained by all nations collectively which should include intelligence, wide usage of radiation monitors by customs, police and other security agencies, installation of state of the art high sensitive radiation monitors and systems etc to prevent and deter stealing and illicit trafficking of radioactive sources

  7. Registration for the Hanford Site: Sources of radioactive emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvia, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    This Registration Application serves to renew the registration for all Hanford Site sources of radioactive air emissions routinely reported to the State of Washington Department of Health (DOH). The current registration expires on August 15, 1993. The Application is submitted pursuant to the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246--247, and is consistent with guidance provided by DOH for renewal. The Application subdivides the Hanford Site into six major production, processing or research areas. Those six areas are in the 100 Area, 200 East Area, 200 West Area, 300 Area, 400 Area, and 600 Area. Each major group of point sources within the six areas listed above is represented by a Source Registration for Radioactive Air Emissions form. Annual emissions. for the sources are listed in the ''Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site,'' published annually. It is a requirement that the following Statement of Compliance be provided: ''The radioactive air emissions from the above sources do meet the emissions standards contained in Chapter 173-480-040 WAC, Ambient Air Quality Standards and Emissions Limits for Radionuclides. As the Statement of Compliance pertains to this submittal, the phrase ''above sources'' is to be understood as meaning the combined air emissions from all sources registered by this submittal

  8. Radioactive check sources for alpha and beta sensitive radiological instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, J.M.; Kane, J.E. II.

    1994-06-01

    Since 1991, the Westinghouse Hanford Company has examined the construction and use of alpha and beta radioactive check sources for calibrating instruments and for performing response checks of instruments used for operational and environmental radiation detection. The purpose of using a radioactive check source is to characterize the response of a radiation monitoring instrument in the presence of radioactivity. To accurately calibrate the instrument and check its response, the check source used must emulate as closely as possible the actual physical and isotopic conditions being monitored. The isotope employed and the physical methods used to fabricate the check source (among other factors) determine instrument response. Although information from applicable national and international standards, journal articles, books, and government documents was considered, empirical data collected is most valuable when considering the type of source to use for a particular application. This paper presents source construction methods, use considerations, and standard recommendations. The results of a Hanford Site evaluation of several types of alpha and beta sources are also given

  9. Development of solid radioactive sources in acrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, I.M.; Koskinas, M.F.; Dias, M.S.; Andrade e Silva, L.G.; Vieira, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The development of water-equivalent solid sources of 133 Ba prepared from an aqueous solution of acrylamide by polymerization by a high dose 60 Co irradiation is described. The main resin characteristics were measured, such as: density, effective atomic number and uniformity. The variation of these parameters was in the range of 1,08 to 1,16 g.cm -3 for density, 3.7 to 4.0 for effective atomic number and 2.8 to 7.2% for the uniformity. These values are in agreement with the literature. (author)

  10. Consequences of dispersal of a radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, R.O.; Chester, C.V.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the question of whether the risk and consequences of theft or sabotage of facilities or vehicles containing small quantities of SNM, source, and by-product materials are such that licensees should be required to adopt further measures to safeguard them. In the course of the study an assessment will be made of the potential consequences of malevolent use of the referenced materials. To provide, these will be compared with the corresponding characteristics of non-nuclear materials such as chemical or biological agents

  11. Installation for producing sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradin, J.; Hayoun, C.

    1969-01-01

    This installation has been designed and built for producing sealed sources of fission elements: caesium 137, strontium 90, promethium 147, ruthenium 106 and cerium 144 in particular. The installation consists of sealed and protected cells, each being assigned to a particular production. The safety and the operational reliability of the equipment are the principal considerations which have governed this work. The report describes the installation and, in particular, the apparatus used as well as the various control devices. In conclusion, a review as presented of six years operation. (authors) [fr

  12. Nuclear and x-ray spectroscopy with radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Research in nuclear chemistry for 1977 is reviewed. The greatest part of the effort was directed to nuclear spectroscopy (systematics, models, experimental studies), but some work was also done involving fast neutrons and x rays from radioactive sources. Isotopes of Tl, Hg, Au, and Eu were studied in particular. Personnel and publications lists are also included. 5 figures, 1 table

  13. Management of spent sealed radioactive sources in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecille, L.; Taylor, D.

    2000-01-01

    For several years, the European Commission (EC) has been active in the field of spent sealed radioactive sources (SSRS) to improve management schemes and to prepare Euratom Directives that will impact on national legislation and regulatory schemes in European Member States (MS). The main safety issues related to the management of SSRS are described and recommendations made are presented. Additional projects are outlined. (author)

  14. Public education on sources and effects of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.E.; Rengan, K.

    1993-01-01

    A six-day workshop, developed for providing information on sources and effects of radioactive waste disposal to the general public, is described. The materials were used successfully with a group representing the general public. An extension of the workshop for high school and junior high school science teachers is discussed. (author) 1 tab

  15. Radioactive source recovery program responses to neutron source emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinehart, S.M.; Hatler, V.A.; Gray, D.W.; Guillen, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Recovery of neutron sources containing Pu 239 and Be is currently taking place at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program was initiated in 1979 by the Department of Energy (DOE) to dismantle and recover sources owned primarily by universities and the Department of Defense. Since the inception of this program, Los Alamos has dismantled and recovered more than 1000 sources. The dismantlement and recovery process involves the removal of source cladding and the chemical separation of the source materials to eliminate neutron emissions. While this program continues for the disposal of 239 Pu/Be sources, there is currently no avenue for the disposition of any sources other than those containing Pu 239 . Increasingly, there have been demands from agencies both inside and outside the Federal Government and from the public to dispose of unwanted sources containing 238 Pu/Be and 241 Am/Be. DOE is attempting to establish a formal program to recover these sources and is working closely with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on a proposed Memorandum of Understanding to formalize an Acceptance Program. In the absence of a formal program to handle 238 Pu/Be and 241 Am/Be neutron sources, Los Alamos has responded to several emergency requests to receive and recover sources that have been determined to be a threat to public health and safety. This presentation will: (1) review the established 239 Pu neutron source recovery program at Los Alamos, (2) detail plans for a more extensive neutron source disposal program, and (3) focus on recent emergency responses

  16. A Hard Month's Work in Manila. Securing Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potterton, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Security managers keep a watchful eye on spent radioactive sources. These disused sources, which served myriad purposes in medicine, industry and research, present a potential security threat; they could be obtained by terrorists to construct a dirty bomb. To ensure nuclear security and safety, it is essential to package, store and eventually dispose of these spent sources safely and securely. In some cases, that is easier said than done. For instance, removing an old and highly radioactive source from a medical device is difficult and dangerous. Imagine doing this remotely, using manipulators, in temperatures of up to 35 degrees and over 20 times. This is exactly what the IAEA, together with the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), successfully achieved in March and April 2013 at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in Manila. (author)

  17. Radioactivity source terms for underground engineering application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewes, H A [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The constraints on nuclide production are usually very similar in any underground engineering application of nuclear explosives. However, in some applications the end product could be contaminated unless the proper nuclear device is used. This fact can be illustrated from two underground engineering experiments-Gasbuggy and Sloop. In the Gasbuggy experiment, appreciable tritium has been shown to be present in the gas currently being produced. However, in future gas stimulation applications (as distinct from experiments), a minimum production of tritium by the explosive is desirable since product contamination by this nuclide may place severe limitations on the use of the tritiated gas. In Sloop, where production of copper is the goal of the experiment, product contamination would not be caused by tritium but could result from other nuclides: Thus, gas stimulation could require the use of fission explosives while the lower cost per kiloton of thermonuclear explosives could make them attractive for ore-crushing applications. Because of this consideration, radionuclide production calculations must be made for both fission and for thermonuclear explosives in the underground environment. Such activation calculations materials of construction are performed in a manner similar to that described in another paper, but radionuclide production in the environment must be computed using both fission neutron and 14-MeV neutron sources in order to treat the 'source term' problem realistically. In making such computations, parameter studies including the effects of environmental temperature, neutron shielding, and rock types have been carried out. Results indicate the importance of carefully evaluating the radionuclide production for each individual underground engineering application. (author)

  18. Radioactivity source terms for underground engineering application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewes, H.A.

    1969-01-01

    The constraints on nuclide production are usually very similar in any underground engineering application of nuclear explosives. However, in some applications the end product could be contaminated unless the proper nuclear device is used. This fact can be illustrated from two underground engineering experiments-Gasbuggy and Sloop. In the Gasbuggy experiment, appreciable tritium has been shown to be present in the gas currently being produced. However, in future gas stimulation applications (as distinct from experiments), a minimum production of tritium by the explosive is desirable since product contamination by this nuclide may place severe limitations on the use of the tritiated gas. In Sloop, where production of copper is the goal of the experiment, product contamination would not be caused by tritium but could result from other nuclides: Thus, gas stimulation could require the use of fission explosives while the lower cost per kiloton of thermonuclear explosives could make them attractive for ore-crushing applications. Because of this consideration, radionuclide production calculations must be made for both fission and for thermonuclear explosives in the underground environment. Such activation calculations materials of construction are performed in a manner similar to that described in another paper, but radionuclide production in the environment must be computed using both fission neutron and 14-MeV neutron sources in order to treat the 'source term' problem realistically. In making such computations, parameter studies including the effects of environmental temperature, neutron shielding, and rock types have been carried out. Results indicate the importance of carefully evaluating the radionuclide production for each individual underground engineering application. (author)

  19. Transfer of technology: Management of disused radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, V.

    2001-01-01

    The number of sealed radioactive sources worldwide is estimated to be in the millions, although the existing registries indicate a much smaller number. If a source is no longer needed or has become unfit for the intended application, it is classified as spent or disused source. The activity of a disused source may still be in the order of GBq or TBq. Recognizing the risk associated with disused radioactive sources and the number of incidents and accidents with a wide range of consequences including widespread contamination and deterministic health effects, the IAEA has embarked on various activities dealing with the safe management of disused radioactive sources. These activities include publication of up-to-date technical information and guidance, development and distribution of management tools, transfer of technology and know-how through training and technical co-operation projects and direct assistance to solve specific safety and technical problems. This paper briefly describes these activities with reference to publications and projects carried out in various Member States. (author)

  20. Transport of radioactive sources-an environmental problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merckaert, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The transport of dangerous goods is submitted to various regulations. These can be international, national or regional and they can differ from country to country. The basis for the regulations for dangerous goods can be found in the recommendations on the transport of dangerous goods, issued by the United Nations committee of experts on the transport of dangerous goods (orange book). For radioactive material the regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material, issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), are applied. The UN recommendations provide for 9 classes of dangerous goods. With regard to class 7, specifically related to the transport of radioactive material special recommendation relating to class 70, the IAEA regulations are referred to. These IAEA regulations for their part provide for 13 schedules, varying between weakly and highly radioactive. The radioactive sources which are used for non-destructive testing or for medical purposes are mostly sealed sources, i.e. the radioactive material is contained in a metallic shell. According to the nature of the isotope and their activity, the sources are transported either in industrial packagings, type A or type B packagings. According to the mode of transport, either air, sea, rail or road, various specific rules are applied, which however, are fortunately nearly completely harmonized. Special attention is paid to radiation protection, heat removal and the testing and fabrication of packagings. As a general rule, the safety of transport is based on the safety of the packagings, i.e. their ability to maintain, even in accident conditions, their capacity of tightness, shielding against radiation and removing the heat generated by the transported material

  1. Categorization of Radioactive Sources. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    . The IAEA takes seriously the enduring challenge for users and regulators everywhere: that of ensuring a high level of safety in the use of nuclear materials and radiation sources around the world. Their continuing utilization for the benefit of humankind must be managed in a safe manner, and the IAEA safety standards are designed to facilitate the achievement of that goal.

  2. Source terms for airborne radioactivity arising from uranium mill wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, M.C.; Downing, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    One of the problems in assessing the radiological impact of uranium milling is to determine the rates of release to the air of material from the various sources of radioactivity. Such source terms are required for modelling the transport of radioactive material in the atmosphere. Activity arises from various point and area sources in the mill itself and from the mill tailings. The state of the tailings changes in time from slurry to solid. A layer of water may be maintained over the solids during the life of the mine, and the tailings may be covered with inert material on abandonment. Releases may be both gaseous and particulate. This paper indicates ways in which radon emanation and the suspension of long-lived particulate activity might be quantified, and areas requiring further exploration are identified

  3. Automatic exposure system for radioactive source at teaching laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seren, Maria Emilia G.; Gaal, Vladmir; Morais, Sergio Luiz de; Rodrigues, Varlei

    2013-01-01

    The development of Compton Scattering experiment, studied by undergraduate students of the Medical Physics course at the Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), takes place in the Medical Physics Teaching Laboratory, belonging to the Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute (IFGW/UNICAMP). The experiment consists of a fixed 137 Cs radioactive source, with current activity of 610.5 MBq and a scintillation detector that turns around the center of the system whose function is to detect the scattered photons spectrum by a scatter object (target). The 137 Cs source is stored in a lead shield with a collimating window for the gamma radiation emitted with energy of 0.662 MeV. This source is exposed only when an attenuation barrier protecting the collimating window is opened. The process of opening and closing the attenuation barrier may deliver a radiation dose to users when done manually. Considering the stochastic harmful effects of ionizing radiation, the goal of this project was to develop an automatic exposure system of the radioactive source, in order to reduce the radiation dose received during the Compton Scattering experiment. The developed system is micro controlled and performs standard operating routines, responding to emergencies. Furthermore, an electromagnetic lock enables quick closing of the barrier by gravity, in case of interruption of the electrical current circuit. Besides reducing the total dose to lab users, the system adds more security to the routine, since it limits the access to the radioactive source and prevents accidental exposure. (author)

  4. Environmental Radioactivity from Natural, Industrial, and Military Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maarouf, B. H.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a translation of the fourth edition of the original book which was written as a reference source for the scientist, engineer, or administrator with a professional interest in the subject, but it may also be a value to the reader who wishes to understand the technical facts behind the public debate. The subject of environmental radioactivity has aspects of vast dimensions. The text of the book concerns primarily with the behavior of radioactive substances when they enter the environment. The important and elaborate technology by which passage of radioactive materials to the environment may be prevented and the equally important field of health physics that is concerned with protecting the atomic energy worker were thus placed beyond the bounds of this work.

  5. Enhancing the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, J.

    2004-01-01

    The NRC initiatives to improve safety and security of sources began before 091101 and include both international and domestic activities. They supported the development and implementation of the IAEA Code of Conduct, which provides categorization of sources of concern, based on risk, improvement of regulatory programs of all member countries and improvement of safety and security of sources. International activities include the IAEA International Conference on Security of Sources (Vienna, Austria, March, 2003), the trilateral cooperation with Canada and Mexico, the assistance to individual countries to improve security and the proposed rule on export and import of radioactive material. The domestic initiatives are to issue the security orders and advisories to licensees, issue the panoramic irradiator orders (June 2003), issue the manufacturer orders (January 2004), complete the interim national source inventory, develop the national source tracking system, maintain the orphan source registration and retrieval program and upgrade the emergency preparedness

  6. REQUISITOS A PARTIR DEL MODELO DEL NEGOCIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaisa Hernández González

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    El punto de partida en el proceso de desarrollo de un software es la identificación de los requisitos.En este trabajo se indica cómo se describe lo que el sistema debería hacer utilizando el lenguaje declientes y desarrolladores. Se incluyen recomendaciones sobre cómo realizar estas actividades y ejemplos que facilitan su comprensión.

  7. Preparation of water-equivalent radioactive solid sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Ione M.; Koskinas, Marina F.; Dias, Mauro S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of water-equivalent solid sources in two geometries, cylindrical and flat without the need of irradiation in a strong gamma radiation source to obtain polymerization is described. These sources should have density similar to water and good uniformity. Therefore, the density and uniformity of the distribution of radioactive material in the resins were measured. The variation of these parameters in the cylindrical geometry was better than 2.0% for the density and 2.3% for the uniformity and for the flat geometry the values obtained were better than 2.0 % and better than 1.3%, respectively. These values are in good agreement with the literature. (author)

  8. Incineration of urban solid waste containing radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronchin, G.P., E-mail: giulio.ronchin@mail.polimi.i [Dipartimento di Energia (Sezione nucleare - Cesnef), Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Campi, F.; Porta, A.A. [Dipartimento di Energia (Sezione nucleare - Cesnef), Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    Incineration of urban solid waste accidentally contaminated by orphan sources or radioactive material is a potential risk for environment and public health. Moreover, production and emission of radioactive fumes can cause a heavy contamination of the plant, leading to important economic detriment. In order to prevent such a hazard, in February 2004 a radiometric portal for detection of radioactive material in incoming waste has been installed at AMSA (Azienda Milanese per i Servizi Ambientali) 'Silla 2' urban solid waste incineration plant of Milan. Radioactive detections performed from installation time up to December 2006 consist entirely of low-activity material contaminated from radiopharmaceuticals (mainly {sup 131}I). In this work an estimate of the dose that would have been committed to population, due to incineration of the radioactive material detected by the radiometric portal, has been evaluated. Furthermore, public health and environmental effects due to incineration of a high-activity source have been estimated. Incineration of the contaminated material detected appears to have negligible effects at all; the evaluated annual collective dose, almost entirely conferred by {sup 131}I, is indeed 0.1 man mSv. Otherwise, incineration of a 3.7 x 10{sup 10} Bq (1 Ci) source of {sup 137}Cs, assumed as reference accident, could result in a light environmental contamination involving a large area. Although the maximum total dose, owing to inhalation and submersion, committed to a single individual appears to be negligible (less than 10{sup -8} Sv), the environmental contamination leads to a potential important exposure due to ingestion of contaminated foods. With respect to 'Silla 2' plant and to the worst meteorological conditions, the evaluated collective dose results in 0.34 man Sv. Performed analyses have confirmed that radiometric portals, which are today mainly used in foundries, represent a valid public health and environmental

  9. Government/Industry Partnership on the Security of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cefus, Greg; Colhoun, Stefan C.; Freier, Keith D.; Wright, Kyle A.; Herdes, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    In the past, industry radiation protection programs were built almost exclusively around radiation safety and the minimization of radiation dose exposure to employees. Over the last decade, and especially the last few years, the emphasis has shifted to include the physical security and enhanced control of radioactive materials. The threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism is a genuine international security concern. In May 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration unveiled the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) to respond to a growing international concern for the proper control and security of radioactive and nuclear materials. An integral part of the GTRI, the International Radiological Threat Reduction (IRTR) Program, was established in February 2002, originally as a Task Force. The IRTR Program is foremost a government-to-government cooperative program with the mission to reduce the risk posed by vulnerable radioactive materials that could be used in a Radioactive Dispersal Device (RDD). However, governments alone cannot prevent the misuse and illicit trafficking of radioactive sources. By expanding the role of private industry as a partner, existing government regulatory infrastructures can be enhanced by formulating and adopting industry self-regulation and self-policing measures. There is international concern regarding the security and control of the vast number of well-logging sources used during oil exploration operations. The prevalence of these sources, coupled with their portability, is a legitimate security concern. The energy exploration industry has well established safety and security protocols and the IRTR Program seeks to build on this foundation. However, the IRTR Program does not have sufficient resources to address the issue without industry assistance, so it is looking to the oil and gas industry to help identify alternative means for accomplishing our mutual objectives. This paper describes

  10. Scientific capabilities of the advanced light source for radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuh, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is a third-generation synchrotron radiation light source and is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national user facility. Currently, the ALS has approximately forty-five operational beamlines spanning a spectrum of scientific disciplines, and provides scientific opportunities for more than 2 000 users a year. Access to the resources of the ALS is through a competitive proposal mechanism within the general user program. Several ALS beamlines are currently being employed for a range of radioactive materials investigations. These experiments are reviewed individually relying on a graded hazard approach implemented by the ALS in conjunction with the LBNL Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH and S) Radiation Protection Program. The ALS provides radiological work authorization and radiological control technician support and assistance for accepted user experimental programs. LBNL has several radioactive laboratory facilities located near the ALS that provide support for ALS users performing experiments with radioactive materials. The capabilities of the ALS beamlines for investigating radioactive materials are given and examples of several past studies are summarised. (author)

  11. The technological safety in facilities that manage radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.

    2014-10-01

    The sealed radioactive sources are used inside a wide range of applications in the medicine, industry and investigation around the world. These sources can contain a great radionuclides variety, exhibiting a wide spectrum of activities and radiological half lives. This way, we can find pattern sources of radionuclides as Americium-241, Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239, Thorium-228 and Thorium-230, etc., with some activity of kBq in research laboratories, Iridium-192 and Cesium-137 sources used in brachytherapy with GBq activities, until sources with P Bq activities in industrial irradiators of Cobalt-60 and Cesium-137. This document approach the physical safety that entities like the IAEA recommends for the facilities that contain sealed sources, especially the measures that are taking in the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) and others government facilities. (Author)

  12. Development of radioactive sealed sources in epoxy matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benega, Marcos A.G.; Nagatomi, Helio R.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Karan Junior, Dib; Souza, Carla D.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study and develop commercial resins for manufacturing solid sealed sources. The sources are produced with radionuclides of barium-133, cesium-137 and cobalt-57. They are used in radiation detectors verification. For the immobilization of the radionuclides in the epoxy matrix, it is made use of emulsifying agents that ensure the miscibility between resin and aqueous radioactive solution, as well as curing agents for controlling, curing and sealing the standard radioactive solution completely. As a result, it is expected to obtain standard sealed sources and equivalent to water. The equivalence to water is an important and necessary characteristic. The radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine are supplied in an aqueous form and the resin applied must have a very similar density comparing to the water. The sources must also be comparable in quality to sources produced internationally, but with low cost and wide available materials in the market. It is intended to create a national technology able to meet the demand of this product in the domestic market and achieve excellence in quality through accreditation and certification of the product by the appropriate agencies. The study of the necessary parameters used in the production of these sources, will bring technology for the manufacture of other categories of standard sealed sources, those used for nuclear medicine, image, laboratories and industry. (author)

  13. Precise Mapping Of A Spatially Distributed Radioactive Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.; Caras, I.; Piestum, S.; Sheli, E.; Melamud, Y.; Berant, S.; Kadmon, Y.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    Spatial distribution measurement of radioactive sources is a routine task in the nuclear industry. The precision of each measurement depends upon the specific application. However, the technological edge of this precision is motivated by the production of standards for calibration. Within this definition, the most demanding field is the calibration of standards for medical equipment. In this paper, a semi-empirical method for controlling the measurement precision is demonstrated, using a relatively simple laboratory apparatus. The spatial distribution of the source radioactivity is measured as part of the quality assurance tests, during the production of flood sources. These sources are further used in calibration of medical gamma cameras. A typical flood source is a 40 x 60 cm 2 plate with an activity of 10 mCi (or more) of 57 Co isotope. The measurement set-up is based on a single NaI(Tl) scintillator with a photomultiplier tube, moving on an X Y table which scans the flood source. In this application the source is required to have a uniform activity distribution over its surface

  14. Sealed radioactive sources and method of their production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benadik, A.; Tympl, M.; Stopek, K.

    1985-01-01

    The active layer of the proposed sources consists of an inorganic sorbent activated with a radioactive component in form of gel, xerogel or glass. The active particles of the inorganic sorbent have the shape of spheres 2 to 2000 μm in diameter. The sources have a tubular, cylindrical or needle shape and are compact with low leachability. They feature minimal radionuclide leakage, they are reliable and safe. Their production technology is proposed. The inorganic sorbent is put in contact with the sollution of the radioactive compound, then separated from the liquid phase, filled into containers, dried, calcined or sintered or otherwise heat-processed into glass at temperatures of 250 -1800 degC. (M.D.)

  15. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  16. Radioactive Sources in Medicine: Impact of Additional Security Measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classic, K. L.; Vetter, R. J.; Nelson, K. L.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, medical centers and hospitals have utilized appropriate security measures to prevent theft or unauthorized use of radioactive materials. Recent anxiety about orphan sources and terrorism has heightened concern about diversion of radioactive sources for purposes of constructing a radiological dispersion device. Some medical centers and hospitals may have responded by conducting threat assessments and incorporating additional measures into their security plans, but uniform recommendations or regulations have not been promulgated by regulatory agencies. The International Atomic Energy Agency drafted interim guidance for the purpose of assisting member states in deciding what security measures should be taken for various radioactive sources. The recommendations are aimed at regulators, but suppliers and users also may find the recommendations to be helpful. The purpose of this paper is to describe threat assessments and additional security actions that were taken by one large and one medium-sized medical center and the impact these measures had on operations. Both medical centers possess blood bank irradiators, low-dose-rate therapy sources, and Mo-99/Tc-99m generators that are common to many health care organizations. Other medical devices that were evaluated include high-dose-rate after loaders, intravascular brachytherapy sources, a Co-60 stereotactic surgery unit, and self-shielded irradiators used in biomedical research. This paper will discuss the impact additional security has had on practices that utilize these sources, cost of various security alternatives, and the importance of a security culture in assuring the integrity of security measures without negatively impacting beneficial use of these sources. (Author) 10 refs

  17. Analysis of the reasons of recently some radioactive source accidents and suggestions for management countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Yongjie; Feng Youcai; Song Chenxiu; Gao Huibin; Xing Jinsong; Pang Xinxin; Wang Xiaoqing; Wei Hong

    2007-01-01

    The article introduces recently some radioactive source accidents in China, and analyses the reasons of the accidents. Some important issues existed in the process of implementing new regulation were summarized, and some suggestions for managing radioactive sources are made. (authors)

  18. Ionization dual-zone static detector having single radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ried, L. Jr.; Wade, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    This ionization detector or combustion product detector includes a single radioactive source located in an ionization chamber, and the ionization chamber includes portions comprising a reference zone and a signal zone. Electrical circuitry connected to the reference and signal zones provides an output signal directly related to changes in voltages across the signal zone in relation to the amount of particulates of combustion present in the ionization chamber

  19. Thin, Conductive, Pyrrolyc film production for radioactive sources backings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Arcos, J.M. los

    1993-01-01

    A procedure for electro polymerization of pyrrole has been set up in order to produce thin, (> 15 μg/cm2) homogeneous (thickness variation < 2%) films, with no need for additional metallization to be used as backings of radioactive sources, having 10-0,4 Kfl/sample, for 35-70 μg/cm . The experimental equipment, reagent and procedure utilized is described as well as the characterization of Pyrrolyc films produced. (Author) 28 refs

  20. COMPARISON OF RECURSIVE ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES FOR POSITION TRACKING RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muske, K.; Howse, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper compares the performance of recursive state estimation techniques for tracking the physical location of a radioactive source within a room based on radiation measurements obtained from a series of detectors at fixed locations. Specifically, the extended Kalman filter, algebraic observer, and nonlinear least squares techniques are investigated. The results of this study indicate that recursive least squares estimation significantly outperforms the other techniques due to the severe model nonlinearity

  1. French studies for improvement of the data for radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchemin, B.; Nimal, B.; Nimal, J.C.; Blachot, J.; Chouha, M.

    1988-01-01

    The 1987 version of the CEA radioactivity data bank is just distributed. This data bank is used to compute concentrations, activities, β and γ spectra, which give sources for shielding purposes. To improve this data bank at short cooling time (t < 200 sec) a methodology based on the statistical model is used to take account of the upper unknown levels. To give an example of the results we get, a brief summary of the studies we made for the TCHERNOBYL case is given

  2. Activities and Issues in Monitoring Scrap Metal Against Radioactive Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.Y., E-mail: sychen@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Over the past few decades, the global scrap metal industry has grown increasingly vigilant regarding radioactive contamination. Accidental melts of radioactive sources in some smelting facilities, in particular, have caused considerable damage and required recovery efforts costing tens of millions of dollars. In response, the industry has developed and deployed countermeasures. Increasingly expensive and sophisticated radiation monitoring devices have been implemented at key scrap entry points - ports and scrapyards. Recognition of the importance of such endeavors has led to a series of activities aimed at establishing organized and coordinated efforts among the interested parties. Recent concerns over the potential use of radioactive sources for radiological devices in terrorist acts have substantially heightened the need for national and international authorities to further control, intercept, and secure the sources that have escaped the regulatory domain. Enhanced collaboration by the government and industry could substantially improve the effectiveness of efforts at control; the 'Spanish Protocol' as developed by the Spanish metal industry and government regulators is a good example of such collaboration. (author)

  3. Certified Training for Nuclear and Radioactive Source Security Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Radioactive sources are used by hospitals, research facilities and industry for such purposes as diagnosing and treating illnesses, sterilising equipment and inspecting welds. Unfortunately, many States, regulatory authorities and licensees may not appreciate how people with malevolent intentions could use radioactive sources, and statistics confirm that a number of security incidents happen around the globe. The adversary could be common thieves, activists, insiders, terrorists and organised crime groups. Mitigating this risk requires well trained and competent staff who have developed the knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to successfully discharge their security responsibilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Institute for Nuclear Security are leading international training efforts. The target audience is a multi-disciplinary group of professionals with management responsibilities for security at facilities with radioactive sources. These efforts to promote training and competence amongst practitioners have been recognised at the 2014 and 2016 Nuclear Security and Nuclear Industry Summits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The security of medical and industrial radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielefeld, Tom; Fischer, Helmut W.

    2008-01-01

    Recent foiled and successful terrorist plots in Europe and the US (including two cases in the UK and Germany which included plans to design radiological dispersal devices in 2004 and 2005), clearly demonstrate that domestic or locally acting terrorist cells have become an important part of the terrorist threat picture. The uncovered 'dirty bomb'-plots involved radioactive material of type or quantity that would not have caused much damage. Still, these observations underscore the necessity to revisit the issue of radioactive sources security in countries which may become the target of a radiological attack. This includes in particular countries in Europe, many of which in the past relied on sophisticated - but safety centred - regulations and functioning oversight institutions. In a pilot study, we have developed plausible attack scenarios involving medical and industrial sources used in Germany. Special emphasis was put on how such sources could be obtained by a locally acting terrorist group using criminal tactics and non-specialized equipment only. To this end, sources storage and handling as well as daily work procedures in hospitals and companies have been analysed to find weak points which could be discovered and exploited by terrorist groups. Publicly available technical information has been used to assess under which circumstances terrorists could obtain various types of sources or whole instruments. Calculations have been performed to estimate the radiation burden to a person handling these sources with improvised equipment. Our study shows that, even in a country with already high regulatory standards, hospitals and industrial facilities still need to introduce improvements to sources security. We therefore discuss and propose a number of affordable security upgrades. Many of our findings in Germany apply to other western countries as well. Hence, we call for a change of mentality of users and manufacturers to take into account not only the safety but

  5. Sealed Radioactive Sources. Information, Resources, and Advice for Key Groups about Preventing the Loss of Control over Sealed Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    Among its many activities to improve the safety and security of sealed sources, the IAEA has been investigating the root causes of major accidents and incidents since the 1980's and publishes findings so that others can learn from them. There are growing concerns today about the possibility that an improperly stored source could be stolen and used for malicious purposes. To improve both safety and security, information needs to be in the hands of those whose actions and decisions can prevent a source from being lost or stolen in the first place. The IAEA developed this booklet to help improve communication with key groups about hazards that may result from the loss of control over sealed radioactive sources and measures that should be implemented to prevent such loss of control. Many people may benefit from the information contained in this booklet, particularly those working with sources and those likely to be involved if control over a source is lost; especially: officials in government agencies, first responders, medical users, industrial users and the metal recycling industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety. This booklet is comprised of several stand-alone chapters intended to communicate with these key groups. Various accidents that are described and information that is provided are relevant to more than one key group and therefore, some information is repeated throughout the booklet. This booklet seeks to raise awareness of the importance of the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. However, it is not intended to be a comprehensive 'how to' guide for implementing safety and security measures for sealed radioactive sources. For more information on these measures, readers are encouraged to consult the key IAEA safety and security-related publications identified in this booklet

  6. Development of a 60Co radioactive rod source used for γ-ray level gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yibing; Pan Liangcai; Yin Shunjiu

    1991-09-01

    The installation of level gauge used for urea stripping tower, the structure and forming of radioactive rod source, and the calculation of its approximate linear graduation are described. The theoretical and practical feasibility has been confirmed from the test results of comparing the imported radioactive rod source to the developed radioactive rod source. The technological process of production, method for obtaining distribution of radioactivity along the axis, and the test and operation of developed rod source on site are also presented

  7. Radioactive inventories and sources for contamination of the Kara Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.; Jenquin, U.P.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on detailing the magnitudes of the sources of radionuclides that may be available, or have already been released to the Ob and Yenisey river systems. The emphasis is on the amounts of radioactivity that have been discharged to the environment in the West Siberian Basin. This are potential source terms to the Kara Sea via the Ob and Yenisey rivers. Russian estimates of what has been discharged to the Barents and Kara Seas, including direct ocean discharges, are summarized to provide some perspective on contamination of the Kara Sea. 1 fig., 3 tabs

  8. Flowsheets and source terms for radioactive waste projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-03-01

    Flowsheets and source terms used to generate radioactive waste projections in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program are given. Volumes of each waste type generated per unit product throughput have been determined for the following facilities: uranium mining, UF 6 conversion, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, boiling-water reactors (BWRs), pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), and fuel reprocessing. Source terms for DOE/defense wastes have been developed. Expected wastes from typical decommissioning operations for each facility type have been determined. All wastes are also characterized by isotopic composition at time of generation and by general chemical composition. 70 references, 21 figures, 53 tables

  9. 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-27

    This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are

  10. Cradle to Grave: Managing Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources in the Mediterranean Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2014-01-01

    Some countries in the Mediterranean region lack appropriate facilities for the safe management or disposal of radioactive waste such as disused radioactive sources. Disused radioactive sources could be lost, stolen or abandoned and thus fall outside the regulatory control. Such loss of control over disused sources presents a significant risk to the public and the environment

  11. Radiation protection rules for handling of sealed radioactive sources in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    The rules presented here relate to the use of sealed radioactive sources in medical therapy, with the radioactive sources being temporarily or permanently incorporated into body cavities or body tissues, or fixed to the body surface. They also relate to radioactive sources with dimensions below 5 mm (as e.g. seeds). (orig./HP) [de

  12. Sources and levels of radioactivity in the Philippine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, E.B.; De Vera, C.M.; De la Cruz, F.M.; Enriquez, E.B.; Garcia, T.Y.; Palad, L.H.; Enriquez, S.O.; Eduardo, J.M.; Asada, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Over the years, the Health Physics Research Section has assessed the sources and levels of radiation exposure in the Philippine environment. The data show that although Filipinos are exposed to both natural and artificial sources of environmental radioactivity, natural sources contribute much more significantly to the dose received by Filipinos than artificial sources. The average equivalent dose rate due to external sources of natural radiation in the Philippines is 45 μSv h -1 . Of this total dose rate, an average of 22 μSv h -1 is due to cosmic radiation while an average of 23 μSv h -1 is due to terrestrial radiation. External sources of natural radiation in the Philippines thus account for an annual per caput effective dose of about 400 μSv. In contrast, the annual per caput dose due to an artificial source, i.e., nuclear power production, was estimated by UNSCEAR (1988) to be only 0.6 μSv. Based on levels of background radioactivity due to external sources of natural radiation which were measured in 1600 locations, a radiation map of the country was developed. Among the internal sources of natural radiation, radon is the large contributor to dose and is considered as a serious indoor pollutant. Indoor radon levels in about 400 Filipino houses ranged from 1 to 63 Bq m -3 with a mean of 24 Bq m -3 . Significantly higher levels ranging from 30 to 347 Bq m -3 were observed in underground, non-uranium mines. Since there are no operational nuclear power plant in the Philippines, artificial radionuclides in the environment consist mainly of long-lived 137 Cs and 90 Sr from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests

  13. Integrated Management Program for Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt IMPRSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, A.; El-Adham, K.

    2004-01-01

    Sealed sources are usually in capsules made of stainless steel. They are the size of a pen or a finger and contain one of hundreds of radioactive elements (e.g., Iridium, Radium) or their isotopes. They are air-tight and very durable, contain the radioactive material but not radiation. They are used in the health sector, industry, military, and universities. Incidents occurred in Met Halfa, Egypt, 2000 (Iridium-192); Goiania, Brazil, 1987 (Cesium-137); Mexico and Southwest U.S., 1977 -1984 (Cobalt-60); Peru, 1999 (Iridium-1992); Poland 2001 (Cobalt-60). The IMPRSS Mission is based on a joined partnership between the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, the Egyptian Ministry of Health, the Sandia National Laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency and others. The IMPRSS Mission protects human health and the environment in Egypt from mismanaged sealed sources, is developed jointly with MOH and EAEA, provides capabilities for managing radioactive sealed sources in Egypt, increases public awareness, provides education and training, improves emergency response capabilities, develops a permanent disposal facility, ensures the program is self-sustaining and ensures close coordination with the IAEA. Infrastructure how to manage sealed sources is discussed. It includes awareness, tracking and inventory control, security, recovery, conditioning and storage, recycling and disposal. Emergency response, regulatory reform, education and training and its targets are provided. The government of Egypt can protect the people of Egypt and is ready for emergencies. Prevention is the first line of defence and detection is the second line of defence. Adequate Emergency Response saves lives and adequate control reduces risk of mismanaged uses or deliberate misuses of sources. A Cradle-to-Grave approach is built on existing capabilities at EAEA and MOH

  14. The ultimate solution. Disposal of disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    The borehole disposal concept (BDC) was first presented to ICEM by Potier, J-M in 2005. This paper repeats the basics introduced by Potier and relates further developments. It also documents the history of the development of the BDC. For countries with no access to existing or planned geological disposal facilities for radioactive wastes, the only options for managing high activity or long-lived disused radioactive sources are to store them indefinitely, return them to the supplier or find an alternative method of disposal. Disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRS) pose an unacceptable radiological and security risk if not properly managed. Out of control sources have already led to many high-profile incidents or accidents. One needs only to remember the recent accident in India that occurred earlier this year. Countries without solutions in place need to consider the future management of DSRSs urgently. An on-going problem in developing countries is what to do with sources that cannot be returned to the suppliers, sources for which there is no further use, sources that have not been maintained in a working condition and sources that are no longer suitable for their intended purpose. Disposal in boreholes is intended to be simple and effective, meeting the same high standards of long-term radiological safety as any other type of radioactive waste disposal. It is believed that the BDC can be readily deployed with simple, cost-effective technologies. These are appropriate both to the relatively small amounts and activities of the wastes and the resources that can realistically be found in developing countries. The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd (Necsa) has carried out project development and demonstration activities since 1996. The project looked into the technical feasibility, safety and economic viability of BDC under the social, economic, environmental and infrastructural conditions currently prevalent in Africa. Implementation is near at hand with

  15. Regulatory inspection: a powerful tool to control industrial radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C.A. da; Leocadio, J.C.; Ramalho, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    An important contribution for Brazilian development, especially for the quality control of products, is the use of radiation sources by conventional industries. There are in Brazil roughly 3,000 radioactive sources spread out among 950 industries. The main industrial practices involved are: industrial radiography, industrial irradiators, industrial accelerators, well logging petroleum and nuclear gauges. More than 1,800 Radiation Protection Officers (RPOs) were qualified to work in these practices. The present work presents a brief description of the safety control over industrial radioactive installations performed by the Brazilian Regulatory Authority, i.e. the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN). This paper also describes the national system for radiation safety inspections, the regulation infrastructure and the national inventory of industrial installations. The inspections are based on specific indicators, and their periodicity depends on the risk and type of installation. The present work discusses some relevant aspects that must be considered during the inspections, in order to make the inspections more efficient in controlling the sources. One of these aspects regards the evaluation of the storage place for the sources, a very important parameter for preventing future risky situations. (author)

  16. Quality control of concretes for conditioning of spent radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez N, M.

    2015-01-01

    The spent sealed radioactive sources are considered as a specific type of radioactive wastes and should be properly stored to ensure their integrity and prevent or limit the release of radionuclides in the geosphere. For this, these sources can be put up in concrete matrices. This research presents the evaluation and characterization of five concretes prepared with 4 brands of commercial cements: CPC Extra RS, CPC 30R Impercem of Cemex, Cruz Azul CPC 30R and CPC 30R of Apasco; three sizes of coarse aggregate (<30 mm, 29-11 mm and <10 mm) and fine aggregate (0.0797 mm) used as matrices for conditioning of spent sealed radioactive sources, in order to verify if these specific concretes accredit the standard NOM-019-Nucl-1995. After hardening for 28 days the concrete specimens were subjected to the tests: compressive strength; thermal cycles, irradiation, leaching and permeability, later to be characterized by: 1) X-ray diffraction in order to meet their crystalline phases; 2) scanning electron microscopy, to determine changes in morphology; 3) infrared spectroscopy, to determine the structural changes of concrete from its functional groups; 4) Raman spectroscopy to determine their structural changes and 5) Moessbauer spectroscopy, which determines changes in the oxidation state of iron in the concrete. According to the results and the changes presented by each concrete after applying the tests set by NOM-019-Nucl-1995, is concluded that the concrete made with cement Cemex brand (CPC 30-RS Extra), gravel of particle size 11-29 mm and sieved sand (0.0797 mm) can be used as matrices of spent sealed sources conditioning. Is remarkable a morphological and structural change of the concrete due to gamma irradiation and heat treatment. (Author)

  17. Regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, A.T.; Fenton, D.; O'Flaherty, T.

    2001-01-01

    The primary legislation governing safety in uses of ionizing radiation in Ireland is the Radiological Protection Act, 1991. This Act provided for the establishment in 1992 of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, and gives the Institute the functions and powers which enable it to be the regulatory body for all matters relating to ionizing radiation. A Ministerial Order made under the Act in 2000 consolidates previous regulations and, in particular, provides for the implementation in Irish law of the 1996 European Union Directive which lays down basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation. Under the legislation, the custody, use and a number of other activities involving radioactive substances and irradiating apparatus require a licence issued by the Institute. Currently some 1260 licences are in force. Of these, some 850 are in respect of irradiating apparatus only and are issued principally to dentists and veterinary surgeons. The remaining licences involve sealed radiation sources and/or unsealed radioactive substances used in medicine, industry or education. A schedule attached to each licence fully lists the sealed sources to which the licence applies, and also the quantities of radioactive substances which may be acquired or held under the licence. It is an offence to dispose of, or otherwise relinquish possession of, any licensable material other than in accordance with terms and conditions of the licence. Disused sources are returned to the original supplier or, where this is not possible, stored under licence by the licensee who used them. Enforcement of the licensing provisions relies primarily on the programme of inspection of licensees, carried out by the Institute's inspectors. The Institute's Regulatory Service has a complement of four inspectors, one of whom is the Manager of the Service. The Manager reports to one of the Institute's Principal

  18. Strengthening the safety and security of radioactive sources worldwide: a perspective on Philippine contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Allan

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive sources have been used for many decades in a wide variety of applications in all countries. The safety of radioactive sources and the associated radiation protection have been implemented by national and international programs during this time with cooperation through the IAEA intended to achieve application of minimum standards and harmonization of approach. The security of radioactive sources is however relatively new consideration. A perspective on the Philippine contributions to the safety and security of radioactive sources will be provided with reference to the following: What is radioactive source security and why it is important?; International cooperation, including the IAEA Code of Conduct; Regulation for radioactive source security; Implementation of radioactive source security measures for licenses, operators and others; Impact of regulatory and operational matters such as professional development and training, emergency preparedness and response, and radiation protection. (author)

  19. Shielding design of disposal container for disused sealed radioactive source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk Hoon; Kim, Ju Youl [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources (DSRSs), which are stored temporally in the centralized storage facility of Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD), will be disposed of in the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in Wolsong. Accordingly, the future plan on DSRS disposal should be established as soon as possible in connection with the construction and operation plan of disposal facility. In this study, as part of developing the systematic management plan, the radiation shielding analysis for three types of disposal container was performed for all kinds of radionuclides (excluding mixed sources) contained in DSRSs generated from domestic area using MicroShield and MCNP5 codes in consideration of the preliminary post-closure safety assessment result for disposal options, source-specific characteristics, and etc. In accordance with the analysis result, thickness of inner container for general disposal container and dimensions (i.e. diameter and height) of inner capsule for two types of special disposal container were determined as 3 mm, OD40×H120 mm (for type 1), and OD100× H240 mm (for type 2), respectively. These values were reflected in the conceptual design of DSRS disposal container, and the structural integrity of each container was confrmed through the structural analysis carried out separately from this study. Given the shielding and structural analysis results, the conceptual design derived from this study sufficiently fulfills the technical standards in force and the design performance level. And consequently, it is judged that the safe management for DSRSs to be disposed of is achieved by utilizing the disposal container with the conceptual design devised.

  20. Shielding design of disposal container for disused sealed radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk Hoon; Kim, Ju Youl

    2017-01-01

    Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources (DSRSs), which are stored temporally in the centralized storage facility of Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD), will be disposed of in the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in Wolsong. Accordingly, the future plan on DSRS disposal should be established as soon as possible in connection with the construction and operation plan of disposal facility. In this study, as part of developing the systematic management plan, the radiation shielding analysis for three types of disposal container was performed for all kinds of radionuclides (excluding mixed sources) contained in DSRSs generated from domestic area using MicroShield and MCNP5 codes in consideration of the preliminary post-closure safety assessment result for disposal options, source-specific characteristics, and etc. In accordance with the analysis result, thickness of inner container for general disposal container and dimensions (i.e. diameter and height) of inner capsule for two types of special disposal container were determined as 3 mm, OD40×H120 mm (for type 1), and OD100× H240 mm (for type 2), respectively. These values were reflected in the conceptual design of DSRS disposal container, and the structural integrity of each container was confrmed through the structural analysis carried out separately from this study. Given the shielding and structural analysis results, the conceptual design derived from this study sufficiently fulfills the technical standards in force and the design performance level. And consequently, it is judged that the safe management for DSRSs to be disposed of is achieved by utilizing the disposal container with the conceptual design devised

  1. Type testing of devices with inserted radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, A.; Droste, B.; Dombrowski, H.

    2006-01-01

    In Germany devices with inserted radioactive sources can get a type approval if they comply with specific requirements. Whoever operates a device whose type has been approved in accordance with the German Radiation Protection Ordinance does not need an individual authorization. Such type approvals for free use are granted by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (B.f.S.) on the basis of type testing performed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (P.T.B.), the national metrology institute, and the Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung und -prufung (B.A.M.), the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing. Main aspects of the assessment are the activity of the radioactive sources, the dose equivalent rate near the devices, the tamper-proofness and leak-tightness of the sources and the safety of the construction of the devices. With the new Radiation Protection Ordinance in 2001, more stringent requirements for a type approval were established. Experiences with the new regulations and the relevant assessment criteria applied by P.T.B. and B.A.M. will be presented. (authors)

  2. Illicit trafficking of nuclear material and other radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmazer, A.; Yuecel, A.; Yavuz, U.

    2001-01-01

    As it is known, for the fact that the illicit trafficking and trading of nuclear materials are being increased over the past few years because of the huge demand of third world states. Nuclear materials like uranium, plutonium, and thorium are used in nuclear explosives that have very attractive features for crime groups, terrorist groups and, the states that are willing to have this power. Crime groups that make illegal trade of nuclear material are also trying to market strategic radioactive sources like red mercury and Osmium. This kind of illegal trade threats public safety, human health, environment also it brings significant threat on world peace and world public health. For these reasons, both states and international organizations should take a role in dealing with illicit trafficking. An important precondition for preventing this kind of incidents is the existence of a strengthened national system for control of all nuclear materials and other radioactive sources. Further, Governments are responsible for law enforcement within their borders for prevention of illegal trading and trafficking of nuclear materials and radiation sources

  3. Application of radioactive sources in analytical instruments for planetary exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economou, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the past 50 years or so, many types of radioactive sources have been used in space exploration. 238 Pu is often used in space missions in Radioactive Heater Units (RHU) and Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for heat and power generation, respectively. In 1960's, 2 ' 42 Cm alpha radioactive sources have been used for the first time in space applications on 3 Surveyor spacecrafts to obtain the chemical composition of the lunar surface with an instrument based on the Rutherford backscatterring of the alpha particles from nuclei in the analyzed sample. 242 Cm is an alpha emitter of 6.1 MeV alpha particles. Its half-life time, 163 days, is short enough to allow sources to be prepared with the necessary high intensity per unit area ( up to 470 mCi and FWHM of about 1.5% in the lunar instruments) that results in narrow energy distribution, yet long enough that the sources have adequate lifetimes for short duration missions. 242 Cm is readily prepared in curie quantities by irradiation of 241 Am by neutrons in nuclear reactors, followed by chemical separation of the curium from the americium and fission products. For long duration missions, like for example missions to Mars, comets, and asteroids, the isotope 244 Cm (T 1/2 =18.1 y, E α =5.8 MeV) is a better source because of its much longer half-life time. Both of these isotopes are also excellent x-ray excitation sources and have been used for that purpose on several planetary missions. For the light elements the excitation is caused mainly by the alpha particles, while for the heavier elements (> Ca) the excitation is mainly due to the x-rays from the Pu L-lines (E x =14-18 keV). 244 Cm has been used in several variations of the Alpha Proton Xray Spectrometer (APXS): PHOBOS 1 and 2 Pathfinder, Russian Mars-96 mission, Mars Exploration Rover (MER) and Rosetta. Other sources used in X-ray fluorescence instruments in space are 55 Fe and 109 Cd (Viking1,2, Beagle 2) and 57 Co is used in Moessbauer

  4. Radioactive heat source and method of making same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, N.B.

    1977-01-01

    A radioactive source of heat which is resistant to cremation conditions is made by encapsulating a radioisotope within a containment vessel and forming a refractory metal silicide diffusion coating exterior thereof. A secondary molybdenum vessel may be provided with a molybdenum silicide coating and then heated in air to oxidize its outer layer. A layer is applied exterior of the diffusion-coating which provides a continuous ceramic oxide layer upon subjection to cremation. This outer layer may be discrete silica carried in a hardenable binder of an organic polymer, and a minor amount of antimony is preferably also included

  5. Risk Prevention for Nuclear Materials and Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper investigates the parameters which may have effects on the safety of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources used in peaceful applications of atomic energy. The emergency response planning in such situations are also indicated. In synergy with nuclear safety measures, an approach is developed in this study for risk prevention. It takes into consideration the collective implementation of measures of nuclear material accounting and control, physical protection and monitoring of such strategic and dangerous materials in an integrated and coordinated real-time mode at a nuclear or radiation facility and in any time

  6. Requirements for the register of physical persons for the preparation, use and handling radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    This norm establishes the process for register of superior level profession nals enabled to the preparation, using, and handling of radioactive sources. This norm applies to the physical persons candidates applying to the register for preparation, use and handling of radioactive sources in radioactive installations at the industry, agriculture, teaching and researching

  7. Radioactivity measurements in Egyptian Phosphate Mines and Their Significance As a Source of Hazardous Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.; Hussein, M.I.; Abdel Hady, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphate mines that may contain radioactive traces in the composition of their ores represent source of hazardous radioactive waste in the environment. Radioactivity measurements have been conducted in nine underground phosphate mines in the Egyptian Eastern Desert in order to estimate the occupational radiation exposure of mine workers in those mining sites. Measurements were carried out of airborne radon and its short- lived decay products (progeny) and thoron progeny, as well as radiation from mines walls, ceilings and floors. Conventional, well established techniques, methods and instrumentation were used to make these measurements. Comparison of experimental data and theoretical predictions showed partial agreement between these two sets of data. This result is partly attributed to the complex layout of these mines, which causes undesirable ventilation conditions, such as recirculation airflow patterns, which could not be adequately identified or quantified. The radiation data obtained were used to estimate the maximum Annual Dose (MAD), and other important occupational radiation exposure variables. These calculations indicate that in eight out of the nine mines surveyed, the MAD exceeded (by a factor of up to 7) the maximum recommended level by ICRP 60. Numbers of suggestions are made in order to reduce the MAD in the affected mines. This study could help in the estimation of the environmental impact of these mine operations on the environment

  8. Sources, classification, and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: (1) early definitions of different types (classes) of radioactive waste developed prior to definitions in laws and regulations; (2) sources of different classes of radioactive waste; (3) current laws and regulations addressing classification of radioactive wastes; and requirements for disposal of different waste classes. Relationship between waste classification and requirements for permanent disposal is emphasized; (4) federal and state responsibilities for radioactive wastes; and (5) distinctions between radioactive wastes produced in civilian and defense sectors

  9. Low-level radioactive waste performance assessments: Source term modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Icenhour, A.S.; Godbee, H.W.; Miller, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) generated by government and commercial operations need to be isolated from the environment for at least 300 to 500 yr. Most existing sites for the storage or disposal of LLW employ the shallow-land burial approach. However, the U.S. Department of Energy currently emphasizes the use of engineered systems (e.g., packaging, concrete and metal barriers, and water collection systems). Future commercial LLW disposal sites may include such systems to mitigate radionuclide transport through the biosphere. Performance assessments must be conducted for LUW disposal facilities. These studies include comprehensive evaluations of radionuclide migration from the waste package, through the vadose zone, and within the water table. Atmospheric transport mechanisms are also studied. Figure I illustrates the performance assessment process. Estimates of the release of radionuclides from the waste packages (i.e., source terms) are used for subsequent hydrogeologic calculations required by a performance assessment. Computer models are typically used to describe the complex interactions of water with LLW and to determine the transport of radionuclides. Several commonly used computer programs for evaluating source terms include GWSCREEN, BLT (Breach-Leach-Transport), DUST (Disposal Unit Source Term), BARRIER (Ref. 5), as well as SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 (which are used in this study). The SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 codes were prepared by Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SOURCE1 is designed for tumulus-type facilities, and SOURCE2 is tailored for silo, well-in-silo, and trench-type disposal facilities. This paper focuses on the source term for ORNL disposal facilities, and it describes improved computational methods for determining radionuclide transport from waste packages

  10. Management of disused long lived sealed radioactive sources (LLSRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    The document provides advice the sealed source users and the national waste management organizations with the technical know-how on the management of disused and spent long lived sealed radioactive sources (LLSRS) and with the particular guidelines required for handling, conditioning for storage, and storage of these sources. The guidance is intended to assist in establishing compliance with the present standards, requirements, and adopted practices. It also provides background material for any possible technical assistance to developing countries and serves as a reference for technical staff involved with IAEA programmes on the subject. Because of the historic nature of many of the sources under this category and the lack of well developed technical procedures recognized on the international level, this publication can serve as a basis for establishing future handling and conditioning procedures. The LLSRS addressed in this publication are primarily those containing radionuclides having half-lives greater than 30 years. These sources may contain long lived alpha-emitters, mainly 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 237 Np, 241 Am, 226 Ra; beta-emitters: 14 C, and 63 Ni and could be neutron sources such as PuBe, RaBe and AmBe

  11. Experiments with radioactive samples at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veluri, V. R.; Justus, A.; Glagola, B.; Rauchas, A.; Vacca, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a national synchrotron-radiation light source research facility. The 7 GeV electron Storage Ring is currently delivering intense high brilliance x-ray beams to a total of 34 beamlines with over 120 experiment stations to members of the international scientific community to carry out forefront basic and applied research in several scientific disciplines. Researchers come to the APS either as members of Collaborative Access Teams (CATs) or as Independent Investigators (IIs). Collaborative Access Teams comprise large number of investigators from universities, industry, and research laboratories with common research objectives. These teams are responsible for the design, construction, finding, and operation of beamlines. They are the owners of their experimental enclosures (''hutches'') designed and built to meet their specific research needs. Fig. 1 gives a plan view of the location of the Collaborative Access Teams by Sector and Discipline. In the past two years, over 2000 individual experiments were conducted at the APS facility. Of these, about 60 experiments involved the use of radioactive samples, which is less than 3% of the total. However, there is an increase in demand for experiment stations to accommodate the use of radioactive samples in different physical forms embedded in various matrices with activity levels ranging from trace amounts of naturally occurring radionuclides to MBq (mCi) quantities including transuranics. This paper discusses in some detail the steps in the safety review process for experiments involving radioactive samples and how ALARA philosophy is invoked at each step and implemented

  12. The error sources appearing for the gamma radioactive source measurement in dynamic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirbu, M.

    1977-01-01

    The error analysis for the measurement of the gamma radioactive sources, placed on the soil, with the help of the helicopter are presented. The analysis is based on a new formula that takes account of the attenuation gamma ray factor in the helicopter walls. They give a complete error formula and an error diagram. (author)

  13. Radiation sources safety and radioactive materials security regulation in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyshliaiev, A.; Holubiev, V.; Makarovska, O.

    2001-01-01

    packages for shipment of radiation sources; State registration of radiation sources; licensing of radiation material transportation. In 1997, the Government of Ukraine decided to establish a unified computerized system of accountancy, control and registration of radiation sources - the State Register of Radiation Sources (Register). In 1998, under the Ukrainian State Production Enterprise 'Isotope' a separate subdivision 'State Register of Radiation Sources' was established. This subdivision functions as the main registration centre, and has been supplied with computer equipment with the assistance of the IAEA. During 1999-2000, the basic documents that regulate the legal status of the Register, the radiation source registration procedure and the State inventory of radiation source procedure were developed and approved by the relevant ministries. Urgent commissioning of the Register and starting the State registration of radiation sources will form a good basis for considerable upgrading of the level of safety and security of radiation sources, reduction of illicit trafficking in radiation sources, and investigation of illicit trafficking cases. Lack of funds is the main problem impeding the commissioning of the Register. On the basis of analysis of safety regulation system for activities dealing with radiation sources in Ukraine, we can draw a conclusion about its sufficiency for effective safety regulation of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials. (author)

  14. Study on induced radioactivity of China Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qingbiao; Wang Qingbin; Wu Jingmin; Ma Zhongjian

    2011-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is the first High Energy Intense Proton Accelerator planned to be constructed in China during the State Eleventh Five-Year Plan period, whose induced radioactivity is very important for occupational disease hazard assessment and environmental impact assessment. Adopting the FLUKA code, the authors have constructed a cylinder-tunnel geometric model and a line-source sampling physical model, deduced proper formulas to calculate air activation, and analyzed various issues with regard to the activation of different tunnel parts. The results show that the environmental impact resulting from induced activation is negligible, whereas the residual radiation in the tunnels has a great influence on maintenance personnel, so strict measures should be adopted.(authors)

  15. National policy for control of radioactive sources and radioactive waste from non-power applications in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevinskas, G.; Mastauskas, A.

    2001-01-01

    According to the Law on Radiation Protection of the Republic of Lithuania (passed in 1999), the Radiation Protection Centre of the Ministry of Health is the regulatory authority responsible for the radiation protection of public and of workers using sources of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. One of its responsibilities is the control of radioactive sources from the beginning of their 'life cycle', when they are imported in, used, transported and placed as spent into the radioactive waste storage facilities. For the effective control of sources there is national authorization system (notification- registration-licensing) based on the international requirements and recommendations introduced, which also includes keeping and maintaining the Register of Sources, controlling and investigating events while illegally carrying on or in possession of radioactive material, decision making and performing the state radiation protection supervision and control of users of radioactive sources, controlling, within the limits of competence, the radioactive waste management activities in nuclear and non-nuclear power applications. According to the requirements set out in the Law on Radiation Protection and the Government Resolution 'On Establishment of the State Register of the Sources of Ionizing Radiation and Exposure of Workers' (1999) and supplementary legal acts, all licence-holders conducting their activities with sources of ionizing radiation have to present all necessary data to the State Register after annual inventory of sources, after installation of new sources, after decommissioning of sources, after disposal of spent sources, after finishing the activities with the generators of ionizing radiation. The information to the Radiation Protection Centre has to be presented every week from the Customs Department of the Ministry of Finance about all sources of ionizing radiation imported to or exported from Lithuania and the information about the companies performed these

  16. Prevention of illicit trafficking of nuclear material and radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Countries like Russia, which have a large nuclear industry, export a significant number of radioactive sources and substances. Some of them are nuclear material. In general, it is the task of the customs inspectors to verify that the content of the shipment is in agreement with the declaration (as safeguards inspectors verify operators declarations). In case of other goods, this is easy. The consignment can be opened and the content can be seen and compared with the declaration. In the case of radioactive shipments this cannot be done. The radioactive substance is in a shielded container and opening is often only possible in a hot cell. Opening of the package and measurement of the removed source in presence of the customs inspector is impossible because the customs inspector is impossible because the customs control begins only after the declaration has been registered. Therefore, the Russian customs authorities have contracted a company to develop a gamma spectrometer, which can be used to verify the source, even if inside the shielded shipping container. Throughout the country - near the where many shipments or receivables take place - there are 18 customs offices, equipped with gamma spectrometers and special software. If a container arrives for customs inspection, its design is called from a database. Then the gamma spectrum outside the container is measured and the measured gamma peak energy and intensity is compared with the expected, which is calculated by software based on the design information of the container. This approach works well. Several cases were already discovered in Russia, where there were attempts to use legal shipments for smuggling radioactive sources. I would like to mention some technical problems concerning control of legal export and import of radioactive sources: a) There are not enough commercial suppliers, which offer the needed equipment; because of lack of competition prices for the equipment are too high b) Presently

  17. Installation for producing sealed radioactive sources; Installation de fabrication de sources radioactives scellees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fradin, J.; Hayoun, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    This installation has been designed and built for producing sealed sources of fission elements: caesium 137, strontium 90, promethium 147, ruthenium 106 and cerium 144 in particular. The installation consists of sealed and protected cells, each being assigned to a particular production. The safety and the operational reliability of the equipment are the principal considerations which have governed this work. The report describes the installation and, in particular, the apparatus used as well as the various control devices. In conclusion, a review as presented of six years operation. (authors) [French] Cette installation a ete concue et realisee pour effectuer des fabrications de sources scellees d'elements de fission: caesium 137 - strontium 90 - promethium 147 - ruthenium 106 - cerium 144 en particulier. L'installation est composee de cellules etanches et protegees, chacune d'elles etant affectee a une fabrication particuliere. La securite et la surete de fonctionnement de l'ensemble sont parmi les elements principaux qui ont guide l'etude. Le rapport decrit l'installation et plus particulierement l'appareillage utilise ainsi que les divers controles et commandes. Le bilan de fonctionnement apres 6 ans d'exploitation sert de conclusion. (auteurs)

  18. Installation for producing sealed radioactive sources; Installation de fabrication de sources radioactives scellees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fradin, J; Hayoun, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    This installation has been designed and built for producing sealed sources of fission elements: caesium 137, strontium 90, promethium 147, ruthenium 106 and cerium 144 in particular. The installation consists of sealed and protected cells, each being assigned to a particular production. The safety and the operational reliability of the equipment are the principal considerations which have governed this work. The report describes the installation and, in particular, the apparatus used as well as the various control devices. In conclusion, a review as presented of six years operation. (authors) [French] Cette installation a ete concue et realisee pour effectuer des fabrications de sources scellees d'elements de fission: caesium 137 - strontium 90 - promethium 147 - ruthenium 106 - cerium 144 en particulier. L'installation est composee de cellules etanches et protegees, chacune d'elles etant affectee a une fabrication particuliere. La securite et la surete de fonctionnement de l'ensemble sont parmi les elements principaux qui ont guide l'etude. Le rapport decrit l'installation et plus particulierement l'appareillage utilise ainsi que les divers controles et commandes. Le bilan de fonctionnement apres 6 ans d'exploitation sert de conclusion. (auteurs)

  19. Management of spent high activity radioactive sources (SHARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this report is to provide all people involved in the handling and management of high activity sources with sufficient information about processes that are required for the safe management of spent high activity radioactive sources (SHARS). This includes examples of spent source management that are already taking place and also a description of the range of appropriate options that are available for each stage in the management process. This report also aims to identify the important issues to be addressed in order to develop a waste management strategy as part of the integrated management strategy that takes account of international experience and the guidance and principles that have been learned from that experience. This report relates specifically to SHARS, which are spent sources that have the potential, with short exposures, to produce acute health effects if handled incorrectly. In addition, they may also incur significant economic costs in any retrieval or environmental remediation operation, following loss of or damage to such a source. The report provides guidance on the technical, administrative and economic issues associated with SHARS from the moment they cease to be in use through to disposal, including temporary storage, transport, conditioning and interim storage

  20. Automatic opening system for radioactive source in teaching laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seren, Maria Emilia Gibin; Gaal, Vladimir; Rodrigues, Varlei; Morais, Sergio Luiz de

    2013-01-01

    Compton scattering phenomenon is experimentally studied during the medical physics laboratory course at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP). The Teaching Laboratory of Medical Physics from IFGW/UNICAMP has a structure for its development: a fixed 137 Cs sealed source with activity 610.5MBq, whose emitted radiation collides on a target, and a scintillation detector that turns around the target and detects scattered photons spectrum. 137 Cs source is stored in a lead shield with a collimating window for the gamma radiation emitted with energy of 0.662MeV. This source is exposed only when attenuation barrier protecting the collimating window is opened. The process of opening and closing the attenuation barrier may deliver radiation dose to users when done manually. Taking into account the stochastic harmful effects of ionizing radiation, the objective of this project was to develop an automatic exposure system of the radioactive source in order to reduce the dose during the Compton scattering experiment. The developed system is micro controlled and performs standard operating routines and responds to emergencies. Electromagnetic lock enables quick closing barrier by gravity in case of interruption of electrical current circuit. Besides reducing the total dose of lab users, the system adds more security in the routine since it limits access to the source and prevents accidental exposure. (author)

  1. The safety and the security of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, B.C.; Ghosh, P.K.; Nandakumar, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    A Task Group was appointed by Chairman, AERB to review the current practice and recommend procedures for ensuring the Safety and the Security of Radioactive Sources in India. The Task Group identified the issues involved and concluded that the current regulatory procedure relating to licensing was adequate in view of the stress placed on pre-licensing requirements and the undertakings obtained from the licensee and ensuring that appropriate radiation monitors and trained personnel are available at the licensee's institution. Each licensee is required to submit periodic reports confiriming the safety and the security of the sources in the possession of the institution. It is important to conduct regulatory inspection of the institutions frequently. In order to optimise the regulatory effort involved, the report recommends frequencies of inspections commensurate with the potential hazard associated with the source. For this purpose the sources are brought under three categories which are largely based on the categorization recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna with deviations introduced on the basis of rationalized hazard potential associated with the sources. The importance of technical coordination between AERB and BARC is emphasised. (author)

  2. Gamma ray energy spectrum of a buried radioactive source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, N B

    1957-07-01

    Because of current attempts to utilize airborne gamma-ray scintillation spectrometers as a means of detecting and identifying buried radioactive mineral deposits, it has become important to study the effects of multiple scattering on the gamma-ray energy spectrum of a source buried in a semi-infinite medium. A series of ten experiments was made. First a scintillation detector was located in air at a fixed distance above a 250 microcurie cobalt-60 source suspended in a large tank. The level of water was raised from 25 cm below the source to 50 cm above, and the gamma-ray energy spectrum was observed. It was found that the high energy portion of the cobalt-60 spectrum remained identifiable even when the source was submerged more than five half-lengths. Further, the ratio of the counting rate of the total incident gamma radiation to the counting rate of the primary 1.33 MeV radiation was found to be very nearly linearly proportional to the depth of water cover. This leads to an empirical method for determining the depth of burial of a cobalt-60 point source. (author)

  3. Radioactive source calibration technique for the CMS hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, E.; Lawlor, C.; Rohlf, J.W. E-mail: rohlf@bu.edu; Wu, S.X.; Baumbaugh, A.; Elias, J.E.; Freeman, J.; Green, D.; Lazic, D.; Los, S.; Ronzhin, A.; Sergueev, S.; Shaw, T.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Zimmerman, T.; Adams, M.; Burchesky, K.; Qian, W.; Baden, A.; Bard, R.; Breden, H.; Grassi, T.; Skuja, A.; Fisher, W.; Mans, J.; Tully, C.; Barnes, V.; Laasanen, A.; Barbaro, P. de; Budd, H

    2003-10-01

    Relative calibration of the scintillator tiles used in the hadronic calorimeter for the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is established and maintained using a radioactive source technique. A movable source can be positioned remotely to illuminate each scintillator tile individually, and the resulting photo-detector current is measured to provide the relative calibration. The unique measurement technique described here makes use of the normal high-speed data acquisition system required for signal digitization at the 40 MHz collider frequency. The data paths for collider measurements and source measurements are then identical, and systematic uncertainties associated with having different signal paths are avoided. In this high-speed mode, the source signal is observed as a Poisson photo-electron distribution with a mean that is smaller than the width of the electronics noise (pedestal) distribution. We report demonstration of the technique using prototype electronics for the complete readout chain and show the typical response observed with a 144 channel test beam system. The electronics noise has a root-mean-square of 1.6 least counts, and a 1 mCi source produces a shift of the mean value of 0.1 least counts. Because of the speed of the data acquisition system, this shift can be measured to a statistical precision better than a fraction of a percent on a millisecond time scale. The result is reproducible to better than 2% over a time scale of 1 month.

  4. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R.

    2014-01-01

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document

  5. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R.

    2014-09-01

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document.

  6. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R. [National Center for Radiation Protection, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, 11442 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-09-30

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document.

  7. The Russian Northern Fleet. Sources of radioactive contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, T [Bellona Foundation, Oslo (Norway); Kudrik, I [Bellona Foundation Branch Office, Murmansk (Russian Federation); Nikitin, A [Scientific Production Association ` ` Typhoon` ` , Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-08-01

    The report describes the problems that the Russian Northern Fleet is experiencing with its nuclear powered vessels and with the storage of spent fuel and other nuclear wastes that the operation of these vessels generates. One of the most serious problems is the lack of regional storage and treatment facilities for radioactive waste. This waste is now deposited haphazardly throughout the various navy yards and bases. The establishment of a regional storage facility for spent fuel, radioactive reactor components, and liquid and solid nuclear waste is a necessary precondition for carrying out the decommissioning of nuclear submarines in an environmentally viable manner. A recurrent theme in the report is the lack of civilian control over the different Northern Fleet nuclear facilities. This leads to a disregard of international recommendations with regard to the handling of nuclear waste. Considerable effort has been made to provide comprehensive references in the report, making it clear that the authors sources of information have been open. By presenting this information the authors hope to contribute to increased insight and consequently to help realize necessary national and international measures. 93 refs.

  8. The Russian Northern Fleet. Sources of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, T.; Kudrik, I.; Nikitin, A.

    1996-08-01

    The report describes the problems that the Russian Northern Fleet is experiencing with its nuclear powered vessels and with the storage of spent fuel and other nuclear wastes that the operation of these vessels generates. One of the most serious problems is the lack of regional storage and treatment facilities for radioactive waste. This waste is now deposited haphazardly throughout the various navy yards and bases. The establishment of a regional storage facility for spent fuel, radioactive reactor components, and liquid and solid nuclear waste is a necessary precondition for carrying out the decommissioning of nuclear submarines in an environmentally viable manner. A recurrent theme in the report is the lack of civilian control over the different Northern Fleet nuclear facilities. This leads to a disregard of international recommendations with regard to the handling of nuclear waste. Considerable effort has been made to provide comprehensive references in the report, making it clear that the authors sources of information have been open. By presenting this information the authors hope to contribute to increased insight and consequently to help realize necessary national and international measures. 93 refs

  9. Management and disposal of disused sealed radioactive sources in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, D.A.; Angus, M.J.; Cecille, L.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Sealed radioactive sources have been widely used for many decades in industry, medicine and research. Although most countries have laid down a regulatory framework to control sealed sources, there are still a number of uncertainties concerning the management of historical Ra- 226 alpha sources and the possibility of retrieving non-registered sources. Both these uncertainties may represent high radiological risks for the population. In addition, management schemes and practises implemented in different countries can be somewhat conflicting and create problems for storage and disposal. This paper describes the results of three studies that were carried out between 1998 and 2001 to consider the situation relating to the regulation and management of spent sealed radioactive sources (SSRS) in each of the fifteen current European Union (EU) member states and the ten central and eastern European (C and EE) countries that are currently being considered for admission to the European Union (namely, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia). The general aim of the studies was to acquire a thorough understanding of the management of SSRS in each country, in order to recommend improvements in management schemes and to establish whether the application of common disposal criteria would be advantageous. The studies covered the following activities: Estimation of the inventory of SSRS in store and disposed in each country; Analysis of the relevant regulations and regulatory framework in each country; Description and review of the current management practises in each country; Estimation of the number of unregistered SSRS (including identification of the reasons why SSRS are lost' and recommending ways of recovering lost' sources). It was important to understand the full life-cycle of sealed radioactive sources, from manufacture through to disposal. Much of the information contained in these studies was obtained

  10. Design and production of activimeters verification sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, R.; Hernandez Rivero, A. T.; Oropesa, P.; Rapado, M.; Falcon, L.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement in a radionuclide calibrator (activimeter) of the doses to be administered to a patient for diagnosis or radiotherapeutic treatment is an essential element in Nuclear Medicine practice. To assure that patient will receive the optimal doses that guarantee the necessary quality of the image to be studied or optimum radiotherapeutic effect, the activity determination should fulfil established accuracy requirements. To this aim, the overall uncertainty in activity determination must not surpass a preestablished limit of about 10 % for the expanded uncertainty of the activity value (with a coverage factor k = 3). To have suitable equipment, periodically calibrated for specialized and authorized specialists and frequently verified in inter calibration periods to guarantee detection of any malfunctioning, are essential requirements to assure the compliance with the prescribed regulations and limiting values. This paper describes the design and production of two models of 137 Cs activimeters verification sealed radioactive sources elaborated with this aim at the Radionuclide Metrology Department of the Isotope Centre of Cuba. Taking into account the international experience in this field was defined 3 -10 MBq as convenient activity range, the 137 Cs as a suitable radionuclide, and a classification ISO/99/C22212 (ISO 2919:1999) for the sealed sources to be obtained. In designed and produced models the activity is bonded in a hydrogel copolymer obtained by gamma irradiation, in a 60 Co irradiator, of a mixture of a 137 Cs aqueous solution with an approximate activity of 5 MBq with two proper monomers (acrylamide and methacrylic acid). The density of obtained copolymer is similar to that of the radioactive solutions employed in nuclear medicine departments for diagnosis and therapy. The obtained sources have appropriate physical stability for a temperature range between 40 o C below zero and 80 o C, as well as for defined activity range. The stability of the

  11. Benchmarking Microwave Cavity Dark Matter Searches using a Radioactive Source

    CERN Multimedia

    Caspers, F

    2014-01-01

    A radioactive source is proposed as a calibration device to verify the sensitivity of a microwave dark matter search experiment. The interaction of e.g., electrons travelling in an arbitrary direction and velocity through an electromagnetically “empty” microwave cavity can be calculated numerically. We give an estimation of the energy deposited by a charged particle into a particular mode. Numerical examples are given for beta emitters and two particular cases: interaction with a field free cavity and interaction with a cavity which already contains an electromagnetic field. Each particle delivers a certain amount of energy related to the modal R/Q value of the cavity. The transferred energy is a function of the particles trajectory and its velocity. It results in a resonant response of the cavity, which can be observed using a sensitive microwave receiver, provided that the deposited energy is significantly above the single photon threshold.

  12. Statement to the international conference on security of radioactive sources. Vienna, 11 March 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2003-01-01

    Around the world, radioactive sources have been used for decades to benefit humankind - to diagnose and treat illnesses, to monitor oil wells and water aquifers, to preserve food, as well as for many other uses. Millions of sources have been distributed worldwide over the past 50 years, with hundreds of thousands currently in use. Most of these sources, such as those in smoke detectors, are weakly radioactive and individually pose little radiological risk. However, about 12 000 industrial radiography sources are supplied annually; more than 10 000 medical radiotherapy units are in use. These types of sources - and others such as those contained in thermo-electric generators - are significant from a safety and security standpoint, because they contain potentially lethal quantities of radioactive material. To protect the public from the hazards of ionizing radiation, cradle-to-grave control is essential for these radioactive sources. For many years the IAEA has been helping States to strengthen their national regulatory infrastructures, to ensure that such radioactive sources are appropriately regulated at all times. Until recently, our emphasis has been on the safety of radioactive sources, with source security as one aspect of safety. However, in the wake of the September 2001 terrorist attacks, and the stark awareness of the potential for radioactive sources to be used in malevolent acts, source security has taken on a new urgency. But while a number of countries are stepping up relevant security measures, many others lack the resources or the national structures to effectively control radioactive sources

  13. Some statistical problems inherent in radioactive-source detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C.S.

    1978-01-01

    Some of the statistical questions associated with problems of detecting random-point-process signals embedded in random-point-process noise are examined. An example of such a problem is that of searching for a lost radioactive source with a moving detection system. The emphasis is on theoretical questions, but some experimental and Monte Carlo results are used to test the theoretical results. Several idealized binary decision problems are treated by starting with simple, specific situations and progressing toward more general problems. This sequence of decision problems culminates in the minimum-cost-expectation rule for deciding between two Poisson processes with arbitrary intensity functions. As an example, this rule is then specialized to the detector-passing-a-point-source decision problem. Finally, Monte Carlo techniques are used to develop and test one estimation procedure: the maximum-likelihood estimation of a parameter in the intensity function of a Poisson process. For the Monte Carlo test this estimation procedure is specialized to the detector-passing-a-point-source case. Introductory material from probability theory is included so as to make the report accessible to those not especially conversant with probabilistic concepts and methods. 16 figures

  14. Strengthening control over radioactive sources in authorized use and regaining control over orphan sources. National strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this report is to provide practical guidance to States on the development of a national strategy for improving control over radioactive sources, particularly dangerous sources (Categories 1-3). Part of this process involves the determination of the magnitude of the potential problem with orphan and vulnerable sources and indeed, whether or not a national strategy is needed. The ultimate objective is that States will use this report to develop and then implement a plan of action that will result in all significant sources being managed in a safe and secure manner. This report attempts to provide both the background knowledge and the methodology necessary for an individual or small team of responsible persons to develop a national strategy for improving control over all radioactive sources, but especially orphan and vulnerable sources. The background knowledge given in Chapter 3 is an update of the information on practices that was given in IAEA-TECDOC-804, which focused on spent radioactive sources. After some introductory material, this report provides both the factual information and the general steps needed to develop and implement a national strategy. Part I contains background information for those who are not already familiar with the subject including the need for national strategies, the generic causes of loss of control of sources, with specific examples and the common applications of radioactive sources. Part II details the actual process for the development and implementation of a national strategy, which includes assessing the problem by first gathering specific and national information, determining the nature and magnitude of the problem, developing the national strategy by evaluating, and prioritizing possible solutions, implementing the strategy subsequent to a high level decision; and evaluating the effectiveness of the plan and making changes as a result until the desired objective is achieved. Searches for sources will be part of

  15. Classification of radioactive self-luminous light sources - approved 1975. NBS Handbook 116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The standard establishes the classification of certain radioactive self-luminous light sources according to radionuclide, type of source, activity, and performance requirements. The objectives are to establish minimum prototype testing requirements for radioactive self-luminous light sources, to promote uniformity of marking such sources, and to establish minimum physical performance for such sources. The standard is primarily directed toward assuring adequate containment of the radioactive material. Testing procedures and classification designations are specified for discoloration, temperature, thermal shock, reduced pressure, impact, vibration, and immersion. A range of test requirements is presented according to intended usage and source activity

  16. Categorization of radioactive sources. Revision of IAEA-TECDOC-1191, Categorization of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Radioactive sources are used throughout the world for a wide variety of peaceful purposes in industry, medicine, agriculture, research and education; and they are also used in military applications. The International Basic Safety Standards provide an internationally harmonized basis for ensuring the safe and secure use of sources of ionizing radiation. Because of the wide variety of uses and activities of radiation sources, a categorization system is necessary so that the controls that are applied to the sources are commensurate with the radiological risks. In September 1998, following an assessment of the major findings of the first International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Materials, held in Dijon, France, from 14 to 18 September 1998 (the Dijon Conference), the IAEA's General Conference (in resolution GC(42)/RES/12), inter alia, encouraged all governments 'to take steps to ensure the existence within their territories of effective national systems of control for ensuring the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials' and requested the Secretariat 'to prepare for the consideration of the Board of Governors a report on: (i) how national systems for ensuring the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials can be operated at a high level of effectiveness; and, (ii) whether international undertakings concerned with the effective operation of such systems and attracting broad adherence could be formulated'. In February 1999, the Secretariat submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors a report prepared in response to the request made of it by the General Conference. The Board took up the report at its March 1999 session and, inter alia, requested the Secretariat to prepare an action plan that took into account the conclusions and recommendations in the report, and the Board's discussion of the report. In August 1999, the Secretariat circulated a proposed Action Plan for

  17. Code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the Code of Conduct are, through the development, harmonization and implementation of national policies, laws and regulations, and through the fostering of international co-operation, to: (i) achieve and maintain a high level of safety and security of radioactive sources; (ii) prevent unauthorized access or damage to, and loss, theft or unauthorized transfer of, radioactive sources, so as to reduce the likelihood of accidental harmful exposure to such sources or the malicious use of such sources to cause harm to individuals, society or the environment; and (iii) mitigate or minimize the radiological consequences of any accident or malicious act involving a radioactive source. These objectives should be achieved through the establishment of an adequate system of regulatory control of radioactive sources, applicable from the stage of initial production to their final disposal, and a system for the restoration of such control if it has been lost. This Code relies on existing international standards relating to nuclear, radiation, radioactive waste and transport safety and to the control of radioactive sources. It is intended to complement existing international standards in these areas. The Code of Conduct serves as guidance in general issues, legislation and regulations, regulatory bodies as well as import and export of radioactive sources. A list of radioactive sources covered by the code is provided which includes activities corresponding to thresholds of categories

  18. Code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the Code of Conduct are, through the development, harmonization and implementation of national policies, laws and regulations, and through the fostering of international co-operation, to: (i) achieve and maintain a high level of safety and security of radioactive sources; (ii) prevent unauthorized access or damage to, and loss, theft or unauthorized transfer of, radioactive sources, so as to reduce the likelihood of accidental harmful exposure to such sources or the malicious use of such sources to cause harm to individuals, society or the environment; and (iii) mitigate or minimize the radiological consequences of any accident or malicious act involving a radioactive source. These objectives should be achieved through the establishment of an adequate system of regulatory control of radioactive sources, applicable from the stage of initial production to their final disposal, and a system for the restoration of such control if it has been lost. This Code relies on existing international standards relating to nuclear, radiation, radioactive waste and transport safety and to the control of radioactive sources. It is intended to complement existing international standards in these areas. The Code of Conduct serves as guidance in general issues, legislation and regulations, regulatory bodies as well as import and export of radioactive sources. A list of radioactive sources covered by the code is provided which includes activities corresponding to thresholds of categories.

  19. Outlines on data base for the use of radioactive sources, and environmental impact in egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, A M; Amin, E; El-Said, Kh M [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, AEA Cairo (Egypt); Gomaa, M A [Reactors Division Nuclear Research Center, AEA Cairo, (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Radio isotopes and radioactive sources have shown increase applications in scientific research, agriculture, medicine and industry. The prime concern in regulating activities involving the release of radioactive materials into the environment, is ensuring the safety of individuals and population. The management of radioactive wastes generated from medical centers, research institutes, industrial facilities, mining operations, and research reactors caused serious accidents. Radiation sources mismanagement resulted in injuries or fatalities to individuals. The objectives of this work is to develop the required data base and establish the necessary rules for safe management of radioactive sources. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Temporary Operational Protocol for making safe and managing Orphaned or Seized Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This protocol outlines the arrangements to manage the safe interim storage of an orphaned radioactive source or of a source identified for seizure, pending its ultimate disposal. Such sources may be sources found outside of regulatory control, detected at a frontier or seized in the public interest. This includes a radioactive source arising from a CBRN, chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, incident, following neutralisation of any associated dispersal device and confirmation of the suspect object as radioactive. The arrangements in this protocol are meant to be consistent with and used in conjunction with relevant protocols to the Major Emergency Framework Document and may be revisited as necessary as those protocols are further developed

  1. Assessment on security system of radioactive sources used in hospitals of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitbanjong, Petchara; Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong

    2016-01-01

    Unsecured radioactive sources have caused deaths and serious injuries in many parts of the world. In Thailand, there are 17 hospitals that use teletherapy with cobalt-60 radioactive sources. They need to be secured in order to prevent unauthorized removal, sabotage and terrorists from using such materials in a radiological weapon. The security system of radioactive sources in Thailand is regulated by the Office of Atoms for Peace in compliance with Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), U.S. DOE, which has started to be implemented since 2010. This study aims to perform an assessment on the security system of radioactive sources used in hospitals in Thailand and the results can be used as a recommended baseline data for development or improvement of hospitals on the security system of a radioactive source at a national regulatory level and policy level. Results from questionnaires reveal that in 11 out of 17 hospitals (64.70%), there were a few differences in conditions of hospitals using radioactive sources with installation of the security system and those without installation of the security system. Also, personals working with radioactive sources did not clearly understand the nuclear security law. Thus, government organizations should be encouraged to arrange trainings on nuclear security to increase the level of understanding. In the future, it is recommended that the responsible government organization issues a minimum requirement of nuclear security for every medical facility using radioactive sources.

  2. Assessment on security system of radioactive sources used in hospitals of Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitbanjong, Petchara, E-mail: petcharajit@gmail.com; Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong [Nuclear Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, 254 Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2016-01-22

    Unsecured radioactive sources have caused deaths and serious injuries in many parts of the world. In Thailand, there are 17 hospitals that use teletherapy with cobalt-60 radioactive sources. They need to be secured in order to prevent unauthorized removal, sabotage and terrorists from using such materials in a radiological weapon. The security system of radioactive sources in Thailand is regulated by the Office of Atoms for Peace in compliance with Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), U.S. DOE, which has started to be implemented since 2010. This study aims to perform an assessment on the security system of radioactive sources used in hospitals in Thailand and the results can be used as a recommended baseline data for development or improvement of hospitals on the security system of a radioactive source at a national regulatory level and policy level. Results from questionnaires reveal that in 11 out of 17 hospitals (64.70%), there were a few differences in conditions of hospitals using radioactive sources with installation of the security system and those without installation of the security system. Also, personals working with radioactive sources did not clearly understand the nuclear security law. Thus, government organizations should be encouraged to arrange trainings on nuclear security to increase the level of understanding. In the future, it is recommended that the responsible government organization issues a minimum requirement of nuclear security for every medical facility using radioactive sources.

  3. The importance of governmental control of radioactive sources used in industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anna Firpo Fuerth, Q.F.; Beatriz Souto Ameigenda, Q.F.

    1998-01-01

    Industrial applications of radioactive sources require good management practices dealing with control and registration. In the following case, a special event occurred between two routine inspections: trading. Then a new human factor came into scene: workers with no specific training and knowledge related to radioactive sources. The up going situation triggered emergency procedures. Finally, there were no negative consequences. (author)

  4. Assessment on security system of radioactive sources used in hospitals of Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jitbanjong, Petchara; Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong

    2016-01-01

    Unsecured radioactive sources have caused deaths and serious injuries in many parts of the world. In Thailand, there are 17 hospitals that use teletherapy with cobalt-60 radioactive sources. They need to be secured in order to prevent unauthorized removal, sabotage and terrorists from using such materials in a radiological weapon. The security system of radioactive sources in Thailand is regulated by the Office of Atoms for Peace in compliance with Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), U.S. DOE, which has started to be implemented since 2010. This study aims to perform an assessment on the security system of radioactive sources used in hospitals in Thailand and the results can be used as a recommended baseline data for development or improvement of hospitals on the security system of a radioactive source at a national regulatory level and policy level. Results from questionnaires reveal that in 11 out of 17 hospitals (64.70%), there were a few differences in conditions of hospitals using radioactive sources with installation of the security system and those without installation of the security system. Also, personals working with radioactive sources did not clearly understand the nuclear security law. Thus, government organizations should be encouraged to arrange trainings on nuclear security to increase the level of understanding. In the future, it is recommended that the responsible government organization issues a minimum requirement of nuclear security for every medical facility using radioactive sources

  5. Las fallas en la ingeniería de requisitos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey Westfall

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recientemente, la Ingeniería de Requisitos ha cobrado una importancia cada vez mayor en la academia y en la industria, debido a que se espera que los productos software de este siglo proporcionen funciones cada vez más centradas en el usuario y de mayor calidad y seguridad. Por lo tanto, es importante comprender las situaciones en las que la práctica actual de la Ingeniería de Requisitos –IR– no funciona adecuadamente. Este documento presenta los resultados de una investigación acerca de las prácticas de IR. Se realizó a través de encuesta web y se focalizó en las técnicas de elicitación de requisitos y en las técnicas de representación de requisitos que los encuestados utilizan. A pesar de que los resultados son el reporte acerca del estado del arte de la Ingeniería de Requisitos para la población que respondió la encuesta, es probable que también refleje el estado del arte de la IR en todo el mundo.

  6. Safety considerations in the disposal of disused sealed radioactive sources in borehole facilities

    CERN Document Server

    International Atomic Energ Agency. Vienna

    2003-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are used in medicine, industry and research for a wide range of purposes. They can contain different radionuclides in greatly varying amounts. At the end of their useful lives, they are termed 'disused sources' but their activity levels can still be quite high. They are, for all practical purposes, another type of radioactive waste that needs to be disposed of safely. Disused sealed radioactive sources can represent a significant hazard to people if not managed properly. Many countries have no special facilities for the management or disposal of radioactive waste, as they have no nuclear power programmes requiring such facilities. Even in countries with developed nuclear programmes, disused sealed sources present problems as they often fall outside the common categories of radioactive waste for which disposal options have been identified. As a result, many disused sealed sources are kept in storage. Depending on the nature of the storage arrangements, this situation may represent a ...

  7. Establishment of radioactive source retirement mechanism based on the method of environmental liability insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    The retirement of radioactive source is a difficult problem that we are facing during the radiation safety regulation in China. This paper analyses the reason of the problem regarding the retirement of radioactive source both from the utilization units and the regulatory body. It is considered that the basic reason is the enterprises don't arrange and use the retirement funds reasonably, which is an economic problem. There exists a limitation when facing the radioactive source retirement in light of licensing and regulation mechanism of the manufacture, selling, uses of radioactive sources in China, and the key to solve this economic problem is to introduce economic method, Some measures and suggestions are given to establish radioactive sources retirement mechanism by using economic methods, based on the comprehensive analysis of the concept, development and function of the environmental liability insurance. (author)

  8. Spallation neutron source target design for radioactive waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    The disposal of high-level radioactive waste has long been one of the most serious problems facing the nuclear industry. Transmutation of this waste through particle bombardment has been suggested numerous times as a possible method of enhancing the waste management process. Due to advances in accelerator technology, the feasibility of an accelerator based transmutation system has increased enough to allow serious investigation of this process. Therefore, in pursuit of this goal, an accelerator target was designed for use in an accelerator based transmutation system. The target design consists of an array of tantalum rods, cooled by liquid sodium, which are arranged in a cylindrical configuration 40 cm in diameter and 125 cm in height. Tantalum was chosen as the target material over tungsten, lead, bismuth, and a lead-bismuth alloy (55 w/o bismuth) due to a large neutron yield, low activation, low chemical toxicity, and the fact that it does not produce significant amounts of long-lived isotopes through spallation or activation. The target yields a neutron source of 29.7 neutrons/proton when exposed to a 1600 MeV proton beam, and is suitable for use with both thermal or fast spectrum transmutation systems

  9. Environmental radioactivity from natural, industrial, and military sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenbud, M.

    1987-01-01

    This document is the third edition of a book generally considered a standard in the field of radioactive materials in the environment. Topics include radiation protection standards, transport mechanisms, terrestrial and aquatic pathways, reprocessing of nuclear fuels, radioactive waste management, the fallout from nuclear explosions, nuclear accidents, and risk assessment

  10. Modelo de Proceso de Conceptualización de Requisitos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Hossian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El proceso de captura de requisitos constituye un proceso con connotaciones sociales relacionadas con diferentes personas (stakeholders, una circunstancia que hace que se presenten ciertos problemas cuando se lleva adelante la conceptualización de requisitos. En este trabajo se propone un Proceso de Conceptualización de Requisitos que se estructura en dos fases: (a Análisis Orientado a al Problema: cuyo objetivo es comprender el problema dado por el usuario en el dominio en el que este se lleva a cabo, y (b Análisis de Orientado al Producto: cuyo objetivo es obtener las funcionalidades que el usuario espera del producto de software a desarrollar, teniendo en cuenta la relación de estas con la realidad expresada por el usuario en su discurso. Se proponen seis técnicas que articulan cada una de las tareas que componen las fases de proceso propuesto.

  11. REASEM: Herramienta para la gestión de requisitos

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Maldonado, Jorge Eduardo; Urrego Giraldo, German; González Palacio, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    El proyecto del cual se deriva este artículo está enmarcado en dos áreas principales: la Ingeniería de Requisitos (IR) y los Sistemas Embebidos (SE), y tiene como objetivo el desarrollo de una herramienta que apoye la metodología ABC-Besoins-SEM, concebida para la gestión de requisitos de Sistemas Embebidos (SE), en la perspectiva de la conceptualización de sistemas ubicuos, con uso intensivo de componentes de hardware/software. Los aplicativos de IR existentes tienen algunas carencias, tales...

  12. The regulatory action in the problem of radioactive sources processed as scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, Walter Adrian; Cateriano, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-01

    The loss of control of a radioactive source can result in a radiological emergency, especially if that source is treated as scrap. This paper presents a case registered in Argentina about discovery of a radioactive source of Kr-85, 9.25 GBq, used in a computer for industrial measurement of thickness. The radioactive source, without registration or identification, was registered by a portal for detection of radioactive material in the middle of the scrap that entered daily in the oven of a important steel company. From there, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (RNA) conducted an investigation to determine the origin of the radioactive source, and in parallel made, in the laboratories of measurement, identification of radioactive material inside the source. This led to a company in financial and judicial bankruptcy, which had not notified the RNA about this situation, and also possessed, according to records, other eleven sources with similar characteristics. Finally the actions and regulatory effort allowed the localization of all the radioactive sources of this company, and its storage and deposit in an authorised repository

  13. Radioactive artifacts: historical sources of modern radium contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaufox, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radium has been distributed in a wide variety of devices during the early part of this century. Antique objects containing significant amounts of radium turn up at flea markets, antique shows, and antique dealers, in a variety of locations. These objects include radium in devices which were used by legitimate medical practitioners for legitimate medical purposes such as therapy, as well as a wide variety of quack cures. These devices may contain anywhere from a few nanocuries to as much as several hundred microcuries of radium. In addition to medical sources, a large variety of scientific instruments utilize radium in luminous dials. These instruments include compasses, azimuth indicators, and virtually any object which might require some form of calibration. In addition, the consumer market utilized a large amount of radium in the production of wrist watches, pocket watches, and clocks with luminous dials. Some of these watches contained as much as 4.5 microCi of radium, and between 1913 and 1920 about 70 gm was produced for the manufacture of luminous compounds. In addition to the large amount of radium produced for scientific and consumer utilization, there were a number of materials produced which were claimed to contain radium but in fact did not, further adding to the confusion in this area. The wide availability of radium is a result of the public's great fascination with radioactivity during the early part of this century and a belief in its curative properties. A number of objects were produced in order to trap the emanations of radium in water for persons to drink in order to benefit from their healing effects. Since the late 20s and early 30s the public's attitude towards radiation has shifted 180 degrees and it is now considered an extremely dangerous and harmful material

  14. Radioactive sources production in the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radosavljevic, B.; Nemoda, Dj.; Memedovic, T.; Bircanin, LJ.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1960, in the Laboratory for radioisotopes production of the Institute isotopes were produced for industrial, medical and research purposes. From the beginning, this activity was developed in two directions: 1. sealed sources, for industrial radiography, teletherapy Cobalt, later for lightning arresters, level meters, densitometers etc., 2. radioactive sources that need chemical treatment for different applications in industry and research. This paper lists the types of radioactive sources and methods for production [sr

  15. Experimental investigation of statistical density function of decaying radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salma, I.; Zemplen-Papp, E.

    1991-01-01

    The validity of the Poisson and the λ P(k) modified Poisson statistical density functions of observing k events in a short time interval is investigated experimentally in radioactive decay detection for various measuring times. The experiments to measure radioactive decay were performed with 89m Y, using a multichannel analyzer. According to the results, Poisson statistics adequately describes the counting experiment for short measuring times. (author) 13 refs.; 4 figs

  16. Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources. 2012 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    The IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, published as IAEA/CODEOC/2004 in January 2004, provides guidance on how States can safely and securely manage radioactive sources that may pose a significant risk. The concept of such an international undertaking on the safety and security of radioactive sources was highlighted in the major findings of the International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and Security of Radioactive Materials held in Dijon, France, in September 1998. Following that conference, the IAEA Board of Governors requested the Director General to initiate exploratory discussions relating to an international undertaking in the areas of the safety and security of radiation sources. This request was reflected in an Action Plan on the Safety of Radiation Sources and Security of Radioactive Materials, with the Secretariat organizing a series of open-ended meetings of technical and legal experts nominated by Member States to further explore the concept of such an undertaking. Noting comments made during meetings of the Board of Governors, the experts agreed that any international undertaking should, for the present, be in the form of a 'code of conduct'. The text of a Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources was accordingly developed. Steps to strengthen the provisions of the Code were subsequently initiated following the International Conference of National Regulatory Authorities with Competence in the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Material held in Buenos Aires in December 2000. Moreover, growing international concern about the security of radioactive sources after the events of 11 September 2001 led to a number of issues being considered further by technical and legal experts. Furthermore, the International Conference on Security of Radioactive Sources held in Vienna in March 2003 made recommendations regarding additional actions that might be needed. In

  17. Strengthening of safety and security of radioactive sources: new regulatory challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki M Lferde, H.; Moutia, Z. [Faculte des Sciences, Dept. de Physique, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-07-01

    The answer to these new regulatory challenges was given by implementation of divers measures aimed at strengthening of safety and security of radioactive sources and to prevent the malevolent use of radioactive sources. The international basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources (B.S.S.) require the establishment and implementation of security measures of radioactive sources to ensure that protection and safety requirements are met. The IAEA has engaged in an extensive effort to establish and/or strengthen national radiation protection and radiological safety infrastructure, including legislation and regulation, a regulatory authority empowered to authorize and inspect regulated activities, an adequate number of trained personnel and technical services that are beyond the capabilities required of the authorized legal persons. The Moroccan authority makes steady efforts to strengthen national radiation safety infrastructure by participating in IAEA model project for upgrading radiation protection infrastructure, to implement the revised version of code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources. Indeed, Morocco expressed its adhesion with the technical assistance project of the IAEA in 2001, carrying on the reinforcement of the national infrastructure of regulation and control of the radioactive materials. The control over radioactive sources is an essential element for maintaining high level of security and safety of radioactive sources. The IAEA T.E.C.-D.O.C.-1388 serves as reference document to implement the control culture. The security problems with which the world is confronted showed that the uses of radioactive sources should subject reinforcements of safety, of control and of security of the radioactive sources. For this purpose, the IAEA launched an action plan for the safety and security of radioactive sources. The IAEA guide Security of radioactive sources will help the

  18. Strengthening of safety and security of radioactive sources: new regulatory challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki M Lferde, H.; Moutia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The answer to these new regulatory challenges was given by implementation of divers measures aimed at strengthening of safety and security of radioactive sources and to prevent the malevolent use of radioactive sources. The international basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources (B.S.S.) require the establishment and implementation of security measures of radioactive sources to ensure that protection and safety requirements are met. The IAEA has engaged in an extensive effort to establish and/or strengthen national radiation protection and radiological safety infrastructure, including legislation and regulation, a regulatory authority empowered to authorize and inspect regulated activities, an adequate number of trained personnel and technical services that are beyond the capabilities required of the authorized legal persons. The Moroccan authority makes steady efforts to strengthen national radiation safety infrastructure by participating in IAEA model project for upgrading radiation protection infrastructure, to implement the revised version of code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources. Indeed, Morocco expressed its adhesion with the technical assistance project of the IAEA in 2001, carrying on the reinforcement of the national infrastructure of regulation and control of the radioactive materials. The control over radioactive sources is an essential element for maintaining high level of security and safety of radioactive sources. The IAEA T.E.C.-D.O.C.-1388 serves as reference document to implement the control culture. The security problems with which the world is confronted showed that the uses of radioactive sources should subject reinforcements of safety, of control and of security of the radioactive sources. For this purpose, the IAEA launched an action plan for the safety and security of radioactive sources. The IAEA guide Security of radioactive sources will help the

  19. Design and development of the network based system for the supervision of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yaoyun; Su Genghua; Zhang Hui; Li Junli; Zhu Li

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To help the environmental protection authorities to upgrade the management of the related organizations and radioactive sources and improve the information level of nuclear technology utilization's supervision. Methods: On the basis of investigation of requirements, the network based system for the supervision of radioactive sources was divided into application system and supervision system, based on MYSQL and SQL Server2005 respectively. Results: The system satisfied the current requirements of the nuclear technology utilization's supervision and is in nationwide operation. Conclusion: The system achieved the dynamic tracking management of radioactive sources and improved the efficiency and level of radiation safety supervision in nuclear technology utilizations. (authors)

  20. Controlling radioactive sources. Stronger 'cradle-to-grave' security needed, IAEA says

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This article highlights the IAEA activities in the field of radiation safety and security of radiation sources and other radioactive materials in its Member States. The IAEA has been active in lending its expertise to search out and secure orphaned sources in several countries. Additionally more than 70 States have joined with the IAEA to collect and share information on trafficking incidents and other unauthorized movements of radioactive sources and other radioactive materials. In March 2002 the IAEA Board of Governors approved a multi-faceted Action plan to Combat Nuclear Terrorism that includes upgrading radiation safety and security. One programme is designed to ensure that significant, uncontrolled radioactive sources are brought under regulatory control and properly secured by providing assistance to Member States in their efforts to identify, locate and secure or dispose of orphan sources

  1. Measures Against-Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear Materials and Other Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barakat, M.B.; Nassef, M.H.; El Mongy, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Since the early nineties, illicit trafficking (IT) of nuclear materials and radioactive sources appeared as a new trend which raised the concern of the international community due to the grave consequences that would merge if these materials or radioactive sources fell into the hands of terrorist groups. However, by the end of the last century illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and radioactive sources lost its considerable salience, in spite of seizure of considerable amounts of 2 '3'5U (76% enrichment) in Bulgaria (May 1999) and also 235 U (30% enrichment) in Georgia (April 2000). Nevertheless, IT should be always considered as a continued and viable threat to the international community. Awareness of the problem should be developed and maintained among concerned circles as the first step towards combating illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and radioactive sources. Illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials needs serious consideration and proper attention by the governmental law enforcement authorities. Measures to combat with IT of nuclear material or radioactive sources should be effective in recovery, of stolen, removed or lost nuclear materials or radioactive sources due to the failure of the physical protection system or the State System Accounting and Control (SSAC) system which are normally applied for protecting these materials against illegal actions. Measures such as use of modern and efficient radiation monitoring equipment at the borders inspection points, is an important step in preventing the illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials across the borders. Also providing radiological training to specific personnel and workers in this field will minimize the consequences of a radiological attack in case of its occurrence. There is a real need to start to enter into cooperative agreements to strengthen borders security under the umbrella of IAEA to faster as an international cooperation in the illicit trafficking

  2. Investigation on supervising and monitoring of major radioactive pollution source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yibing; Zhang Zongrang; Men Meng; Zhang Peng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: In order to optimize the supervisory monitoring proposal of the major radioactive enterprises. Methods: The authors have worked out the public doses within the range of 0-1 km as well as 1-2 km through monitoring analysis of the radioactive pollutant enterprises on the samples of its surrounding air, water, soil and organism. Results: Generally the pollutant range of the enterprises runs from 0 to 1.5 km. Conclusion: Unnecessary working hours can be shortened as long as we keep the routine supervisory monitor of pollutant enterprises within the range of 2 km. (authors)

  3. Storage of low-level radioactive waste and regulatory control of sealed sources in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Markkanen, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concentrated on the non nuclear low-level radioactive waste. The cornerstone for maintaining radioactive sources under control in Finland is that all practices involving sources are subject to authorization and all licensing information, including information on each individual source, are entered into a register which is continuously updated based on applications and notifications received from the licenses. Experiences during the past twenty years have shown that source-specific records of sources combined with regular inspections at the places of use have prevented efficiency losing control over sealed radioactive sources. The current capacity in the interim storage for State owned waste is not adequate for all used sealed sources and other small user waste which are currently kept in the possession of the licensees. Thus, expansion of the storage capacity and other options for taking care of the small user waste is under consideration. (N.C.)

  4. The design of radioactive source tracking management system based on RFID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongjun; Zhou Jianliang

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a solution of safety and security management system of radioactive source in storage and use by employing advanced RFID technology and computer database technology. And make some suggestions for further improvement. (authors)

  5. Order of 25 March 1981 concerning the approval of special form radioactive materials in sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This order determines the models of sealed sources which constitute special form radioactive materials within the meaning of the Order of 24 November 1977 concerning the characteristics of such materials. (NEA) [fr

  6. Method of preparing initial multilayer radioactive pellets in production of planar radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stopek, K.; Satorie, Z.

    1982-01-01

    A compact radioactive foil is placed into a press mould on a thin surface layer of compacted or powder metal and is covered with powder metal. In order to achieve the required dimension and activity the radioactive foil is cut from a large sheet. The multilayer pellet is compacted and rolled using routine methods applied in powder metallurgy. This method excludes the possibility of destroying the active pellet during handling, improves its mechanical properties and is seven times less time demanding than methods used so far. (M.D.)

  7. Code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The objective of this Code is to achieve and maintain a high level of safety and security of radioactive sources through the development, harmonization and enforcement of national policies, laws and regulations, and through tile fostering of international co-operation. In particular, this Code addresses the establishment of an adequate system of regulatory control from the production of radioactive sources to their final disposal, and a system for the restoration of such control if it has been lost.

  8. Approaches to assign security levels for radioactive substances and radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, M.V.; Petrovskij, N.P.; Pinchuk, G.N.; Telkov, S.N.; Kuzin, V.V.

    2011-01-01

    The article contains analyzed provisions on categorization of radioactive substances and radiation sources according to the extent of their potential danger. Above provisions are used in the IAEA documents and in Russian regulatory documents for differentiation of regulatory requirements to physical security. It is demonstrated that with the account of possible threats of violators, rules of physical protection of radiation sources and radioactive substances should be amended as regards the approaches to assign their categories and security levels [ru

  9. Code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    The objective of this Code is to achieve and maintain a high level of safety and security of radioactive sources through the development, harmonization and enforcement of national policies, laws and regulations, and through tile fostering of international co-operation. In particular, this Code addresses the establishment of an adequate system of regulatory control from the production of radioactive sources to their final disposal, and a system for the restoration of such control if it has been lost

  10. Use of radioactive sources in measuring characteristics of snowpacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry W. Anderson; Philip M. McDonald; Lloyd W. Gay

    1963-01-01

    Use of radioactive probes inserted in mountain snowpacks may make possible more accurate appraisal and prediction of snowmelt water. Commercially available gamma and neutron probes were tested for their ability to measure snow density, ice lenses, and the thermal quality of individual layers in the snowpack.

  11. Uranium Glass: A Glowing Alternative to Conventional Sources of Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Roeland

    2017-01-01

    There is a relatively simple way of using radioactive material in classroom experiments: uranium glass, which provides teachers with a suitable substance. By using the right computer software and a radiation sensor, it can be demonstrated that uranium glass emits radiation at a greater rate than the background radiation and with the aid of UV…

  12. Methodology for safety and security of radioactive sources and materials. The Israeli approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keren, M.

    1998-01-01

    About 10 Radioactive incidents occurred in Israel during 1996-1997. Some of them were theft or lost of Radioactive equipment or sources, some happened because misuse of Radioactive equipment and some of other reasons. Part of them could be eliminated if a better methodological attitude to the subject existed. A new methodology for notification, registration and licensing is described. Hopefully this methodology will increase defense in depth and the Safety and Security of Radioactive sources and materials. Information on the inventory of Radioactive sources and materials is essential. Where they are situated, what is the supply rate or all history from berth to grave. Persons involved are important: Who are the Radiation Safety Officers (RSO), what is their training and updating programs. As much as possible information on the site and places where those Radioactive sources and materials are used. Procedures for security of sources and materials is part of site information, beside safety precautions. Users are obliged to inform on any changes and to ask for confirmation to those changes. The same is when high activity sources are moved across the country. (author)

  13. Regulatory Oversight of Radioactive Sources through the Integrated Management of Safety and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) has full regulatory competence; its mission is to oversee the safety and security of all the peaceful applications of atomic energy. All the radioactive sources having activity above the exemption level is registered and licensed both from safety and security points of view. The Hungarian central register of radioactive sources contains about 7,000 radioactive sources and 450 license holders. In order to use its limited resources the HAEA has decided to introduce an integrated regulatory oversight programme. Accordingly, during the licensing process and inspection activities the HAEA intends to assess both safety and security aspects at the same time. The article describes the Hungarian the various applications of radioactive materials, and summarizes the preparation activities of the HAEA. (author)

  14. Inventory and categorization of radioactive sources in the CDTN, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Fabio; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive sources have wide application, in the medicine, industry, agriculture and in the research centers. After the use those sources are considered radioactive wastes and conducted to the CNEN research institutes, that have the legal responsibility to receive and control. The safe attribution of wasted sources is essential for minimizing the possibility oc accident occurrence. The data of the stored sources in the CDTN are included and processed in the data bank SISFONT - Sistema de Informacoes sobre Fontes Seladas Fora de Uso, but this system does not allow their categorization. For that, a efficient, precise and easy interaction categorization system was developed

  15. Current status of securing Category 1 and 2 radioactive sources in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Y-F.; Tsai, C-H. [Atomic Energy Council of Executive Yuan of Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    For enhancing safe and secure management of Category 1 and 2 radioactive sources against theft or unauthorized removal, AEC (Atomic Energy Council) of Taiwan have been regulating the import/export of the sources ever since 2005, in compliance with the IAEA's (International Atomic Energy Agency) 'Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources'. Furthermore in consulting the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No.11 report, administrative regulations on the program of securing the sources have been embodied into AECL's regulatory system since 2012, for the purpose of enforcing medical and non-medical licensees and industrial radiographers to establish their own radioactive source security programs. Regulations require that security functions such as access control, detection, delay, response and communication and security management measures are to be implemented within the programs. This paper is to introduce the current status in implementing the security control measures in Taiwan. (author)

  16. Safety considerations in the disposal of disused sealed radioactive sources in borehole facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are used in medicine, industry and research for a wide range of purposes. They can contain different radionuclides in greatly varying amounts. At the end of their useful lives, they are termed 'disused sources' but their activity levels can still be quite high. They are, for all practical purposes, another type of radioactive waste that needs to be disposed of safely. Disused sealed radioactive sources can represent a significant hazard to people if not managed properly. Many countries have no special facilities for the management or disposal of radioactive waste, as they have no nuclear power programmes requiring such facilities. Even in countries with developed nuclear programmes, disused sealed sources present problems as they often fall outside the common categories of radioactive waste for which disposal options have been identified. As a result, many disused sealed sources are kept in storage. Depending on the nature of the storage arrangements, this situation may represent a high potential risk to workers and to the public. The IAEA has received numerous requests for assistance from Member States faced with the problem of safely managing disused sealed sources. The requests have related to both technical and safety aspects. Particularly urgent requests have involved emergency situations arising from unsafe storage conditions and lost sources. There is therefore an important requirement for the development of safe and cost-effective final disposal solutions. Consequently, a number of activities have been initiated by the IAEA to assist Member States in the management of disused sealed sources. The objective of this report is to address safety issues relevant to the disposal of disused sealed sources, and other limited amounts of radioactive waste, in borehole facilities. It is the first in a series of reports aiming to provide an indication of the present issues related to the use of borehole disposal facilities to safely disposal

  17. The Net Enabled Waste Management Database as an international source of radioactive waste management information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csullog, G.W.; Friedrich, V.; Miaw, S.T.W.; Tonkay, D.; Petoe, A.

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA's Net Enabled Waste Management Database (NEWMDB) is an integral part of the IAEA's policies and strategy related to the collection and dissemination of information, both internal to the IAEA in support of its activities and external to the IAEA (publicly available). The paper highlights the NEWMDB's role in relation to the routine reporting of status and trends in radioactive waste management, in assessing the development and implementation of national systems for radioactive waste management, in support of a newly developed indicator of sustainable development for radioactive waste management, in support of reporting requirements for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, in support of IAEA activities related to the harmonization of waste management information at the national and international levels and in relation to the management of spent/disused sealed radioactive sources. (author)

  18. Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and the Supplementary Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In operative paragraph 4 of its resolution GC(47)/RES/7.B, the General Conference, having welcomed the approval by the Board of Governors of the revised IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources (GC(47)/9), and while recognizing that the Code is not a legally binding instrument, urged each State to write to the Director General that it fully supports and endorses the IAEA's efforts to enhance the safety and security of radioactive sources and is working toward following the guidance contained in the IAEA Code of Conduct. In operative paragraph 5, the Director General was requested to compile, maintain and publish a list of States that have made such a political commitment. The General Conference, in operative paragraph 6, recognized that this procedure 'is an exceptional one, having no legal force and only intended for information, and therefore does not constitute a precedent applicable to other Codes of Conduct of the Agency or of other bodies belonging to the United Nations system'. In operative paragraph 7 of resolution GC(48)/RES/10.D, the General Conference welcomed the fact that more than 60 States had made political commitments with respect to the Code in line with resolution GC(47)/RES/7.B and encouraged other States to do so. In operative paragraph 8 of resolution GC(48)/RES/10.D, the General Conference further welcomed the approval by the Board of Governors of the Supplementary Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources (GC(48)/13), endorsed this Guidance while recognizing that it is not legally binding, noted that more than 30 countries had made clear their intention to work towards effective import and export controls by 31 December 2005, and encouraged States to act in accordance with the Guidance on a harmonized basis and to notify the Director General of their intention to do so as supplementary information to the Code of Conduct, recalling operative paragraph 6 of resolution GC(47)/RES/7.B. 4. The

  19. Managing the risks of legacy radioactive sources from a security perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Mark; Murray, Allan

    2008-01-01

    The safety and security risk posed by highly radioactive, long-lived sources at the end of their normal use has not been consistently well-managed in previous decades. The Brazilian Cs-137 accident in 1986 and the Thailand Co-60 accident in 2000 are prime examples of the consequences that ensue from the loss of control of highly dangerous sources after their normal use. With the new international emphasis on security of radioactive sources throughout their life cycle, there is now further incentive to address the management of risks posed by legacy, highly dangerous radioactive sources. The ANSTO South-East Asia Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) Project has identified, and is addressing, a number of legacy situations that have arisen as a result of inadequate management practices in the past. Specific examples are provided of these legacy situations and the lessons learned for managing the consequent safety and security risk, and for future complete life-cycle management of highly radioactive sources. (author)

  20. Code of practice for the control and safe handling of radioactive sources used for therapeutic purposes (1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Code is intended as a guide to safe practices in the use of sealed and unsealed radioactive sources and in the management of patients being treated with them. It covers the procedures for the handling, preparation and use of radioactive sources, precautions to be taken for patients undergoing treatment, storage and transport of radioactive sources within a hospital or clinic, and routine testing of sealed sources [fr

  1. Predicting induced radioactivity for the accelerator operations at the Taiwan Photon Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, R J; Jiang, S H

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of induced radioactivity due to the operations of a 3-GeV electron accelerator at the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS). According to the beam loss analysis, the authors set two representative irradiation conditions for the activation analysis. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been used to predict the isotope inventories, residual activities, and remanent dose rates as a function of time. The calculation model itself is simple but conservative for the evaluation of induced radioactivity in a light source facility. This study highlights the importance of beam loss scenarios and demonstrates the great advantage of using FLUKA in comparing the predicted radioactivity with corresponding regulatory limits. The calculated results lead to the conclusion that, due to fairly low electron consumption, the radioactivity induced in the accelerator components and surrounding concrete walls of the TPS is rather moderate and manageable, while the possible activation of air and cooling water in the tunnel and their environmental releases are negligible.

  2. Design and tests of a package for the transport of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paulo de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    The Type A package was designed for transportation of seven cobalt-60 sources with total activity of 1 GBq. The shield thickness to accomplish the dose rate and the transport index established by the radioactive transport regulation was calculated by the code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5). The sealed cobalt-60 sources were tested for leakages. according to the regulation ISO 9978:1992 (E). The package was tested according to regulation Radioactive Material Transport CNEN. The leakage tests results pf the sources, and the package tests demonstrate that the transport can be safe performed from the CDTN to the steelmaking industries

  3. Safety assessment of borehole disposal of unwanted radioactive sealed sources in Egypt using Goldsim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, John Russell; Mattie, Patrick D.

    2004-01-01

    A radioactive sealed source is any radioactive material that is encased in a capsule designed to prevent leakage or escape of the radioactive material. Radioactive sealed sources are used for a wide variety of applications at hospitals, in manufacturing and research. Typical uses are in portable gauges to measure soil compaction and moisture or to determine physical properties of rocks units in boreholes (well logging). Hospitals and clinics use radioactive sealed sources for teletherapy and brachytherapy. Oil exploration and medicine are the largest users. Accidental mismanagement of radioactive sealed sources each year results in a large number of people receiving very high or even fatal does of ionizing radiation. Deliberate mismanagement is a growing international concern. Sealed sources must be managed and disposed effectively in order to protect human health and the environment. Effective national safety and management infrastructures are prerequisites for efficient and safe transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal. The Integrated Management Program for Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt (IMPRSS) is a cooperative development agreement between the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA), Egyptian Ministry of Health (MOH), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the University of New Mexico (UNM), and Agriculture Cooperative Development International (ACDI/VOCA). The EAEA, teaming with SNL, is conducting a Preliminary Safety Assessment (PSA) of an intermediate-depth borehole disposal in thick arid alluvium in Egypt based on experience with the U.S. Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD). Goldsim has been selected for the preliminary disposal system assessment for the Egyptian GCD Study. The results of the PSA will then be used to decide if Egypt desires to implement such a disposal system

  4. Avoiding radiation exposure while training to locate a radioactive source: a virtual reality exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marins, E.R.; Cotelli do Espírito Santo, A.; Abreu Mól, A. C. de; Cunha, G.; Landau, L.

    2015-01-01

    A technician undergoing radioprotection training must learn to use radiation detectors. Practical exercises involve being near to radiation sources. The work here presented reduces the exposure to individuals using a virtual environment to achieve preliminary apprenticeship prior using real radioactive sources. (authors)

  5. Search for lost or orphan radioactive sources based on Nal gamma spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Within recent decades many radioactive sources have been lost, stolen, or abandoned, and some have caused contamination or irradiation of people. Therefore reliable methods for source recovery are needed. The use of car borne NaI(Tl) detectors is discussed. Standard processing of spectra in general...

  6. Determination of activation level energy of nuclear isomers by calibration of microspectra of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veres, A.; Pavlicsek, I.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear isomers with unknown activation level were irradiated by calibrated radioactive sources. The integral cross sections were calculated for different energies of the sources. The activation energy was given by values coinciding with each other within the limits of error. The method made the determination of the unknown level of 1180+-10 keV of 195 Pt nucleus possible. (author)

  7. Order No 485 on the use of unsealed radioactive sources in hospitals, laboratories, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This Order, made in furtherance of an Order of 20 Novembre 1975 concerning safety precautions in the use of radioactive substances, implements in Directive 80/836/Euratom on radiation protection. It lays down a licensing system for the purchase and use of unsealed radioactive sources and also provides for their storage and disposal. The National Board of Health is the licensing authority. The Order also prescribes radiation protection measures for laboratory personnel [fr

  8. Activity determination of the Am-241 sources from radioactive lightning rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minematsu, Denise; Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Ferreira, Robson de Jesus

    2009-01-01

    The authorization for manufacture commerce and installation of radioactive lightning rods, in Brazil, was lifted in 1989 by the National Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN (Resolution no 4/89). Since this date, these devices have been replaced and have been sent to the Institutes subordinated to the CNEN, amongst them the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN-CNEN/SP. Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory - RWML of the IPEN - CNEN/SP had received, approximately, 16,000 units up to the end of 2008. The radioactive lightning rod is constituted in its majority, for a central metallic rod, where two or three metallic plates are mounted. In these plates, on average, six Am-241 sources are fixed. The process used for the radioactive lightning rods treatment is the dismantling of the device and the withdrawal of the sources from the metallic plates. The activity values of the lightning rods sources, supplied by the manufacturers, vary from two to three orders of magnitude and therefore it is necessary to characterize these sources. This paper describes the methodology used to measure the actual activity of each Am-241 sources extracted from the radioactive lightning rods. The first step was to sample tens of Am-241 sources and carry out the activity measurements for further use in the system calibration. The equipment used in this first stage was a gamma spectrometer, previously calibrated with an Am-241 standard source, in agreement with the same arrangement and same geometry in the measures of the sources. Results show that there are sources with similar activity values of those supplied by the manufacturers, but there are also sources with no activity - or also activity very low compared with the expected value -, as well as sources contend other radionuclides. (author)

  9. REQUISITOS DAS NORMAS DE UM SGI VERSUS REQUISITOS DOS CLIENTES: Um estudo de caso em uma empresa do ramo offshore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Barcellos de Jesus Targueta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho apresenta os resultados de uma pesquisa qualitativa realizada em uma empresa de inspeção, manutenção e reparo de equipamentos que acumulam pressão e de equipamentos destinados à segurança da região Norte do Estado do Rio de Janeiro que, por força de mercado, decidiu implantar um sistema integrado de gestão da qualidade com base nas NBR’s ISO 9001:2008, 14001:2004(Sistema de Gestão Ambiental e OHSAS 18001:2007(Segurança e Saúde. Nesta pesquisa, buscou-se confrontar os requisitos dos principais clientes com os requisitos das normas a fim de verificar se a adoção das mesmas tornaria a organização capaz de atender plenamente aos requisitos dos clientes. A análise demonstrou que a certificação de uma empresa pode não ser suficiente para a plena satisfação de seus clientes.

  10. Safety and security of radioactive sources in industrial radiography in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollah, A. S.; Nazrul, M. Abdullah [Industrial Inspection Service Limited, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2013-07-01

    Malicious use of radioactive sources can involve dispersal of that material through an explosive device. There has been recognition of the threat posed by the potential malicious misuse of NDT radioactive source by terrorists. The dispersal of radioactive material using conventional explosives, referred to as a 'dirty bomb', could create considerable panic, disruption and area access denial in an urban environment. However, as it is still a relatively new topic among regulators, users, and transport and storage operators worldwide, international assistance and cooperation in developing the necessary regulatory and security infrastructure is required. The most important action in reducing the risk of radiological terrorism is to increase the security of radioactive sources. This paper presents safety and security considerations for the transport and site storage of the industrial radiography sources as per national regulations entitled 'Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Rules-1997'.The main emphasis was put on the stages of some safety and security actions in order to prevent theft, sabotage or other malicious acts during the transport of the packages. As a conclusion it must be mentioned that both safety and security considerations are very important aspects that must be taking in account for the transport and site storage of radioactive sources used in the practice of industrial radiography. (authors)

  11. Lesson Learned from Conditioning of Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources (DSRS) in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nik Marzukee Nik Ibrahim; Mohd Abdul Wahab Yusof; Norasalwa Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the conditioning of disused sealed radioactive source (DSRS) in Malaysia. In Malaysia, sealed radioactive sources (SRS) are widely used in Malaysia especially in industry, medicine and research. Once SRS are no longer in use, they are declared disused and managed as radioactive waste. In order to reduce the risk associated with disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRS), the first priority would be to bring them under appropriate controls. This paper describes the experience developed and activities performed by Nuclear Malaysia throughout the period in conditioning of DSRS as well as future programme to further enhancing the infrastructure. Collaborative efforts with the various relevant groups such as Loji and Prototaip Development Centre (PDC) and Industrial Technology Division (BTI) provide an effective avenue in ensuring successful implementation of the programme. Currently, until August 2015, Malaysia has in possession about 12,154 unit of DSRS categories 3-5 and 4 units of DSRS category 2 sources which being stored at the interim storage facility Nuclear Malaysia. A national activity was implemented for the on-the-job training of personnel tasked with the conditioning of DSRS, at the Waste Technology Development Centre (WasTeC) facilities. This is part of -cradle-to-grave- control of radioactive sources to protect the workers and public from the hazards of ionizing radiation. (author)

  12. Safety and security of radioactive sources in industrial radiography in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A. S.; Nazrul, M. Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Malicious use of radioactive sources can involve dispersal of that material through an explosive device. There has been recognition of the threat posed by the potential malicious misuse of NDT radioactive source by terrorists. The dispersal of radioactive material using conventional explosives, referred to as a 'dirty bomb', could create considerable panic, disruption and area access denial in an urban environment. However, as it is still a relatively new topic among regulators, users, and transport and storage operators worldwide, international assistance and cooperation in developing the necessary regulatory and security infrastructure is required. The most important action in reducing the risk of radiological terrorism is to increase the security of radioactive sources. This paper presents safety and security considerations for the transport and site storage of the industrial radiography sources as per national regulations entitled 'Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Rules-1997'.The main emphasis was put on the stages of some safety and security actions in order to prevent theft, sabotage or other malicious acts during the transport of the packages. As a conclusion it must be mentioned that both safety and security considerations are very important aspects that must be taking in account for the transport and site storage of radioactive sources used in the practice of industrial radiography. (authors)

  13. Sources and fate of environmental radioactivity at the earth's surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Daoushy, F.

    2010-01-01

    Sources and fate of environmental radioactivity at the earth surface This is to link environmental radioactivity to RP in Africa? To describe the benefits of Africa from this field in terms of RP, safety and security policies. To create a mission and a vision to fulfil the needs of ONE PEOPLE, ONE GOAL, ONE FAITH. Sources, processes and fate of environmental radioactivity Previous experience helps setting up an African agenda.(1) Factors influencing cosmogenic radionuclides(2) Factors influencing artificial radionuclides: (a) nuclear weapon-tests (b) nuclear accidents (c) Energy, mining and industrial waste (3) Factors influencing the global Rn-222 and its daughters. (4) Dynamics of cycles of natural radioactivity, e.g. Pb-210. (5) Environmental radiotracers act as DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS to assess air and water quality and impacts of the atmospheric and hydrospheric compartments on ecosystems.6) Definition of base-lines for rehabilitation and protection. Climate influences sources/behaviour/fate of environmental radioactivity. Impacts on life forms in Africa would be severe. Assessing environmental radioactivity resolves these issue

  14. Securing radioactive sources into disuse, NORM, management, security assessment, exclusion, exemption and clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastidas Pazmino, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Ecuadorian Atomic Energy Commission, through the unity of Radiation Protection Services, with the area of Radioactive Waste Management, has made the study of disused radioactive sources at the national level and are kept in the Temporary Storage of Radioactive Waste; has been made joint efforts with the Department of Energy of the United States for the repatriation of sources originating in that country; similarly, the use of radioactive materials in medicine, industry and research has had a significant increase in the country in the recent years, resulting in the generation of radioactive wastes requiring proper management, to ensure protection to human health and the environment now and into the future. Ecuador, through the Ecuadorian Atomic Energy Commission ensures that the Radioactive Waste Management is done by ensuring an adequate level of protection to human beings and the environment, seeks to meet the objectives of protection of human health, environmental protection, protection beyond national borders; protection of future generations; charges imposed on future generations; national legal framework; control of the production of radioactive wastes; unit interplay between production and radioactive waste management; security installations; in the same way within this framework are the NORM of which has been carried out preliminary studies in the Ecuador Orient, which is part of the lung that Amazon uses oxygen to the whole world, have been submitted NORM as a result of oil hidden within the operation, which has presented measures of exposure high inlays within hose from the wells operating and currently looking to move to the next stage, which are considering different alternatives for managing radioactive waste as more appropriate. (author)

  15. Ion sources for initial use at the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use the 25-MV tandem accelerator for the acceleration of radioactive ion beams to energies appropriate for research in nuclear physics; negative ion beams are, therefore, required for injection into the tandem accelerator. Because charge exchange is an efficient means for converting initially positive ion beams to negative ion beams, both positive and negative ion sources are viable options for use at the facility; the choice of the type of ion source will depend on the overall efficiency for generating the radioactive species of interest. A high-temperature version of the CERN-ISOLDE positive ion source has been selected and a modified version of the source designed and fabricated for initial use at the HRIBF because of its low emittance, relatively high ionization efficiencies and species versatility, and because it has been engineered for remote installation, removal and servicing as required for safe handling in a high-radiation-level ISOL facility. Prototype plasma-sputter negative ion sources and negative surfaceionization sources are also under design consideration for generating negative radioactive ion beams from high electron-affinity elements. A brief review of the HRIBF will be presented, followed by a detailed description of the design features, operational characteristics, ionization efficiencies, and beam qualities (emittances) of these sources

  16. Revised IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    The revised Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources is aimed primarily at Governments, with the objective of achieving and maintaining a high level of safety and security of radioactive sources through the development, harmonization and enforcement of national policies, laws and regulations; and through the fostering of international co-operation. It focuses on sealed radioactive sources and provides guidance on legislation, regulations and the regulatory body, and import/export controls. Nuclear materials (except for sources containing 239Pu), as defined in the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials, are not covered by the revised Code, nor are radioactive sources within military or defence programmes. An earlier version of the Code was published by IAEA in 2001. At that time, agreement was not reached on a number of issues, notably those relating to the creation of comprehensive national registries for radioactive sources, obligations of States exporting radioactive sources, and the possibility of unilateral declarations of support. The need to further consider these and other issues was highlighted by the events of 11th September 2001. Since then, the IAEA's Secretariat has been working closely with Member States and relevant International Organizations to achieve consensus. The text of the revised Code was finalized at a meeting of technical and legal experts in August 2003, and it was submitted to IAEA's Board of Governors for approval in September 2003, with a recommendation that the IAEA General Conference adopt it and encourage its wide implementation. The IAEA General Conference, in September 2003, endorsed the revised Code and urged States to work towards following the guidance contained within it. This paper summarizes the history behind the revised Code, its content and the outcome of the discussions within the IAEA Board of Governors and General Conference. (Author) 8 refs

  17. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  18. Radioactivity measurements of metallic 192Ir sources by calorimetric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genka, Tsuguo; Iwamoto, Seikichi; Takeuchi, Norio

    1992-01-01

    The necessity of establishing the traceability of dose measurement in brachytherapy 192 Ir sources is realized by physicians and researchers in the medical field. Standard sources of various shapes such as open-quotes hairpin,close quotes open-quotes single pin,close quotes open-quotes thin wire,close quotes and open-quotes seedclose quotes for calibrating ionization chambers in hospitals are being demanded. Nominal activities of not only these source products but also the standard sources have been so far specified by open-quotes apparentclose quotes values. Determination of open-quotes absoluteclose quotes activity by an established means such as 4pi-beta-gamma coincidence counting is not practical because quantitative dissolution of metallic iridium is very difficult. We tried to determine the open-quotes absoluteclose quotes activity by a calorimetric method in a fully nondestructive way

  19. A combined thermal dissociation and electron impact ionization source for radioactive ion beam generationa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Williams, C.

    1996-01-01

    The probability for simultaneously dissociating and efficiently ionizing the individual atomic constituents of molecular feed materials with conventional, hot-cathode, electron-impact ion sources is low and consequently, the ion beams from these sources often appear as mixtures of several molecular sideband beams. This fragmentation process leads to dilution of the intensity of the species of interest for radioactive ion beam (RIB) applications where beam intensity is at a premium. We have conceived an ion source that combines the excellent molecular dissociation properties of a thermal dissociator and the high ionization efficiency characteristics of an electron impact ionization source that will, in principle, overcome this handicap. The source concept will be evaluated as a potential candidate for use for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The design features and principles of operation of the source are described in this article. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  20. Comparison of public exposures from different sources of radioactive contamination in recent years in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokal, B.; Krizman, M.

    2003-01-01

    In spite of that Slovenia is a small country it contains a considerable variety of radioactive sources, which cause radioactive contamination of the environment. These sources mostly belong to nuclear fuel cycle, as the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant, the Zirovski vrh Uranium Mine (in the decommissioning), the TRIGA Research Reactor and Central low and intermediate level radioactive waste storage. Some other technological enhanced natural radiation sources, for example, the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant have also an impact to the environment. The comparison of the public exposure due to various sources of radioactive releases to the exposure of a members of the public in Slovenia shows that the critical group in the vicinity of the Zirovski Vrh uranium mine is the most exposed one in Slovenia. The global contamination due to the Chernobyl accident and the past nuclear tests was estimated to be around 10 μSv in Slovenia while the estimated annual dose for all other radioactive facilities are in the order of magnitude of one μSv. In this review the releases from the hospitals are not reported but some studies showed that it is not negligible. (authors)

  1. Regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials: The UK position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englefield, C.; Holyoak, B.; Ledgerwood, K.; Littlewood, K.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the organizations involved in the regulation of the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials across the UK. The safety of radiation sources is within the regulatory remit of the Health and Safety Executive, under the Health and safety of Work Act 1974 and associated regulations. Any employer using radiation sources has a statutory duty to comply with this legislation, thereby protecting workers and the public from undue risk. From a radioactive waste management perspective, the storage and use of radioactive materials and the accumulation and disposal of radioactive waste are regulated by the environment agencies of England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993. Special regulatory arrangements apply to nuclear sites, such as power stations and fuel cycle plants, and some additional bodies are involved in the regulation of the security of fissile materials. An explanation is given in the paper as to how these organizations to work together to provide a comprehensive and effective regulatory regime. An overview of how these regulators have recently started to work more closely with other enforcement bodies, such as the Police and Customs and Excise is also given, to illustrate the approach that is being applied in the UK to deal with orphan sources and illicit trafficking. (author)

  2. The safety of radiation sources and radioactive materials in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the present infrastructure for the safety of radiation sources in China, where applications of radiation sources have become more and more widespread in the past years. In particular, it refers to the main functions of the National Nuclear Safety Administration of the State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA), which is acting as the regulatory body for nuclear and radiation safety at nuclear installations, the Ministry of Public Health which issues licences for the use of radiation sources, and the Ministry of Public Security, which deals with the security of radiation sources. The report also refers to the main requirements of the existing regulatory system for radiation safety, i.e. the basic dose limits for radiation workers and the public, the licensing system for nuclear installations and for radioisotope-based and other irradiation devices, and the environmental impact assessment system. Information on the nationwide survey of radiation sources carried out by SEPA in 1991 is provided, and on some accidents that occurred in China due to loss of control of radiation sources and errors in the operation of irradiation facilities. (author)

  3. The Belgian approach and status on the radiological surveillance of radioactive substances in metal scrap and non-radioactive waste and the financing of orphan sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeckeveldt, Marnix; Preter, Peter De; Michiels, Jan; Pepin, Stephane; Schrauben, Manfred; Wertelaers, An

    2007-01-01

    Numerous facilities in the non-nuclear sector in Belgium (e.g. in the non-radioactive waste processing and management sector and in the metal recycling sector) have been equipped with measuring ports for detecting radioactive substances. These measuring ports prevent radioactive sources or radioactive contamination from ending up in the material fluxes treated by the sectors concerned. They thus play an important part in the protection of the workers and the people living in the neighbourhood of the facilities, as well as in the protection of the population and the environment in general. In 2006, Belgium's federal nuclear control agency (FANC/AFCN) drew up guidelines for the operators of non-nuclear facilities with a measuring port for detecting radioactive substances. These guidelines describe the steps to be followed by the operators when the port's alarm goes off. Following the publication of the European guideline 2003/122/EURATOM of 22 December 2003 on the control of high-activity sealed radioactive sources and orphan sources, a procedure has been drawn up by FANC/AFCN and ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian National Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials, to identify the responsible to cover the costs relating to the further management of detected sealed sources and if not found to declare the sealed source as an orphan source. In this latter case and from mid-2006 the insolvency fund managed by ONDRAF/NIRAS covers the cost of radioactive waste management. At the request of the Belgian government, a financing proposal for the management of unsealed orphan sources as radioactive waste was also established by FANC/AFCN and ONDRAF/NIRAS. This proposal applies the same approach as for sealed sources and thus the financing of unsealed orphan sources will also be covered by the insolvency fund. (authors)

  4. A general description of the Swedish radiation protection regulations of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staalnacke, C.-G.

    2001-01-01

    The regulation of ionizing radiation in Sweden is based on both the Radiation Protection Act and Ordinance from 1998. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) acts as the regulatory authority for radiation safety and issues detailed regulations in specific areas. The report summarizes how the SSI controls radiation sources, including orphan sources for which a process for analyzing their occurrence has started in Sweden. A number of proposed procedures for the control and follow-up of sealed radioactive sources is provided. (author)

  5. Safety regulation for the design approval of special form radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Woon-Kap

    2009-01-01

    Several kinds of special form radioactive sources for industrial, medical applications are being produced in Korea. Special form radioactive sources should meet strict safety requirements specified in the domestic safety regulations and the design of the sources should be certified by the regulatory authority, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST). Several safety tests such as impact, percussion, heating, and leak tests are performed on the sources according to the domestic regulations and the international safety standards such as ANSI N542-1977 and ISO 2919-1999(E). As a regulatory expert body, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) assesses various types of application documents, such as safety analysis report, quality assurance program, and other documents evidencing fulfillment of requirements for design approval of the special form radioactive sources, submitted by a legal person who intends to produce special form radioactive sources and then reports the assessment result to MEST. A design approval certificate is issued to the applicant by MEST on the basis of a technical evaluation report presented by KINS.

  6. Microbial habitability of Europa sustained by radioactive sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altair, Thiago; de Avellar, Marcio G B; Rodrigues, Fabio; Galante, Douglas

    2018-01-10

    There is an increasing interest in the icy moons of the Solar System due to their potential habitability and as targets for future exploratory missions, which include astrobiological goals. Several studies have reported new results describing the details of these moons' geological settings; however, there is still a lack of information regarding the deep subsurface environment of the moons. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the microbial habitability of Europa constrained by terrestrial analogue environments and sustained by radioactive energy provided by natural unstable isotopes. The geological scenarios are based on known deep environments on Earth, and the bacterial ecosystem is based on a sulfate-reducing bacterial ecosystem found 2.8 km below the surface in a basin in South Africa. The results show the possibility of maintaining the modeled ecosystem based on the proposed scenarios and provides directions for future models and exploration missions for a more complete evaluation of the habitability of Europa and of icy moons in general.

  7. Regional cooperation to reduce the safety and security risks of Orphan radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Geoffrey; Hacker, Celia; Murray, Allan; Romallosa, Kristine; Caseria, Estrella; Africa del Castillo, Lorena

    2008-01-01

    ANSTO's Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) Project, in cooperation with the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), has initiated a program to reduce the safety and security risks of orphan radioactive sources in the Philippines. Collaborative work commenced in February 2006 during the Regional Orphan Source Search and Methods Workshop, co-hosted by ANSTO and the US National Nuclear Security Administration. Further professional development activities have occurred following requests by PNRI to ANSTO to support improvements in PNRI's capability and training programs to use a range of radiation survey equipment and on the planning and methods for conducting orphan source searches. The activities, methods and outcomes of the PNRI-ANSTO cooperative program are described, including: i.) Delivering a training workshop which incorporates use of source search and nuclide identification equipment and search methodology; and train-the-trainer techniques for effective development and delivery of custom designed training in the Philippines; ii.) Support and peer review of course work on Orphan Source Search Equipment and Methodology developed by PNRI Fellows; iii.) Supporting the delivery of the inaugural National Training Workshop on Orphan Source Search hosted by PNRI in the Philippines; iv.) Partnering in searching for orphan sources in Luzon, Philippines, in May 2007. The methods employed during these international cooperation activities are establishing a new model of regional engagement that emphasises sustainability of outcomes for safety and security of radioactive sources. (author)

  8. Ukrainian efforts in preventing illicit trafficking in nuclear materials and other radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratov, S.I.

    1998-01-01

    The Ukrainian efforts in preventing illicit trafficking in nuclear materials and other radioactive sources are described. Attention is paid for Ukrainian Government's Decree intended, in particular, to facilitate in establishing well-coordinated activities of the Ukrainian law enforcement bodies and other agencies involved, assigning the status of the main expert organization on illicit trafficking in nuclear materials to the Scientific Center 'Institute for Nuclear Research', in developing the three-years Program on prevention illicit trafficking in nuclear materials and other radioactive sources on the Ukrainian territory as well as measures at the State and customs borders. The main directions provided by the draft Program mentioned are presented as well. (author)

  9. Code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the code of conduct is to achieve and maintain a high level of safety and security of radioactive sources through the development, harmonization and enforcement of national policies, laws and regulations, and through the fostering of international co-operation. In particular, this code addresses the establishment of an adequate system of regulatory control from the production of radioactive sources to their final disposal, and a system for the restoration of such control if it has been lost. (N.C.)

  10. Influence of the radioactive source position inside the well-type ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuahara, L.T.; Correa, E.L.; Potiens, M.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The activimeter, instrument used in radionuclide activity measurement, consists primarily of a well type ionization chamber coupled to a special electronic device. Its response, after calibration, is shown in activity units (Becquerel or Curie). The goal of this study is to verify radioactive source position influence over activity measured by this instrument. Radioactive sources measurements were made at different depths inside the ionization chamber well. Results showed maximum variation of -23 %, -28 % and -15 % for 57 Co, 133 Ba and 137 Cs, respectively. (author)

  11. Interface for safety and security of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seggane, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In facilities and activities involving use of radiation sources, safety and security measures have in common the aim of protecting human life and health and the environment. In addition, safety and security measures must be designed and implemented in an integrated manner, so that security measures do not compromise safety and safety measures do not compromise security measures. This work reviewed issues related to establishing a clear interface between safety and security of radiation sources. The Government, the Regulatory Authority and licensee/registrants and other relevant stakeholders should work together and contribute to ensure that safety and security of sources is ensured and well interfaced. A Radiotherapy facility has been used as a case study. (au)

  12. Orphan sources and the challenges: requirement for the prevention of malevolent use of radioactive sources and preparedness for radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Challenges from smuggled or illegally transported radioactive sources with intention of causing threats to the society are similar to the radiological emergencies possible from misplaced/lost radioactive sources. While large number of radioactive sources are transported and are in use world over, the emergency preparedness and response system is not adequately developed compared to that for nuclear facilities. After the terrorist attack on W.T.C., there is concern world over about the malicious use of radioactive material calling for improving the emergency response system and international cooperation for preventing illicit trafficking of radioactive sources/material. Extremely sensitive state-of-the art monitoring systems installed at appropriate locations and periodic mobile radiation monitoring around suspected areas can be deterrent and can prevent the illicit trafficking of radioactive sources. Unless every nation ensures strict administrative control over the sources and implement usage of state-of-the art systems and methodology for early detection/prevention of illegal movement of sources within the territory and across its boundaries, the challenges from the orphan sources will remain for ever. The issues and challenges of man made radiological emergencies, remedial measures and the methodology for prevention and management of such emergencies are discussed here. The threat from an orphan source depends on many parameters. The type and quantity of the radionuclide, physical and chemical form influencing dispersion in air, deposition, solubility, migration in soil etc., can vary the radiological consequences when the source gets crushed accidentally along with scrap or is used for malevolent purposes. Depending on the level of environmental contamination, long term effects of the radiological emergency can significantly vary. Development of capability for quick detection, assessment and response are essential if prevention of theft/misuse of such sources

  13. Herramientas CASE para ingeniería de Requisitos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Alarcon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presentan apartes del resultado de la investigación sobre algunas herramientas CASE que apoyan las tareas de la Ingeniería de Requisitos (IR. Dicha fase esta contemplada en el proceso de Ingenieríade Software para el desarrollo de proyectos informáticos. Además se pretende analizar, sistematizar e integrarlos resultados del estudio con el fin de determinarlas principales características, ventajas y desventajas de una herramienta CASE para la IR.

  14. Regulatory control of radioactive sources: an international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakus, F.N.

    1998-01-01

    Within its Regular Programme and its Technical Co-operation Programme, the IAEA undertakes a number of activities in support of national efforts aimed at strengthening national infrastructures for the control of radiation sources. The framework of these activities is described. (author)

  15. Internet as a Source of Misconception: "Radiation and Radioactivity"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar Sesen, Burcin; Ince, Elif

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine students' usage styles of the Internet for seeking information and to investigate whether information obtained from the Internet is a source of misconceptions. For this reason, a two-stage study was conducted. At the first stage, a questionnaire was developed to get information about students' Internet usage…

  16. Spent sealed radioactive sources conditioning technology for the disposal at the national repository Baita-Bihor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujoreanu, D.; Popescu, I.V.

    2006-01-01

    A spent sealed radioactive source(SRS) is a high integrity capsule which contains a small amount of concentrated radionuclide with an activity which ranges from a few MBq up to levels of hundreds TBq. Presently, there are now many spent and unusable SRS in Romania, which have been used a long time in various industrial applications (smoke detectors, weld testing etc.). Considering the activity of the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (STDR) at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti regarding radioactive source collecting from various economic agents, several radioactive sources are held in the intermediate storage deposit facility on the institute platform awaiting conditioning for the final disposal. This paper presents the conditioning technology for this sources, which has as ultimate purpose to completion of a product which matches the waste acceptance requirements imposed by the National Authority Control of Nuclear Activities, CNCAN, for the disposal site DNDR Baita - Bihor. The technology used for obtaining the final product allows two options for the immobilization of the sources in the 218 L steel drum and these are: Sources placed in the original packages and which can not be dismantled will be isolated by encapsulation in 10 litters metal capsules and then conditioned in 218 l steel drum, with a concrete biological shielding; Sources removed from the initial package are isolated in stainless steel capsules, which are to be conditioned in the same 218 L steel drum. The final product obtained as a result of the concrete conditioning operations of the spent SRS in 218 L steel drum is the steel drum - concrete - low radioactive waste assembly which presents itself as a concrete block which includes one or more capsules containing SRS. (author)

  17. Selection and design of ion sources for use at the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Haynes, D.L.; Mills, G.D.; Olsen, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use the 25 MV tandem accelerator for the acceleration of radioactive ion beams to energies appropriate for research in nuclear physics; negative ion beams are, therefore, required for injection into the tandem accelerator. Because charge exchange is an efficient means for converting initially positive ion beams to negative ion beams, both positive and negative ion sources are viable options for use at the facility. The choice of the type of ion source will depend on the overall efficiency for generating the radioactive species of interest. Although direct-extraction negative ion sources are clearly desirable, the ion formation efficiencies are often too low for practical consideration; for this situation, positive ion sources, in combination with charge exchange, are the logical choice. The high-temperature version of the CERN-ISOLDE positive ion source has been selected and a modified version of the source designed and fabricated for initial use at the facility because of its low emittance, relatively high ionization efficiencies, and species versatility, and because it has been engineered for remote installation, removal, and servicing as required for safe handling in a high-radiation-level ISOL facility. The source will be primarily used to generate ion beams from elements with intermediate to low electron affinities. Prototype plasma-sputter negative ion sources and negative surface-ionization sources are under design consideration for generating radioactive ion beams from high-electron-affinity elements. The design features of these sources and expected efficiencies and beam qualities (emittances) will be described in this report

  18. Guidelines on radiation protection for work with open radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Danish National Institute of Radiation Protection (SIS) has published this, fourth edition of guidelines on radiation protection for work with open radiation sources. There are few changes compared to the previous edition, film doses are updated and preparation of the Danish legislation with respect to the 1991 ICRP recommendations (ICRP publication 60) is discussed. In this future recommendation the new dose limits will be proposed and new risk factors enlightened. (EG)

  19. A simple method to prolong the service life of radioactive sources for external radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingjie; Tian, Yuan; Dai, Jianrong

    2014-07-08

    A radioactive source is usually replaced and disposed after being used for a certain amount of time (usually a half-life). In this study, a simple method is proposed to prolong its service life. Instead of replacing the used source with a new source of full activity, a new source of less activity is added in the source holder in front of the used one, so that the total activity of two sources is equal to the initial activity of the used source or even higher. Similarly, more sources can be added to the previous ones. Attenuation of front source(s) to the back source(s) was evaluated with exponential attenuation equation, and variation of source-focus distance (SFD) with inverse square law for Leksell 4C Gamma Knife, which served as an example of external radiotherapy units. When the number of front sources increased from 1 to 3, the relative air kerma decreased from 36.5% to 5.0%. Both the attenuation effect and SFD variation contributed to the decrease in air kerma, with the former being the major factor. If the height of the source can be decreased in some way, such as increasing the specific activity of sources, the sources can be used more efficiently. The method prolongs the service life of sources by several factors, and reduces the expense of source exchange and reclamation.

  20. National campaign for the search and recovery of Orphan radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboneras, Pedro; Ortiz, Maria T.; Correa, Cristina; Rueda, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the main initial approaches of the campaign for the 'Recovery of Orphan Radioactive Sources' undertaken in Spain, in addition to the steps taken, the experience gained and the partial results obtained. The campaign began on 19th February 2007 and this paper reports the findings until 31st December 2007. The paper aims to share the experience gained with others who are considering or are already involved in similar campaigns and to enable opinions to be exchanged with those responsible for such campaigns in other countries. The campaign was initiated by the Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade with the expert assistance of the Nuclear Security Council. The initiative came about as a result of national legislation currently in force regarding the control of highly active and orphan radioactive source, which implements a European Directive. The campaign was commissioned to ENRESA (the Spanish National Company for Radioactive Waste Management) and the work, which began in 2007, will continue into 2008. The campaign aims to seek and recover the largest possible number of orphan radioactive sources (an Orphan radioactive source is understood to be one which is detected outside the standard control system and which, when detected, has an activity level higher than the exemption levels established in national and European regulations), and involves the collaboration of various different agents and organisations where such sources are or may be found. Finally, the paper provides details regarding the number and radiological characteristics of the sources which have already been recovered in Spain during the 2007 campaign. (author)

  1. Reducing Uncontrolled Radioactive Sources through Tracking and Training: US Environmental Protection Agency Initiatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopsick, D.A., E-mail: kopsick.deborah@epa.gov [US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The international metal processing industries are very concerned about the importation of scrap metal contaminated with radioactive materials. When radioactive sources fall out of regulatory control, improper handling can cause serious injury and death. There is no one way to address this problem and various US governmental and industry entities have developed radiation source control programmes that function within their authorities. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mission is to protect public health and the environment. To ensure this protection, EPA's approach to orphan sources in scrap metal has focused on regaining control of lost sources and preventing future losses. EPA has accomplished this through a number of avenues including training development, product stewardship, identification of non-radiation source alternatives, physical tagging of sources, field testing of innovative radiation detection instrumentation and development of international best practices. In order to achieve its goal of enhanced control on contaminated scrap metal and orphaned radioactive sources, EPA has forged alliances with the metals industry, other Federal agencies, state governments and the IAEA. (author)

  2. Application of just-in-time manufacturing techniques in radioactive source in well logging industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atma Yudha Prawira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear logging is one of major areas of logging development. This paper presents an empirical investigation to bring the drilling and completion of wells from an ill-defined art to a refined sci-ence by using radioactive source to “look and measure” such as formation type, formation dip, porosity, fluid type and numerous other important factors. The initial nuclear logging tools rec-ords the radiation emitted by formation as they were crossed by boreholes. Gamma radiation is used in well logging as it is powerful enough to penetrate the formation and steel casing. The ra-dioactive source is reusable so that after engineer finished the job the radioactive source is sent back to bunker. In this case inventory level of radioactive source is relatively high compared with monthly movement and the company must spend large amount of cost just for inventory. After calculating and averaging the monthly movement in 2014 and 2015, we detected a big pos-sibility to cut the inventory level to reduce the inventory cost.

  3. Production of calibration sources and/or radioactive tracers with the cyclotron CV-28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osso Junior, Joao Alberto

    1995-01-01

    The present stage of production of calibration sources and radioactive tracers with the Cyclotron CV-28 is described. Among the methods already developed special attention is given to the production of 57 Co, 109 Cd and 111 In. (author). 3 refs

  4. Remote monitoring of radioactive sources based on i.MX27 platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Defeng; Wang Renbo; Lin Gangyong; Ding Yufei

    2012-01-01

    It based on the ASIC solutions, has chosen Freescale's i.MX27 development system as a platform for designing video capture and transmission system. The article uses the latest H.264 video compression standard and complete the entire system of hardware and software design, which is successfully applied to remote monitoring of radioactive sources. (authors)

  5. A compact ultra-clean system for deploying radioactive sources inside the KamLAND detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banks, T.I.; Freedman, S.J.; Wallig, J.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Mitsui, T.; Nakamura, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Bloxham, T.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Ichimura, K.; Murayama, H.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H.M.; Winslow, L.A.; Dwyer, D.A.; McKeown, R.D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B.E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; Downum, K.E.; Gratta, G.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K.M.; Detwiler, J.A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact, ultra-clean device used to deploy radioactive sources along the vertical axis of the KamLAND liquid-scintillator neutrino detector for purposes of calibration. The device worked by paying out and reeling in precise lengths of a hanging, small-gauge wire rope (cable); an

  6. A Hard Month's Work in Manila. Securing Radioactive Sources (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potterton, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Security managers keep a watchful eye on spent radioactive sources. These disused sources, which served myriad purposes in medicine, industry and research, present a potential security threat; they could be obtained by terrorists to construct a dirty bomb. To ensure nuclear security and safety, it is essential to package, store and eventually dispose of these spent sources safely and securely. In some cases, that is easier said than done. For instance, removing an old and highly radioactive source from a medical device is difficult and dangerous. Imagine doing this remotely, using manipulators, in temperatures of up to 35 degrees and over 20 times. This is exactly what the IAEA, together with the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), successfully achieved in March and April 2013 at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in Manila. (author)

  7. A Hard Month's Work in Manila. Securing Radioactive Sources (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potterton, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Security managers keep a watchful eye on spent radioactive sources. These disused sources, which served myriad purposes in medicine, industry and research, present a potential security threat; they could be obtained by terrorists to construct a dirty bomb. To ensure nuclear security and safety, it is essential to package, store and eventually dispose of these spent sources safely and securely. In some cases, that is easier said than done. For instance, removing an old and highly radioactive source from a medical device is difficult and dangerous. Imagine doing this remotely, using manipulators, in temperatures of up to 35 degrees and over 20 times. This is exactly what the IAEA, together with the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), successfully achieved in March and April 2013 at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in Manila. (author)

  8. A Hard Month's Work in Manila. Securing Radioactive Sources (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potterton, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Security managers keep a watchful eye on spent radioactive sources. These disused sources, which served myriad purposes in medicine, industry and research, present a potential security threat; they could be obtained by terrorists to construct a dirty bomb. To ensure nuclear security and safety, it is essential to package, store and eventually dispose of these spent sources safely and securely. In some cases, that is easier said than done. For instance, removing an old and highly radioactive source from a medical device is difficult and dangerous. Imagine doing this remotely, using manipulators, in temperatures of up to 35 degrees and over 20 times. This is exactly what the IAEA, together with the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), successfully achieved in March and April 2013 at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in Manila. (author)

  9. A Hard Month's Work in Manila. Securing Radioactive Sources (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potterton, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Security managers keep a watchful eye on spent radioactive sources. These disused sources, which served myriad purposes in medicine, industry and research, present a potential security threat; they could be obtained by terrorists to construct a dirty bomb. To ensure nuclear security and safety, it is essential to package, store and eventually dispose of these spent sources safely and securely. In some cases, that is easier said than done. For instance, removing an old and highly radioactive source from a medical device is difficult and dangerous. Imagine doing this remotely, using manipulators, in temperatures of up to 35 degrees and over 20 times. This is exactly what the IAEA, together with the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), successfully achieved in March and April 2013 at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in Manila. (author)

  10. The physical protection of radiation sources and radioactive materials in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sungita, Y.Y.; Massalu, I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In recognition of the legal deficiency and the awareness of radiation safety, the parliament of the United Republic of Tanzania enacted the protection from radiation act no. 5 of 1983, which established the national radiation commission (NRC) as a regulatory authority. The main objective of the act was to provide for a legal framework and guidance of the control of the use of radiation sources and radioactive materials with the view to achieve an assurance for acceptance level of radiation protection and safety standard. Due to trade liberalization that is currently experienced in the country, the increase in the number of radiation practices is observed yearly. medical diagnostic x-ray facilities constitute 72 % of all radiation installations in the country. Radioactive materials used in research, teaching and industrial application constitute 24 % and those used in therapy and nuclear medicine is 4 %. About seven radioactive materials incidents occurred in Tanzania during 1996-2000. Among these cases, some were illegal possession and across-boarder trafficking of radioactive materials. Theft and losses radioactive equipments or sources were also experienced. This presentation discusses the experienced incidents of illegal possession, theft and loss of radioactive materials and the lesson learnt from those events in connection with our operational laws. The needs for improvement of the whole system of notification, authorization, registration and licensing to cope up with increase in radiation practices and cross-border illegal trafficking of radioactive materials. The importance of involving immigration officers, police and custom officer with proper training in radiation safety aspect is emphasized. The recommendation are given in an attempt to rescue the situation. (author)

  11. Introduction to radiation protection practical knowledge for handling radioactive sources

    CERN Document Server

    Grupen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The book presents an accessible account of the sources of ionising radiation and the methods of radiation protection. The basics of nuclear physics which are directly related to radiation protection are briefly discussed. The book describes the units of radiation protection, the measurement techniques, biological effects of radiation, environmental radiation, and many applications of radiation. For each chapter there is a problem section with full solutions. A detailed glossary and many useful information in appendixes complete the book. The author has addressed the issue of internationality to make sure that the text and, in particular, the complicated regulations can be easily interpreted not only in Europe and the United States but also in other countries. The subject of radiation protection requires a certain amount of mathematics. For those who have forgotten the basic rules of calculus a short refresher course in the form of a mathematical appendix is added.

  12. Management and packaging of radioactive sources (90Sr) for their transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales C, M; Roas Z, N.

    2000-09-01

    This work describes the different activities that were carried out in relation to the identification of five sources of 90 Sr and the administrative administrations in the face of the regulatory authority of the country, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CONEA), for the transfer of the sources toward its final destination. The preparation of the package and the documentation presented before the CONEA were in agreement to that settled down in the Regulation for the safe transport of radioactive materials (IAEA)

  13. Search for lost or orphan radioactive sources based on NaI gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aage, H.K.; Korsbech, U.

    2003-01-01

    Within recent decades many radioactive sources have been lost, stolen, or abandoned, and some have caused contamination or irradiation of people. Therefore reliable methods for source recovery are needed. The use of car borne NaI(Tl) detectors is discussed. Standard processing of spectra in general can disclose strong and medium level signals from manmade nuclides. But methods for detecting low level signals from weak, distant or shielded sources can be improved. New methods for source detection and identification based on noise adjusted singular value decomposition and on area specific stripping of spectra are presented

  14. Optimisation of the neutron source based on gas dynamic trap for transmutation of radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeev, Andrey V.

    2012-06-01

    The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in collaboration with the Russian and foreign organizations develop the project of 14 MeV neutron source, which can be used for fusion material studies and for other application. The projected neutron source of plasma type is based on the plasma Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT), which is a special magnetic mirror system for plasma confinement. Presented work continues the subject of development the GDT-based neutron source (GDT-NS) for hybrid fusion-fission reactors. The paper presents the results of recent numerical optimization of such neutron source for transmutation of the long-lives radioactive wastes in spent nuclear fuel.

  15. Transport of radioactive source of cobalt-60 for the steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paulo de Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive materials are used in the fields of medicine, industry, research and nuclear power production. The use of radioactive material may involve transportation and this implies in the application of safety measures to the workers, public and the environment. Many types of radioactive material are produced all over the world and some modes of transport are involved. The IAEA regulations are based on the philosophy that radioactive material being transported should be adequately packaged to provide protection against the hazards of the material under all conditions of transport. Some Brazilian steel industries control the levels of liquid steel in continuous casting systems by means of sealed sources of cobalt-60. The Center for Development of Nuclear Technology-CDNT produces several of these sources to meet these industries and these sources must be transported in packages designed and tested as requirements of the rules of carriage of radioactive materials. For the transportation of seven sources of cobalt-60 with total activity of 1 GBq since CDNT to the applicant industries was designed, built and tested a Type A package. The thickness of the shield to meet the surface dose rate and the index of transport was calculated by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code-Version 5) and practical values were compatible. The sealed sources of cobalt-60 were tested as to leak through the tightness test conducted according to ISO 9978:1992 (E) and the tests to demonstrate the capability of resistance of packaged under normal conditions of transport were made on the facilities of CDNT. (author)

  16. Study of classification and disposed method for disused sealed radioactive source in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk Hoon; Kim, Ju Youl; Lee, Seung Hee [FNC Technology Co., Ltd.,Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In accordance with the classification system of radioactive waste in Korea, all the disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRSs) fall under the category of EW, VLLW or LILW, and should be managed in compliance with the restrictions for the disposal method. In this study, the management and disposal method are drawn in consideration of half-life of radionuclides contained in the source and A/D value (i.e. the activity A of the source dividing by the D value for the relevant radionuclide, which is used to provide an initial ranking of relative risk for sources) in addition to the domestic classification scheme and disposal method, based on the characteristic analysis and review results of the management practices in IAEA and foreign countries. For all the DSRSs that are being stored (as of March 2015) in the centralized temporary disposal facility for radioisotope wastes, applicability of the derivation result is confirmed through performing the characteristic analysis and case studies for assessing quantity and volume of DSRSs to be managed by each method. However, the methodology derived from this study is not applicable to the following sources; i) DSRSs without information on the radioactivity, ii) DSRSs that are not possible to calculate the specific activity and/or the source-specific A/D value. Accordingly, it is essential to identify the inherent characteristics for each of DSRSs prior to implementation of this management and disposal method.

  17. Safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This International Conference, hosted by the Government of France and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) and the World Customs Organization (WCO), was the first one devoted to the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials and - for the first time - brought together radiation safety experts, regulators, and customs and police officers, who need to closely co-operate for solving the problem of illicit trafficking. The technical sessions reviewed the state of the art of twelve major topics, divided into two groups: the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials. The safety part comprised regulatory control, safety assessment techniques, engineering and managerial measures, lessons from experience, international cooperation through reporting systems and databases, verification of safety through inspection and the use of performance indicators for a regulatory programme. The security part comprised measures to prevent breaches in the security of radioactive materials, detection and identification techniques for illicit trafficking, response to detected cases and seized radioactive materials, strengthening awareness, training and exchange of information. The Conference was a success in fostering information exchange through the reviews of the state of the art and the frank and open discussions. It raised awareness of the need for Member States to ensure effective systems of control and for preventing, detecting and responding to illicit trafficking in radioactive materials. The Conference finished by recommending investigating whether international undertakings concerned with an effective operation of national systems for ensuring the safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials

  18. Radioactive sources of main radiological concern in the Kola-Barents region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.; Baklanov, A.

    1998-07-01

    This overview focuses on some major issues for risk analysis appearing in our recent study surveying radioactive sources on the Kola Peninsula, along with adjacent parts of the Arctic seas. The main issues of the parts are as follows: An introduction to the presence of radioactive sources and environmental contamination in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region and the current status as regards various significant studies. Radioactive contamination in man and the environment on the Kola Peninsula, as well as radioactive transfer during the last three decades from external sources to the Kola-Barents region. The main conclusion from the findings is that the contamination is generally relatively low and that neither the activity levels in samples of soil, vegetation, and the important food-chains, nor the content in man indicate any changes since 1986 that could not be explained by the combined effect of the cumulative deposition from the nuclear weapons testing and the accident in Chernobyl. The radioactive sources of main concern in the region belong to the following categories: nuclear power submarine and cruiser naval bases; civil nuclear power ice-breaker fleet; building and repairing shipyards; nuclear power plants; radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel storage facilities; sunken reactors/ships; liquid radioactive waste dumping; solid radioactive waste dumping; nuclear weapon bases; nuclear weapon tests; civil nuclear explosions; nuclear accidents; mining radioactive ore deposits and plants; new projects and others. Several case studies concerning releases in the Kola-Barents region are reviewed, and followed by consequence analyses for the categories of primary interest covering: a) airborne releases from the Kola NPP, and from submarines or spent nuclear fuel; b) releases from objects in the marine environment including submarines, dumped reactors, and various other radioactive objects and waste; c) releases from liquid and solid wastes stored on land or during

  19. Radioactive sources of main radiological concern in the Kola-Barents region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, R.; Baklanov, A

    1998-07-01

    This overview focuses on some major issues for risk analysis appearing in our recent study surveying radioactive sources on the Kola Peninsula, along with adjacent parts of the Arctic seas. The main issues of the parts are as follows: An introduction to the presence of radioactive sources and environmental contamination in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region and the current status as regards various significant studies. Radioactive contamination in man and the environment on the Kola Peninsula, as well as radioactive transfer during the last three decades from external sources to the Kola-Barents region. The main conclusion from the findings is that the contamination is generally relatively low and that neither the activity levels in samples of soil, vegetation, and the important food-chains, nor the content in man indicate any changes since 1986 that could not be explained by the combined effect of the cumulative deposition from the nuclear weapons testing and the accident in Chernobyl. The radioactive sources of main concern in the region belong to the following categories: nuclear power submarine and cruiser naval bases; civil nuclear power ice-breaker fleet; building and repairing shipyards; nuclear power plants; radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel storage facilities; sunken reactors/ships; liquid radioactive waste dumping; solid radioactive waste dumping; nuclear weapon bases; nuclear weapon tests; civil nuclear explosions; nuclear accidents; mining radioactive ore deposits and plants; new projects and others. Several case studies concerning releases in the Kola-Barents region are reviewed, and followed by consequence analyses for the categories of primary interest covering: a) airborne releases from the Kola NPP, and from submarines or spent nuclear fuel; b) releases from objects in the marine environment including submarines, dumped reactors, and various other radioactive objects and waste; c) releases from liquid and solid wastes stored on land or during

  20. Main Activities to Improve the Control of Radioactive Sources and Maintain an Effective Regulatory Nuclear Systems in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2006, the Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Security, DRS, of National Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, has gone through many improvements. In 2006 CNEN signed the commitment to the recommendations of the Code of Conduct on The Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and the Guidance on The Import and Export of Radioactive Sources. The DRS is responsible for the licensing and control of nuclear facilities, fuel cycle, waste management and the control of radioactive sources and authorizations of medical and industrial installations. In 2009 the department responsible for the control of radioactive sources and authorizations of medical and industrial installations implemented an “Electronic Management System” in which this System integrates the transport department and waste management department. The Electronic Management System is linked to the register of radioactive sources and facilities and there is an access on line to the Customs, making the control of import and export of radioactive sources robust, efficient and fast. During the period from 2006 until 2015 the most relevant regulations related to the control of radioactive sources and authorizations of medical and industrial installations were reviewed and some were elaborated and issued. These documents were in line with the Categorization of Radioactive Sources and the International Basic Safety Standards, issued in the IAEA Safety Standard Series as General Safety Requirements Part 3 (GSR Part 3). The paper describes all the steps that were adopted in order to implement these systems and the improvements on our Nuclear Regulatory Systems. (author)

  1. Application of the new requirements of safety of the IAEA for the previous management to the final disposal of radioactive waste in the region: a personal vision; Aplicacion de los nuevos requisitos de seguridad del OIEA para la gestion previa a la disposicion final de desechos radiactivos en la region: una vision personal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sed, Luis Andres Jova, E-mail: jovaluis@gmail.com [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear (CNSN), La Habana (Cuba)

    2013-07-01

    The work includes the requirements for the responsibilities associated with the management prior to the final disposal of radioactive waste and as they are referred to in the Region. Also discusses the requirements for the main stages of the management prior to the final disposal of radioactive waste. A very important section of the new requirements is that establish requirements for safe operation of facilities management prior to the final disposal of radioactive wastes and the implementation of activities under conditions of safety and development. The work is emphatic on the importance of safety justification since the beginning of the development of a facility as a basis for the decision-making and approval process. Emphasis is also on the gradual approach which should provide for the collection, analysis and interpretation of the relevant technical data, plans for the design and operation, and the formulation of the justification of the security. This paper gives a personal view of the situation in the Region.

  2. Regional Integrated Tenets to Reinforce the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources (ClearZone)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzer, P.

    2003-01-01

    The EURATOM Research and Training Programme on Nuclear Energy includes 2 main fields - fusion energy research and management of radioactive waste, radiation protection and other activities of nuclear technology and safety.Seven instruments (mechanisms) for projects management are used - 'Network of Excellence' (NOE); 'Integrated Project' (IP); 'Specific Targeted Research Project' or 'Specific Targeted Training Project' (STREP); 'Co-ordination Action' (CA); Actions to Promote and Develop Human Resources and Mobility Specific Support Actions; Integrated Infrastructure Initiatives. Two consecutive sub-projects are proposed: 'small' - countries of the Visegrad four + Austrian participant -within the 6th FP 'Specific Supported Actions' and 'large' - participation of more countries in the region - more oriented to practical implementation of the 'small' project findings - intention to use the 6th Framework Programme resources to co-financing the implementation activities. The main objectives are: to create effective lines of defense (prevention -detection - categorization - transport - storage) against malicious use of radioactive sources; to achieve and maintain a high level of safety and security of radioactive sources; to arise the radioactive sources management safety and security culture at the Central European region. Consortium of 11 organisations from Czech Republic, Slovak Republic, Austria, Hungary and Poland is established for the Project implementation. The Project task are grouped in the following areas: legislation, infrastructure, practices; metallurgical industry, cross border control; instrumentation and metrology; information system

  3. Use of Portal Monitors for Detection of Technogenic Radioactive Sources in Scrap Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovev, D. B.; Merkusheva, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    The article considers the features of organization of scrap-metal primary radiation control on the specialized enterprises engaging in its deep processing and storage at using by primary technical equipment - radiation portal monitors. The issue of this direction relevance, validity of radiation control implementation with the use of radiation portal monitors, physical and organizational bases of radiation control are considered in detail. The emphasis is put on the considerable increase in the number of technogenic radioactive sources detected in scrap-metal that results in the entering into exploitation of radioactive metallic structures as different building wares. One of reasons of such increase of the number of technogenic radioactive sources getting for processing with scrap-metal is the absence of any recommendations on the radiation portal monitors exploitation. The practical division of the article offers to recommendation on tuning of the modes of work of radiation portal monitors depending on influence the weather factor thus allowing to considerably increase the percent of technogenic radioactive sources detection.

  4. Methods and apparatus for safely handling radioactive sources in measuring-while-drilling tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wraight, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method for removing a chemical radioactive source from a MWD tool which is coupled in a drill string supported by a drilling rig while a borehole is drilled and includes logging means for measuring formation characteristics in response to irradiation of the adjacent formations by the radioactive source during the drilling operation. The steps of the method are: halting the drilling operation and then removing the drill string from the borehole for moving the MWD tool to a work station at the surface where the source is at a safe working distance from the drilling rig and will be accessible by way of one end of the MWD tool; positioning a radiation shield at a location adjacent to the one end of the MWD tool where the shield is ready for receiving the source as it is moved away from the other end of the MWD tool and then moving the source away from the other end of the MWD tool for enclosing the source within the shield; and once the source is enclosed within the shield; removing the shield together with the enclosed source from the MWD tool for transferring the enclosed source to another work station

  5. Safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the European Commission (EC), International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and the World Customs Organization (WCO) organized an International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Materials, in Dijon, France, from 14 to 18 September 1998. The Government of France hosted this Conference through the Commissariat a l`energie atomique, Direction des applications militaires (CEA/DAM). This TECDOC contains the contributed papers dealing with the topics of this Conference which were accepted by the Conference Programme Committee for presentation. The papers written in one of the two working languages of the Conference, English or French are presented here each by a separate abstract. Ten technical sessions covered the following subjects: the regulatory control of radiation sources, including systems for notification, authorization and inspection; safety assessment techniques applied to radiation sources and design and technological measures including defense in depth and good engineering practice; managerial measures, including safety culture, human factors, quality assurance, qualified experts, training and education; learning from operational experience; international co-operation, including reporting systems and databases; verification of compliance, monitoring of compliance and assessment of the effectiveness of national programmes for the safety of sources; measures to prevent breaches in the security of radioactive materials, experience with criminal acts involving radioactive materials; detection and identification technologies for illicitly trafficked radioactive materials; response to detected cases and seized radioactive materials, strengthening of the awareness, training and exchange of information. The IAEA plans to issue the proceedings of this Conference containing the invited presentations, rapporteurs and Chairpersons overviews and summaries

  6. Safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the European Commission (EC), International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and the World Customs Organization (WCO) organized an International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Materials, in Dijon, France, from 14 to 18 September 1998. The Government of France hosted this Conference through the Commissariat a l'energie atomique, Direction des applications militaires (CEA/DAM). This TECDOC contains the contributed papers dealing with the topics of this Conference which were accepted by the Conference Programme Committee for presentation. The papers written in one of the two working languages of the Conference, English or French are presented here each by a separate abstract. Ten technical sessions covered the following subjects: the regulatory control of radiation sources, including systems for notification, authorization and inspection; safety assessment techniques applied to radiation sources and design and technological measures including defense in depth and good engineering practice; managerial measures, including safety culture, human factors, quality assurance, qualified experts, training and education; learning from operational experience; international co-operation, including reporting systems and databases; verification of compliance, monitoring of compliance and assessment of the effectiveness of national programmes for the safety of sources; measures to prevent breaches in the security of radioactive materials, experience with criminal acts involving radioactive materials; detection and identification technologies for illicitly trafficked radioactive materials; response to detected cases and seized radioactive materials, strengthening of the awareness, training and exchange of information. The IAEA plans to issue the proceedings of this Conference containing the invited presentations, rapporteurs and Chairpersons overviews and summaries

  7. Code of practice for the use of sealed radioactive sources in borehole logging (1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this code is to establish working practices, procedures and protective measures which will aid in keeping doses, arising from the use of borehole logging equipment containing sealed radioactive sources, to as low as reasonably achievable and to ensure that the dose-equivalent limits specified in the National Health and Medical Research Council s radiation protection standards, are not exceeded. This code applies to all situations and practices where a sealed radioactive source or sources are used through wireline logging for investigating the physical properties of the geological sequence, or any fluids contained in the geological sequence, or the properties of the borehole itself, whether casing, mudcake or borehole fluids. The radiation protection standards specify dose-equivalent limits for two categories: radiation workers and members of the public. 3 refs., tabs., ills

  8. Safety and security of radiation sources and radioactive materials: A case of Zambia - least developed country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banda, S.C.

    1998-01-01

    In Zambia, which is current (1998) classified as a Least Developed Country has applications of nuclear science and technology that cover the medical, industrial, education and research. However, the application is mainly in medical and industry. Through the responsibility of radiation source is within the mandate of the Radiation Protection Board. The aspects involving security fall on different stake holders some that have no technical knowledge on what radiation is about. The stake holders in this category include customs clearing and forwarding agents, state security/defence agencies and the operators. Such a situation demands a national system that should be instituted to meet the safety and security requirements but takes into account the involvement of the diverse stake holders. In addition such system should avoid unnecessary exposure, ensure safety of radioactive materials and sources, detect illicit trade and maintain integrity of such materials or sources. This paper will provide the status on issue in Zambia and the challenges that exist to ensure further development in application of Nuclear Science and Technology (S and T) in the country takes into account the safety and security requirements that avoid deliberate and accidental loss of radiation sources and radioactive materials. The Government has a responsibility to ensure that effective system is established and operated to protect radiation sources and radioactive materials from theft, sabotage and ensure safety. (author)

  9. A study on the safety of spent fuel management. Radioactive source term modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Lee, Hoo Keun; Park, Keun Il; Hwoang, Jung Ki; Chung, Choong Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-02-01

    The types and probabilities of events which may occur during the process of reception, transfer and storage of spent fuels in an away-from-reactor (AFR) spent fuel storage facility were analyzed in order to calculate the amount of radioactive material released to operation area and atmosphere, and the basic model for predicting the radioactive source-term under normal and abnormal operations were developed. Also, oxidation and dissolution of U0{sub 2} pellet was investigated to estimate the amount of radioactive materials released from spent fuel and the release characteristics of radionuclides from defected spent fuel rods was analyzed. Basic information using FIRAC code to analyze the ventilation system during fire accident was prepared and FIRIN was detached from FIRAC modified to simulate the compartment fire by personal computer. (Author).

  10. Expansion design for a radioactive sources handling laboratory type II class B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez S, P. S.; Monroy G, F.; Alanis, J.

    2013-10-01

    The Radioactive Wastes Research Laboratory (RWRL) of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico), at the moment has three sections: instrumental analysis, radioactive material processes, counting and a license type II class C, to manipulate radioactive material. This license limits the open sources handling to 300 kBq for radionuclides of very high radio-toxicity as the Ra-226, for what is being projected the license extension to type II class B, to be able to manage until 370 MBq of this radionuclides type, and the Laboratory, since the location where is the RWRL have unused area. This work presents a proposal of the RWRL expansion, taking into account the current laboratory sections, as well as the established specifications by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). The current planes of the RWRL and the expansion proposal of the laboratory are presented. (Author)

  11. AÇÃO POPULAR: REQUISITO DA LESIVIDADE

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Junior, Adilson

    2010-01-01

    A ação popular nasceu no Direito Romano e se sabe que ela apareceu primeiramente no Brasil na Constituição do Império. O seu objetivo sempre foi o de possibilitar aos cidadãos a defesa da res pública (coisa pública). Contudo, muito tempo já passou desde a vigência da Lei nº 4.717, de 1965, e ainda hoje existem divergências sobre a necessidade ou não de se preencher o requisito da lesividade para que seja possível o julgamento da ação popular. A dissertação busca justamente a...

  12. Muestreo como un requisito fundamental en las ciencias experimentales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badii, M. H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los fundamentos básicos de muestreo, enfatizando los requisitos para determinar el tamaño óptimo de la muestra. Se discuten el muestreo absoluto y relativo y la comparación entre ellos. Se destaca la relevancia del tipo de distribución espacial en el diseño de muestreo y presenta varios modelos de uso actual para la determinación de ella. Se presentan de manera somera tres modelos de uso común, y finalmente, y por su relevancia práctica e económica, se discuten las cinco modalidades de muestreo secuencial.

  13. Germanium detector calibration according to the standard NF M 60-810 without using radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, J. M.; Garell, I.; Losset, Y.; Vichot, L. [CEA de Valduc, Service de Protection Contre Les Rayonnements, 21110 Is sur Tille (France); Chazalet, J.; Tauvel, Y.; Poulet, F. [IUP Genie des Systemes Industriels, Universite Blaise Pascal, Departement de Physique, 24 avenue des Landais, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2009-07-01

    In-situ gamma ray spectrometry is used to determine the specific activities of natural and artificial radioactive nuclides in the soil with a good accuracy. This method is very interesting for environmental measurements and leads to soil determination activity. It is a cheaper method than analysis of great amounts of soil samples in the laboratory. As there is no standard soil, detection efficiency can be estimated using either statistical tools or combination of radioactive point sources calibration thanks to mathematical models of NF-M-60-810 standard representing the radionuclide distribution in soil. Experimental determination of detection efficiency requires a large number of operations involving the handling of radioactive standards in the energy range from 0.06 - 2 MeV. For these reasons, detection efficiency model has been determined without using radioactive sources. In order to reduce analytical time and to simplify the efficiency detector calibration, it is possible to associate numerical and deterministic methods and to get a relative accuracy below 25 per cent

  14. The French Experience Regarding Peer Reviews to Improve the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachaume, J.-L.; Bélot, G.

    2015-01-01

    France has a 50 year history of control over radioactive sources. Convinced that peer reviews may be helpful to improve any regulatory system, France decided to experience a ‘full scope’ Integrated Regulatory Review Service mission in 2006 and its follow-up mission in 2009, including a review of the implementation of the Code of Conduct. The reviews, interviews and observations performed during these missions enabled the experts to have a thorough knowledge of the French system and to highlight its strengths and ways for improvements. Following these reviews, France decided to rely on its good practices, extend them as much as possible and to define, implement and address an action plan to improve its regulatory control over radioactive sources, while maintaining the prime responsibility on the operators. While good practices in the tracking of sources were maintained and slight evolutions were conducted in the safety regulations, licensing process, and inspection and enforcement actions, the major outcome of these reviews will obviously consist of the entrustment of the French Nuclear Safety Authority with the role of the regulatory authority for the security of radioactive sources and the implementation of dedicated provisions. (author)

  15. Safe management of sealed radioactive sources at Karachi nuclear power complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, T.B.; Qamar, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the conditioning of sealed radioactive sources, carried out at the Karachi Nuclear Power Complex (KNPC) in co-operation with the IAEA. The radioactive sources were radium needles of various size, used by various radiotherapy units in different hospitals throughout the country. For some time the use of radium needles had been abandoned and they were stored in hospitals awaiting proper disposal. Since their storage conditions were not ideal and there was a potential of leakage of radioactive material into the environment, it was decided to condition and store them safely. A significant logistic effort was required to identify these sources, bring them to a central facility and condition them according to current international standards. Various steps were involved in conditioning the sources: place it in a stainless steel capsule, weld the capsule, test it for a leak, place the capsule in a lead shielded package, put and seal the shielded package in a concrete-lined steel drum and finally store it at the waste storage facility. A total amount of about 1500 mg of Radium needles were conditioned. Radiation exposure during the entire operation was within acceptable limits. (author)

  16. Low-level radioactive waste source terms for the 1992 integrated data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loghry, S.L.; Kibbey, A.H.; Godbee, H.W.; Icenhour, A.S.; DePaoli, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This technical manual presents updated generic source terms (i.e., unitized amounts and radionuclide compositions) which have been developed for use in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These source terms were used in the IDB annual report, Integrated Data Base for 1992: Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories, Projections, and Characteristics, DOE/RW-0006, Rev. 8, October 1992. They are useful as a basis for projecting future amounts (volume and radioactivity) of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) shipped for disposal at commercial burial grounds or sent for storage at DOE solid-waste sites. Commercial fuel cycle LLW categories include boiling-water reactor, pressurized-water reactor, fuel fabrication, and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) conversion. Commercial nonfuel cycle LLW includes institutional/industrial (I/I) waste. The LLW from DOE operations is category as uranium/thorium fission product, induced activity, tritium, alpha, and open-quotes otherclose quotes. Fuel cycle commercial LLW source terms are normalized on the basis of net electrical output [MW(e)-year], except for UF 6 conversion, which is normalized on the basis of heavy metal requirement [metric tons of initial heavy metal ]. The nonfuel cycle commercial LLW source term is normalized on the basis of volume (cubic meters) and radioactivity (curies) for each subclass within the I/I category. The DOE LLW is normalized in a manner similar to that for commercial I/I waste. The revised source terms are based on the best available historical data through 1992

  17. A singly charged ion source for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Suzuki, K.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source.

  18. Characterization of radioactive orphan sources by gamma spectrometry; Caracterizacion de fuentes huerfanas radiactivas por espectrometria gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz W, H., E-mail: wcruz@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (PGRR/IPEN), Lima (Peru). Planta de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos

    2013-07-01

    The sealed radioactive sources are widely applicable in industry. They must have a permanent control and must be registered with the Technical Office of the National Authority (OTAN). However, at times it has identified the presence of abandoned sealed sources unknown to the owner. These sources are called 'orphan sources'. Of course these sources represent a high potential risk because accidents can trigger dire consequences depending on your activity and chemical form in which it presents the radioisotope. This paper describes the process and the actions taken to characterize two orphan radioactive sources from the smelter a Aceros Arequipa. For characterization we used a gamma spectrometry system using a detector NaI(Tl) 3″ x 3″ with a multichannel analyzer Nucleus PCA-II. The radioisotope identified was cesium - 137 ({sup 137}Cs) in both cases. Fortunately, the sources maintained their integrity would otherwise have generated significant pollution considering the chemical form of the radioisotope and easy dispersion. (author)

  19. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-09-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives.

  20. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as … well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives

  1. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives

  2. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives.

  3. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives

  4. A compact ultra-clean system for deploying radioactive sources inside the KamLAND detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, T. I.; Freedman, S. J.; Wallig, J.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Mitsui, T.; Nakamura, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Bloxham, T.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Ichimura, K.; Murayama, H.; O`Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact, ultra-clean device used to deploy radioactive sources along the vertical axis of the KamLAND liquid-scintillator neutrino detector for purposes of calibration. The device worked by paying out and reeling in precise lengths of a hanging, small-gauge wire rope (cable); an assortment of interchangeable radioactive sources could be attached to a weight at the end of the cable. All components exposed to the radiopure liquid scintillator were made of chemically compatible UHV-cleaned materials, primarily stainless steel, in order to avoid contaminating or degrading the scintillator. To prevent radon intrusion, the apparatus was enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing inside a glove box, and both volumes were regularly flushed with purified nitrogen gas. An infrared camera attached to the side of the housing permitted real-time visual monitoring of the cable's motion, and the system was controlled via a graphical user interface.

  5. Feasibility study on utilization of vitrified radioactive waste as radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo; Yoshii, Fumio; Hyakutake, Kenichiro

    1995-01-01

    A feasibility study on utilization of vitrified high level radioactive waste (VW) as radiation source has been carried out. Natural rubber latex was radiation vulcanized with VW to demonstrate the feasibility. The dose rate was 0.1 kGy/hr. As a sensitizer, n-butyl acrylate was added. Negligible small activation of natural rubber (NR) latex by neutron from the VW was observed. The residual sensitizer in the irradiated latex and physical properties of film molded from the irradiated latex were the same level with the conventional radiation vulcanization of NR latex with γ-rays from Co-60. Surgical gloves and protective rubber gloves for radioactive contamination were produced from 20 litters of NR latex vulcanized with 2 VWs. The physical properties of both gloves were acceptable. These results suggested that vitrified high level waste can be used as an industrial radiation source. (author)

  6. A compact ultra-clean system for deploying radioactive sources inside the KamLAND detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, T.I., E-mail: tbanks@berkeley.edu [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Freedman, S.J. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Wallig, J.; Ybarrolaza, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Inoue, K. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Kishimoto, Y. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Koga, M. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Mitsui, T. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Nakamura, K. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); and others

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact, ultra-clean device used to deploy radioactive sources along the vertical axis of the KamLAND liquid-scintillator neutrino detector for purposes of calibration. The device worked by paying out and reeling in precise lengths of a hanging, small-gauge wire rope (cable); an assortment of interchangeable radioactive sources could be attached to a weight at the end of the cable. All components exposed to the radiopure liquid scintillator were made of chemically compatible UHV-cleaned materials, primarily stainless steel, in order to avoid contaminating or degrading the scintillator. To prevent radon intrusion, the apparatus was enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing inside a glove box, and both volumes were regularly flushed with purified nitrogen gas. An infrared camera attached to the side of the housing permitted real-time visual monitoring of the cable's motion, and the system was controlled via a graphical user interface.

  7. Generation projection of solid and liquid radioactive wastes and spent radioactive sources in Mexico; Proyeccion de generacion de desechos radiactivos solidos, liquidos y fuentes radiactivas gastadas en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia A, E.; Hernandez F, I. Y.; Fernandez R, E. [Universidad Politecnica del Valle de Toluca, Km 5.7 Carretera Almoloya de Juarez, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Monroy G, F.; Lizcano C, D., E-mail: fabiola.monroy@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    This work is focused to project the volumes of radioactive aqueous liquid wastes and spent radioactive sources that will be generated in our country in next 15 years, solids compaction and radioactive organic liquids in 10 years starting from the 2014; with the purpose of knowing the technological needs that will be required for their administration. The methodology involves six aspects to develop: the definition of general objectives, to specify the temporary horizon of projection, data collection, selection of the prospecting model and the model application. This approach was applied to the inventory of aqueous liquid wastes, as well as radioactive compaction organic and solids generated in Mexico by non energy applications from the 2001 to 2014, and of the year 1997 at 2014 for spent sources. The applied projection models were: Double exponential smoothing associating the tendency, Simple Smoothing and Lineal Regression. For this study was elected the first forecast model and its application suggests that: the volume of the compaction solid wastes, aqueous liquids and spent radioactive sources will increase respectively in 152%, 49.8% and 55.7%, while the radioactive organic liquid wastes will diminish in 13.15%. (Author)

  8. Problems and management of radioactive sources and measures against illicit trafficking of nuclear materials in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strezov, A.

    1998-01-01

    Illicit trafficking of nuclear materials continues to pose a danger to public health and safety and to nuclear non proliferation efforts. The majority of cases so far have involved only small amounts of fissile materials or mainly radioactive sources in Bulgaria. A proper scheme for analysis of seized nuclear materials will be developed based on existing equipment for NDA analysis of nuclear materials supplemented by new system through PHARE project assistance by EU experts. (author)

  9. Safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarfaj, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The present status of the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials in Saudi Arabia is reviewed in details. Hazards and potential threat, material control and responsible parties, in addition to management and the technical requirements, are the main topics that are discussed. Some interest is given to the responsibilities of the regulatory authority, with special emphasis on the role of King Abdulaziz city for Science and Technology as a national competent authority. (author)

  10. Security of handling radioactive sources and the role of the regulatory body in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, M.

    1998-01-01

    The motivation of the present paper was undertaken to discuss the system adopted by the National Centre for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NCNSRC) in handling the radioactive sources inside the country. The system concentrates mainly on the role of the centre concerning three main categories namely regulations, licensing and training. The mutual co-operation between the regulatory body and the other agencies concerning this matter is going to be presented. (author)

  11. Charge breeding of radioactive isotopes at the CARIBU facility with an electron beam ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrasek, R. C.; Dickerson, C. A.; Hendricks, M.; Ostroumov, P.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.; Zinkann, G.

    2018-05-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Source Charge Breeder (EBIS-CB) has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory as part of the californium rare ion breeder upgrade. For the past year, the EBIS-CB has been undergoing commissioning as part of the ATLAS accelerator complex. It has delivered both stable and radioactive beams with A/Q 18% into a single charge state. The operation of this device, challenges during the commissioning phase, and future improvements will be discussed.

  12. New depositing method of Langmuir-Blodgett film of fatty acid soap as a radioactive source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwahashi, Makio; Watanabe, Norifumi; Seimiya, Tsutomu; Naito, Fujio

    1985-02-01

    A stable radioactive source in vacuo was obtained by a new depositing method of Langmuir-Blodgett (L/B) film. In spite of the slight consumption of the substrate solution (only 2-2.5 ml) for preparing a 15 mm x 25 mm sized L/B film containing four molecular layers of /sup 109/Cd-eicosanoate, the deposition of the film was complete. (author).

  13. Spotting Radioactive Sources Buried Underground Using an Airborne Radiation Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinfeld, M.; Wengrowicz, U.; Beck, A.; Marcus, E.; Tirosh, D.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides theoretical background concerning the capability of the Airborne Radiation Monitoring System [1]to detect fission products buried at 1-meter depth under the ground surface,at a flight altitude of 100 meters above ground.The 137 Cs source was used as a typical fission product. The System monitors radioactive contamination in the air or on the ground using two 2 inch NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors and computerized accessories for analysis purposes

  14. Alpha spectrometry of thick sources. II. Application to the study of radioactive equilibria in uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena Barrenechea, M.L.; Tormo Ferrero, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method for determining nuclide activities in 4n + 2 uranium series using alpha spectrometry of thick sources is described. This method has been applied to several uranium ores, showing different states of radioactive equilibria. The spectra from samples prepared by cold compression show some anomalies, due to the evolution and later decay of 219 Rn and daughters. This phenomenon must be taken in consideration when computing spectra line intensities. (author) [es

  15. A Low-Tech, Low-Budget Storage Solution for High Level Radioactive Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett Carlsen; Ted Reed; Todd Johnson; John Weathersby; Joe Alexander; Dave Griffith; Douglas Hamelin

    2014-07-01

    The need for safe, secure, and economical storage of radioactive material becomes increasingly important as beneficial uses of radioactive material expand (increases inventory), as political instability rises (increases threat), and as final disposal and treatment facilities are delayed (increases inventory and storage duration). Several vendor-produced storage casks are available for this purpose but are often costly — due to the required design, analyses, and licensing costs. Thus the relatively high costs of currently accepted storage solutions may inhibit substantial improvements in safety and security that might otherwise be achieved. This is particularly true in areas of the world where the economic and/or the regulatory infrastructure may not provide the means and/or the justification for such an expense. This paper considers a relatively low-cost, low-technology radioactive material storage solution. The basic concept consists of a simple shielded storage container that can be fabricated locally using a steel pipe and a corrugated steel culvert as forms enclosing a concrete annulus. Benefits of such a system include 1) a low-tech solution that utilizes materials and skills available virtually anywhere in the world, 2) a readily scalable design that easily adapts to specific needs such as the geometry and radioactivity of the source term material), 3) flexible placement allows for free-standing above-ground or in-ground (i.e., below grade or bermed) installation, 4) the ability for future relocation without direct handling of sources, and 5) a long operational lifetime . ‘Le mieux est l’ennemi du bien’ (translated: The best is the enemy of good) applies to the management of radioactive materials – particularly where the economic and/or regulatory justification for additional investment is lacking. Development of a low-cost alternative that considerably enhances safety and security may lead to a greater overall risk reduction than insisting on

  16. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M., E-mail: fernandopeleias@gmail.com, E-mail: czeituni@ipen.br, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br; and others

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is a term used generically to represent a group of more than 100 illnesses, including malignant tumors from different locations. According to World Health Organization (WHO), is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounted for 7.6 million deaths. Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type in the world, representing about 10% of all cases of cancer and its treatment may be by surgery, radiotherapy or even vigilant observation. A method of radiotherapy which has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness is brachytherapy, where radioactive seeds are placed inside or next to the area requiring treatment, which reduces the probability of unnecessary damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Currently, the radioactive isotope Iodine-125, adsorbed on silver substrate, is one of the most used in prostate brachytherapy. The present study compares several deposition methods of radioactive Iodine on silver substrate, in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers of the institute. Therefore, Iodine-131 was used for testing (same chemical behavior of Iodine -125). Three methods were selected: method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 65.16% ; method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by David Kubiatowicz -HCl) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80% . Based on the results, the second method is the suggested one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. (author)

  17. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a term used generically to represent a group of more than 100 illnesses, including malignant tumors from different locations. According to World Health Organization (WHO), is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounted for 7.6 million deaths. Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type in the world, representing about 10% of all cases of cancer and its treatment may be by surgery, radiotherapy or even vigilant observation. A method of radiotherapy which has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness is brachytherapy, where radioactive seeds are placed inside or next to the area requiring treatment, which reduces the probability of unnecessary damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Currently, the radioactive isotope Iodine-125, adsorbed on silver substrate, is one of the most used in prostate brachytherapy. The present study compares several deposition methods of radioactive Iodine on silver substrate, in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers of the institute. Therefore, Iodine-131 was used for testing (same chemical behavior of Iodine -125). Three methods were selected: method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 65.16% ; method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by David Kubiatowicz -HCl) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80% . Based on the results, the second method is the suggested one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. (author)

  18. A high-efficiency positive (negative) surface ionization source for radioactive ion beam (abstract)a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Mills, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    A versatile, new concept, spherical-geometry, positive (negative) surface-ionization source has been designed and fabricated which will have the capability of generating both positive- and negative-ion beams without mechanical changes to the source. The source utilizes a highly permeable, high-work-function Ir ionizer (φ≡5.29 eV) for ionizing highly electropositive atoms/molecules; while for negative-surface ionization, the work function is lowered to φ≡1.43 eV by continually feeding cesium vapor through the ionizer matrix. The use of this technique for negative ion beam generation has the potential of overcoming the chronic poisoning effects experienced with LaB 6 while enhancing considerably the efficiency for negative surface ionization of atoms and molecules with intermediate electron affinities. The flexibility of operation in either mode makes it especially attractive for radioactive ion beam applications and, therefore, the source will be used as a complementary replacement for the high-temperature electron impact ionization sources presently in use at the Holifield radioactive beam facility. The design features and operational principles of the source will be described in this report. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. A positive (negative) surface ionization source concept for radioactive ion beam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Mills, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    A novel, versatile, new concept, spherical-geometry, positive (negative) surface-ionization source has been designed and fabricated which will have the capability of generating both positive- and negative-ion beams without mechanical changes to the source. The source utilizes a highly permeable, high-work-function Ir ionizer (φ ≅ 5.29 eV) for ionizing highly electropositive atoms/molecules; while for negative-surface ionization, the work function is lowered by continually feeding a highly electropositive vapor through the ionizer matrix. The use of this technique to effect low work function surfaces for negative ion beam generation has the potential of overcoming the chronic poisoning effects experienced with LaB 6 while enhancing the probability for negative ion formation of atomic and molecular species with low to intermediate electron affinities. The flexibility of operation in either mode makes it especially attractive for radioactive ion beam (RIB) applications and, therefore, the source will be used as a complementary replacement for the high-temperature electron impact ionization sources presently in the use at the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility (HRIBF). The design features and operational principles of the source are described in this report. (orig.)

  20. The UK's Surplus Source Disposal Programme: successful management of a national radioactive legacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Clive; Burns, Philip; Wakerley, Malcolm; Watson, Isabelle; Cook, Marianne; Moloney, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Between 2004 and 2009, the Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP) arranged and subsidised the safe disposal or recycling of more than 11 000 unwanted radioactive items containing in total more than 8.5 x 10 14 Bq of activity, from some 500 sites throughout the United Kingdom. Sources were removed principally from universities, schools and colleges, museums, and hospitals. SSDP was funded by the UK Government and managed by the Environment Agency. The programme was delivered at a total cost of Pounds 7.14 million, nearly Pounds 2 million less than its initial budget. This was a big success for health and safety, the environment, business and the public purse. Current legislative requirements under the High Activity Sealed Sources Directive, which came into effect during 2005, will prevent a build-up of high activity surplus sources in future. Continuing vigilance may be needed to avoid a build-up of lower activity disused sources. (note)

  1. The UK's Surplus Source Disposal Programme: successful management of a national radioactive legacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Clive [Environment Agency, Block 1, Government Buildings, Burghill Road, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS10 6BF (United Kingdom); Burns, Philip [Formerly of the Environment Agency, Olton Court, 10 Warwick Road, Solihull B92 7HX (United Kingdom); Wakerley, Malcolm [Formerly of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Ergon House, 17 Smith Square, London SW1P 3JR (United Kingdom); Watson, Isabelle [Scottish Environment Protection Agency, 5 Redwood Crescent, Peel Park, East Kilbride G74 5PP (United Kingdom); Cook, Marianne [Scottish Government, Victoria Quay, Edinburgh EH6 6QQ (United Kingdom); Moloney, Barry [Safeguard International (now EnergySolutions), B168, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QT (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Between 2004 and 2009, the Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP) arranged and subsidised the safe disposal or recycling of more than 11 000 unwanted radioactive items containing in total more than 8.5 x 10{sup 14} Bq of activity, from some 500 sites throughout the United Kingdom. Sources were removed principally from universities, schools and colleges, museums, and hospitals. SSDP was funded by the UK Government and managed by the Environment Agency. The programme was delivered at a total cost of Pounds 7.14 million, nearly Pounds 2 million less than its initial budget. This was a big success for health and safety, the environment, business and the public purse. Current legislative requirements under the High Activity Sealed Sources Directive, which came into effect during 2005, will prevent a build-up of high activity surplus sources in future. Continuing vigilance may be needed to avoid a build-up of lower activity disused sources. (note)

  2. Declaration and authorization forms for the fabrication, distribution or use of radioactive sources or electric generators of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document gathers all the forms to be completed when declaring or when asking for an authorization for the fabrication, retailing or use of radioactive sources or electric equipment generating ionizing radiation. These forms can concern all domains (use of sealed radioactive sources, possession and use of a particle accelerator or of radionuclides, import or export of radionuclides or of products containing radionuclides), or the use of such materials or equipment in the medical sector, or the fabrication and use in industry or research, or in user's guides for radioactive sources

  3. Characterization of source rocks and groundwater radioactivity at the Chihuahua valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renteria V, M.; Montero C, M.E.; Reyes C, M.; Herrera P, E.F.; Valenzuela H, M. [Centro de lnvestigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Miguel de Cervantes 120, 31109 Chihuahua, (Mexico); Rodriguez P, A. [World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Chihuahuan Desert Program, Coronado 1005, 31000 Chihuahua (Mexico); Manjon C, G.; Garcia T, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada 11, ETS Arquitectura, Av. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla, (Spain); Crespo, T. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid, (Spain)]. e-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx

    2007-07-01

    As part of a scientific research project about alpha radioactivity in groundwater for human consumption at the Chihuahua City, the characterization of rock sources of radioactivity around de Chihuahua valley was developed. The radioactivity of groundwater and sediments was determined, too. The radioactivity of uranium- and thorium- series isotopes contained in rocks was obtained by high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. Some representative values are 50 Bq/kg for the mean value of Bi-214 activity, and 121.5 Bq/kg for the highest value at West of the city. The activity of sediments, extracted during wells perforation, was determined using a Nal(TI) detector. A non-reported before uranium ore was localized at the San Marcos range formation. Its outcrops are inside the Chihuahua-Sacramento valley basin and its activity characterization was performed. Unusually high specific uranium activities, determined by alpha spectrometry, were obtained in water, plants, sediments and fish extracted at locations close to outcrops of uranium minerals. The activity of water of the San Marcos dam reached 7.7 Bq/L. The activity of fish, trapped at San Marcos dam, is 0.99 Bq/kg. Conclusions about the contamination of groundwater at North of Chihuahua City were obtained. (Author)

  4. Characterization of source rocks and groundwater radioactivity at the Chihuahua valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renteria V, M.; Montero C, M.E.; Reyes C, M.; Herrera P, E.F.; Valenzuela H, M.; Rodriguez P, A.; Manjon C, G.; Garcia T, R.; Crespo, T.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a scientific research project about alpha radioactivity in groundwater for human consumption at the Chihuahua City, the characterization of rock sources of radioactivity around de Chihuahua valley was developed. The radioactivity of groundwater and sediments was determined, too. The radioactivity of uranium- and thorium- series isotopes contained in rocks was obtained by high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. Some representative values are 50 Bq/kg for the mean value of Bi-214 activity, and 121.5 Bq/kg for the highest value at West of the city. The activity of sediments, extracted during wells perforation, was determined using a Nal(TI) detector. A non-reported before uranium ore was localized at the San Marcos range formation. Its outcrops are inside the Chihuahua-Sacramento valley basin and its activity characterization was performed. Unusually high specific uranium activities, determined by alpha spectrometry, were obtained in water, plants, sediments and fish extracted at locations close to outcrops of uranium minerals. The activity of water of the San Marcos dam reached 7.7 Bq/L. The activity of fish, trapped at San Marcos dam, is 0.99 Bq/kg. Conclusions about the contamination of groundwater at North of Chihuahua City were obtained. (Author)

  5. Regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Prouza, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes legal and regulatory provisions for radiation protection and safe use of sources of ionizing radiation in the Czech Republic with special emphasis on aspects of bringing activities under regulatory control and releasing them from it. It covers the development of a new legal framework, the work of the regulatory body, an overview of sources in use and provisions to achieve effective regulatory control of facilities and releases of radioactive material into the environment. Also, it describes reported unusual events with a proposed scheme for their classification and evaluation. (author)

  6. Selection of targets and ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    In this report, the authors describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications. A brief review of present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect fast and efficient diffusion release of the short-lived species is also given

  7. Control of trafficking of radioactive sources/substances on European Community eastern border

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovjagina, Irina; Graveris, Visvaldis

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Taking into account Latvia geographical location, historical core stones (the dissolution of Soviet Union, join to European Community) and increasing of the international terrorism treats, control fissile and non-fissile radioactive material become one of high priorities. During past 2 years active work and practical exercise with representative from Ministry of Defense, Police, and Custom etc. on control of trafficking of such materials were performed and Operational Manual for Control on Radioactive Materials for Customs and Policy officers is issued. All land borders check points with Russian Federation and Byelorussian, all harbors and airports were equipped with a gamma/ neutrons or gamma control portals. To control unwanted material traffic within the country, as well as to ensure the recycled scrap metal is source-free use of monitoring portals and additional portable detectors in the past years strictly increased. Cases with alarm levels, when gamma dose rate exceeds more than 1.5 times the background level, are subject to reporting and analyzing by Radiation Safety Centre (RDC) experts (24 hours on duty). Consultative phone service for inhabitants is maintained; guidelines and working procedures within Authority and other Institutions involving were developed and implemented. As a result, in 2007 RDC has got 612 reports from the border. In 83% cases this was relevant to the trains, in 17%- to the trucks. Mostly enhanced activity was due to potassium compounds in fertilizers (85%), due to ceramics (4%), abrasives (2.5%), and refractory materials (3%). Controlling scrap metal there were revealed two sources in 2007 - one Sr-90 calibration source and other Cs-137 orphan source (origin unknown). The presence of radioactive sources in scrap in the past 3 years has been represented by Co-60, Cs-137 and Sr-90 sources, parts of statically electricity neutralizers, Ra-226. Several times NORM industries polluted materials were from scrap excluded

  8. Radon Adsorbed in Activated Charcoal--A Simple and Safe Radiation Source for Teaching Practical Radioactivity in Schools and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-01-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal.…

  9. Radioactive sources and contaminated materials in scrap: monitoring, detection and remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallini, R.; Berna, V.; Bonora, A.; Santini, M.

    1999-01-01

    The scrap recycling in steel and other metal mills represents one of the most relevant activities in the Province of Brescia (Lombardy, Italy). In our Province more than 20 million tonnes of metal scrap are recycled every year by a melting process. Since 1990, many accidents which took place were caused by the unwanted melting of radioactive sources, that were probably hidden in metal scrap. In 1993, the Italian Government stated directives to monitor metal scrap imported from non-EC countries because of the suspicion of the illegal traffic of radioactive materials. In 1996, a law imposed the control of all metal scrap, regardless of their origins. Since 1993, our staff have controlled thousands of railway wagons and trucks. Approximately a hundred steel mills and foundries of aluminium, cooper, brass, etc. have also been controlled and many samples have been collected (flue dust, slag, finished products). During these controls, contaminated areas have been brought to light in two warehouses (Cs 137), in 6 companies (Cs 137 and Am 241), in two landfills of industrial waste (Cs 137) and in a quarry (Cs 137). Up to now the contaminated areas have been cleaned, except for the last one. About 150 radioactive sources on contaminated materials have been found in metal scrap. We found radioactive sources of Co 60, Ra 226, Ir 192, Kr 85, Am 241, while the contamination of metals was mainly due to Ra 226. The situation described above justifies an accurate control of the amount of scrap to reduce the risk of contamination of the workers in the working areas, in the environment and in the general public. (author)

  10. Strategy for fitting source strength and reconstruction procedure in radioactive particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosorov, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    The Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT) technique is widely applied to study the dynamic properties of flows inside a reactor. Usually, a single radioactive particle that is neutrally buoyant with respect to the phase is used as a tracker. The particle moves inside a 3D volume of interest, and its positions are determined by an array of scintillation detectors, which count the incoming photons. The particle position coordinates are calculated by using a reconstruction procedure that solves a minimization problem between the measured counts and calibration data. Although previous studies have described the influence of specified factors on the RPT resolution and sensitivities, the question of how to choose an appropriate source strength and reconstruction procedure for the given RPT setup remains an unsolved problem. This work describes and applies the original strategy for fitting both the source strength and the sampling time interval to a specified RPT setup to guarantee a required accuracy of measurements. Additionally, the measurement accuracy of an RPT setup can be significantly increased by changing the reconstruction procedure. The results of the simulations, based on the Monte Carlo approach, have demonstrated that the proposed strategy allows for the successful implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle when designing the RPT setup. The limitations and drawbacks of the proposed procedure are also presented. - Highlights: • We develop an original strategy for fitting source strength and measurement time interval in radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique. • The proposed strategy allows successfully to implement the ALAPA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle in designing of a RPT setup. • Measurement accuracy of a RPT setup can be significantly increased by improvement of the reconstruction procedure. • The algorithm can be applied to monitor the motion of the radioactive tracer in a reactor

  11. Assessment of the properties of disused sealed radioactive sources for disposal in a borehole facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjepong, K.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive wastes arise from applications in which radioactive materials are used. Medicine, industries and agriculture are examples of areas where radioactive materials are used. Most of the radioactive materials used in nuclear applications are in the form of sealed radioactive sources (SRS). After a number of usages, the SRS may no longer be useful enough for its original purpose and will be considered as a disused sealed radioactive source (DSRS). DSRS are potentially dangerous to human health and the environment, and therefore important to manage them safely. Currently in Ghana, DSRS are collected and stored awaiting a final disposal option. There are ongoing plans to implement the Borehole Disposal of Disused Sealed Sources (BOSS) system in Ghana as a final disposal option. There are, however, concerns about the number of DSRS disposal packages that can safely be disposed in a narrow borehole underground in a long term without posing any harm to people and the environment. It is therefore necessary to assess the properties of DSRS that need to be placed into the borehole to determine the safety of this disposal option. For this study, 160 DSRS were selected from the DSRS inventory. The present activity, volume, A/D ratio and thermal output of all the DSRS were determined. The SIMBOD database tool was used to determine the number of capsules and disposal packages that will be required with respect to the DSRS registered into it. Also, verification measurements to confirm the DSRS inventory data were conducted. The assessment have shown that DSRS used in this study would require a total of seven (7) capsules. The estimated total activity of the disposal packages were below the waste acceptance criteria and the thermal output for each disposal package were also below the 50W limit. One borehole with an estimated length of 57 m will be safe to dispose the DSRS used in this study. The verification measurements confirmed the confirmed the DSRS inventory data. It

  12. Regulatory control and safety of radiation and radioactive sources in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The application of ionizing radiation and radioactive sources in different fields such as, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and teaching is constantly increasing in Bangladesh. Any system enacted to control exposure to ionizing radiation has as primary objective the protection of health of people against the deleterious effects of radiation. Establishing the appropriate level of radiological protection and safety of radiation sources used in practice or intervention attains this objective. The regulatory program governing the safe use of radioactive and radiation sources in Bangladesh is based on the legislation enacted as Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NSRC) Act-93 and NSRC Rules-97 and its implementation by the competent authority. The radiation control infrastructures and procedure are described as well as their functioning for the implementation of relevant activities such as licensing, regular inspection, personal dose monitoring, emergency preparedness, etc. The issue of security of radiation source is dealt in close relation with the preparation and use of the inventory of all radiation sources in the country

  13. Development of target ion source systems for radioactive beams at GANIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajeat, O., E-mail: bajeat@ganil.fr [GANIL, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN Cedex 05 (France); Delahaye, P. [GANIL, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN Cedex 05 (France); Couratin, C. [GANIL, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN Cedex 05 (France); LPC Caen, 6 bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 CAEN Cedex (France); Dubois, M.; Franberg-Delahaye, H.; Henares, J.L.; Huguet, Y.; Jardin, P.; Lecesne, N.; Lecomte, P.; Leroy, R.; Maunoury, L.; Osmond, B.; Sjodin, M. [GANIL, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN Cedex 05 (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • For Spiral 1, a febiad ion source has been connected to a graphite target. • For Spiral 2, an oven made with a carbon resistor is under development. • We made some measurement of effusion in the Spiral 2 target. • A laser ion source is under construction. -- Abstract: The GANIL facility (Caen, France) is dedicated to the acceleration of heavy ion beams including radioactive beams produced by the Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) method at the SPIRAL1 facility. To extend the range of radioactive ion beams available at GANIL, using the ISOL method two projects are underway: SPIRAL1 upgrade and the construction of SPIRAL2. For SPIRAL1, a new target ion source system (TISS) using the VADIS FEBIAD ion source coupled to the SPIRAL1 carbon target will be tested on-line by the end of 2013 and installed in the cave of SPIRAL1 for operation in 2015. The SPIRAL2 project is under construction and is being design for using different production methods as fission, fusion or spallation reactions to cover a large area of the chart of nuclei. It will produce among others neutron rich beams obtained by the fission of uranium induced by fast neutrons. The production target made from uranium carbide and heated at 2000 °C will be associated with several types of ion sources. Developments currently in progress at GANIL for each of these projects are presented.

  14. Targets for ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is based on the use of the well-known on-line isotope separator (ISOL) technique in which radioactive nuclei are produced by fusion type reactions in selectively chosen target materials by high-energy proton, deuteron, or He ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of radioactive ion beams (RIBs), selection of the most appropriate target material for production of the species of interest is, perhaps, the most difficult. In this report, we briefly review present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect maximum diffusion release rates of the short-lived species that can be realized at the temperature limits of specific target materials. We also describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the HRIBF as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications

  15. Application of wireless sensor network to problems of detection and tracking of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, P

    2006-01-01

    International efforts are being conducted to warranty a continuous control of radioactive sources. A theoretical and practical study has been achieved about the feasibility of installing wireless sensor networks on nuclear installations, or plants that uses radioactive material. The study is faced through the implementation of a system designed over the relatively new platform of motes, that gives a great flexibility for distributing sensors taking advantages of new wireless technologies and high-level programming. The work shows an analysis of the state of the technique of sensors, detectors, antennas and power supply including nuclear power supply. It also shows contributions on these fields by experimentation and proposed designs. Three applications that justify the technology are shown and a demonstration project is proposed. The social improvements of the system basically are a technical approach to the continuous control of radioactive sources during their life cycle and the online monitoring of the staff with the possibility of identifying and optimizing the procedures that are the maximum of expositions in practice or detecting potentials expositions [es

  16. Strengthening the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials: Timely action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    When used as they should be, commercial radiation sources and radioactive materials are useful tools that pose no unacceptable risks to people or environment. In fact, their applications in fields such as medicine, industry, agriculture, and environmental research help countries to achieve sizeable social and economic benefits important to global goals of sustainable development. For most of the past half century, the IAEA has been instrumental in advancing the application of techniques that constructively make use of ionizing radiation properties, particularly in developing countries. But though global standards are in place, and being strengthened, a disturbing picture is emerging. It is regrettably framed by tragic consequences from accidents that involved unsafe, abandoned, lost, or uncontrolled radiation sources, including illicit trafficking of radioactive materials, notably in the 1990s. A turning point in global awareness of serious problems came in 1998, at an international conference in France. In March 1999, the IAEA Board of Governors discussed the issue, and a multi faced Action Plan is being submitted to the general Conference. This edition of IAEA Bulletin looks closely at the problems and issues the international community is facing, and the steps States are taking to reinforce the safety and security of radioactive materials

  17. HELER: UNA HERRAMIENTA PARA LA INGENIERÍA DE REQUISITOS AUTOMATIZADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Callejas Cuervo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el resultado de la investigación realizada con el fin de implementar la herramienta HELER (Herramienta Libre para la Especificación de Requisitos, que ofrece soporte a las actividades de Ingeniería de Requisitos contempladas en la fase de entendimiento del problema, enmarcada dentro del Proceso Unificado. Se explica de manera breve la herramienta, en cuanto a sus módulos de proyecto, de stakeholder, de actores y casos de uso y, luego, de requisitos; posteriormente se proponen los trabajos futuros de investigación y finalmente se presentan algunas conclusiones importantes.

  18. Modelos del proceso de educción de requisitos: Un mapeo sistemático

    OpenAIRE

    Dante Carrizo; Cristian Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    La educción es una actividad dentro del proceso de la Ingeniería de Requisitos que recupera información relevante acerca del dominio del problema y de las necesidades de los stakeholders para la conformación de los requisitos del producto software. Para evaluar la efectividad de la educción, es necesario conocer y modelar la influencia del contexto en el cual se desarrolla este proceso. Este artículo presenta el estado del arte sobre la actividad de educción de requisitos, principalmente sobr...

  19. Sources to environmental radioactive contamination from nuclear activities in the former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polikarpov, G.G.; Aarkrog, A.

    1993-01-01

    There is three major sites of radioactive environmental contamination in the former USSR: the Cheliabinsk region in the Urals, Chernobyl NPP in Ukraine and Novaya Zemlya in the Arctic Ocean. The first mentioned is the most important with regard to local (potential) contamination, the last one dominates the global contamination. A number of sites and sources are less well known with regard to environmental contamination. This is thus the case for the plutonium production factories at Tomsk and Dodonovo. More information on nuclear reactors in lost or dumped submarines is also needed. From a global point of view reliable assessment of the radioactive run-off from land and deposits of nuclear waste in the Arctic Ocean are in particular pertinent

  20. Virtual Reality Based Accurate Radioactive Source Representation and Dosimetry for Training Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molto-Caracena, T.; Vendrell Vidal, E.; Goncalves, J.G.M.; Peerani, P.; )

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) technologies have much potential for training applications. Success relies on the capacity to provide a real-time immersive effect to a trainee. For a training application to be an effective/meaningful tool, 3D realistic scenarios are not enough. Indeed, it is paramount having sufficiently accurate models of the behaviour of the instruments to be used by a trainee. This will enable the required level of user's interactivity. Specifically, when dealing with simulation of radioactive sources, a VR model based application must compute the dose rate with equivalent accuracy and in about the same time as a real instrument. A conflicting requirement is the need to provide a smooth visual rendering enabling spatial interactivity and interaction. This paper presents a VR based prototype which accurately computes the dose rate of radioactive and nuclear sources that can be selected from a wide library. Dose measurements reflect local conditions, i.e., presence of (a) shielding materials with any shape and type and (b) sources with any shape and dimension. Due to a novel way of representing radiation sources, the system is fast enough to grant the necessary user interactivity. The paper discusses the application of this new method and its advantages in terms of time setting, cost and logistics. (author)

  1. Implantation of a databank of radioactive sources; Implantacao de um banco de dados de fontes radioativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joana D' Arc Moraes dos

    2015-07-01

    Radionuclides are isotopes that emit radiation. They can be safely applied in medicine, industry, basic research, for metrology and for environmental control. In most applications each radionuclide needs to be characterized regarding their activity concentration (AC) in Becquerel per gram (Bq / g) and also their measurement uncertainty. The Radionuclide Laboratory in the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry, belonging to the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), has a number of standardization systems, where the activity concentrations and the measurement uncertainty are determined. Some radionuclides are stored in glass vials for later use; they have billions of years’ half-lives. These standard solutions are identified by their symbol radioactive element followed by a number. There are hundreds of light bulbs with radioactive sources that periodically need their concentration of activity to be inventoried. The previously deployed control system only allowed access from a unique laboratory point. The inventory was done individually and then was integrated to individual activities in order to determine the overall activity of each radionuclide. This work aims to implement an integrated standards database to an information system that allows users to gain access from various lab points. Thus, the inventory of radioactive sources can be performed in order to signal the need to acquire new solutions. Also, it can indicate, through new activities concentrations, after decay, when different solutions may be discarded in accordance with legal standards of radiation protection and management of the CNEN waste, in order to protect the population and the environment. The adjustment of the existing deficiencies in the system previously used will allow better control related to the use of radioactive materials, minimizing the risks of improper disposal of radionuclides in the environment and can be considered the greatest contribution this work. (author)

  2. Theoretical and instrumental aspects of preparation of radioactive sources for precise nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenkov, M.I.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zhdanov, V.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Precise investigations of spectra from nuclear radiations are quite sensitive to quality of radiation sources used. In an ideal case a source should introduce no noticeable distortion into registered spectrum. In spectroscopy of low-energy gamma-quanta, electrons and alpha particles sample preparation quite frequently turns to be challenging independent scientific investigation. Source preparation is conventionally performed at two stages - extraction of activity from a target and its uniform distribution over a substrate. A general requirement to such radioactive layer is maximal total and specific activity. Unfortunately, there is no universal source preparation method currently available for precise spectroscopy. In a number of cases excellent results are provided by fractional sublimation method based on ability of some elements to evaporate from target material at heating. The method demonstrates a several advantages. The paper introduces a complex of experimental equipment for preparation of high-quality radioactive sources. This complex is arranged in a well-protected heavy box equipped with master-slave manipulators. Biological protection of the box makes it possible to handle activities up to 10 11 Bq. Main part of the complex is a special vacuum post that assures works with active samples in the vacuum up to 10 -7 mm Hg - the operations include fractional sublimation, thermal evaporation, thermal diffusion, evaporation by electron beam, etc. All units of the vacuum post arranged in the box are designed to work with master-slave manipulators. The post is mainly used for preparation of a high-quality beta sources and extraction of microamounts of radionuclides from reactor and cyclotron targets by the method of fractional sublimation. Another important unit of the complex is an equipment for selective chemisorption in vacuum. Complex comprises all required auxiliary equipment The entire complex operated at high rate of reliability. The paper pays

  3. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal—a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-07-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 g of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment.

  4. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal- a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, an ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 gram of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity, the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment. (author)

  5. Assessment of the threat from diverted radioactive material and 'orphan sources' - An international comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhausler, F.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Multiple international activities have been undertaken to contain the trafficking of weapons-usable material in order to reduce the risk from the proliferation of such material. In addition, over the past decade the issue of unintended handling and transport of radioactive material has become increasingly important. Concurrent with the growing number of radioactive sources in industry, medicine, agriculture and research, the probability for losing control over such sources increases as well ('orphan sources'). The potential impact on society and the environment from these two categories of threat has been documented extensively in the literature. In this study representatives from 11 countries in the Americas, Europe and Asia-Pacific formed a network to exchange information concerning nuclear and other radioactive material on the following topic areas: Legislation and regulatory practices for the production, processing, handling, use, holding, storage, transport, import, and export; History of site-specific non-compliance and enforcement actions, as well as punitive actions; National approach for handling the issue of orphan sources; The role of national security forces; Managerial and technical procedures to ensure material inventory control and accountancy; Aspects of physical protection on-site and during transport; Technical/scientific expertise and equipment available at the national level to detect, identify and quantify such material in the field; Level of practical implementation of technical equipment to detect such material at border crossings, airports, railway stations, and mail distribution centres; Cases of seizure of nuclear and contaminated materials, illegal sales and fraud; Training programmes available for preventing, detecting and responding to the loss of control. The results of the analysis show that, despite several international consensus documents and supporting legislation, in several cases major additional efforts are needed

  6. Study of radioactive sources accumulation with application of thermoluminescence dosemeters on the base of alkaline earth metals sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokbergenov, I.; Sadykov, T.

    2001-01-01

    Methodic for study of accumulation and distribution of radioactive sources in a nature objects is developed. An essence of the method consists of in that quantity of accumulated radioactive sources in a nature objects is defining by absorption dose measured with help of thermoluminescent dosemeters on the base of alkaline earth metals sulfates such as CaSO 4 :Dy and SrSO 4 :Eu

  7. Regularity of the wear control of radioactive sources from the nuclear measurers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira L, M.

    2006-01-01

    The control of radioactive sources in Brazil is regulated by the CNEN (National Comissao of Nuclear Energy). The Laboratory of Descontaminacao of the IPEN (Institute of Energy Y Nuclear Investigations) it offers to the companies that work with nuclear measurers, essays for control of the source wear according to the ISO 9978/1992 through the smear tests Y of leakage. The analyses are taken in alpha Y beta detectors of low bottom radiation with annual detection limits around 1 Bq. Certificates of the accepted analyses by the CNEN for sources that already passed its time of validity assured by the makers, but its continue operational are emitted. The smear test is repeated the whole year, while the leakage test repeats to every two years. A balance of the last two years of the activities of the laboratory shows the regularity of the clients Y the growth of companies specialized in radioprotection with official of radioprotection, credited by the regulatory authority that its act as intermediaries in the process, contacting the clients, gathering the samples next to the proprietors of sources Y hiring our services. Overalls, proves that the inspection activities by part of the regulatory authority are fulfil. In 2004, 192 sources were analyzed by the smear method Y 86 sources by leakage. In 2005, 232 sources were analyzed by the smear method Y 60 sources by leakage. All the leakage tests was made in sources of Americium of oneself Y only client that brings the sources so that they dismantle them to him in the Sources production laboratory of the IPEN. By the quantity Y age of the sources that were analyzed in those two years, it is proven that the number of sources without use conditions (total activity measured by the two added methods smaller than 180Bq) it doesn't arrive to 2%. (Author)

  8. Searching for hidden radioactive sources in the Barents Rescue 2001 nuclear emergency exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smethurst, Mark A.; Mogaard, John O.; Mauring, Eirik; Koziel, Janusz; Kihle, Ola

    2001-11-01

    The international nuclear emergency exercise Barents Rescue took place in the vicinity of Boden in northern Sweden between the 12th and 20th of September 2001. The Gamma Search Cell part of the exercise was designed to test the abilities of car-borne and airborne measuring systems to quickly locate and characterise radioactive sources hidden in the countryside. The Geological Survey of Norway participated in the Gamma Search Cell with a car-borne gamma-ray spectrometer system, a field team of three persons and a remote support group of two persons situated in Trondheim. The Geological Survey of Norway team identified 16 sources and 2 small areas of Chernobyl fallout in real time. Two additional sources were identified during post processing of the data. Otherwise the team drove past 2 ''strong'' and 4 weak sources without detecting them. The remaining 9 sources were in locations not visited by the car-borne measuring system. All but two source identifications were reported to the base of operations within a few minutes of discovery. The Geological Survey of Norway's source search strategy worked well and comparatively few strong sources were overlooked in the short time allocated for searching. The measuring system proved to be extremely reliable, making approximately 140,000 measurements during 8 days of measuring in and around Boden. (author)

  9. Management of disused high-activity sealed radioactive sources: Opting for removal from the national territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourão, Rogério Pimenta, E-mail: mouraor@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Since 2007 Brazil has been using the removal from its territory as a strategy for the management of sealed sources. Three campaigns have been carried out so far, each aiming at specific source types or categories. In the first of these campaigns in 2007, 126 neutron sources of American origin were repatriated to the USA, followed in 2010 by around 900 low activity sources (Categories 3 to 5, according to the IAEA classification system). Both operations were conducted by teams of the American institute Los Alamos National Laboratory. A third campaign, focused on high activity sources – essentially Cobalt-60 sources for teletherapy – was carried out between 2016 and 2017 and resulted in 81 spent high activity radioactive sources of American- and Canadian-origin been sent to Germany and the USA. This operation was carried out by a team of South Africa using a dedicated Mobile Hot Cell. The benefits to Brazil resulting from these operations are clear: increase in safety and security; availability of new precious storage space; less effort dedicated to the disused sealed sources storage; less space in the future borehole facility; financial gains in the selling or reuse of steel, lead and depleted uranium from the original shields. An overexposure incident occurred during the operation, in which a worker was exposed to a dose above the annual statutory limit. (author)

  10. Metrological tests of a 200 L calibration source for HPGE detector systems for assay of radioactive waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boshkova, T.; Mitev, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present test procedures, approval criteria and results from two metrological inspections of a certified large volume "1"5"2Eu source (drum about 200 L) intended for calibration of HPGe gamma assay systems used for activity measurement of radioactive waste drums. The aim of the inspections was to prove the stability of the calibration source during its working life. The large volume source was designed and produced in 2007. It consists of 448 identical sealed radioactive sources (modules) apportioned in 32 transparent plastic tubes which were placed in a wooden matrix which filled the drum. During the inspections the modules were subjected to tests for verification of their certified characteristics. The results show a perfect compliance with the NIST basic guidelines for the properties of a radioactive certified reference material (CRM) and demonstrate the stability of the large volume CRM-drum after 7 years of operation. - Highlights: • Large (200 L) volume drum source designed, produced and certified as CRM in 2007. • Source contains 448 identical sealed radioactive "1"5"2Eu sources (modules). • Two metrological inspections in 2011 and 2014. • No statistically significant changes of the certified characteristics over time. • Stable calibration source for HPGe-gamma radioactive waste assay systems.

  11. Radioactive aerosols of the object 'Ukryttya' (a review). Part 4.2. Sources and generation of radioactive aerosols during technogenic activities in 1987 - 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogorodnikov, B.I.; Pazukhin, Eh.M.

    2006-01-01

    The sources of radioactive aerosol formation were considered at operation. It is shown that concentrations, radionuclide composition, size distribution, transfer and transformation in environment depended on physical and chemical processes proceeding within reactor breakdown, man-caused activity into premises of the object 'Shelter' and near ChNPP. 34 refs.; 7 figs.; 11 tab

  12. Accident with radioactive substances in laboratory. An exercise during the education of persons in radiation protection, who are working with open radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolze, B.

    2003-01-01

    In spite of carefulness it is possible,that contamination occur by handling unscaled radioactive sources or in case of an accident. It is demonstrated in an exercise managing an accident with unscaled radioactive sources. The persons, who are educated in radiation protection for handling unsealed radioactive sources, must have knowledge of theoretical regulations of the radiation protection law and of the limits in radiation protection. Also they have to know the handling to reduce possible contamination. They have to be able to calculate the dose of skin contamination. In my lecture I give some information on regulations of accidents with radioactive sources in Germany and a scenario of an accident and I explain, what is to do to manage this event. A person opened an ampoule. The activity splashed and contaminated the person's hand, arm and face. Also in the room there was a contamination. The desk and the floor were contaminated. There were 50 MBq P-32 as NaH 2 P''32O 3 in water solution, I give a report on practices in our courses, which the participants have to do. The radiological experts have to decontaminate the skin and they have to calculate the skin-dose and to give the information to the authorities. (Author) 4 refs

  13. Characterization of sealed radioactive sources. Uncertainty analysis to improve detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, D.G.; Sommers, J.D.; Adamic, M.L.; Jimenez, M.; Giglio, J.J.; Carney, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    A radioactive 137 Cs source has been analyzed for the radioactive parent 137 Cs and stable decay daughter 137 Ba. The ratio of the daughter to parent atoms is used to estimate the date when Cs was purified prior to source encapsulation (an 'age' since purification). The isotopes were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after chemical separation. In addition, Ba was analyzed by isotope dilution ICP-MS (ID-ICP-MS). A detailed error analysis of the mass spectrometric work has been undertaken to identify areas of improvement, as well as quantifying the effect the errors have on the 'age' determined. This paper reports an uncertainty analysis to identifying areas of improvement and alternative techniques that may reduce the uncertainties. In particular, work on isotope dilution using ICP-MS for the 'age' determination of sealed sources is presented. The results will be compared to the original work done using external standards to calibrate the ICP-MS instrument. (author)

  14. Radioactivity in papers: the concentration and source of naturally occurring radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobashi, Asaya

    2005-01-01

    The radioactivities of naturally occurring radionuclides ( 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K) in papers such as magazines, newspapers, and copying papers produced in Japan were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry to obtain information on radioactivity level of papers. The X-ray diffraction measurement of the samples was also carried out to elucidate the source of radionuclides contained in them. The average 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th, and 40 K contents of pocket-sized books were 6.4, 21.5, 23.7, and 18.8 Bq kg -1 , respectively, and those of other kinds of samples were near to or less than the values. The 228 Th content was generally somewhat higher than the 228 Ra content. Possibly 228 Ra was leached from the raw materials of the papers to water during their production in preference to 228 Th. The concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides were correlated to each other. The X-ray diffraction study showed that kaolinite, talc, and calcite were contained in the papers. The kaolinite content of the samples was correlated to the concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides, indicating that the naturally occurring radionuclides in the paper samples were mainly brought with kaolinite used as filler or coating pigment in the papers. The regression analysis of the data showed that the natural radioactivity content of filler kaolinite was higher than that of pigment kaolinite. (author)

  15. Induced Radioactivity in Lead Shielding at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Vinita J; Schaefer, Charles; Kahnhauser, Henry

    2017-06-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was shut down in September 2014. Lead bricks used as radiological shadow shielding within the accelerator were exposed to stray radiation fields during normal operations. The FLUKA code, a fully integrated Monte Carlo simulation package for the interaction and transport of particles and nuclei in matter, was used to estimate induced radioactivity in this shielding and stainless steel beam pipe from known beam losses. The FLUKA output was processed using MICROSHIELD® to estimate on-contact exposure rates with individually exposed bricks to help design and optimize the radiological survey process. This entire process can be modeled using FLUKA, but use of MICROSHIELD® as a secondary method was chosen because of the project's resource constraints. Due to the compressed schedule and lack of shielding configuration data, simple FLUKA models were developed. FLUKA activity estimates for stainless steel were compared with sampling data to validate results, which show that simple FLUKA models and irradiation geometries can be used to predict radioactivity inventories accurately in exposed materials. During decommissioning 0.1% of the lead bricks were found to have measurable levels of induced radioactivity. Post-processing with MICROSHIELD® provides an acceptable secondary method of estimating residual exposure rates.

  16. Management for the prevention of accidents from disused sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this report is to provide advice to sealed radiation source (SRS) users, radioactive waste operators, and other concerned public sectors on the measures to be taken to reduce the risk of accidents associated with disused or spent SRS. The report also explains policies as well as technical and administrative procedures to minimize the risk of accidents and to mitigate the consequences should an accident occur. The report emphasizes areas of high risk in handling disused or spent SRS in any form and condition to help to save health, life and financial resources

  17. A study on the trend of the Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear Materials and Other Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joung-Hoon; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Jung-Soo

    2008-01-01

    As part of its overall programme on nuclear material security, the IAEA has maintained a database on the number of incidents of trafficking in nuclear materials and other radioactive sources since 1995. The ITDB's principle objective is to facilitate the exchange of authoritative information on reported incidents among states. The information collected from the various states is subjected to ongoing analysis by the Agency's ITDB staff to identify common trends and patterns, to assess threats, and to evaluate weaknesses in material security and detection capabilities and practices. In this paper, we will discuss the trends and patterns which are analyzed using the ITDB from 1993 to 2006

  18. Nuclear and x-ray spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Fifteenth annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rink, R.W.; Wood, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Research during the year is summarized briefly for the following areas: nuclear spectroscopy (including nuclear systematics and models and experimental studies of heavy-nucleus decays), x rays from radioactive sources (including L-subshell x-ray fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields and the measurement of tailing corrections in low-energy coincidence intensity determinations), and miscellaneous topics concerning computer codes and equipment. One may assume publication of completed work in the usual channels. Lists of personnel, publications, etc., are included. 7 figures

  19. The status of safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials in Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebeyehu Wolde, G.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1993, the National Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) has been empowered by the 'Radiation Protection Proclamation no. 79/1993' to authorize and inspect regulated activities, issue guidelines and standards and enforce the legislation and regulations. The report describes the status of the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials in Ethiopia and the progress made towards building a sound and effective national regulatory infrastructure. Also, the report highlights the challenges and difficulties encountered and concludes by indicating the way forward towards the strategic goals. (author)

  20. The safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials: The situation in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezzanotte, R.; Sgrilli, E.

    2001-01-01

    An outline of the relevant Italian legislation is provided in the report in order to give an overview of the country's situation concerning the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials. The main rules making up the Italian system are itemized in the report, as regards statutes and legislative acts. Legislative Decree no. 241, 2001, will transpose into Italian legislation the directive 96/29 Euratom, which lays down European Basic Safety Standards in accordance with the recommendations of ICRP Publication 60. The report also refers to the Italian regulatory system and how it is structured and operated. (author)

  1. A high-intensity He-jet production source for radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, D.J.; Kimberly, H.J.; Grisham, D.L.; Talbert, W.L.; Wouters, J.M.; Rosenauer, D.; Bai, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a thin-target, He-jet transport system operating with high primary beam intensities is explored as a high-intensity production source for radioactive beams. This method is expected to work well for short-lived, non-volatile species. As such the thin-target, He-jet approach represents a natural complement to the thick-target ISOL method in which such species are not, in general, rapidly released. Highlighted here is a thin-target, He-jet system that is being prepared for a 500 + μA, 800-MeV proton demonstration experiment at LAMPF this summer

  2. Measures to prevent to illicit users of radioactive sources and nuclear material in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasiunaitiene, R.M.; Mastauskas, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The government of every country, depending on its economic recourses, attaches a great importance to the radiation protection and safety of population. And one of the instruments that helps in realization of this problem is to create a system in the country that prevents the possibility to illicitly use sources of ionizing radiation. It was a very important task to create such a system after Lithuania got back its independence in 1991. Because of its geographic location, Lithuania becomes a transit country of illicit transport of radioactive materials from Russia, Ukraine and other former Soviet states into western countries. At the same time it was very important to ensure the safety of the sources (that means to ensure from stealing, plundering, loss, etc.), because when the former system disintegrated, companies became bankrupt. The system was developed to solve such problems. Under the requirements of legal acts there were prescribed (delegated) functions of State institutions in order of competence in solving the problems to ensure Radiation Protection. Under the requirements of the Law on Radiation Protection, Radiation Protection Center is the main institution in Lithuania responsible for solving the problems of Radiation Protection of the population from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The responsibilities and obligations of the users of the sources were defined in legal acts: 1. The Law on Nuclear Energy; 2. The Law on Radiation Protection; 3. The Law on Radioactive Waste Management; 4. The Law on Changes and Appendices of the Code of the Administrative Law Violations; 5. On the Establishing the State Register of the Sources of Ionizing Radiation and Exposure of Workers, Governmental Resolution; 6. On the Confirm an Regulation of Licensing the Practices with Ionizing Radiation Sources, Governmental Resolution. After approval of the State Register of the Sources of Ionizing Radiation and Exposure of Workers, all the users of sources of

  3. Methodology study for fixation of radioactive iodine in polymeric substrate for brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Souza, Daiane B. de; Benega, Marcos A.G.; Souza, Anderson S. de; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Calos A.; Fernandes, Vagner; Melo, Emerson Ronaldo de; Camargo, Anderson Rogerio de

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is now the second leading cause of death by disease in several countries, including Brazil. Prostate cancer is the most common among men. Brachytherapy is a modality of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed inside or in contact with the organ to be treated. The most widely used radioisotope in prostate brachytherapy is Iodine-125 which is presented fixated on a silver substrate that is subsequently placed inside a titanium capsule. A large dose of radiation is released only in the targeted tumor protecting healthy surrounding tissues. The technique requires the application of 80 - 120 seeds per patient. The implants of seeds have low impact and non-surgical procedures. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. This work proposes an alternative to the seeds that have already been developed, in order to reduce the cost by obtaining a better efficiency on fixing the radioactive iodine onto the epoxy resin. Methods have been developed to perform the fixation of Iodine-125 onto polymeric substrates. The parameters analyzed were the immersion time, type of static or dynamic reaction, concentration of the adsorption solution, the specific activity of the radioactive source, the need for carrier and chemical form of the radioactive Iodine. These experiments defined the most effective method to fixate the Iodine onto the polymeric material (epoxy resin), the Iodine activity in the polymeric substrate, the activity of the distribution of variation in a plot of polymeric cores and the efficiency of the epoxy resin to seal the seed. (author)

  4. Physical protection of mobile radioactive sources commonly used in the well logging and industrial radiography industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, Maegon E.

    2016-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Radiological Security (ORS) is to protect high-activity radiological materials around the globe. ORS works domestically within the United States and collaborates with over 80 countries to protect medical, industrial, research and other radiological sources from being used by malicious actors in a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or radiation exposure device (RED). One area of specific concern is mobile radioactive sources, such as those used in radiography to inspect welds or metal integrity, and those in the oil and gas industry to characterize exploration and production wells in pursuit of oil caches. These mobile radiological sources are of sufficient Curie quantities to be categorized as desirable sources for malicious actors. This presentation will provide an overview of a mobile source tracking system developed by ORS in conjunction with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and will discuss how the system can contribute to source security, as well as next steps to pilot this technology

  5. Radioactive waste evacuation of the sources of a low dose rate brachytherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrada, A.; Huerga, C.; Santa Olalla, I.; Vicedo, A.; Corredoira, E.; Plaza, R.; Vidal, J.; Tellez, M.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The second class Radioactive Installation start -up authorization makes responsible for its security to the installation exploiter and supervisor. The specifications established in the authorization, which are mandatory, point out several actions, some of these actions are the hermeticity tests of radioactive sources an radiologic controls of environment dosimetry. It is necessary to optimize the time spent in each activity, managing them as reasonably as possible. An important matter to take into account is to keep and control only those radioactive or radiological equipment which, even if are in work, have an appropriate performance for the patient treatment Material And Method a Paz hospital has an intracavity brachytherapy (L.D.R.), Curietron model. The Radioprotection Department proposed to remove from service the unit due to its age, this was carried out by the Commission of Guarantee and Quality Control. There were different solutions taken into account to decommission the unit, finally the option chosen as the most convenient for the installation was to manage directly the withdrawal of the radioactive material which consisted of seven Cs-137 probes model CsM1 and total nominal certificated activity of 7770 MBq ( 210 mCi ) dated in May 2005. It also has to be considered as a radioactive waste the inner storage elements of the Curietron and the transport and storage curie stock, built with depleted uranium. To accomplish this aim an evacuation container was designed consisting of an alloy of low-melting point (M.C.P.96), which fulfills the transport conditions imposed by E.N.R.E.S.A. ( Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A). A theoretical calculation was performed to estimate the thickness of the shield which adequate to the rate of dose in contact demanded. Accuracy of these calculations has been verified using T.L. dosimetry. Results The radiation levels during the extraction intervention of the radioactive probes and its transfer to

  6. Non-linear degradation model of cement barriers in a borehole repository for disused radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharbieh, Heidar K.; Cota, Stela

    2015-01-01

    Narrow diameter borehole facilities (a few tens of centimeters), like the BOSS concept developed by the IAEA, provide a safe and cost effective disposal option for radioactive waste and particularly disused sources. The BOSS concept (borehole disposal of sealed radioactive sources) comprises a multi-barrier system of cement grout and stainless steel components. In order to predict the long-time performance of the cement barriers as an input of a future safety assessment under the specific hydrochemical and hydrological conditions, a non-linear degradation model was developed in this work. With the assistance of the program 'PHREEQC' it describes the change of the porosity and the hydraulic conductivity with time, which also let to conclusions concerning the change of the sorption capacity of the cement grout. This work includes the theoretical approach and illustrates the non-liner degradation by means of an exemplary water composition found in the saturated zone and the dimensions of the backfill made of cement grout representing a barrier of the BOSS borehole facility. (author)

  7. Experimental methods in radioactive ion-beam target/ion source development and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welton, R.F.; Alton, G.D.; Cui, B.; Murray, S.N.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed off-line experimental techniques and apparatuses that permit direct measurement of effusive-flow delay times and ionization efficiencies for nearly any chemically reactive element in high-temperature target/ion sources (TIS) commonly used for on-line radioactive ion-beam (RIB) generation. The apparatuses include a hot Ta valve for effusive-flow delay-time measurements, a cooled molecular injection system for determination of ionization efficiencies, and a gas flow measurement/control system for introducing very low, well-defined molecular flows into the TIS. Measurements are performed on a test stand using molecular feed compounds containing stable complements of the radioactive nuclei of interest delivered to the TIS at flow rates commensurate with on-line RIB generation. In this article, the general techniques are described and effusive-flow delay times and ionization efficiency measurements are reported for fluorine in an electron-beam plasma target/ion source developed for RIB generation and operated in both positive- and negative-ion extraction modes. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  8. Environmental radiation control and quality management system in design and operation of sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    New environmental regulations and radiation safety standards are being implemented almost daily to ensure radiation safety, in particular for practices causing exposures to undue radiation doses. A particular emphasis of real challenge for organizations and users of radiation sources has to be for proper radiological safety assessment and is becoming cost effectively to be prepared for auditing. Special concern for the environment is of global . nature, and hence environmental auditing has been and will continue to be an essential practice for improving the environment and for meeting the relevant regulations and standards. In general, most facilities that deal with radioactive sources undertake strict safety measures in terms of personnel radiation protection, handling procedures and security. Hence, those measures should comply with the requirements of the environmental protection standards. Accordingly, a successful quality management system must balance realities of organization and personnel in achieving quality objectives. Organizational principles are found in the technical aspects of' quality management, such as, charting, requirements, measurements, procedures, ... , etc. Human principles are found in the communication side of quality management (e.g. meetings, ,decision making, ,teams, ... , etc). The quality management must understand and balance skills needed to blend them together. Large gamma irradiators present a high potential radiation hazard to the surrounding environment, since the amount of radioactivity is of the order of (P Bq) and a very high dose rates are produced during irradiation. Application of environmental radiation control deemed by regulatory authority and a proper quality management system by the utility would serve public health and safety

  9. Recovery from Iridium-192 flakes of a radioactive source for industrial use after a radiation incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, W.H.; Zapata, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) is the most used and ideal for industrial radiography applications, especially in petrochemical plants and pipelines and provides better contrast sensitivity for thick (25.4 mm). This source has constructive sealed double encapsulation, the internal capsule containing stainless steel to radioactive material in the form of flakes and welded with TIG process. The radiological incident happened at a gas station fuel sales in circumstances in which there was a homogeneity test welds a tank, the flakes or Ir-192 fell off his ponytail and left scattered over an area of 2 m 2 , some fell flat areas and other land so collected in lead shielding and metal container and ground source. Full recovery of the leaflets was performed at the Division of radioactive waste management (GRRA) gaining a total of 22 flakes with no radiation risk to staff performance and installation and the conclusion was reached that the misapplicaion of TIG welding was the main cause the incident. (author)

  10. Dose-rate mapping and search of radioactive sources in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ylaetalo, S.; Karvonen, J.; Ilander, T.; Honkamaa, T.; Toivonen, H.

    1996-12-01

    The Estonian Ministry of Environment and the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) agreed in 1995 on a radiation mapping project in Estonia. The country was searched to find potential man-made radioactive sources. Another goal of the project was to produce a background dose-rate map over the whole country. The measurements provided an excellent opportunity to test new in-field measuring systems that are useful in a nuclear disaster. The basic idea was to monitor road sides, cities, domestic waste storage places and former military or rocket bases from a moving vehicle by measuring gamma spectrum and dose rate. The measurements were carried out using vehicle installed systems consisting of a pressurised ionisation chamber (PIC) in 1995 and a combination of a scintillation spectrometer (NaI(TI)) and Geiger-Mueller-counter (GM) in 1996. All systems utilised GPS-satellite navigation signals to relate the measured dose rates and gamma-spectra to current geographical location. The data were recorded for further computer analysis. The dose rate varied usually between 0.03-0.17 μSv/h in the whole country, excluding a few nuclear material storage places (in Saku and in Sillamae). Enhanced dose rates of natural origin (0.17-0.5 μSv/h) were measured near granite statues, buildings and bridges. No radioactive sources were found on road sides or in towns or villages. (orig.) (14 refs.)

  11. Resistance to radiation and concretes thermal cycles for conditioning of spent radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez N, M.; Monroy G, F.; Gonzalez D, R. C.; Corona P, I. J.; Ortiz A, G.

    2014-10-01

    In order to know the concrete type most suitable for use as a matrix of conditioning of spent radioactive sources, concrete test tubes using 4 different types of cement were prepared: CPC 30-Rs Extra, CPC 30-R Impercem, CPC 30-R Rs and CPC 30-R with two gravel sizes >30 mm and <10 mm. The concrete test tubes were subjected to testing compressive strength after 28 days of hardening and after being irradiated and subjected to thermal cycles. Subsequently they were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, in order to evaluate whether these concretes accredited the tests set by the NOM-019-Nucl-1995. The results show that the compressive strength of the hardened concretes to 28 days presents values between 36 and 25 MPa; applying irradiation the resistance may decrease to 30% of its original strength; and if subjected to high and low temperatures the ettringite formation also causes a decrease in resistance. The results show that concretes made from cement Impercem, Cruz Azul with gravel <10 mm comply with the provisions of standard and they can be used for conditioning of spent radioactive sources. (Author)

  12. Study and survey of assembling parameters to a radioactive source production laboratory used to verify equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, Erica; Nagatomy, Helio Rissei; Moura, Eduardo S.; Zeituni, Carlos Alberto; Hilario, Katia A. Fonseca; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Karam Junior, Dib

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the survey of parameters for the installation and implementation of a laboratory for radioactive sources production at immobilized resin. These sources are used in nuclear medicine for verification of dose calibrators, as the standard guidelines of the National Commission of Nuclear CNEN-NE-3.05 'Radioprotection and safety requirements for nuclear medicine services.' The radioisotopes used for this purpose are: Co-57, Cs-137 and Ba-133, with activities of 185 MBq, 9.3 MBq and 5.4 MBq, respectively. The parameters for the assembly of the laboratory shall be defined according to guidelines that guide the deployment of radiochemical laboratories and standards of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy. (author)

  13. Artificial intelligence methods applied for quantitative analysis of natural radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medhat, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Basic description of artificial neural networks. ► Natural gamma ray sources and problem of detections. ► Application of neural network for peak detection and activity determination. - Abstract: Artificial neural network (ANN) represents one of artificial intelligence methods in the field of modeling and uncertainty in different applications. The objective of the proposed work was focused to apply ANN to identify isotopes and to predict uncertainties of their activities of some natural radioactive sources. The method was tested for analyzing gamma-ray spectra emitted from natural radionuclides in soil samples detected by a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry based on HPGe (high purity germanium). The principle of the suggested method is described, including, relevant input parameters definition, input data scaling and networks training. It is clear that there is satisfactory agreement between obtained and predicted results using neural network.

  14. Study and survey of assembling parameters to a radioactive source production laboratory used to verify equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Erica; Nagatomy, Helio Rissei; Moura, Eduardo S.; Zeituni, Carlos Alberto; Hilario, Katia A. Fonseca; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M., E-mail: egauglitz@ipen.b, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karam Junior, Dib, E-mail: dib.karan@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents the survey of parameters for the installation and implementation of a laboratory for radioactive sources production at immobilized resin. These sources are used in nuclear medicine for verification of dose calibrators, as the standard guidelines of the National Commission of Nuclear CNEN-NE-3.05 'Radioprotection and safety requirements for nuclear medicine services.' The radioisotopes used for this purpose are: Co-57, Cs-137 and Ba-133, with activities of 185 MBq, 9.3 MBq and 5.4 MBq, respectively. The parameters for the assembly of the laboratory shall be defined according to guidelines that guide the deployment of radiochemical laboratories and standards of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy. (author)

  15. Development of simulators algorithms of planar radioactive sources for use in computer models of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Jose Wilson; Leal Neto, Viriato; Lima Filho, Jose de Melo; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents as algorithm of a planar and isotropic radioactive source and by rotating the probability density function (PDF) Gaussian standard subjected to a translatory method which displaces its maximum throughout its field changes its intensity and makes the dispersion around the mean right asymmetric. The algorithm was used to generate samples of photons emerging from a plane and reach a semicircle involving a phantom voxels. The PDF describing this problem is already known, but the generating function of random numbers (FRN) associated with it can not be deduced by direct MC techniques. This is a significant problem because it can be adjusted to simulations involving natural terrestrial radiation or accidents in medical establishments or industries where the radioactive material spreads in a plane. Some attempts to obtain a FRN for the PDF of the problem have already been implemented by the Research Group in Numerical Dosimetry (GND) from Recife-PE, Brazil, always using the technique rejection sampling MC. This article followed methodology of previous work, except on one point: The problem of the PDF was replaced by a normal PDF transferred. To perform dosimetric comparisons, we used two MCES: the MSTA (Mash standing, composed by the adult male voxel phantom in orthostatic position, MASH (male mesh), available from the Department of Nuclear Energy (DEN) of the Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), coupled to MC EGSnrc code and the GND planar source based on the rejection technique) and MSTA N T. The two MCES are similar in all but FRN used in planar source. The results presented and discussed in this paper establish the new algorithm for a planar source to be used by GND

  16. Development of a surface ionization source for the production of radioactive alkali ion beams in SPIRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleon, C.; Jardin, P.; Gaubert, G.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Alcantara-Nunez, J.; Alves Conde, R.; Barue, C.; Boilley, D.; Cornell, J.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Jacquot, B.; Leherissier, P.; Leroy, R.; Lhersonneau, G.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Maunoury, L.; Pacquet, J.Y.; Pellemoine, F.; Pierret, C.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the production of radioactive alkali ion beams by the isotope separation on-line (ISOL) method in SPIRAL I, a surface ionization source has been developed at GANIL to produce singly-charged ions of Li, Na and K. This new source has been designed to work in the hostile environment whilst having a long lifetime. This new system of production has two ohmic heating components: the first for the target oven and the second for the ionizer. The latter, being in carbon, offers high reliability and competitive ionization efficiency. This surface ionization source has been tested on-line using a 48 Ca primary beam at 60.3 A MeV with an intensity of 0.14 pA. The ionization efficiencies obtained for Li, Na and K are significantly better than the theoretical values of the ionization probability per contact. The enhanced efficiency, due to the polarization of the ionizer, is shown to be very important also for short-lived isotopes. In the future, this source will be associated with the multicharged electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) ion source NANOGAN III for production of multicharged alkali ions in SPIRAL. The preliminary tests of the set up are also presented in this contribution.

  17. Metrological tests of a 200 L calibration source for HPGE detector systems for assay of radioactive waste drums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshkova, T; Mitev, K

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present test procedures, approval criteria and results from two metrological inspections of a certified large volume (152)Eu source (drum about 200L) intended for calibration of HPGe gamma assay systems used for activity measurement of radioactive waste drums. The aim of the inspections was to prove the stability of the calibration source during its working life. The large volume source was designed and produced in 2007. It consists of 448 identical sealed radioactive sources (modules) apportioned in 32 transparent plastic tubes which were placed in a wooden matrix which filled the drum. During the inspections the modules were subjected to tests for verification of their certified characteristics. The results show a perfect compliance with the NIST basic guidelines for the properties of a radioactive certified reference material (CRM) and demonstrate the stability of the large volume CRM-drum after 7 years of operation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Basic design and construction of a mobile hot cell for the conditioning of spent high activity radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Hongxiang; Fan Zhiwen; Al-Mughrabi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The conditioning of spent high activity radioactive sources is one important step in sealed radioactive sources management strategies. Based on the practice on the designing of the immobilized hot cell, the handling of the sealed radioactive sources, and the reference of the mobile hot cell constructed in South Africa, SHARS conditioning process and the basic design of a mobile hot cell is developed. The mobile hot cell has been constructed and the tests including the cold test of the SRS conditioning, the hot cell assemble and disassemble and SRS recovery were done. The shielding capacity were tested by 3.8 x 10 13 Bq cobalt-60 sources and the dose rate of the equipment surface, below 2 m, is less than 0.016 mSv/h. It is proved that the designing requirement is meet and the function of the equipment is good. (authors)

  19. Opening remarks at the International Conference on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, Bordeaux, France, 27 June 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, T.

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of radioactive sources are controlled properly. However, radiological accidents have occurred in all regions of the world - which indicates that there is not always sufficient control of sources throughout their life cycle. Even advanced countries with developed regulatory systems lose track of sources each year resulting in orphan sources with the potential to cause incidents or accidents. Actually, an increasing number of cases of uncontrolled movement of sources are reported the Agency's Illicit Trafficking Database (ITDB). The International Conference on Security of Radioactive Sources, held in Vienna, Austria, in 2003, addressed these concerns and called for international initiatives, including the updating of the IAEA Action Plan for the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. As a direct result of the updated Action Plan the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources was revised and approved by the Board of Governors in 2003, its supporting Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources was developed and approved in 2004 and the Safety Guide on Categorization of Radioactive Sources was completed recently. All three documents were developed under the auspices of the IAEA to achieve international consensus and they play a central role in this Conference. It is worth noting that more than 70 countries have already expressed their intention to follow the guidance given in the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources - and I would like to encourage more countries to do so. The Agency has been promoting for some time now the idea of a Global Nuclear Safety Regime. At the heart of this regime is a strong and effective national safety infrastructure where - as an overriding priority - safety issues are given the attention warranted by their significance. The need for sustainable regulatory infrastructure for the safety and security of radioactive sources was discussed at the

  20. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program: implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security

  1. Proposal of conditioning of the not-in-use sealed sources which are stored in the Radioactive Wastes Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jova, L.; Garcia, N.; Benitez, J.C.; Salgado, M.; Hernandez, A.

    1996-01-01

    There is a considerable number of sealed sources which are no longer in use at the radioactive wastes treatment facility. In the present work a methodology is proposed for the final conditioning of these sources, based on their immobilization in a cement matrix. This cementation is accomplished within a 200-liter tank

  2. The detection of orphan radioactive sources and the regulatory attitude; La deteccion de fuentes radiactivas huerfanas y la actitud regulatoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truppa, W.; Amodei, A.; Castro, L.; Rojas, C. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Subgerencia Control de Instalaciones Radiactivas Clase ll y III, Av. Del Libertador 8250 Ciudad de Buenos Aires (C1429BNP) (Argentina)]. e-mail: wtruppa@sede.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    In the last decade, the appearance of orphan control radioactive sources has been one constant restlessness in the environment of the regulatory control. Of the well-known cases in the world the more common have been the appearance of type sources or industrial use, which by control lack, by negligence or abandonment were without the due protection and receipt. It is presented in this work the detection of a radioactive source of Cs-137 pickup among the scrap that entered to an important steelworks of the country, by a detector of portal type. Starting from there, Ia Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) it carried out a deep investigation to determine the origin of the radioactive source, which drove to detect and to put low control to other three radioactive sources of the same type used in level measurement, originally housed in a tank of daily consumption of gas-oil, inside a craft that it was broken up for it sale like scrap. During the execution of these tasks they took the regulatory collection, chord to what indicates the normative of the Argentine Republic, harmonized by the international requirements as for the control of radioactive material. (Author)

  3. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Carla Daruich

    2012-01-01

    Among the different ways to treat prostate cancer, brachytherapy with iodine- 125 seeds is an option that provides good results and fewer side effects. In the present study several deposition methods of radioactive iodine in a silver substrate were compared in order to choose the most suitable alternative for the routine production to be implemented at IPEN's laboratory. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers present. Therefore, the 131 I was used for testing (same chemical behavior as 131 I). Four methods were selected: Method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method developed by D.Kubiatowicz) presented 65.16% efficiency; Method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by D. Kubiatowicz - HCl) with the result of 70.80% efficiency; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) with 55.80% efficiency; Method 4 (IQ-IPEN) resulted in 99% efficiency. Since this method has more radioactive material fixation (which represents virtually the entire cost of the seed), the final price is the cheapest. This method is the suggested one to be implemented in the IPEN's laboratory for brachytherapy sources production. Besides, the method is the fasted one. (author)

  4. Implementation of an Imaging Spectrometer for Localization and Identification of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermine, Lemaire; Carrel, Frederick; Gmar, Mehdi; Menesguen Yves; Normand, Stephane; Schoepff, Vincent; Abou-Khalil, Roger; Amgarou, Khalil; Menaa, Nabil; Tebug, Timi; Angelique, Jean-Claude; Bonnet, Florent; De-Toro, Daniel; Giarmana, Olivier; Patoz, Audrey; Talent, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    Spatial localization of radioactive sources is currently a main issue interesting nuclear industry as well as homeland security applications, and can be achieved using gamma cameras. For several years, CEA LIST has been designing a new system, called GAMPIX, with improved sensitivity, portability and ease of use. The main remaining limitation is the lack of spectrometric information, preventing radioactive materials identification. This article describes the development of an imaging spectrometer based on the GAMPIX technology. Experimental tests have been carried out according to both spectrometric methods enabled by the pixelated Timepix readout chip used in the GAMPIX gamma camera. The first method is based on the size of the impacts produced by a gamma-ray energy deposition in the detection matrix. The second one uses the Time over Threshold (ToT) mode of the Timepix chip and deals with time spent by pulses generated by charge preamplifiers over a user-specified threshold. Both energy resolution and sensitivity studies proved the superiority of the ToT approach that will consequently be further explored. Energy calibration, tests of several pixel sizes and use of the Medipix3 readout chip are tracks to improve performances of the newly implemented imaging spectrometer. (authors)

  5. Site-sensitive hazards of potential airborne radioactive release from sources on the Kola peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.; Thaning, L.; Baklanov, A.

    1998-02-01

    In this work we focus on cases of airborne releases from some of the sources on the Kola Peninsula - primarily nuclear reactors on submarines and the Kola Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP). The purpose of our study is to illustrate, and discuss some features - dependent on site and release characteristics - of the deposition patterns resulting from assumed unit radioactive releases to the atmosphere from a location at a fjord and from the KNPP in Polyarnye Zori. Using meteorological data for one real weather situation, the analysis is based on simulating the transport in air of assumed radioactive releases and estimating the deposition pattern on local, meso- and regional scales. By allowing unit releases to occur simultaneously from the site at the fjord and from the power plant (and with the same release profile in time) comparisons are made of differences in deposition patterns in and outside the Kola region. In this case study a set of assumed release heights, durations of the release, and particle size distributions are applied to indicate the dependence for the resulting deposition pattern on these parameters

  6. The HAW-Project: Test disposal of highly radioactive radiation sources in the Asse salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Two electrical heater tests were already started in November 1988 and are continuously surveyed in respect of the thermomechanical and geochemical response of the rock mass. Also the handling system necessary for the emplacement of 30 radioactive canisters (Sr-90 and Cs-137 sources) was developed and succesfully tested. This system consists of six multiple transport and storage casks of the type Castor-GSF-5, two above ground/below ground shuttle transport casks of the type Asse TB1, an above ground transfer station, an underground transport vehicle, a disposal machine, and a borehole slider. A laboratory investigation program on radiation effects in salt is being performed in advance to the radioactive canister emplacement. This program includes the investigation of thermally and radiolytically induced water and gas release from the rock salt and the radiolytical decomposition of salt minerals. For gamma dose and dose rate measurements in the test field measuring systems consisting of ionisation chambers as well as solid state dosemeters were developed and tested. Thermomechanical computer code validation is performed by calculational predictions and parallel investigation of the stress and displacement fields in the underground test field. (orig./HP)

  7. Charge Breeding of Radioactive Ions in an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source(ECRIS) at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Lindroos, M

    2002-01-01

    The development of an efficient charge breeding scheme for the next generation of RIB facilities will have a strong impact on the post-accelerator for several Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) projects at European large scale facilities. At ISOLDE/CERN there will be the unique possibility to carry out experiments with the two possible charge breeding set-ups with a large variety of radioactive isotopes using identical injection conditions. One charge breeding set-up is the Penning trap/EBIS combination which feeds the REX-ISOLDE linear accelerator and which is in commissioning now. The second charge breeder is a new ECRIS PHOENIX developed at the ISN ion source laboratory at Grenoble. This ECRIS is now under investigation with a 14 GHz amplifier to characterize its performance. The experiments are accompanied by theoretical studies in computer simulations in order to optimize the capture of the ions in the ECRIS plasma. A second identical PHOENIX ECRIS which is under investigation at the Daresbury Laboratory is avai...

  8. The use of radioactive sources for the study of wear in refractory linings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, G.; Hours, R.

    1960-01-01

    Following a discussion on the radioactive method for studying wear in refractory linings (description of the method, advantages and disadvantages, choice of radioactive indicator and detection), the article deals in some detail with the problems of safety involved in this technique. The two most important points discussed are: 1- the need to fix an upper limit of activity in the cast iron: the authors propose a figure of 1 mc of cobalt 60 in 500 tons; 2- the precautions necessary to remedy the diffusion of cobalt 60 in the brickwork (development of special pyro-ceramic sources). After a discussion on the international view point regarding the use of the method, a brief outline of some French projects is given, with particular reference to the case of a blast furnace. A note from the Commission interministerielle des Radioelements is given as an appendix; this deals with special conditions laid down for the use of radioelements in the determination of wear in refractory walls. (author) [fr

  9. Radioactive sealed sources: Reasonable accountability, exemption, and licensing activity thresholds -- A technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.W.; Shingleton, K.L.

    1996-01-01

    Perhaps owing to their small size and portability, some radiation accidents/incidents have involved radioactive sealed sources (RSSs). As a result, programs for the control and accountability of RSSs have come to be recommended and emplaced that essentially require RSSs to be controlled in a manner different from bulk, unsealed radioactive material. Crucially determining the total number of RSSs for which manpower-intensive radiation protection surveillance is provided is the individual RSS activity above which such surveillance is required and below which such effort is not considered cost effective. Individual RSS activity thresholds are typically determined through scenarios which impart a chosen internal or external limiting dose to Reference Man under specified exposure conditions. The resultant RSS threshold activity levels have meaning commensurate with the assumed scenario exposure parameters, i.e., if they are realistic and technically based. A review of how the Department of Energy (DOE), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have determined their respective accountability, exemption, and licensing threshold activity values is provided. Finally, a fully explained method using references readily available to practicing health physicists is developed using realistic, technically-based calculation parameters by which RSS threshold activities may be locally generated

  10. Development of sealed radioactive sources immobilized in epoxy resin for verification of detectors used in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiezzi, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    The radioactive sealed sources are used in verification ionization chamber detectors, which measure the activity of radioisotopes used in several areas, such as in nuclear medicine. The measurement of the activity of radioisotopes must be made with accuracy, because it is administered to a patient. To ensure the proper functioning of the ionization chamber detectors, standardized tests are set by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the National Nuclear Energy Commission using sealed radioactive sources of Barium-133, Cesium-137 and Cobalt-57. The tests assess the accuracy, precision, reproducibility and linearity of response of the equipment. The focus of this work was the study and the development of these radioactive sources with standard Barium-133 and Cesium-137,using a polymer, in case commercial epoxy resin of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and a curing agent based on modified polyamine diethylenetriamine (DETA), to immobilize the radioactive material. The polymeric matrix has the main function of fix and immobilize the radioactive contents not allowing them to leak within the technical limits required by the standards of radiological protection in the category of characteristics of a sealed source and additionally have the ability to retain the emanation of any gases that may be formed during the manufacture process and the useful life of this artifact. The manufacturing process of a sealed source standard consists of the potting ,into bottle standardized geometry, in fixed volume of a quantity of a polymeric matrix within which is added and dispersed homogeneously to need and exact amount in activity of the radioactive materials standards. Accordingly, a study was conducted for the choice of epoxy resin, analyzing its characteristics and properties. Studies and tests were performed, examining the maximum miscibility of the resin with the water (acidic solution, simulating the conditions of radioactive solution), loss of mechanical and

  11. Development of sealed radioactive sources immobilized in epoxy resin for verification of detectors used in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Nagatomi, Helio R.; Zeituni, Calos A.; Benega, Marcos A.G.; Souza, Daiane B. de; Costa, Osvaldo L. da; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Anderson S. de; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Santos, Rafael Melo dos; Melo, Emerson Ronaldo de, E-mail: rktiezzi@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karan Junior, Dib [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The radioactive sealed sources are used in verification ionization chamber detectors, which measure the activity of radioisotopes used in several areas, such as in nuclear medicine. The measurement of the activity of radioisotopes must be made with accuracy, because it is administered to a patient. To ensure the proper functioning of the ionization chamber detectors, standardized tests are set by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the National Nuclear Energy Commission using sealed radioactive sources of Barium-133, Cesium-137 and Cobalt-57. The tests assess the accuracy, precision, reproducibility and linearity of response of the equipment. The focus of this work was the study and the development of these radioactive sources with standard Barium-133, Cesium-137 and Cobalt-57,using a polymer, in case commercial epoxy resin of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and a curing agent based on modified polyamine diethylenetriamine (DETA), to immobilize the radioactive material. The polymeric matrix has the main function of fix and immobilize the radioactive contents not allowing them to leak within the technical limits required by the standards of radiological protection in the category of characteristics of a sealed source and additionally have the ability to retain the emanation of any gases that may be formed during the manufacture process and the useful life of this artifact. The manufacturing process of a sealed source standard consists of the potting ,into bottle standardized geometry, in fixed volume of a quantity of a polymeric matrix within which is added and dispersed homogeneously to need and exact amount in activity of the radioactive materials standards. Accordingly, a study was conducted for the choice of epoxy resin, analyzing its characteristics and properties. Studies and tests were performed, examining the maximum solubility of the resin in water (acidic solution, simulating the conditions of radioactive solution), loss of mechanical

  12. A combined thermal dissociation and electron impact ionization source for radioactive ion beam generation (abstract)a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Williams, C.

    1996-01-01

    The probability for simultaneously dissociating and efficiently ionizing the individual atomic constituents of molecular feed materials with conventional, hot-cathode, electron-impact ion sources is low and consequently, the ion beams from these sources often appear as mixtures of several molecular sideband beams. This fragmentation process leads to dilution of the intensity of the species of interest for radioactive ion beam (RIB) applications where beam intensity is at a premium. We have conceived an ion source that combines the excellent molecular dissociation properties of a thermal dissociator and the high ionization efficiency characteristics of an electron impact ionization source that will, in principle, overcome this handicap. The source concept will be evaluated as a potential candidate for use for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The design features and principles of operation of the source are described in this article. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. Radiation-hygienic estimation of interstitial gamma therapy conducted according to principle of subsequent introduction of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamyatin, O.A.; Golikov, V.Ya.; Korenkov, I.P.; Ter-Kazar'yan, N.S.; Mindlin, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    A comparative study of two radiation-hygienic methods of interstitial gamma-therapy: with subsequent introduction of radioactive needles of a standard type; with subsequent manual introduction of 60 Co sources have been carried out. Chronometry-dosimetric methods of investigation and the methods of individual dosimetry underlie the studies. The obtained data showed, that doses of irradiation to which medical personnel is subjected during the use of the method of subsequent manual introduction of the active sources are 3-4 times lower, than those during the introduction of standard radioactive needles with a higher quality of the procedure performance, ensuring a good therapeutic effect. All this makes it possible to consider interstitial gamma-therapy with the use of the principle of subsequent introduction of the source to be a more perspective method than interstitial gamma-therapy with the use standard radioactive needless 60 Co

  14. Characterization and packaging of disused sealed radioactive sources; Caracterizacion y acondicionamiento de fuentes radiactivas selladas en desuso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, S.L. [Instituto Boliviano de Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear (IBTEN), La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

    2013-07-01

    In Bolivia are generated disused sealed sources and radioactive waste resulting from the use of radioactive materials in industrial, research and medicine. The last includes the diagnosis and treatment. Whereas exposure to ionizing radiation is a potential hazard to personnel who applies it, to those who benefit from its use or for the community at large, it is necessary to control the activities in this field. The Instituto Boliviano de Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear - IBTEN is working on a regional project from International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, RLA/09/062 Project - TSA 4, Strengthening the National Infrastructure and Regulatory Framework for the Safe Management of Radioactive waste in Latin America. This Project has strengthened the regulatory framework regarding the safe management of radioactive waste. The aim of this work was focused primarily on the security aspects in the safe management of disused sealed sources. The tasks are listed below: 1. Characterization of disused sealed sources 2. Preparation for transport to temporary storage 3. Control of all disused radioactive sources. (author)

  15. Ion beam production and study of radioactive isotopes with the laser ion source at ISOLDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosseev, Valentin; Chrysalidis, Katerina; Day Goodacre, Thomas; Marsh, Bruce; Rothe, Sebastian; Seiffert, Christoph; Wendt, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    At ISOLDE the majority of radioactive ion beams are produced using the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS). This ion source is based on resonant excitation of atomic transitions by wavelength tunable laser radiation. Since its installation at the ISOLDE facility in 1994, the RILIS laser setup has been developed into a versatile remotely operated laser system comprising state-of-the-art solid state and dye lasers capable of generating multiple high quality laser beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. A continuous programme of atomic ionization scheme development at CERN and at other laboratories has gradually increased the number of RILIS-ionized elements. At present, isotopes of 40 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized by the ISOLDE RILIS. Studies related to the optimization of the laser-atom interaction environment have yielded new laser ion source types: the laser ion source and trap and the versatile arc discharge and laser ion source. Depending on the specific experimental requirements for beam purity or versatility to switch between different ionization mechanisms, these may offer a favourable alternative to the standard hot metal cavity configuration. In addition to its main purpose of ion beam production, the RILIS is used for laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes. In an ongoing experimental campaign the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of long isotopic chains have been measured by the extremely sensitive in-source laser spectroscopy method. The studies performed in the lead region were focused on nuclear deformation and shape coexistence effects around the closed proton shell Z = 82. The paper describes the functional principles of the RILIS, the current status of the laser system and demonstrated capabilities for the production of different ion beams including the high-resolution studies of short-lived isotopes and other applications of RILIS lasers for ISOLDE experiments. This article belongs to the Focus on

  16. Sources/treatment of uncertainties in the performance assessment of geologic radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranwell, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Uncertainties in the performance assessment of geologic radioactive waste repositories have several sources. The more important ones include: 1) uncertainty in the conditions of a disposal system over the temporal scales set forth in regulations, 2) uncertainty in the conceptualization of the geohydrologic system, 3) uncertainty in the theoretical description of a given conceptual model of the system, 4) uncertainty in the development of computer codes to implement the solution of a mathematical model, and 5) uncertainty in the parameters and data required in the models and codes used to assess the long-term performance of the disposal system. This paper discusses each of these uncertainties and outlines methods for addressing these uncertainties

  17. Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Nineteenth annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Our effort is centered on radioactive decay studies of far-from-stable nuclides produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). Progress is reported on the following studies: lifetime of the g/sub 7/2/ level in 109 Ag; halflife of the h/sub 9/2/ level in 187 Au; decay of 8.4 min 187 Au → 187 Pt; orbital EC probabilities and decay energy of 207 Bi; decay of 9 min /sup 201m/Po and 16 min /sup 201g/Po; decay of 2.5 min 125 Ba; decay of 7.4 min 203 At; exploration of neutron-deficient Sm, Pm, and Nd nuclides; preparation of thoron active deposit conversion electron sources; inception of nuclear laser spectroscopy at UNISOR; and nuclear structure calculations with nuclear models. Publications are listed

  18. Current status of control of radiation sources and radioactive materials in the United Republic of Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyaruba, M.M.; Mompome, W.K.

    2001-01-01

    A Protection from Radiation Act was enacted in Tanzania in 1983 to regulate the use of ionizing radiation and protect people against its danger. The Act established a regulatory authority known as National Radiation Commission (NRC), which is the corporate body to enforce the law and regulations. From the beginning of 2000, the NRC has kept inventory of 200 and 324 radiation installations, and radiation sources and radioactive materials in the country, respectively; and has provided personnel monitoring services to 665 radiation workers. However, due to the trade liberalization that is currently being experienced in the country, the increase in the number of radiation practices is observed yearly. To cope with the situation, the whole system of notification, authorization, registration and licensing needs to be improved. The improvement has now started by amending the existing Protection from Radiation Act. (author)

  19. Combating illicit trafficking of nuclear material and other radioactive sources in Republic of Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotsev, A.; Dimitov, K.

    2001-01-01

    The turbulent history of the Republic of Bulgaria is proof of its importance for the commercial and military interests of the nations that have conquered and exploited the country through the ages. It is clear that it is the connecting node of two continents, Europe and Asia. It is a natural stop in the movement of goods for transcontinental commercial purposes as well as a natural resting place for the movement of armies during the ancient and medieval times. The geopolitical situation that currently exists in the Republic of Bulgaria may form conditions for illicit trafficking. This paper gives a short description of the efforts of the Government of Bulgaria to combat the illicit trafficking of nuclear material and other radioactive sources. (author)

  20. Radiological Risk Assessment and Cask Materials Qualification for Disposed Sealed Radioactive Sources Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.; Olteanu, G.; Bujoreanu, D.

    2009-01-01

    The hazardous waste problem imposes to respect national and international agreed regulations regarding their transport, taking into account both for maintaining humans, goods and environment exposure under specified limits, during transport and specific additional operations, and also to reduce impact on the environment. The paper follows to estimate the radiological risk and cask materials qualification according to the design specifications for disposed sealed radioactive sources normal transport situation. The shielding analysis has been performed by using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's SCALE 5 programs package. For thermal analysis and cask materials qualification ANSYS computer code has been used. Results have been obtained under the framework of Advanced system for monitoring of hazardous waste transport on the Romanian territory Research Project which main objective consists in implementation of a complex dual system for on-line monitoring both for transport special vehicle and hazardous waste packages, with data automatic transmission to a national monitoring center

  1. An orthodontic device for retaining implanted radioactive sources during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuko, Noriko; Katsura, Kouji; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Sato, Katsurou; Kawana, Masahiro; Nonomura, Naobumi

    2000-01-01

    An orthodontic retainer was devised to keeping implanted radioactive sources in position and improve the quality of life during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity. The retainer was used in 3 patients with oral cancer, one with cancer of the hard palate, one with cancer of the soft palate, and one with cancer of the floor of mouth, during brachytherapy using 198 Au grains and 137 Cs needles. These patients could speak freely. One with cancer of the hard palate could drink water and ingest semi-liquid food during treatment instead of nasal tube feeding. The plaster dental model obtained while making the retainer proved to be useful for training radiation oncologists. (author)

  2. Overview of sources of radioactive particles of Nordic relevance as well as a short description of available particle characterisation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B. (Norwegian Univ. of Life Sciences (Norway)); Nygren, U.; Thaning, L.; Ramebaeck, H. (Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Sidhu, S. (Inst. for Energy Technology (Norway)); Roos, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe DTU, Roskilde (Denmark)); Poellaenen, R. (STUK (Finland)); Ranebo, Y.; Holm, E. (Univ. Lund (Sweden))

    2008-10-15

    The present overview report show that there are many existing and potential sources of radioactive particle contamination of relevance to the Nordic countries. Following their release, radioactive particles represent point sources of short- and long-term radioecological significance, and the failure to recognise their presence may lead to significant errors in the short- and long-term impact assessments related to radioactive contamination at a particular site. Thus, there is a need of knowledge with respect to the probability, quantity and expected impact of radioactive particle formation and release in case of specified potential nuclear events (e.g. reactor accident or nuclear terrorism). Furthermore, knowledge with respect to the particle characteristics influencing transport, ecosystem transfer and biological effects is important. In this respect, it should be noted that an IAEA coordinated research project was running from 2000-2006 (IAEA CRP, 2001) focussing on characterisation and environmental impact of radioactive particles, while a new IAEA CRP focussing on the biological effects of radioactive particles will be launched in 2008. (author)

  3. Overview of sources of radioactive particles of Nordic relevance as well as a short description of available particle characterisation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B.; Nygren, U.; Thaning, L.; Ramebaeck, H.; Sidhu, S.; Roos, P.; Poellaenen, R.; Ranebo, Y.; Holm, E.

    2008-10-01

    The present overview report show that there are many existing and potential sources of radioactive particle contamination of relevance to the Nordic countries. Following their release, radioactive particles represent point sources of short- and long-term radioecological significance, and the failure to recognise their presence may lead to significant errors in the short- and long-term impact assessments related to radioactive contamination at a particular site. Thus, there is a need of knowledge with respect to the probability, quantity and expected impact of radioactive particle formation and release in case of specified potential nuclear events (e.g. reactor accident or nuclear terrorism). Furthermore, knowledge with respect to the particle characteristics influencing transport, ecosystem transfer and biological effects is important. In this respect, it should be noted that an IAEA coordinated research project was running from 2000-2006 (IAEA CRP, 2001) focussing on characterisation and environmental impact of radioactive particles, while a new IAEA CRP focussing on the biological effects of radioactive particles will be launched in 2008. (au)

  4. The development of a mobile hot cell facility for the conditioning of spent high activity radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebenberg, G.R.; Al-Mughrabi, M.

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Waste Technology Section with additional support from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the IAEA Nuclear Security Fund has funded the design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of a portable hot cell intended to address the problem of disused Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) in obsolete irradiation devices such as teletherapy heads and dry irradiators. The project is initially targeting the African continent but expected soon to expand to Latin America and Asia. This hot cell allows source removal, characterization, consolidation, repackaging in modern storage shields, and secure storage of high risk SHARS at national radioactive waste storage facilities. (authors)

  5. Efforts of Turkey in combating with illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucel, F.A.; Akats, N.; Yilmazer, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources creates both non-proliferation problems and also is a radiation hazard risk for the law enforcement officers, public and the environment. Since the illicit trafficking and trading of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources has been increasing over the past years, it is very important to take immediate measures for preventing these activities. Turkey, as a country having a unique position at the crossing points of the two major routes - one connecting the Black Sea to the Mediterranean and the other connecting Europe to Asia and the Middle East - is situated on the routes of illicit trafficking. Thus, Turkey attaches great importance to combating illicit trafficking and strongly supports all efforts in this field. After the IAEA resolution GC(XXXVIII)RES/15 requesting Member States to 'take all necessary measures to prevent illicit trafficking in nuclear materials' had been adopted, Turkey gave full support to the IAEA Programme on Combating Illicit Nuclear and other Radioactive Materials and also took some measures to combat such trading. Regulatory activities regarding nuclear and radiological safety, including safeguards and physical protection in Turkey, are under the responsibility of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA). The TAEA ensures that the licensed activities do not cause any unreasonable risk to the public and to environmental safety and that they do not impair the common defense and security interest of Turkey. TAEA was established by the Act No.2690 of 9th July 1982 and replaced the Turkish Atomic Energy Commission created by the Act No.6821 in 1956. The Act No.2690 Authorizes the TAEA to carry out the activities connected with the fulfillment of Turkey's obligations arising from international agreements in the field of safeguards and physical protection. This paper covers the efforts and coordination role of TAEA's planned activities and the measures

  6. Electron capture detector based on a non-radioactive electron source: operating parameters vs. analytical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bunert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatographs with electron capture detectors are widely used for the analysis of electron affine substances such as pesticides or chlorofluorocarbons. With detection limits in the low pptv range, electron capture detectors are the most sensitive detectors available for such compounds. Based on their operating principle, they require free electrons at atmospheric pressure, which are usually generated by a β− decay. However, the use of radioactive materials leads to regulatory restrictions regarding purchase, operation, and disposal. Here, we present a novel electron capture detector based on a non-radioactive electron source that shows similar detection limits compared to radioactive detectors but that is not subject to these limitations and offers further advantages such as adjustable electron densities and energies. In this work we show first experimental results using 1,1,2-trichloroethane and sevoflurane, and investigate the effect of several operating parameters on the analytical performance of this new non-radioactive electron capture detector (ECD.

  7. Modelling and simulation the radioactive source-term of fission products in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porfirio, Rogilson Nazare da Silva

    1996-01-01

    The source-term was defined with the purpose the quantify all radioactive nuclides released the nuclear reactor in the case of accidents. Nowadays the source-term is limited to the coolant of the primary circuit of reactors and may be measured or modelled with computer coders such as the TFP developed in this work. The calculational process is based on the linear chain techniques used in the CINDER-2 code. The TFP code considers forms of fission products release from the fuel pellet: Recoil, Knockout and Migration. The release from the gap to the coolant fluid is determined from the ratio between activity measured in the coolant and calculated activity in the gap. Considered the operational data of SURRY-1 reactor, the TFP code was run to obtain the source=term of this reactor. From the measured activities it was verified the reliability level of the model and the employed computational logic. The accuracy of the calculated quantities were compared to the measured data was considered satisfactory. (author)

  8. Ministerial Decree of 13 November 1964 concerning approval of the model of the register for commercial operations covering source materials, ores and radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    This Decree prescribes the procedure to be complied with for entering information in the special register for commercial operations concerning source materials, ores and radioactive materials. (NEA) [fr

  9. Measures against illicit trafficking of nuclear material and radioactive sources in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotoukh, O.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Republic of Belarus strives to take an active part in international cooperation in the field of prevention and interception of illicit uses of nuclear material and radioactive sources through: multilateral international agreements and bilateral interagency treatments; information exchange within the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database; participation in different international seminars, workshops, conferences including those under the IAEA auspices etc. Belarus is constantly improving regulatory, legal and technical aspects of activities aimed at: accounting, control and ensuring of physical protection of nuclear material and security of radioactive sources; exercising efficient control over their export and import; detecting cases of their illicit uses and illegal cross-border movements and informing of such cases through the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database; developing and providing training opportunities for personnel. Through Resolution 'On Measures for Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials' issued by the Council of Ministers in 1993, Committee for Supervision of Industrial and Nuclear Safety (PROMATOMNADZOR) was appointed as the authority responsible for ensuring physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. Through Resolution 'On Measures for Fulfillment of Provisions of the Non-Proliferation Treaty' issued by the Council of Ministers in 1993, Promatomnadzor was designated as the national competent authority responsible for the establishment and maintenance of the State System of Accounting and Control of nuclear material. The system accounts all the nuclear material meeting the criteria defined in the Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA. The system includes two levels: i.e. on-site accounting and control and state accounting and control exercised by Promatomnadzor. Apart from reporting to the Agency, the system also provides for national tasks being accomplished: control over uses of nuclear material, its physical protection, access

  10. UN MODELO DE DIÁLOGO PARA LA EDUCCIÓN DE REQUISITOS DE SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS M. ZAPATA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La educción de requisitos es importante en el desarrollo de software pues, dependiendo de la calidad de este proceso, se pueden desarrollar mejores aplicaciones de software. En la educción de requisitos, las entrevistas suelen ser el método más utilizado y se consideran diálogos entre analistas e interesados. Los trabajos realizados al respecto, presentan limitaciones como la carencia de una estructura definida para las entrevistas analistainteresado, obligando al analista a realizar de manera subjetiva el proceso de educción. En este artículo, se presenta una propuesta de estructura para un modelo de diálogo encaminado a la educción de requisitos de software. Además, se presenta la manera de realizar las preguntas durante una entrevista del proceso de educción, por medio de un caso de estudio.

  11. Alineación entre metas organizacionales y elicitación de requisitos del software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Zapata J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available La elicitación de los requisitos del software debe contribuir a la obtención de una primera descripción del problema que permita establecer las motivaciones para su solución mediante sistemas informáticos. Los métodos y herramientas convencionales para la elicitación de requisitos pueden, sin embargo, dejar de lado aspectos fundamentales de la organización debido a su interés por enfocarse en situaciones relativas a los problemas puntuales que aquejan el entorno del software. En este artículo se ilustra el uso de una herramienta administrativa de uso común (el diagrama causa - efecto, con algunas modificaciones, para lograr un análisis cuantitativo del grado en que se logran alinear las metas organizacionales con los requisitos correspondientes a una pieza de software.

  12. Modelos de Requisitos Basados en I* para Detectar Proactividad en Dashboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Pérez-Acosta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo es presentar modelos para la captura de los requisitos de un dashboard para detectar un comportamiento proactivo. Estos modelos siguen un enfoque orientado hacia metas y fueron creados con el marco de trabajo i*, que toma como base las premisas del modelado social. Para detectar el comportamiento proactivo se usaron patrones basados en modelos de i* para detectar proactividad en la etapa de requisitos de un sistema de software. Los modelos que se obtienen como resultado del trabajo tienen representados los actores, metas, intenciones, tareas y recursos que se necesitan para modelar los requisitos de un dashboard con un comportamiento proactivo y pueden, además, ser utilizados en distintos contextos de negocio.

  13. Management of Spent Sealed Radioactive Sources in Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania and Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, M.; Cowley, M.; Moreton, T.; Wells, D.

    2003-01-01

    This study has been performed to consider the situation relating to the regulation and management of spent sealed radioactive sources (SSRS) in five of the Central and Eastern European (C and EE) countries that are being considered for admission to the EU, namely, Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania and Slovakia. Two previous studies have considered the situation in the current EU member states(1) and in the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Poland and Slovenia(2). The general aim of this study has been to acquire a thorough understanding of the management of SSRS in the five countries, in order to recommend improvements in management schemes and to establish whether the application of common disposal criteria would be advantageous. This report is structured in the following manner; following the Introduction (Section 1), there is a description of the current and proposed regulatory requirements in the EU, together with a summarised comparison of the regulatory systems in the five countries with EU standards (Section 2). Sections 3 to 7 are dedicated to each of the five countries. Each of these sections is similarly sub-divided to enable country-by-country and topic-by-topic comparison. In each of Sections 3 to 7 there is an overview, description of the sealed source inventory, regulations, current management practices, retrieval of unregistered (sometimes known as lost or orphan sources) SSRS, conclusions and a description of possible future technical assistance projects. In addition, there is a description in each of Sections 3 to 7 of the management of 226 Ra sources, which is receiving special attention in many countries (Table I provides a summary and comparison of the management of 226 Ra in the five countries).both country-specific and generic recommendations. A common concern in the five countries and many other countries, including the EU member states, is the problem of accidental inclusion of SSRS in consignments of scrap metal. The detection of

  14. Uma análise sistêmica sociotecnológica da engenharia de requisitos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Augusto Machado Moretto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1518-2924.2010v15nesp2p26 A engenharia de requisitos, etapa inicial da construção de sistemas de informação, requer intenso intercâmbio de informação entre profissionais de tecnologias da informação e comunicação, e peritos no negócio. A teoria e a prática comum da engenharia de requisitos, no entanto, são tecnocêntricas e caracterizadas por dificuldade de comunicação. A literatura recente aborda a concepção de sistemas sociotecnológicos, cujas propriedades emergem por meio da colaboração dinâmica entre pessoas e agentes artificiais. Este artigo apresenta um modelo sistêmico sociotecnológico da engenharia de requisitos com base no modelo CESM de Mario Bunge, segundo o qual todo sistema concreto pode ser representado segundo seus componentes, ambiente, estrutura e mecanismo. Entre os componentes, estão os peritos no negócio, profissionais de TIC, agentes artificiais e os objetos da colaboração dinâmica – modelo de domínio e requisitos. O mecanismo é essencialmente um processo de comunicação, com intercâmbio de informações e compartilhamento de conhecimento. Essa descrição presta-se à compreensão sistêmica da engenharia de requisitos, visando à intervenção para aliviar os problemas comunicacionais do processo e promover a emergência de requisitos que representem as reais necessidades do sistema.

  15. Una propuesta orientada a objetivos para el análisis de requisitos en RIAs

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar Calderón, José Alfonso; Garrigós Fernández, Irene; Casteleyn, Sven; Mazón López, José Norberto

    2011-01-01

    Actualmente, existen diversas metodologías que brindan soporte al desarrollo de RIAs haciendo énfasis en la etapa de desarrollo e implementación. Sin embargo, no consideran una etapa de análisis de requisitos específica para RIAs que resulta necesaria para poder determinar en etapas tempranas de desarrollo qué funcionalidades deben ser especificadas en el cliente dependiendo de los requisitos no funcionales que se quiera maximizar. Con la finalidad de paliar esta limitación, en este trabajo s...

  16. Environmental Radioactivity from Natural, Industrial and Military Sources. 4th Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Steve

    1998-09-01

    Merril Eisenbud's series of books on environmental radioactivity have long had a place on the bookshelves of those involved with the environmental aspects of radiation protection. They provide authoritative coverage of the subject including sources, transport mechanisms and effects. The first edition, published in 1963, was naturally mostly concerned with the effects of nuclear weapons testing in the atmosphere. The second edition, published in 1977, reflected the then expansive phase of nuclear power development worldwide and included an extensive treatment of the nuclear fuel cycle and its contributions to environmental radioactivity. In 1987 the third edition included coverage of the Three Mile Island accident and the Chernobyl accident against the background of cessation of new orders for nuclear plant in the United States. The fourth edition is a major revision with a lot of new material, and the welcome adoption of SI units throughout. The principal additions to the new edition are chapters on environmental surveillance, radiological assessment and dose reconstruction, and the remediation of contaminated sites; nothing has been lost from the extensive coverage of other topics in the third edition, whilst the text and bibliography have been revised and brought up to date. Earlier editions of the book have provided good summaries of accidents which have resulted in environmental contamination, and the updating here results in more extensive and up-to-date coverage of the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents, including the more recent evidence of health effects from the latter, together with new sections on the Palomares nuclear weapons accident in Spain, the Mayak/Chelyabinsk complex in Russia, and the accidents involving lost gamma radiation sources in Juarez, Mexico and Goiania, Brazil. Both here and in the extensive coverage of contamination at the USDoE production sites the new edition reflects and benefits from the increased public availability

  17. The measurement results of radioactive sources in Turkish hardcoal enterprise (TTK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonul, Bicher

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In Health Department of TTK there are 3 roentgen equipments. Because of these equipments reflecting X-ray, therefore they categorized as the group of producing radioactive source.Each equipment has the capacity of 100 MA. According to radiation safeyt regulations and codes of practice, the equipment is used under the licence certificate of number 99/4173. In 2000, due to change of responsible personnel in the department, when TTK applied for changing licence, the application was rejected because responsible personel had to be graduate from radiology branch. On 5 May 2003, as referred to in article four of radiation safety regulations, educational seminar on the subject of personnel responsible for radiation protection and to protect personnel to be assigned in dangerous and extraordinary situations from radiation was given by Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK) in Safety and Training Department of TTK. It came on the scene that the personnel working in Health Department of TTK had to be trained and certificated by TAEK. For this purpose, TTK applied for the examination done by TAEA on 21 June 2003. But this application was not accepted as the personel had to be graduated from radiology branch.To renew the licience according to the radiation regulations, the application will be done again to TAEK after preparing necesarry conditions.The dosimeter results of the personnel at roentgen equipment in Health Department of TTK are measured and in the hand of TTK. For BERTHOLD type Cs-137 model equipment used for measuring density in filtration unit, Catalagz? Washery Plant has providing and using licence under the certificate of number KRY0049.02.001 dated on 26 May 2005 according to radiation safety regulations and statutes given by TAEA .As referred to in article 15 of radiation safety regulations published in official paper having number of 23999 and dated on 24 March 2006, the areas which can be subjected to over the annual dosage of 1mSv are named as

  18. Study and survey of assembling parameters to a radioactive source production laboratory used to verify equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, Erica

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of parameters for the proper and safe flooring, doors, windows, fume hoods and others, in a radiochemical laboratory. The layout of each item follows guidelines and national standards of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), aiming to ensure the radiological protection of workers and environment. The adequate items arrangement in the radiochemical laboratory ensures quality and safety in the production of 57 Co 137 Cs and 133 Ba radioactive sealed sources, with activities 185, 9.3 and 5.4 MBq, respectively. These sources are used to verify meter activity equipment and should be available throughout the Nuclear Medicine Center, following the recommendations of CNEN-NN-3.05 standard R equirements for Radiation Protection and Safety Services for Nuclear Medicine , to verify the activity of radiopharmaceuticals that are administered in patients, for diagnosis and therapy. Verification of measuring activity equipment will be used to perform accuracy, reproducibility and linearity tests, which should show results within the limits specified in the standard CNEN-NN-3.05. (author)

  19. The development of a methodology to assess population doses from multiple sources and exposure pathways of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, J.; Stansby, S.; Thorne, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Environment Agency (EA) has new duties in accordance with the Basic Safety Standards Directive under which it is required to ensure that doses to individuals received from exposure to anthropogenic sources of radioactivity are within defined limits. In order to assess compliance with these requirements, the EA needs to assess the doses to members of the most highly exposed population groups ('critical' groups) from all relevant potential sources of anthropogenic radioactivity and all relevant potential exposure pathways to such radioactivity. The EA has identified a need to develop a methodology for the retrospective assessment of effective doses from multiple sources of radioactive materials and exposure pathways associated with those sources. Under contract to the EA, AEA Technology has undertaken the development of a suitable methodology as part of EA R and D Project P3-070. The methodology developed under this research project has been designed to support the EA in meeting its obligations under the Euratom Basic Safety Standards Directive and is consistent with UK and international approaches to radiation dosimetry and radiological protection. The development and trial application of the methodology is described in this report

  20. Classification system of radioactive sources to attend radiological emergencies, the last three cases of theft in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz C, M. A.; Garcia M, T.

    2014-10-01

    Following last three cases of theft of radioactive material in Mexico is convenient to describe how to classify radioactive sources and make decisions to confront the emergency. For this there are IAEA publications, which determine the Dangerous values or value D, for different radionuclides and activity values usually used in practice, and employees in industry, medicine and research. The literature also describes the different scenarios to determine the activity of different radioisotopes that can cause deterministic effects to workers or the population and thus classify the degree of relative risk that these sources may be involved in an accident. Defined the classification of sources, we can make decisions to respond to emergencies in their proper perspective also alert the public to the description of the risks associated with the sources in question, without this leading to a situation of greater crisis. (Author)

  1. Measures against illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coker, A.J.; Adesanmi, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Background Information - The concern worldwide over the dangers associated with illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources is shared by the Federal Government and people of Nigeria. In order to protect its territories, the government in the second quarter of 1998 gave a directive that Nigeria should be registered as a participating nation in the Illicit Trafficking Database Programme being organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Immediately, a National Committee (NC) was established comprising all relevant ministries and government agencies, particularly the ones involved in the control and use of radioactive materials, such as the Federal Radiation Protection Service (FRPS), Nuclear Research Centres, Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA), Energy Commission of Nigeria, the Nigerian Police Force, the Customs and the Ports Authority. By August 1998, the committee got Nigeria duly registered with the IAEA as a participating nation and presented a proposal to the Federal Government on how to monitor our ports of entry, borders and the entire country in order to participate effectively in the programme. In other to check illicit trafficking of nuclear materials effectively and efficiently within and across the Nigerian borders, the National Committee gave priority to proper organisational structure, manpower training and development, and the provision of adequate and necessary facilities and infrastructure for nationwide radiation monitoring programme. Organisational Structure - In Nigeria, there is the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Decree No. 19 of 1995 which established the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) and an Institute of Radiation Protection (IRP). The decree empowers the NRA to regulate the production, possession, transfer, import, export, trade, use, transportation, storage and disposal of radioactive materials and radiation equipment in order to ensure radiation

  2. Post-closure safety assessment of near surface disposal facilities for disused sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seunghee; Kim, Juyoul

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-closure safety assessment of near surface disposal facility for DSRS was performed. • Engineered vault and rock-cavern type were considered for normal and well scenario. • 14 C, 226 Ra, 241 Am were primary nuclides contributing large portion of exposure dose. • Near surface disposal of DSRSs containing 14 C, 226 Ra and 241 Am should be restricted. - Abstract: Great attention has been recently paid to the post-closure safety assessment of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) disposal facility for disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRSs) around the world. Although the amount of volume of DSRSs generated from industry, medicine and research and education organization was relatively small compared with radioactive wastes from commercial nuclear power plants, some DSRSs can pose a significant hazard to human health due to their high activities and long half-lives, if not appropriately managed and disposed. In this study, post-closure safety assessment was carried out for DSRSs generated from 1991 to 2014 in Korea in order to ensure long-term safety of near surface disposal facilities. Two kinds of disposal options were considered, i.e., engineered vault type disposal facility and rock-cavern type disposal facility. Rock-cavern type disposal facility has been under operation in Gyeongju city, republic of Korea since August 2015 and engineered vault type disposal facility will be constructed until December 2020 in the vicinity of rock-cavern disposal facility. Assessment endpoint was individual dose to the member of critical group, which was modeled by GoldSim, which has been widely used as probabilistic risk analysis software based on Monte Carlo simulation in the area of safety assessment of radioactive waste facilities. In normal groundwater scenario, the maximum exposure dose was extremely low, approximately 1 × 10 −7 mSv/yr, for both disposal options and satisfied the regulatory limit of 0.1 mSv/yr. However, in the

  3. Post-closure safety assessment of near surface disposal facilities for disused sealed radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seunghee; Kim, Juyoul, E-mail: gracemi@fnctech.com

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Post-closure safety assessment of near surface disposal facility for DSRS was performed. • Engineered vault and rock-cavern type were considered for normal and well scenario. • {sup 14}C, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 241}Am were primary nuclides contributing large portion of exposure dose. • Near surface disposal of DSRSs containing {sup 14}C, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 241}Am should be restricted. - Abstract: Great attention has been recently paid to the post-closure safety assessment of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) disposal facility for disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRSs) around the world. Although the amount of volume of DSRSs generated from industry, medicine and research and education organization was relatively small compared with radioactive wastes from commercial nuclear power plants, some DSRSs can pose a significant hazard to human health due to their high activities and long half-lives, if not appropriately managed and disposed. In this study, post-closure safety assessment was carried out for DSRSs generated from 1991 to 2014 in Korea in order to ensure long-term safety of near surface disposal facilities. Two kinds of disposal options were considered, i.e., engineered vault type disposal facility and rock-cavern type disposal facility. Rock-cavern type disposal facility has been under operation in Gyeongju city, republic of Korea since August 2015 and engineered vault type disposal facility will be constructed until December 2020 in the vicinity of rock-cavern disposal facility. Assessment endpoint was individual dose to the member of critical group, which was modeled by GoldSim, which has been widely used as probabilistic risk analysis software based on Monte Carlo simulation in the area of safety assessment of radioactive waste facilities. In normal groundwater scenario, the maximum exposure dose was extremely low, approximately 1 × 10{sup −7} mSv/yr, for both disposal options and satisfied the regulatory limit

  4. Global threat reduction initiative efforts to address transportation challenges associated with the recovery of disused radioactive sealed sources - 10460

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitworth, Julie; Abeyta, Cristy L.; Griffin, Justin M.; Matzke, James L.; Pearson, Michael W.; Cuthbertson, Abigail; Rawl, Richard; Singley, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Proper disposition of disused radioactive sources is essential for their safe and secure management and necessary to preclude their use in malicious activities. Without affordable, timely transportation options, disused sealed sources remain in storage at hundreds of sites throughout the country and around the world. While secure storage is a temporary measure, the longer sources remain disused or unwanted the chances increase that they will become unsecured or abandoned. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Off-Site Source Recovery Project (GTRIlOSRP), recovers thousands of disused and unwanted sealed sources annually as part of GTRl's larger mission to reduce and protect high risk nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Faced with decreasing availability of certified transportation containers to support movement of disused and unwanted neutron- and beta/gamma-emitting radioactive sealed sources, GTRIlOSRP has initiated actions to ensure the continued success of the project in timely recovery and management of sealed radioactive sources. Efforts described in this paper to enhance transportation capabilities include: (sm b ullet) Addition of authorized content to existing and planned Type B containers to support the movement of non-special form and other Type B-quantity sealed sources; (sm b ullet) Procurement of vendor services for the design, development, testing and certification of a new Type B container to support transportation of irradiators, teletherapy heads or sources removed from these devices using remote handling capabilities such as the IAEA portable hot cell facility; (sm b ullet) Expansion of shielded Type A container inventory for transportation of gamma-emitting sources in activity ranges requiring use of shielding for conformity with transportation requirements; (sm b ullet) Approval of the S300 Type A fissile container for transport of Pu-239 sealed sources internationally; (sm b ullet) Technology transfer of

  5. Real breakthrough in detection of radioactive sources by portal monitors with plastic detectors and New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm (ASIA-New)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavrov, Andrei; Yamamoto, Eugene [Rapiscan Systems, Inc., 14000 Mead Street, Longmont, CO, 80504 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) with plastic detectors represent the main instruments used for primary border (customs) radiation control. RPM are widely used because they are simple, reliable, relatively inexpensive and have a high sensitivity. However, experience using the RPM in various countries has revealed the systems have some grave shortcomings. There is a dramatic decrease of the probability of detection of radioactive sources under high suppression of the natural gamma background (radiation control of heavy cargoes, containers and, especially, trains). NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) existing in objects under control trigger the so-called 'nuisance alarms', requiring a secondary inspection for source verification. At a number of sites, the rate of such alarms is so high it significantly complicates the work of customs and border officers. This paper presents a brief description of new variant of algorithm ASIA-New (New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm), which was developed by the Rapiscan company. It also demonstrates results of different tests and the capability of a new system to overcome the shortcomings stated above. New electronics and ASIA-New enables RPM to detect radioactive sources under a high background suppression (tested at 15-30%) and to verify the detected NORM (KCl) and the artificial isotopes (Co- 57, Ba-133 and other). New variant of ASIA is based on physical principles, a phenomenological approach and analysis of some important parameter changes during the vehicle passage through the monitor control area. Thanks to this capability main advantage of new system is that this system can be easily installed into any RPM with plastic detectors. Taking into account that more than 4000 RPM has been installed worldwide their upgrading by ASIA-New may significantly increase probability of detection and verification of radioactive sources even masked by NORM. This algorithm was tested for 1,395 passages of

  6. U Y 105 standard use of non sealed radioactive sources in nuclear medicine: approve for Industry energy and Mining Ministry 28/6/2002 Resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Establish minimal requirements radiological safety for use non sealed radioactive sources in nuclear medicine.The present standard is used in operation or nuclear medicine practices using non sealed radioactive sources with diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in vivo and in vitro

  7. Requisitos e impedimentos para ser árbitro en el derecho español

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Rodríguez Mejía

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La ley española de arbitraje, Ley 60 de 2003, contempla en distintos artículos los requisitos legales que debe reunir todo aquel que pretenda ser árbitro en una controversia regida por la misma, así como también, aquellas situaciones que de presentarse, les impedirán obrar como tal. Al mismo tiempo, y en consonancia con la prevalencia que da a la autonomía de la voluntad de las partes, el legislador español permitió que éstas acuerden otros requisitos a los futuros árbitros. Así las cosas, el artículo analiza, de forma crítica, los requisitos e impedimentos legales a los árbitros bajo el marco de la ley, el fundamento e importancia de que las partes a su vez determinen otros requisitos, así como también, el momento en el que se espera se cumplan los mismos.

  8. Requisitos e impedimentos para ser árbitro en el derecho español

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Rodríguez Mejía

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available La ley española de arbitraje, Ley 60 de 2003, contempla en distintos artículos los requisitos legales que debe reunir todo aquel que pretenda ser árbitro en una controversia regida por la misma, así como también, aquellas situaciones que de presentarse, les impedirán obrar como tal. Al mismo tiempo, y en consonancia con la prevalencia que da a la autonomía de la voluntad de las partes, el legislador español permitió que éstas acuerden otros requisitos a los futuros árbitros. Así las cosas, el artículo analiza, de forma crítica, los requisitos e impedimentos legales a los árbitros bajo el marco de la ley, el fundamento e importancia de que las partes a su vez determinen otros requisitos, así como también, el momento en el que se espera se cumplan los mismos.

  9. Source term evaluation model for high-level radioactive waste repository with decay chain build-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Manish; Sunny, Faby; Oza, R B

    2016-09-18

    A source term model based on two-component leach flux concept is developed for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The long-lived radionuclides associated with high-level waste may give rise to the build-up of activity because of radioactive decay chains. The ingrowths of progeny are incorporated in the model using Bateman decay chain build-up equations. The model is applied to different radionuclides present in the high-level radioactive waste, which form a part of decay chains (4n to 4n + 3 series), and the activity of the parent and daughter radionuclides leaching out of the waste matrix is estimated. Two cases are considered: one when only parent is present initially in the waste and another where daughters are also initially present in the waste matrix. The incorporation of in situ production of daughter radionuclides in the source is important to carry out realistic estimates. It is shown that the inclusion of decay chain build-up is essential to avoid underestimation of the radiological impact assessment of the repository. The model can be a useful tool for evaluating the source term of the radionuclide transport models used for the radiological impact assessment of high-level radioactive waste repositories.

  10. Modelo de requisitos para sistemas embebidos: Model of requirements for embedded systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana González Palacio

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta un modelo de requisitos como apoyo para la construcción de sistemas embebidos. En la actualidad, las metodologías de Ingeniería de Requisitos propuestas para este dominio no establecen continuidad en su proceso de desarrollo, ya que poseen una fuerte orientación a la etapa de diseño y un énfasis más débil en la etapa de análisis. Además, dichas metodologías ofrecen pautas para tratar los requisitos luego de que han sido obtenidos, pero no proponen herramientas; como por ejemplo, un modelo de requisitos, para la obtención de estos. Este trabajo hace parte de un proyecto de investigación que tiene como objetivo proponer una metodología de Ingeniería de Requisitos (IR para el análisis de Sistemas Embebidos (SE. El modelo de requisitos propuesto y su forma de utilización se ilustran mediante un caso de aplicación consistente en la obtención de requisitos para un sistema de sensado de movimiento, embebido en un sistema de alarma para hogar.In this paper a model of requirements for supporting the construction of embedded systems is presented. Currently, the methodologies of Engineering of Requirements, in this field, do not let continuity in their development process, since they have a strong orientation to design stage and a weaker emphasis on the analysis stage. Furthermore, such methodologies provide guidelines for treating requirements after being obtained. However, they do not propose tools such as a model of requirements for obtaining them. This paper is the result of a research project which objective is to propose engineering of requirements methodology for embedded systems analysis. The model of proposed requirements and its use are illustrated through an application case consisting on obtaining requirements for a movement sensing system, embedded in a home alarm system.

  11. RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE USSR: A REVIEW OF UNCLASSIFIED SOURCES, 1963-1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. J.; Schneider, K. J.

    1990-03-01

    year capacity as the first of several modules, was about 30% completed by July 1989. The completion of this plant was subsequently "indefinitely postponed." The initial reprocessing scheme at the Kyshtym site used sodium uranyl acetate precipitation from fuel dissolved in nitric acid solutions. The basic method~ ology now appears to be based on the conventional PUREX process. Dry reprocessing on a pilot or laboratory scale has been under way in Dimitrovgrad since 1984, and a larger unit is now being built, according to the French CEA. Perhaps significantly, much research is being done on partitioning high-level waste into element fractions. The Soviets appear to have the technology to remove radioactive noble gases released during reprocessing operations; however, there are no indications of its implementation. Millions of curies of liquid low- and intermediate-level wastes have been disposed of by well injection into underground areas where they were supposedly contained by watertight rock strata. Some gaseous wastes were also disposed of by well injection. This practice is not referred to in recent literature and thus may not be widely used today. Rather, it appears that these waste streams are now first treated to reduce volume, and then solidified using bitumen or concrete. These solidified liquid wastes from Soviet nuclear power reactor operations, along with solid wastes, are disposed of in shallow-land burial sites located at most large power reactor stations. In addition, 35 shallow-land burial sites have been alluded to by the Soviets for disposal of industrial, medical, and research low-level wastes as well as ionization sources. Research on tritium-bearing and other gaseous wastes is mentioned, as well as a waste minimization program aimed at reducing the volume of waste streams by 30%. The Soviets have announced that their high-level waste management plan is to 1) store liquid wastes for 3-5 years; 2) incorporate the waste into glass (at a final glass

  12. Spes: An intense source of Neutron-Rich Radioactive Beams at Legnaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Monetti, A.; Rossignoli, M.; Ballan, M.; Borgna, F.; D'Agostini, F.; Gramegna, F.; Prete, G.; Meneghetti, G.; Ferrari, M.; Zenoni, A.

    2018-02-01

    The Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) method for the production of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) is attracting significant interest in the worldwide nuclear physics community. Within this context the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) RIB facility is now under construction at INFN LNL (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro). This technique is established as one of the main techniques for high intensity and high quality beams production. The SPES facility will produce n-rich isotopes by means of a 40 MeV proton beam, emitted by a cyclotron, impinging on a uranium carbide multi-foil fission target. The aim of this work is to describe the most important results obtained by the study of the on-line behavior of the SPES production target assembly. This target system will produce RIBs at a rate of about 1013 fissions per second, it will be able to dissipate a total power of up to 10 kW, and it is planned to work continuously for 2 week-runs of irradiation. ISOL beams of 24 different elements will be produced, therefore a target and ion source development is ongoing to ensure a great variety of produced isotopes and to improve the beam intensity and purity.

  13. Sources, amounts, and characteristics of low-level radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibbey, A.H.; Godbee, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    Low-level radioactive solid wastes (LLW) are generated in the nuclear fuel cycle, national defense programs, institutional (especially medical/biological) applications, and other research and development activities. The estimated total accumulation of defense LLW, approx. 50.8 x 10 6 ft 3 (approx. 1.4 x 10 6 m 3 ), is roughly three times that estimated for commercial LLW, mill tailings excepted. All nuclear fuel cycle steps generate some LLW, but power plants are the chief source. From 1975 through 1977, reactor process stream cleanup generated approx. 1 x 10 6 (approx. 2.8 x 10 4 m 3 ) annually. Spent fuel storage (or reprocessing) and facility decontamination and decommissioning will become important LLW generators as the nuclear power industry matures. The LLW contains dry contaminated trash, much of which is combustible and/or compactible; discarded tools and equipment; wet filter sludges and ion-exchange resins; disposable filter cartridges; and solidified or sorbed liquids, including some organics. A distinguishing characteristic of LLW is a long-lived alpha-emitting transuranic content of 5 ft 3 (approx. 2.1 x 10 4 m 3 )/y. The majority of these wastes, > 6 x 10 5 ft 3 (> 1.7 x 10 4 m 3 ), was medical and academic wastes which usually contained isotopes with induced activities of less than or equal to 60-day half-life, neglecting 3 H and 14 C

  14. The source of solar energy, ca. 1840-1910: From meteoric hypothesis to radioactive speculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, Helge

    2016-12-01

    Why does the Sun shine? Today we know the answer to the question and we also know that earlier answers were quite wrong. The problem of the source of solar energy became an important part of physics and astronomy only with the emergence of the law of energy conservation in the 1840s. The first theory of solar heat based on the new law, due to J.R. Mayer, assumed the heat to be the result of meteors or asteroids falling into the Sun. A different and more successful version of gravitation-to-heat energy conversion was proposed by H. Helmholtz in 1854 and further developed by W. Thomson. For more than forty years the once so celebrated Helmholtz-Thomson contraction theory was accepted as the standard theory of solar heat despite its prediction of an age of the Sun of only 20 million years. In between the gradual demise of this theory and the radically different one based on nuclear processes there was a period in which radioactivity was considered a possible alternative to gravitational contraction. The essay discusses various pre-nuclear ideas of solar energy production, including the broader relevance of the question as it was conceived in the Victorian era.

  15. Pulse shape discrimination of plastic scintillator EJ 299-33 with radioactive sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, E. V.; Chatterjee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Russotto, P.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; Geraci, E.; Gnoffo, B.; Guazzoni, C.; Lanzalone, G.; De Luca, S.; Maiolino, C.; Martorana, N. S.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Parsani, T.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2018-05-01

    The present study has been carried out in order to investigate about the possibility of using EJ 299-33 scintillator in a multi-detector array to detect neutrons along with light charged particles. In a reaction induced by stable and exotic heavy-ions beams, where copious production of neutrons and other light charged particles occurs, discrimination with low identification threshold of these particles are of great importance. In view of this, EJ 299-33 scintillator having dimension of 3 cm × 3 cm × 3 cm backed by a photomultiplier tube was tested and used under vacuum to detect neutrons, gamma-rays and alpha particles emitted by radioactive sources. Anode pulses from the photomultiplier tube were digitized through GET electronics, recorded and stored in a data acquisition system for the purpose of an off-line analysis. The measurements, under vacuum and low background conditions, show good pulse shape discrimination properties characterized by low identification threshold for neutrons, gamma-rays and alpha particles. The Figures of Merit for neutron-gamma and alpha particles-gamma discriminations have been evaluated together with the energy resolution for gamma-ray and alpha particles.

  16. The Effect of Gamma-ray Detector Energy Resolution on the Ability to Identify Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, K.E.; Gosnell, T.B.; Knapp, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the results of an initial study on radiation detector spectral resolution, along with the underlying methodology used. The study was done as part of an ongoing effort in Detection Modeling and Operational Analysis (DMOA) for the DNDO System Architecture Directorate. The study objective was to assess the impact of energy resolution on radionuclide identification capability, measured by the ability to reliably discriminate between spectra associated with 'threats' (defined as fissile materials) and radioactive 'non-threats' that might be present in the normal stream of commerce. Although numerous factors must be considered in deciding which detector technology is appropriate for a specific application, spectral resolution is a critical one for homeland security applications in which a broad range of non-threat sources are present and very low false-alarm rates are required. In this study, we have proposed a metric for quantifying discrimination capability, and have shown how this metric depends on resolution. In future work we will consider other important factors, such as efficiency and volume, and the relative frequency of spectra known to be discrimination challenges in practical applications

  17. Doses of radiation from natural and artificial radioactive sources. [In German

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzen, L F; Myszynski, G; Wiesenack, G

    1957-01-01

    Only since quite recently has man been subjected to irradiation which, as the result of medical and industrial development has been added to the radiation from natural sources. According to the investigations quoted artificial radiation accounts for 20 to 25 per cent of the total radiation level. Atomic test explosions have so far only made an insignificant contribution. The same can still be said of the industrial application of nuclear energy which is still in its infancy. It has been estimated that people living in Europe will over a period of 30 years be subjected to a total dose of radiation from 2500 to 4000 mr. Of this total dose received in 30 years about 750 to 850 mr will be contributed by medical and industrial appurtenances, the overwhelming share of 600 to 700 mr being the result of medical x-ray diagnosis. The atmospheric radioactivity has been estimated (incl. rainfall, etc.) at 20 to 30 mr over a period of 30 years and will therefore not represent any hazards as far as external, direct radiation is concerned. The possible absorption by and accumulation of radiation substances in the body must, however, be carefully studied and special consideration must be given to fission products with a long half-life.

  18. Sources of ionizing radiation, radioactive or nuclear materials out of control. National system of response in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxtova, L.; Adamek, P.; Moravecb, R.; Melich, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper authors deals with the Customs inspection of radioactive materials - present situation as well as with situation after accession of the Slovak Republic process to European Union (EU). he actual response system to incidents with orphan sources or radioactive material occurring in metal scrap, illicit trafficking and disused sources out of control is laid down on the following scheme. The national strategy is aimed to establish a more effective responding system preventing further illegal trafficking with regard to the acceding process which will require for new member states joining EU proper arrangements in improving the safety of radiation sources over the life-cycle to ensure the effective functioning in the conditions of the Slovak Republic's membership in the European Union

  19. Automatic exposure system for radioactive source at teaching laboratory; Sistema automatico de abertura de fonte radioativa em laboratorio de ensino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seren, Maria Emilia G.; Gaal, Vladmir; Morais, Sergio Luiz de; Rodrigues, Varlei, E-mail: mseren@ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin

    2013-12-15

    The development of Compton Scattering experiment, studied by undergraduate students of the Medical Physics course at the Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), takes place in the Medical Physics Teaching Laboratory, belonging to the Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute (IFGW/UNICAMP). The experiment consists of a fixed {sup 137}Cs radioactive source, with current activity of 610.5 MBq and a scintillation detector that turns around the center of the system whose function is to detect the scattered photons spectrum by a scatter object (target). The {sup 137}Cs source is stored in a lead shield with a collimating window for the gamma radiation emitted with energy of 0.662 MeV. This source is exposed only when an attenuation barrier protecting the collimating window is opened. The process of opening and closing the attenuation barrier may deliver a radiation dose to users when done manually. Considering the stochastic harmful effects of ionizing radiation, the goal of this project was to develop an automatic exposure system of the radioactive source, in order to reduce the radiation dose received during the Compton Scattering experiment. The developed system is micro controlled and performs standard operating routines, responding to emergencies. Furthermore, an electromagnetic lock enables quick closing of the barrier by gravity, in case of interruption of the electrical current circuit. Besides reducing the total dose to lab users, the system adds more security to the routine, since it limits the access to the radioactive source and prevents accidental exposure. (author)

  20. Collection of a radioactive source of $^{83}$Kr to study the gas distribution dynamics in a large GRPC detector

    CERN Multimedia

    An ultra-granular hadronic calorimeter was built using Glass Resistive Plate Chamber (GRPC) detectors as the sensitive medium. The gas of those detectors of $1 \\times 1$ m$^{2}$ each is constrained to be on one side of the detector. To ensure good gas distribution a prototype was built. Such a scheme could be extended to larger GRPC detectors of more than 2 m$^{2}$ if found efficient. To check the performance a radioactive gas could be used in association with the usual gas mixture used to operate the GRPC. The distribution of the radioactive gas can be monitored thanks to the 1 cm$^2$ resolution provided by the embedded electronics used to read out the detector. The radioactive $^{83}$Kr source (obtained from $^{83}$Rb decay) could be produced at the ISOLDE facility and will be used to study larger GRPC detectors at CERN.

  1. Handling of Highly Radioactive Radiation Sources in a Hot Cell Using a Mechanically Driven Cell Crane - 13452

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klute, Stefan; Huber, Wolfgang-Bruno [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Am Taubenfeld 25/1, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Meyer, Franz [Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    In 2010, Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH was awarded the contract for design and erection of a Hot Cell for handling and storage of highly radioactive radiation sources. This Hot Cell is part of a new hot cell laboratory, constructed for the NHZ (Neues Handhabungszentrum = New Handling Center) of the Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH (NES). All incurring radioactive materials from Austria are collected in the NHZ, where they are safely conditioned and stored temporarily until their final storage. The main tasks of the NES include, apart from the collection, conditioning and storage of radioactive waste, also the reprocessing and the decontamination of facilities and laboratories originating from 45 years of research and development at the Seibersdorf site as well as the operation of the Hot Cell Laboratory [1]. The new Hot Cell Laboratory inside the NHZ consists of the following room areas: - One hot cell, placed in the center, for remote controlled, radiation protected handling of radioactive materials, including an integrated floor storage for the long-term temporary storage of highly radioactive radiation sources; - An anteroom for the loading and unloading of the hot cell; - One control room for the remote controlling of the hot cell equipment; - One floor storage, placed laterally to the hot cell, for burial, interim storage and removal of fissionable radioactive material in leak-proof packed units in 100 l drums. The specific design activity of the hot cell of 1.85 Pbq relating to 1-Me-Radiator including the integrated floor storage influences realization and design of the components used in the cell significantly. (authors)

  2. Production of multicharged radioactive ion beams for spiral: studies and realization of the first target-ion source system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maunoury, L.

    1998-01-01

    In the framework of the SPIRAL project, which concerns the production and the acceleration of a multicharged radioactive ions beam, the following part has been studied: production and ionization of the radioactive ions beam. A first target-source (nanogan II), devoted exclusively to the production of multicharged radioactive ions gas type beams, has been studied and tested. The diffusion efficiency has been deduced from the diffusion equations (Fick laws). This efficiency is governed by the following parameters: the temperature, the grains size of the target, the Arrhenius parameters and the radioactive period. Another study concerning the production targets is presented. It deals with the temperature distribution allowing an utilization of more than one month at a temperature of 2400 K. Another development (SPIRAL II) is devoted to the production of high neutron content radioactive atoms created by the uranium fission, from fast neutrons. The neutrons beam is produced by the ''stripping break-up'' of a deutons beam in a converter. (A.L.B.)

  3. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  4. The role of the Gosatomnadzor of Russia in national regulating of safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, M.V.; Sitnikov, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    As at the end of 1999, the Gosatomnadzor of Russia supervised 6551 radiation sources, including 1285 unsealed sources with individual activity from a minimal level to 1x10 12 Bq and a total activity of 585x10 12 Bq, and also 5266 sealed sources with individual activity from 30 to 1x10 17 Bq and the total activity of more than 11x10 17 Bq. A national infrastructure has been created in the Russian Federation in order to regulate the safety of nuclear energy use. The infrastructure includes the legal system and the regulatory authorities based on and acting according to it. The regulation of radiation safety, including assurance of radiation source safety and radioactive material security (management of disused sources, planning, preparedness and response to abnormal events and emergencies, recovery of control over orphan sources, informing users and others who might be affected by lost source, and education and training in the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials), is realized within this infrastructure. The legal system includes federal laws ('On the Use of Nuclear Energy' and 'On Public Radiation Safety'), a number of decrees and resolutions of the President and the Government of the Russian Federation, federal standards and rules for nuclear energy use, and also departmental and industrial manuals and rules, State standards, construction standards and rules and other documents. The safety regulation tasks have been defined by these laws, according to which regulatory authorities are entrusted with the development, approval and putting into force of standards and rules in the nuclear energy use, with issuing licenses for carrying out nuclear activities, with safety supervision assurance, with review and inspection implementation, with control over development and realization of protective measures for workers, population and environment in emergencies at nuclear and radiation hazardous facilities. Russian national regulatory

  5. International conference on the safety and security of radioactive sources: Towards a global system for the continuous control of sources throughout their life cycle. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the conference is to promote a wide exchange of information on key issues relating to the safety and security of radioactive sources, including: drawing up an inventory; finding a solution without delay to situations resulting from past activities; preparing for the future by defining a global cooperative approach to the continuous control of radioactive sources during their life cycle. It is expected that the conference will foster a better understanding of the risks posed by these sources from the point of view of radiation safety and the threat associated with some of them in the event of malevolent use, and will help in finding ways of reducing the likelihood of the occurrence of a radiological incident or accident, or of a malevolent act. It is also expected to identify the preparedness and response measures that are necessary and to facilitate a common understanding on the feasibility of creating a sustainable global system for ensuring the safety and security of radioactive sources

  6. International conference on the safety and security of radioactive sources: Towards a global system for the continuous control of sources throughout their life cycle. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The objective of the conference is to promote a wide exchange of information on key issues relating to the safety and security of radioactive sources, including: drawing up an inventory; finding a solution without delay to situations resulting from past activities; preparing for the future by defining a global cooperative approach to the continuous control of radioactive sources during their life cycle. It is expected that the conference will foster a better understanding of the risks posed by these sources from the point of view of radiation safety and the threat associated with some of them in the event of malevolent use, and will help in finding ways of reducing the likelihood of the occurrence of a radiological incident or accident, or of a malevolent act. It is also expected to identify the preparedness and response measures that are necessary and to facilitate a common understanding on the feasibility of creating a sustainable global system for ensuring the safety and security of radioactive sources.

  7. The technological safety in facilities that manage radioactive sources; La seguridad tecnologica en instalaciones que manejan fuentes radiactivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizcano, D., E-mail: david.lizcano@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The sealed radioactive sources are used inside a wide range of applications in the medicine, industry and investigation around the world. These sources can contain a great radionuclides variety, exhibiting a wide spectrum of activities and radiological half lives. This way, we can find pattern sources of radionuclides as Americium-241, Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239, Thorium-228 and Thorium-230, etc., with some activity of kBq in research laboratories, Iridium-192 and Cesium-137 sources used in brachytherapy with GBq activities, until sources with P Bq activities in industrial irradiators of Cobalt-60 and Cesium-137. This document approach the physical safety that entities like the IAEA recommends for the facilities that contain sealed sources, especially the measures that are taking in the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) and others government facilities. (Author)

  8. The Minister Council decree about conditions for to bring into the Polish customs area, to take away from the Polish customs area, and to transit through this area nuclear materials, radioactive sources and device including such sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.

    2002-01-01

    The decree refers to conditions for to bring into the Polish customs area, to take away from the Polish customs area, and to transit through this area nuclear materials, radioactive sources and devices containing such sources

  9. Study and methodologies for fixing epoxy resin in radioactive sources used for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tozetti, Cíntia A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Silva, José T.; Júnior, Dib K.; Fernandes, Vagner; Souza, Raquel V.; Abreu, Rodrigo T., E-mail: bteigarodrigues@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the number of new cancer cases worldwide will reach 15 million by 2020. The disease is already the second leading cause of death worldwide, being behind only cardiovascular disease. It is unquestionable that it is a public health problem, especially among developing countries. Prostate cancer is the most common among men, approximately 28.6%. The choice of type of treatment for prostate cancer should consider several factors such as: tumor size and extent, apparent aggressiveness (pathological characteristics), age, health. Among the methods applied, brachytherapy has been used in the initial and intermediate stages of the disease. Brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed in contact with or within the organ being treated. This technique allows a large dose of radiation to be released only on the target tumor that protects healthy surrounding tissues. Sources may have different shapes and sizes, but the one used for prostate cancer is usually 4.5 mm in length and 0.8 mm in diameter. About 80 to 120 seeds can be used per patient. Iodine-125 is the radioisotope most used in brachytherapy of the prostate, it emits 35,49keV X-rays in 100% of the decays, with average energy of 29 keV. The treatment of prostate cancer with permanent implantation of iodine-125 seeds has grown dramatically in the world in recent years. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. (author)

  10. Study and methodologies for fixing epoxy resin in radioactive sources used for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Rostelato, Maria E.C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Tozetti, Cíntia A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Silva, José T.; Júnior, Dib K.; Fernandes, Vagner; Souza, Raquel V.; Abreu, Rodrigo T.

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the number of new cancer cases worldwide will reach 15 million by 2020. The disease is already the second leading cause of death worldwide, being behind only cardiovascular disease. It is unquestionable that it is a public health problem, especially among developing countries. Prostate cancer is the most common among men, approximately 28.6%. The choice of type of treatment for prostate cancer should consider several factors such as: tumor size and extent, apparent aggressiveness (pathological characteristics), age, health. Among the methods applied, brachytherapy has been used in the initial and intermediate stages of the disease. Brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed in contact with or within the organ being treated. This technique allows a large dose of radiation to be released only on the target tumor that protects healthy surrounding tissues. Sources may have different shapes and sizes, but the one used for prostate cancer is usually 4.5 mm in length and 0.8 mm in diameter. About 80 to 120 seeds can be used per patient. Iodine-125 is the radioisotope most used in brachytherapy of the prostate, it emits 35,49keV X-rays in 100% of the decays, with average energy of 29 keV. The treatment of prostate cancer with permanent implantation of iodine-125 seeds has grown dramatically in the world in recent years. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. (author)

  11. Radioactive waste management in the USSR: A review of unclassified sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    The Soviet Union does not currently have an overall radioactive waste management program or national laws that define objectives, procedures, and standards, although such a law is being developed, according to the Soviets. Occupational health and safety does not appear to receive major attention as it does in Western nations. In addition, construction practices that would be considered marginal in Western facilities show up in Soviet nuclear power and waste management operations. The issues involved with radioactive waste management and environmental restoration are being investigated at several large Soviet institutes; however, there is little apparent interdisciplinary integration between them, or interaction with the USSR Academy of Sciences. It is expected that a consensus on technical solutions will be achieved, but it may be slow in coming, especially for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and environmental restoration of contaminated areas. Meanwhile, many treatment, solidification, and disposal options for radioactive waste management are being investigated by the Soviets

  12. Calculations of the mean regional dispersion of a radioactive gas emitted from a continuous source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, C.

    1974-10-01

    The mean dispersion of a radioactive gas over distances of the order of 1000 kilometers is estimated with the aid of a statistical treatment of computed geostrophic trajectories and simplified vertical diffusion calculations based on the eddy diffusivity theory. (author)

  13. A study on Prediction of Radioactive Source-term from the Decommissioning of Domestic NPPs by using CRUDTRAN Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Soon; Lee, Sang Heon; Cho, Hoon Jo [Department of Nuclear Engineering Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    For the study, the behavior mechanism of corrosion products in the primary system of the Kori no.1 was analyzed, and the volume of activated corrosion products in the primary system was assessed based on domestic plant data with the CRUDTRAN code used to predict the volume. It is expected that the study would be utilized in predicting radiation exposure of workers performing maintenance and repairs in high radiation areas and in selecting the process of decontaminations and decommissioning in the primary system. It is also expected that in the future it would be used as the baseline data to estimate the volume of radioactive wastes when decommissioning a nuclear plant in the future, which would be an important criterion in setting the level of radioactive wastes used to compute the quantity of radioactive wastes. The results of prediction of the radioactive nuclide inventory in the primary system performed in this study would be used as baseline data for the estimation of the volume of radioactive wastes when decommissioning NPPs in the future. It is also expected that the data would be important criteria used to classify the level of radioactive wastes to calculate the volume. In addition, it is expected that the data would be utilized in reducing radiation exposure of workers in charge of system maintenance and repairing in high radiation zones and also predicting the selection of decontaminations and decommissioning processes in the primary systems. In future researches, it is planned to conduct the source term assessment against other NPP types such as CANDU and OPR-1000, in addition to the Westinghouse type nuclear plants.

  14. National regulatory authorities with competence in the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    The Buenos Aires Conference, hosted by the Government of Argentina, was attended by 89 regulatory officials from 57 Member States. The conference provided a forum for fostering the exchange of information and experience on the development of adequate regulatory systems for effective control of the safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials. This publication contains 64 individual presentations delivered at the Conf