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Sample records for radioactive method avaliacao

  1. Evaluation of human dental loss caused by carbamide peroxide bleacher compared with phosphoric acid conditioning - radioactive method; Avaliacao da perda dental humana com o uso do clareador peroxido de carbamida comparado ao condicionamento com acido fosforico - metodo radiometrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Eduardo Makoto; Yousseff, Michel Nicolau [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Dentistica; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica

    2002-07-01

    The radiometric method was applied to the evaluation of dental loss caused by carbamide peroxide when it is applied on the surface layers of enamel and dentin tissues. Also the dental loss caused by the etching with 37% phosphoric acid procedure used in aesthetic restoration was assessed for comparison with those results obtained. The tooth samples irradiated with a P standard in a thermal neutron flux of the nuclear reactor were placed in contact with 10% carbamide peroxide or with 37% phosphoric acid solution. The radioactivity of {sup 32} P transferred from the radioactive teeth to the bleaching gel or to etching acid was measured using a Geiger Muller detector to calculate the mass of P removed in this treatment and losses were calculated after obtaining their P concentrations. Results obtained indicated that enamel and dentin exposed to carbamide peroxide bleaching agent lose phosphorus. The extent of enamel loss was smaller than that obtained for dentin. In the case of acid etching, there was no difference between the results obtained for enamel and dentin loss. Also the dentin loss obtained after a treatment of 30 applications of 10% carbamide peroxide was the same magnitude of that one application of 37% phosphoric acid. (author)

  2. Radioactive air sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Maiello, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of radioactive air sampling has matured and evolved over decades, it has lacked a single resource that assimilates technical and background information on its many facets. Edited by experts and with contributions from top practitioners and researchers, Radioactive Air Sampling Methods provides authoritative guidance on measuring airborne radioactivity from industrial, research, and nuclear power operations, as well as naturally occuring radioactivity in the environment. Designed for industrial hygienists, air quality experts, and heath physicists, the book delves into the applied research advancing and transforming practice with improvements to measurement equipment, human dose modeling of inhaled radioactivity, and radiation safety regulations. To present a wide picture of the field, it covers the international and national standards that guide the quality of air sampling measurements and equipment. It discusses emergency response issues, including radioactive fallout and the assets used ...

  3. Method of storing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Toshio; Hiratake, Susumu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the radiation doses externally irradiated from treated radioactive waste and also reduce the separation of radioactive nuclide due to external environmental factors such as air, water or the like. Method: Radioactive waste adhered with radioactive nuclide to solid material is molten to mix and submerge the radioactive nuclide adhered to the surface of the solid material into molten material. Then, the radioactive nuclide thus mixed is solidified to store the waste in solidified state. (Aizawa, K.)

  4. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorklund, W.J.; McElroy, J.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form involves calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix

  5. Disposal method of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetake, Naoto; Fukazawa, Tetsuo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety of underground disposal of radioactive wastes for a long period of time by surrounding the periphery of the radioactive wastes with materials that can inhibit the migration of radioactive nuclides and are physically and chemically stable. Method: Hardening products prepared from a water-hardenable calcium silicate compound and an aqueous solution of alkali silicate have compression strength as comparable with that of concretes, high water tightness and adsorbing property to radioactive isotopes such as cobalt similar to that of concretes and they also show adsorption to cesium which is not adsorbed to concretes. Further, the kneaded slurry thereof is excellent in the workability and can be poured even into narrow gaps. Accordingly, by alternately charging granular radioactive wastes and this slurry before hardening into the ground, the radioactive wastes can be put to underground disposal stably with simple procedures. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuramoto, Naohiko.

    1992-01-01

    When granular materials comprising radioactive wastes containing phosphorus are processed at first in a fluidized bed type furnace, if the granular materials are phosphorus-containing activated carbon, granular materials comprising alkali compound such as calcium hydroxide and barium hydroxide are used as fluidizing media. Even granular materials of slow burning speed can be burnt stably in a fluidizing state by high temperature heat of the fluidizing media, thereby enabling to take a long burning processing time. Accordingly, radioactive activated carbon wastes can be processed by burning treatment. (T.M.)

  7. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Kamiya, Kunio; Yusa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To form radioactive wastes into a pellet-like solid body having high strength. Structure: Liquid waste containing a radioactive material is heated into a powdery body. Granular solid matter such as sand greater in diameter than grain size of the powdery body are mixed into the powdery body, and thereafter the mixture is formed by a granulator into a pellet-like solid body. The thus formed material is introduced into a drum can, into which a thermoplastic material such as asphalt is poured into the can and cooled so that the asphalt is impregnated inside the pellet to obtain a solid having high strength. (Furukawa, Y.)

  8. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Ken-ichi; Kawamura, Hideki; Takeuchi, Kunifumi.

    1997-01-01

    Base rock is dug in a substantially cylindrical shape, bentonite blocks in an amount for a predetermined lift are disposed on the inner side of the dug wall surfaces. Concrete blocks constituting a structure of an underground silo are disposed at the inner side. Barrier blocks are disposed to the inner side thereof, and vessels incorporated with radioactive wastes are disposed to the inner side. The bentonite disposed to the inner side of the dug wall surfaces, the concrete structure of the underground silo and the barrier members are divided in the vertical direction into a plurality of blocks, and these blocks are stacked successively from the lowermost layer together with the containing vessels of the radioactive wastes, and after stacking them to a predetermined height, a filler is filled up to the circumference of the vessels. With such a constitution, the underground silo is not fallen down or vibrated even upon occurrence of an earthquake. In addition, bending stresses are scarcely caused thereby making reinforcement of iron reinforcing materials unnecessary. Accordingly, the sealing performance is improved, and processing cost is reduced. (T.M.)

  9. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshihide; Minami, Yuji; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Kageyama, Hisashi; Kobori, Junzo.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To perform the curing sufficiently even when copper hydroxide that interferes the curing reaction is contained in radioactive wastes. Method: Solidification of radioactive wastes containing copper hydroxide using thermoset resins is carried out under the presence of an alkaline material. The thermoset resin used herein is an polyester resin comprising unsaturated polyester and a polymerizable monomer. The alkaline substance usable herein can include powder or an aqueous solution of hydroxides or oxides of sodium, magnesium, calcium or the like. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Method of solidifying radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Mihara, Shigeru; Yamashita, Koji; Sauda, Kenzo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain satisfactory plastic solidification products rapidly and more conveniently from radioactive wastes. Method: liquid wastes contain, in addition to sodium sulfate as the main ingredient, nitrates hindering the polymerizing curing reactions and various other unknown ingredients, while spent resins contain residual cationic exchange groups hindering the polymerizing reaction. Generally, as the acid value of unsaturated liquid polyester resins is lower, the number of terminal alkyd resins is small, formation of nitrates is reduced and the polymerizing curing reaction is taken place more smoothly. In view of the above, radioactive wastes obtained by dry powderization or dehydration of radioactive liquid wastes or spent resins are polymerized with unsaturated liquid polyester resins with the acid value of less than 13 to obtain plastic solidification. Thus, if the radioactive wastes contain a great amount of polymerization hindering material such as NaNO 2 , they can be solidified rapidly and conveniently with no requirement for pre-treatment. (Kamimura, Y.)

  11. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshihiko; Maruko, Morihisa; Takamura, Yoshiyuki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively separate radioactive claddings from the slurry of wasted ion exchange resins containing radioactive claddings. Method: Wasted ion exchange resins having radioactive claddings (fine particles of iron oxides or hydroxide adhered with radioactive cobalt) are introduced into a clad separation tank. Sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide is introduced to the separation tank to adjust the pH value to 3 - 6. Then, sodium lauryl sulfate is added for capturing claddings and airs are blown from an air supply nozzle to generate air bubbles. The claddings are detached from the ion exchange resins and adhered to the air bubbles. The air bubbles adhered with the claddings float up to the surface of the liquid wastes and then forced out of the separation tank. (Ikeda, J.)

  12. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katada, Katsuo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the management for radioactive wastes containers thereby decrease the amount of stored matters by arranging the radioactive wastes containers in the order of their radioactivity levels. Method: The radiation doses of radioactive wastes containers arranged in the storing area before volume-reducing treatment are previously measured by a dosemeter. Then, a classifying machine is actuated to hoist the containers in the order to their radiation levels and the containers are sent out passing through conveyor, surface contamination gage, weight measuring device and switcher to a volume-reducing processing machine. The volume-reduced products are packed each by several units to the storing containers. Thus, the storing containers after stored for a certain period of time can be transferred in an assembled state. (Kawakami, Y.)

  13. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Ootsuka, Masaharu; Uetake, Naoto; Ozawa, Yoshihiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prepare radioactive solidified wastes excellent in strength, heat resistance, weather-proof, water resistance, dampproof and low-leaching property. Method: A hardening material reactive with alkali silicates to form less soluble salts is used as a hardener for alkali silicates which are solidification filler for the radioactive wastes, and mixed with cement as a water absorbent and water to solidify the radioactive wastes. The hardening agent includes, for example, CaCO 3 , Ca(ClO 4 ) 2 , CaSiF 6 and CaSiO 3 . Further, in order to reduce the water content in the wastes and reduce the gap ratio in the solidification products, the hardener adding rate, cement adding rate and water content are selected adequately. As the result, solidification products can be prepared with no deposition of easily soluble salts to the surface thereof, with extremely low leaching of radioactive nucleides. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Method of storing radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, M; Kamiya, K; Sugimoto, Y

    1976-01-09

    A method is claimed to decrease the number of storage containers filled with radioactive wastes. A wire-netting containers having a capacity of 67 liters is filled with 60 kg of pellet-like radioactive solid material. The wire-netting container is held in the middle of a drum can, and asphalt is poured between the drum can and the wire-netting container and stored until radioactivity is attenuated. After storage, the stored body is heated to melt the asphalt and the wire-netting container is removed. Thereafter, the pellet-like radioactive solid material is taken out of the wire-netting container and combined with the other pellet-like radioactive solid material similarly taken out of the storage container, and the resultant material is filled into a wire-netting container having a capacity of 167 liters every 150 kg, and inserted again into the same drum can, into which recovered asphalt is poured for final storage.

  15. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Masahiko; Kira, Satoshi; Watanabe, Naotoshi; Nagaoka, Takeshi; Akane, Junta.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain solidification products of radioactive wastes having sufficient monoaxial compression strength and excellent in water durability upon ocean disposal of the wastes. Method: Solidification products having sufficient strength and filled with a great amount of radioactive wastes are obtained by filling and solidifying 100 parts by weight of chlorinated polyethylene resin and 100 - 500 parts by weight of particular or powderous spent ion exchange resin as radioactive wastes. The chlorinated polyethylene resin preferably used herein is prepared by chlorinating powderous or particulate polyethylene resin in an aqueous suspending medium or by chlorinating polyethylene resin dissolved in an organic solvent capable of dissolving the polyethylene resin, and it is crystalline or non-crystalline chlorinated polyethylene resin comprising 20 - 50% by weight of chlorine, non-crystalline resin with 25 - 40% by weight of chlorine being particularly preferred. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Kikuchi, Makoto; Yusa, Hideo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain solidified radioactive wastes at high packing density by packing radioactive waste pellets in a container and then packing and curing a thermosetting resin therein. Method: Radioactive liquid wastes are dried into power and subjected to compression molding. The pellets thus obtained are supplied in a predetermined amount from the hopper to the inside of a drum can. Then, thermosetting plastic and a curing agent are filled in the drum can. Gas between the pellets is completely expelled by the intrusion of the thermosetting resin and the curing agent among the pellets. Thereafter, the drum can is heated by a heater and curing is effected. After the curing, the drum can is sealed. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Method of processing radioactive gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masayuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the quantity of radioactive gas discharged at the time of starting a nuclear power plant. Method: After the stoppage of a nuclear power plant air containing a radioactive gas is extracted from a main condenser by operating an air extractor. The air is sent into a gaseous waste disposal device, and then introduced into the activated carbon adsorptive tower of a rare gas holdup device where xenon and krypton are trapped. Thereafter, the air passes through pipelines and returned to the main condenser. In this manner, the radioactive gas contained in air within the main condenser is removed during the stoppage of the operation of the nuclear power plant. After the plant has been started, when it enters the normal operation, a flow control valve is closed and another valve is opened, and a purified gas exhausted from the rare gas holdup device is discharged into the atmosphere through an exhaust cylinder. (Aizawa, K.)

  18. Method and techniques of radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafar, M.; Aasi, N.

    2002-04-01

    This study illustrates the characterization of radioactive wastes produced by the application of radioisotopes in industry and research. The treatment methods of such radioactive wastes, chemical co-precipitation and ion exchange depending on the technical state of radioactive waste management facility in Syria were described. The disposal of conditioned radioactive wastes, in a safe way, has been discussed including the disposal of the radioactive sources. The characterizations of the repository to stock conditioned radioactive wastes were mentioned. (author)

  19. Method for radioactivity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbarger, C. John; Cowder, Leo R.

    1976-10-26

    The disclosure relates to a method for analyzing uranium and/or thorium contents of liquid effluents preferably utilizing a sample containing counting chamber. Basically, 185.7-keV gamma rays following .sup.235 U alpha decay to .sup.231 Th which indicate .sup.235 U content and a 63-keV gamma ray doublet found in the nucleus of .sup.234 Pa, a granddaughter of .sup.238 U, are monitored and the ratio thereof taken to derive uranium content and isotopic enrichment .sup.235 U/.sup.235 U + .sup.238 U) in the liquid effluent. Thorium content is determined by monitoring the intensity of 238-keV gamma rays from the nucleus of .sup.212 Bi in the decay chain of .sup.232 Th.

  20. Method of disposing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isozaki, Kei.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To enable safety ocean disposal of radioactive wastes by decreasing the leaching rate of radioactive nucleides, improving the quick-curing nature and increasing the durability. Method : A mixture comprising 2 - 20 parts by weight of alkali metal hydroxide and 100 parts by weight of finely powdered aqueous slags from a blast furnace is added to radioactive wastes to solidify them. In the case of medium or low level radioactive wastes, the solidification agent is added by 200 parts by weight to 100 parts by weight of the wastes and, in the case of high level wastes, the solidification agent is added in such an amount that the wastes occupy about 20% by weight in the total of the wastes and the solidification agent. Sodium hydroxide used as the alkali metal hydroxide is partially replaced with sodium carbonate, a water-reducing agent such as lignin sulfonate is added to improve the fluidity and suppress the leaching rate and the wastes are solidified in a drum can. In this way, corrosions of the vessel can be suppressed by the alkaline nature and the compression strength, heat stability and the like of the product also become excellent. (Sekiya, K.)

  1. Method removing radioactivity from kaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    A method of reducing the radioactivity found in naturally occurring kaolins to about 40% below its native value, and the leachable radiogenic components to less than 20% is described. This reduction is achieved by removing from the kaolin particles of a size less than 0.5 microns. This removal may be carried out by gravitational settling, flocculation of non-colloidal particles, or acid leaching

  2. Method of processing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Susumu; Moriya, Tetsuo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Kariya, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve contamination proofness, water proofness, close bondability and stretching performance of strippable paints coated to substrates liable to be contaminated with radioactive materials. Method: Strippable paints are previously coated on substrates which may possibly be contaminated with radioactive materials. After the contamination, the coated membranes are stripped and removed. Alternatively, the strippable paints may be coated on the already contaminated substrates and, after drying, the paints are stripped and removed. The strippable paints used herein have a composition comprising a styrene-butadiene block copolymer containing from 60 to 80 wt% of styrene as a main ingredient and from 0.3 to 5 % by weight of a higher alkyl amine compound having 12 to 18 carbon atoms blended with the copolymer. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. Method for burning radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Akinori; Tejima, Takaya.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To completely process less combustible radioactive wastes with no excess loads on discharge gas processing systems and without causing corrosions to furnace walls. Method: Among combustible radioactive wastes, chlorine-containing less combustible wastes such as chlorine-containing rubbers and vinyl chlorides, and highly heat generating wastes not containing chloride such as polyethylene are selectively packed into packages. While on the other hand, packages of less combustible wastes are charged into a water-cooled jacket type incinerator intermittently while controlling the amount and the interval of charging so that the temperature in the furnace will be kept to lower than 850 deg C for burning treatment. Directly after the completion of the burning, the packed highly heat calorie producing wastes are charged and subjected to combustion treatment. (Yoshihara, H.)

  4. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshihide; Minami, Yuji; Matsuura, Hiroyuki

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable complete curing even when radioactive wastes contain those materials hindering the curing reaction, for example, copper hydroxide. Method: After admixing an alkaline substance to radioactive concentrated liquid wastes containing copper hydroxide or other amphoteric substances, they are dried, powderized and then cured with thermosetting resins. The thermosetting resins usable herein include, for example, those prepared by mixing an unsaturated polyester with a monomer such as styrene. When a polymerization initiator such as methyl ethyl ketone peroxide and a polymerization promotor are added to the mixture, it takes places curing reaction at normal temperature. Suitable alkaline substances usable herein are those which are insoluble to the liquid wastes and do not change the chemical form under heating and drying. (Yoshihara, H.)

  5. A method for conditioning radioactive-wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuaz, Daniel; Thiery, Daniel.

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a method for conditioning radioactive-wastes, according to the main patent. This method is characterized in that the radioactive wastes are constituted by radio-elements incorporated with filtration and/or floculation promoters. This can be applied to radioactive effluent processing [fr

  6. Using radioactive tracers for the evaluation of industrial equipment; Utilizacao de tracadores radioativos na avaliacao de equipamentos industriais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Luis Eduardo Barreira; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de; Sousa, Alvaro Serafim F. de [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the radioactive tracer technique, giving as example some cases of the possible utilization developed by the Nuclear Engineering Institute, RJ, BR (Argonaut reactor) and through charged particle (CV-28 cyclotron), and also his production and aspects of radiological safety.

  7. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matagi, Yoshihiko; Takahara, Akira; Ootsuka, Katsuyuki.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid the reduction in the atmospheric insulation by preventing the generation of CO 2 , H 2 O, etc. upon irradiation of microwave heat. Method: Radioactive wastes are charged into a hopper, supplied on a conveyor, fed each by a predetermined amount to a microwave furnace and heated by microwaves applied from a microwave guide. Simultaneously, inert gases are supplied from a supply line. The Radioactive wastes to be treated are shielded by the inert gases to prevent the combustion of decomposed gases produced from the wastes upon irradiation of microwave heat to thereby prevent the generation of CO 2 , H 2 , etc., as well as the generated decomposed gases are diluted with the inert gases to decrease the dissociation of the decomposed gases to prevent the reduction in the atmospheric insulation. Since the spent inert gases can be recovered for reuse, the amount of gaseous wastes released to the atmosphere can be decreased and the working life of the high performance air filters can be extended. (Sekiya, K.)

  8. Decontaminating method for radioactive contaminant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    After decontamination of radioactive contaminates with d-limonene, a radioactive material separating agent not compatible with liquid wastes caused by decontamination is added to the liquid wastes. Then after stirring, they are stood still to be separated into two phases, and the radioactive materials in the liquid waste phase caused by decontamination are transferred to the phase of the radioactive material separating agent. With such procedures, they can satisfactorily be separated into two phases of d-limonene and the radioactive material separating agent. Further, d-limonene remaining after the separation can be used again as a decontaminating agent for radioactive contaminates. Therefore, the amount of d-limonene to be used can be reduced, to lower the cost for cleaning, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes formed. (T.M.)

  9. Evaluation of kerma rate in radioactive waste disposal; Avaliacao da taxa de kerma em deposito de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Rodolfo O.; Silva, Joao C.P.; Santos, Joao R. dos, E-mail: oliveira@ien.gov.br, E-mail: jcarlos@ien.gov.br, E-mail: regis@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to assess the progression of kerma rate levels in the air due to the increase of collection, storing and storage of radioactive waste in the new building (after expansion) of the radioactive waste disposal (RWD) of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Brazil. This review is carried out every six months at IEN with thermoluminescent dosimeter lithium fluoride LiF: Mg, Cu, P (TLD-100H). Here are the average values of kerma rate for the period 2008- 2012. In this context, the methodology used for selection and choices of detectors used in dosimeters is presented. The detectors were chosen through homogeneity criteria of the pack, standardization factor and coefficient of variation (CV%). The monitoring points and the exposure time of the detectors are chosen considering various factors, including the rate of occupation and indoor and outdoor positions to RWD. These evaluations showed that the contribution of the new waste disposal in increasing kerma rate of IEN, has proved to be insignificant, that is, the presence of RWD does not contribute to increased environmental kerma rate in the region around this installation.

  10. Evaluation of external exposure in a radioactive waste deposit; Avaliacao da exposicao externa em um deposito de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Sergio Quinet de; Pereira, Wagner de Souza; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo; Dores, Luis Augusto de Carvalho Bresser; Dantas, Marcelino Vicente de Almeida; Silva, Ana Claudia Antunes; Garcia Filho, Oswaldo, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.b, E-mail: sergioquinet@inb.gov.b, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.b, E-mail: luisdores@inb.gov.b, E-mail: marcelino@inb.go.b, E-mail: anasilva@inb.gov.b, E-mail: ogarcia@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio

    2011-10-26

    The ore treatment unit (OTU) of Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), located at Caldas municipality - Minas Gerais, Brazil, posses a radioactive deposit, coming mainly from the chemical processing of monazite sands for obtention of 'rare earths'. The main components of these waste are the 'torta II (thorium rich residues) and the 'mesothorium' ({sup 228}Ra rich residues) - conditioned in steel drums (200 liters), plastic pumps (100 liters) or underground silos. These loaders are deposited in waste loading warehouses existent at the OTU and periodic evaluations of the external exposure rates (mR/h) are part of the 'Programa de Monitoracao Radiologica Ocupacional' of the unit. This paper presents a brief history of origins of this waste deposit and the material found there, and also the result of a routine monitoring of the external exposure rates

  11. Processing method for radioactive sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Yuichi; Kaneko, Masaaki.

    1993-01-01

    The concentration of radioactive sludges contained in a storage tank is controlled, thereafter, a filter is charged into a processing vessel to continuously conduct dewatering. Then, the radioactive sludges and an oxidizer are mixed by stirring using a stirring impeller and by vibrations using a vibrator. At the same time, thermic rays are irradiated by using infrared ray lamps to heat and decompose them. Since thermic rays reach the center of the radioactive sludges by the infrared ray lamps, ion exchange resins are sufficiently decomposed and carbonized into inorganic material. Then, a filling hardener such as mortar cement having a good flowability is charged to solidify the wastes. With such procedures, radioactive sludges can be stored under a stable condition for a long period of time by decomposing organic materials into inorganic materials and solidifying them. Further, an operator's radiation exposure dose can remarkably be reduced by applying a predetermined and a stabilization treatment in an identical processing vessel. (N.H.)

  12. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Ichiro; Hashimoto, Yasuo.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the volume-reduction effect, as well as enable simultaneous procession for the wastes such as burnable solid wastes, resin wastes or sludges, and further convert the processed materials into glass-solidified products which are much less burnable and stable chemically and thermally. Method: Auxiliaries mainly composed of SiO 2 such as clays, and wastes such as burnable solid wastes, waste resins and sludges are charged through a waste hopper into an incinerating melting furnace comprising an incinerating and a melting furnace, while radioactive concentrated liquid wastes are sprayed from a spray nozzle. The wastes are burnt by the heat from the melting furnace and combustion air, and the sprayed concentrated wastes are dried by the hot air after the combustion into solid components. The solid matters from the concentrated liquid wastes and the incinerating ashes of the wastes are melted together with the auxiliaries in the melting furnace and converted into glass-like matters. The glass-like matters thus formed are caused to flow into a vessel and gradually cooled to solidify. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kikuchi, M; Funabashi, K; Yusa, H; Horiuchi, S

    1978-12-21

    Purpose: To decrease the volume of radioactive liquid wastes essentially consisting of sodium hydroxide and boric acid. Method: The concentration ratio of sodium hydroxide to boric acid by weight in radioactive liquid wastes essentially consisting of sodium hydroxide and boric acid is adjusted in the range of 0.28 - 0.4 by means of a pH detector and a sodium concentration detector. Thereafter, the radioactive liquid wastes are dried into powder and then discharged.

  14. Solidification method of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Tsutomu; Chino, Koichi; Sasahira, Akira; Ikeda, Takashi

    1992-07-24

    Metal solidification material can completely seal radioactive wastes and it has high sealing effect even if a trace amount of evaporation should be caused. In addition, the solidification operation can be conducted safely by using a metal having a melting point of lower than that of the decomposition temperature of the radioactive wastes. Further, the radioactive wastes having a possibility of evaporation and scattering along with oxidation can be solidified in a stable form by putting the solidification system under an inert gas atmosphere. Then in the present invention, a metal is selected as a solidification material for radioactive wastes, and a metal, for example, lead or tin having a melting point of lower than that of the decomposition temperature of the wastes is used in order to prevent the release of the wastes during the solidification operation. Radioactive wastes which are unstable in air and scatter easily, for example, Ru or the like can be converted into a stable solidification product by conducting the solidification processing under an inert gas atmosphere. (T.M.).

  15. Radioactive liquid waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Takashi; Baba, Tsutomu; Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Matsuda, Masami; Chino, Koichi; Ikeda, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    As an adsorbent used for removing radioactive nuclides such as cesium and strontium from radioactive liquid wastes generated from a reprocessing plant, a silicon compound having siloxane bonds constituted by silicon and oxygen and having silanol groups constituted by silicon, oxygen and hydrogen, or an inorganic material mainly comprising aluminosilicate constituted with silicon, oxygen and aluminum is used. In the adsorbent of the present invention, since silica main skeletons are partially decomposed in an aqueous alkaline solution to newly form silanol groups having a cation adsorbing property, pretreatment such as pH adjustment is not necessary. (T.M.)

  16. Statistic methods for searching inundated radioactive entities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubasov, Yu.V.; Krivokhatskij, A.S.; Khramov, N.N.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of searching flooded radioactive object in a present area was considered. Various models of the searching route plotting are discussed. It is shown that spiral route by random points from the centre of the area examined is the most efficient one. The conclusion is made that, when searching flooded radioactive objects, it is advisable to use multidimensional statistical methods of classification

  17. Method of treating radioactive waste material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, W.

    1980-01-01

    A method of treating radioactive waste material, particularly a radioactive sludge, is described comprising separating solid material from liquid material, compressing the solid material and encapsulating the solid material in a hardenable composition such as cement, bitumen or a synthetic resin. The separation and compaction stages are conveniently effected in a tube press. (author)

  18. Method for treating radioactive liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komrow, R.R.; Pritchard, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    A process for treating and handling radioactive liquids and rendering such liquids safe for handling is disclosed. Transportation and disposal, the process comprises adding thereto a small amount of a water-insoluble alkali salt of an aqueous alkali saponified gelatinized-starch-polyacrylonitrile graft polymer, to form a solid, semi-solid or gel product

  19. Apparatus and method for radioactive waste screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Douglas W.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Salomon, Hopi; Williams, Charles Leroy

    2012-09-04

    An apparatus and method relating to screening radioactive waste are disclosed for ensuring that at least one calculated parameter for the measurement data of a sample falls within a range between an upper limit and a lower limit prior to the sample being packaged for disposal. The apparatus includes a radiation detector configured for detecting radioactivity and radionuclide content of the of the sample of radioactive waste and generating measurement data in response thereto, and a collimator including at least one aperture to direct a field of view of the radiation detector. The method includes measuring a radioactive content of a sample, and calculating one or more parameters from the radioactive content of the sample.

  20. Analytical method for solving radioactive transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vudakin, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Analytical method for solving radioactive transformations is presented in this paper. High accuracy series expansion of the depletion function and nonsingular Bateman coefficients are used to overcome numerical difficulties when applying well-known Bateman solution of a simple radioactive decay. Generality and simplicity of the method are found to be useful in evaluating nuclide chains with one hundred or more nuclides in the chain. Method enables evaluation of complete chain, without elimination of short-lives nuclides. It is efficient and accurate

  1. Radioactive liquid water processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Noda, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Fumio.

    1993-01-01

    Alkaline earth metals and heavy metals are added to radioactive liquid wastes containing a surface active agent comprising alkali metal salts of higher fatty acids. These metals form metal soaps with the surface active agent dissolved in the liquid wastes and crystallized. The crystallized metal soaps are introduced to a filtering column filled with a burnable polymeric fibrous filtering material. The filtering material is burnt. This can remove the surface active agent to remove COD without using an active carbon. (T.M.)

  2. Method for storing radioactive combustible waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

    1973-10-01

    A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

  3. Method of reprocessing radioactive asphalt solidification products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaya, Iwao; Murakami, Tadashi; Miyake, Takafumi; Inagaki, Yuzo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain heat-stable solidification products and decrease the total volume thereof by modifying the solidified form by the reprocessing of existent radioactive asphalt solidification products. Method: Radioactive asphalt solidification products are heated into a fluidized state. Then, incombustible solvents such as perchloroethylene or trichloroethylene are added to a dissolving tank to gradually dissolve the radioactive asphalt solidification products. Thus, organic materials such as asphalts are transferred into the solvent layer, while inorganic materials containing radioactive materials remain as they are in the separation tank. Then, the inorganic materials containing the radioactive materials are taken out and then solidified, for example, by converting them into a rock or glass form. (Kawakami, Y.)

  4. Method of processing radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootaka, Hisashi; Aizu, Tadashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the volume-reducing effect for the radioactive solids wastes by freezing and then pulverizing them. Method: Miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes produced from a nuclear power plant and packed in vinyl resin bags are filled in a drum can and nitrogen gas at low temperature (lower than 0 0 C) from a cylinder previously prepared by filling liquid nitrogen (at 15kg/cm 2 , -196 0 C) to freeze the radioactive solid wastes. Thereafter, a hydraulic press is inserted into the drum can to compress and pulverize the thus freezed miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes into powder. The powder thus formed does not expand even after removing the hydraulic press from the drum can, whereby the volume reduction of the radioactive solid wastes can be carried out effectively. (Horiuchi, T.)

  5. Method of decomposing radioactive organic solvent wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uki, Kazuo; Ichihashi, Toshio; Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tatsuaki

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decompose radioactive organic solvent wastes or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom into organic materials under moderate conditions, as well as greatly decrease the amount of secondary wastes generated. Method: Radioactive organic solvent wastes comprising an organic phosphoric acid ester ingredient and a hydrocarbon ingredient as a diluent therefor, or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom are oxidatively decomposed by hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution of phosphoric acid metal salts finally into organic materials to perform decomposing treatment for the radioactive organic solvent wastes. The decomposing reaction is carried out under relatively moderate conditions and cause less burden to facilities or the likes. Further, since the decomposed liquid after the treatment can be reused for the decomposing reaction as a catalyst solution secondary wastes can significantly be decreased. (Yoshihara, H.)

  6. Method for immobilizing radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babad, H.; Strachan, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive iodine, present as alkali metal iodides or iodates in an aqueous solution, is incorporated into an inert solid material for long-term storage by adding to the solution a stoichiometric amount with respect to the formation of a sodalite (3M2O.3Al2O3. 6SiO2.2MX, where M alkali metal; X I - or IO 3- ) of an alkali metal, alumina and silica, stirring the solution to form a homogeneous mixture, drying the mixture to form a powder, compacting and sintering the compacted powder at 1073 to 1373 K (800 0 to 1100 0 C.) for a time sufficient to form sodalite

  7. Method of processing radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motojima, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the efficiency of removing radioactive cesium from radioactive liquid waste by employing zeolite affixed to metallic compound ferrocyanide as an adsorbent. Method: Regenerated liquid waste of a reactor condensation desalting unit, floor drain and so forth are collected through respective supply tubes to a liquid waste tank, and the liquid waste is fed by a pump to a column filled with zeolite containing a metallic compound ferrocyanide, such as with copper, zinc, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel or the like. The liquid waste from which radioactive cesium is removed is dried and pelletized by volume reducing and solidifying means. (Yoshino, Y.)

  8. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to a decontamination method for radioactive metal waste products derived from equipment that handles radioactive materials whose surfaces have been contaminated; in particular it concerns a decontamination method that reduces the amount of radioactive waste by decontaminating radioactive waste substances to a level of radioactivity in line with normal waste products. In order to apply chemical decontamination to metal waste products whose surfaces are divided into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste; the carbon steel waste is treated using only a primary process in which the waste is immersed in a sulfuric acid solution, while the stainless steel waste must be treated with both the primary process and then electrolytically reduces it for a specific length of time and a secondary process that uses a solution of sulfuric acid mixed with oxidizing metal salts. The method used to categorize metal waste into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste involves determining the presence, or absence, of magnetism. Voltage is applied for a fixed duration; once that has stopped, electrolytic reduction repeats the operative cycle of applying, then stopping voltage until the potential of the radioactive metal waste is retained in the active region. 1 fig. 2 tabs

  9. Method for processing powdery radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Toshihide; Nakayama, Yasuyuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify radioactive wastes with ease and safety at a high reaction speed but with no boiling by impregnating the radioactive wastes with chlorostyrene. Method: Beads-like dried ion exchange resin, powdery ion exchange resin, filter sludges, concentrated dried waste liquor or the like are mixed or impregnated with a chlorostyrene monomer dissolving therein a polymerization initiator such as methyl ethyl ketone peroxide and benzoyl peroxide. Mixed or impregnated products are polymerized to solid after a predetermined of time through curing reaction to produce solidified radioactive wastes. Since inflammable materials are used, this process has a high safety. About 70% wastes can be incorporated. The solidified products have a strength as high as 300 - 400 kg/cm 3 and are suitable to ocean disposal. The products have a greater radioactive resistance than other plastic solidification products. (Seki, T.)

  10. Method for solidifying powdery radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Toshihide.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify powdery radioactive wastes through polymerization in a vessel at a high impregnation speed with no cloggings in pipes. Method: A drum can is lined with an inner liner layer of a predetermined thickness made of inflammable material such as glass fiber. A plurality of pipes for supplying liquid plastic monomer are provided in adjacent to the upper end face of the inflammable material or inserted between the vessel and the inflammable material. Then powdery radioactive wastes are filled in the vessel and the liquid plastic monomer dissolving therein a polymerization initiator is supplied through the pipes. The liquid plastic monomer impregnates through the inflammable material layer into the radioactive wastes and the plastic monomer is polymerized by the aid of the polymerization initiator after a predetermined of time to produce solidified plastic products of radioactive wastes. (Seki, T.)

  11. Method of processing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Susumu.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive solid wastes generated from nuclear power plants are pressed and reduced in the volume by a compressor into compression products. Next, the compression products are put into a vessel in a tank and a solidifying material at low viscosity such as vinyl monomer is supplied and impregnated into the inner gaps of the compression products while the pressure in the tank is reduced by a vacuum pump. Subsequently, the compression products are heated and pressurized in the tank to polymerize and solidify the solidifying material. Then, a plurality of solidified compression products are placed in the inside of a drum can and fixed at the periphery thereof together with fixing material such as mortars and plastics. Accordingly, even when underground water should intrude after underground disposal, there is no more risk of causing swelling pressure due to water absorption. Accordingly, there is no more possiblity to cause cracks in the wastes due to the swelling pressure, and wastes of excellent stability and integrity can be obtained. (I.N.)

  12. Recovering method for high level radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Toshiki

    1998-01-01

    Offgas filters such as of nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and waste control facilities are burnt, and the burnt ash is melted by heating, and then the molten ashes are brought into contact with a molten metal having a low boiling point to transfer the high level radioactive materials in the molten ash to the molten metal. Then, only the molten metal is evaporated and solidified by drying, and residual high level radioactive materials are recovered. According to this method, the high level radioactive materials in the molten ashes are transferred to the molten metal and separated by the difference of the distribution rate of the molten ash and the molten metal. Subsequently, the molten metal to which the high level radioactive materials are transferred is heated to a temperature higher than the boiling point so that only the molten metal is evaporated and dried to be removed, and residual high level radioactive materials are recovered easily. On the other hand, the molten ash from which the high level radioactive material is removed can be discarded as ordinary industrial wastes as they are. (T.M.)

  13. Method of decontaminating radioactive metal wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaji, Nobuyoshi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To completely prevent the surface contamination of an equipment and decrease the amount of radioactive wastes to be resulted. Method: The surfaces of vessels, pipeways or the likes of nuclear reactor facilities to be contaminated with radioactive materials are appended with thin plates of metals identical or different from the constituents of the surfaces so as to be releasable after use. The material and the thickness of the plates and the method of appending then are determined depending on the state of use of the appended portions. Since only the stripped plates have to be processed as radioactive wastes, the amount of wastes can be decreased and, since the scrap materials can be reused, it is advantageous in view of the resource-saving. (Sekiya, K.)

  14. Method of solidifying radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain solidification products of radioactive wastes satisfactorily and safely with no destruction even under a high pressure atmosphere by preventing the stress concentration by considering the relationships of the elastic module between the solidifying material and radioactive solid wastes. Method: Solidification products of radioactive wastes with safety and securing an aimed safety ratio are produced by conditioning the modules of elasticity of the solidifying material equal to or less than that of the radioactive wastes in a case where the elastic module of radioactive solid wastes to be solidified is smaller than that of the solidifying material (the elastic module of wastes having the minimum elastic module among various wastes). The method of decreasing the elastic module of the solidifying material usable herein includes the use of such a resin having a long distance between cross-linking points of a polymer in the case of plastic solidifying materials, and addition of rubber-like binders in the case of cement or like other inorganic solidifying materials. (Yoshihara, H.)

  15. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Yamazaki, Sei; Miura, Haruki.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal wastes, which are generated from radioactive material handling facilities and the surfaces of which are contaminated by radioactive materials. That is, it has a feature of applying acid dissolution simultaneously with mechanical grinding. The radioactive metal wastes are contained in a vessel such as a barrel together with abrasives in a sulfuric acid solution and rotated at several tens rotation per minute. By such procedures for the radioactive metal wastes, (1) cruds and passive membranes are mechanically removed, (2) exposed mother metal materials are uniformly brought into contact with sulfuric acid and further (3) the mother metal materials dissolve the cruds and the passive membranes also chemically by a reducing dissolution (so-called local cell effect). According to the method of the present invention, stainless steel metal wastes having cruds and passive membranes can rapidly and efficiently be decontaminated to a radiation level equal with that of ordinary wastes. (I.S.)

  16. Analytical method for solving radioactive transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukadin, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The exact method of solving radioactive transformations is presented. Nonsingular Bateman coefficients, which can be computed using recurrence formulas, greatly reduce computational time and eliminate singularities that often arise in problems involving nuclide transmutations. Depletion function power series expansion enables high accuracy of the performed calculations, specially in a case of a decay constants with closely spaced values. Generality and simplicity of the method make the method useful for many practical applications. (author)

  17. Method of solidifying radioactive laundry wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to solidify radioactive laundry wastes containing non-ionic liquid detergents less solidifiable by plastic solidification process in liquid laundry wastes for cloths or the likes discharged from a nuclear power plant. Method: Radioactive laundry wastes are solidified by using plastic solidifying agent comprising, as a main ingredient, unsaturated polyester resins and methylmethacrylate monomers. The plastic solidifying agents usable herein include, for example, unsaturated polyester resins prepared by condensating maleic anhydride and phthalic anhydride with propylene glycol and incorporated with methylmethacrylate monomers. The mixing ratio of the methylmethacrylate monomers is preferably 30 % by weight based on the unsaturated polyester resins. (Aizawa, K.)

  18. Method of burning flammable radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahata, Taneaki.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To completely oxidize flammable radioactive wastes such as organic compounds, ion exchange materials or oils. Method: Contaminated flammable radioactive wastes are heated and pyrolytically decomposed in the range 400 0 to 500 0 C in the presence of oxygen under lower pressure than atmospheric pressure. Volatile organic substance, hydrogen and soot subsequently produced are passed over oxidation catalyst. The catalysts such as copper oxide, iron oxide, cobalt oxide, nickel oxide, chromium oxide are heated in the range 600 0 to 700 0 C to produce stable oxides. (J.P.N.)

  19. Quantitative autoradiography - a method of radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treutler, H.C.; Freyer, K.

    1988-01-01

    In the last years the autoradiography has been developed to a quantitative method of radioactivity measurement. Operating techniques of quantitative autoradiography are demonstrated using special standard objects. Influences of irradiation quality, of backscattering in sample and detector materials, and of sensitivity and fading of the detectors are considered. Furthermore, questions of quantitative evaluation of autoradiograms are dealt with, and measuring errors are discussed. Finally, some practical uses of quantitative autoradiography are demonstrated by means of the estimation of activity distribution in radioactive foil samples. (author)

  20. Method of decontaminating radioactive-contaminated instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Fujii, Masaaki; Kitaguchi, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safety processing of liquid wastes by recovering radioactive metal ions remaining in the electrolytes after the decontamination procedure thereby decreasing the radioactivity. Method: In a decontamination tank containing electrolytes consisting of diluted hydrochloric acid and diluted sulfuric acid, are provided a radioactive contaminated instrument connected to an anode and a collector electrode made of stainless steel connected to a cathode respectively. Upon applying electrical current, the portion of the mother material to be decontaminated is polished electrolytically into metal ions and they are deposited as metal on the collection electrode. After completion of the decontamination, an ultrasonic wave generator is operated to strip and remove the oxide films. Thereafter, the anode is replaced with the carbon electrode and electrical current is supplied continuously, whereby the remaining metal ions are deposited and recovered as the metal on the collection electrode. (Yoshino, Y.)

  1. Method of decontaminating radioactive-contaminated instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, M; Fujii, M; Kitaguchi, H

    1982-03-29

    Purpose: To enable safety processing of liquid wastes by recovering radioactive metal ions remaining in the electrolytes after the decontamination procedure thereby decreasing the radioactivity. Method: In a decontamination tank containing electrolytes consisting of diluted hydrochloric acid and diluted sulfuric acid, are provided a radioactive contaminated instrument connected to an anode and a collector electrode made of stainless steel connected to a cathode respectively. Upon applying electrical current, the portion of the mother material to be decontaminated is polished electrolytically into metal ions and they are deposited as metal on the collection electrode. After completion of the decontamination, an ultrasonic wave generator is operated to strip and remove the oxide films. Thereafter, the anode is replaced with the carbon electrode and electrical current is supplied continuously, whereby the remaining metal ions are deposited and recovered as the metal on the collection electrode.

  2. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes with plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Yasumura, Keijiro; Minami, Yuji; Tomita, Toshihide

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent solidification of solidifying agents in the mixer by conducting the mixing process for the solidifying agents and the radioactive wastes at a temperature below the initiation point for the solidification of the agents thereby separating the mixing process from the solidification-integration process. Method: Catalyst such as cobalt naphthenate is charged into an unsaturated polyester resin in a mixer previously cooled, for example, to -10 0 C. They are well mixed with radioactive wastes and the mixture in the mixer is charged in a radioactive waste storage container. The temperature of the mixture, although kept at a low temperature initially, gradually increases to an ambient temperature whereby curing reaction is promoted and the reaction is completed about one day after to provide firm plastic solidification products. This can prevent the solidification of the solidifying agents in the mixer to thereby improve the circumstance's safety. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. Method of processing radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi; Soda, Kenzo; Mihara, Shigeru.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain satisfactory plastic solidification products rapidly and smoothly by adding oxidizers to radioactive liquid wastes. Method: Sulfuric acid, etc. are added to radioactive liquid wastes to adjust the pH value of the liquid wastes to less than 3.0. Then, ferrous sulfates are added such that the iron concentration in the liquid wastes is 100 mg/l. Then, after adjusting pH suitably to the drying powderization by adding alkali such as hydroxide, the liquid wastes are dried and powderized. The resultant powder is subjected to plastic solidification by using polymerizable liquid unsaturated polyester resins as the solidifying agent. The thus obtained solidification products are stable in view of the physical property such as strength or water proofness, as well as stable operation is possible even for those radioactive liquid wastes in which the content ingredients are unknown. (Takahashi, M.)

  4. Sampling method of environmental radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This manual provides sampling methods of environmental samples of airborne dust, precipitated dust, precipitated water (rain or snow), fresh water, soil, river sediment or lake sediment, discharged water from a nuclear facility, grains, tea, milk, pasture grass, limnetic organisms, daily diet, index organisms, sea water, marine sediment, marine organisms, and that for tritium and radioiodine determination for radiation monitoring from radioactive fallout or radioactivity release by nuclear facilities. This manual aims at the presentation of standard sampling procedures for environmental radioactivity monitoring regardless of monitoring objectives, and shows preservation method of environmental samples acquired at the samplingpoint for radiation counting for those except human body. Sampling techniques adopted in this manual is decided by the criteria that they are suitable for routine monitoring and any special skillfulness is not necessary. Based on the above-mentioned principle, this manual presents outline and aims of sampling, sampling position or object, sampling quantity, apparatus, equipment or vessel for sampling, sampling location, sampling procedures, pretreatment and preparation procedures of a sample for radiation counting, necessary recording items for sampling and sample transportation procedures. Special attention is described in the chapter of tritium and radioiodine because these radionuclides might be lost by the above-mentioned sample preservation method for radiation counting of less volatile radionuclides than tritium or radioiodine. (Takagi, S.)

  5. On - Site Assessment Methods For Environmental Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrinec, B.; Babic, D.; Bituh, T.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the rapid determination of radioactivity in cases of release into the environment as well as in cases of nuclear/radiological accidents is described. These measurements would enable a direct risk assessment for humans and biota, without any sampling and at a considerably larger number of locations than in previous studies. Thus obtained, the substantially expanded dataset is expected to shed more light on the properties of environmental radioactivity both in the region studied and in other similar areas. Field measurements will be performed and samples of soil and biota will be collected in order to compare field results with laboratory measurements. Once the method has been validated, previously unexplored locations will be included in the study. Our measurements at numerous locations will also provide control values for comparison in cases of any unplanned or accidental radiological event. An assessment of the possible effects of radionuclide concentrations on the human food chain and biota will be performed within the appropriate models used worldwide exactly for this purpose. In this way, the project should contribute to regional, European, and global efforts towards understanding the radiological impact on ecosystems. Field measurements will also address certain issues in the environmental metrology of radioactive substances, e.g., simultaneous determination of activity concentrations and related dose rates. This will serve as a tool for rapid risk assessment in emergency situations. (author).

  6. Method of processing radioactive metal wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yoichi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Tsuzura, Katsuhiko.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable long and safety storage for radioactive metal wastes such as used fuel cans after the procession or used pipe, instruments and the likes polluted with various radioactive substances, by compacting them to solidify. Method: Metal wastes such as used fuel cans, which have been cut shorter and reprocessed, are pressed into generally hexagonal blocks. The block is charged in a capsule of a hexagonal cross section made of non-gas permeable materials such as soft steels, stainless steels and the likes. Then, the capsule is subjected to static hydraulic hot pressing as it is or after deaeration and sealing. While various combinations are possible for temperature, pressure and time as the conditions for the static hydraulic hot pressing, dense block with no residual gas pores can be obtained, for example, under the conditions of 900 0 C, 1000 Kg/cm 2 and one hour where the wastes are composed of zircaloy. (Kawakami, Y.)

  7. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Fumio; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Matsuda, Masami.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the performance of removing metal ions in ion exchange resins for use in clean-up of service water or waste water in BWR type reactors. Method: A column filled with activated carbon is disposed at the pre- or post-stage of a clean-up system using ion exchange resins disposed for the clean-up of service water or waste water of a nuclear reactor so that organics contained in water may be removed through adsorption. Since the organic materials are thus adsorbed and eliminated, various types of radioactive ions contained in radioactive liquid are no more masked and the performance of removing ions in the ion exchanger resins of the clean-up device can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Method and equipment of processing radioactive laundry wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takamori; Suzuki, Takeo; Tabata, Masayuki; Takada, Takao; Yamaguchi, Shin-ichi; Noda, Tetsuya.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively process radioactive laundry wastes generated due to water-washing after dry-cleaning of protective clothings which have been put on in nuclear facilities. Method: Dry cleaning soaps and ionic radioactive materials contained in radioactive laundry wastes are selectively adsorbed to decontaminate by adsorbents. Then, the adsorbents having adsorbed dry cleaning soaps and ionic radioactive materials are purified by being removed with these radioactive materials. The purified adsorbents are re-used. (Seki, T.)

  9. 40 CFR 141.25 - Analytical methods for radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical methods for radioactivity... § 141.25 Analytical methods for radioactivity. (a) Analysis for the following contaminants shall be conducted to determine compliance with § 141.66 (radioactivity) in accordance with the methods in the...

  10. Processing method of radioactive metal wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetake, Naoto; Urata, Megumu; Sato, Masao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the volume and increase the density of radioactive metal wastes easily while preventing scattering of radioactivity and process them into suitable form to storage and treatment. Method: Metal wastes mainly composed of zirconium are discharged from nuclear power plants or fuel re-processing plants, and these metals such as zirconium and titanium vigorously react with hydrogen and rapidly diffuse as hydrides. Since the hydrides are extremely brittle and can be pulverized easily, they can be volume-reduced. However, since metal hydrides have no ductility, dehydrogenation is applied for the molding fabrication in view of the subsequent storage and processing. The dehydrogenation is easy like the hydrogenation and fine metal pieces can be molded in a small compression device. For the dehydrogenation, a temperature is slightly increased as compared with that in the hydrogenation, pressure is reduced through the vacuum evacuation system and the removed hydrogen is purified for reuse. The upper limit for the temperature of the hydrogenation is 680 0 C in order to prevent the scttering of radioactivity. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Method of controlling radioactive waste processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikawa, Hiroji; Sato, Takao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To minimize the pellet production amount, maximize the working life of a solidifying device and maintaining the mechanical strength of pellets to a predetermined value irrespective of the type and the cycle of occurrence of the secondary waste in the secondary waste solidifying device for radioactive waste processing systems in nuclear power plants. Method: Forecasting periods for the type, production amount and radioactivity level of the secondary wastes are determined in input/output devices connected to a control system and resulted signals are sent to computing elements. The computing elements forecast the production amount of regenerated liquid wastes after predetermined days based on the running conditions of a condensate desalter and the production amounts of filter sludges and liquid resin wastes after predetermined days based on the liquid waste processing amount or the like in a processing device respectively. Then, the mass balance between the type and the amount of the secondary wastes presently stored in a tank are calculated and the composition and concentration for the processing liquid are set so as to obtain predetermined values for the strength of pellets that can be dried to solidify, the working life of the solidifying device itself and the radioactivity level of the pellets. Thereafter, the running conditions for the solidifying device are determined so as to maximize the working life of the solidifying device. (Horiuchi, T.)

  12. Method of plastic solidification of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Yasuo; Tokimitsu, Fujio.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent occurrence of deleterious cracks to the inside and the surface of solidification products, as well as eliminate gaps between the products and the vessel inner wall upon plastic solidification processing for powdery or granular radioactive wastes. Method: An appropriate amount of thermoplastic resins such as styrenic polymer or vinyl acetate type polymer as a low shrinking agent is added and mixed with unsaturated polyester resins to be mixed with radioactive wastes so as to reduce the shrinkage-ratio to 0 % upon curing reaction. Thus, a great shrinkage upon hardening the mixture is suppressed to prevent the occurrence of cracks to the surface and the inside of the solidification products, as well as prevent the gaps between the inner walls of a drum can vessel and the products upon forming solidification products to the inside of the drum can. The resultant solidification products have a large compression strength and can sufficiently satisfy the evaluation standards as the plastic solidification products of radioactive wastes. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Solidification processing method for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Akimitsu; Tanaka, Keiji; Heta, Katsutoshi.

    1991-01-01

    The pressure in a vessel containing radioactive wastes is previously reduced and cement mortar prepared by kneading cement, sand and kneading agent with water is poured under shaking substantially to the upper end of the vessel. After the lowering of the mortar level due to the deforming has been terminated, the pressure is increased gradually. Then, the cement mortar is further poured substantially to the upper end of the vessel again. With such a two step pouring method, spaces other than the radioactive wastes in the vessel can be filled substantially completely with the cement mortar. Accordingly, it is possible to avoid the problem in view of the strength due to the formation of gaps at the inside of the vessel, or leaching of radioactive materials due to the intrusion of water into the gaps. Further, if washing water is reutilized as water for kneading or washing after the precipitation of the solid contents, the amount of the secondary wastes generated can be reduced. (T.M.)

  14. Method of removing radioactive waste from oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belanger, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a method of removing particulates, radioactive contaminants, and moisture from oil, which consists of: straining out the particulates by passing the oil through a coarse filter screen to a receiving vessel; forming an upper stratum of oil and a lower stratum of sludge, consisting of mud, oil, particulates, and moisture, by heating the upper two-thirds of the receiving vessel; skimming off the stratum of oil from the receiving vessel; transferring the sludge from the receiving vessel to a container; transferring additional separated oil to the receiving vessel; conveying the oil skimmed from the receiving vessel to a mixing vessel; adding an effective amount of Calcium Hypochlorite crystals containing 65% free Chlorine to the mixing vessel to initiate salt formation with the radioactive contaminants; mixing the contents of the mixing vessel for at least ten minutes; transferring the mixture from the mixing vessel to a circulating heater; outputting the mixture from the circulating heater to a second mixing vessel; removing moisture from the oil; and filtering from the oil, the solid radioactive contaminant-salts and residual particulate matter

  15. Method of producing radioactive carbon powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon powder, placed in a hermetically closed apparatus under vacuum together with radium ore, adsorbs radon gas emanating from the radium ore thus producing a radioactive carbonaceous material, the radioactivity of which is due to the presence of adsorbed radon. The radioactive carbon powder thus obtained has excellent therapeutical efficacy and is suitable for a variety of applications because of the mild radioactivity of radon. Radium ore permits substantially limitlessly repeated production of the radioactive carbon powder

  16. Method of solidifying liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekar, A.; Petrovic, J.; Timulak, J.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste containing boric acid salts is mixed with zeolite tuff and neutralized by lime. Power plant fly ash containing single-component or mixed Portland cement is then added to the mixture. Prior to packaging, anion-active bitumen emulsion or an aqueous emulsion of fatty acid salts and of free fatty acids insoluble in water can be added. Examples are given listing accurate proportions of the individual components. The advantage of the said solidification method is the use of easily available raw materials and improved values of extractability of the resulting product radionuclides. (E.S.)

  17. Chemically reducing decontamination method for radioactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Sato, Hitoshi.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of electrolytically reducing radioactive metal wastes, then chemically dissolving the surface thereof with a strong acid decontaminating solution. This method utilizes dissolving characteristics of stainless steels in the strong acid solution. That is, in the electrolytic reduction operation, a portion of the metal wastes is brought into contact with a strong acid decontaminating solution, and voltage and current are applied to the portion and keep it for a long period of time so as to make the potential of the immersed portion of the metal wastes to an active soluble region. Then, the electrolytic reduction operation is stopped, and the metal wastes are entirely immersed in the decontaminating solution to decontaminate by chemical dissolution. As the decontaminating solution, strong acid such as sulfuric acid, nitric acid is used. Since DC current power source capacity required for causing reaction in the active soluble region can be decreased, the decontamination facility can be minimized and simplified, and necessary electric power can be saved even upon decontamination of radioactive metal wastes made of stainless steels and having a great area. Further, chemical dissolution can be conducted without adding an expensive oxidizing agent. (N.H.)

  18. Evaluation of the natural radioactivity at sands of anomalous regions of Espirito Santo state, Brazil; Avaliacao da radioatividade natural em areias de regioes anomalas do Espirito Santo, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Reginaldo Ribeiro de; Pecequilo, Brigitte Roxana Soreanu, E-mail: raquino@ipen.b, E-mail: brigitte@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    The natural radioactivity in sands of anomalous regions of the state of Espirito Santo, Brazil, were calculated from the concentration of activity of {sup 40}K, {sup 225}Ra and {sup 232}Th for the places of south and central of Camburi, Curva da Jurema, Ilha do Boi, Setibinha, south and central area of Praia da Areia Preta, denominated Black Spot. The samples were sealed and measured by high resolution gamma spectrometry and after a expectation time pf 30 days, until to reach a radioactive equilibrium

  19. Method of processing radioactive rare gase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagusagawa, Atsushi; Tuda, Kazuaki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a safety processing method without using mechanical pumps or pressure-proof containers and, accordingly, with no risk for the leakage of radioactive rare gas. Method: A container filled with zeolige is inserted with a cover being opened into an autoclave. Meanwhile, krypton-containing gases are supplied to an adsorption tower filled with adsorbents, cooled, adsorbed and then heated to desorb adsorbed krypton. The krypton-containing gases are introduced due to the pressure difference to the autoclave thereby causing krypton to adsorb at ambient temperature to zeolite. Then, the inside of the autoclave is heated to desorb krypton and adsorbed moistures from zeolite and the pressure is elevated. After sending the gases under pressure to the adsorption tower, the zeolite-filled container is taken out from the autoclave, tightly closed and then transferred to a predetermined site. (Takahashi, M.)

  20. Method for electrolytic decontamination of radioactive contaminated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Horita, Masami; Onuma, Tsutomu; Kato, Koji

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to an electrolytic decontamination method for radioactive contaminated metals. The contaminated sections are eluted by electrolysis after the surface of a piece of equipment used with radioactive substances has been immersed in an electrolyte. Metal contaminated by radioactive substances acts as the anode

  1. Leaching methods for conditioned radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentiero, R.; Bienvenu, P.; Huebra, A. G. de la; Dale, C.; Grec, D.; Gallego, C.; Rodriguez, M.; Vanderlinden, F.; Voors, P. I.; Welbergen, J.; May, R.; Fays, J.

    2005-01-01

    The physico-chemical characterization of solidified, real or simulated, radioactive waste is essential in determining their long-term stability in conditions close to that which could be encountered during disposal. The evaluation or prediction of the performance of conditioned waste passes through many suitable studies and experiments, according to a documented qualification programme. In this respect the leaching test is among the first important techniques to evaluate the feasibility of a waste form and for comparing and selecting the best waste form. So the leaching behaviour of an immobilized radioactive waste is a relevant property to be studied. The objective of the present report is to collect and describe the most representative leaching methods used in international laboratories, mainly at European level, whether standard or standard-derived. In this instance the work is a summary of the Network knowledge and applications on leaching processes in order to exchange information and scientific and technical experiences in this respect. The focus is to express all the relevant parameters of the test and its field of application. all this background is the needed starting point to clarify the similarities and shortcomings of the methods used in the EN-TRAP laboratories and, subsequently, the possible equalities or differences which can be attributed to the characteristic parameters of the different type of wastes treated. In order to comprise the significance and the effects of the parameters involved in leaching phenomena, an initial discussion on leaching mechanisms and on achievable results is made in this document. The international standardised methods are summarised as being the origin for all the network leaching procedures. This work in a preliminary way represents a comparative review ordered to introduce an unique leaching procedure to be tested in an interlaboratory comparative exercise. Further the unique method would be a quick internal reference

  2. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumada, Norimitsu; Shibata, Setsuo; Wakabayashi, Toshikatsu; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the procession of liquid wastes containing insoluble salts of boric acid and calcium in a process for solidifying under volume reduction of radioactive liquid wastes containing boron. Method: A soluble calcium compound (such as calcium hydroxide, calcium oxide and calcium nitrate) is added to liquid wastes whose pH value is adjusted neutral or alkaline such that the molar ratio of calcium to boron in the liquid wastes is at least 0.2. Then, they are agitated at a temperature between 40 - 70 0 C to form insoluble calcium salt containing boron. Thereafter, the liquid is maintained at a temperature less than the above-mentioned forming temperature to age the products and, thereafter, the liquid is evaporated to condensate into a liquid concentrate containing 30 - 80% by weight of solid components. The concentrated liquid is mixed with cement to solidify. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. Calibration method based on direct radioactivity measurement for radioactive gas monitoring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Ohi, Yoshihiro; Chida, Tohru; Wu, Youyang.

    1993-01-01

    A calibration method for radioactive gas monitoring instruments was studied. In the method, gaseous radioactivity standards were provided on the basis of the direct radioactivity measurement by the diffusion-in long proportional counter method (DLPC method). The radioactivity concentration of the gas mixture through a monitoring instrument was determined by sampling the known volume of the gas mixture into the proportional counter used for the DLPC method. Since oxygen in the gas mixture decreased the counting efficiency in a proportional counter, the influence on calibration was experimentally estimated. It was not serious and able to be easily corrected. By the present method, the relation between radioactivity concentration and ionization current was determined for a gas-flow ionization chamber with 1.5 l effective volume. It showed good agreement with the results in other works. (author)

  4. Methods of measuring radioactivity in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Mats

    In this thesis a variety of sampling methods have been utilised to assess the amount of deposited activity, mainly of 137Cs, from the Chernobyl accident and from the nuclear weapons tests. Starting with the Chernobyl accident in 1986 sampling of air and rain was used to determine the composition and amount of radioactive debris from this accident, brought to southern Sweden by the weather systems. The resulting deposition and its removal from urban areas was than studied through measurements on sewage sludge and water. The main part of the thesis considers methods of determining the amount of radiocaesium in the ground through soil sampling. In connection with soil sampling a method of optimising the sampling procedure has been developed and tested in the areas of Sweden which have a comparatively high amount of 137Cs from the Chernobyl accident. This method was then used in a survey of the activity in soil in Lund and Skane, divided between nuclear weapons fallout and fallout from the Chernobyl accident. By comparing the results from this survey with deposition calculated from precipitation measurements it was found possible to predict the deposition pattern over Skane for both nuclear weapons fallout and fallout from the Chernobyl accident. In addition, the vertical distribution of 137Cs has been modelled and the temporal variation of the depth distribution has been described.

  5. Method for processing radioactive wastes containing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Takeshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To bake, solidify and process even radioactive wastes highly containing sodium. Structure: H and or NH 4 zeolites of more than 90g per chemical equivalent of sodium present in the waste is added to and left in radioactive wastes containing sodium, after which they are fed to a baker such as rotary cylindrical baker, spray baker and the like to bake and solidify the wastes at 350 to 800 0 C. Thereby, it is possible to bake and solidify even radioactive wastes highly containing sodium, which has been impossible to do so previously. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Evaluation of pulp and mortar to pack bitumen radioactive waste; Avaliacao de pastas e argamassas para o embalado de rejeitos radioativos betuminizados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregorio, Marina da S.; Vieira, Vanessa M.; Tello, Cledola C.O., E-mail: msg@cdtn.br, E-mail: vanessamotavieira@gmail.com, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    According to international experience, for the deposition of cement in surface repository, is necessary the use of cement mortar pastes to immobilize the product. Determining the most efficient folder or for the packed mortar, as well as its ideal formulation, is the goal of this study. To do various experiments with samples of cement paste and mortar, with presence of fluxing and / or clay were performed. Viscosity, density, setting time and compressive strength were evaluated. This study will be presented only the results found in testing of compressive strength to be an essential parameter in the transport, storage and disposal of the product. From the results found will be selected the best formulations for use in packed bitumen tailings from the National Radioactive Waste Repository.

  7. Method of solidifying radioactive waste by plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Tomita, Toshihide.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent leakage of radioactivity by providing corrosion-resistant layer on the inner surface of a waste container for radioactive waste. Constitution: The inner periphery and bottom of a drum can is lined with an non-flammable cloth of such material as asbestos. This drum is filled with a radioactive waste in the form of powder or pellets. Then, a mixture of a liquid plastic monomer and a polymerization starting agent is poured at a normal temperature, and the surface is covered with a non-flammable cloth. The plastic monomer and radioactive waste are permitted to impregnate the non-flammable cloth and are solidified there. Thus, even if the drum can is corroded at the sea bottom after disposal it in the ocean, it is possible to prevent the waste from permeating into the outer sea water because of the presence of the plastic layer on the inside. Styrene is used as the monomer. (Aizawa, K.)

  8. Method and apparatus for solidifying radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadota, Hiroko; Kikuchi, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Tamada, Shin.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of solidifying radioactive wastes that generate heat with water curing solidifying material and the object there of is suppress the effect of heat generation of the wastes given on the solidification material. That is, it is a feature of the invention to inject water content contained in the water curable solidification material in the form of ice into the wastes. Thus, since the water content in the water curable solidification material is ice, the solidification products can be obtained by way of the following three steps: (1) ice is dissolved into water, (2) solid content of the solidification material is dissolved into water, and(3) curing reaction of the solidification material is started. Acccordingly, since the heat generated from the wastes contributes as heat of reaction when ice is dissolved into water till the solidification material has been completely filled, promotion for the curing reaction causing problems so far can be suppressed to enable easy filling. Then, after the completion of the filling of the solidification material, the heat of the wastes has an effect of promoting the second and the third steps described above to accelerate the curing reaction. (K.M.)

  9. Method of separating radioactive krypton gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Shigeru; Awada, Yoshihisa.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effectively and safely separate and recover Kr-85, which requires a long storage period for attenuating radioactivity, from a mixture gas consisting of Kr-85 and Xe by a liquefaction distillation method. Structure: A mixture gas consisting of Kr and Xe is subjected to heat exchange in a cooler with Freon gas from a plurality of distillation towers for its temperature reduction from normal temperature to a lower temperature, and then it is supplied to a distillation tower. The distillation tower is held at a pressure above 15 ata, preferably around 20 ata, and a condenser provided at the top of the distillation tower is furnished with Freon as cooling medium. The rare mixture gas is distilled by liquefaction within a distillation tower, and Kr-85 is obtained from a top duct while obtaining Xe from a bottom duct. Xe after separation by liquefaction is returned to a rare mixture gas supply inlet of a liquefaction distillation means for repeated refinement in the distillation tower. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. New method for the radioactive determination of vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, Nathan; Fries, J.E.; Richards, C.S.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a method for the radioactive determination of vitamin B12 in a sample solution of serum in which a radioactive tracer of vitamin B12 and the vitamin B12 of the serum compete with respect to an intrinsic factor of limited linking capacity. The free radioactive vitamin B12 and the free vitamin B12 of the serum are separated from the intrinsic factor and from the radioactive vitamin B12 and from the serum vitamin B12 linked to this factor, before the radioactivity is measured against standard values. The method consists in separating the free radioactive vitamin B12 and the free serum vitamin B12 of the intrinsic factor and portions of radioactive and serum vitamin B12 linked to this factor, by adding an adequate quantity of bentonite to adsorb the free radioactive vitamin B12 and free serum vitamin B12 so that the intrinsic factor surface floating solution in association with the linked radioactive vitamin B12 and the linked serum vitamin B12 may be physically isolated from the solid bentonite that has adsorbed the free radioactive vitamin B12 and the free serum vitamin B12 [fr

  11. Methods for Characterisation of unknown Suspect Radioactive Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahagia, M.; Grigorescu, E.L.; Luca, A.; Razdolescu, A.C.; Ivan, C.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents various identification and measurement methods, used for the expertise of a wide variety of suspect radioactive materials, whose circulation was not legally stated. The main types of examined samples were: radioactive sources, illegally trafficked; suspect radioactive materials or radioactively contaminated devices; uranium tablets; fire detectors containing 241 Am sources; osmium samples containing radioactive 185 Os or enriched 187 Os. The types of analyses and determination methods were as follows: the chemical composition was determined by using identification reagents or by neutron activation analysis; the radionuclide composition was determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry; the activity and particle emission rates were determined by using calibrated radiometric equipment; the absorbed dose rate at the wall of all types of containers and samples was determined by using calibrated dose ratemeters. The radiation exposure risk for population, due to these radioactive materials, was evaluated for every case. (author)

  12. Method of processing low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Ichiro; Sugai, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively reduce the radioactivity density of low-level radioactive liquid wastes discharged from enriched uranium conversion processing steps or the likes. Method: Hydrazin is added to low-level radioactive liquid wastes, which are in contact with iron hydroxide-cation exchange resins prepared by processing strongly acidic-cation exchange resins with ferric chloride and aqueous ammonia to form hydrorizates of ferric ions in the resin. Hydrazine added herein may be any of hydrazine hydrate, hydrazine hydrochloride and hydranine sulfate. The preferred addition amount is more than 100 mg per one liter of the liquid wastes. If it is less than 100 mg, the reduction rate for the radioactivety density (procession liquid density/original liquid density) is decreased. This method enables to effectively reduce the radioactivity density of the low-level radioactive liquid wastes containing a trace amount of radioactive nucleides. (Yoshihara, H.)

  13. Method of transporting radioactive slurry-like wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, K; Yusa, H; Sugimoto, Y

    1975-06-30

    The object is to prevent blockage of a transporting tube to positively and effectively transport radioactive slurry wastes. A method of transporting radioactive slurry-like wastes produced in an atomic power plant, wherein liquid wastes produced in the power plant are diluted to form into a driving liquid, by which said radioactive slurry-like wastes are transported within the pipe, and said driving liquid is recovered as the liquid waste.

  14. Assessment of natural radioactivity in wall paints of commercial use in Brazil; Avaliacao da radioatividade natural em tintas de uso comercial no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Leandro Milhomens da

    2016-11-01

    Natural radioactivity in soils, rocks and construction materials, due to {sup 40}K and the natural series of {sup 232}Th and {sup 2}'3{sup 8}U, is the main contribution to external exposure in mankind. In this work, activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra ({sup 238}U series), {sup 232}Th and {sup 4}'0K were determined for 50 white latex wall paints samples, commercialized in Brazil, namely 15 Economic quality samples, 15 Standard quality samples and 20 Premium quality samples and for a single titanium dioxide sample. The samples were tightly sealed and stored for a minimum period of 30 days, to reach the radioactive secular equilibrium from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series, then measured by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The activity concentration was determined using the weighted average concentrations of {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ac, {sup 212}Pb and {sup 212}Bi for {sup 232}Th. The {sup 4}'0K activity concentration was determined by its single transition of 1460.8 keV. Self attenuation correction factors of the samples whose densities are higher than 1.0 g.cm{sup -3}, were determined and used to make the necessary corrections. The radiological indices radium equivalent activity (Ra{sub eq}), activity concentration index (I{sub γ}), internal exposure risk index (H{sub in}) and external exposure risk index (H{sub ex}) and also the absorbed dose rate (D) and annual effective dose (D{sub ef}) were calculated from the activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K. The activity concentration values for {sup 226}Ra ranged from under the minimum detectable activity to 38.7 Bq.kg{sup -1}, for {sup 232}Th from under the minimum detectable activity to 101.2 Bq.kg{sup -1} and for {sup 40}K from under the minimum detectable activity to 256 Bq.kg{sup -1}. Ra{sub eq} ranged from 1.41 Bq.kg{sup -1} to 203 Bq.kg{sup -1}, I{sub γ} ranged from 0.0047 to 0.720, H{sub in} from 0.0076 to 0.653 and H{sub ex

  15. Method of concentrating radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes generated from nuclear power facilities are caused to flow into a vessel incorporated with first hydrophobic porous membranes. Then, the radioactive liquid wastes are passed through the first hydrophobic porous membranes under an elevated or reduced pressure to remove fine particles contained in the liquid wastes. The radioactive liquid wastes passed through the first membranes are stored in a temporary store a vessel and steams generated under heating are passed through the second hydrophobic porous membranes and then cooled and concentrated as condensates. In this case, the first and the second hydrophobic porous membranes have a property of passing steams but not water and, for example, are made of tetrafluoroethylen resin type thin membranes. Accordingly, since the fine particles can be removed by the first hydrophobic porous membranes, lowering of the concentration rate due to the deposition of solid contents to the membranes upon concentration can be prevented. (I.S.)

  16. Method of encapsulating waste radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, J.A.; Rootham, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    When encapsulating radioactive waste including radioactive liquid having a retardant therein which retards the setting of cements by preventing hydration at cement particles in the mix, the liquid is mixed with ordinary Portland cement and subjected, in a high shear mixer, to long term shear far in excess of that needed to form ordinary grout. The controlled utilization of the retardants plus shear produces a thixotropic paste with extreme moldability which will not bleed, and finally sets more rapidly than can be expected with normal cement mixtures forming a very strong product. (author)

  17. Dry blasting decontaminating method for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Hitoshi.

    1993-01-01

    In the present invention, when abrasives are dry blasted on the surface of radioactive wastes and the recovered abrasives are classified for re-use, abrasives having a microvicker's hardness (HMV) of greater than 600 and a grain size of greater than 1mm are used in a case where the radioactive wastes to be abraded are stainless steels. This enables dry blasting decontamination for stainless steels which has been considered to be impossible. In addition since the amount of secondary wastes are reduced, it is extremely effective. (T.M.)

  18. Method for solidifying liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berreth, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The quantity of nitrous oxides produced during the solidification of liquid radioactive wastes containing nitrates and nitrites can be substantially reduced by the addition to the wastes of a stoichiometric amount of urea which, upon heating, destroys the nitrates and nitrites, liberating nontoxic N 2 , CO 2 and NH 3 . 5 claims, no drawings

  19. Decontamination method for radioactively contaminated material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Yuichi; Mizuguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hitoshi; Komatsubara, Masaru

    1998-01-01

    Radioactively contaminated materials having surfaces contaminated by radioactive materials are dissolved in molten salts by the effect of chlorine gas. The molten salts are brought into contact with a low melting point metal to reduce only radioactive materials by substitution reaction and recover them into the low melting point metal. Then, a low melting point metal phase and a molten salt phase are separated. The low melting point metal phase is evaporated to separate the radioactive materials from molten metals. On the other hand, other metal ions dissolved in the molten salts are reduced into metals by electrolysis at an anode and separated from the molten salts and served for regeneration. The low melting point metals are reutilized together with contaminated lead, after subjected to decontamination, generated from facilities such as nuclear power plant or lead for disposal. Since almost all materials including the molten salts and the molten metals can be enclosed, the amount of wastes can be reduced. In addition, radiation exposure of operators who handle them can be reduced. (T.M.)

  20. Method and device for solidifying radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Tadamasa.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify radioactive waste without producing radioactive dusts by always heating and evaporating the water from liquid radioactive waste in a mixture of liquid plastic and exhausting the molten mixture of the waste residue and the plastic material. Constitution: Liquid plastic material in a tank cooled to prevent polymerization or changes of its properties is continuously supplied to the top of a heating and mixing evaporator by a constant supply pump. After the heat transfer surface of the evaporator is covered with the plastic material, radioactive waste in the tank is supplied to the evaporator via the constant supply pump. The waste is abruptly mixed with the plastic material by an agitating rotor, heated by a heater, and the evaporated water is fed to a condenser. An anhydrous molten mixture is continuously exhausted from the bottom of the evaporator into a mixture cooler, a polymerizing agent and catalyst are introduced thereinto from a polymerizing agent tank and a catalyst tank, inhibitor is introduced thereinto from a polymerization inhibitor tank as required, and is filled with the mixture a solidifying container while it is cooled for its polymerization and solidification. (Yoshino, Y.)

  1. Processing method for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro

    1991-01-01

    Drainages, such as water after used for washing operators' clothes and water used for washing hands and for showers have such features that the radioactive concentration is extremely low and detergent ingredients and insoluble ingredients such as waste threads, hairs and dirts are contained. At present, waste threads are removed by a strainer. Then, after measuring the radioactivity and determining that the radioactivity is less than a predetermined concentration, they are released to circumstances. However, various organic ingredients such as detergents and dirts in the liquid wastes are released as they are and it is not preferred in respect of environmental protection. Then, in the present invention, activated carbon is filled in a container orderly so that the diameter of the particles of the activated carbon is increased in the upper layer and decreased in the lower layer, and radioactive liquid wastes are passed through the container. With such a constitution. Both of soluble substances and insoluble substances can be removed efficiently without causing cloggings. (T.M.)

  2. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  3. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Kuribayashi, Nobuhide; Minami, Yuji; Kamiyama, Hisashi

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To greatly reduce the quantity of radioactive liquid wastes by subjecting the same to drying treatment, and to granulate the thus formed dry powders to prevent scattering thereof thereby to fill a storage vessel safely with the powders without contaminating the surroundings. Constitution: Radioactive liquid wastes within a storage tank are supplied to a drier where the wastes are subjected to evaporation treatment, and pulverized. The thus dried powders are temporarily stored in a hopper by means of a screw feeder. The dry powders which have reached a predetermined quantity are supplied to a stirrer-granulator by means of a quantitative screw feeder, and mixed and stirred with a binder sent from a binder storage tank through a binder quantity determining device, whereby the powders are granulated. After the granulation, the granulated powders are extruded by a centrifugal force, and filled in the storage vessel by way of a conduit. (Yoshino, Y.)

  4. Plastic solidification method for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshihide; Inakuma, Masahiko.

    1992-01-01

    Condensed liquid wastes in radioactive wastes are formed by mixing and condensing several kinds of liquid wastes such as liquid wastes upon regeneration of ion exchange resins, floor draining liquid wastes and equipment draining liquid wastes. Accordingly, various materials are contained, and it is found that polymerization reaction of plastics is inhibited especially when reductive material, such as sodium nitrite is present. Then, in the present invention, upon mixing thermosetting resins to radioactive wastes containing reducing materials, an alkaline material is admixed to an unstaturated polyester resin. This can inactivate the terminal groups of unsaturated polyester chain, to prevent the dissociation of the reducing agent such as sodium nitrite. Further, if an unsaturated polyester resin of low acid value and a polymerization initiator for high temperature are used in addition to the alkaline material, the effect is further enhanced, thereby enabling to obtain a strong plastic solidification products. (T.M.)

  5. Processing method of radioactive cleaning drain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Shigemitsu; Murakami, Tadashi; Kitao, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Upon processing of radioactive cleaning drains, contained Co-60 is removed by a selectively adsorbing adsorbent. In addition, after removing suspended materials by a filtering device, Co-60 as predominant nuclides in the drain is selectively adsorbed. The concentration of objective Co-60 is in the order of 0.1 Bq/cc, and non-radioactive metal ions such as Na + ions are present in the order of ppm in addition to Co-60. A granular adsorbent for selectively adsorbing Co-60 is oxine-added activated carbon, and has a grain size of from 20 to 48 mesh. The granular adsorbent is used while being filled in an adsorbing tower. Since a relatively simple device comprising the filtering device and the adsorbing tower in combination is provided, the reduction of the construction cost can be expected. In addition, since no filtering aid is used in the filtering device, the amount of secondary wastes is small. (N.H.)

  6. Discarding processing method for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Shiro; Kato, Hiroaki; Hatakeyama, Takao; Oura, Masato.

    1992-01-01

    At first, in a discrimination step, extremely low level radioactive wastes are discriminated to metals and concretes and further, the metal wastes are discriminated to those having hollow portions and those not having hollow portions, and the concrete wastes are discriminated to those having block-like shape and those having other shapes respectively. Next, in a processing step, the metal wastes having hollow portions are applied with cutting, devoluming or packing treatment and block-like concrete wastes are applied with surface solidification treatment, and concrete wastes having other shapes are applied with crushing treatment respectively. Then, the extremely low level radioactive wastes contained in a container used exclusively for transportation are taken out, in a movable burying facility with diffusion inhibiter kept at a negative pressure as required, in a field for burying operation, and buried in a state that they are isolated from the outside. Accordingly, they can be buried safely and efficiently. (T.M.)

  7. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcpheeters, C.C.; Wolson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1

  8. Method of burying vessel containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Yoshihito.

    1989-01-01

    A float having an inert gas sealed therein is attached to a tightly closed vessel containing radioactive wastes. The vessel is inserted and kept in a small hole for burying the tightly closed vessel in an excavated shaft in rocks such as of granite or rock salts, while filling bentonite as shielding material therearound. In this case, the float is so adjusted that the apparent specific gravity is made equal or nearer between the tightly closed vessel and the bentonite, so that the rightly closed vessel does not sink and cause direct contact with the rocks even if bentonite flows due to earthquakes, etc. This can prevent radioactivity contamination through water in the rocks. (S.K.)

  9. Developing methods for detecting radioactive scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellian, J.G.; Johnston, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    During the last 10 years, there have been major developments in radiation detection systems used for catching shielded radioactive sources in scrap metal. The original testing required to determine the extent of the problem and the preliminary designs of the first instruments will be discussed. Present systems available today will be described listing their advantages and disadvantages. In conclusion, the newest developments and state of the art equipment will also be included describing the limits and most appropriate locations for the systems

  10. Method for storage of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesky, H.; Wunderer, A.

    1978-01-01

    When nuclear fuel is reprocessed, apart from liquid radioactive wastes in certain cases also oxyhydrogen, i.e. a mixture of oxygen and hydrogen, is formed by radiolysis. It is proposed to remove the decay heat that will be formed by means of boiling cooling, to condense the steam and to recycle the condensate to the liquid waste store. The oxyhydrogen is to be rarefied by means of the steam and then catalytically recombined. The most advantageous process steps are discussed. (RW) [de

  11. Methods for calibrating radioactivity well logging tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggoner, J.A.; Turcotte, R.E.; Hunt-Grubbe, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Field-calibrating of well-logging tools is achieved by means of a sleeve, which has radioactive material distributed therein, and which envelopes the portion of the tool housing containing the detector. Accurate calibration can be performed and the source can be made considerably weaker than those now in use as it can be brought very close to the detector thus lessening errors. (U.K.)

  12. Novel method of producing radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikata, E.; Amano, H.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive iodine(I-131) is easily obtained by heating, at a temperature ranging from 600 0 C to 650 0 C, a tellurium oxide intermediate which was obtained by heating telluric acid or tellurium trioxide at a temperature from about 400 0 C to 560 0 C and was irradited with a neutron flux. Thus, pure I-131 is obtained without the complicated operations required in a conventional process for separation and/or purification of the product. 4 claims

  13. Method for storing radioactive rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Atsushi; Nagao, Hiroyuki; Takiguchi, Yukio; Kanazawa, Toshio; Soya, Masataka.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To safely and securely store radioactive rare gases for a long period of time. Structure: The waste gases produced in nuclear power plant are cooled by a cooler and then introduced into a low temperature adsorbing device so that the gases are adsorbed by adsorbents, and then discharged into atmosphere through the purifying gas discharge line. When the radioactive rare gases reach a level of saturation in the amount of adsorption, they are heated and extracted by a suction pump and heated by a heater. The gases are then introduced into an oxygen-impurity removing device and the purified rare gases containing no oxygen and impurities are cooled by a cooler and fed into a gas holder. When the amount of radioactive rare gases stored within the gas holder reaches a given level, they are compressed and sealed by a compressure into a storing cylinder and residual gases in the piping are sucked and recovered into the gas holder, after which the cylinder is removed and stored in a fixed room. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Methods for removing radioactive isotopes from contaminated streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, D.R.; Hickey, T.N.; Spulgis, I.S.; Parish, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Methods for removing radioactive isotopes from contaminated gas streams for use in atmospheric containment and cleanup systems in nuclear power plants are provided. The methods provide for removal of radioactive isotopes from a first portion of the contaminated stream, separated from the remaining portion of the stream, so that adsorbent used to purify the first portion of the contaminated stream by adsorption of the radioactive isotopes therefrom can be tested to determine the adsorbing efficacy of the generally larger portion of adsorbent used to purify the remaining portion of the stream

  15. Method of treating radioactive waste waters from uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priban, V.; Novak, L.; Zubcek, L.; Hinterholzinger, O.

    1987-01-01

    radioactive mine waters with suspended solid particles and acid salinated solutions from the process of underground leaching of radioactive ores with sulfuric acid, are discharged in a specified ratio to a common sump. The acid salinated solutions are used as a coagulation agent for the treatment of radioactive mine waters. Both solutions are mixed at simultaneous addition of lime milk suspension. In a sedimentation tank, the precipitate thus produced is sedimented and the clarified water is carried from the tank to a public water flow. The advantages of the method include the treatment of an over-balance 3 m 3 /min of acid salinated solutions from the process of underground leaching of radioactive ores with sulfuric acid, and reduction in the cost of radioactive mine water treatment. (E.S.)

  16. Method of processing nitrate-containing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Norito; Nagase, Kiyoharu; Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Ouchi, Jin.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently concentrate nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes by electrolytically dialyzing radioactive liquid wastes to decompose the nitrate salt by using an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having ion exchange membranes and anodes made of special materials. Method: Nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes are supplied to and electrolytically dialyzed in a central chamber of an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having cationic exchange membranes and anionic exchange membranes made of flouro-polymer as partition membranes, whereby the nitrate is decomposed to form nitric acid in the anode chamber and alkali hydroxide compound or ammonium hydroxide in the cathode chamber, as well as concentrate the radioactive substance in the central chamber. Coated metals of at least one type of platinum metal is used as the anode for the electrolytic cell. This enables efficient industrial concentration of nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes. (Yoshihara, H.)

  17. Method for the radioactive determination of the foliates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, H.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the radioactive determination of the foliates, in which a determination is made of the uptake on a protein fraction of the milk taking up the foliates by competition between the foliate(s) to be determined and a folic acid by-product labelled with a radioactive isotope. The characteristics of this method is that it consists in using tyramide of iodinated folic acid 125 [fr

  18. Method for controlling incineration in combustor for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaoku, Y.; Uehara, A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for controlling incineration in a combustor for low-level radioactive wastes. In particular, it relates to a method for economizing in the consumption of supplemental fuel while maintaining a stable incineration state by controlling the amount of fuel and of radioactive wastes fed to the combustor. The amount of fuel supplied is determined by the outlet gas temperature of the combustor. (L.L.)

  19. Method of producing radioactive technetium-99M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karageozian, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    A chromatographic process of producing high purity and high yield radioactive Technetium-99m. A solution containing Molybdenum-99m and Technetium-99m is placed on a chromatographic column and eluted with a neutral solvent system comprising an organic solvent and from about 0.1 to less than about 10% of water or from about 1 to less than about 70% of a solvent selected from the group consisting of aliphatic alcohols having 1 to 6 carbon atoms. The eluted solvent system containing the Technetium-99m is then removed leaving the Technetium-99m as a dry, particulate residue

  20. Method of preparing initial multilayer radioactive pellets in production of planar radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stopek, K.; Satorie, Z.

    1982-01-01

    A compact radioactive foil is placed into a press mould on a thin surface layer of compacted or powder metal and is covered with powder metal. In order to achieve the required dimension and activity the radioactive foil is cut from a large sheet. The multilayer pellet is compacted and rolled using routine methods applied in powder metallurgy. This method excludes the possibility of destroying the active pellet during handling, improves its mechanical properties and is seven times less time demanding than methods used so far. (M.D.)

  1. Manufacturing method for radioactive material containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamino, Yoshikazu; Nishioka, Eiji; Toyota, Michinori.

    1997-01-01

    A containing vessel for radioactive materials (for example, spent fuels) comprises an inner cylinder made of stainless steel having a space for containing radioactive materials at the inside and an outer cylinder made of stainless steel disposed at the outer side of the inner cylinder. Lead homogenization is applied to a space between the inner and the outer cylinders to deposit a lead layer. Then, molten lead heated to a predetermined temperature is cast into the space between the inner and the outer cylinders. A valve is opened to discharge the molten lead in the space from a molten lead discharge pipe, and heated molten lead is injected from a molten lead supply pipe. Then, the discharge of the molten lead and the injection of the molten lead are stopped, and the lead in the space is coagulated. With such procedures, gaps are not formed between the lead of the homogenized portion and the lead of cast portion even when the thickness of the inner and the outer cylinders is great. (I.N.)

  2. Method of decomposing treatment for radioactive organic phosphate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uki, Kazuo; Ichihashi, Toshio; Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tatsuaki

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To decompose the organic phosphoric-acid ester wastes containing radioactive material, which is produced from spent fuel reprocessing facilities, into inorganic materials using a simple device, under moderate conditions and at high decomposing ratio. Method: Radioactive organic phosphate wates are oxidatively decomposed by H 2 O 2 in an aqueous phosphoric-acid solution of metal phosphate salts. Copper phosphates are used as the metal phosphate salts and the decomposed solution of the radioactive organic phosphate wastes is used as the aqueous solution of the copper phosphate. The temperature used for the oxidizing decomposition ranges from 80 to 100 0 C. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. Method of treatment in a system passing radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, K; Kinoshita, M; Asakura, Y

    1976-05-14

    A method to ensure the safety of the reactor and reduce radiation exposure dose by preventing oxygen hydrogen reaction of the reactor off-gas and accumulation of the radioactive material is described. Substances which are accumulated in an off-gas duct and are likely to capture radioactive material (for instance Pd catalyst falling from a recombiner) is changed into a stable material (for instance, PdI/sub 2/) which is hot likely to capture radioactive material through reaction with a stabilizer (for instance, I/sub 2/, Cl/sub 2/, HCl, etc.). This stabilized material is washed off the atomic power plant system.

  4. Method of solidifying radioactive ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Yuji; Tomita, Toshihide

    1989-01-01

    Spent anion exchange resin formed in nuclear power plants, etc. generally catch only a portion of anions in view of the ion exchange resins capacity and most of the anions are sent while possessing activities to radioactive waste processing systems. Then, the anion exchange resins increase the specific gravity by the capture of the anions. Accordingly, anions are caused to be captured on the anion exchange resin wastes such that the specific gravity of the anion exchange resin wastes is greater than that of the thermosetting resins to be mixed. This enables satisfactory mixing with the thermosetting resins and, in addition, enables to form integral solidification products in which anion exchange resins and cation exchange resins are not locallized separately and which are homogenous and free from cracks. (T.M.)

  5. Method of processing radioactive cesium liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Hiroaki; Asaoka, Sachio; Kondo, Tadami; Suzuki, Isao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To convert and settle cesium, mainly, Cs-137 in liquid wastes in the form of pollucites, that is, cesium-containing ores. Constitution: Water, silica, alumina and alkali metal source are mixed with radioactive liquid wastes containing cesium as the main metal element ingredient, to which an onium compound is further added and they are brought into reaction till pollucite ores (Cs 16 (Al 16 Si 32 O 96 )) are formed. Since most portion of cesium is thus settled in the form of pollucites, storage safety can be attained. Further, the addition of the onium compound can moderate the condition and shorten the time till the pollucite ores are formed. The onium compound usable herein includes tetramethyl ammonium. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Method and device of decontaminating radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Tamada, Masami.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To surely enable grinding for the inner surface of hollow radioactive solid wastes such as pipeways or valves, as well as enable to decontaminate these solid wastes to such a level as being capable of processing in the same manner for the ordinary wastes. Method: A grinding piece abutting resiliently against the inner surface of a hollow radioactive solid wastes to be contaminated is attached at the top end of a flexible shaft, and the inner surface of the radioactive solid wastes is ground while rotating and slightly reciprocating, as well as axially moving the flexible shaft. Consequently, since the grinding piece is always abutted against the inner surface of the radioactive solid wastes just following after the profile of the inner surface, and the flexible shaft is resiliently flexed corresponding to the profile of the inner surface of the radioactive solid wastes, even an inner surface of radioactive solid wastes with a complicated configuration can surely be ground entirely. This surely enables to remove radioactive claddings and contaminated layers deposited on the surface. (Yoshihara, H.)

  7. Evaluation of methods for wax determination in crude oil; Avaliacao de metodos de determinacao de parafinas em petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Julio Cesar M.; Silva, Maria do Socorro A.J. da; Vasconcellos, Rosa C.U. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Tamanqueira, Juliana B. [Fundacao Gorceix, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Determining the wax content of crude oil is of great importance for petroleum industry, especially for production, storage and transportation of crude oils. Many different methodologies of wax determining are available in the technical literature. However, the selection of the most suitable method must be in accordance with the aim of the analysis and observing the specificities of each technique. The purpose of this work was to determine the performance of different techniques of wax determining applied to characterization of precipitation properties of waxy compounds in crude oils. Twelve samples of crude oils proceeding from the main Brazilian oil producing sedimentary basins were selected for this study. These samples were analyzed by three important analytical techniques of wax determining: precipitation by cooled solvent; liquid chromatography with precipitation by cooled solvent; and liquid chromatography followed by gas chromatography. Differential scanning calorimetry data related to the wax crystallization in these oils were used as parameters of validation. The results obtained in this study indicate that the liquid chromatography followed by gas chromatography method has the best performance for wax determining in crude oils. (author)

  8. Method of melting decontamination of radioactive contaminated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Noboru; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the transfer efficiency of radioactive materials into slags. Method: Contaminated metals are melt with adding slagging agent in order to transfer the radioactive materials into the slag, where the slagging agent holds less free energy than that of metal oxides contaminated with radioactive materials in order to promote the transfer of the contaminated materials into the slag layer. This effect can also be attained on metals or alloys other than iron contaminated with radioactive materials. In the case of alloy, the slagging agent is to containing such metal oxide that free energy is less than that of the oxide of metal being the main ingredient element of the alloy. The decontamination effect can further be improved by containing halogenide such as calcium fluoride together with the metal oxide into the slagging agent. (Ikeda, J.)

  9. Method of electrolytic decontamination of contaminated metal materials for radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yoshio; Ishibashi, Masaru; Matsumoto, Hiroyo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To electrolytically eliminate radioactive materials from metal materials contaminated with radioactive materials, as well as efficiently remove metal ions leached out in an electrolyte. Method: In the case of anodic dissolution of metal materials contaminated with radioactivity in an electrolyte to eliminate radioactive contaminating materials on the surface of the metal materials, a portion of an electrolytic cell is defined with partition membranes capable of permeating metal ions therethrough. A cathode connected to a different power source is disposed to the inside of the partition membranes and fine particle of metals are suspended and floated in the electrolyte. By supplying an electric current between an insoluble anode disposed outside of the partition membranes and the cathode, metal ions permeating from the outside of the partition membranes are deposited on the fine metal particles. Accordingly, since metal ions in the electrolyte are removed, the electrolyte can always be kept clean. (Yoshihara, H.)

  10. Radioactive waste processing method and device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Tateyama, Shinji.

    1998-01-01

    A powdery activated carbon is charged to radioactive liquid wastes to form a mixed slurry. The slurry is subjected to solid/liquid separation, and a high-molecular water absorbent is charged to the separated activated carbon sludge wastes to process them while stirring. The high-molecular water absorbent comprises a graft polymer of starch and acrylonitrile or a cross-linked polymer of sodium acrylate and a cross-linking agent. The high-molecular water absorbing agent is previously charged to a vessel for containing the wasted active carbon sludges. The device of the present invention comprises a filtration device for solid/liquid separation of the mixed slurry, a sludge-containing vessel, a device for charging the high-molecular water absorbent and a sludge stirring device. The device of charging the high-molecular water absorbent comprises a plurality of weighing devices for weighing the change of the weight of the charged products and a conveyor for transferring the sludge-containing vessels. With such a constitution, stable sludge can be obtained, and activated carbon sludge wastes can be burnt without crushing them. (T.M.)

  11. Method of ground disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashina, Heihachi.

    1991-01-01

    Rock bases are drilled to form a disposal hole, an overhanging hole and a burying hole each as a shaft. An appropriate number of canisters prepared by vitrification of high level radioactive wastes are charged in the disposal hole with a gap to the inner wall of the hole. Shock absorbers each made of bentonite are filled between each of the canisters and between the canister and the inner wall of the disposal hole, and the canisters are entirely covered with the layer of the shock absorbers. Further, plucking materials having water sealing property such as cement mortar are filled thereover. With such a constitution, in a case if water should intrude into the overhung portion, since the disposal hole is covered with the large flange portion in addition to the water sealing performance of the plucking, the shock absorbers and the canisters undergo no undesirable effects. Further, in a case if water should intrude to the disposal hole, the shock absorber layers are swollen by water absorption, to suppress the intrusion of water. (T.M.)

  12. Manufacturing method for radioactive material containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Hideharu; Matsushita, Kazuo; Toyota, Michinori.

    1997-01-01

    Lead homogenization is applied on the inner surface of a space formed between an inner cylinder and an outer cylinder, and a molten lead heated to about 400 to 500degC is cast into a space formed between the inner cylinder and the outer cylinder in a state where the inner and the outer cylinders are heated to from 200 to 300degC. The space formed between the inner cylinder and the outer cylinder is heated to and kept at 330degC or higher for at least 2minutes after the casting of the molten lead, and then it is cooled. Thus, lowering of density of the molten lead due to excess elevation of temperature or dropping of the lead at the homogenization portion by heating the inner and the outer cylinders to an excessively high temperature are not caused. In addition, formation of gaps in the boundary between the inner cylinder and the outer cylinder or between the lead of the homogenized portion and that of the cast portion due to the melting of the lead of the homogenized portion in the space is prevented reliably thereby capable of forming a satisfactory shielding member. Then, even when the thickness of the inner cylinder and the outer cylinder is large, radioactive material containing vessel excellent in heat releasing property and radiation shielding property can be manufactured. (N.H.)

  13. Volatile suppressing method for radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Atsushi; Haruguchi, Keiko.

    1997-01-01

    In the present invention, a metal plate is disposed above the pool water surface of a suppression chamber disposed to a reactor container in order to reduce evaporation of radioactive iodine released from a suppression pool. A metal plate is disposed above the pool water surface of the suppression chamber disposed to the reactor container. In addition, a metal plate is disposed around the space connecting a bent tube extending from a dry well to underwater of suppression pool water and a gas bent tube extending from the suppression chamber to an emergency gas processing system. Spray water is supplied for cooling the suppression chamber d as a means for cooling the metal plate. Then, among iodine released to the suppression chamber, elemental iodine liberated from the pool water is deposited on the surface of the metal plate, and the amount of iodine to be flown into and processed by an emergency gas processing system or a filter bent system can be reduced. (T.M.)

  14. Method of treating radioactive sludge waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Yuichi; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Ichihashi, Toshio

    1989-01-01

    For removing water content from sludge wastes, filtration or steam condensation may be considered, but none of them can sufficiently reduce the water content since filtration may cause clogging and steam treatment has a limit in the condensation. In view of the above, radioactive sludge wastes are dehydrated by an electroosmotic process in a vessel and then dehydrated solid contents are solidified in the vessel. Since the sludge wastes are mainly composed o fion exchange resins and iron oxides deposited to the resins, when a DC voltage is applied to the sludges containing such solid contents, a force tending to premeate them through the fine pores in the filter is exerted to water. As a result, only water is removed while the solids are being held on the filters. Since the moving direction of water is different depending on the property of the sludges, the polarity of the electrodes may be changed depending on the nature of the sludges. Thus, volume reduction can be improved and treating conditions can be controlled easily by a simple device. (N.H.)

  15. Underground processing method for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Yoshihiro

    1998-01-01

    In the present invention, even a processing vessel not having a satisfactory radiation shielding property can be covered by a waterproof material easily and safety. Namely, a large number of small waterproof blocks are laid on the bottom of a discarding hole of a shaft and then a large number of the above-mentioned blocks are stacked along the inner surface of the discarding hole to an appropriate height. A discarding vessel containing radioactive wastes is inserted to the containing space surrounded by each of the blocks, and then a single large waterproof block is settled on the upper portion of the discarding vessel and the discarding hole is closed. The discarding vessel is thus surrounded by the blocks. With such procedures, the small waterproof blocks are disposed while being reliably positioned with no gap by manual operation by operators before containing the discarding vessel into the discarding hole and then the large waterproof blocks can be settled simply by a remote control after containing the discarding vessel. (N.H.)

  16. Radioactive standards and calibration methods for contamination monitoring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-06-01

    Contamination monitoring in the facilities for handling unsealed radioactive materials is one of the most important procedures for radiation protection as well as radiation dose monitoring. For implementation of the proper contamination monitoring, radiation measuring instruments should not only be suitable to the purpose of monitoring, but also be well calibrated for the objective qualities of measurement. In the calibration of contamination monitoring instruments, quality reference activities need to be used. They are supplied in different such as extended sources, radioactive solutions or radioactive gases. These reference activities must be traceable to the national standards or equivalent standards. On the other hand, the appropriate calibration methods must be applied for each type of contamination monitoring instruments. In this paper, the concepts of calibration for contamination monitoring instruments, reference sources, determination methods of reference quantities and practical calibration methods of contamination monitoring instruments, including the procedures carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and some relevant experimental data. (G.K.)

  17. A method for prevention of radioactive material release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Sato, Chikara; Kitamura, Masao.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a method for preventing an underwater radioactive material from being released in a simple and highly reliable manner, which can decrease an amount of radioactive materials discharged into open air from reactor water containing a large amount of radioactive materials such as a reactor core pool. Structure: Pure warm water higher in temperature than that of reactor water is poured from the top of a water surface of a water tank which stores reactor water containing radioactive materials such as radioactive iodine, and water is drawn through an outlet located downwardly of the pure warm water inlet to form a layer of pure warm water at the upper part of the water tank while preventing diffusion of the reactor water into the pure warm water by the difference in density between the reactor water and the pure warm water and downward movement of the pure warm water, thereby preventing contact of the reactor water with the atmosphere and diffusion of the radioactive material into the atmosphere. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Method of melting and decontaminating radioactive contaminated aluminum material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Noboru; Kawasaki, Katsuo; Iba, Hajime.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the decontaminating efficiency upon melting decontamination of radioactive-contaminated aluminum materials. Method: This invention concerns an improvement for the method of melting decontamination by adding slug agent composed of organic compound to contaminated aluminum material and extracting the radioactive materials into the slug thereby decontaminating the aluminum material. Specifically metals effective for reducing the active amount of aluminum are added such that the content is greater than a predetermined value in the heat melting process. The metal comprises Mg, Cu or a mixture thereof and the content is more than 4 % including those previously contained in the aluminum material. (Ikeda, J.)

  19. Treatment method for stabilization of radioactive exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideo, Oni; Takashi, Miyake; Hitoshi, Miyamoto; Toshio, Funakoshi; Yuzo, Inagaki.

    1988-01-01

    This is a method for eluting radioactive nuclides from a radioactive ion exchange resin in which it has been absorbed. First, the Cs in this resin is extracted using a neutral salt solution which contains Na + . The Cs that has been transferred to the neutral salt solution is absorbed and expelled by inorganic ion exchangers. Then the Co, Fe, Mn and Sr in said resin are eluted using an acidic solution; the Co, Fe, Mn and Sr that have been transferred to the acidic solution are separated from that solution by means of a diffusion dialysis vat. This process is a unique characteristic of this ion exchange resin treatment method. 1 fig

  20. Cask for radioactive material and method for preventing release of neutrons from radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, M.F.; Shaffer, P.T.

    1981-01-01

    A cask for radioactive material, such as nuclear reactor fuel or spent nuclear reactor fuel, includes a plurality of associated walled internal compartments for containing such radioactive material, with neutron absorbing material present to absorb neutrons emitted by the radioactive material, and a plurality of thermally conductive members, such as longitudinal copper or aluminum castings, about the compartment and in thermal contact with the compartment walls and with other such thermally conductive members and having thermal contact surfaces between such members extending, preferably radially, from the compartment walls to external surfaces of the thermally conductive members, which surfaces are preferably in the form of a cylinder. The ends of the shipping cask also preferably include a neutron absorber and a conductive metal covering to dissipate heat released by decay of the radioactive material. A preferred neutron absorber utilized is boron carbide, preferably as plasma sprayed with metal powder or as particles in a matrix of phenolic polymer, and the compartment walls are preferably of stainless steel, copper or other corrosion resistant and heat conductive metal or alloy. The invention also relates to shipping casks, storage casks and other containers for radioactive materials in which a plurality of internal compartments for such material, e.g., nuclear reactor fuel rods, are joined together, preferably in modular construction with surrounding heat conductive metal members, and the modules are joined together to form a major part of a finished shipping cask, which is preferably of cylindrical shape. Also within the invention are methods of safely storing radioactive materials which emit neutrons, while dissipating the heat thereof, and of manufacturing the present shipping casks

  1. Selecting device for processing method of radioactive gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Ryoichi; Komoda, Norihisa.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To extend the period of replacement of a filter for adsorbing radioactive material by discharging waste gas containing radioactive material produced from an atomic power equipment after treating it by a method selected on the basis of the results of measurement of wind direction. Structure: Exhaust gas containing radioactive material produced from atomic power equipment is discharged after it is treated by a method selected on the basis of the results of wind direction measurement. For Instance, in case of sea wind the waste gas passes through a route selected for this case and is discharged through the waste gas outlet. When the sea wind disappears (that is, when a land wind or calm sets in), the exhaust gas is switched to a route for the case other than that of the sea wind, so that it passes through a filter consisting of active carbon where the radioactive material is removed through adsorption. The waste gas now free from the radioactive material is discharged through the waste gas outlet. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Method for electrochemical decontamination of radioactive metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekechukwu, Amy A [Augusta, GA

    2008-06-10

    A decontamination method for stripping radionuclides from the surface of stainless steel or aluminum material comprising the steps of contacting the metal with a moderately acidic carbonate/bicarbonate electrolyte solution containing sodium or potassium ions and thereafter electrolytically removing the radionuclides from the surface of the metal whereby radionuclides are caused to be stripped off of the material without corrosion or etching of the material surface.

  3. Methods for calculating population dose from atmospheric dispersion of radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B L; Jow, H N; Lee, I S [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA)

    1978-06-01

    Curves are computed from which population dose (man-rem) due to dispersal of radioactivity from a point source can be calculated in the gaussian plume model by simple multiplication, and methods of using them and their limitations are considered. Illustrative examples are presented.

  4. Method of processing radioactive metallic sodium with recycling alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko; Mitsuzuka, Norimasa.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To employ high safety alcohol procession and decrease the amount of wastes in the procession of radioactive metallic sodium discharged from LMFBR type reactors. Method: Radioactive metallic sodium containing long half-decay period nuclides such as cesium, strontium, barium, cerium, lanthanum or zirconium is dissolved in an alcohol at about 70% purity. After extracting the sodium alcoholate thus formed, gaseous hydrochloride is blown-in to separate the sodium alcoholate into alcohol and sodium chloride, and regenerated alcohol is used again for dissolving sodium metal. The sodium chloride thus separated is processed into solid wastes. (Furukawa, Y.)

  5. Method of processing solidification product of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daime, Fumiyoshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the long-time stability of solidification products by providing solidification products with liquid tightness, gas tightness, abrasion resistance, etc., of the products in the course of the solidification for the treatment of radioactive wastes. Method: The surface of solidification products prepared by mixing solidifying agents with powder or pellets is entirely covered with high molecular polymer such as epoxy resin. The epoxy resin has excellent properties such as radiation-resistance, heat resistance, water proofness and chemical resistance, as well as have satisfactory mechanical properties. This can completely isolate the solidification products of radioactive wastes from the surrounding atmosphere. (Yoshino, Y.)

  6. Method to determine the radioactivity of radioactive waste packages. Basic procedure of the method used to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants: 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    This document describes the procedures adopted in order to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants in Japan. The standards applied have been approved by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan after deliberations by the Subcommittee on the Radioactivity Verification Method for Waste Packages, the Nuclear Cycle Technical Committee, and the Standards Committee. The method for determining the radioactivity of the low-level radioactive waste packages was based on procedures approved by the Nuclear Safety Commission in 1992. The scaling factor method and other methods of determining radioactivity were then developed on the basis of various investigations conducted, drawing on extensive accumulated knowledge. Moreover, the international standards applied as common guidelines for the scaling factor method were developed by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear Energy, Subcommittee SC 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology. Since the application of accumulated knowledge to future radioactive waste disposal is considered to be rational and justified, such body of knowledge has been documented in a standardized form. The background to this standardization effort, the reasoning behind the determination method as applied to the measurement of radioactivity, as well as other related information, are given in the Annexes hereto. This document includes the following Annexes. Annex 1: (reference) Recorded items related to the determination of the scaling factor. Annex 2 (reference): Principles applied to the determining the radioactivity of waste packages. (author)

  7. Method of reducing the volume of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Burrill, K.A.; Desjardins, C.D.; Salter, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    There is provided a method of reducing the volume of radioactive waste, comprising: pyrolyzing the radioactive waste in the interior of a vessel, while passing superheated steam through the vessel at a temperature in the range 500 to 700 degrees C, a pressure in the range 1.0 to 3.5 MPa, and at a flow rate in the range 4 to 50 mL/s/m 3 of the volume of the vessel interior, to cause pyrohydrolysis of the waste and to remove carbon-containing components of the pyrolyzed waste from the vessel as gaseous oxides, leaving an ash residue in the vessel. Entrained particles present with the gaseous oxides are filtered and acidic vapours present with the gaseous oxides are removed by solid sorbent. Steam and any organic substances present with the gaseous oxides are condensed and the ash is removed from the vessel. The radioactive waste may be deposited upon an upper screen in the vessel, so that a substantial portion of the pyrolysis of the radioactive waste takes place while the radioactive waste is on the upper screen, and pyrolyzed waste falls through the upper screen onto a lower screen, where another substantial portion of the pyrohydrolysis takes place. The ash residue falls through the lower screen

  8. Radioactive ion beam production by the ISOL method for SPIRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landre-Pellemoine, Frederique

    2001-01-01

    This work is directly related to the SPIRAL project (Systeme de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Acceleres en Lignes) of which the start up will begin in September 2001 at GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) in Caen. This thesis primarily concerns the development of radioactive ion production systems (target/ion source) by the thorough study of each production stage of the ISOL (Isotopic Separation On Line) method: target and/or projectile fragmentation production, diffusion out of target material, effusion into the ion source and finally the ionization of the radioactive atoms. A bibliographical research and thermal simulations allowed us to optimize materials and the shape of the production and diffusion targets. A first target was optimized and made reliable for the radioactive noble gases production (argon, neon...). A second target dedicated to the radioactive helium production was entirely designed and realised (from the specifications to the 'off line' and 'on line' tests). Finally, a third target source system was defined for singly-charged radioactive alkaline production. The intensities of secondary beams planned for SPIRAL are presented here. A detailed study of the diffusion effusion efficiency for these various targets showed that the use of a fine microstructure carbon (grain size of 1 μm) improved the diffusion and showed the importance of thickness of the lamella for the short lived isotope effusion. (author) [fr

  9. Method of melt-decontaminating alumium contaminated with radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Iba, Hajime; Miura, Noboru; Kawasaki, Katsuo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable optimum deontamination for radioactive-contaminated aluminum by further improving the decontaminating effect of the slag agent added to radioactive contaminated materials. Method: The slag agent is mainly composed of chloride type slags having a high reactivity for mainly incorporating uranium compounds and easily reacting near the melting point of aluminum and incorporated with fluorides for weakening the deliquescent characteristic to the chloride materials. Further, those slag agents are selected which can be treated at a low temperature in order to prevent the uranium compounds once incorporated into the slags from re-melting into the molten aluminum. Typically, a slag agent comprising 14 LiF, 76 KCl - 10 BaCl 2 is preferred. The basicity of the slag agent ranges from 0.5 to 2 and the melting point is 700 deg C. The melting decontaminating efficiency for the radioactive-contaminated aluminum can thus be improved. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Method of processing liquid wastes containing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kaname; Shirai, Takamori; Nemoto, Kuniyoshi; Yoshikawa, Jun; Matsuda, Takeshi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the number of solidification products by removing, particularly, Co-60 that is difficult to remove in a radioactive liquid wastes containing a water-soluble chelating agent, by adsorbing Co-60 to a specific chelating agent. Method: Liquid wastes containing radioactive cobalt and water-soluble chelating agent are passed through the layer of less water-soluble chelating agent that forms a complex compound with cobalt in an acidic pH region. Thus, the chelating compound of radioactive cobalt (particularly Co-60) is eliminated by adsorbing the same on a specific chelating agent layer. The chelating agent having Co-60 adsorbed thereon is discarded as it is through the cement- or asphalt-solidification process, whereby the number of solidification products to be generated can significantly be suppressed. (Moriyama, K.)

  11. Method of preventing contaminations in radioactive material handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Shunji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the contamination on the floor surface of working places by laying polyvinyl butyral sheets over the floor surface, replacing when the sheets are contaminated, followed by burning. Method: Polyvinyl butyral sheets comprising 50 - 70 mol% of butyral component are laid in a radioactive material handling facility, radioactive materials are handled on the polyvinyl butyral sheets and the sheets are replaced when contaminated. The polyvinyl butyral sheets used contain 62 - 68 mol% of butyral component and has 0.03 - 0.2 mm thickness. The contaminated sheets are subjected to burning processing. This can surely collect radioactive materials and the sheets have favorable burnability, releasing no corrosive or deleterious gases. In addition, they are inexpensive and give no hindrance to the workers walking. (Takahashi, M.)

  12. Method of electrolytically decontaminating of radioactive metal wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oonuma, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Akio; Yamadera, Toshio.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly reduce the volume of secondary wastes by separating from electrolytes metal ions containing radioactive metal ions dissolved therein in the form of elemental metals of a reduced volume with ease, as well as regenerating the electrolytes for re-use. Method: Contaminated portions at the surface of the radioactive metal wastes are dissolved in electrolytes and, when the metal ion concentration in the electrolytes reaches a predetermined level, the electrolytes are introduced to an acid recovery step and an electrodeposition step. The recovered acid is re-used as the electrolytes, while dissolved metal ions containing radioactive metal ions are deposited as elemental metals in the electrodeposition step. The electrolytes usable herein include those acids easily forming stable complex compounds with the metals or those not forming hydroxides of the contaminated metals. Combination of sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid, sodium chloride and hydrochloride or the like is preferred. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Method of solidifying and disposing radioactive waste plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Yasumura, Keijiro

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify radioactive waste as it is with plastic by forming a W/O (Water-in-Oil) emulsion with the radioactive waste and a plastic solidifier, and treating it with a polymerization starting agent, an accelerator, and the like. Method: A predetermined amount of alkaline substance such as sodium hydroxide, triethanol, or the like is added quantitatively to radioactive waste and it is mixed by an agitator. A predetermined amount of solidifier such as unsaturated polyester or the like is added to the mixture and it is further mixed by the agitator to form a stable W/O emulsion. Subsequently, predetermined amounts of polymerization starting agent such as methyl ethyl ketone peroxide and polymerization accelerator such as cobalt naphthenate or the like are added thereto, the mixture is mixed, and is then allowed to stand for at room temperature for the plastic solidification thereof. No reaction occurs after the solidification. (Sekiya, K.)

  14. Method of reducing radioactivity in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshino, Yasuo

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent increase of radiation dose ratio in primary coolant circuit pipeways of nuclear reactor and reduce operators' exposure dose upon periodical inspection, etc. Method: β-diketone such as acetylacetone is added in a predetermined amount to reactor cooling water. β-diketone dissolves to catch metal ions and iron oxides as the main ingredient of cruds. The resultant β-diketone complex of metals is slightly water soluble neutron molecule, and the total metal amount in the reactor coolant is at a concentration of less than 10 ppb and completely dissolved in water. Accordingly, deposition of clads in the coolant to pipeways can be prevented thereby enabling to prevent the increase in the radiation dose ratio in the pipeways and thus reduce the operators' exposure dose. (Takahashi, M.)

  15. Method of solidifying radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetake, Naoto; Kawamura, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto; Fukazawa, Tetsuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to confine the volatiling ingredients such as cesium in liquid wastes safely in glass solidification products while suppressing the volatilization thereof. Method: Acid salt of tetravalent metal such as titanium phosphate has an intense selective adsorption property to cesium. So liquid wastes stored in a high level liquid wastes tank is mixed with titanium phosphate gels stored in an adsorbent tank, then supplied to a mixer and mixed with a sodium silicate solution stored in a sodium silicate storage tank and boric acid stored in an additive tank, into gel-like state. The gel-like material thus formed is supplied to a drier. After being dried at a temperature of 200sup(o)C - 300sup(o)C, the material is melted under heating at a temperature of 1000sup(o)C - 1100sup(o)C, and then cooled to solidify. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Method of treatment of radioactive silts and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlakov, A.P.; Sobolev, I.A.; Barinov, A.S.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Karlin, S.V.; Flit, V.U.

    1997-01-01

    To solve the problem of silts and soils that are contaminated with radioactive and toxic substances, the following method has been developed at SIA RADON. The material is mixed with limestone and other components, including up to 70% (mass) of dried residue of liquid radioactive waste. The mixture is heated at 800 to 1,000 C, shredded, and used to form cement. This cementation process may be used to treat radioactive or other chemical waste. The work demonstrated that in the case of silts, for example, the product volume is reduced by a factor of 1.5 to 3 compared to the initial silts volume. A fast hardening, durable product is obtained, the quality of which is not inferior to that obtained by using the traditional binders. For some parameters, e.g., hardening rate and macroelement leaching, the current method is significantly better than the traditional cementation process. It has also been demonstrated that, over a wide range of parameters, when dry residue of liquid radioactive waste is used in the initial mixture, the part of NO x can be reduced to nitrogen, thereby reducing NO x emissions

  17. Development of radiometric methods for radioactive waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessaro, Ana Paula Gimenes

    2015-01-01

    The admission of radioactive waste in a final repository depends among other things on the knowledge of the radioisotopic inventory of the waste. To obtain this information it is necessary make the primary characterization of the waste so that it is composition is known, to guide the next steps of radioactive waste management. Filter cartridges that are used in the water polishing system of IEA-R1 research reactor is one of these wastes. The IEA-R1 is a pool-type research reactor, operating between 2 and 5 MW that uses water as coolant, moderator and biological shield. Besides research, it is used for production of radioisotopes and irradiation of samples with neutron and gamma beams. It is located in the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute at the University of Sao Paulo campus. The filter cartridges are used to retain particles that are suspended in the cooling water. When filters become saturated and are unable to maintain the flow within the established limits, they are replaced and disposed of as radioactive waste. After a period of decay, they are sent to the Radioactive Waste Management Department. The aim of this work is to present the studies to determine the activity of gamma emitters present in the cartridge filters. The activities were calculated using the dose rates measured with hand held detectors, after the ratios of the emission rates of photons were evaluated by gamma spectrometry, by the Point Kernel method, which correlates the activity of a source with dose rates at various distances. The method described can be used to determine routinely the radioactive inventory of these filters, avoiding the necessity of destructive radiochemical analysis, or the necessity of calibrating the geometry of measurement. (author)

  18. Method for removing radioactive iodine and radioactive organic iodides from effluent gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A method and composition for removing radioactive and organic iodides from an 131 I-containing off-gas stream is provided. The composition for removal by adsorption is a ceramic material with a surface area of from about 5 m 2 /g to about 250 m 2 /g impregnated with a metallic salt. The method for removing the iodine or iodide is accomplished by passing the off-gas stream over the ceramic material impregnated with the metallic salt. It finds special application in air filters for nuclear power plants

  19. Study of the radioactivity of rocks by the photographic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picciotto, E E

    1949-08-16

    The use of photographic plates, and especially of the new Ilford and Kodak plates, in nuclear physics is briefly described. In particular, the application of these methods to the study of the radioactivity of rocks is discussed. In a series of studies made by the authors, the photographic plates were placed in close contact with a thin, highly polished sheet of the rock sample and then developed under specified conditions. This method was used to determine the concentration of U and Th in two radioactive rock samples and the results are given. The samples were then reduced to powder form and the concentrations were again determined. Work on dissolved samples has not yet been completed. In conclusion, the relative merits of these different techniques are indicated.

  20. Method of detecting water leakage in radioactive waste containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishioka, Hitoshi; Takao, Yoshiaki; Hayakawa, Kiyoshige.

    1989-01-01

    Lower level radioactive wastes formed upon operation of nuclear facilities are processed by underground storage. In this case, a plurality of drum cans packed with radioactive wastes are contained in a vessel and a water soluble dye material is placed at the inside of the vessel. The method of placing the water soluble dye material at the inside of the vessel includes a method of coating the material on the inner surface of the vessel and a method of mixing the material in sands to be filled between each of the drum cans. Then, leakage of water soluble dye material is detected when water intruding from the outside into the vessel is again leached out of the vessel, to detect the water leakage from the inside of the vessel. In this way, it is possible to find a water-invaded vessel before corrosion of the drum can by water intruded into the vessel and leakage of nuclides in the drum can. Accordingly, it is possible to apply treatment such as repair before occurrence of accident and can maintain the safety of radioactive water processing facilities. (I.S.)

  1. Application of radiological imaging methods to radioactive waste characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessaro, Ana Paula Gimenes; Souza, Daiane Cristini B. de; Vicente, Roberto, E-mail: aptessaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Radiological imaging technologies are most frequently used for medical diagnostic purposes but are also useful in materials characterization and other non-medical applications in research and industry. The characterization of radioactive waste packages or waste samples can also benefit from these techniques. In this paper, the application of some imaging methods is examined for the physical characterization of radioactive wastes constituted by spent ion-exchange resins and activated charcoal beds stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Department of IPEN. These wastes are generated when the filter media of the water polishing system of the IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor is no longer able to maintain the required water quality and are replaced. The IEA-R1 is a 5MW pool-type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water, and fission and activation products released from the reactor core must be continuously removed to prevent activity buildup in the water. The replacement of the sorbents is carried out by pumping from the filter tanks into several 200 L drums, each drum getting a variable amount of water. Considering that the results of radioanalytical methods to determine the concentrations of radionuclides are usually expressed on dry basis,the amount of water must be known to calculate the total activity of each package. At first sight this is a trivial problem that demanded, however some effort to be solved. The findings on this subject are reported in this paper. (author)

  2. Monte Carlo method to characterize radioactive waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Josenilson B.; Dellamano, Jose C.; Potiens Junior, Ademar J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive methods for radioactive waste drums characterization have being developed in the Waste Management Department (GRR) at Nuclear and Energy Research Institute IPEN. This study was conducted as part of the radioactive wastes characterization program in order to meet specifications and acceptance criteria for final disposal imposed by regulatory control by gamma spectrometry. One of the main difficulties in the detectors calibration process is to obtain the counting efficiencies that can be solved by the use of mathematical techniques. The aim of this work was to develop a methodology to characterize drums using gamma spectrometry and Monte Carlo method. Monte Carlo is a widely used mathematical technique, which simulates the radiation transport in the medium, thus obtaining the efficiencies calibration of the detector. The equipment used in this work is a heavily shielded Hyperpure Germanium (HPGe) detector coupled with an electronic setup composed of high voltage source, amplifier and multiport multichannel analyzer and MCNP software for Monte Carlo simulation. The developing of this methodology will allow the characterization of solid radioactive wastes packed in drums and stored at GRR. (author)

  3. Nuclear incineration method for long life radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takaaki; Uematsu, Kunihiko.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear incineration method is the method of converting the long life radioactive nuclides in wastes to short life or stable nuclides by utilizing the nuclear reaction caused by radiation, unlike usual chemical incineration. By the nuclear incineration, the radioactivity of wastes increases in a short period, but the problems at the time of the disposal are reduced because of the decrease of long life radioactive nuclides. As the radiation used for the nuclear incineration, the neutron beam from fission and fusion reactors and accelerators, the proton beam and gamma ray from accelerators have been studied. The object of the nuclear incineration is actinide, Sr-90, Cs-137, I-129 and Tc-99. In particular, waste actinide emits alpha ray, and is strongly toxic, accordingly, the motive of attempting the nuclear incineration is strong. In Japan, about 24t of waste actinide will accumulate by 2000. The principle of the nuclear incineration, and the nuclear incineration using nuclear fission and fusion reactors and accelerators are described. The nuclear incineration using fission reactors was examined for the first time in 1972 in USA. It is most promising because it is feasible by the present technology without particular research and development. (Kako, I.)

  4. Discussion on the methods for calculation release limits for low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Fengbo; Liu Xiaochao

    2012-01-01

    The release request for low-level radioactive waste are briefly described in this paper. Associating with the conditions of low-level radioactive waste of some radioactive waste processing station, the methods and gist for calculating release limits for low-level radioactive waste with national release limits and annual effective dose limit for the public or the occupation are discussed. Then release limits for the low-level radioactive waste are also proposed. (authors)

  5. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  6. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  7. Method of processing radioactive nuclide-containing liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Masahide; Tomoshige, Shozo; Kondo, Kozo; Suzuki, Kazunori; Todo, Fukuzo; Yamanaka, Akihiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify radioactive nuclides in to a much compact state and facilitate the storage. Method: Liquid wastes such as drain liquids generated from a nuclear power plant at a low density of 1 x 10 -6 - 10 -4 μCi/ml are previously brought into contact with a chelate type ion exchange resin such as of phenolic resin or ion exchange resin to adsorb the radioactive nuclides on the resin and the nuclides are eluted with sulfuric acid or the like to obtain liquid concentrates. The liquid concentrates are electrolyzed in an ordinary electrolytic facility using platinum or the like as the anode, Al or the like as the cathode, under the presence of 1 - 20 g/l of non-radioactive heavy metals such as Co and Ni in the liquid and while adjusting pH to 2 - 8. The electrolysis liquid residue is returned again to the electrolysis tank as it is or in the form of precipitates coagulated with a polymeric floculant. The supernatant liquid upon floculating treatment is processed with the chelate type ion exchange resin into hazardless liquid. (Sekiya, K.)

  8. Solidified ceramics of radioactive wastes and method of producing it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oota, Takao; Matake, Shigeru; Ooka, Kazuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide solidified ceramics which have low leaching properties to water of radioactive substance, excellent heat dissipating and resistive properties and high mechanical strength by mixing and sintering limited amounts of titanium and aluminum compounds with calcined radioactive wastes containing special compound. Method: More than 20% by weight of titanium compound (as TiO 2 ) and more than 5% by weight of aluminum compound (as Al 2 O 3 ) are mixed with the calcined radioactive wasted containing, as converted by oxide, 5 to 40% by weight of Na 2 O, 5 to 20% by weight of Fe 2 O 3 , 5 to 15% by weight of MoO 3 , 5 to 15% by weight of ZrO 2 , 2 to 10% by weight of CeO 2 , 2 to 10% by weight of Cs 2 O, 1 to 5% by weight of BaO, 1 to 5% by weight of SrO, 0.2 to 2% by weight of Rb 2 O, 0.2% by weight of Y 2 O 3 , 0.2 to 2% by weight of NiO, 5 to 20% by weight of rare earth metal oxide, and 0.2 to 2% by weight of Cr 2 O 3 . The mixture is molded, sintered, and solidified to ceramics which contains no Mo phase, Na 2 O, MoO 3 , K 2 O, MoO 3 and Cs 2 O, MoO 3 phases and the like. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Distinguishing method for contamination/radio-activation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Takuji; Kato, Keiichiro; Koda, Satoshi.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of distinguishing the contamination/radio-activation of radioactive wastes used in processing wastes generated upon dismantling of exhausted nuclear reactors. Especially, contaminated/radio-activation is distinguished for wastes having openings such as pipes and valves, by utilizing scattering of γ-rays or γ-ray to β-ray ratio. That is, ratio of scattered γ-rays and direct γ-rays or ratio of β-rays and γ-rays from radioactive wastes are measured and compared by a radiation detector, to distinguish whether the radioactive wastes contaminated materials or radio-activated materials. For example, when an object to be measured having an opening is contaminated at the inner side, the radiation detector facing to the opening mainly detects high direct γ-rays emitted from the object to be measured while a radiation detector not facing the opening mainly detects high scattered γ-rays relatively. On the other hand, when the object is a radio-activated material, any of the detectors detect scattered γ-rays, so that they can be distinguished by these ratios. (I.S.)

  10. Device and method for traditional chinese medicine diagnosis using radioactive tracer method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shanling; Shen, Miaohe

    1997-05-29

    Disclosed is a device and method for traditional chinese medicine diagnosis using radioactive-tracer method. At least two nuclear radiation probes are arranged apart along the channels to detect the changing with time and on space of the intensity of radioactivity of the nuclear radioactive tracer which has been injected into the body in the channel position. The detected signals are amplified by amplifiers, and the outputs of the amplifiers are applied to data processing means which monitor the whole detecting process in real time and analyse and process the detected information about the changing of the intensity of radioactivity with time and on space indicating the operating of vital energy and blood, and obtain state parameters about operating of vital energy and blood in the body which is then output through data output means. (author) figs.

  11. New measurement techniques of environmental radioactivity. Methods of surveying marine radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshii

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of radioactivity have been carried out in solution or suspension in sea-water, bottom sediments and specific marine organisms. The general approach to radionuclide measurement in seawater and bottom sediments has been concentration by coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange or solvent extraction. These methods employed are based primarily on shipboard collection of samples followed by land-based laboratory analyses and are too time-consuming. For rapid measurement, in situ measurement of seawater or seabed gamma-ray has developed. A gamma-ray detecting probe containing the NaI(Tl) scintillation or germanium detector is enclosed in a sealed cylinder. The measurements are made by suspending the probe in a 200-300 liter tank and passing seawater through the tank by means of ship deck pumping system, towing the probe across the seafloor, hanging down the probe to the seabed, or loading the probe on a remotely operated undersea vehicle. In situ measurement of gamma-ray in the marine environment has some application to a mineral exploration and to monitoring of sea areas which may become contaminated as the result of accidents or contamination incidents. This article reviews several gamma-ray detecting probes and describes the recent studies at JAERI on the development of a small electric-cooled Ge gamma-ray detector and a marine environmental radioactivity investigation system for in situ measurement of gamma-ray. (J.P.N.)

  12. Method of electrolytic processing for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Yoshiharu; Tamai, Hideaki.

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes containing sodium compounds are electrolized using mercury as a cathode. As a result, they are separated into sodium-containing metal amalgam and residues. Metals containing sodium are separated from amalgam, purified and re-utilized, while mercury is recycled to the electrolysis vessel. The foregoing method can provide advantageous effect such as: (1) volume of the wastes to be processed can be reduced, (2) since processing can be carried out at a relatively low temperature, low boiling elements can be handled with no evaporization, (3) useful elements can be recovered and (4) other method than glass solidification can easily be employed remarkable volume-reduction of solidification products can be expected. (K.M.)

  13. Method for ultimate disposition of borate containing radioactive wastes by vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bege, D.; Faust, H.J.; Puthawala, A.; Stunkel, H.

    1984-01-01

    Method for the ultimate disposition of radioactive wastes by vitrification, in which weak to medium radioactive waste concentrates from borate-containing radioactive liquids are mixed with added glass-forming materials, maximally in a ratio of 1:3, and the mixture heated to obtain a glass-forming melt

  14. Method of reducing the radioactivity in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Kenya; Honda, Takashi; Furutani, Yasumasa; Kashimura, Eiji; Minato, Akira; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the radioactivity in nuclear power plants in contact with pure water at high temperature and high pressure. Method: For suppressing the deposition of radioactive materials in nuclear reactor coolants to the structural materials, oxide layers which are relatively porous but have a sufficient layer thickness are formed as the primary treatment and then thin but dense layers are formed as the secondary treatment. Oxidization is applied by means of heated water or steams with less oxidizing property in the first treatment, while oxidizing treatment is applied with heated water and steams at high oxidizing property in the second treatment, because the effect of suppressing corrosion is insufficient only by means of the membranes in the primary treatment, while the layers formed by the secondary treatment alone are liable to be injured and degraded. Since coolants for use in BWR type reactors usually contain about 200 ppb of dissolved oxygen, it is desirably from 40 to 100 ppb for the primary treatment and from 400 ppb to 8 ppb for the secondary treatment, and non-oxidating heated gases at high purity such as Ar, N 2 , He may be used in addition to heated water and steams. (Kawakami, Y.)

  15. Method for the disposal of radioactive waste liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kamiya, K; Kuriyama, O

    1976-03-19

    A method is presented to solidify radioactive waste liquids such as washing liquids containing radioactive material generated in an atomic power plant to thereby facilitate transport of them. A drum can is inserted into a drum can supporting vessel and carried by a truck toward and under the evaporation chamber. A lifter is upwardly extended by an elevator to provide an intimate contact between the lower end of a steam chamber and the upper end of the drum can through a seal ring. Next, a mixture of a washing waste liquid and a defoaming agent is filled from a supply pipe into the drum can in spraying manner. Into a heater is supplied heated vapor from a heated vapor supply pipe to vaporize and condense the waste liquids. The vaporized vapor passes through a demister and is condensed by a condenser. After the condensed liquids of a predetermined concentration have been obtained, a lifter is retracted to cause the drum can to be moved under a cement mixer to feed cement into the drum can for mixing and solidifying it therein.

  16. Methods for studying the radioactive contamination of plants (1963); Methodes d'etude de la contamination radioactive des vegetaux (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R; Jeanmaire, L; Michon, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The authors first define the doctrine which led to the devising of a method for studying the radioactive pollution of plants, based on the use of simple techniques, having the possibility of being adapted for routine work, and so devised that each stage is proceeded with only if the preceding one justifies it. For each stage a study is effected comparing the results obtained by the use of more exact techniques. The second part describes in detail the techniques used. (authors) [French] Dans une premiere partie lea auteurs definissent la doctrine qui leur a permis d'elaborer une methode d'etude de la pollution radioactive des vegetaux, basee sur l'utilisation de techniques simples, se pretant au travail de serie et concues de telle maniere que chaque etape n'est abordee que si la precedente le justifie. Chaque etape fait l'objet d'une etude qui compare les resultats a ceux obtenue par des techniques plus precises. La deuxieme partie decrit dans le detail les techniques utilisees. (auteurs)

  17. MethodS of radioactive waste processing and disposal in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstykh, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of investigations into radioactive waste processing and disposal in the United Kingdom are discussed. Methods for solidification of metal and graphite radioactive wastes and radioactive slime of the Magnox reactors are described. Specifications of different installations used for radioactive waste disposal are given. Climatic and geological conditions in the United Kingdom are such that any deep storages of wastes will be lower than the underground water level. That is why dissolution and transport by underground waters will inevitably result in radionuclide mobility. In this connection an extended program of investigations into the main three aspects of disposal problem namely radionucleide release in storages, underground water transport and radionuclide migration is realized. The program is divided in two parts. The first part deals with retrival of hydrological and geochemical data on geological formations, development of specialized methods of investigations which are necessary for identification of places for waste final disposal. The second part represents theoretical and laboratory investigations into provesses of radionuclide transport in the system of ''sttorage-geological formation''. It is concluded that vitrification on the base of borosilicate glass is the most advanced method of radioactive waste solidification

  18. Method of producing a solution of radioactive lanthanum-140 from radioactive barium-140 in an isotope generator and installation to carry out the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, K.; Jacobs, G.; Sauerwein, K.

    1979-01-01

    A method of separating radioactive lanthanum-140 from radioactive Ba-140 is proposed. The lanthanum-140 will be washed out of a sulphate precipitate and separated from Ba-140-sulphate by a granular filter mass of CaSO 4 and BaSO 4 . Details of the process are given. (UWI) [de

  19. Method of monitoring volume activity of natural radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, V.

    1980-01-01

    The method of monitoring radioactivity of a aerosol trapped, eg., with a filter is based on counting quasi-coincidences of the RaC-RaC' and ThC-ThC' decay. The first electronic unit counts quasi-coincidences at a time interval proportional to the ThC' half-life while the second electronic unit counts quasi-coincidences at a time interval proportional to the RaC' half-life, reduced by the time interval of the first electronic unit. The quasi-coincidences are evaluated of the RaC-RaC' decay independently of the ThC-ThC' quasi-coincidences and the decay products of the trapped radon and thoron gases are thus offset separately. (J.P.)

  20. Melt-processing method for radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroaki

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive solid wastes are charged into a water-cooled type cold crucible induction melting furnace disposed in high frequency coils, and high frequency currents are supplied to high frequency coils which surround the melting furnace to melt the solid wastes by induction-heating. In this case, heat plasmas are jetted from above the solid wastes to the solid wastes to conduct initial heating to melt a portion of the solid wastes. Then, high frequency currents are supplied to the high frequency coils to conduct induction heating. According to this method, even when waste components of various kinds of materials are mixed, a portion of the solid wastes in the induction melting furnace can be melted by the initial heating by jetting heat plasmas irrespective of the kinds and the electroconductivity of the materials of the solid wastes. With such procedures, entire solid wastes in the furnace can be formed into a molten state uniformly and rapidly. (T.M.)

  1. Method of separating radioactive nuclides from ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Saikoku, Masami; Taneta, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to safely process radioactive nuclides from spent ion exchange resins by using existent processing facilities. Method: Ion exchange resins in aqueous medium are at first placed to the ultrasonic wave irradiation site and put into such a state where clads and resins are easily separatable from each other by weakening the bonding force between them. Since the clads are magnetic material such as Fe 3 O 4 or NiFe 2 O 4 , the clads can be collected in the direction of the magnetic force by exerting the magnetic field simultaneously. The collected clads are transported by means of the aqueous medium to a collecting tank by removing the effect of magnetic field, for example, by interrupting the current supply to the electromagnet. Finally, they were subjected to stabilization and fixation into inorganic hardening agent such as cement hardener. Thus, processions can be made safely by using existent facilities. (Takahashi, M.)

  2. Method of burning ion-exchange resin contaminated with radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigenori.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To process spent ion exchange resins to reduce their volume, without increasing the load on a off-gas system and in a stable state and at the same time not leaving any uncombusted portions. Method: The water slurries of the ion exchange resins contaminated with radioactive materials is dehydrated or dry combusted to reduce the water content. A binder is then added to solidify the ion exchange resin. The solidified ion exchange resins are then combusted in a furnace. This prevents the ion exchange resin from being dispersed by air and combustion gases. Furthermore, the solidified ion exchange resins in the form of small pellets burn from the surface inwards. Moreover the binder is carbonized by the combustion heat and promotes combustion to convert the ion exchange resins into a solid mass, making sure that no uncombusted portion is left. (Takahashi, M.)

  3. Method of volume-reducing processing for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Koei; Yamauchi, Noriyuki; Hirayama, Toshihiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To process the processing products of radioactive liquid wastes and burnable solid wastes produced from nuclear facilities into stable solidification products by heat melting. Method: At first, glass fiber wastes of contaminated air filters are charged in a melting furnace. Then, waste products obtained through drying, sintering, incineration, etc. are mixed with a proper amount of glass fibers and charged into the melting furnace. Both of the charged components are heated to a temperature at which the glass fibers are melted. The burnable materials are burnt out to provide a highly volume-reduced products. When the products are further heated to a temperature at which metals or metal oxides of a higher melting point than the glass fiber, the glass fibers and the metals or metal oxides are fused to each other to be combined in a molecular structure into more stabilized products. The products are excellent in strength, stability, durability and leaching resistance at ambient temperature. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Method for solidification of radioactive iodine-containing solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Uetake, Naoto.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To process radioactive iodine containing solid wastes as non-leaching solidified wastes with no risk of iodine release. Method: It has been known for the thermal stability of CuI, PbI 2 or adsorbents containing the same that they do not release iodine in an inert gas atmosphere or in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature lower than 480 deg C. In view of the above, adsorbents containing iodine in the chemical form of CuI or PbI 2 , or CuI or powdery PbI 2 per se are sealed and solidified into low melting glass at a temperature of lower than 480 deg C at which no iodine release occurs in a non-oxidative atmosphere. Since the products are vitrified wastes, they scarcely show leaching property and are excellent in durability and stability. (Takahashi, M.)

  5. The matrix method for radiological characterization of radioactive waste

    CERN Document Server

    Magistris, M

    2007-01-01

    Beam losses are responsible for material activation in some of the components of particle accelerators. The activation is caused by several nuclear processes and varies with the irradiation history and the characteristics of the material (namely chemical composition and size). Once at the end of their operational lifetime, these materials require radiological characterization. The radionuclide inventory depends on the particle spectrum, the irradiation history and the chemical composition of the material. As long as these factors are known and the material cross-sections are available, the induced radioactivity can be calculated analytically. However, these factors vary widely among different items of waste and sometimes they are only partially known. The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN, Geneva) has been operating accelerators for high-energy physics for 50 years. Different methods for the evaluation of the radionuclide inventory are currently under investigation at CERN, including the so-calle...

  6. Experiment of decontamination of radioactive liquid by a biological method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormser, G.

    1962-01-01

    The author reports experiments of treatment of radioactive liquid effluents by percolation on a bacterial bed like the one used for the treatment of sewer wastewaters. He also reports results obtained in other countries in terms of reduction of effluent radioactivity for various radioactive ions. The installation is described and results are presented in terms of variation of contamination of an effluent with respect to its recycling on a bacterial bed [fr

  7. Radioactive waste storage facility and underground disposal method for radioactive wastes using the facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Yoshihiro.

    1997-01-01

    A sealed container storage chamber is formed in underground rocks. A container storage pool is formed on the inner bottom of the sealed vessel storage chamber. A heat exchanger for cooling water and a recycling pump are disposed on an operation floor of the sealed vessel storage chamber. Radioactive wastes sealed vessels in which radioactive wastes are sealed are transferred from the ground to the sealed vessel storage chamber through a sealed vessel transferring shaft, and immersed in cooling water stored in the vessel storage pool. When after heat of the radioactive wastes is removed by the cooling water, the cooling water in the vessel storage pool is sucked up to the ground surface. After dismantling equipments, bentonite-type fillers are filled in the inside of the sealed vessel storage chamber, sealed vessel transferring shaft, air supplying shaft and air exhaustion shaft, and the radioactive waste-sealed vessels can be subjected stably to into underground disposal. (I.N.)

  8. Melting method for radioactive solid wastes and device therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Masahiko; Abe, Takashi; Nakayama, Junpei; Kusamichi, Tatsuhiko; Sakamoto, Koichi

    1998-11-17

    Upon melting radioactive solid wastes mixed with radioactive metal wastes and non metal materials such as concrete by cold crucible high frequency induction heating, induction coils are wound around the outer circumference of a copper crucible having a water cooling structure to which radioactive solid wastes are charged. A heating sleeve formed by a material which generates heat by an induction heating function of graphite is disposed to the inside of the crucible at a height not in contact with molten metals in the crucible vertically movably. Radioactive solid wastes are melted collectively by the induction heat of the induction coils and thermal radiation and heat conduction of the heating sleeve heated by the induction heat. With such procedures, non metal materials such as concrete and radioactive metal wastes in a mixed state can be melt collectively continuously highly economically. (T.M.)

  9. Processing method and device for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Yukita, Atsushi.

    1997-01-01

    When only suspended particulate ingredients are contained as COD components in radioactive washing liquid wastes, the liquid wastes are heated by a first process, for example, an adsorption step to adsorb the suspended particulate ingredients to an activated carbon, and then separating and removing the suspended particulate ingredients by filtration. When both of the floating particle ingredients and soluble organic ingredients are contained, the suspended particulate ingredients are separated and removed by the first process, and then soluble organic ingredients are removed by other process, or both of the suspended particulate ingredients and the soluble organic ingredients are removed by the first process. In an existent method of adding an activated carbon and then filtering them at a normal temperature, the floating particle ingredients cover the layer of activated carbon formed on a filter paper or fabric to sometimes cause clogging. However, according to the method of the present invention, since disturbance by the floating particle ingredients does not occur, the COD components can be separated and removed sufficiently without lowering liquid waste processing speed. (T.M.)

  10. Acupuncture meridians demythified. A study using the radioactive tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.; Esquerre, J.P.; Guiraud, R.; Guiraud, G.; Lazorthes, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive trajectories can be visualized by injecting a radioactive tracer, technetium 99 m, at the site of acupuncture points. To determine the exact nature of these trajectories we performed several experiments on healthy volunteers, and our results may be summarized as follows. The target organs of technetium 99 m, and notably the thyroid gland, were always visualized. The circulating radioactivity, visible on scintiscans and confirmed by venous blood counts, was not negligible. The radioactive trajectories we observed were often divided at their starting point and did not extend along the whole length of the acupuncture meridians they might have made visible. The radioactive trajectories disappeared after venous blockade to reappear when the blockade was lifted. Finally, the radioactive trajectories obtained were very similar after injection at the acupuncture point and at a control point. These findings indicate a lymphatic and venous drainage of the radioactive tracer at the site of injection followed by transportation through the veins, rather than visualization of acupuncture meridians as suggested by some authors [fr

  11. Acupuncture meridians demythified. A study using the radioactive tracer method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J.; Esquerre, J.P.; Guiraud, R.; Guiraud, G.; Lazorthes, Y.

    1988-07-01

    Radioactive trajectories can be visualized by injecting a radioactive tracer, technetium 99 m, at the site of acupuncture points. To determine the exact nature of these trajectories we performed several experiments on healthy volunteers, and our results may be summarized as follows. The target organs of technetium 99 m, and notably the thyroid gland, were always visualized. The circulating radioactivity, visible on scintiscans and confirmed by venous blood counts, was not negligible. The radioactive trajectories we observed were often divided at their starting point and did not extend along the whole length of the acupuncture meridians they might have made visible. The radioactive trajectories disappeared after venous blockade to reappear when the blockade was lifted. Finally, the radioactive trajectories obtained were very similar after injection at the acupuncture point and at a control point. These findings indicate a lymphatic and venous drainage of the radioactive tracer at the site of injection followed by transportation through the veins, rather than visualization of acupuncture meridians as suggested by some authors.

  12. Method for enzyme synthesis of radioactive thymine 5'-deoxyribonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejedly, Z.; Ekl, J.; Hybs, K.; Kolina, J.; Filip, J.; Votruba, I.; Skoda, J.

    1978-01-01

    The enzyme synthesis is described for thymidine-5'-monophosphate, thymidine-5'-diphosphate and thymidine-5'-triphosphate specifically or nonspecifically labelled with 14 C or 3 H. The anabolic transformation of radioactive thymine to radioactive thymine 5'-deoxyribonucleotides is catalyzed by the action of enzyme preparations separated from Escherichia coli bacteria. It is achieved by the action of nonpurified cell-free extracts on special auxotrophic mutants of the thymine-dependent Escherichia coli SPT - strain in the presence of deoxyriboso-1-phosphate and adenosine-5'-triphosphate. The radioactive thymidine-5'-monophosphate may further be phosphorylated. In reaction mixtures, radioactive thymine, deoxyriboso-1-phosphate and adenosine-5'-triphosphate are used in molar ratios of 1:1:2 to 1:10:100, the optimum molar ratio being 1:5:10. (B.S.)

  13. Treatment of radioactive waste water by flocculation method, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Syojiro; Tsutsui, Tenson.

    1976-01-01

    Coagulation property of particle on the treatment of radioactive waste water by floculation method is varied with its electrical potential and mixing condition. The surface state of the particle is influenced by contents of coexistent materials in the waste water and added materials at the treatment process. In the case of using ferric hydroxide as coagulant, assuming the ions which decide the potential of the particle surface are Fe(OH) 2 + and Fe(OH) 4 - , calculated values of the potential agree with zeta-potential of ferric hydroxide particle which is formed from FeCl 4 and NaOH in demineralized water. When Na 2 CO 3 is in the waste water as coexistent materials, anion HCO 3 - adsorbs on the particle surface in connection with pH variation and thus the surface charge is being minus. If Ca 2+ ion is present in the waste water, the surface charge plus. ABS acts as single molecule anion at low concentration, but it forms micell at high concentration and influences zeta-potential of the particle. The potential of the particle is correlated to the coprecipitation rate of 90 Sr in the waste water. (auth.)

  14. Method of radioactive waste processing and equipment therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Skaba, V.; Ditl, P.

    1988-01-01

    Mushy or liquid radioactive wastes are mixed with chemical additives, e.g., aluminium sulfate, colloidal silicon oxide, formic acid and cement suspension. The mix is heated to 100 to 320 degC. By drying the waste and by chemical reaction, a bulk intermediate product will be obtained which is homogenized with molten bitumen or organic polymers. The mass is then poured into containers where it will harden and will then be transported to the depository. The advantage of the method is that the final product is a stable mass resistant to separation, leaching and erosion, showing long-term storage safety. The main components of the installation are a mixed reactor, a doser of bulk material and a homogenizer which are series connected in that order. The apparatus is mounted on a support structure which may be divided into at least two parts. The advantage of this facility is that it is easily transported and can thereby be used for processing waste at source. (E.S.). 2 figs

  15. Methods of surveying and monitoring marine radioactivity. Report of an ad hoc panel of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    An effective control of the radioactive pollution of the sea depends partly on the availability of adequate technical methods for surveying and monitoring the sea and marine products with regard to the presence of radioactive substances. The purpose of this manual is to offer such methods.

  16. A method and apparatus for preparing the storage of noxious substances, in particular radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The invention relates to the storage of radioactive substances. It deals with a method for storing a substance, in particular a noxious or radioactive substance, comprising trapping said substance in a solid substance by bombarding said solid substance with ions of the above substance, so that the latter reaches a certain concentration level in the solid substance. This is applicable to the storage of radioactive wastes [fr

  17. Radioactive waste processing facility and underground processing method for radioactive wastes using the facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuyuki

    1998-01-01

    There are disposed a communication pit laterally extended in an underground base rock, an access pit extended from the ground surface to the communication pit, discarding pits laterally extended at a plurality of longitudinal positions of the communication pit and layered buffer materials for keeping a radioactive waste-sealing container at substantially the center of the discarding pit. The layered buffer material comprises fan-shaped buffer blocks divided so that the axial end faces of inner and outer layers are displaced with each other in the axial direction of the discarding pit and so that the circumferential end faces of the inner and the outer layers are circumferentially displaced with each other. Even if the base lock should move, the layered buffer material reduces the propagation of the movement to the radioactive waste-sealing vessel thereby enabling to enhance supporting strength. (N.H.)

  18. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes by solidification with cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To subject radioactive liquid wastes to a cement solidification treatment after heating and drying it by a thin film scrape-off drier to render it into the form of power, and then molding it into pellets for the treatment. Structure: Radioactive liquid wastes discharged from a nuclear power plant or nuclear reactor are supplied through a storage tank into a thin film scrape-off drier. In the drier, the radioactive liquid wastes are heated to separate the liquid, and the residue is taken out as dry powder from the scrape-off apparatus. The powder obtained in this way is molded into pellets of a desired form. These pellets are then packed in a drum can or similar container, into which cement paste is then poured for solidification. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Method for solidification and disposal of radioactive pellet waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To form radioactive waste into pellet, which is impregnated with plastic monomer for polymerization, and then packed into a drum can to have gaps between composites filled with cement, mortar, and molten asphalt, thus increasing water resistance and strength. Structure: Radioactive powdery bodies discharged from a thin film scaraping drier are formed into pellets in the desired shape. The thus pelletized radioactive solid waste is impregnated with a fluid plastic monomer such as styrene monomer and methacrylacidmethyl, and a polymerization accelerator is added thereto for polymerization. As a consequence, a composite pellet of powdery solid waste and plastic may be obtained. This is packed into the drum can container, into which cement paste, cement mortar or molten asphalt are put to fill the space between the plastic pellet composites, thus obtaining a solidified body integral with the drum can. (Taniai, N.)

  20. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes by using zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, T; Mimura, H

    1975-09-18

    The object is to processing radioactive liquid waste by zeolites to be fixed to a solidified body having a very small lixiviation property. The nuclide in radioactive liquid waste is exchanged and adsorbed into natural or synthetic zeolites, which are then burnt to a temperature lower than 1000/sup 0/C -- melting point. Thus, the zeolite structure is broken to form fine amorphous silicate aluminate or silicate aluminate of the nuclide exchanged and adsorbed. Both are very hard to be soluble in water. Further, the lixiviation from the solidified body is limited to the surface thereof, and it will no longer be detected in a few days.

  1. Processing method for discharged radioactive laundry water waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo; Kitsukawa, Ryozo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Kiuchi, Yoshimasa; Hattori, Yasuo.

    1995-01-01

    In order to process discharged radioactive laundry water wastes safely and decrease radioactive wastes, bubbling of a surface active agent in a detergent which causes a problem upon its condensation is suppressed, so that the liquid condensate are continuously and easily dried into a powder. A nonionic surface active agent is used against the bubbling of the surface active agent. In addition, the bubbling in an the evaporation can is reduced, and the powderization is facilitated by adding an appropriate inorganic builder. (T.M.)

  2. Radioactive waste processing method for a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kuriyama, O

    1976-06-04

    Object is to subject radioactive liquid waste in a nuclear power plant to reverse permeation process after which it is vaporized and concentrated thereby decreasing the quantity of foam to be used to achieve effective concentration of the liquid waste. Liquid waste containing a radioactive material produced from a nuclear power plant is first applied with pressure in excess of osmotic pressure by a reverse permeation device and is separated into clean water and concentrated liquid by semi-permeable membrane. Next, the thus reverse-permeated and concentrated waste is fed to an evaporator which control foaming by the foam and then further reconcentrated for purification of the liquid waste.

  3. Processing method and device for radioactive waste containing surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukita, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Ryozo; Izumida, Tatsuo; Nishi, Takashi; Hattori, Yasuo.

    1997-01-01

    Washing liquid wastes generated in washing facilities in a nuclear power plant are collected in a liquid waste collecting tank. A suspension containing a powdery active carbon is supplied to the liquid waste collecting tank. Organic ingredients such as of a surfactant, oil ingredients and radioactive materials in the form of ions contained in the washing liquid wastes are adsorbed to the powdery active carbon. The washing liquid wastes containing the powdery active carbon and granular radioactive materials are led into an active carbon separating and drying device. The powdery active carbon and granular radioactive materials contained in the washing liquid wastes are filtered and separated by a filtering plate, and accumulated as filtered materials on the surface of the filtering plate. The purified washing liquid wastes are discharged to the outside. The filtered materials are dried by hot steams (or hot water) and dried air. The filtered materials are peeled from the filtering plate. The filtered materials, in other word, dried powdery active carbon and granular radioactive materials are transported to and burnt in an incinerator. (I.N.)

  4. Method for evaluating the applicability and application rate wastes in soil; Metodo para avaliacao da aplicabilidade e taxa de aplicacao de residuos em solo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linhares, Monica Moreira [Partime (Brazil); Seabra, Paulo Negrais [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1991-01-01

    Land treatment of refinery solid wastes has been practiced in the last few years by some PETROBRAS refineries. The biodegradation process is dynamic and complex, and incorrect monitoring may destroy the potential of the soil. Due to great differences both in terms of soils and of residues, each case must be monitored individually. We therefore developed a monitoring method for land farming systems based on the impact of the waste on indigenous soil microbial populations. The method is extremely simple, requiring only a gas chromatograph to evaluate the CO{sub 2} evolution, and can detect possible causes for low efficiency biodegradation processes. Conditions should then be altered, to ensure adequate functioning of the system.The method also allows for determination of the applicability of candidate wastes and of acceptable waste application rates in soil. (author) 2 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Method of evaluation of diagnostics reference levels in computerized tomography; Metodo de avaliacao de niveis de referencia de radiodiagnostico em tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Walter Flores

    1999-04-01

    Computerized tomography is a complex technique with several selectable exposition parameters delivering high doses to the patient. In this work it was developed a simple methodology to evaluate diagnostic reference levels in computerized tomography, using the concept of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD), recently adopted by the Health Ministry. For evaluation of the MSAD, a dose distribution was obtained through a measured dose profile on the axial axis of a water phantom with thermoluminescence dosemeters, TLD-100, for different exam technique. The MSAD was evaluated hrough two distinct methods. First, it was evaluated by the integration of the dose profile of a single slice and, second, obtained by the integration on central slice of the profile of several slices. The latter is in of accordance with the ionization chamber method, suggesting to be the most practical method of dose evaluation to be applied in the diagnostic reference level assessment routine for CT, using TLDs. (author)

  6. Establishment of radioactive source retirement mechanism based on the method of environmental liability insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    The retirement of radioactive source is a difficult problem that we are facing during the radiation safety regulation in China. This paper analyses the reason of the problem regarding the retirement of radioactive source both from the utilization units and the regulatory body. It is considered that the basic reason is the enterprises don't arrange and use the retirement funds reasonably, which is an economic problem. There exists a limitation when facing the radioactive source retirement in light of licensing and regulation mechanism of the manufacture, selling, uses of radioactive sources in China, and the key to solve this economic problem is to introduce economic method, Some measures and suggestions are given to establish radioactive sources retirement mechanism by using economic methods, based on the comprehensive analysis of the concept, development and function of the environmental liability insurance. (author)

  7. Sealed radioactive sources and method of their production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benadik, A.; Tympl, M.; Stopek, K.

    1985-01-01

    The active layer of the proposed sources consists of an inorganic sorbent activated with a radioactive component in form of gel, xerogel or glass. The active particles of the inorganic sorbent have the shape of spheres 2 to 2000 μm in diameter. The sources have a tubular, cylindrical or needle shape and are compact with low leachability. They feature minimal radionuclide leakage, they are reliable and safe. Their production technology is proposed. The inorganic sorbent is put in contact with the sollution of the radioactive compound, then separated from the liquid phase, filled into containers, dried, calcined or sintered or otherwise heat-processed into glass at temperatures of 250 -1800 degC. (M.D.)

  8. Radioactive waste processing method and processing device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi; Noge, Kenji; Matsuda, Masami; Takeshi, Kiyotaka

    1998-01-01

    Each predetermined amount of aggregates such as cements and sands as water-hardening solidification materials and kneading water are charged from a solidification material containing vessel, an aggregate containing vessel and a kneading water containing vessel to a kneading vessel of a paste supply device. The cements, the sands and the kneading water are kneaded by the rotation of a kneader. A produced solidification material paste is charged from the kneader to a drum through a paste transporting pump. Miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes have been filled in a drum. The solidification paste produced while supplying the cements, the sands and the kneading water into the kneader is discharged from the kneader. Since increase of viscosity of the solid material paste in the kneader is suppressed, the solidification paste can be easily flown into narrow gaps between radioactive miscellaneous solid wastes in the drum. (I.N.)

  9. Method of and apparatus for decontaminating radioactive garments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capella, J.A.; Morrison, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Garments are deposited in a cleaning drum which is agitated during a wash cycle. A dry cleaning solvent is continuously added to the drum during the wash cycle and continuously removed from the drum during the wash cycle to flush the radioactive particulate material separated from the garments into a sump. The solvent is pumped from the sump for addition to the drum during the wash cycle and the pumped solvent is filtered to remove substantially all of the radioactive particulate material suspended in the solvent. Radiation sensors permit monitoring of the recycled solvent to ensure satisfactory operation of filters. The solvent is cleaned by a distilling apparatus, a condenser and a moisture separating apparatus. A fan dryer is provided. (author)

  10. Method for removing radioactive waste from a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    By using the existing safety and auxiliary systems in a nuclear power plant a bunker-type building is to be linked up with the region of the main airlock, in which the radioactive material to be disposed of may pass through the necessary mechanical and chemical process while being handled in mobile containers. The constructional and engineering measures are described by a design example. (TK) [de

  11. Method for removal of decay heat of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesky, H.; Wunderer, A.

    1981-01-01

    In this process, the decay heat from radioactive substances is removed by means of a liquid carried in the coolant loop. The liquid is partially evaporated by the decay heat. The steam is used to drive the liquid through the loop. When a static pressure level equivalent to the pressure drop in the loop is exceeded, the steam is separated from the liquid, condensed, and the condensate is reunited with the return flow of liquid for partial evaporation. (orig.) [de

  12. Method of encapsulating solid radioactive waste material for storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Bates, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    High-level radioactive wastes are encapsulated in vitreous carbon for long-term storage by mixing the wastes as finely divided solids with a suitable resin, formed into an appropriate shape and cured. The cured resin is carbonized by heating under a vacuum to form vitreous carbon. The vitreous carbon shapes may be further protected for storage by encasement in a canister containing a low melting temperature matrix material such as aluminum to increase impact resistance and improve heat dissipation. 8 claims

  13. Evaluation of natural radioactivity in some granitic rocks in the state of Parana, Brazil and its use in civil construction; Avaliacao da radioatividade natural em algumas rochas graniticas do estado do Parana e sua utilizacao na construcao civil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ademar de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Primordial, or terrestrial natural radionuclides, are found in different amounts in the environment. In dwellings, an important dose increment is due to building materials, which contribute for both the external gamma dose from the radionuclides of the {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th series and the natural {sup 40}K and the internal dose, due mainly to {sup 222}Rn inhalation. Once granitic rocks are widely used both as construction materials or structural flooring, those rocks can become an important dose source, depending on the content of concentrations of radioactivity, and the construction application. In this work, a database for granitic rocks of the crystalline shield of Parana (mainly in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba, RMC), used in civil construction, was generated, evaluating in terms of radiological protection the external and internal dose increments, caused by the use of these materials. Also, possible correlations between the {sup 226}Ra activity concentration, the {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate, density, porosity and chemical composition (oxide content) in these samples had been studied. The external dose was assessed by gamma-ray spectrometry with High-Purity Germanium detectors, where the activity concentration of the radionuclides {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K are the parameters used in dosimetric models (Dosimetric Indexes), which established limits in accordance with the form, amount and application of material of construction. For the calculation of the annual effective external dose it was assumed a room model with dimensions of 4 m x 5 m x 2:8 m and all walls internally covered with 2 cm thickness of granite and an annual exposure time of 7000 h as suggested by the European Commission of Radiological Protection for internal superficial coating materials. The internal exposure was assessed from the radon concentration in the air of the room model, simulated from the superficial exhalation rate of {sup 222}Rn. The exhalation

  14. Photoluminescence evaluation of TiO{sub 2} synthesized by Pechini method; Avaliacao da fotoluminescencia do TiO{sub 2} sintetizado pelo metodo Pechini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, D.S.; Diniz, V.C.S.; Dantas, J.; Araujo, P.M.A.G.; Costa, A.C.F.M., E-mail: dagobertoufcg@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Viana, R.S.; Junior, S.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. Quimica Fundamental; Torquato, R.A. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2017-07-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) stands out for use in various applications mainly due to its properties of thermal and chemical stability and its excellent optical properties. However, these properties are dependent on the type and phase morphology, which is related to the TiO{sub 2} processing method. Thus, this paper proposed to synthesize TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles by polymeric precursor method with different polymorphs, and evaluate the influence of these phases in the photoluminescent properties. For this, the stoichiometric molar proportions of citric acid:metallic cations of 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1 and 5:1 were investigated. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy, textural analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), excitation and emission spectroscopy and determination of the band gap by UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The presence of anatase and rutile was confirmed by XRD in different proportions for each sample. The agglomerate size increased with the citric acid/metal cations ratio as observed by SEM. Concerning photoluminescence, the maximum intensity in the emission spectrum occurred at the wavelength of 533 nm for the 3:1 sample and the maximum intensity in the excitation spectrum occurred for the 2:1 sample at the wavelength of 451 nm. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the reconstruction method and effect of partial volume in brain scintiscanning; Avaliacao do metodo de reconstrucao e efeito do volume parcial em cintilografia cerebral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, Monica Araujo

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, on which occurs a progressive and irreversible destruction of neurons. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) 35.6 million people are living with dementia, being recommended that governments prioritize early diagnosis techniques. Laboratory and psychological tests for cognitive assessment are conducted and further complemented by neurological imaging from nuclear medicine exams in order to establish an accurate diagnosis. The image quality evaluation and reconstruction process effects are important tools in clinical routine. In the present work, these quality parameters were studied, and the effects of partial volume (PVE) for lesions of different sizes and geometries that are attributed to the limited resolution of the equipment. In dementia diagnosis, this effect can be confused with intake losses due to cerebral cortex atrophy. The evaluation was conducted by two phantoms of different shapes as suggested by (a) American College of Radiology (ACR) and (b) National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) for Contrast, Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) and Recovery Coefficient (RC) calculation versus lesions shape and size. Technetium-99m radionuclide was used in a local brain scintigraphy protocol, for proportions lesion to background of 2:1, 4:1, 6:1, 8:1 and 10:1. Fourteen reconstruction methods were used for each concentration applying different filters and algorithms. Before the analysis of all image properties, the conclusion is that the predominant effect is the partial volume, leading to errors of measurement of more than 80%. Furthermore, it was demonstrate that the most effective method of reconstruction is FBP with Metz filter, providing better contrast and contrast to noise ratio results. In addition, this method shows the best Recovery Coefficients correction for each lesion. The ACR phantom showed the best results assigned to a more precise reconstruction of a cylinder, which does not

  16. Covering localization, mapping and evaluation of ducts, using Pipeline Current Mapper Methods (PCM); Localizacao, mapeamento e avaliacao de revestimento de dutos, utilizando o metodo Pipeline Current Mapper (PCM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furquim, Antonio Jorge [ESTEIO Engenharia e Aerolevantamentos S.A., Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Esteio Engenharia e Aerolevantamentos S.A., together with the PETROBRAS - Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., comes accomplishing the Location, Geo positioning, Mapping and Inspection of the Coating in more than 5.000 km of pipes in several areas of the country. The works come being executed seeking the obtaining of the real position of Ducts (They-Built) and the conditions in that meets the coating of the same ones. The risings base on the method Pipeline Current Mapper (PCM), using the equipment of production of Radio detection to locate and to inspect the conditions of the coating. This work presents the results, analyses, precision, benefits and difficulties found during the execution of the surveying. (author)

  17. A new method for decontamination of radioactive waste using low-pressure arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Furukawa, Shizue; Adachi, Kazuo; Amakawa, Tadashi; Kanbe, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the decontamination features of the low-pressure arc-discharge method for radioactive waste generated in the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants were examined. The low-pressure arc-discharge method was applied to type 304 stainless-steel, type 316L stainless-steel, alloy 600 and carbon-steel covered with radioactive corrosion products. Approximately, 80% of the radioactivity build up on stainless-steels could be removed by the low-pressure arc discharge

  18. Method for testing the radioactivity of objects containing metal or concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanulik, J [Recytec SA, (Switzerland)

    1991-12-31

    Radioactively contaminated objects are placed into a borofluoric acid bath following a rough spot test and are precipitated in a measurable geometry on the cathode plates in the course of an electrolytic process, for example. In the course of the subsequent testing, the metals lying below a pre-determined maximum value of radioactive emissions are separated and supplied to the waste reclamation. The materials lying above this threshold value during the spot testing are first decontaminated and then placed in the acid bath. The borofluoric acid is not used up in this process and remains in the system. It is possible to use already radioactively contaminated boric acid from pressurized water reactors, to which it is merely required to add fluoric acid and to distill, for generating borofluoric acid. The method in accordance with the invention reduces the radioactive waste and reduces the testing and administrative effort required for the release of the non-radioactive materials. (author) 1 tab., 4 figs.

  19. Electric energy deficit marginal cost: historic, evaluation and proposition of a new method; Custo marginal do deficit de energia eletrica: historico, avaliacao e proposta de uma nova metodologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Paulo Gerson Cayres

    2009-05-15

    The optimization model actually used to the energy operation planning of the National Interconnected System - NIS has as objective function the minimization of expected total cost operation. To achieve this goal the model provides optimal allocation of hydrothermal resources during the study horizon, employing aggregated subsystems. The deficit marginal cost is a parameter which is explicitly informed to the model, and does a part in the operation total cost calculation being a predominant factor in the service conditions evaluation of national electric energy market, affecting the energy costs and the risk of deficit on NIS. In this work is realized an integral study about the electric energy deficit marginal cost, starting with a historical review, followed by a actualization of your actual value and a propose of a new method for the calculation of deficit marginal cost value. The studies shows the impact of the values found over service conditions to the electric energy market in the energy operation planning, focusing on some usual indicators adopted in studies of the electrical sector. (author)

  20. Radioactive heat source and method of making same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, N.B.

    1977-01-01

    A radioactive source of heat which is resistant to cremation conditions is made by encapsulating a radioisotope within a containment vessel and forming a refractory metal silicide diffusion coating exterior thereof. A secondary molybdenum vessel may be provided with a molybdenum silicide coating and then heated in air to oxidize its outer layer. A layer is applied exterior of the diffusion-coating which provides a continuous ceramic oxide layer upon subjection to cremation. This outer layer may be discrete silica carried in a hardenable binder of an organic polymer, and a minor amount of antimony is preferably also included

  1. Radioactivity measurements of 32P solutions by calorimetric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genka, T.; Nataredja, I.K.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactivity of 32 P solution is measured with a twin-cup heat-flow microcalorimeter. In order to convert whole decay energy evolved from the 32 P solution in a glass vial into thermal power, 5 mm-thick lead container was used as a radiation absorber. Corrections for heat loss due to thermal radiation and bremsstrahlung escape as well as an effect of impurity ( 33 P) are conducted. The overall uncertainty of the nondestructive measurement as a sample is in a container is estimated to be ± 1.5 %. Discussion about estimates of uncertainties is also given in detail. (author)

  2. Method for utilizing decay heat from radioactive nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busey, H.M.

    1974-01-01

    Management of radioactive heat-producing waste material while safely utilizing the heat thereof is accomplished by encapsulating the wastes after a cooling period, transporting the capsules to a facility including a plurality of vertically disposed storage tubes, lowering the capsules as they arrive at the facility into the storage tubes, cooling the storage tubes by circulating a gas thereover, employing the so heated gas to obtain an economically beneficial result, and continually adding waste capsules to the facility as they arrive thereat over a substantial period of time

  3. Development of methods to extralt and solidify highly radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnek, R.; Persson, A.; Faelth, L.; Annehed, H.

    1977-06-01

    Zeolites are proposed as selective ion exchange materials to extract highly radioactive fission products as cesium 137 and strontium 90, and corrosion products. The zeolites 13X, F and PC showed a high adsorption capacity for cesium and strontium. A heat treatment at 800-1300 degrees C for about two hours gave a vitrified material. The chemical resistance of the heat treated zeolites was tested in a soxhlets-apparatus, were a streaming solution at 100 degrees C was in contact with the zeolite for 1-2 days. For all cases, the amount of dissolved strontium was below the detection threshold.(L.K.)

  4. Radioactive material dry-storage facility and radioactive material containing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Hidetoshi; Kumagaya, Naomi; Ganda, Takao.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a radioactive material dry storage facility which can unify the cooling efficiency of a containing tube and lower the pressure loss in a storage chamber. Namely, a cylindrical body surrounds a first containing tube situated on the side of an air discharge portion among a plurality of containing tubes and forms an annular channel extending axially between the cylindrical body and the first containing tube. An air flow channel partitioning member is disposed below a second containing tube situated closer to an air charging portion than the first containing tube. A first air flow channel is formed below the air channel partitioning member extending from the air charging portion to the annular channel. The second air channel is formed above the air channel partitioning member and extends from the air charging portion to the air discharge portion by way of a portion between the second containing tubes and the portion between the cylindrical body and the first containing tube. Then, low temperature air can be led from the air charging portion to the periphery of the first containing tube. The effect of cooling the first containing tube can be enhanced. The difference between the cooling efficiency between the second containing tube and the first containing tube is decreased. (I.S.)

  5. Method of processing cellulose filter sludge containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Setsuo; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Kusakabe, Takao; Kawakami, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    To cellulose filter sludges deposited with radioactive wastes, 1 to 15% of cellulase based on the solid content of the filter sludges is caused to act in an aqueous medium with 4 to 8 pH at 10 to 50degC. If the pH value exceeds 8, hydrolyzing effect of cellulase is decreased, whereas a tank is corroded if the pH value is 4 or lower. If temperature is lower than 10degC, the rate of the hydrolysis reaction is too low to be practical. It is appropriate that the temperature is at the order of 40degC. If it exceeds 50degC, the cellulase itself becomes unstable. It is most effective that the amount of cellulase is about 8% and its addition by more than 15% is not effective. In this way, liquids in which most of filter sludges are hydrolyzed are processed as low level radioactive wastes. (T.M.)

  6. Sealing method and sealing device for radioactive waste containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Koji; Otsuki, Akira

    1998-01-01

    A radioactive waste-containing body is hoisted down into a strong-material vessel opened upwardly, and a strong-material lid is hoisted down to the opening of the strong-material-vessel and welded. The strong material vessel is hoisted up and loaded on a corrosion resistant-material bottom plate placed horizontally. A corrosion resistant-material vessel having one opening end and having a corrosion resistant-material flange on the other end and previously agreed with the strong material-vessel main body is hoisted up by a hoisting device having an inserting device so that the opening of the corrosion resistant vessel is directed downwardly. The corrosion resistant vessel is press-fitted to the outside of the strong material-vessel by the inserting device while being heated by a preheater to shrink. Subsequently, the lower end of the corrosion resistant-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material bottom plate are welded to constitute a corrosion resistant-material vessel. Then, the radioactive waste containing body can be sealed in a sealing vessel comprising the strong-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material vessel. (N.H.)

  7. Processing method for contaminated water containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, Toshiaki; Fukagawa, Ken-ichiro.

    1994-01-01

    For absorbing contaminated water containing radioactive substances, a sheet is prepared by covering water absorbing pulps carrying an organic water absorbent having an excellent water absorbability is semi-solidified upon absorption water with a water permeable cloth, such as a non-woven fabric having a shape stability. As the organic water absorbent, a hydrophilic polymer which retains adsorbed water as it is used. In particular, a starch-grafted copolymer having an excellent water absorbability also for reactor water containing boric acid is preferred. The organic water absorbent can be carried on the water absorbing pulps by scattering a granular organic water absorbent to the entire surface of the water absorbing cotton pulp extended thinly to carry it uniformly and putting them between thin absorbing paper sheets. If contaminated water containing radioactive materials are wiped off by using such a sheet, the entire sheet is semi-solidified along with the absorption with no leaching of the contaminated water, thereby enabling to move the wastes to a furnace for applying combustion treatment. (T.M.)

  8. Radioactive waste immobilization in protective ceramic forms by the HIP method at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayenko, S.Yu.; Kantsedal, V.P.; Tarasov, R.V.; Starchenko, V.A.; Lyubtsev, R.I.

    1993-01-01

    Intense research activities have been carried out in recent years at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) to develop the method of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) for immobilizing radioactive (primarily, high-level) wastes. With this method, the radioactive material is immobilized in a matrix under the simultaneous action of high pressures (up to 6,000 atm) and appropriate temperatures. The process has 2 variants: (1) radioactive wastes are treated as powders of oxides resulting from calcination during chemical treatment of spent fuel. In this case the radioactive material enters into the crystalline structure of the immobilized matrix or is distributed in the matrix as a homogeneous mixture; (2) protective barrier layers are pressed on spent fuel rods or their pieces as radioactive wastes, by the HIP method (fuel rod encapsulation in a protective form). Based on numerous results from various studies, the authors suggest that various ceramic compositions should be used as protective materials. Here the authors report two trends of their investigations: (1) development of ecologically clean process equipments for radioactive waste treatment by the HIP method; (2) manufacture of promising protective ceramic compositions and investigation of their physico-mechanical properties

  9. A simple method for the measurement of radioactivity of samples separated by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, T.

    1981-01-01

    Gas chromatographs with flame ionization detector can be used to determine the radioactivity ( 14 C) of separated peaks. After a suitable change in the detector output the combustion product 14 CO 2 can be trapped by hyamine hydroxyde and measured by liquid scintigraphy. 90% of peak activity can be collected and measured, thus the method can be applied to determine the distribution and specific radioactivity of the components separated by gas chromatography. (author)

  10. Method of producing solidification product of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Shunji; Iwami, Etsuji; Kadota, Keishi.

    1989-01-01

    Layers of thermosetting resin composition capable of curing at normal temperature are formed to a thickness of 2 to 5 mm at the bottom of a container. As the thermosetting resin composition capable of curing at normal temperature, there can be mentioned, for example, unsaturated polyester resin comprising a polymerizable monomer and an unsaturated polyester. After the layers are cured, a mixture of radioactive wastes and the thermosetting resin composition capable of curing at normal temperature is filled on the layer. After curing, thermosetting resin composition capable of curing at normal temperature is filled so as to fill gaps between the curing product and the container caused by curing shrinkage and at the upper surface of the curing products. After curing, plastic layers are formed at the surface. This can avoid residual bubbles in the layers or development of cracks. Further, leaching rate of Na ions is low and water proofness can be improved as well. (T.M.)

  11. Method for decreasing radiation hazard in transporting radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodrich, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    At the end of their useful life, fuel rods are removed from a nuclear reactor and transferred underwater into a shipping cask. The water in the pool of the nuclear reactor system (or fuels reprocessing plant) may contain troublesome amounts of radioactive isotopes, creating biological hazards for any shipping cask unless adequately cleaned after contacting pool water. Potential contamination of substantially all of the entire exterior of the shipping cask is avoided because such shipping cask is at least predominantly immersed in fresh water within a vertically shiftable container which can be, for example, shifted between the bottom and the surface of the pool. Fresh water is supplied to the interior of the shiftable container whereby substantially all of the exterior of the shipping cask is immersed in fresh water, maintained at a pressure and/or flow velocity preventing the pool water from contacting the exterior of the shipping cask

  12. Method of melting to solidify radioactive powder wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuka, Katsuyuki; Miyazaki, Hitoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the microwave irradiation efficiency in a melting furnace. Constitution: Pelletization, sludgification and granularization are carried out as powderous dust reducing treatment. In the granularization, for example, radioactive burning ashes are sent from a hopper to a mixer and mixed with processing aids such as binders. Then, they are pelletized in a pelletizer into granular products and sent to a microwave melting furnace by way of a sieve screen. The granular products are melted by microwaves from a microwave guide tube and taken out through an exit. This can prevent powderous dusts from floating and scattering in the melting furnace and prevent the reduction in the microwave irradiation efficiency due to generation of electric discharges. (Seki, T.)

  13. Membrane methods for the treatment of low and intermediate radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Harasimowicz, M.; Tyminski, B.

    2001-01-01

    Membrane processes have been investigated at Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (INCT) since eighties. Different polymeric membranes were tested with radioactive solutions in long time operations. Such membrane processes as ultrafiltration, 'seeded' ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis were studied in a laboratory scale and in pilot plant experiments. The experiments show the advantage of membrane methods over some other processes used for radioactive wastes treatment. The RO method is being implemented at Institute of Atomic Energy in Swierk (Warsaw), where liquid radioactive wastes from all of Poland are collected and processed. Another method for liquid radioactive wastes treatment employing hydrophobic polymer membrane was developed at INCT. The process called membrane distillation was investigated for some years and the pilot plant for the processing 50 dm 3 /h of radioactive effluents was constructed. The pilot plant experiments show membrane distillation allows complete purification of liquid radioactive waste in one stage and does not need additional processes to ensure sufficient purity of water discharged to the environment. Comparison between two processes: membrane distillation and reverse osmosis showed that in some cases MD could be more beneficial. (author)

  14. Systematic analysis method for radioactive wastes generated from nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameo, Yutaka; Ishimori, Ken-ichiro; Haraga, Tomoko; Shimada, Asako; Katayama, Atsushi; Nakashima, Mikio; Takahashi, Kuniaki

    2011-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for the simple and rapid determination of radioactive nuclides, which are selected as important nuclides for the safety assessment of the disposal of wastes generated from research facilities. We advanced the development of a high-efficiency nondestructive measurement technique for γ-ray-emitting nuclides, simple and rapid methods for the pretreatment of hard-to-dissolve samples and subsequent radiochemical separation, and rapid determination methods for long-lived nuclides. In order to establish a system to analyze the important nuclides in various kinds of sample, actual radioactive wastes such as concentrated liquid waste, activated concrete, and metal pipes were analyzed by the present method. The results showed that the present method was well suited for a rapid and simple determination of low-level radioactive wastes generated from research facilities. (author)

  15. Method and apparatus for removing radioactive gases from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frumerman, R.; Brown, W.W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a method for removing radioactive gases from a nuclear reactor including the steps of draining coolant from a nuclear reactor to a level just below the coolant inlet and outlet nozzles to form a vapor space and then charging the space with an inert gas, circulating coolant through the reactor to assist the release of radioactive gases from the coolant into the vapor space, withdrawing the radioactive gases from the vapor space by a vacuum pump which then condenses and separates water from gases carried forward by the vacuum pump, discharging the water to a storage tank and supplying the separated gases to a gas compressor which pumps the gases to gas decay tanks. After the gases in the decay tanks lose their radioactive characteristics, the gases may be discharged to the atmosphere or returned to the reactor for further use

  16. Monte Carlo Library Least Square (MCLLS) Method for Multiple Radioactive Particle Tracking in BPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijian; Lee, Kyoung; Gardner, Robin

    2010-03-01

    In This work, a new method of radioactive particles tracking is proposed. An accurate Detector Response Functions (DRF's) was developed from MCNP5 to generate library for NaI detectors with a significant speed-up factor of 200. This just make possible for the idea of MCLLS method which is used for locating and tracking the radioactive particle in a modular Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) by searching minimum Chi-square values. The method was tested to work pretty good in our lab condition with a six 2" X 2" NaI detectors array only. This method was introduced in both forward and inverse ways. A single radioactive particle tracking system with three collimated 2" X 2" NaI detectors is used for benchmark purpose.

  17. Method for recycling radioactive noble gases for functional pulmonary imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forouzan-Rad, M.

    1976-05-01

    A theoretical treatment of the dynamic adsorption and desorption processes in the adsorption column is developed. The results of this analysis are compared with the space-time measurements of 133 Xe activity distribution in a charcoal column, when trace amounts of this gas in exponentially decreasing concentrations are fed into the column. Based on these investigations, a recycling apparatus is designed for use with xenon isotopes, especially 127 Xe, in studies of pulmonary function. The apparatus takes advantage of the high adsorbability of activated coconut charcoal for xenon a low temperature (-78 0 C) in order to trap the radioactive xenon gas that is exhaled during each ventilation-perfusion study. The trapped xenon is then recovered by passing low-pressure steam through the charcoal column. It is found that steam removes xenon from the surface of the charcoal more effectively than does heating and evacuation of the charcoal bed. As a result, an average xenon recovery of 96 percent has been achieved. Improved design parameters are discussed

  18. A destructive sample preparation method for radioactive waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olteanu, M.; Bucur, C.

    2015-01-01

    Acid digestion, using the microwave power, was applied for ''dissolution'' of different materials corresponding to the radioactive waste matrices resulted from a nuclear power plant operation, including exchange resin (cationic and mixed), concrete, paper, textile and activated charcoals. A small aliquot of solid sample (0.1-0.5g) was mixed with a known volume of digestion reagents (HNO3 67% - H2O2 30% or HNO3 67% - HCl 37%, with HF addition if the SiO2 was present in matrices) in a 100 ml PTFE vessel and it was mineralized using a Berghof digestion system, Speedwave 4. Starting from the manufacturer procedures, the technical parameters (temperature and mineralization time), the types and quantities of digestion reagents were optimized. After the mineralization process, the samples were transferred in centrifuge tubes, separated at 3500 rot/min and visually analysed. The obtained solutions were clear, without suspended or deposed materials and separated phases, ready for future separation processes of the ''difficult to measure'' radioisotopes. (authors)

  19. Layered packaging: A synergistic method of transporting radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmann, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    The DOE certification for a transportation cask used to ship radioactive Krypton 85 from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was allowed to expire in 1987. The Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) was charged by DOE with modifying this cask to meet all current NRC requirements and preparing an updated Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, which would be submitted by DOE to the NRC for certification. However, an urgent need arose for ORNL to receive Krypton 85 which was in storage at the ICPP, which would not allow time to obtain certification of the modified shipping cask. WINCO elected to use a layered shipping configuration in which the gaseous Krypton 85 was placed in the uncertified, modified shipping cask to make use of its shielding and thermal insulation properties. This cask was then inserted into the Model No. 6400 (Super Tiger) packaging using a specially constructed plywood box and polyurethane foam dunnage. Structural evaluations were completed to assure the Super Tiger would provide the necessary impact, puncture, and thermal protection during maximum credible accidents. Analyses were also completed to determine the uncertified Krypton shipping cask would provide the necessary containment and shielding for up to 3.7 E+14 Bq of Krypton 85 when packaged inside the Super Tiger. The resulting reports, based upon this layered packaging concept, were adequate to first obtain DOE certification for several restricted shipments of Krypton 85 and then NRC certification for unrestricted shipments

  20. Method for recycling radioactive noble gases for functional pulmonary imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forouzan-Rad, M.

    1976-05-01

    A theoretical treatment of the dynamic adsorption and desorption processes in the adsorption column is developed. The results of this analysis are compared with the space-time measurements of /sup 133/Xe activity distribution in a charcoal column, when trace amounts of this gas in exponentially decreasing concentrations are fed into the column. Based on these investigations, a recycling apparatus is designed for use with xenon isotopes, especially /sup 127/Xe, in studies of pulmonary function. The apparatus takes advantage of the high adsorbability of activated coconut charcoal for xenon a low temperature (-78/sup 0/C) in order to trap the radioactive xenon gas that is exhaled during each ventilation-perfusion study. The trapped xenon is then recovered by passing low-pressure steam through the charcoal column. It is found that steam removes xenon from the surface of the charcoal more effectively than does heating and evacuation of the charcoal bed. As a result, an average xenon recovery of 96 percent has been achieved. Improved design parameters are discussed. (auth)

  1. Buffer lining manufacturing method for radioactive waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Susumu; Sugino, Hiroyuki

    1998-01-01

    A recessed portion is formed on an upper surface of a filler layer made of a buffer powder filled into a container main body, the upper portion of the vessel main body is closed by a shrinkable liquid tight film. It is placed in a pressurizing container and pressed to mold a buffer lining base material integrated with the vessel main body. A flat upper surface and a containing space are formed by shaving to form a buffer lining. A disposing vessel containing radioactive wastes is inserted into the containing space, and the containing space is closed by a buffer block. The upper surface is sealed by a lid. With such a constitution, since a buffer lining integrated with the vessel main body can be formed easily inside the vessel main body, the disposing vessel can be contained in the containing vessel in a state surrounded by the buffer easily and stably without laying or piling over a large quantity of buffer blocks. (T.M.)

  2. Multilayer bimetallic media as protection method of radioactive radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borts, B.V.; Tkachenko, V.I.; Tkachenko, I.V.

    2010-01-01

    Multilayer bimetallic media as means of protection of the earth's space vehicle from radioactive space radiation is described in the proposed paper. Evaluation of radiation losses of electron energy in inhomogeneous media is carried out; these media may be formed by layers of materials with different dielectric constants or they may be simulated by dielectric permittivity varying in space by harmonic law. It is shown that in such media the radiation losses of electron are proportional to the square of parameter of inhomogeneity, that is the losses are low. In the case when in periodic laminar medium with sharp boundaries the conditions of parametric union of self-waves of medium are satisfied, the losses of electron are proportional to the inhomogeneity parameter to first power and are comparable with losses that are caused by elementary events of scattering. The mean length of radiation losses of electron with energy 2(6) MeV in multilayer bimetallic medium tungsten-aluminum with period L ∼ 0,3 ·10 -6 cm is comparable with mean path of electron in such medium. The characteristic angles of radiation have the discrete character and are directed from 0 to 180 degree C. The power of losses increases with the radiation angle increase and is maximal for characteristic angles approaching 90 degree C.

  3. Experimental methods for studying the diffusion of radioactive gases in solids. VII. Sorption method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekman, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    The details of the use of a sorption method in the study of the diffusion of gasses and vapors labeled with radioactive tracers in solids have been considered. Three variants of diffusion systems, which permit the determination of the diffusion coefficient and the solubility constant of gases both from the increase in the amount of diffusate in the sample and from the decrease in its amount in the reservoir, have been tested. Different ways of conducting the experiment have been discussed. A universal method for taking into account the processes of the absorption and scattering of radiation in the material of the sample has been proposed. The experimental results were treated with the aid of a specially developed program package, which is realized on computers of the BESM-6 type. Various mathematical models of the diffusion of gases in solids have been analyzed. Solutions of the diffusion equations under the boundary conditions of the sorption method for the cases of diffusion with trapping, dissociative diffusion, and diffusion in a plate containing spherical inclusions have been obtained. The method has been tested in the example case of the diffusion of a radiative inert gas, viz., radon-22, in low-density polyethylene

  4. Gamma-ray spectrometry method used for radioactive waste drums characterization for final disposal at National Repository for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste--Baita, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, L; Tugulan, L C; Dragolici, F; Alexandru, C

    2014-05-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Department from IFIN-HH, Bucharest, performs the conditioning of the institutional radioactive waste in concrete matrix, in 200 l drums with concrete shield, for final disposal at DNDR - Baita, Bihor county, in an old exhausted uranium mine. This paper presents a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the characterization of the radioactive waste drums' radionuclides content, for final disposal. In order to study the accuracy of the method, a similar concrete matrix with Portland cement in a 200 l drum was used. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  5. A Mild Method for Regioselective Labeling of Aromatics with Radioactive Iodine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, Mads Holger; Nissen, Felix; Pedersen, Palle Jacob

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to label ortho‐, meta‐, and para‐trimethylsilyl‐substituted aryl substituents with radioactive iodide is described. The method takes advantage of the ipso‐directing and activating properties of trimethylsilyl substituents on the arenes. The method was demonstrated on a griseoful...

  6. Adaptation of the TCLP and SW-846 methods to radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griest, W.H.; Schenley, R.L.; Caton, J.E.; Wolfe, P.F.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications of conventional sample preparation and analytical methods are necessary to provide radiation protection and to meet sensitivity requirements for regulated constituents when working with radioactive samples. Adaptations of regulatory methods for determining ''total'' Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) volatile and semivolatile organics and pesticides, and for conducting aqueous leaching are presented

  7. Method of cement-solidification of radioactive liquid wastes containing surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Yusa, H

    1979-04-10

    Purpose: To provide the subject method comprising the steps of adjusting the concentration of the surfactant to a value less than the predetermined value even when the concentration of the surfactant is high, and rendering the uniaxial compression strength of the cement-solidification body into more than the defined fabrication reference value. Method: To radioactive liquid wastes there are applied means for boiling and heating liquid wastes by addition of sulfuric acid, means for cracking surfactants by the addition of oxidants and means for precipitating and arresting surfactants. After suppressing the hindrance of the cement hydration reaction by surfactants, the radioactive liquid wastes are cement-solidified. (Nakamura, S.).

  8. Method and apparatus for the treatment of radioactive or toxic waste waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstaetter, K; Glock, J; Jakusch, H

    1976-05-26

    A method is described which proposes to store radioactive or toxic waste water in a binder, e.g. bitumen, for disposal. First of all, the liquid contained in the waste water is evaporated so that the radioactive or toxic part remains in solid form. This solid, whose specific gravity must be higher than that of the binder, is put on the surface of the binder, e.g. bitumen. Due to gravity it is embedded by sedimentation and completely covered by the binder. An apparatus with two variants to carry out the process is described, with particular emphasis on the advantages as compared to conventional methods.

  9. Method for the simultaneous recovery of radionuclides from liquid radioactive wastes using a solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskiy, Valeriy Nicholiavich; Smirnov, Igor V.; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to solvents, and methods, for selectively extracting and recovering radionuclides, especially cesium and strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive wastes. More specifically, the invention relates to extracting agent solvent compositions comprising complex organoboron compounds, substituted polyethylene glycols, and neutral organophosphorus compounds in a diluent. The preferred solvent comprises a chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, diphenyl-dibutylmethylenecarbamoylphosphine oxide, PEG-400, and a diluent of phenylpolyfluoroalkyl sulfone. The invention also provides a method of using the invention extracting agents to recover cesium, strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive waste.

  10. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M., E-mail: fernandopeleias@gmail.com, E-mail: czeituni@ipen.br, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br; and others

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is a term used generically to represent a group of more than 100 illnesses, including malignant tumors from different locations. According to World Health Organization (WHO), is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounted for 7.6 million deaths. Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type in the world, representing about 10% of all cases of cancer and its treatment may be by surgery, radiotherapy or even vigilant observation. A method of radiotherapy which has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness is brachytherapy, where radioactive seeds are placed inside or next to the area requiring treatment, which reduces the probability of unnecessary damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Currently, the radioactive isotope Iodine-125, adsorbed on silver substrate, is one of the most used in prostate brachytherapy. The present study compares several deposition methods of radioactive Iodine on silver substrate, in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers of the institute. Therefore, Iodine-131 was used for testing (same chemical behavior of Iodine -125). Three methods were selected: method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 65.16% ; method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by David Kubiatowicz -HCl) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80% . Based on the results, the second method is the suggested one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. (author)

  11. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a term used generically to represent a group of more than 100 illnesses, including malignant tumors from different locations. According to World Health Organization (WHO), is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounted for 7.6 million deaths. Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type in the world, representing about 10% of all cases of cancer and its treatment may be by surgery, radiotherapy or even vigilant observation. A method of radiotherapy which has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness is brachytherapy, where radioactive seeds are placed inside or next to the area requiring treatment, which reduces the probability of unnecessary damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Currently, the radioactive isotope Iodine-125, adsorbed on silver substrate, is one of the most used in prostate brachytherapy. The present study compares several deposition methods of radioactive Iodine on silver substrate, in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers of the institute. Therefore, Iodine-131 was used for testing (same chemical behavior of Iodine -125). Three methods were selected: method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 65.16% ; method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by David Kubiatowicz -HCl) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80% . Based on the results, the second method is the suggested one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. (author)

  12. Radioactivity metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, J.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the radioactivity metrology are reviewed. Radioactivity primary references; absolute methods of radioactivity measurements used in the Laboratoire de Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants; relative measurement methods; traceability through international comparisons and interlaboratory tests; production and distribution of secondary standards [fr

  13. A high-performance liquid chromatography method for the serotonin release assay is equivalent to the radioactive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sono-Koree, N K; Crist, R A; Frank, E L; Rodgers, G M; Smock, K J

    2016-02-01

    The serotonin release assay (SRA) is considered the gold standard laboratory test for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). The historic SRA method uses platelets loaded with radiolabeled serotonin to evaluate platelet activation by HIT immune complexes. However, a nonradioactive method is desirable. We report the performance characteristics of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) SRA method. We validated the performance characteristics of an HPLC-SRA method, including correlation with a reference laboratory using the radioactive method. Serotonin released from reagent platelets was quantified by HPLC using fluorescent detection. Results were expressed as % release and classified as positive, negative, or indeterminate based on previously published cutoffs. Serum samples from 250 subjects with suspected HIT were tested in the HPLC-SRA and with the radioactive method. Concordant classifications were observed in 230 samples (92%). Sera from 41 healthy individuals tested negative. Between-run imprecision studies showed standard deviation of performance characteristics, equivalent to the historic radioactive method, but avoids the complexities of working with radioactivity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Processing methods for operation test data of radioactive aerosols monitor based on accumulation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Cuiming; Xi Pingping; Ma Yinghao; Tan Linglong; Shen Fu

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a radioactive aerosol continuous monitor based on accumulation sampling and measuring and three methods for processing the operation data. The monitoring results are processed by the 3 methods which are applied both under the conditions of natural background and at workplaces of a nuclear facility. How the monitoring results are assessed and how to calculate the detection limit when using the 3 different methods are explained. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 methods are discussed. (authors)

  15. Method and apparatus for disposing a radioactive waste container to submarine bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Kiyoshi; Yoshida, Shoichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To completely eliminate a danger occurred by the rolling of a hull in the ocean in a method and apparatus for disposing radioactive waste container to submarine bottom by independently handling the radioactive waste containers when loading the container in a compartment carried on a barge and sinking the containers together with the compartment to the submarine bottom at its disposing time. Method: Radioactive waste containers are carried into a compartment loaded on a barge floating completely, and the barge is then applied with external force thereto by a ship or the like and sailed to the marine disposal area. Then, water is filled in the ballast tank of the barge to submerge the barge, the compartment is floated and separated from the containers, and water is charged into the compartment to sink the compartment. (Aizawa, K.)

  16. Radioactivity evaluation method for pre-packed concrete packages of low-level dry active wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Toshiaki; Funahashi, Tetsuo; Watabe, Kiyomi; Ozawa, Yukitoshi; Kashiwagi, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    Low-level dry active wastes of nuclear power plants are grouted with cement mortal in a container and planned to disposed into the shallow land disposal site. The characteristics of radionuclides contained in dry active wastes are same as homogeneous solidified wastes. In the previous report, we reported the applicability of the radioactivity evaluation methods established for homogeneous solidified wastes to pre-packed concrete packages. This report outlines the developed radioactivity evaluation methods for pre-packed concrete packages based upon recent data. Since the characteristics of dry active wastes depend upon the plant system in which dry active wastes originate and the types of contamination, sampling of wastes and activity measurement were executed to derive scaling factors. The radioactivity measurement methods were also verified. The applicability of non-destructive methods to measure radioactivity concentration of pre-packed concrete packages was examined by computer simulation. It is concluded that those methods are accurate enough to measure actual waste packages. (author)

  17. Digital processing method for monitoring the radioactivity of stack releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vialettes, H.; Leblanc, P.; Perotin, J.P.; Lazou, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The digital processing method proposed is adapted for data supplied by a fixed-filter detector normally used for analogue processing (integrator system). On the basis of the raw data (pulses) from the detector, the technique makes it possible to determine the rate of activity released whereas analogue processing gives only the released activity. Furthermore, the method can be used to develop alarm systems on the basis of a possible exposure rate at the point of fall-out, and by including in the program a coefficient which allows for atmospheric diffusion conditions at any given time one can improve the accuracy of the results. In order to test the digital processing method and demonstrate its advantages over analogue processing, various atmospheric contamination situations were simulated in a glove-box and analysed simultaneously, using both systems, from the pulses transmitted by the same sampling and fixed-filter detection unit. The experimental results confirm the advantages foreseen in the theoretical research. (author)

  18. Method for assay of radioactivity in waste soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramlitt, E.T.; Willhoite, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    Contaminated soil is a result of many nuclear operations. During facility decommissioning or site cleanup, it may be packaged for disposal. The waste soil must be assayed for contaminants to follow transport regulations and waste handling facility requirements. Methods used for assay include the following: (1) sampling the ground before excavation and assuming ground data apply to soil when packaged; (2) analyzing samples taken from the soil added to a package; (3) counting radiation at the exterior of the package; and (4) measuring neutron absorption by packaged waste soil. The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) worked with Eberline Instruments Corporation (EIC) to develop an automated assay method for the waste stream in a plutonium-contaminated soil cleanup at Johnston Atoll in the North Pacific Ocean. The perfected method uses a personal computer, an electronic weighing scale, and a programmable radiation counter. Computer programs get weight and radiation counts at frequent intervals as packages fill, calculate activity in the waste, and produce reports. The automated assay method is an efficient one-person routine that steadfastly collects data and produces a comprehensive record on packaged waste

  19. Research and development of radioactive waste treatment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Nang

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) uses the reactor for research, training, isotope production and activation analyses. NRI generates about 150 m 3 of liquid and 5 m 3 of solid wastes every year. The researched methods applied to treatment of radwastes are coagulation-precipitation and two steps ion-exchange for liquid waste and compaction for solid waste are described. (author)

  20. Processing method of radiation concrete waste and manufacturing method for radioactive waste solidifying filling mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukekiyo, Mitsuaki; Okamoto, Masamichi

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive concrete wastes are crushed and pulverized. Fine solid granular materials caused by the pulverization are classified and the grain size is controlled so that the maximum grain size is 2.5mm, with the grains having a grain size of up to 0.15mm being up to 30% by weight to form fine aggregates. Separated and recovered fine concrete powders are classified and the size of the powder is controlled within a range of from 3,000 to 15,000cm 2 /g which is smaller than cement particles to form fine powders having a stable quality suitable as a mixing agent. The fine aggregates and the mixing agent are mixed to form a filling mortar (filler) for solidifying radioactive wastes. The filling mortar is filled together with other radioactive wastes in a drum to form a waste body in a drum. With such a constitution, crushed radioactive concrete wastes can be reutilized completely. (I.N.)

  1. Method for purification of environmental objects, contaminated with radioactive substancesas a result of natural disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammadov, Kh.; Shiraliyeva, Kh.; Mirzayev, N.; Garibov, R.; Allahverdiyev, G.; Aliyeva, U.; Farajova, A.

    2017-01-01

    , centrifugation and evaporation/ and vegetation /firing, treatment with nitric acid and distilled water/ taken from all regions of the republic were carried out. Mineral compositions have been studied by X-ray fluorescence, γ, α, β spectroscopy, electron microscopy and chemical methods. Four times washing /stirring and extraction/ by distilled water were used to clean the soil samples. It is possible to re-wash the soil for achieve complete cleaning of deeply contaminated soils. Methods sedimentation, centrifugation, mass spectroscopy and adsorption on activated carbon or on organic porous adsorbents /copolymers of maleic anhydride with styrene hardened by polyethylene polyamines/ were used for purification (separation of heavy elements, radioactive isotopes) of water samples and water extracts of soil.

  2. Method and device for marine disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the subject method and device wherein a unit thrown away can body formed by firmly tying a several drum vessels is thrown away in seawater thereby carrying out a throw-away operation rapidly, safely and highly efficiently. Method: In the hatch is stacked in multistage a unit throw-away can body formed by firmly tying four drums. A self-travelling suspended bedplate with a thrown away rail device runs on rails, and is fixed to a necessary position. An accomodation and throwing away operation control chamber applied with radiation protection is attached to this self-travelling suspended bedplate to perform surveillance of the interior of the chamber, and accommodation and throwing away operation is carried out by a picture image sent from a television camera and safe and accurate operations. (Nakamura, S.)

  3. Investigation of the radioactivity of rocks by the photographic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, J H.J.; Bremner, J W

    1948-06-05

    The method employed is to place an Ilford Nuclear Research plate at a distance of about 0.1 mm from a flat surface of the specimen cut with a diamond saw, and expose it for one to three weeks, depending or the probable activity of the specimen. In more recent experiments the plate has been placed in contact with the cut surface, as this makes easier the identification of ..cap alpha..-rays tracks, which all originate from one nucleus. Theoretically, from the frequencies of two-, three-, four-, and five-ray stars, it should be possible to estimate the separate amounts of uranium and thorium present. Enough data have not yet been obtained to determine whether this method will prove possible. The results of some experiments are reviewed briefly.

  4. Decontamination methods of the vegetables contaminated with radioactive materials from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kunihide; Shiba, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Among agricultural products, vegetables contaminated with radioactive materials were examined to find a practical decontamination method. For spinach, washing by running water or hot water, and by ultrasonic or shower washing were tested. Furthermore, chemical method using detergent acid, alkaline salt was examined. High removal efficiency was obtained for iodine 131 using sodium hydrosulfate. For visual observation, IP imaging and scanning electromagnetic method were used to find spots and plane contamination. (S. Ohno)

  5. Applications of radioactive methods in cement concrete testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinakaran, M.; Vijayaraghavan, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Basic principles regarding the neutron moderation technique and the successful application of this technique for determining the moisture and cement content in hardened concrete are briefly discussed. Since fast neutrons are converted into slow thermal neutrons by elastic scattering in the presence of hydrogen nuclei, it is possible to determine the moisture content in hardened cement concrete using precalibrated relationships. Also since most of the hydrogenous matter in concrete pertains to non-fixed water and hydrated cement compounds, an analysis of slow neutron counts on a sample at different non-fixed moisture contents make the estimation of cement content possible using the mathematical relationship between cement content, degree of hydration and the equivalent moisture content. The method developed is quick, non-destructive, and repeatable at the same time giving better accuracy when compared to conventional chemical methods. Use was also made of gamma ray transmission method for determining the differential density at various depths in a cement concrete pavement making use of cores cut from the pavement. Further, development proposed for determination of density at different depths of pavement in situ is also discussed. (auth.)

  6. alpha-particle radioactivity from LR 115 by two methods of analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Azkour, K; Adloff, J C; Pape, A

    1999-01-01

    LR115 track detectors were exposed to samples of Moroccan phosphate and phosphogypsum to measure their alpha-particle radioactivity. Then two formalisms were used for the dosimetry: simulation by a Monte Carlo method and determination of concentrations from a numerically integrated track registration equation. The results were compared with those deduced gamma-ray spectrometry.

  7. Method for the determination of clay and mica concentrations in subsurface sandstone formations through radioactive logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for radioactivity well logging in a subsurface sandstone formation penetrated by a borehole. The invention relates particularly to clay and mica contents, which are determined from the natural gamma-ray activities. The natural sources of gamma radiation in the formation, are the trace elements thorium, uranium and potassium. (U.K.)

  8. Method for reduction in volume and encapsulation of water-containing weakly radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, D.W.; Miller, G.P.; Weech, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Solutions and slurries of waste material in water are dehydrated and enclosed in a polymerizate for final storage. The water is removed as an azeotropic mixture and the dehydrated waste residue is then enclosed in an organic polymerizate. The method and system disclosed in this patent claim are particularly suitable for safe removal of radioactive waste. (orig.) [de

  9. A simple and feasible method of effectiveness evaluation on radioactive decontamination action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lin; Geng Xiaobing; Sun Jian; Wang Jihong; Guo Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive decontamination is a vital task in nuclear emergency response. The assessment of decontamination effectiveness is of great importance to decision-making. An index system for effectiveness evaluation of radioactive decontamination action in nuclear emergency response is produced. A method of decontamination effectiveness evaluation based on analytic hierarchy process and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation is presented. Index weights are determined through analytic hierarchy process. And scores of objects in each hierarchy are judged by fuzzy comprehensive evaluation. Then comprehensive effectiveness of the top object can be obtained, which can offer a basis for decision-making of decontamination action. (authors)

  10. Radioactivity measurements of metallic 192Ir sources by calorimetric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genka, Tsuguo; Iwamoto, Seikichi; Takeuchi, Norio

    1992-01-01

    The necessity of establishing the traceability of dose measurement in brachytherapy 192 Ir sources is realized by physicians and researchers in the medical field. Standard sources of various shapes such as open-quotes hairpin,close quotes open-quotes single pin,close quotes open-quotes thin wire,close quotes and open-quotes seedclose quotes for calibrating ionization chambers in hospitals are being demanded. Nominal activities of not only these source products but also the standard sources have been so far specified by open-quotes apparentclose quotes values. Determination of open-quotes absoluteclose quotes activity by an established means such as 4pi-beta-gamma coincidence counting is not practical because quantitative dissolution of metallic iridium is very difficult. We tried to determine the open-quotes absoluteclose quotes activity by a calorimetric method in a fully nondestructive way

  11. Membrane methods for separation of radioactive noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekman, I.N.; Bozhenko, E.I.; Ievlev, A.L.; Kazankin, Yu.N.; Nikonov, V.N.; Teplyakov, V.V.; Shvyryaev, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Using the different ial permeability method at different temperatures (20-120 deg C) transport characteristics of inert gases, N 2 , O 2 , CH 4 , CQ 2 and H 2 as the main components of waste gases in homogeneous films of arylate-siloxane block-copolymer (silar) of different composition, as well as of its components - polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyarylate, have been measured. Dependences of diffusion and permeability coefficients on inert gas atom dimensions, and solubility coefficient - on strength constant of the Lennard-Jones potential, are analyzed. It is shown that selectivity of silar gas permbility is determined by the properties of siloxane component, and the values of permeability coefficients decrease with the increase of polyarylate block part due to dominating decrease in diffusion coefficients as compared with solubility coefficients

  12. Absorbing method of iodine in radioactive gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutome, Yutaka; Mifuji, Hiroshi; Ito, Sakae.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain an iodine adsorbing efficiency at a high level by keeping the adsorbing atmosphere to more than a predetermined temperature to thereby suppress the degradation and the activity reduction in zeolite. Method: Adsorption and desorption-regeneration of gaseous wastes are performed in parallel by heating gaseous wastes in a heater and switchingly supplying the same to adsorption columns by way of valve operation. Processed gases are cooled in a cooler and desorbed gases are supplied to an after-treatment device to eliminate or recover iodine 131. In the adsorption column, iodine in gaseous wastes is adsorbed to remove by using zeolite, wherein the adsorbing atmosphere is kept at a temperature higher than 40 0 C. This can prevent the formation of an aqueous HNO 3 solution from NO 2 and H 2 O contained in the gaseous wastes and prevent the degradation of the zeolite adsorption layer. (Kawakami, Y.)

  13. Use of economics methods in the field of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepine, Jacques.

    1981-01-01

    The broad principles of the discounted cash flow system which consists in introducing the time factor into the economic calculations are presented. The discounted cash flow (DCF) rate of return corresponds to the global balance between the offer of and demand for capital or between savings and investments. Examples of applications are given: DCF average cost of the nuclear kWh, the cubic metre of stored waste and the cubic metre saved by a reduction on volume. Optimisation is considered: that is to say the total DCF cost minimum of the processing, transport and storage of waste line. The method is limited by other criteria: safety, protection against radiations, political aspects. Nevertheless, it is useful to know their economic impact to avoid reaching prohibitive costs and to ensure that the decisions to come are consistent with those taken in the past [fr

  14. Melting-decontamination method for radioactive contaminated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Miura, Noboru; Iba, Hajime.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate uranium components remaining in metals even after the uranium-contaminated metals are melted. Method: Metal wastes contaminated with actinide element or its compound as nuclear fuel substance are melted in a crucible. Molten metals are fallen through a filter disposed at the bottom of the crucible into another receiving crucible. Uranium compounds are still left in the molten metal fallen in the receiving crucible. The residual uranium compounds are concentrated by utilizing the principle of the zone-refining process. That is, a displaceable local-heating heater is disposed to the receiving crucible, by which metals once solidified in the receiving crucible is again heated locally to transfer from solid to molten phase in a quasi-equibilized manner. In this way, by eliminating the end of the metal rod at which the uranium is segregated, the contaminating coefficient can be improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  15. A flowrate measurement method by counting of radioactive particles suspended in a liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, G.

    1983-04-01

    By external counting of fine #betta# emitting radioactive particles suspended in a liquid, the flowrate in a system of pipes can be measured. The study comprises three phases: 1. - The hydraulic validity of the method is demonstrated in laminar as well as in turbulent flow under certain conditions of particles size and density and of liquid viscosity. 2. - Radioactive labelling of microspheres of serumalbumin or ion exchange resins with indium 113m delivered by a generator Tin 113 → Indium 113m. 3. - Counting with a scintillation detector: a method of threshold overstepping is experimented with a mechanical or electronic simulator; the statistical study of particle superposition under the detector enables a correction for the resulting counting losses to be proposed. The method provides absolute measurements, but is particularly suitable to measure relative flowrates in a hydraulic network. It can be continuous and does not perturb the flow and the network. The accuracy of the method is analysed in details [fr

  16. Memory Effects Study of Measuring Radioactive Xenon Isotopes With β-γ Coincidence Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Wang Jun; Li Qi; Zhao Yungang; Fan Yuanqing; Zhang Xinjun

    2010-01-01

    The β-γ coincidence technique is a kind of the key important method to detect radioactive xenon isotopes for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). This paper describes noble gases memory effects of β-γ coincidence detector. Xenon memory effects were measured and its influence on detector's minimum detectable activity (MDA) was evaluated. The methods of reducing xenon memory effects were studied. In conclusion, aluminium coated plastic scintillator and YAP scintillator can remarkably decrease xenon memory effects. (authors)

  17. Cementation of the solid radioactive waste with polymer-cement solutions using the method of impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunova, O.

    2015-01-01

    Cementation of solid radioactive waste (SRW), i.e. inclusion of solid radioactive waste into cement matrix without cavities - is one of the main technological processes used for conditioning low and intermediate level radioactive waste. At FSUE 'Radon' the industrialized method of impregnation has been developed and since 2003 has been using for cementation of solid radioactive waste. The technology is that the polymer-cement solution, having high penetrating properties, is supplied under pressure through a tube to the bottom of the container in which solid radioactive waste has preliminarily been placed. The polymer-cement solution is evenly moving upwards through the channels between the particles of solid radioactive waste, fills the voids in the bulk volume of the waste and hardens, forming a cement compound, the amount of which is equal to the original volume. The aim of the investigation was a selection of a cement solution suitable for SRW impregnation (including fine particles) without solution depletion and bottom layers stuffing. It has been chosen a polymer: PHMG (polyhexamethylene-guanidine), which is a stabilizing and water-retaining component of the cement solution. The experiments confirm that the polymer increases the permeability of the cement solution by a 2-2.5 factor, the viscosity by a 1.2 factor, the stability of the consistency by a 1.5-1.7 factor, and extends the operating range of the W/C ratio to 0.5-1.1. So it is possible to penetrate a volume of SRW bigger by a 1.5-2.0 factor. It has been proved, that PHMG polymer increases strength and frost-resistance of the final compounds by a 1.8-2.7 factor, and contributes to fast strength development at the beginning of hardening and it decreases Cs-137 leashing rate by a 1.5-2 factor

  18. Devoluming method and device for radioactive metal wastes containing zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Masahiko; Wada, Ryutaro.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of sealing radioactive metal wastes in a capsule and compressing the capsule for devoluming treatment. The method comprises a step of carrying radioactive metal wastes into a sealed chamber having a capacity somewhat greater than that of the capsule, a deaerating step of sucking the air in the sealed chamber to attain a substantially vacuum state, a compression-devoluming step of compression-devoluming the capsule by reducing the volume of the sealed chamber and a transporting step of transporting the devolumed capsule from the sealed chamber. The sealed chamber to which the capsule incorporated with radioactive metal wastes containing a zirconium alloy is carried is then deaerated into a substantially vacuum state. Even if ignitable powdery dusts are generated from the radioactive metal wastes crushed by compression-devoluming of the capsule in the succeeding compression-devoluming step, since the air necessary for ignition is not present, ignition of the powdery dusts is prevented. Alternatively, since the inside of the sealed chamber is filled with an inert gas, ignition of the powdery dusts can effectively be prevented. (N.H.)

  19. Radioactive decontamination methods and their effectiveness as a function of terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T; Kellner, C R; Oswald, K M [California Univ., Mercury, NV (USA). Lawrence Radiation Lab.

    1978-08-01

    A large area of rugged terrain on the Nevada Test Site was contaminated following a spill of radioactively contaminated drilling mud. The contamination was shown to consist of /sup 103/Ru and /sup 106/(Ru-Rh) with total estimated activity at release time of 38 and 6 Ci, respectively. Several decontamination methods were used and their effectiveness assessed by determining the fraction of radioactivity remaining (FR) following each. In flat areas, the front end loader was by far the most efficient method, removing large quantities of dirt in relatively short periods of time. FRs of 10-/sup 22/ were achieved. In canyon areas, flushing with water was most effective on rocky surfaces with FRs of 10/sup -3/, while shoveling and bagging in evaporated mud collection ponds worked well and resulted in FRs of 10/sup -2/. The FR in rocky cracks was about 10/sup -1/ following flushing with water. In Locations where radioactive mud/water had not penetrated the ground surface to more than 1-2in., such as fine grain, flat compact dirt, vacuuming was very effective achieving FRs of 10/sup -3/. However, unless the contaminated area was very small (e.g. dropping from front end loading operations), vacuuming was too slow to be of practical value. Under the supervision of experienced radiation monitors, the radioactive mud spill area was safely cleaned up using, for the most part, standard earth moving equipment and personnel untrained in decontamination procedures.

  20. Radioactive decontamination methods and their effectiveness as a function of terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.; Kellner, C.R.; Oswald, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    A large area of rugged terrain on the Nevada Test Site was contaminated following a spill of radioactively contaminated drilling mud. The contamination was shown to consist of 103 Ru and 106 [Ru-Rh] with total estimated activity at release time of 38 and 6 Ci, respectively. Several decontamination methods were used and their effectiveness assessed by determining the fraction of radioactivity remaining (FR) following each. In flat areas, the front end loader was by far the most efficient method, removing large quantities of dirt in relatively short periods of time. FRs of 10- 22 were achieved. In canyon areas, flushing with water was most effective on rocky surfaces with FRs of 10 -3 , while shoveling and bagging in evaporated mud collection ponds worked well and resulted in FRs of 10 -2 . The FR in rocky cracks was about 10 -1 following flushing with water. In Locations where radioactive mud/water had not penetrated the ground surface to more than 1-2in., such as fine grain, flat compact dirt, vacuuming was very effective achieving FRs of 10 -3 . However, unless the contaminated area was very small (e.g. dropping from front end loading operations), vacuuming was too slow to be of practical value. Under the supervision of experienced radiation monitors, the radioactive mud spill area was safely cleaned up using, for the most part, standard earth moving equipment and personnel untrained in decontamination procedures. (author)

  1. The method of radioactive tracer for measuring the amount of inorganic nanoparticles in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzulukov, Yu; Antsiferova, A.; Demin, V. A.; Demin, V. F.; Kashkarov, P.

    2015-11-01

    The method to measure the mass of inorganic nanoparticles in biological (or any other samples) using nanoparticles labeled with radioactive tracers is developed and applied to practice. The tracers are produced in original nanoparticles by radioactive activation of some of their atomic nuclei. The method of radioactive tracers demonstrates a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy equal or better than popular methods of optical and mass spectrometry, or electron microscopy and has some specific advantages. The method can be used for study of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in living organism, as well as in ecological and fundamental research. It was used in practice to study absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Se, ZnO, TiO2 as well as to study transportation of silver nanoparticles through the barriers of blood-brain, placenta and milk gland of rats. Brief descriptions of data obtained in experiments with application of this method included in the article. The method was certified in Russian Federation standard system GOST-R and recommended by the Russian Federation regulation authority ROSPOTREBNADZOR for measuring of toxicokinetic and organotropy parameters of nanoparticles.

  2. Novel methods for estimating 3D distributions of radioactive isotopes in materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Y., E-mail: y.iwamoto0805@ruri.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Taya, T.; Okochi, H.; Ogata, H. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yamamoto, S. [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan)

    2016-09-21

    In recent years, various gamma-ray visualization techniques, or gamma cameras, have been proposed. These techniques are extremely effective for identifying “hot spots” or regions where radioactive isotopes are accumulated. Examples of such would be nuclear-disaster-affected areas such as Fukushima or the vicinity of nuclear reactors. However, the images acquired with a gamma camera do not include distance information between radioactive isotopes and the camera, and hence are “degenerated” in the direction of the isotopes. Moreover, depth information in the images is lost when the isotopes are embedded in materials, such as water, sand, and concrete. Here, we propose two methods of obtaining depth information of radioactive isotopes embedded in materials by comparing (1) their spectra and (2) images of incident gamma rays scattered by the materials and direct gamma rays. In the first method, the spectra of radioactive isotopes and the ratios of scattered to direct gamma rays are obtained. We verify experimentally that the ratio increases with increasing depth, as predicted by simulations. Although the method using energy spectra has been studied for a long time, an advantage of our method is the use of low-energy (50–150 keV) photons as scattered gamma rays. In the second method, the spatial extent of images obtained for direct and scattered gamma rays is compared. By performing detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4, we verify that the spatial extent of the position where gamma rays are scattered increases with increasing depth. To demonstrate this, we are developing various gamma cameras to compare low-energy (scattered) gamma-ray images with fully photo-absorbed gamma-ray images. We also demonstrate that the 3D reconstruction of isotopes/hotspots is possible with our proposed methods. These methods have potential applications in the medical fields, and in severe environments such as the nuclear-disaster-affected areas in Fukushima.

  3. Novel methods for estimating 3D distributions of radioactive isotopes in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Taya, T.; Okochi, H.; Ogata, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, various gamma-ray visualization techniques, or gamma cameras, have been proposed. These techniques are extremely effective for identifying "hot spots" or regions where radioactive isotopes are accumulated. Examples of such would be nuclear-disaster-affected areas such as Fukushima or the vicinity of nuclear reactors. However, the images acquired with a gamma camera do not include distance information between radioactive isotopes and the camera, and hence are "degenerated" in the direction of the isotopes. Moreover, depth information in the images is lost when the isotopes are embedded in materials, such as water, sand, and concrete. Here, we propose two methods of obtaining depth information of radioactive isotopes embedded in materials by comparing (1) their spectra and (2) images of incident gamma rays scattered by the materials and direct gamma rays. In the first method, the spectra of radioactive isotopes and the ratios of scattered to direct gamma rays are obtained. We verify experimentally that the ratio increases with increasing depth, as predicted by simulations. Although the method using energy spectra has been studied for a long time, an advantage of our method is the use of low-energy (50-150 keV) photons as scattered gamma rays. In the second method, the spatial extent of images obtained for direct and scattered gamma rays is compared. By performing detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4, we verify that the spatial extent of the position where gamma rays are scattered increases with increasing depth. To demonstrate this, we are developing various gamma cameras to compare low-energy (scattered) gamma-ray images with fully photo-absorbed gamma-ray images. We also demonstrate that the 3D reconstruction of isotopes/hotspots is possible with our proposed methods. These methods have potential applications in the medical fields, and in severe environments such as the nuclear-disaster-affected areas in Fukushima.

  4. Apparatus and method for depressurizing, degassing, and affording decay of the radioactivity of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.; Plotz, J.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an apparatus for depressurizing, degassing and affording decay of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants having a turbine and a main condenser turbine wherein exhaust steam of the turbine is condensed and forms a main condensate, and includes a collecting tank for the condensate situated below the condenser. A plurality of horizontal degassing channels, each having a lateral overflow, are disposed in the upper part of the condensate collecting tank and are filled with the main condensate up to the level of the overflow. At least one feedwater preheater which is heated by bleeder steam from the turbine provides a secondary condensate. Below the overflow height of the degassing channels extend horizontal feed pipes for the secondary condensate. The feed pipes are connected to the output of pressure relieving expanding devices and are provided on their underside with discharge openings for the bubbling of the secondary condensate into the main condensate to thereby degass the main condensate. The condensate collecting tank has mutually offset partitions therein providing an adequately long path for the decay of the main and secondary condensates. The condensate which is discharged from the condensate collecting tank is returned into the cycle as feedwater. Also disclosed is a method of operating the foregoing apparatus

  5. Extended methods using thick-targets for nuclear reaction data of radioactive isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebata, Shuichiro; Aikawa, Masayuki; Imai, Shotaro

    2017-09-01

    The nuclear transmutation is a technology to dispose of radioactive wastes. However, we do not have enough basic data for its developments, such as thick-target yields (TTY) and the interaction cross sections for radioactive material. We suggest two methods to estimate the TTY using inverse kinematics and to obtain the excitation function of the interaction cross sections which is named the thick-target transmission (T3) method. We deduce the energy-dependent conversion relation between the TTYs of the original system and its inverse kinematics, which can be replaced to a constant coefficient in the high energy region. Furthermore we show the usefulness of the T3 method to investigate the excitation function of the 12C + 27Al reaction in the simulation.

  6. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides information on the origin, characteristics and methods of processing of radioactive wastes, as well as the philosophy and practice of their storage and disposal. Chapters are devoted to the following topics: radioactive wastes, characteristics of radioactive wastes, processing liquid and solid radioactive wastes, processing wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, processing gaseous radioactive wastes, fixation of radioactive concentrates, solidification of high-level radioactive wastes, use of radioactive wastes as raw material, radioactive waste disposal, transport of radioactive wastes and economic problems of radioactive wastes disposal. (C.F.)

  7. Study of classification and disposed method for disused sealed radioactive source in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk Hoon; Kim, Ju Youl; Lee, Seung Hee [FNC Technology Co., Ltd.,Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In accordance with the classification system of radioactive waste in Korea, all the disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRSs) fall under the category of EW, VLLW or LILW, and should be managed in compliance with the restrictions for the disposal method. In this study, the management and disposal method are drawn in consideration of half-life of radionuclides contained in the source and A/D value (i.e. the activity A of the source dividing by the D value for the relevant radionuclide, which is used to provide an initial ranking of relative risk for sources) in addition to the domestic classification scheme and disposal method, based on the characteristic analysis and review results of the management practices in IAEA and foreign countries. For all the DSRSs that are being stored (as of March 2015) in the centralized temporary disposal facility for radioisotope wastes, applicability of the derivation result is confirmed through performing the characteristic analysis and case studies for assessing quantity and volume of DSRSs to be managed by each method. However, the methodology derived from this study is not applicable to the following sources; i) DSRSs without information on the radioactivity, ii) DSRSs that are not possible to calculate the specific activity and/or the source-specific A/D value. Accordingly, it is essential to identify the inherent characteristics for each of DSRSs prior to implementation of this management and disposal method.

  8. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Carla Daruich

    2012-01-01

    Among the different ways to treat prostate cancer, brachytherapy with iodine- 125 seeds is an option that provides good results and fewer side effects. In the present study several deposition methods of radioactive iodine in a silver substrate were compared in order to choose the most suitable alternative for the routine production to be implemented at IPEN's laboratory. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers present. Therefore, the 131 I was used for testing (same chemical behavior as 131 I). Four methods were selected: Method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method developed by D.Kubiatowicz) presented 65.16% efficiency; Method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by D. Kubiatowicz - HCl) with the result of 70.80% efficiency; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) with 55.80% efficiency; Method 4 (IQ-IPEN) resulted in 99% efficiency. Since this method has more radioactive material fixation (which represents virtually the entire cost of the seed), the final price is the cheapest. This method is the suggested one to be implemented in the IPEN's laboratory for brachytherapy sources production. Besides, the method is the fasted one. (author)

  9. Comparison between ex situ and in situ measurement methods for the assessment of radioactively contaminated land. Comparison between measurement methods for the characterisation of radioactively contaminated land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostron, Peter D.; Ramsey, Michael H.; Heathcote, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, it is estimated that there may be 20,000,000 cubic metres of contaminated land at Sellafield alone. Harwell and Dounreay are known to have significant amounts of radioactive or nonradioactive contaminated land (NDA, 2006). It is therefore important to devise optimal methods for the characterisation of areas of land for radionuclide content, in order to enable cost-effective decommissioning. With chemical contaminants, ex situ measurements are made on a larger volume of soil than are in situ measurements, such as PXRF. However, the opposite is often true for the characterisation of radioactive contamination, when this involves the detection of penetrating radiation from γ-emitting radionuclides. This means that when investigating for hotspots of radioactive contamination at or near the ground surface, better coverage can be obtained using in situ methods. This leads to the question, what is the optimal strategy (e.g. percentage coverage, counting time) for in situ characterisation of radioactively contaminated land' Surveys on light-moderate contaminated areas of ground were conducted at Dounreay in order to compare the relative effectiveness of in situ and ex situ methods, both for the detection of radioactive hotspots and also for estimating the average radionuclide content of an area of ground. These surveys suggest that continuous coverage by in situ devices is more effective at hotspot detection, with ex situ laboratory measurements being less effective, although in one case elevated activity below 10 cm depth that was identified by ex situ measurement was not located by in situ measurement. The surveys also highlighted that careful choice of an appropriate spatial model is critical to the estimation of activity concentrations over averaging areas. Whereas continuous coverage may be considered necessary for hotspot identification, in the particular case of the detection of hot particles (where the particle is very small compared to the sampling

  10. Method of storing radioactive rare gas. [gas occupies spaces in the zeolite crystal lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, H; Miharada, H; Takiguchi, Y; Kanazawa, T; Soya, M

    1975-05-15

    A method is provided to prevent dispersion of radioactive rare gas atoms by sealing them in a pressurised state within zeolite and thereby confining them in position within the zeolite crystal lattice. Radioactive rare gas is separated from exhaust gas and concentrated by using a low temperature adsorption means or liquefaction distillation means and necessary accessory means, and then it is temporarily stored in a gas holder. When a predetermined quantity of storage is reached, the gas is led to a sealing tank containing zeolite heated to 300 to 400/sup 0/C and held at 3,000 to 4,000 atmospheres, and under this condition radioactive rare gas is brought to occupy the spaces in the zeolite crystal lattice. After equilibrium pressure is reached by the pressure in the tank at that temperature, the gas is cooled in the pressurised state down to room temperature. Subsequently, the rare gas remaining in the tank and duct is recovered by a withdrawal pump into the gas holder. Thereafter, the zeolite with radioactive rare gas sealed in it is taken out from the tank and sealed within a long period storage container, which is then housed in a predetermined place for storage.

  11. A new method for measuring aerosol nebulizers output using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatnash, A.A.; Connolly, C.K.; Chandler, S.T.

    1998-01-01

    Reproducibility and comparability of bronchial challenge tests depends critically on accurate assessment of nebulizers output. Evaporation during nebulization means that simple weighing is inaccurate, overestimating the delivered dose of active ingredient. We wanted to quantify this effect in the context of intermittent nebulization, using a dosimeter as used in bronchial provocation tests. Output of three types of nebulizers, from the MEFAR dosimeter, was measured by radioactive tracer, using a standard solution of technetium-99m-pertechnetate (1.5 kBq x mL -1 ) in 4 mL of normal saline. The aerosol was impacted by suction onto a micro filter, and the radioactivity measured. Nebulizers were weighed before and after nebulization. Ratio of nebulized volume calculated from the radioactivity on the filter, to the total volume loss by weight, was expressed as nebulized ratio. The effect on output of two concentrations of methacholine, two tracers of different weights, and change in temperature, were assessed. Nebulized ratio varied between 44.1-71.6%. Results were more consistent within the same type of nebulizer than between different makes. Neither changes in molar concentration nor molecular weight affected nebulizer output or nebulized ratio. Mean nebulized ratio was 58.5%, showing that calibration by weighing, overestimates the delivered dose by a factor of approximately two. Measuring radioactivity eluted from a micro filter, onto which nebulized output had been impacted proved to be a satisfactory method of calibration. (au)

  12. Development and application of RP-HPLC methods for the analysis of transition metals and their radioactive isotops in radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seekamp, S.

    1999-07-01

    A major criterion in the final disposal of nuclear waste is to keep possible changes in the geosphere due to the introduction of radioactive waste as small as possible and to prevent any escape into the biosphere in the long term. The Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) has therefore established limit values for a number of nuclides. Verifying these limits has to date involved laborious wet chemical analysis. In order to accelerate quantification there is a need to develop rapid multielement methods. HPLC methods represent a starting point for this development. Chemical separation is necessary to quantify β-emitters via their radioactive radiation since they are characterized by a continuous energy spectrum. A method for quantifying transition metals and their radioactive isotopes from radioactive waste has been created by using a chelating agent to select the analytes and RP-HPLC to separate the complexes formed. In addition to separating the matrix, complexation on a precolumn has the advantage of enriching the analytes. The subject of this thesis is the development and application of the method including studies of the mobile and stationary phase, as well as the optimization of all parameters, such as pH value, sample volume etc., which influence separation, enrichment or detection. The method developed was successfully tested using cement samples. It was also used for investigations of ion exchange resins and for trace analysis in calcium fluoride. Furthermore, the transferability of the method to actinides was examined by using a different complexing agent. (orig.) [de

  13. A method for purifying air containing radioactive substances resulting from the disintegration of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, C.W.

    1974-01-01

    The invention relates to the extraction of radioactive isotopes from air. It refers to a method for withdrawing the radioactive substances resulting from the disintegration of radon from air, said method of the type comprising filtrating the air contaminated by the radon daughter products in a filter wetted with water in order to trap said substances in water. It is characterized in that it comprises the steps of causing the water contaminated by the radon daughter products to flow through a filtrating substance containing a non hydrosoluble granular substrate, the outer surface of which has been dried then wetted by a normally-liquid hydrocarbon, and of returning then wetted by a normally-liquid hydrocarbon, and of returning the thus filtrated water so that it wets again the air filter and entraps further radon daughter products. This can be applied to the purification of the air in uranium mines [fr

  14. Method of conversion of caustic liquid radioactive wastes containing sodium nitrates into solid insoluble products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Brownell, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    A proposal is made to convert caustic, liquid, radioactive wastes containing sodium nitrate into a solid product by reaction with powdered aluminium silicate at temperatures between 30 0 and 100 0 C, which is practically insoluble (10 -7 to 10 -10 g/cm 2 -day) and is thermally stable. A cancrinite is formed which binds the radioactive salts in the cage-like structure of its crystal lattice. The method is also suitable for liquid wastes from the Purex method as well as for wastes containing fission products of Cs 137 and Sr 90 in concentrations of 0.37 M to 0.01 M. Numerous detailed examples explain the invention. (UW/LH) [de

  15. On-line monitoring of water amount in fresh concrete by radioactive-wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemi, T.; Arai, M.; Enomoto, S.; Suzki, K.; Kumahara, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The committee on nondestructive inspection for steel reinforced concrete structures in the Federation of Construction Materials Industries, Japan has published a proposed standard for on-line monitoring of water amount in fresh concrete by the radioactive wave method. By applying a neutron technique, water amount in fresh concrete is estimated continuously from the energy consumption of neutron due to hydrogen. A standard is discussed along with results of verification tests. Thus, on-line monitoring for water amount is proposed

  16. Research on design method of main control room intake air radioactive monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lei; Sun Yu; Wang Jiaoya; Liu Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    According to the design of the main control room intake gamma radiation dose rate monitoring channels in CPR1000 project and the study of relevant regulations and standards, a design method of main control room air inlet radioactive monitoring was presented. The measured object, equipment layout and chain operation were described. The threshold setting was explored using a calculation model established by MCNP software. The advantages, disadvantages and improvement ideas of this design were presented on the basis of calculation results. (authors)

  17. Method to decontaminate radioactive water in the presence of impurity substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, H; Hepp, H; Kluger, W; Geisel, R

    1978-08-24

    The method ensures the removal of radioactive substances from hard-to-decontaminate water. Before decontamination proper, ozone or chlorine is added to the water for demasking. The daughter products (oxidized radionuclides) of ozone are gaseous while the decay products of the chlorine remain in the water in the form of salts. In both cases, complex or chelate formation during the subsequent decontamination process is avoided.

  18. Method to decontaminate radioactive water in the presence of impurity substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, H.; Hepp, H.; Kluger, W.; Geisel, R.

    1978-01-01

    The method ensures the removal of radioactive substances from hard-to-decontaminate water. Before decontamination proper, ozone or chlorine is added to the water for demasking. The daughter products (oxidized radionuclides) of ozone are gaseous while the decay products of the chlorine remain in the water in the form of salts. In both cases, complex or chelate formation during the subsequent decontamination process is avoided. (DG) [de

  19. New depositing method of Langmuir-Blodgett film of fatty acid soap as a radioactive source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwahashi, Makio; Watanabe, Norifumi; Seimiya, Tsutomu; Naito, Fujio

    1985-02-01

    A stable radioactive source in vacuo was obtained by a new depositing method of Langmuir-Blodgett (L/B) film. In spite of the slight consumption of the substrate solution (only 2-2.5 ml) for preparing a 15 mm x 25 mm sized L/B film containing four molecular layers of /sup 109/Cd-eicosanoate, the deposition of the film was complete. (author).

  20. Admissible thermal loading in geological formations. Consequences on radioactive waste disposal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The study of the ''Admissible thermal loading in geological formations and its consequence on radioactive waste disposal methods'' comprises four volumes: Volume 1. ''Synthesis report'' (English/French text). Volume 2. Granite formations (French text). Volume 3. Salt formations (German text). Volume 4. Clay formations (French text). The present ''synthesis report'' brings together the formation produced by the three specific studies dealing with granite, salt and clay

  1. Using gas blow methods to realize accurate volume measurement of radioactivity liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Caiyun

    2010-01-01

    For liquid which has radioactivity, Realized the accurate volume measurement uncertainty less than 0.2% (k=2) by means of gas blow methods presented in the 'American National Standard-Nuclear Material Control-Volume Calibration Methods(ANSI N15.19-1989)' and the 'ISO Committee Drafts (ISO/TC/85/SC 5N 282 )' and Explored a set methods of Data Processing. In the article, the major problems is to solve data acquisition and function foundation and measurement uncertainty estimate. (authors)

  2. A simple method for the verification of clearance levels for non-radioactive solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, B.

    1997-01-01

    ANSTO's radiopharmaceutical production laboratories generate 25 m 3 of solid waste per month. Most of this waste is not radioactive. Up until recently the non-radioactive waste was cleared from the controlled area and stored for 10 halflives prior to disposal as normal solid refuse. To eliminate the storage and ''double handling'' of the large quantities of non-radioactive waste a simple clearance method was devised to allow direct disposal. This paper describes how clearance levels were determined. Here the term ''clearance level'' is used as a general term for the release of material regardless of whether it was previously subject to regulatory control. This contrasts with the IAEA definition of a clearance level and highlights a potential problem with the implementation of exemption levels to keep material out of regulatory control and the use of clearance levels to allow removal of materials from regulatory control. Several common hand held contamination monitors were tested to determine their limits of detection and ability to meet these clearance levels. The clearance method includes waste segregation and size limitation features to ensure the waste is monitored in a consistent manner, compatible with the limits of detection. The clearance levels achieved were subsequently found to be compatible with some of the unconditional clearance levels in IAEA-TECDOC-855 and the measurement method also meets the required features of that document. The ANSTO non-radioactive waste clearance system has been in operation for more than 12 months and has proved simple and effective to operate. Approximately 12m 3 of the solid waste is now been treated directly as normal solid refuse. This paper describes the ANSTO clearance system, the contamination monitor tests and details practical problems associated with the direct monitoring of solid waste, including averaging of the activity in the package. The paper also briefly highlights the potential problem with the use of

  3. A method for estimating radioactive cesium concentrations in cattle blood using urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Itaru; Yamagishi, Ryoma; Sasaki, Jun; Satoh, Hiroshi; Miura, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Otani, Kumiko; Okada, Keiji

    2017-12-01

    In the region contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear accident, radioactive contamination of live cattle should be checked before slaughter. In this study, we establish a precise method for estimating radioactive cesium concentrations in cattle blood using urine samples. Blood and urine samples were collected from a total of 71 cattle on two farms in the 'difficult-to-return zone'. Urine 137 Cs, specific gravity, electrical conductivity, pH, sodium, potassium, calcium, and creatinine were measured and various estimation methods for blood 137 Cs were tested. The average error rate of the estimation was 54.2% without correction. Correcting for urine creatinine, specific gravity, electrical conductivity, or potassium improved the precision of the estimation. Correcting for specific gravity using the following formula gave the most precise estimate (average error rate = 16.9%): [blood 137 Cs] = [urinary 137 Cs]/([specific gravity] - 1)/329. Urine samples are faster to measure than blood samples because urine can be obtained in larger quantities and has a higher 137 Cs concentration than blood. These advantages of urine and the estimation precision demonstrated in our study, indicate that estimation of blood 137 Cs using urine samples is a practical means of monitoring radioactive contamination in live cattle. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  4. Use of risk assessment methods for security design and analysis of nuclear and radioactive facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Andrade, Marcos C.; Jordao, Elizabete

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the applicability of risk assessment methods for analyzing the physical protection of nuclear and radioactive facilities. One of the important processes for physical protection in nuclear and radioactive facilities is the identifying of areas containing nuclear materials, structures, systems or components to be protected from sabotage, which could directly or indirectly lead to unacceptable radiological consequences. A survey of the international guidelines and recommendations about vital area identification, design basis threat (DBT), and the security of nuclear and radioactive facilities was carried out. The traditional methods used for quantitative risk assessment, like FMEA (Failure Mode and Effect Analysis), Event and Decision Trees, Fault and Success Trees, Vulnerability Assessment, Monte Carlo Simulation, Probabilistic Safety Assessment, Scenario Analysis, and Game Theory, among others, are highlighted. The applicability of such techniques to security issues, their pros and cons, the general resources needed to implement them, as data or support software, are analyzed. Finally, an approach to security design and analysis, beginning with a qualitative and preliminary examination to determine the range of possible scenarios, outcomes, and the systems to be included in the analyses, and proceeding to a progressively use of more quantitative techniques is presented. (author)

  5. Study on Method of Asphalt Density Measurement Using Low Level Radioactive Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin-young; Kim, Jung-hoon; Whang, Joo-ho

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental cause of damage to road pavement is insufficient management of asphalt density during construction. Currently, asphalt density in Korea is measured in a laboratory by extracting a core sample after construction. This method delays the overall time of measurement and therefore it is difficult to achieve real-time density management. Using a radioactive isotope for measuring asphalt density during construction reduces measuring time thus enabling realtime measurement. Also, it is provided reliable density measurement to achieve effective density management at work sites. However, existing radiological equipment has not been widely used because of management restrictions and regulations due to the high radiation dose. In this study, we employed a non-destructive method for density measurement. Density is measured by using a portable gamma-ray backscatter device having a radioactivity emission of 100 μCi or less (notice No. 2002-23, Ministry of Science and Technology, standards on radiation protection, etc.), a sealed radioactive source subject to declaration

  6. Method and apparatus for the purification of a liquid contaminated with radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mende, H.

    1976-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for the purification of a liquid contaminated with radioactive substances is described, wherein the liquid is infed to an evaporator in or with which there is connected a column having a multiplicity of superposed plates or floors. The vapor generated in the evaporator is guided through a washing or scrubbing liquid uniformly distributed at the floors and flowing in crosswise counterflow with regard to the vapor. The washing liquid at the floors is deflected a number of times in such a manner that the washing liquid itself together with the droplets entrained by the vapor are uniformly admixed and the washing liquid subjected to a constant intake of the radioactive substance

  7. Containers and systems for the measurement of radioactive gases and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nicholas R; Watrous, Matthew G; Oertel, Christopher P; McGrath, Christopher A

    2017-06-20

    Containers for a fluid sample containing a radionuclide for measurement of radiation from the radionuclide include an outer shell having one or more ports between an interior and an exterior of the outer shell, and an inner shell secured to the outer shell. The inner shell includes a detector receptacle sized for at least partial insertion into the outer shell. The inner shell and outer shell together at least partially define a fluid sample space. The outer shell and inner shell are configured for maintaining an operating pressure within the fluid sample space of at least about 1000 psi. Systems for measuring radioactivity in a fluid include such a container and a radiation detector received at least partially within the detector receptacle. Methods of measuring radioactivity in a fluid sample include maintaining a pressure of a fluid sample within a Marinelli-type container at least at about 1000 psi.

  8. Method to prepare essentially organic waste liquids containing radioactive or toxic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, W.; Drobnik, S.H.; Hild, W.; Kroebel, R.; Meyer, A.; Naumann, G.

    1976-01-01

    Waste solutions occuring in nuclear technology containing radioactive or toxic materials can be solidified by mixing with a polymerisable mixture with subsequent polymerization. An improvement of this method, especially for liquids in which the radioactive components are present as organic compounds is achieved by adding a mixture of at least one monomeric vinyl compound, at least one polyvinyl compound and appropriate catalysts and by polymerizing at temperatures between 15 and 150 0 C. Should the waste liquid contain mineral acid, this is first neutralized by the addition of CaO or MgO. In processing oils or soaps, the addition of swelling agent for polystyrol resins is advantageous. 16 examples illustrate the invention. (UWI) [de

  9. Development of detection method for individual environmental particles containing alpha radioactive nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, Konomi; Yasuda, Kenichiro; Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu; Nakayama, Shinichi

    2006-01-01

    Artificial radioactive nuclides have been emitted from various sources and have fallen on the surface of the earth as fine particles. Although the characterization of the individual fallout particles is very important, their analysis is difficult. The purpose of this study is to develop a new detection method for individual objective particles containing radioactive nuclides in the environment. The soil or sediment sample was confined in a plastic film and the locations of objective particles were identified with alpha tracks created in a solid-state detectors (BARYOTRAK, Fukuvi Chemical, Ltd) stuck to the both sides of the plastic film. A piece of the film containing the objective particle was cut with a nitrogen laser for following individual particle analysis. This procedure allowed us to detect the objective particle from innumerable number of particles in the environment and characterize the individual particles. (author)

  10. Method of estimating the leakage of multiple barriers in a radioactive materials shipping package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towell, R.H.; Kapoor, A.; Oras, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical study of the performance of multiple leaky barriers in containing radioactive materials in a shipping package. The methods used are reasoned analysis and finite element modeling barriers. The finite element model is developed and evaluated with parameters set to bracket 6M configurations with three to six nested plastic jars, food-pack cans, and plastic bags inside Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 2R inner containers with pipe thread closures. The results show that nested barriers reach the regulatory limit of 1x10 -6 A 2 /hr in 11 to 52 days, even though individually the barriers would exceed the regulatory limit by a factor of as much as 370 instantaneously. These times are within normal shipping times. The finite element model is conservative because it does not consider the deposition and sticking of the leaking radioactive material on the surfaces inside each boundary

  11. Side loading vault system and method for the disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meess, D.C.; Jones, B.J.; Mello, R.M.; Weiss, T.G. Jr.; Wright, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method for the disposal of hazardous radioactive waste. It comprises: constructing a floor slab in the earth; constructing an elongated wall assembly over the floor slab having sidewalls and a front wall and a back wall at either end the side walls being longer than the front and back walls; providing an accessway in the front wall; constructing a ceiling slab over the wall assembly that is supported at least in part by the wall assembly to form a vault cell; inspecting the vault cell for structural defects, introducing hazardous radioactive waste through the accessway in the front wall and loading the cell with the waste from the back wall to the front wall in rows, each of which is substantially parallel to the back wall to minimize radiation exposure to workers loading the cell, and closing the accessway of the vault cell by constructing a removable wall structure within the accessway

  12. Drop Test Using Finite Element Method for Transport Package of Radioactive Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoxiao; Zhao Bing; Zhang Jiangang; Li Gouqiang; Wang Xuexin; Tang Rongyao

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical test for transport package of radioactive material is one of the important tests for demonstrating package structure design. Drop test of package is a kind of destructive test. It is a common method of adopting the pre-analysis to determine drop orientation.Mechanical test of a sealed source package was calculated with finite element method (FEM) software. Based on the analysis of the calculation results, some values were obtained such as the stress, strain, acceleration and the drop orientation which causes the most severe damage, and the calculation results were compared with the results of test. (authors)

  13. Calculation of radioactivity of β-nuclides by CIEMAT/NIST method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Fujun; Zhang Shengdong; Ding Youqian; Sun Hongqing; Tang Peijia

    2010-01-01

    CIEMAT/NIST method for calculating radioactivity of β-nuclides was introduced in this paper. The influences of KB value and quenching parameter on the radioactivity computation of 241 Pu, 106 Ru/ 106 Rh, 63 Ni, 151 Sm and 14 C were studied by CIEMAT/NIST method with 3 H tracing. It is shown that the effect of KB value can be ignored if it varies in a proper range; Except for 106 Ru/ 106 Rh, the discrepancy between prediction and actual activity is lower than 2% in low quenching extent. However, it increases with quenching extent, and the largest discrepancy soars to nearly 13%. In addition, the reason for bad agreement of 106 Ru/ 106 Rh between prediction and actual activity was discussed. Efficiency calibration curves of 79 Se, 93 Zr and 107 Pd were also computed by CIEMAT/NIST method, compared with approximate replacement method or fitting and interpolation method. It is shown that CIEMAT/NIST method is no more accurate and suitable than the other two techniques. (authors)

  14. A Novel Method for Remote Depth Estimation of Buried Radioactive Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukaegbu, Ikechukwu Kevin; Gamage, Kelum A A

    2018-02-08

    Existing remote radioactive contamination depth estimation methods for buried radioactive wastes are either limited to less than 2 cm or are based on empirical models that require foreknowledge of the maximum penetrable depth of the contamination. These severely limits their usefulness in some real life subsurface contamination scenarios. Therefore, this work presents a novel remote depth estimation method that is based on an approximate three-dimensional linear attenuation model that exploits the benefits of using multiple measurements obtained from the surface of the material in which the contamination is buried using a radiation detector. Simulation results showed that the proposed method is able to detect the depth of caesium-137 and cobalt-60 contamination buried up to 40 cm in both sand and concrete. Furthermore, results from experiments show that the method is able to detect the depth of caesium-137 contamination buried up to 12 cm in sand. The lower maximum depth recorded in the experiment is due to limitations in the detector and the low activity of the caesium-137 source used. Nevertheless, both results demonstrate the superior capability of the proposed method compared to existing methods.

  15. Detecting the presence of abnormal radioactivity in scrap using the statistical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillet, G.

    1999-01-01

    The radiological protection criteria recommended for recycling of metals (as in the paper 'Radiation protection 89') cannot be used when scrap is checked on arrival at steel plants. In the event of an incident, neither the nature of the radioelements that may be present in the scrap, nor their level of activity, nor their physical form, are known. In practice abnormal radioactivity in scrap is detected by comparison with ambient radioactivity. However, ambient radioactivity cannot be regarded as a threshold of acceptability which applies to all products . Its level varies substantially from one place to another. All products display natural radioactivity: its level varies greatly, but in some cases it significantly supplements ambient radioactivity, though this does not mean that the products must be considered dangerous (the classic example is that of some granites and some refractory materials). In our arrival checks on scrap-carrying vehicles (lorries and wagons) using gantries, we focus on changes in the measured ambient radioactivity, expressed in impulses per second, which arise from the presence of the vehicle between the sensor and the ambient radioactivity. For each vehicle, this shielding effect is expressed in terms of the ratio between the level measured in the presence of the vehicle and the level measured immediately before its arrival. The result is therefore a dimensionless number. We carried out a statistical analysis of the results of lorry checks at three sites where the checking equipment is identical, but the natural ambient radioactivity levels very different. We observed that the distributions of the values of this ratio were identical for all the sites, and relate very well to a Gaussian distribution with a mean value of 0.71 and a standard deviation of 0.06. Hence these values are characteristic of the dispersion of the shielding effect of the population of 'scrap-carrying lorries checked with a specific type of checking equipment

  16. Development of scaling factor prediction method for radionuclide composition in low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Beak

    1995-02-01

    Low-level radioactive waste management require the knowledge of the natures and quantities of radionuclides in the immobilized or packaged waste. U. S. NRC rules require programs that measure the concentrations of all relevant nuclides either directly or indirectly by relating difficult-to-measure radionuclides to other easy-to-measure radionuclides with application of scaling factors. Scaling factors previously developed through statistical approach can give only generic ones and have many difficult problem about sampling procedures. Generic scaling factors can not take into account for plant operation history. In this study, a method to predict plant-specific and operational history dependent scaling factors is developed. Realistic and detailed approach are taken to find scaling factors at reactor coolant. This approach begin with fission product release mechanisms and fundamental release properties of fuel-source nuclide such as fission product and transuranic nuclide. Scaling factors at various waste streams are derived from the predicted reactor coolant scaling factors with the aid of radionuclide retention and build up model. This model make use of radioactive material balance within the radioactive waste processing systems. Scaling factors at reactor coolant and waste streams which can include the effects of plant operation history have been developed according to input parameters of plant operation history

  17. Bentonite engineered barrier building method for radioactive waste on sub-surface disposal test project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takuo; Takahashi, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Kunifumi; Namiki, Kazuto

    2008-01-01

    The engineering barriers such as clay and concrete materials are planned to use for covering radioactive waste in cavern-type disposal facility. The requirement to clay barrier is very low permeability, which could be satisfied by high density Bentonite, and such a compaction method will be needed. Two methods, compaction and air shot, were tested in engineering scale for constructing a high-density clay barrier. Two types of compaction equipments, 'Teasel plate' and 'Plate compacter', were developed and engineering scale experiments were performed for compacting Bentonite only and Bentonite-sand-aggregate mixture. As a result, the Teasel plate can reach higher density Bentonite in relatively short time in comparison to other equipments. While, regarding air shot method, an air-shot machine in a tunnel construction site was tested by different water adding methods (wet, dry, and half wet). It is concluded that the dry and half wet constructing methods will achieve reasonable workability. As a result, the best construction option can be chosen according to the locations of radioactive waste facility. (author)

  18. Groundwater flow analysis using mixed hybrid finite element method for radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Hiroomi; Shimomura, Masanori; Kawakami, Hiroto; Suzuki, Shunichi

    2011-01-01

    In safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities, ground water flow analysis are used for calculating the radionuclide transport pathway and the infiltration flow rate of groundwater into the disposal facilities. For this type of calculations, the mixed hybrid finite element method has been used and discussed about the accuracy of ones in Europe. This paper puts great emphasis on the infiltration flow rate of groundwater into the disposal facilities, and describes the accuracy of results obtained from mixed hybrid finite element method by comparing of local water mass conservation and the reliability of the element breakdown numbers among the mixed hybrid finite element method, finite volume method and nondegenerated finite element method. (author)

  19. Outcomes of experimental researches on stainless steel decontamination from radioactive contamination using electric slag remelting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vurim, A.D.; Pakhnitz, A.V.; Trukhachev, A.G.; Bukhtoyarov, O.I.; Goncharov, A.Ye.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Institute of Atomic Energy prepared and conducted the experiments the purpose of researching a possibility of applying of stainless steel electric slag remelting for its decontamination from radioactive contamination. The activities were conducted at participating of the specialists of Kurgan State University, Kurgan (Russian Federation). A stand, which includes the electroslag furnace (power - 150 kW, current - to 3000 A) and auxiliary equipment (the system of common and special ventilation, system of remote control, system of parameters measuring and registering and others) was created to conduct the experiments. The properties of slag compositions were researched in the course of experiments preparation. Oxide (CaO-Al 2 O 3 - CaO-SiO 2 - MgO-B 2 O 3 ) and fluoride-oxide (CaF 2 -SiO 2 - MgF 2 -SiO 2 ) slag systems and some their modifications were chosen to research physical and chemical properties. Physical and chemical properties of the slag systems were experimentally researched and it included: measuring of surface tension using the method of maximum pressure in a gas bubble (at the same time density was measured); measuring of slag alloys electrical conductivity; measuring of melt volt-ampere characteristics. The flue tubes of high temperature reactor gas cooling KET technological channels were chosen as a source of radioactive contaminated stainless steel. This reactor is meant for testing of the fuel pin and FA of the nuclear pulse propulsion. Decontamination effect for all the remelted flue tubes was indirectly confirmed by the outcomes of measuring of radioactive radiation dose rate of the materials, extracted of the crystallizer after experiments finishing. The outcomes of the experiments show that the following processes pass at electroslag remelting of radioactively contaminated steel: uranium extraction from steel; uranium transfer from steel to slag; saving or insignificant modification of steel initial composition; radionuclides deposing

  20. Multiple methods for assessing the dose to skin exposed to radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubeau, J.; Heinmiller, B.E.; Corrigan, M.

    2017-01-01

    There is the possibility for a worker at a nuclear installation, such as a nuclear power reactor, a fuel production facility or a medical facility, to come in contact with radioactive contaminants. When such an event occurs, the first order of business is to care for the worker by promptly initiating a decontamination process. Usually, the radiation protection personnel performs a G-M pancake probe measurement of the contamination in situ and collects part or all of the radioactive contamination for further laboratory analysis. The health physicist on duty must then perform, using the available information, a skin dose assessment that will go into the worker's permanent dose record. The contamination situations are often complex and the dose assessment can be laborious. This article compares five dose assessment methods that involve analysis, new technologies and new software. The five methods are applied to 13 actual contamination incidents consisting of direct skin contact, contamination on clothing and contamination on clothing in the presence of an air gap between the clothing and the skin. This work shows that, for the cases studied, the methods provided dose estimates that were usually within 12% (1σ) of each other, for those cases where absolute activity information for every radionuclide was available. One method, which relies simply on a G-M pancake probe measurement, appeared to be particularly useful in situations where a contamination sample could not be recovered for laboratory analysis. (authors)

  1. Alternative methods for dispoal of low-level radioactive wastes. Task 1. Description of methods and assessment of criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.D.; Miller, W.O.; Warriner, J.B.; Malone, P.G.; McAneny, C.C.

    1984-04-01

    The study reported herein contains the results of Task 1 of a four-task study entitled Criteria for Evaluating Engineered Facilities. The overall objective of this study is to ensure that the criteria needed to evaluate five alternative low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal methods are available to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Agreement States. The alternative methods considered are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults, earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, and augered holes. Each of these alternatives is either being used by other countries for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal or is being considered by other countries or US agencies. In this report the performance requirements are listed, each alternative is described, the experience gained with its use is discussed, and the performance capabilities of each method are addressed. Next, the existing 10 CFR Part 61 Subpart D criteria with respect to paragraphs 61.50 through 61.53, pertaining to site suitability, design, operations and closure, and monitoring are assessed for applicability to evaluation of each alternative. Preliminary conclusions and recommendations are offered on each method's suitability as an LLW disposal alternative, the applicability of the criteria, and the need for supplemental or modified criteria

  2. Easy method to measure radioactive waste with a gamma-camera detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murat, C.; Barrau, C.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this technical note is to evaluate an easy method to measure 99m Tc samples with an activity of 1000, 100 and 10 Bq/L. This study is performed with a gamma camera detector in two departments of nuclear medicine in Avignon and in Nimes. We develop a procedure to measure 99m Tc radioactive waste at the two hospitals output in accordance with the D.G.S./D.H.O.S. no. 2001/323 circular requests of the Ministry for Employment and Solidarity. (authors)

  3. Development and improvement of radioactive methods for tribiological researches on elements of tools, machines and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, B.

    1979-02-01

    Charged particle activation analysis based on the bombardment with 15MeV protons from cyclotron was used to study the friction wearing at the zone of contacts in cutting tools, roller bearings and gear teeth. The radioactivity of resulting isotopes such as Co-56, Co-58, Re-183 serves as a measure of the mass changes on the surface tools. The method is suitable for studying the parameters effecting wearing processes and the role of cutting fluid, and also to envisage the economic factors in production planning

  4. Method for volume reduction and encapsulation of water-bearing, low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The invention relates to the processing of water-bearing wastes, especially those containing radioactive materials from nuclear power plants like light-water moderated and cooled reactors. The invention provides a method to reduce the volume of wastes like contaminated coolants and to dispose them safely. According to the invention, azeotropic drying is applied to remove the water. Distilation temperatures are chosen to be lower than the lowest boiling point of the mixture components. In the preferred version, a polymerizing monomer is used to obtain the azeotropic mixture. In doing so, encapsulation is possible by combination with a co-reactive polymer that envelopes the waste material. (G.J.P.)

  5. Hydraulic fracturing as a method for the disposal of volatile radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, J.H.; Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-08-01

    This report proposed the further development of the hydrofracture process at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the permanent disposal of volatile radioactive wastes. The assessment of this method has included the disposal of 129 I, 14 C, 85 Kr, and tritium. It is recommended that additional studies be made of the feasibility of injecting krypton, as an admixture with xenon, directly into the hydrofracture grout stream for disposal in deep, impermeable shale formations. The annual production of 85 Kr from reprocessing 1500 metric tons of fuel would create a void of less than or equal to 1% when injected into the grout mixture used in a typical hydrofracture operation

  6. Method of determining paper-deposited materials, eg. lead, by their reaction with radioactive krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.; Pruzinec, J.

    1976-01-01

    The invention claims a method of determining substances on a paper carrier based on the substance reaction with 85 Kr gas and the measurement of radioactivity of the kryptonate formed. Lead is shown as an example. Different amounts of lead acetate were deposited on Whatman 2 chromatographic paper as was an unknown sample of Pb salt. The paper was exposed to a 2.5 mCi 85 Kr atmosphere for 48 hours. The activity of the individual spots was then measured, a calibration curve established and the amount of lead in the analyzed sample read-out. (Ha)

  7. Development of characterization methods applied to radioactive wastes and waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, C.; Bienvenu, Ph.; Comte, J.; Excoffier, E.; Dodi, A.; Gal, O.; Gmar, M.; Jeanneau, F.; Poumarede, B.; Tola, F.; Moulin, V.; Jallu, F.; Lyoussi, A.; Ma, J.L.; Oriol, L.; Passard, Ch.; Perot, B.; Pettier, J.L.; Raoux, A.C.; Thierry, R.

    2004-01-01

    This document is a compilation of R and D studies carried out in the framework of the axis 3 of the December 1991 law about the conditioning and storage of high-level and long lived radioactive wastes and waste packages, and relative to the methods of characterization of these wastes. This R and D work has permitted to implement and qualify new methods (characterization of long-lived radioelements, high energy imaging..) and also to improve the existing methods by lowering detection limits and reducing uncertainties of measured data. This document is the result of the scientific production of several CEA laboratories that use complementary techniques: destructive methods and radiochemical analyses, photo-fission and active photonic interrogation, high energy imaging systems, neutron interrogation, gamma spectroscopy and active and passive imaging techniques. (J.S.)

  8. Evaluation of radiation shielding performance in sea transport of radioactive material by using simple calculation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odano, N.; Ohnishi, S.; Sawamura, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishimura, K.

    2004-01-01

    A modified code system based on the point kernel method was developed to use in evaluation of shielding performance for maritime transport of radioactive material. For evaluation of shielding performance accurately in the case of accident, it is required to preciously model the structure of transport casks and shipping vessel, and source term. To achieve accurate modelling of the geometry and source term condition, we aimed to develop the code system by using equivalent information regarding structure and source term used in the Monte Carlo calculation code, MCNP. Therefore, adding an option to use point kernel method to the existing Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, the code system was developed. To verify the developed code system, dose rate distribution in an exclusive shipping vessel to transport the low level radioactive wastes were calculated by the developed code and the calculated results were compared with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. It was confirmed that the developed simple calculation method can obtain calculation results very quickly with enough accuracy comparing with the Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP4C

  9. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, J.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains a summary of that workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report. An appendix contains the 8 papers presented at the conference: NRC proposed policy statement on the use of probabilistic risk assessment methods in nuclear regulatory activities; NRC proposed agency-wide implementation plan for probabilistic risk assessment; Risk evaluation of high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy at a large research/teaching institution; The pros and cons of using human reliability analysis techniques to analyze misadministration events; Review of medical misadministration event summaries and comparison of human error modeling; Preliminary examples of the development of error influences and effects diagrams to analyze medical misadministration events; Brachytherapy risk assessment program plan; and Principles of brachytherapy quality assurance.

  10. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 1: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains a summary of that workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC's intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report. An appendix contains the 8 papers presented at the conference: NRC proposed policy statement on the use of probabilistic risk assessment methods in nuclear regulatory activities; NRC proposed agency-wide implementation plan for probabilistic risk assessment; Risk evaluation of high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy at a large research/teaching institution; The pros and cons of using human reliability analysis techniques to analyze misadministration events; Review of medical misadministration event summaries and comparison of human error modeling; Preliminary examples of the development of error influences and effects diagrams to analyze medical misadministration events; Brachytherapy risk assessment program plan; and Principles of brachytherapy quality assurance

  11. Radioactivity in food and the environment: calculations of UK radiation doses using integrated methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allott, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Dear Sir: I read with interest the paper by W C Camplin, G P Brownless, G D Round, K Winpenny and G J Hunt from the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) on 'Radioactivity in food and the environment: calculations of UK radiation doses using integrated methods' in the December 2002 issue of this journal (J. Radiol. Prot. 22 371-88). The Environment Agency has a keen interest in the development of a robust methodology for assessing total doses which have been received by members of the public from authorised discharges of radioactive substances to the environment. Total dose in this context means the dose received from all authorised discharges and all exposure pathways (e.g. inhalation, external irradiation from radionuclides in sediment/soil, direct radiation from operations on a nuclear site, consumption of food etc). I chair a 'total retrospective dose assessment' working group with representatives from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), Food Standards Agency (FSA), National Radiological Protection Board, CEFAS and BNFL which began discussing precisely this issue during 2002. This group is a sub-group of the National Dose Assessment Working Group which was set up in April 2002 (J. Radiol. Prot. 22 318-9). The Environment Agency, Food Standards Agency and the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate previously undertook joint research into the most appropriate methodology to use for total dose assessment (J J Hancox, S J Stansby and M C Thorne 2002 The Development of a Methodology to Assess Population Doses from Multiple Source and Exposure Pathways of Radioactivity (Environment Agency R and D Technical Report P3-070/TR). This work came to broadly the same conclusion as the work by CEFAS, that an individual dose method is probably the most appropriate method to use. This research and that undertaken by CEFAS will help the total retrospective dose assessment working group refine a set of principles and a methodology for the

  12. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive waste management and disposal requirements options available are discussed. The possibility of beneficial utilization of radioactive wastes is covered. Methods of interim storage of transuranium wastes are listed. Methods of shipment of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes are presented. Various methods of radioactive waste disposal are discussed

  13. Study of shielding analysis methods for casks of spent fuel and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Ai

    2017-01-01

    Casks are used for storage or transport spent fuels or radioactive waste. Because high shielding performances are required, it is very important to confirm the validity of shielding analysis methods in order to evaluate cask shielding abilities appropriately. For this purpose, following studies were carried out. 1) A series of parameter survey for several codes to evaluated the difference of the results. 2) Calculations using the MCNP code are effective and theoretically have better accuracy. However setting reasonable variance reduction parameters is indispensable. Therefore, effectiveness of the ADVANTG code which produces automatically reasonable variance reduction parameters is carried out by comparison with conventional method. As a result, the validity of shielding analysis methods for casks is confirmed. The results will be taken into consideration in our future shielding analysis. (author)

  14. Artificial intelligence methods applied for quantitative analysis of natural radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medhat, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Basic description of artificial neural networks. ► Natural gamma ray sources and problem of detections. ► Application of neural network for peak detection and activity determination. - Abstract: Artificial neural network (ANN) represents one of artificial intelligence methods in the field of modeling and uncertainty in different applications. The objective of the proposed work was focused to apply ANN to identify isotopes and to predict uncertainties of their activities of some natural radioactive sources. The method was tested for analyzing gamma-ray spectra emitted from natural radionuclides in soil samples detected by a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry based on HPGe (high purity germanium). The principle of the suggested method is described, including, relevant input parameters definition, input data scaling and networks training. It is clear that there is satisfactory agreement between obtained and predicted results using neural network.

  15. Methods of high-sensitive analysis of actinides in liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diakov, Alexandre A.; Perekhozheva, Tatiana N.; Zlokazova, Elena I.

    2002-01-01

    A complex of methods has been developed to determine actinides in liquid radioactive wastes for solving the problems of radiation, nuclear and ecological safety of nuclear reactors. The main method is based on the radiochemical separation of U, Np-Pu, Am-Cm on ion-exchange and extraction columns. An identification of radionuclides and determination of their content are performed using alpha-spectrometry. The microconcentrations of the sum of the main fissile materials U-235 and Pu-239 are determined with the usage of plastic track detectors. An independent method of U-238 content determination is the neutron activation analysis. Am-241 content is possible to determine with gamma-spectrometry. (author)

  16. Method for determination of radioactive iodine isotopes in environmental objects and biologic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubynin, O.D.; Pogodin, R.I.

    1981-01-01

    The method proposed for determination of radioactive iodine isotopes content in environmental objects and biologic materials is based on the extraction of iodine with carbon tetrachloride and subsequent precipitation of bismuthyl iodine (BiOI) in perchloric medium. Sample preparation for analysis is carried out using conventional alkaline ashing methods. Quantitative iodine separation is hampered if macroquantities of Cl - , Br - , SO 4 2 - , SO 8 2 - , Cr 2 O 7 2 - and other ions are present in the solution. Iodine extraction is carried out before its precipitation. Separated iodine preparation activity is measured using scintillation (NaI) Tl gamma spectrometer. The method's sensitivity when measuring iodine-131 preparations makes up 0.07 Bq per 1 sample with the error +-25 %

  17. Standard test method for static leaching of monolithic waste forms for disposal of radioactive waste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a measure of the chemical durability of a simulated or radioactive monolithic waste form, such as a glass, ceramic, cement (grout), or cermet, in a test solution at temperatures <100°C under low specimen surface- area-to-leachant volume (S/V) ratio conditions. 1.2 This test method can be used to characterize the dissolution or leaching behaviors of various simulated or radioactive waste forms in various leachants under the specific conditions of the test based on analysis of the test solution. Data from this test are used to calculate normalized elemental mass loss values from specimens exposed to aqueous solutions at temperatures <100°C. 1.3 The test is conducted under static conditions in a constant solution volume and at a constant temperature. The reactivity of the test specimen is determined from the amounts of components released and accumulated in the solution over the test duration. A wide range of test conditions can be used to study material behavior, includin...

  18. Increase in the specific radioactivity of tritium-labeled compounds obtained by tritium thermal activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badun, G.A.; Chernysheva, M.G.; Ksenofontov, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    A method of tritium introduction into different types of organic molecules that is based on the interaction of atomic tritium with solid organic target is described. Tritium atoms are formed on the hot W-wire, which is heated by the electric current. Such an approach is called 'tritium thermal activation method'. Here we summarize the results of labeling globular proteins (lysozyme, human and bovine serum albumins); derivatives of pantothenic acid and amino acids; ionic surfactants (sodium dodecylsulfate and alkyltrimethylammonium bromides) and nonionic high-molecular weight surfactants - pluronics. For the first time it is observed that if the target-compound is fixed and its radicals are stable the specific radioactivity of the labeled product can be drastically increased (up to 400 times) when the target temperature is ca. 295 K compared with the results obtained at 77 K. The influence of labeling parameters as tritium gas pressure, exposure time and W-wire temperature was tested for each target temperature that results in the optimum labeling conditions with high specific radioactivity and chemical yield of the resulting compound. (orig.)

  19. Methods and apparatus for safely handling radioactive sources in measuring-while-drilling tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wraight, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method for removing a chemical radioactive source from a MWD tool which is coupled in a drill string supported by a drilling rig while a borehole is drilled and includes logging means for measuring formation characteristics in response to irradiation of the adjacent formations by the radioactive source during the drilling operation. The steps of the method are: halting the drilling operation and then removing the drill string from the borehole for moving the MWD tool to a work station at the surface where the source is at a safe working distance from the drilling rig and will be accessible by way of one end of the MWD tool; positioning a radiation shield at a location adjacent to the one end of the MWD tool where the shield is ready for receiving the source as it is moved away from the other end of the MWD tool and then moving the source away from the other end of the MWD tool for enclosing the source within the shield; and once the source is enclosed within the shield; removing the shield together with the enclosed source from the MWD tool for transferring the enclosed source to another work station

  20. Study to build up method for determining radioactivity of H-3 in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Thu Bac; Nguyen Thi Thu Ha; Vo Thi Anh; Ha Thi Lan Anh; Cao Duc Viet; Duong Van Thang; Dinh Thi Bich Lieu

    2015-01-01

    Tritium is the radioactive isotope of the hydrogen element (denoted as T or H-3). Main chemical forms of Tritium in the atmosphere are Tritium vapor (HTO) and gaseous Tritium (HT). HTO and HT were collected simultaneously by the MARC-7000 Tritium sampler. The sampler has been specifically designed for capturing Tritium most efficiently using a series of four sample bottles, a cooling system and a system of Palladium-Alumina catalytic oven. Air Tritium samples were collected at a flow rate of 30 L/h continuously for duration up to 15 days depending on atmospheric humidity. Average efficiency of H-3 collection in the atmosphere was 74.82 %. The collected samples were enriched by electrolytic method. The electrolysed samples were purified afterward by distillation with PbCl_2 for alkali precipitation. Finally the samples were mixed with Packard Ultima Gold LLT cocktail in proportion of 1:1 and measured by the TRI CARB 3170 TR/SL Liquid scintillation counting system in a total period of 1000 min. Minimum detectable activity (MDA) was about of 4 mBq/m"3. Relative error was less than 11%. 24 air samples in Hanoi for one year from 11/2013 to 10/2014 were collected and analyzed. Monthly average radioactivity of H-3 was 22.39 mBq/m"3 and its standard deviation was 4.84 mBq/m"3. This value was 5.6 times higher than MDA value and equivalent to H-3 background level in several countries. The obtained technical procedure is applicable to determine Tritium radioactivity in the atmosphere. (author)

  1. Studies of radioactive deposition on farm buildings and testing of some methods for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Inger; Erlandsson, B.; Hansson, J.; Dolby, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Studies were made of radioactive fallout on roofs of farm buildings and of some methods of decontamination. The aim was to find ways of reducing the external radiation dose to farmers working and farm animals housed in stables in a fallout situation. The roof material studied was steel plate (A) and tile (B,C, D), each with four sample areas of ca. 1 m 2 . The roof samples were collected at three places and from totally four building in regions which in 1986 (after the Chernobyl fallout) has a 137 Cs ground depositions of 3040 kBq/m 2 (A, B, C) and > 100 kBq/m 2 (D). Four different decontamination methods were tested: 1. High pressure washing with water. 2. Repeated high pressure washing with water. 3. Application of foam of a sanitizing chemical for livestock buildings followed by high pressure washing with water. 4. Application of a solution of KCl followed by high pressure washing with water. In C, the effect of decontamination expressed as the percentage decrease of the 137 Cs activity was on average for all methods, 55%. This material was coated before the decontamination by a marked growth of algae or moss, which was effectively washed off during the sanitizing procedure. In B, the average activity decontamination effect was 25%, while in D (with the highest original activity, but without growth of organic material) the effect was very small, 3%. In A, the activity level before decontamination was so low that measurements after decontamination were considered unnecessary. Method number 4 was the most effective in B and C, 32% and 64%, respectively, while method number 3 was the most effective in D, 5.7%. The results indicate that good effects can be achieved in radioactivity decontamination of roof material with equipment and chemicals which are normally available on farms

  2. The Comparison on Treatment Method of Liquid Radioactive Waste in Yonggwang No 3 and 4 and No 5 and 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yu Sun; Kim, Soong Pyung; Lee, Seung Jin

    2004-01-01

    Most of the low-level liquid radioactive wastes generated from PWR plants are classified into high or low total suspended solid(HTDS or LTDS), and into radiochemical and radioactive laundry waste. Although the evaporation process has a high decontamination ability, it has several problems such as corrosion, foam, and congestion. A new liquid waste disposal process using the ion-exchange demineralizer(IED), instead of the current evaporation process, has been introduced into the Yonggwang NPP No 5 and 6. These two methods have been compared to understand the differences in this study. Aspects compared here were the released radioactivity amount of the liquid radioactive wastes, the dose of off-site residents, the decontamination factor, and the amount of the solid radioactive wastes. The IED system is designed to discharge higher radioactivity about 20% than the evaporating system, and the actual radioactivity released from the evaporating and IED system were 0.473 mCi and 1.098 mCi, respectively. The radioactivity released from the IED was 2.32 times higher than that of the evaporating system. The dose of off-site residents was 2.97 x 10 -6 mSv for the evaporating system, and 6.47 x 10 -6 mSv for IED. The decontamination factor(DF) of the evaporator is, in most cases, far lower than the lower limits of detection(LLD) with the Ge-Li detector. Due to the low concentration of the liquid wastes collected from the liquid waste system, the decontamination factor of IED is very low. Since there is not enough data on the amount of solid radioactive wastes generated by the evaporation system, the comparison on these two systems has been conducted on the basis of the design, and the comparison result was that the evaporating system generated more wastes about 40% than IED.

  3. The Comparison on Treatment Method of Liquid Radioactive Waste in Yonggwang No 3 and 4 and No 5 and 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Yu Sun; Kim, Soong Pyung [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [RedTek CO., LTD., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-15

    Most of the low-level liquid radioactive wastes generated from PWR plants are classified into high or low total suspended solid(HTDS or LTDS), and into radiochemical and radioactive laundry waste. Although the evaporation process has a high decontamination ability, it has several problems such as corrosion, foam, and congestion. A new liquid waste disposal process using the ion-exchange demineralizer(IED), instead of the current evaporation process, has been introduced into the Yonggwang NPP No 5 and 6. These two methods have been compared to understand the differences in this study. Aspects compared here were the released radioactivity amount of the liquid radioactive wastes, the dose of off-site residents, the decontamination factor, and the amount of the solid radioactive wastes. The IED system is designed to discharge higher radioactivity about 20% than the evaporating system, and the actual radioactivity released from the evaporating and IED system were 0.473 mCi and 1.098 mCi, respectively. The radioactivity released from the IED was 2.32 times higher than that of the evaporating system. The dose of off-site residents was 2.97 x 10{sup -6} mSv for the evaporating system, and 6.47 x 10{sup -6} mSv for IED. The decontamination factor(DF) of the evaporator is, in most cases, far lower than the lower limits of detection(LLD) with the Ge-Li detector. Due to the low concentration of the liquid wastes collected from the liquid waste system, the decontamination factor of IED is very low. Since there is not enough data on the amount of solid radioactive wastes generated by the evaporation system, the comparison on these two systems has been conducted on the basis of the design, and the comparison result was that the evaporating system generated more wastes about 40% than IED.

  4. On the possibility of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste by plasma methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V., E-mail: gavrikov@ihed.ras.ru; Samokhin, A. A.; Smirnov, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Khomyakov, Yu. S. [Innovation–Technology Center of the Project Proryv (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The concept of plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste is presented. An approach that is based on using an accelerating potential to overcome the energy and angular spread of plasma ions at the separation region inlet and utilizing a potential well to separate spatially the ions of different masses is proposed. It is demonstrated that such separation may be performed at distances of about 1 m with electrical potentials of about 1 kV and a magnetic field of about 1 kG. The estimates of energy consumption and performance of the plasma separation method are presented. These estimates illustrate its potential for technological application. The results of development and construction of an experimental setup for testing the method of plasma separation are presented.

  5. Sampling methods for pasture, soil and deposition for radioactivity emergency preparedness in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, M.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare sampling techniques for pasture, soil and deposition, planned for radioactivity surveillance in emergency situations in the Nordic countries. The basis of the survey was a questionnaire, sent to radiation protection authorities and laboratories. Sampling of pasture is performed with a cutting height between 1 and 5 cm above the ground from an area of about 1 m 2 . The sampling plots are usually randomly positioned. Soil samples, 3 to 20 cores in various patterns, are generally taken by a corer of varying diameter. For deposition sampling, precipitation collectors of different sizes are used. When comparing results, the differences between laboratories should be borne in mind so that proper corrections can be made. It is, however, important to consider that, especially in an emergency situation, the use of standardised methods may worsen the results if these methods are not part of the daily work. (orig.)

  6. Characterisation of radioactive contaminated materials by combined radiometric and spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulama, C.; Toma, A.; Dobrin, R.; Ciocîrlan, C.; Stoica, S.; Valeca, M.; Popescu, I. I.

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, a combined analytical methodology is described, for characterization of radioactive contaminated materials. The subject of testing activities was a set of solutions provided by the Cernavoda NPP, which are originating from processes of radiological survey of workplaces in the plant. In the introduction section, a theoretical approach was given to the origin and nature of main radionuclides occurring in the primary cooling system of the nuclear power plant, with the aim to establish selection criteria and performance requirements for the analytical methods to be used in the development of the characterization methodology. A combination of radiometric and spectrometric methods was selected, based on gross beta counting, high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. (authors)

  7. Methods of Disposing Of High-Level Radioactive Waste: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abumurade, K.

    2002-01-01

    High level nuclear waste from both commercial reactors and defense industry presents a difficult problem to the scientific community as well as the public. The solutions to this problem is still debatable both technically and ethically. There are few methods proposed for disposing of high level waste. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. However, the very deep underground geologic repository is the best choice for disposing of high-level radioactive wastes. The cost benefit equation of nuclear power production and its waste is discussed. However, the public should be educated about this matter to minimize the gap between them and the nuclear power community including scientists industry, and governments. (Author) 15 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  8. Decommissioning and dismantling: Qualification of gamma scanning method for decontrolling measurement of radioactive wastes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genrich, V.; Sattler, P.

    1998-01-01

    At the time being measurements for the release of buildings and parts of buildings are mainly performed with contamination monitors, free release equipment, wipe test a. s. o. The technical application of in-situ gamma-scanning systems for release measurement should be demonstrated with this research project. This method presents considerable advantages in comparison with standard procedures, as f. ex. reduction of radioactive waste or area covering investigation of the inspected building. A system with a NaI(Tl) and a HPGe-detector was applied. With the high-resolving system it can be shown that also low limit values can be kept with short measurement time. With the NaI(Tl)-detector system it was demonstrated that with limit values lower than 1 Bq/m 3 there may be problems observing the limit values. The investigation showed that especially the high-resolving system for the release measurement of buildings (f. ex. floors, walls, complete rooms) is well-suited. The in-situ gamma-scanning shows big advantages in its economy as f. ex. no sampling and only short measurement times are required. The sharp limitation of the existing contamination and the reduction of radioactive waste involved herewith are further advantages which justify the application of this measurement technique. (orig.)

  9. Way of thinking and method of promotion of disposal of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Masatoshi

    1993-01-01

    It is decided that the high level waste separated from spent fuel is solidified with glass, stored for 30-50 years to cool it down, and the final disposal is done under the responsibility of the government. As to the final disposal of high level waste, the method of enclosing glass-solidified waste in robust containers and burying them in deep stable strata to isolate from human environment is considered to be the safest. The significance of fuel reprocessing is the proper and safe separation and control of high level waste besides the reuse of unburned uranium and newly formed plutonium in spent fuel. The features of the high level waste solids are that their amount to be generated is little, the radioactivity attenuates with the lapse of time, the heat generation decreases with the lapse of time, and they are hard to elute and move. In order to prevent radioactive substances from appearing in human environment by being dissolved in groundwater, those are isolated with the combination of natural and artificial barriers. The requirements for the barriers are discussed. The research and development are in progress on the establishment of stratum disposal technology, the evaluation of suitability of geological environment and the selection of expected disposal grounds. (K.I.)

  10. A Study on the Radioactivity Reduction Method for the Decladding Hull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Ho; Jung, In Ha; Park, Jang Jin; Shin, Jin Myeong; Lee, Ho Hee; Yang, Myung Seung

    1994-01-01

    The cladding materials remaining after reprocessing process of the nuclear fuel, generally called as hulls, are classified as a high-level radioactive waste. They are usually packaged in the container for disposal after being compacted, melted, or solidified into the matrix. The efforts to fabricated a better ingot for a more favorable disposal to the environment have failed due to the technical difficulties encountered in the chemical decontamination method. In the early 1990s, the accumulation of radio-chemical data on hulls and the advent of new technology such as a laser or plasma have made the pre-treatment of the hulls mere efficient. This paper summarizes the information regarding the radio-chemical analysis of the hull through a literature survey and determines the characteristics of the hull and depth profile of the radio-nuclides within the hull thickness. The feasibility study was carried out to evaluate the reduction of the radioactivity by peeling off the surface of the hull with the application of laser technology

  11. Application of the Monte Carlo method to estimate doses in a radioactive waste drum environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Garcia, T.; Burgos, M.C.; Felipe, A.; Sanchez-Mayoral, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    During refuelling operation in a Nuclear Power Plant, filtration is used to remove non-soluble radionuclides contained in the water from reactor pool. Filter cartridges accumulate a high radioactivity, so that they are usually placed into a drum. When the operation ends up, the drum is filled with concrete and stored along with other drums containing radioactive wastes. Operators working in the refuelling plant near these radwaste drums can receive high dose rates. Therefore, it is convenient to estimate those doses to prevent risks in order to apply ALARA criterion for dose reduction to workers. The Monte Carlo method has been applied, using MCNP 4B code, to simulate the drum containing contaminated filters and estimate doses produced in the drum environment. In the paper, an analysis of the results obtained with the MCNP code has been performed. Thus, the influence on the evaluated doses of distance from drum and interposed shielding barriers has been studied. The source term has also been analysed to check the importance of the isotope composition. Two different geometric models have been considered in order to simplify calculations. Results have been compared with dose measurements in plant in order to validate the calculation procedure. This work has been developed at the Nuclear Engineering Department of the Polytechnic University of Valencia in collaboration with IBERINCO in the frame of an RD project sponsored by IBERINCO

  12. Triacylglycerol secretion in rats: validation of a tracer method employing radioactive glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, M.; Williams, M.A.; Baker, N.

    1984-01-01

    A two-compartment model was developed to analyze the temporal changes in plasma triacylglycerol (TG)-specific radioactivity after injection of [2- 3 H]glycerol into rats. The analysis, which yielded fractional rate constants of TG secretion, was tested in rats fed diets either adequate or deficient in essential fatty acids (EFA) and containing either glucose, fructose or sucrose as the dietary carbohydrate. The method of analysis appeared valid, first, because of a close agreement between experimental and computer-fitted TG-specific radioactivity curves, and second, because the fractional rate constants obtained were quite similar to fractional rate constants determined previously by the Triton WR-1339 technique in rats maintained on identical diets. The results show that EFA deficiency increased the fractional rate constant of TG secretion 1.7-, 1.8- and 3.3-fold and the rate of TG secretion 1.8-, 1.6- and 1.4-fold when the dietary carbohydrate was glucose, sucrose and fructose, respectively, in comparison with control rats fed diets supplying these same carbohydrates but adequate in EFA. In the latter groups, the rates of plasma TG secretion were in the range of 0.14-0.17 mg/min per 100 g body weight, and the rate of secretion in the fructose-fed rats was only 20% higher than in the glucose-fed rats

  13. Method of inhibiting concentration of radioactive corrosion products in cooling water or nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabayashi, Jun-ichi; Hishida, Mamoru; Ishikura, Takeshi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the increase in the concentration of the radioactive corrosion products in cooling water, which increase is accompanied by the transference of the corrosion products activated and accumulated in the core due to dissolution and exfoliation into the core water, and inhibit the flowing of said products out of the core and the diffusion thereof into the cooling system, thereby to prevent the accumulation of said products in the cooling system and prevent radioactive contaminations. Method: In a nuclear power plant of a BWR type light water reactor, when the temperature of the pile water is t 0 C, hydrogen is injected in cooling water in a period of time from immediately before starting of the drive stopping operation of the nuclear power plant to immediately after the termination of restarting operation, whereby the concentration of hydrogen in the reactor water through said period is maintained at a value more than 2exp (0.013 t) cm 3 N.T.P./kg H 2 O. (Aizawa, K.)

  14. Method to Solve the Problem of the Radioactivity Detection in Environmental Samples. Characteristic Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Martinez, M.; Heras, M.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of the detection or when the radioactivity can be considered as higher than the background using different measurement techniques has been the objective of several statistical studies and controversies. The detection limit and the critical limit were studied by Currie in year 1968 and used by radiochemistry laboratories considering different ways of calculation that introduced confusion and not correct implementations. In the last few years, and due to the increasing number of standardization processes on the field of radioactivity and accreditation, several international institutions have chosen to unify the criteria for using common determination of detection limits. The most used methods are those developed by MARLAP and International Standard Organization ISO (Standard-11929). In this report are summarised both standards doing a comparative study and giving some examples of how to apply these limits. In same cases, little differences in the uncertainty calculation have been observed but the final results have been concordant. A deeply study of these standards can be done consulting the web page of the American Labs that developed MARLAP or buying the original ISO standard ISO-11929 recently approved (2009). (Author) 17 refs

  15. Radioactive material-containing vessel and method of manufacturing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Hiroshi; Wada, Katsuyoshi; Ota, Shigeo; Nishioka, Eiji; Okuno, Michinori.

    1995-01-01

    In a vessel for containing radioactive materials having an outer wall with a structure of interposing a lead layer, as a shielding material between inner and outer cylinders made of steel plates, the inner cylinder and the lead layer are in close contact by way of a thin layer of a lead/tin type soldering material and to such an extent that the boundary layer is not detected by supersonic inspection. In addition, flux is coated to the steel plate, which forms the inner cylinder, on the surface being in contact with the lead layer, then a thin layer of the soldering material such as lead or tin is formed, to cast the lead between the inner and the outer cylinders. Then, since the inner cylinder and the lead layer are thermally joined tightly, heat generated at the inside can effectively be released to the outside, so that it is effective as a high-performance cask for transporting a large amount of radioactive materials such as spent nuclear fuels having high temperature afterheat. In addition, a containing vessel with good contact between the inner cylinder and the lead can be manufactured at a low cost only applying a simple primer treatment on the surface of the inner cylinder in addition to an existent lead casting method. (N.H.)

  16. A review of methods for sampling large airborne particles and associated radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, J.A.; Nicholson, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive particles, tens of μm or more in diameter, are unlikely to be emitted directly from nuclear facilities with exhaust gas cleansing systems, but may arise in the case of an accident or where resuspension from contaminated surfaces is significant. Such particles may dominate deposition and, according to some workers, may contribute to inhalation doses. Quantitative sampling of large airborne particles is difficult because of their inertia and large sedimentation velocities. The literature describes conditions for unbiased sampling and the magnitude of sampling errors for idealised sampling inlets in steady winds. However, few air samplers for outdoor use have been assessed for adequacy of sampling. Many size selective sampling methods are found in the literature but few are suitable at the low concentrations that are often encountered in the environment. A number of approaches for unbiased sampling of large particles have been found in the literature. Some are identified as meriting further study, for application in the measurement of airborne radioactivity. (author)

  17. Environment assessing for airborne radioactive particulate release-introduction of methods in IAEA safety report series No.19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Dan; Yang, Liu; Shen, Fu; Yang, Yi; Ma, Yinghao; Ma, Tao; Zhang, Zhilong; Fu, Cuiming

    2016-01-01

    Airborne radioactive particulate in many important nuclear facilities (particularly nuclear power plants) will have a strong impact on the relative public dose if they are released into the corresponding environment traversing the stack or vents. The radiation protection researchers have regarded the relative environment assessing and estimation of public doses. And the model of assessing impact of discharges radioactive substance to the environment have been recommended by many international organizations (e.g. IAEA) with the nuclear energy safety and radiation protection. This paper introduced the generic models that were suggested by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), for use in assessing the impact of discharges of radioactive substances to the environment (e.g. IAEA Safety Report Series No.19). The writers of this paper, based on the recommend methods, assessed the discharge limits in some airborne radioactive substances discharging standards. The reasons that IAEA method are introduced are mainly the following considerations: IAEA is one of international organizations with some authorities in the nuclear energy safety and radiation protection; and, more important, the recommend modes are operational methods rather than the methods having little operations such as that have used by some researchers. It is wish that the introduced methods in this paper can be referenced in draft or revise of the standards related to discharges of radioactive substances to the environment

  18. Environment assessing for airborne radioactive particulate release-introduction of methods in IAEA safety report series No.19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Dan; Yang, Liu; Shen, Fu; Yang, Yi; Ma, Yinghao; Ma, Tao; Zhang, Zhilong; Fu, Cuiming [China Institute for Radiation Protection, Taiyuan (China)

    2016-12-15

    Airborne radioactive particulate in many important nuclear facilities (particularly nuclear power plants) will have a strong impact on the relative public dose if they are released into the corresponding environment traversing the stack or vents. The radiation protection researchers have regarded the relative environment assessing and estimation of public doses. And the model of assessing impact of discharges radioactive substance to the environment have been recommended by many international organizations (e.g. IAEA) with the nuclear energy safety and radiation protection. This paper introduced the generic models that were suggested by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), for use in assessing the impact of discharges of radioactive substances to the environment (e.g. IAEA Safety Report Series No.19). The writers of this paper, based on the recommend methods, assessed the discharge limits in some airborne radioactive substances discharging standards. The reasons that IAEA method are introduced are mainly the following considerations: IAEA is one of international organizations with some authorities in the nuclear energy safety and radiation protection; and, more important, the recommend modes are operational methods rather than the methods having little operations such as that have used by some researchers. It is wish that the introduced methods in this paper can be referenced in draft or revise of the standards related to discharges of radioactive substances to the environment.

  19. On the self-diffusion process in liquid metals and alloys by the radioactive tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganovici, L.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of self-diffusion process in liquid metals and alloys is presented. There are only a few pure metals for which diffusion coefficients in a liquid state are known. The thesis aims at increasing the number of liquid metals for which diffusion coefficients are available, by determining these values for liquids: Cd, Tl, Sb and Te. The self-diffusion coefficients of Te in some tellurium based liquid alloys such as Tl 2 Te, PbTe and Bi 90 Te 10 were also determined. Self-diffusion coefficients have been measured using two radioactive tracer methods: a) the capillary-reservoir method; b) the semi-infinite capillary method. The self-diffusion coefficients were derived from the measured radioactive concentration profile, using the solutions of Fick's second law for appropriate initial and limit conditions. The temperature dependence study of self-diffusion coefficients in liquids Cd, Tl, Sb and Te, was used to check some theoretical models on the diffusion mechanism in metallic melts. The experimental diffusion data interpreted in terms of the Arrhenius type temperature dependence, was used to propose two simple empiric relations for determining self diffusion coefficients of group I liquid metals and for liquid semi-metals. It was established a marked decrease of self-diffusion coefficients of liquid Te close to the solidification temperature. The diffusivity of Te in liquid Tl 2 Te points to an important decrease close to the solidification temperature. A simplified model was proposed for the diffusion structural unit in this alloy and the hard sphere model for liquid metals was checked by comparing the theoretical and experimental self-diffusion coefficients. (author)

  20. Method Development for Rapid Analysis of Natural Radioactive Nuclides Using Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, J.M.; Ji, Y.Y.; Lee, H.; Park, J.H.; Jang, M.; Chung, K.H.; Kang, M.J.; Choi, G.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    As an attempt to reduce the social costs and apprehension arising from radioactivity in the environment, an accurate and rapid assessment of radioactivity is highly desirable. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are widely spread throughout the environment. The concern with radioactivity from these materials has therefore been growing for the last decade. In particular, radiation exposure in the industry when handling raw materials (e.g., coal mining and combustion, oil and gas production, metal mining and smelting, mineral sands (REE, Ti, Zr), fertilizer (phosphate), and building materials) has been brought to the public's attention. To decide the proper handling options, a rapid and accurate analytical method that can be used to evaluate the radioactivity of radionuclides (e.g., {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 40}K) should be developed and validated. Direct measuring methods such as alpha spectrometry, a liquid scintillation counter (LSC), and mass-spectrometry are usually used for the measurement of radioactivity in NORM samples, and they encounter the most significant difficulties during pretreatment (e.g., purification, speciation, and dilution/enrichment). Since the pretreatment process consequently plays an important role in the measurement uncertainty, method development and validation should be performed. Furthermore, a-spectrometry has a major disadvantage of a long counting time, while it has a prominent measurement capability at a very low activity level of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 226}Ra. Contrary to the α-spectrometry method, a measurement technique using ICP-MS allow radioactivity in many samples to be measured in a short time period with a high degree of accuracy and precision. In this study, a method was developed for a rapid analysis of natural radioactive nuclides using ICP-MS. A sample digestion process was established using LiBO{sub 2} fusion and Fe co-precipitation. A magnetic

  1. Studies on methods of measurement of radioactivities of 36Cl and 3H in dual labelled samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Shusuke; Asou, Hiroaki; Oishi, Katsuhiko; Hirano, Kiyoshi; Sato, Isamu

    1985-01-01

    In order to clarify how chloride molecules are transported into nervous tissue cells, we simultaneously used [ 36 Cl] -NaCl and [ 3 H] -inulin, and added AgNO 3 to the extract from the nervous tissue, obtaining 36 Cl-samples from the AgCl-precipitate and 3 H-samples from the supernatant. As for radioactivity of 36 Cl or 3 H in the dual-labelled samples, the recovery rates by our separation method were about 100%. Using cultured astrocytoma cells, 36 Cl-uptake into the cells, which was calculated by inulin assumption, was investigated. Intracellular 36 Cl-radioactivity changed vis-a-vis with that in the extracellular space. The volume of intracellular water, which was calculated by 3 H-inulin assumption, remained unchanged, even though a few variations in 36 Cl-radioactivity in cells were determined by both our separation method and spill-over method. (author)

  2. Direct continuous multichannel γspectrometric measurements- one of the main methods for control and study of radioactive environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khitrov, L.M.; Rumiantsev, O.V.

    1991-01-01

    In Chernobyl along with usual methods of environment radiation control there were used methods and equipment of direct continuous multichannel measurements. The necessary equipment was installed both on permanent observation stations (river Pripyat, Chernobyl, river Dnieper, Kiev) and on mobile units (helicopters, scientific river-boats, automobiles). Together with continuous control of radioactive situation and its estimation in time and space this equipment enabled to carry out the following: - determination of time-spatial structure of radioactive pollution in stationary points and on space (mapping); - selection of representative samples for subsequent radionuclide analysis; - direct data input into the computer, data storage and data base creation. The results and conclusions drawn are important not only for the situation on Chernobyl atomic station - they may and should be used for a continuous radioactive monitoring of the environment. Though the method and its realization remain to be modernized and unified. (author)

  3. Method and apparatus for stabilizing signals in radioactive well logging tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampfer, J.G.; Ingram, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for stabilizing signals in radioactive well logging tools. In the tool a main scintillating crystal and photomultiplier tube for detecting radiation induced in the borehole by a source of radiation are provided and a reference crystal, including a source of mono-energetic radiation, for producing continuous reference signals of a predetermined energy level. The signals are monitored and the spectrum is stabilized to correct for drift of the data signals introduced by the photomultiplier tube and the data transmission system. The preferred mono-energetic reference signals are selected to appear in the energy spectrum at a level which minimizes error. An electronic circuit at the surface provides a correction signal for adjusting the gain of a data signal amplifier responsive to changes in the reference signal, thereby correcting for drift in the data signal

  4. Method of denitrification and stabilization of radioactive aqueous solutions of radioisotope nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecak, V.; Matous, V.

    1983-01-01

    The method is solved of denitrification and of the stabilization of aqueous solutions of radioactive isotopes produced during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The aqueous solution is first mixed with the vitreous component, most frequently phosphoric acid, ammonium phosphate or boric acid and if needed with the addition of alkalis, possibly with clarifying or anti-foam components, e.g., arsenic trioxide, antimony or cerium oxide. The mixture is further adjusted with ammonia to pH 5 - 9. The liquid mixture is then thermally and pyrolytically processed, e.g., by calcinator or fluid-bed reactor or by pot melting at temperatures of 3O0 to 900 degC while of a powder product or glass melt is formed in the presence of gaseous emissions composed of nitrous oxide - nitrogen. The resulting product is further processed by containerization or is sealed in a metal matrix. (B.S.)

  5. Method for evaluating building materials with a high content of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranden, E.

    1979-01-01

    In order to avoid increased radiation doses to the population due to the introduction of building materials with an unusually high content of radioactivity, a method for evaluating building materials has been developed. An expression for the gamma radiation due to radium, thorium and potassium 40 has been proposed by a Scandinavian group. When this value for a given material does not exceed 1, then no restriction is placed. Should it exceed 1, then the material is subjected to further investigation. Similarly, since the radon concentration depends on the radium content, an expression for this is proposed. Should this be less than unity the material may be sold freely. Should it exceed unity, further investigations must be made. Measurements have also been made on the exhalation of radon from concrete, and the results are given. An expression including this exhalation rate and the ventilation rate, giving the radon concentration is given. (JIW)

  6. Radioactive indium labelling of the figured elements of blood. Method, results, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducassou, D.; Nouel, J.P.

    Following the work of Thakur et al. the authors became interested in red corpuscle, leucocyte and platelet labelling with indium 111 or 113m (8 hydroxyquinolein-indium). For easier labelling of the figured elements of blood the technique described was modified. The chelate is prepared by simple contact at room temperature of indium 111 or 113m chloride and water-soluble 8 hydroxyquinolein sulphate, in the presence of 0.2M TRIS buffer. The figured element chosen suspended in physiological serum is added directly to the solution obtained, the platelets and leucocytes being separated out beforehand by differential centrifugation. While it gives results similar to those of Thabur et al. the method proposed avoids the chloroform extraction of the radioactive chelate and the use of alcohol, liable to impair the platelet regation capacity [fr

  7. Count rate balance method of measuring sediment transport of sand beds by radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauzay, G.

    1968-01-01

    Radioactive tracers are applied to the direct measurement of the sediment transport rate of sand beds. The theoretical measurement formula is derived: the variation of the count rate balance is inverse of that of the transport thickness. Simultaneously the representativeness of the tracer is critically studied. The minimum quantity of tracer which has to be injected in order to obtain a correct statistical definition of count rate given by a low number of grains 'seen' by the detector is then studied. A field experiment was made and has let to study the technological conditions for applying this method: only the treatment of results is new, the experiment itself is carried out with conventional techniques applied with great care. (author) [fr

  8. Description of two-proton radioactivity by the methods of the quantum theory of ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadmenskij, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    Two-proton decay of spherical nuclei has been investigated on the base of the formalism of quantum mechanical theory of ternary fission. The suggested method of construction of partial two-proton-decay-width amplitudes and of asymptotics of the decaying nucleus wave functions allows to solve a problem of two-proton radioactivity description without the traditionally used in R-matrix approaches laborious sewing procedure for internal and external parent nucleus wave functions in three-body scheme. In the frame of diagonal approximation, the wave-function structure for Cooper pair of two emitted protons in parent nucleus was analyzed as well as the behavior of the wave function describing potential scattering of two-proton-decay products with taking into account decay channel coupling and properties of interaction potentials between these products [ru

  9. Method and apparatus for treating liquid contaminated with radioactive particulate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirs, G.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus reduces the amount of radioactive solids resulting from the filtration of particulate contaminants from liquid in a nuclear reactor plant. A filtration system includes a pre-filter comprising a sheet filter medium through which the reactor liquid passes to remove relatively large particulate contaminants for storage or disposal. The reactor liquid is then passed through a bed of granular filter medium to accumulate substantially all the previously non-filtered contaminants and thereby provide a clarified liquid suitable for reuse in the reactor. Backwash liquid is flowed through the granular filter bed to remove and entrain the accumulated contaminants into a slurry which is received by a reservoir where the slurry is maintained quiescently to settle the contaminants. Removal of liquid from the reservoir concentrates the contaminants for storage or further processing, without the necessity of large quantities of filter aids that would increase the quantity of storage-requiring contaminated solids

  10. The fingerprint method for characterization of radioactive waste in hadron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Magistris, M

    2008-01-01

    Beam losses are responsible for material activation in most of the components of particle accelerators. The activation is caused by several nuclear processes and varies with the irradiation history and the characteristics of the material (namely chemical composition and size). Once at the end of their operational lifetime, these materials require radiological characterization. The radionuclide inventory depends on the particle spectrum, the irradiation history and the chemical composition of the material. As long as these factors are known and the material cross-sections are available, the induced radioactivity can be calculated analytically. However, these factors vary widely among different items of waste and sometimes they are only partially known. The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN, Geneva) has been operating accelerators for high-energy physics for 50 years. Different methods for the evaluation of the radionuclide inventory are currently under investigation at CERN, including the so-calle...

  11. Method for monitoring the course of oxidation of iodide ion during radioactive iodination operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuezhong, Luo

    1986-05-01

    A micro-iodine ion selective electrode is developed to follow and monitor the course of oxidation of iodide ion during radioactive iodination operation. The experimental results indicate that this method can quickly respond to the course of oxidation if the reacting liquid is greater than 30 micro liter in volume. Therefore it can be used for accurate controlling the amount of oxidzing reagent used for the reaction, for example, the amount of chloroamine T can be reduced to 1/40 of the amount ordinarily used for the preparation of angiotonin II and insulin. The effect of pH and concentration of phosphate of the reacting liquid to the oxidation reaction of I with chloroamine T is also studied.

  12. Physics-based, Bayesian sequential detection method and system for radioactive contraband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, James V; Axelrod, Michael C; Breitfeller, Eric F; Chambers, David H; Guidry, Brian L; Manatt, Douglas R; Meyer, Alan W; Sale, Kenneth E

    2014-03-18

    A distributed sequential method and system for detecting and identifying radioactive contraband from highly uncertain (noisy) low-count, radionuclide measurements, i.e. an event mode sequence (EMS), using a statistical approach based on Bayesian inference and physics-model-based signal processing based on the representation of a radionuclide as a monoenergetic decomposition of monoenergetic sources. For a given photon event of the EMS, the appropriate monoenergy processing channel is determined using a confidence interval condition-based discriminator for the energy amplitude and interarrival time and parameter estimates are used to update a measured probability density function estimate for a target radionuclide. A sequential likelihood ratio test is then used to determine one of two threshold conditions signifying that the EMS is either identified as the target radionuclide or not, and if not, then repeating the process for the next sequential photon event of the EMS until one of the two threshold conditions is satisfied.

  13. A fuzzy logic based method to monitor organizational resilience: application in a brazilian radioactive facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Vidal, Mario C.R.; Cosenza, Carlos A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Resilience is the intrinsic ability of a system to adjust its functioning prior to, during, or following changes and disturbances, so that it can sustain required operations under expected and unexpected conditions. This definition focuses on the ability to function, rather than on being impervious to failure, and thereby overcomes the traditional conflict between productivity and safety. Resilience engineering (RE) has fast become recognized as a valuable complement to the established approaches to safety of complex socio-technical systems and methods to monitor organizational resilience are needed. However, few, if any, comprehensive and systematic research studies focus on developing an objective, reliable and practical assessment model for monitoring organizational resilience. Most methods cannot fully solve the subjectivity of resilience evaluation. In order to remedy this deficiency, the aim of this research is to adopt a Fuzzy Set Theory (FST) approach to establish a method for resilience assessment in organizations based on leading safety performance indicators, defined according to the resilience engineering principles. The method uses FST concepts and properties to model the indicators and to assess the results of their application. To exemplify the method we performed an exploratory case study at the process of radiopharmaceuticals dispatch package of a Brazilian radioactive facility. (author)

  14. Use of casual tree method for investigation of incidents and accidents involving radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Senne Junior, Murillo; Marques, Raissa Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    There are many methodologies used for investigation of accidents to facilitate the search of the factors that cause these events in different areas of industry. These can be called proactive methods, if they are used before the occurrence of the events, or reactive methods that are applied after the occurrence of the incident or accident, and are used as a basis of information to prevent further events. One of these methods is the Causal Tree Method (CTM). The basic idea of this technique is that incidents and accidents result from variations in usual processes. These variations can be related to the individual, the task, the material or the environment. The tree starts with the end event (incident or accident) and works backwards. The facts relating to the end event are used in the construction of the causal tree. The end event is the starting point and only the facts that contributed to the incident or accident should be selected. The analyst has to identify and list the variations and then display them in the analytic tree, showing causal relations. The objective of this paper is to test the application of the CTM method in investigation of incidents and accidents involving radioactive materials, in order to evaluate its efficiency on finding the typical factors causing these events. (author)

  15. A fuzzy logic based method to monitor organizational resilience: application in a brazilian radioactive facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R., E-mail: grecco@ien.gov.br, E-mail: luquetti@ien.gov.br, E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Divisao de Instrumentacao e Confiabilidade Humana; Vidal, Mario C.R.; Cosenza, Carlos A.N., E-mail: mvidal@ergonomia.ufrj.br, E-mail: cosenza@pep.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEP/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia de Producao

    2013-07-01

    Resilience is the intrinsic ability of a system to adjust its functioning prior to, during, or following changes and disturbances, so that it can sustain required operations under expected and unexpected conditions. This definition focuses on the ability to function, rather than on being impervious to failure, and thereby overcomes the traditional conflict between productivity and safety. Resilience engineering (RE) has fast become recognized as a valuable complement to the established approaches to safety of complex socio-technical systems and methods to monitor organizational resilience are needed. However, few, if any, comprehensive and systematic research studies focus on developing an objective, reliable and practical assessment model for monitoring organizational resilience. Most methods cannot fully solve the subjectivity of resilience evaluation. In order to remedy this deficiency, the aim of this research is to adopt a Fuzzy Set Theory (FST) approach to establish a method for resilience assessment in organizations based on leading safety performance indicators, defined according to the resilience engineering principles. The method uses FST concepts and properties to model the indicators and to assess the results of their application. To exemplify the method we performed an exploratory case study at the process of radiopharmaceuticals dispatch package of a Brazilian radioactive facility. (author)

  16. Activity measurement by using γ-ray sum peak method considering intake radioactivity and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Hiroshi; Narita, Norihiko; Tomita, Kenichi; Katoh, Yoshichika; Mori, Chizuo; Momose, Takumaro; Shinohara, Kunihiko

    2000-01-01

    It is important to measure external and internal exposure dose in the case of accident. The external exposure can be measured by various dosimeters, but the internal exposure is usually calculated from estimated amounts of intake radioactivity because of difficulty of direct measurement. Detection efficiency of human counter used in direct measurement is necessary, but there is no effective method to determine it for non-uniform distribution. The γ-ray sum peak method is tried for the cascade γ-ray emitter under the consideration of small diffusion such as just after intake. After disintegration rates of sources of 46 Sc and 60 Co were determined by 4πβ-γ coincidence method, γ-ray spectra were measured at various positions. Calculated disintegration rates by sum peak method agreed with those by coincidence method within 10%. The similar results were obtained for distributed plural sources in restricted condition. It is also investigated as application for the case that the other nuclide is contained in it. Using peak-to-total ratios measured in advance, the disintegration rates were determined only from the peak intensities. In this case the results had systematic uncertainty of about 20%. (author)

  17. Rapid method of identification of β-ray emitters and of β-radioactive impurity dosage (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gallic, Y.; Legrand, J.; Grinberg, B.

    1961-01-01

    We describe a simple method of radioactive analysis, which allows an accurate determination of maximal energies of β-emitters, and detection and titration of radioactive impurities in radionuclides as well. The method described, which uses a plastic scintillator, is based on the fact that the curve obtained by plotting the number of pulses measured against the threshold is a straight line, in the case of pure β-emitters. We then derive a simple relation between the data of this straight line and the maximal energy of the β-spectrum of the radionuclide under consideration. (authors) [fr

  18. Development of a Method to Assess the Radiation Dose due to Internal Exposure to Short-lived Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmaman, D.; Koch, J.; Ribak, J.

    2014-01-01

    Work with radioactive materials requires monitoring of the employees' exposure to ionizing radiation. Employees may be exposed to radiation from internal and/or external exposure. Control of external exposure is mostly conducted through personal radiation dosimeters provided to employees. Control of internal exposure can be performed by measuring the concentration of radioactive substances excreted in urine or through whole-body counting in which the entire body or target organs are scanned with a sensitive detector system (1). According to the regulations in Israel an employee that may be internally exposed must undergo an exposure control at least once every three months. The idea lying behind the control of internal exposure by urine testing is that if radioactive material has penetrated into the employee body, it can be detected even if the test is performed once every three months. A model was fitted for each element describing its dispersion in the body and its excretion therefrom (2). By means of this model, one can estimate the activity that entered the body and calculate the resulting radiation dose to which the worker was exposed. There is a problem to implement this method when it comes to short-lived radioactive materials, for which it is very likely that the material that penetrated into the body has decayed and cannot be detected by testing once every three months. As a result, workers with short-lived radioactive materials are presently not monitored for internal exposure, in contradiction to the requirements of the Safety at Work Regulations. The purpose of the study is to develop an alternative method to assess the amount of radioactive material absorbed in the body and the resulting radiation dose due to internal exposure of workers to short-lived radioactive materials

  19. Multi-method characterization of low-level radioactive waste at two Sandia National Laboratories environmental restoration sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E. Jr.; Galloway, R.B.; Dotson, P.W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of multiple characterization methods to radioactive wastes generated by the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Environmental Restoration (ER) Project during the excavation of buried materials at the Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF) and the Radioactive Waste Landfill (RWL). These waste streams include nuclear weapon components and other refuse that are surface contaminated or contain sealed radioactive sources with unknown radioactivity content. Characterization of radioactive constituents in RWL and CWLF waste has been problematic, due primarily to the lack of documented characterization data prior to burial. A second difficulty derives from the limited information that ER project personnel have about weapons component design and testing that was conducted in the early days of the Cold War. To reduce the uncertainties and achieve the best possible waste characterization, the ER Project has applied both project-specific and industry-standard characterization methods that, in combination, serve to define the types and quantities of radionuclide constituents in the waste. The resulting characterization data have been used to develop waste profiles for meeting disposal site waste acceptance criteria

  20. Screening of alternative methods for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, P.J.; Thamer, B.J.; Christensen, D.E.; Wehmann, G.

    1978-10-01

    A systematic method for categorizing these disposal alternatives which provides assurance that no viable alternatives are overlooked is reported. Alternatives are categorized by (1) the general media in which disposal occurs, (2) by whether the disposal method can be considered as dispersal, containment or elimination of the wastes, and (3) by the applicability of the disposal method to the possible physical waste forms. A literature survey was performed and pertinent references listed for the various alternatives discussed. A bibliography is given which provides coverage of published information on low-level radioactive waste management options. The extensive list of disposal alternatives identified was screened and the most viable choices were selected for further evaluation. A Technical Advisory Panel met and reviewed the results. Suggestions from that meeting and other comments are discussed. The most viable options selected for further evaluation are: (1) improving present shallow land burial practices; (2) deeper depth burial; (3) disposal in cavities; (4) disposal in exposed or buried structures; and (5) ocean disposal. 42 references

  1. Dating methods based on the radioactive disequilibrium (1961); Methodes de chronologie par le desequilibre radioactif (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coquema, C; Coulomb, R; Goldsztein, M; Schiltz, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The existence in the uranium families of two long-life descendants: ionium (half-life 80000 years) and protactinium (half-life 32000 years), together with the differences in geochemical behaviour of the various natural radio-elements, particularly thorium, make it possible to envisage several models of geological time-scales covering-periods from 0 to 500000 years The theory of two of the most important models i s developed and methods are described for making radiochemical measurements on the various nuclides which are essential for resolving these models (U{sup 238}, Th{sup 234}, Th{sup 230}, Ra{sup 226}, Pa{sup 231}, Th{sup 232}, Th{sup 228}, Po{sup 210}) An example of dating is given in the case of a secondary mineralisation on a weathered portion of a deposit in the Limouzat (Forez). Samples of autunite and chalcolite taken at different levels of the mine were calculated to be between 30000 and 240000 years old. (authors) [French] L'existence dans les familles de l'uranium de deux descendants a vie longue: ionium (periode 80000 ans) et protactinium (periode 32000 ans), ainsi que les differences tie comportement geochimique des divers radioelements naturels, en particulier du thorium, permettent d'envisager plusieurs modeles d'echelles geochronologiques couvrant un domaine allant de 0 a 500000 ans. Nous developpons la theorie de deux de ces modeles les plus importants, et decrivons les methodes de dosage radiochimiques des divers nucleides dont la connaissance est necessaire a la resolution des modeles ({sup 238}U, {sup 234}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 232}Th, {sup 228}Th, {sup 210}Po). On donne un exemple de chronologie d'une mineralisation secondaire sur la partie alteree du gisement du Liznouzat (Forez). Des echantillons d'autunite et de chalcolite pris a differents niveaux de la mine ont pu etre dates de 30000 a 240000 ans. (auteurs)

  2. Polarized secondary radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaika, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of polarized radioactive nuclei beam production: a) a method nuclear interaction of the non-polarized or polarized charged projectiles with target nuclei; b) a method of polarization of stopped reaction radioactive products in a special polarized ion source with than following acceleration; c) a polarization of radioactive nuclei circulating in a storage ring are considered. Possible life times of the radioactive ions for these methods are determined. General schemes of the polarization method realizations and depolarization problems are discussed

  3. Method to determine the activity concentration and total activity of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.

    2001-02-01

    A characteristic system of radioactive waste is described to determine the concentration of radionuclides activity and the total activity of bundles of radioactive waste. The system this integrated by three subsystems: - Elevator of drums. - Electromechanics. - Gamma spectroscopy. In the system it is analyzed waste of issuing gamma specifically, and this designed for materials of relative low density and it analyzes materials of cylindrical recipients

  4. Methods and apparatus for determining the spatial distribution of a radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The spatial distribution of a radioactive material is determined by locating the positions of and energy losses resulting from Compton interactions which occur in a detector as a result of gamma photons emitted by the radioactive material, which may, for example, have been administered to a patient for medical diagnostic investigation. (auth)

  5. Flow-rate measurement using radioactive tracers and transit time method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turtiainen, Heikki

    1986-08-01

    The transit time method is a flow measurement method based on tracer techniques. Measurement is done by injecting to the flow a pulse of tracer and measuring its transit time between two detection positions. From the transit time the mean flow velosity and - using the pipe cross section area - the volume flow rate can be calculated. When a radioisotope tracer is used the measurement can be done from outside the pipe and without disturbing the process (excluding the tracer injection). The use of the transit time method has been limited because of difficulties associated with handling and availability of radioactive tracers and lack of equipment suitable for routine use in industrial environments. The purpose of this study was to find out if these difficulties may be overcome by using a portable isotope generator as a tracer source and automating the measurement. In the study a test rig and measuring equipment based on the use of a ''1''3''7Cs/''1''3''7''''mBa isotope generator were constructed. They were used to study the accuracy and error sources of the method and to compare different algorithms to calculate the transit time. The usability of the method and the equipment in industrial environments were studied by carrying out over 20 flow measurements in paper and pulp mills. On the basis of the results of the study, a project for constructing a compact radiatracer flowmeter for industrial use has been started. The application range of this kind of meter is very large. The most obvious applications are in situ calibration of flowmeters, material and energy balance studies, process equipment analyses (e.g. pump efficiency analyses). At the moment tracer techniques are the only methods applicable to these measurements on-line and with sufficient accuracy

  6. A radioactive tracer dilution method to determine the mass of molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Cao; Jarrell, Josh; Hardtmayer, D.E.; White, Susan; Herminghuysen, Kevin; Kauffman, Andrew; Sanders, Jeff; Li, Shelly

    2017-01-01

    A new technique for molten salt mass determination, termed radioactive tracer dilution, that uses 22 Na as a tracer was validated at bench scale. It has been a challenging problem to determine the mass of molten salt in irregularly shaped containers, where a highly radioactive, high-temperature molten salt was used to process nuclear spent/used fuel during electrochemical recycling (pyro-processing) or for coolant/fuel salt from molten salt reactors. A radioactive source with known activity is dissolved into the salt. After a complete mixture, a small amount of the salt is sampled and measured in terms of its mass and radioactivity. By finding the ratio of the mass to radioactivity, the unknown salt mass in the original container can be precisely determined. (author)

  7. Recovery and storage method for radioactive iodine by vacuum freeze-drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Ouchi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Toru.

    1990-01-01

    After scrubbing off-gas formed in a re-processing process for spent nuclear fuels, scrubbing liquids after use are subjected, as they are or with addition of additives, to a precipitating treatment. Then, liquid wastes containing radioactive iodine was subjected to freeze-drying treatment by freeze-drying under vacuum to recover radioactive iodine as iodine compounds. Off-gas scrubbing is conducted by using a sodium hydroxide solution and copper or silver ions may be added as additives in the precipitating treatment. Recovered iodine compounds containing radioactive iodine are solidified, either directly or after formulating into a composition of naturally existing iodine-containing ores by means of high pressure pressing into ores. This can prevent radioactive iodine 1 29I of long half-decay time from diffusing into the circumference and store the radioactive iodine stably for a long period of time. (T.M.)

  8. Rapid method of identification of {beta}-ray emitters and of {beta}-radioactive impurity dosage (1961); Methode rapide d'identification des emetteurs-{beta} et de dosage d'impuretes radioactives-{beta} (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Gallic, Y; Legrand, J; Grinberg, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    We describe a simple method of radioactive analysis, which allows an accurate determination of maximal energies of {beta}-emitters, and detection and titration of radioactive impurities in radionuclides as well. The method described, which uses a plastic scintillator, is based on the fact that the curve obtained by plotting the number of pulses measured against the threshold is a straight line, in the case of pure {beta}-emitters. We then derive a simple relation between the data of this straight line and the maximal energy of the {beta}-spectrum of the radionuclide under consideration. (authors) [French] Description d'une methode simple d'analyse radioactive, permettant de determiner avec precision l'energie maximum des emetteurs-{beta}, ainsi que de deceler et de doser les impuretes radioactives dans un radionuclide. La technique decrite utilise un scintillateur plastique. On exploite le fait que la courbe du nombre d'impulsions mesurees, en fonction du seuil de discrimination, est une droite, pour un emetteur-{beta} pur. Une relation simple entre les caracteristiques de cette droite et l'energie maximum du spectre-{beta} du radionuclide, correspondant, a ete etablie. (auteurs)

  9. Safety analysis of geologic containment of long life radioactive wastes. Critical assessment of existing methods and proposition of prospective approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masure, P.; Gedefroy, P.; Imauven, C.

    1983-01-01

    Existing methods of risk analysis applied to disposal of long-lived radioactive waste in geologic formations are rewieved. A prospective analysis method for containment performances is proposed, deduced in the burial system from the combination of interaction between wastes, repository, host rock, surrounding geosphere, of natural evolution of each component of the system, sudden or chance events that could break waste containment. The method is based on the elaboration of four basic schemes graded in difficulties to facilitate comparisons

  10. A quantification method for peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) using gas chromatography (GC) with a non-radioactive pulsed discharge detector (PDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Gao, Xin; McClure, Crystal D.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, we developed a method for continuous PAN measurements by gas chromatography (GC) with a non-radioactive pulsed discharge detector (PDD). Operational parameters were optimized based on the ratio of peak height over baseline noise (P/N ratio). The GC/PDD system was compared with a traditional radioactive electron-capture detector (ECD). In the lab, the method detection limit (MDL) of the new GC/PDD method (9 pptv) was lower than the radioactive GC/ECD method (15 pptv), demonstrating its excellent potential. The MDL of GC/PDD in the field campaign at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO) was 23 pptv, higher than in the lab. This was caused in part by the decreased slope of the calibration curve resulting from the low air pressure level at MBO. However, the MDL level of GC/PDD at MBO is still low enough for accurate PAN measurements, although special attention should be paid to its application at high-elevation sites. Observations of PAN were conducted at MBO in the summer of 2016 with the GC/PDD system, and provided more evidence of the performance of the system. PAN was found to be highly correlated with CO. The promising performance of GC/PDD which does not require a radioactive source makes it a useful approach for accurate PAN measurements in the field.

  11. A simple method to prolong the service life of radioactive sources for external radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingjie; Tian, Yuan; Dai, Jianrong

    2014-07-08

    A radioactive source is usually replaced and disposed after being used for a certain amount of time (usually a half-life). In this study, a simple method is proposed to prolong its service life. Instead of replacing the used source with a new source of full activity, a new source of less activity is added in the source holder in front of the used one, so that the total activity of two sources is equal to the initial activity of the used source or even higher. Similarly, more sources can be added to the previous ones. Attenuation of front source(s) to the back source(s) was evaluated with exponential attenuation equation, and variation of source-focus distance (SFD) with inverse square law for Leksell 4C Gamma Knife, which served as an example of external radiotherapy units. When the number of front sources increased from 1 to 3, the relative air kerma decreased from 36.5% to 5.0%. Both the attenuation effect and SFD variation contributed to the decrease in air kerma, with the former being the major factor. If the height of the source can be decreased in some way, such as increasing the specific activity of sources, the sources can be used more efficiently. The method prolongs the service life of sources by several factors, and reduces the expense of source exchange and reclamation.

  12. Application of mercurometric analysis methods to radioactive (and/or toxic) samples: Pycnometry and porosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannen, L.

    1991-01-01

    The analytical tools and methods used in the laboratory of High and Medium Activity of the Nuclear Research Centre in Mol to determine the density and the open porosity of radioactive (and/or toxic) samples are described. The density is determined by a vacuum pycnometer with plunger displacement. This home-made apparatus has been automated up to a high degree so that operation is easily performed in the remote handling conditions of a hot cell environment. The amount of mercury displaced by the sample is measured. The accuracy is better than 0.2 %. The porosimeter is a commercial apparatus which was modified to improve the hot cell compatibility and to provide fast processing of the data. The open porosity and its pore size distribution are determined from the measurement of the amount of mercury intruded into the sample under increasing pressure. The paper describes both instruments and the working methods. Also included are some examples of measurement results. (author). 5 figs

  13. Evaluation of alternative methods for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, P.; Wehmann, G.; Thamer, B.J.; Card, D.H.

    1979-07-01

    A comparative analysis of the most viable alternatives for disposal of solid low-level radioactive wastes is presented to aid in evaluating national waste management options. Four basic alternative methods are analyzed and compared to the present practice of shallow land burial. These include deeper burial, disposal in mined cavities, disposal in engineered structures, and disposal in the oceans. Some variations in the basic methods are also presented. Technical, socio-political, and economic factors are assigened relative importances (weights) and evaluated for the various alternatives. Based on disposal of a constant volume of waste with given nuclear characteristics, the most desirable alternatives to shallow land burial in descending order of desirability appear to be: improving present practices, deeper burial, use of acceptable abandoned mines, new mines, ocean dumping, and structural disposal concepts. It must be emphasized that the evaluations reported here are generic, and use of other weights or different values for specific sites could change the conclusions and ordering of alternatives determined in this study. Impacts and costs associated with transportation over long distances predominate over differences among alternatives, indicating the desireability of establishing regional waste disposal locations. The impacts presented are for generic comparisons among alternatives, and are not intended to be predictive of the performance of any actual waste disposal facility

  14. Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods

  15. Method for the conditioning of high level radioactive wastes for their safe storage and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geel, J. van; Eschrich, H.; Detilleux, E.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the treatment of solidified high level radioactive wastes to enable them to be safely stored or disposed of in an approved manner. The solidified waste is embedded in a matrix of pure metals or metal alloys. The metals may be Pb, Pb/Sb alloys, Pb/Sn alloys, Pb/Bi alloys, Pb/Zn alloys, or mixtures of these, or Al, Al/Si alloys, Al/Mg alloys, Al/Cu alloys, or mixtures. The matrix is clad with non-corrosive material, selected from stainless steel, Ti, Pb, Pb alloys, Al, Al alloys, or mixtures of same. A non-corrosive container is filled with the solidified waste and is heated to above the melting temperature of the metallic matrix material used to embed the waste. The matrix material is then added and the container is cooled. The container may then be degassed. The solidified waste feed may be in the form of a vitreous material containing the high level waste; this vitreous material may consist of a lead borosilicate or a mixture of non-lead borosilicates and phosphate glasses, and the method of preparing it is described. (U.K.)

  16. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

  17. Determination of 129I in low level radioactive waste by two different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szanto, Zs.; Szucs, Z.; Svingor, E.; Molnar, M.; Palcsu, L.; Futo, I.; Vajda, N.; Molnar, Zs.; Kabai, E.

    2001-01-01

    Determination of the physical, chemical and radiological properties of wastes intended for disposal in any radwaste repository represents one of the major goals of every country dealing with nuclear facilities. In most disposal facilities the long lived α- and β-emitting radionuclides have the most restrictive inventory limits, because they do not decay appreciably in the lifetime of the facility. One of the most restrictive radionuclides is 129 I, a fission product with long half- life, high mobility and biological hazard for the human body. The purpose of this paper is to present and to compare the 129 I results obtained by two different Institutes, using different measurement methods on a wide variety of low level radioactive waste streams generated at the Paks NPP. The Institute of Nuclear Technique of the Technical and Economical University of Budapest analyzed 129 I in a sequential scheme that included preconcentration, neutron activation, post-irradiation chemistry and counting of the shorter-lived 130 I activation product, while the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences used radiochemical separation followed by low-energy direct gamma-ray spectrometry. The results show a good correlation and prove the availability of both measurement methods.(author)

  18. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility's WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator's waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits

  19. Labile soil phosphorus as influenced by methods of applying radioactive phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvaratnam, V.V.; Andersen, A.J.; Thomsen, J.D.; Gissel-Nielsen, G.

    1980-03-01

    The influence of different methods of applying radioactive phosphorus on the E- and L-values was studied in four foil types using barley, buckwheat, and rye grass for the L-value determination. The four soils differed greatly in their E- and L-values. The experiment was carried out both with and without carrier-P. The presence of carrier-P had no influence on the E-values, while carrier-P in some cases gave a lower L-value. Both E- and L-values dependent on the method of application. When the 32 P was applied on a small soil or sand sample and dried before mixing with the total amount of soil, the E-values were higher than at direct application most likely because of a stronger fixation to the soil/sand particles. This was not the case for the L-values that are based on a much longer equilibrium time. On the contrary, the direct application of the 32 p-solution to the whole amount of soil gave higher L-values of a non-homogeneous distribution of the 32 p in the soil. (author)

  20. Gross alpha and beta activity analyses in urine-a routine laboratory method for internal human radioactivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Zhao, Luqian; Qin, Hongran; Zhao, Meijia; Zhou, Yirui; Yang, Shuqiang; Su, Xu; Xu, Xiaohua

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to provide rapid results for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The authors hypothesized that valuable information could be obtained from gas proportional counter techniques by screening urine samples from potentially exposed individuals rapidly. Recommended gross alpha and beta activity screening methods generally employ gas proportional counting techniques. Based on International Standards Organization (ISO) methods, improvements were made in the evaporation process to develop a method to provide rapid results, adequate sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation and operator intervention for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The method described by an American National Standards Institute publication was used to calibrate the gas proportional counter, and urine samples from patients with or without radionuclide treatment were measured to validate the method. By improving the evaporation process, the time required to perform the assay was reduced dramatically. Compared with the reference data, the results of the validation samples were very satisfactory with respect to gross-alpha and gross-beta activities. The gas flow proportional counting method described here has the potential for radioactivity monitoring in the body. This method was easy, efficient, and fast, and its application is of great utility in determining whether a sample should be analyzed by a more complicated method, for example radiochemical and/or γ-spectroscopy. In the future, it may be used commonly in medical examination and nuclear emergency treatment.Health Phys. 106(5):000-000; 2014.

  1. Method and apparatus for glass solidification porcessing for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torada, Shin-ichiro; Masaki, Toshio; Sakai, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    Glass material supplied to a glass melting furnace is made in the form of a glass container. Then, radioactive liquid wastes are directly injected into the glass vessel and the glass vessel injected with the radioactive liquid wastes is charged into the glass melting furnace. The glass material and the radioactive liquid wastes are supplied simultaneously to the glass melting furnace. Then, corresponding to the amount of the glass material used for the glass vessel, the amount of the radioactive liquid wastes injected to the inside thereof is controlled to thereby set the mixing ratio between the glass material and the radioactive liquid wastes. Further, by controlling the number of the glass vessels injected with the radioactive liquid wastes to be charged into the glass melting furnace, the amount of supplying the radioactive liquid wastes and the glass material is controlled. This can easily maintain constant the amount of the glass material and the radioacative liquid wastes supplied to the glass melting furnace and the mixing ratio thereof. (T.M.)

  2. Analysis of radioactive corrosion test specimens by means of ICP-MS. Comparison with earlier methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, Roy

    1997-07-01

    In June 1992, an ICP-MS instrument (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry) was commissioned for use with radioactive sample solutions at Studsvik Nuclear's Hot Cell Laboratory. For conventional environmental samples the instrument permits the simultaneous analysis of many trace elements, but the software used in evaluation of the mass spectra is based on a library of isotopic compositions relevant only for elements in the lithosphere. Fission products and actinides, however, have isotopic compositions which are significantly different from the natural elements, and which also vary with the burnup of the nuclear fuel specimen. Consequently, a spread-sheet had to be developed which could evaluate the mass spectra with these isotopic compositions. Following these preparations, a large number of samples (about 200) from SKB's experimental programme for the study of spent fuel corrosion have been analyzed by the ICP-MS technique. Many of these samples were archive solutions of samples which had been taken earlier in the programme. This report presents a comparison of the analytical results for uranium, plutonium, cesium, strontium and technetium by both the ICP-MS technique, and the previously used analytical methods. For three products, a satisfactory agreement between the results from the various methods was obtained, but for uranium and plutonium the ICP-MS method gave results which were 10-20% higher than the conventional methods. The comparison programme has also shown, not unexpectedly, that significant losses of plutonium from solution had occurred, by precipitation and/or absorption, in the archive solutions during storage. It can be expected that such losses also occur for the other actinides, and consequently, all the analytical results for actinides in older archive solutions must be treated with great caution. 9 refs

  3. Methods of the conversion of radioactive wastes. Look into the past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezchikov, D.

    2001-01-01

    In 1948 Government of the USSR made provisions to gear industrial complex for obtain Pu-239 in Chelyabinsk region. Making Pu-239 in metal form leaded to formation of big quantity of liquid radioactive wastes. It was impossible to provide cleaning water. The radioactive waste were put into Techa river till 1951. Many people lived near Techa and took big dose of radiation. It is very important that people did not know anything about behavior of the radioactive substances in the environment and action on the health. (authors)

  4. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ye; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2015-01-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr 3 ) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr 3 detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R 2 =0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. - Highlights: • An airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was developed to measure radionuclide after a nuclear accident. • A spectrum correction algorithm was proposed to obtain precise information on the detected radioactivity within a small area. • The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. • The corresponding spectrum correction coefficients increase first and then stay constant

  5. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ye [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Tang, Xiao-Bin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2015-10-11

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr{sub 3} detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R{sup 2}=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. - Highlights: • An airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was developed to measure radionuclide after a nuclear accident. • A spectrum correction algorithm was proposed to obtain precise information on the detected radioactivity within a small area. • The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. • The corresponding spectrum correction coefficients increase first and then stay constant.

  6. Devoluming method of acidic radioactive liquid waste and processing system therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takamori; Honda, Tadahiro

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes such as liquid wastes discharged from chemical decontamination (containing free acids, metal salts dissolved in acids, not-dissolved iron rust and radioactive metals) are introduced to an acid recovering device using a diffusion permeation membrane and separated to a deacidified liquid and separated acid liquid. The separated acid liquid mainly comprising free acids is recovered to a tank for recovered acids, and used repeatedly for removing crud. The deacidified liquid mainly comprising salts is concentrated in a reverse osmosis membrane (RO) concentration device. RO concentrated liquid containing radioactive metals is dried, and salts are decomposed in a drying/salt-decomposing device and separated into metal oxides and a mixed gas of an acidic gas and steams. The gas is cooled in an acid absorbing device and recovered as free acids. The metal oxides containing radioactive metals are solidified. (I.N.)

  7. Sodalite-type radioactive waste solidification product and method of synthesizing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Masashi; Yoshida, Takumasa.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive waste solidification products formed by solidifying radioactive wastes comprising halides such as chlorides of alkali metal elements, alkaline earth metal elements, rare earth elements, noble metal elements generated upon dry-type reprocessing of nuclear fuels and separation of dry-type high level liquid wastes, are solidified to stable products by incorporating radioactive wastes in the form of halides into a cavity of sodalite condensation cage of aluminosilicates having three dimensional skeleton structure. Alternatively, NaOH, Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 are mixed and heated to 600 to 900degC to form an intermediate reaction products, and then the reaction products are mixed with the halides and heated to form sodalite-type radioactive water solidification products. Thus, the halides in fission products can be held by the three dimensional skeleton structure similar with that of sodalite which is a sort of natural minerals containing chlorides, thereby enabling to solidify them stably. (N.H.)

  8. A new method for the labelling of proteins with radioactive arsenic isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennewein, M. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann-Weg 2, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Hermanne, A. [VUB Cyclotron, University of Brussels, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Mason, R.P. [Department of Radiology, Advanced Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thorpe, P.E. [Department of Pharmacology and Simmons and Hamon Cancer Centers, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Roesch, F. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann-Weg 2, 55128 Mainz (Germany)]. E-mail: frank.roesch@uni-mainz.de

    2006-12-20

    Radioarsenic labelled radiopharmaceuticals could be a valuable asset to positron emission tomography. In particular, the long half-lives of {sup 72}As (T{sub 1/2}=26h) and {sup 74}As (T{sub 1/2}=17.8d) allow to investigate slow physiological or metabolical processes, like the enrichment and distribution of monoclonal antibodies (mab) in tumour tissue. In this work, a new method for the labelling of proteins with various radioactive arsenic isotopes was developed. For this purpose, two proteins, namely a chimeric IgG{sub 3} monoclonal antibody, ch3G4, directed against anionic phospholipids, and Rituxan (Rituximab), were labelled as a proof of principle with no-carrier-added radioarsenic isotopes ({sup 74}As and {sup 77}As). The developed labelling chemistry gives high yields (>99.9%), is reliable and could easily be transferred to automated labelling systems in a clinical environment. At least for the mab used in this work, this route of radioarsenic labelling does not affect the immunoreactivity of the product. The arsenic label stays stable for up to 72h at the molecular mass of the monoclonal antibody, which is in particular relevant to follow the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of the labelled mab for several days.

  9. Application of geostatistical methods to long-term safety analyses for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehlig, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    Long-term safety analyses are an important part of the design and optimisation process as well as of the licensing procedure for final repositories for radioactive waste in deep geological formations. For selected scenarios describing possible evolutions of the repository system in the post-closure phase, quantitative consequence analyses are performed. Due to the complexity of the phenomena of concern and the large timeframes under consideration, several types of uncertainties have to be taken into account. The modelling work for the far-field (geosphere) surrounding or overlaying the repository is based on model calculations concerning the groundwater movement and the resulting migration of radionuclides which possibly will be released from the repository. In contrast to engineered systems, the geosphere shows a strong spatial variability of facies, materials and material properties. The paper presented here describes the first steps towards a quantitative approach for an uncertainty assessment taking into account this variability. Due to the availability of a large amount of data and information of several types, the Gorleben site (Germany) has been used for a case study in order to demonstrate the method. (orig.)

  10. Intake of radioactive materials as assessed by the duplicate diet method in Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Nonaka, Shunkichi; Tada, Jun Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    A large quantity of radioactive materials was released from Reactor-II of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F-1 NPP). People living in the area affected by the release are concerned about internal exposures from the daily intakes of contaminated foodstuffs. In order to assess whether the people should be concerned, Co-op Fukushima (Consumer Co-operative in Fukushima Prefecture) conducted a broad survey of radiocaesium in daily meals for which local inhabitants voluntarily provided a set of duplicate meals. Analyses by the duplicate diet method were conducted from November 2011 to March 2012 and from June 2012 to September 2012, each covering 100 families throughout the prefecture. Among the 200 meals thus analysed, 12 were found to have 134 Cs and/or 137 Cs concentrations exceeding 1 Bq kg −1 . Even with the largest radiocaesium value in our survey, daily consumption of such meals throughout a year gave an annual committed effective dose that did not exceed 0.1 mSv. (paper)

  11. Control method of air activity levels by the presence of radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo D, N.; Alonso J, M.T.; Zerquera, J.T.; Barroso P, I.

    1996-01-01

    The filtration of great air volumes and further measurement of suitable filter gross beta activity have been the method used by The National Radiological Environmental Monitoring Network of the Republic of Cuba in order to asses, quantitatively, the beta activity in air. The values measured by the three aerosol monitoring laboratories in the country show that the volumetric activity of short-lived radionuclides varied from 0.62 to 6.9 Bq/m 3 . The gross activity values, due to the presence of long-lived radionuclides in air have not been higher than the detection limit of 4 mBq/m 3 . The annual effective dose estimation due to the inhalation of radioactive aerosol from natural sources ranged from 0.03 to 0.3 mSv. These values were lower than the world-wide mean dose (0.80 mSv) and were related to the features of our natural environment. (authors). 6 refs., 1 tab

  12. Contamination of stainless steel process piping with radioactive cobalt colloids and methods for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeleye, S.A.; White, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Significant deposits of activity can occur on the internal surface of pipework carrying aqueous radioactive liquid. This paper describes experimental work to contaminate stainless steel piping with colloidal particles of Co 60 and considers decontamination methods. The effects on steel contamination of varying cobalt concentration and aqueous liquor pH were investigated. Deposition increased with increasing cobalt concentration and the ''plate-out'' increased markedly with increasing liquid pH. Low deposition occurred at pH ∼ 2 increasing by orders of magnitude at pH ∼ 10. Steel type had an effect on activity picked up. It was shown that liquid turbulence, on the surface, reduced activity deposition. Since the extent of contamination to be removed depends on deposition or ''plate-out'' kinetics, the factors affecting the rate of activity deposition are considered. Specimens of steel piping were treated by contacting with acid, electroetching or abrasion with emery cloth. Surface treatment was shown to delay deposition, in certain instances, but did not have much effect on overall equilibrium level of surface activity. The surface activity could be reduced by treatment with dilute nitric acid: however significant activity remained. Most of the remaining activity could be removed by treatment with nitric acid in an ultrasonic bath. (Author)

  13. Portable non-destructive assay methods for screening and segregation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Alan; Jones, Stephanie; Clapham, Martin; Lucero, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Significant cost-savings and operational efficiency may be realised by performing rapid non-destructive classification of radioactive waste at or near its point of retrieval or generation. There is often a need to quickly categorize and segregate bulk containers (drums, crates etc.) into waste streams defined at various boundary levels (based on its radioactive hazard) in order to meet disposal regulations and consignor waste acceptance criteria. Recent improvements in gamma spectroscopy technologies have provided the capability to perform rapid in-situ analysis using portable and hand-held devices such as battery-operated medium and high resolution detectors including lanthanum halide and high purity germanium (HPGe). Instruments and technologies that were previously the domain of complex lab systems are now widely available as touch-screen 'off-the-shelf' units. Despite such advances, the task of waste stream screening and segregation remains a complex exercise requiring a detailed understanding of programmatic requirements and, in particular, the capability to ensure data quality when operating in the field. This is particularly so when surveying historical waste drums and crates containing heterogeneous debris of unknown composition. The most widely used portable assay method is based upon far-field High Resolution Gamma Spectroscopy (HRGS) assay using HPGe detectors together with a well engineered deployment cart (such as the PSC TechniCART TM technology). Hand-held Sodium Iodide (NaI) detectors are often also deployed and may also be used to supplement the HPGe measurements in locating hot spots. Portable neutron slab monitors may also be utilised in cases where gamma measurements alone are not suitable. Several case histories are discussed at various sites where this equipment has been used for in-situ characterization of debris waste, sludge, soil, high activity waste, depleted and enriched uranium, heat source and weapons grade plutonium, fission products

  14. Gamma-spectrometric and total alpha-beta counting methods for radioactivity analysis of deuterium depleted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdes, Ov. S.; Mladin, C.; Vladu, Mihaela; Bulubasa, G.; Bidica, N.

    2008-01-01

    According to national regulations, as well as to the EU directive on the quality of drinking water, the radionuclide concentrations represent some of the drinking water quality parameters. Among the most important radioactivity content parameters are: the total alpha and total beta concentration (Bq/l); K-40 content, and the gamma-nuclides volume activities. The paper presents the measuring methods for low-level total alpha and/or beta counting of volume samples, as well as the high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometric method used to measure the volume activity of nuclides in drinking water. These methods are applied to monitor the radioactivity content and quality of the QLARIVIA brand of Deuterium depleted water (DDW). There are discussed the performances of these applied methods as well as some preliminary results. (authors)

  15. Liquid radioactive waste concentration by the method of evaporation from porous plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Karlin, Yu.V.; Maryakhin, M.A.; Myasnikov, Yu.G.; Slastennikov, Yu.T.

    2009-01-01

    As it is shown by bench-scale experiments radioactive effluents are concentrated to salt content 319 g/l at temperature lower, than evaporation temperature of water, and specific power inputs lower, than specific evaporation heat of water by 20 times. Results of tests at pilot plant (productivity to 43 kg/h by evaporation water) that is placed in mobile water purification unit ECO are described. This unit is used for radioactive water treatment from different organizations at SPU Radon

  16. HARAS. A new method for risk evaluation of working with open radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaver, T.

    1998-01-01

    Thumbs of rule with respect to the characteristics and the handling of, and protection facilities for radioactive materials in laboratories are used by everybody involved in radiation protection activities. However, the thumbs of rule must be based on a thorough risk analysis. The so-called HARAS study provides the results of such an analysis, consisting of recommendations to alter the government policy with respect to radionuclide laboratories. HARAS is a Dutch abbreviation for handling of radioactive materials

  17. Models and methods to evaluate consequences of the release of airborne radioactivity from NNPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anh, T.H.

    1989-01-01

    To examine the radioactive contamination and possible consequences of a nuclear power plant on living organisms during its operation periodes, the computer programmes were elaborated for assessing its fluences on the environment. The authors have resolved the following problems: i) Calculation of fission product inventories in the reactor core; ii) Calculation of the atmospheric dispersion of the released radionuclides under the meteorological conditions as well as the deposition of the radioactive substances on the soil; iii) Calculation of the irradiation doses

  18. Evaluation of fracture toughness in dental ceramics using indentation and SEVNB (Single Edge V-Notched Beam)-method; Avaliacao da tenacidade a fratura de ceramicas dentarias atraves do metodo de entalhe - SEVNB (Single Edge V-Notched Beam)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, L.A.; Santos, C.; Souza, R.C.; Ribeiro, S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (DEMAR/EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia de Lorena. Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais. Polo Urbo-Industrial; Strecker, K. [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del-Rei (DME/UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais Eletricos; Oberacker, R. [Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    In this work, the fracture toughness of different ceramics based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} were evaluated using, comparatively two methods, Vickers indentation and SEVNB (Single Edge V-Notched Beam) method. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}(3%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) micro-particled and ZrO{sub 2}(3%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanometric, ZrO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} composites were sintered at different temperatures. Samples were characterized by relative density, X-ray diffraction, SEM, and mechanical evaluation by hardness, bending strength and fracture toughness obtained by ickers indentation and SEVNB-method. The results were presented comparing the densification and microstructural results. Furthermore, the advantages and limitations of each method were discussed. (author)

  19. Inspection method for solidification product of radioactive waste and method of preparing solidification product of radiation waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo; Tamada, Shin; Matsuda, Masami; Kamata, Shoji; Kikuchi, Makoto.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful X-ray generation device using an electron-ray accelerator is used for inspecting presence or absence of inner voids in solidification products of radioactive wastes during or after solidification. By installing the X-ray CT system and the radioactive waste solidifying facility together, CT imaging for solidification products is conducted in a not-yet cured state of solidifying materials during or just after the injection. If a defect that deteriorates the durability of the solidification products should be detected, the solidification products are repaired, for example, by applying vibrations to the not-yet cured solidification products. Thus, since voids or cracks in the radioactive wastes solidification products, which were difficult to be measured so far, can be measured in a short period of time accurately thereby enabling to judge adaptability to the disposal standards, inspection cost for the radioactive waste solidification product can be saved remarkably. Further, the inside of the radioactive waste solidification products can be evaluated correctly and visually, so that safety in the ground disposal storage of the radioactive solidification products can be improved remarkably. (N.H.)

  20. Study radiolabeling of urea-based PSMA inhibitor with 68-Galliu: Comparative evaluation of automated and not automated methods; Estudo de radiomarcacao com Galio-68 do inibidor de PSMA baseado em ureia: avaliacao comparativa de metodo automatizado e nao automatizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcarde, Lais Fernanda

    2016-07-01

    The methods for clinical diagnosis of prostate cancer include rectal examination and the dosage of the prostatic specific antigen (PSA). However, the PSA level is elevated in about 20 to 30% of cases related to benign pathologies, resulting in false positives and leading patients to unnecessary biopsies. The prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), in contrast, is over expressed in prostate cancer and founded at low levels in healthy organs. As a result, it stimulated the development of small molecule inhibitors of PSMA, which carry imaging agents to the tumor and are not affected by their microvasculature. Recent studies suggest that the HBED-CC chelator intrinsically contributes to the binding of the PSMA inhibitor peptide based on urea (Glu-urea-Lys) to the pharmacophore group. This work describes the optimization of radiolabeling conditions of PSMA-HBED-CC with {sup 68}Ga, using automated system (synthesis module) and no automated method, seeking to establish an appropriate condition to prepare this new radiopharmaceutical, with emphasis on the labeling yield and radiochemical purity of the product. It also aimed to evaluate the stability of the radiolabeled peptide in transport conditions and study the biological distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in healthy mice. The study of radiolabeling parameters enabled to define a non-automated method which resulted in high radiochemical purity (> 95 %) without the need for purification of the labeled peptide. The automated method has been adapted, using a module of synthesis and software already available at IPEN, and also resulted in high synthetic yield (≥ 90%) specially when compared with those described in the literature, with the associated benefit of greater control of the production process in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices. The study of radiolabeling parameters afforded the PSMA-HBED-CC-{sup 68}Ga with higher specific activity than observed in published clinical studies (≥ 140,0 GBq

  1. Processing method for liquid waste containing various kinds of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyabe, Keiji; Nabeshima, Masahiro; Ozeki, Noboru; Muraki, Tsutomu.

    1996-01-01

    Various kind of radioactive materials and heavy metal elements dissolved in liquid wastes are removed from the liquid wastes by adsorbing them on chitin or chitosan. In this case, a hydrogen ion concentration in the liquid wastes is adjusted to a pH value of from 1 to 3 depending on the kinds of the radioactive materials and heavy metal elements to be removed. Since chitin or chitosan has a special ion exchange performance or adsorbing performance, chemical species comprising radioactive materials or heavy metals dissolved in the liquid wastes are adsorbed thereto by ion adsorption or physical adsorption. With such procedures, radioactive materials and heavy metal elements are removed from the liquid wastes, and the concentration thereof can be reduced to such a level that they can be discharged into environments. On the other hand, since chitin or chitosan adsorbing the radioactive materials and heavy metal elements has a structure of polysaccharides, it is easily burnt into gaseous carbon dioxide. Accordingly, the amount of secondary wastes can remarkably be reduced. (T.M.)

  2. Application of the Laplace transform method for computational modelling of radioactive decay series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Deise L.; Damasceno, Ralf M.; Barros, Ricardo C. [Univ. do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IME/UERJ) (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias Computacionais

    2012-03-15

    It is well known that when spent fuel is removed from the core, it is still composed of considerable amount of radioactive elements with significant half-lives. Most actinides, in particular plutonium, fall into this category, and have to be safely disposed of. One solution is to store the long-lived spent fuel as it is, by encasing and burying it deep underground in a stable geological formation. This implies estimating the transmutation of these radioactive elements with time. Therefore, we describe in this paper the application of the Laplace transform technique in matrix formulation to analytically solve initial value problems that mathematically model radioactive decay series. Given the initial amount of each type of radioactive isotopes in the decay series, the computer code generates the amount at a given time of interest, or may plot a graph of the evolution in time of the amount of each type of isotopes in the series. This computer code, that we refer to as the LTRad{sub L} code, where L is the number of types of isotopes belonging to the series, was developed using the Scilab free platform for numerical computation and can model one segment or the entire chain of any of the three radioactive series existing on Earth today. Numerical results are given to typical model problems to illustrate the computer code efficiency and accuracy. (orig.)

  3. Application of the Laplace transform method for computational modelling of radioactive decay series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Deise L.; Damasceno, Ralf M.; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that when spent fuel is removed from the core, it is still composed of considerable amount of radioactive elements with significant half-lives. Most actinides, in particular plutonium, fall into this category, and have to be safely disposed of. One solution is to store the long-lived spent fuel as it is, by encasing and burying it deep underground in a stable geological formation. This implies estimating the transmutation of these radioactive elements with time. Therefore, we describe in this paper the application of the Laplace transform technique in matrix formulation to analytically solve initial value problems that mathematically model radioactive decay series. Given the initial amount of each type of radioactive isotopes in the decay series, the computer code generates the amount at a given time of interest, or may plot a graph of the evolution in time of the amount of each type of isotopes in the series. This computer code, that we refer to as the LTRad L code, where L is the number of types of isotopes belonging to the series, was developed using the Scilab free platform for numerical computation and can model one segment or the entire chain of any of the three radioactive series existing on Earth today. Numerical results are given to typical model problems to illustrate the computer code efficiency and accuracy. (orig.)

  4. Pretreatment method for radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes and pretreatment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakaida, Yasuo.

    1996-01-01

    Heretofore, radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes have been discharged directly to a storing and decaying storage vessel to conduct a water draining treatment. In the present invention, the radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes to be discharged are not discharged to the storage vessel directly but injected to a filling tank, as a pretreatment, to distinguish whether proteins are mixed in the liquid wastes or not. When proteins are mixed, miscellaneous materials such as proteins are recovered and removed by a protein processing system. When proteins are not mixed, radioactive iodine is recovered and removed directly by an iodine processing system. With such procedures, water draining treatment in the storing and decaying storage vessel is mitigated, and even when the amount of the radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes is increased, the existent maintaining and decaying storage vessel can be used as it is. Accordingly, a safe water draining treatment with good efficiency can be conducted relative to radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes at a reduced cost. (T.M.)

  5. Cost effective method for valuation of impacts caused by greenhouse gases emissions for oil and gas companies; Metodo de custo-efetividade para avaliacao de impactos causados pelas emissoes de gases de efeito estufa em empresas de oleo e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Elisa Vieira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barros, Sergio Ricardo da Silveira [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LATEC/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Mestrado em Sistemas de Gestao

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this work is to apply the method of cost-effectiveness in economic evaluation of new investment projects, based on information about reducing greenhouse gases emissions. In the context of the commitment of companies with the Climate Change and Sustainability, this work is important and contributes to the oil and gas industry, because it integrates information on reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in negative Net Present Value (NPV) projects, helping the portfolio manager on decision making between alternative projects. In this article, examples are given of two investment projects, in which the cost effectiveness methodology is applied, considering the reduction of emission of greenhouse gases such as additional environmental benefit, or cost avoidance, in an adjusted model of the economic viability analysis of meritorious projects. (author)

  6. Use of the 3DVH Software as a complementary method of IMRT pretreatment evaluation; Utilizacao do Software 3DVH como metodo complementar de avaliacao de pre-tratamento de IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyra, Jesse G.P.; Bruning, Fabio F.; Funchal, Melissa; Toledo, Hugo V.; Bornatto, Pricila; Fernandes, Tatiane C.O., E-mail: jesse_lyra@hotmail.com [Hospital Erasto Gaertner / Liga Paranaense de Combate ao Cancer (LPCC), Departamento de Radioterapia, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study is to compare the method of treatment planning evaluation for IMRT using the gamma index to the method of the 3DVH Software. The 3DVH Software was used with the MapCheck2 detector 2D array under a 6MV x-ray beam of linear accelerator equipped with 120 leafs MLC. Nine treatment plans of prostate patients chose randomly and fully anonimatize were performed in the Eclipse planning system, using the AAA calculation algorithm in IMRT sliding window technique. These plans were approved and treated according to the gamma analysis criteria of the institution. The comparisons were made in absolute dose and normalized at maximum dose for each field and then with the 3DVH Software the Dmax, Dmean, D15%, D25%, D35% and D50% parameters for the bladder and rectum, Dmean for the bulb, Dmax for the femur and D95% for the PTV were evaluated. In the planar analysis by field, the plans studied had a minimum of 97.5% approval. The PTV-related differences have relative variation from 1.3 to 2.2%, that is, greater coverage than expected for this structure. For the organs at risk, the relative differences observed were between -5.3 to 25.8%, which could result in a non-approved plan if these variations are close to the clinical tolerances of the OAR. The results show that even a plan compatible with greater than or equal to 95% of the points, the gamma analysis does not give enough information if this plan can or cannot be approved for treatment and that there is a need for more detailed verification of the plan which considers not only the planar evaluation, but also the evaluation of the DVH measured, and the 3DVH Software proved be adequate for this analysis. (author)

  7. Radioactive Waste Management Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This strategy defines methods and means how collect, transport and bury radioactive waste safely. It includes low level radiation waste and high level radiation waste. In the strategy are foreseen main principles and ways of storage radioactive waste

  8. Sampling methods and non-destructive examination techniques for large radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, T.H.; Smith, D.L.; Burgoyne, K.E.; Maxwell, D.J.; Norris, G.H.; Billington, D.M.; Pipe, R.G.; Smith, J.E.; Inman, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress is reported on work undertaken to evaluate quality checking methods for radioactive wastes. A sampling rig was designed, fabricated and used to develop techniques for the destructive sampling of cemented simulant waste using remotely operated equipment. An engineered system for the containment of cooling water was designed and manufactured and successfully demonstrated with the drum and coring equipment mounted in both vertical and horizontal orientations. The preferred in-cell orientation was found to be with the drum and coring machinery mounted in a horizontal position. Small powdered samples can be taken from cemented homogeneous waste cores using a hollow drill/vacuum section technique with the preferred subsampling technique being to discard the outer 10 mm layer to obtain a representative sample of the cement core. Cement blends can be dissolved using fusion techniques and the resulting solutions are stable to gelling for periods in excess of one year. Although hydrochloric acid and nitric acid are promising solvents for dissolution of cement blends, the resultant solutions tend to form silicic acid gels. An estimate of the beta-emitter content of cemented waste packages can be obtained by a combination of non-destructive and destructive techniques. The errors will probably be in excess of +/-60 % at the 95 % confidence level. Real-time X-ray video-imaging techniques have been used to analyse drums of uncompressed, hand-compressed, in-drum compacted and high-force compacted (i.e. supercompacted) simulant waste. The results have confirmed the applicability of this technique for NDT of low-level waste. 8 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Uncertainty analysis of the radiological characteristics of radioactive waste using a method based on log-normal distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigase, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainty on characteristics of radioactive LILW waste packages is difficult to determine and often very large. This results from a lack of knowledge of the constitution of the waste package and of the composition of the radioactive sources inside. To calculate a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty on a characteristic of a waste package one has to combine these various uncertainties. This paper discusses an approach to this problem, based on the use of the log-normal distribution, which is both elegant and easy to use. It can provide as example quantitative estimates of uncertainty intervals that 'make sense'. The purpose is to develop a pragmatic approach that can be integrated into existing characterization methods. In this paper we show how our method can be applied to the scaling factor method. We also explain how it can be used when estimating other more complex characteristics such as the total uncertainty of a collection of waste packages. This method could have applications in radioactive waste management, more in particular in those decision processes where the uncertainty on the amount of activity is considered to be important such as in probability risk assessment or the definition of criteria for acceptance or categorization. (author)

  10. The Study on Radioactive Nuclide Distributions within a Fuel Rod by Tomographic Gamma Scanning Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quanhu, Zhang; Lee, H. K.; Hong, K. P.; Choo, Y. S.; Kim, D. S.

    2005-06-01

    Based on the specified need of the IMEF, the feasibility of Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique has been investigated for its potential for non-destructive gamma scanning measurements of irradiated fuel rods. TGS technique has been developed for determining some radioactive isotopes' distributions of a fuel rod in hot cell. The results obtained from the simulation model extracting from real gamma scanning experimental condition in this work by new developed computer simulation codes confirmed that the gamma emission TGS technique has potential for determination of radioactive isotopes' distributions of a fuel rod. In order to verify the simulation codes, we have designed several computation schemes for both 3 by 3 and 10 by 10 fuel rod model under present situation at M1 hot cell in IMEF. The results which relative errors are less than 10% show that we have simulated and implemented determination of radioactive isotopes' distributions on simulated fuel rod by TGS technique successfully

  11. A new method in the management of skin neoplasm using a flexible radioactive patch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Sang Gun; Lee, Min Geol [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwi Eon; Chung, Yae Lee [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Hee [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung Bae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a flexible radioactive polyurethane patch incorporating {beta}-emitting radionuclide (166Ho) to treat malignant skin lesions. We covered the tumor surface (n=133) with the radioactive patch for 33.58 {+-} 5.33 minutes. Radiation dose delivered was 35 Gy for Bowen's disease (n=78), Kaposi sarcoma (n=25), actinic keratosis (n=5), and 50 Gy for BCC (n=17) and squamous carcinoma (n=8). Complete response was observed in 91.7% after the first therapeutic trial, 96.2% after 2nd and 97.7% after 4th trial with excellent cosmetic outcome for 31.15{+-}13.88 months of follow-up. Radioactive patch therapy is effective for superficial skin cancers that are impractical for surgery.

  12. A new method in the management of skin neoplasm using a flexible radioactive patch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Sang Gun; Lee, Min Geol; Kim, Gwi Eon; Chung, Yae Lee; Kim, Eun Hee; Park, Kyung Bae

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a flexible radioactive polyurethane patch incorporating β-emitting radionuclide (166Ho) to treat malignant skin lesions. We covered the tumor surface (n=133) with the radioactive patch for 33.58 ± 5.33 minutes. Radiation dose delivered was 35 Gy for Bowen's disease (n=78), Kaposi sarcoma (n=25), actinic keratosis (n=5), and 50 Gy for BCC (n=17) and squamous carcinoma (n=8). Complete response was observed in 91.7% after the first therapeutic trial, 96.2% after 2nd and 97.7% after 4th trial with excellent cosmetic outcome for 31.15±13.88 months of follow-up. Radioactive patch therapy is effective for superficial skin cancers that are impractical for surgery

  13. Study Circles as a Method of Informing the Adult Population on Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralj, M.

    2002-01-01

    Public acceptance of the radioactive waste disposal facilities is difficult to achieve. Analysis of the reasons that underlie public rejection of radioactive waste disposal facilities shows that people are not adequately informed about the proposal. They also have a lot of prejudices due to the lack of knowledge and understanding about basic facts on radioactivity and environmental processes. ARAO has proposed that the topic of radioactivity and radioactive waste be included in the program of study circles in order to promote knowledge and understanding of these issues among the adult population in several Slovenian communities. Study circles are self-organized adult learning groups in the local community environment. Two study circles were initially proposed: one in Krsko, the community with a nuclear facility, and one in Radovljica, a community without a nuclear facility. Because of troubles with the unexpected politicization of nuclear issues, the study circle in Krsko was postponed to the later term, so that only the study circle in the community without the nuclear installation was active. The members were found by personal invitations. They worked on different issues dealing with radiation, mainly with the application of radiation and radioactive substances in medicine. Through the study circle activities the interest in radiation issues increased. The members reported that they disseminated their interest and acquired knowledge to their family members and friends. Our experience shows that self-learning in small groups, promoting discussions and the confrontation of different opinions, results in an increase in objective knowledge. Therefore, study circles can provide a good basis for confidence building in the nuclear technology.(author)

  14. The methods of conversion of radioactive waste: a look at the past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezchikov, D.

    2000-01-01

    In 1948, the Government of the USSR made provisions to establish an industrial complex to produce Pu-239 in the Chelyabinsk region. PA 'MAYAK' was part of this complex. It is now addressing radioactive waste disposition in peacetime. Making Pu-239 in metal form led to the formation of large quantities of liquid radioactive waste. Since it was impossible to clean the water at that time, radioactive waste was put in the Techa River until 1951. The liquid waste contained a mixture of radioactive Sr, Cs, Nb, Ru and other elements. Sr-90 and Cs-137 accounted for about a quarte of the radioactivity. Many people lived near the Techa and received large doses of radiation. About 2.7 million Curies was put into the river before this practice stopped arid waste was then put into Lake Karachay. High-activity waste was placed in concrete and steel for protection. The volume was cooled with water. When cooling was stopped, the dry mixture heated to 300-350 degrees and exploded. According to official information, the reason for the incident was because the system's control temperature and level of the waste were exceeded. Repair was impossible because radiation fields were high. Contents of the volume were released in the plume and spread into the atmosphere. Around 90 percent of the radioactivity fell near the place of the burst. The rest of the 2 million curies was spread by wind and appeared as the West Ural Trace. It was very important to utilize solid waste (SW). Around 200 special places were made for storage of SW. High-activity SW was kept in reinforced-concrete containers. Middle-activity waste was put in a trench. The total activity of SW is approximately 2 million Curies. (authors)

  15. Numerical method for analysis of temperature rises and thermal stresses around high level radioactive waste repository in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooka, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    The disposal of high-level radioactive waste should result in temperature rises and thermal stresses which change the hydraulic conductivity of the rock around the repository. For safety analysis on disposal of high-level radioactive waste into hard rock, it is necessary to find the temperature rises and thermal stresses distributions around the repository. In this paper, these distribution changes are analyzed by the use of the finite difference method. In advance of numerical analysis, it is required to simplify the shapes and properties of the repository and the rock. Several kinds of numerical models are prepared, and the results of this analysis are examined. And, the waste disposal methods are discussed from the stand-points of the temperature rise and thermal stress analysis. (author)

  16. Filtering and concentrating device for processing radioactive waste and operation method therefor, processing facility for radioactive wastes and processing method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Ken-ichi; Yamazaki, Masami

    1998-01-01

    A filtering and concentrating device is prepared by assembling a porous ceramic filtering material having a pore diameter of 1 μm or less secured by a support to a filtering device main body. The porous ceramic filtering material preferably comprises a surface portion having pores having a diameter of 1 μm or less and a hollow ceramic material having filtering flow channels having a diameter greater than the pores on the surface portion. The ratio of the diameter and the thickness of the hollow ceramic material is determined to greater than 50 : 1. The filtering and concentrating device precisely filter and concentrate radioactive liquid wastes containing an insoluble solid content generated from a nuclear power plant to conduct solid/liquid separation thereby forming a filtrate and concentrated wastes having a mass concentration of 20% or more. With such a constitution, stable filtration and concentration can be conducted while reducing occurrence of clogging of filtering materials. In addition, the frequency for the exchange of filtering materials can be reduced. (I.N.)

  17. Review of safety assessment methods. A report of the performance assessment advisory group of the radioactive waste management committee OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste is a major issue in the nuclear debate. This report provides a concise and accessible overview of the methods available for evaluating the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems, particularly those to be built in deep geological formations

  18. Method for making a low density polyethylene waste form for safe disposal of low level radioactive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, P.; Kalb, P.D.

    1984-06-05

    In the method of the invention low density polyethylene pellets are mixed in a predetermined ratio with radioactive particulate material, then the mixture is fed through a screw-type extruder that melts the low density polyethylene under a predetermined pressure and temperature to form a homogeneous matrix that is extruded and separated into solid monolithic waste forms. The solid waste forms are adapted to be safely handled, stored for a short time, and safely disposed of in approved depositories.

  19. Lacrimal system pathology in patients with malignant thyroid tumors after radioactive iodine therapy, and its correction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Yu. Beldovskaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Radioactive iodine therapy after thyroidectomy is the standard of differentiated thyroid cancer treatment in the modern world. Main dose-dependent side effects described in the literature include: sialadenitis, xerostomia, taste and/or odor loss, swelling of surrounding tissues. Ophthalmic complications are rarely reported. Aim. To assess the lacrimal system condition in patients after radioactive iodine therapy for thyroid cancer. Material and methods. The study included 17 patients (34 eyes. There were female patients aged 19 to 43 years (mean age was 31 years who underwent a course of radioactive iodine therapy for thyroid cancer. All of them complained of periodic or constant tearing in the period from 2 months to 1 year after therapy course. In four patients, there was a permanent or periodic mucopurulent discharge when pressing on the lacrimal sac area. All patients underwent a standard ophthalmological examination, including visual acuity testing, anterior segment biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, and tear production tests. Dye disappearance test, Jones I and II tests, lacrimal pathways irrigation, and, if necessary, cone-ray computer tomography with preliminary lacrimal pathways contrasting were performed to evaluate the tear outflow abnormalities. Results. Tear production disorders were detected in 20 eyes (58.8% (among them, moderate dry eye syndrome was diagnosed in 3 cases; tear outflow pathology was revealed in 14 eyes (41.2% (namely naso-lacrimal duct obstruction and stenosis, and chronic purulent dacryocystitis. For patients with tear production pathology artificial tears were prescribed, and endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy was performed in cases of tear outflow disturbances. Conclusion. The use of radioactive iodine in doses exceeding 80 mCi leads to the development of lacrimal system pathology: dry eye syndrome of various severity, and tear outflow disorders. Lacrimal system pathology significantly worsens

  20. SGSreco. A method for accurate and reliable determination of the radioactive inventory in radioactive waste barrels; SGSreco. Eine Methode zur genauen und verlaesslichen Bestimmung des Aktivitaetsinventares in radioaktiven Abfallfaessern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6)

    2013-07-01

    The computer code SGSreco is used for the evaluation of counting rate distributions from SGS (segmented gamma scan) measurements on radioactive waste barrels. The code is based on data fitting to a physical model function; the results include position parameters, point source activities and the activity of a homogeneous activity distribution. A simulation study has shown that the point source activity can be determined with 2% accuracy. Conventional methods are based on the assumption of a homogeneous activity distribution which is wrong for about 75% of the radioactive waste barrels, the determined nuclide specific activities have significant error rates. The use of SGSreco improves the accuracy and reliability of activity determinations and reduces the conservatism of activity estimations. The latter one allows an optimal utilization of the repository capacity with respect to the maximum activities at the end of the operational phase of the repository Konrad.

  1. LOWRAD 96. Methods and applications of low-level radioactivity measurements. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietz, J [ed.; Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    The newest developments in the field of low-level radioactivity measurements and new applications for existing and low-level measuring facilities are presented. The contributions mostly were devoted to basic physical aspects and applications of low-level counting. Papers on chemical separation and preparation techniques and on low-level radiation dose determinations were also presented. (DG)

  2. Mutation breeding of bulb crops by means of radioactive irradiation and other methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkema, H.Y.

    1974-01-01

    Results of mutation breeding of bulb crops by means of radioactive irradiation, colchicine and heat treatment are discussed. The optimal dose of X radiation is stated. Mutation frequency was low; it is suggested to apply radiation on plant material that is propagated by way of adventitious buds

  3. Quality assurance methods and procedures for accepting radioactive waste for final storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenger, R.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of quality assurance for the final storage of radioactive materials is presented together with the procedure, characterisation, procedural development and documentation involved. Other topics include the assessment of the material to find its suitability for final storage and the tests for transport. 4 figs., 9 refs

  4. Correspondence between radioactive and functional methods in the quality control of DNA restriction and modifying enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, L E; Pupo, E; Miranda, F

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the use of two radiolabeled lambda DNA/Hpa II substrates to detect 5'-->3', 3'-->5' single and double stranded DNA dependent exonuclease and phosphatase activities found as contaminants in restriction and modifying enzyme preparations. Looking for the meaning of the radioactive assay...

  5. An improved analytical method for iodine-129 determination in low-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Yi-Kong; Wang, TsingHai; Jian, Li-Wei; Chen, Wei-Han; Wang, Chu-Fang [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences; Tsai, Tsuey-Lin [Atomic Energy Council, Taiwan (China). Chemical Analysis Div.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, an alkaline-digestion pretreatment and a subsequent ICP-MS measurement were conducted for iodine-129 (I-129) determination in low-level radioactive waste. A TMAH + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Triton X-100 mixed alkaline digestion was the most effective mixture for I-129 determination. Using this alkaline reagent, a high level of I-129 recovery (101 ± 6%) was achieved for the analysis of the I-129-spiked standard reference materials NIST 2709 and 2711. Importantly, the I-129 concentrations determined for ten real samples provided by the Lan-Yu radioactive waste temporary storage site were found to be below the detection limit (0.011 mg/kg). This value was only approximately 30-70% of the values determined using the I-129/Cs-137 scaling factor. This means that using the I-129/Cs-137 scaling factor severely overestimates the I-129 concentration in these low-level radioactive wastes. We therefore suggest that a detailed re-inspection of the I-129/Cs-137 scaling factor should be performed to appropriately categorize these low-level radioactive wastes.

  6. Absolute 22Na radioactivity measurement by gamma efficiency variation of 4πβ-γ coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Yoshio; Kawada, Yasusi.

    1994-01-01

    The absolute radioactivity of 22 Na was obtained by gamma efficiency variation of 4πβ-γ coincidence method. Some other previous techniques, such as sum peak gate method based on the positron emission rate, relative measurement with calibrated ionization chambers, and gamma spectrometry with a HPGe detector, were also tried to ensure the present result. The results of these methods were in reasonable agreement with the present absolute measurement. The assayed source solution of this experiment was transferred to NBS type ampoules, and sealed ampoules were sent to the SIR (International Reference System) in BIPM, Taiwan and Indonesia for the international comparison. (author)

  7. Radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.F.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A problem with ore sorting arrangements is that radiation is difficult to measure accurately while particles are moving at speed past the detector. This is particulary so when dealing with ores such as gold ores which have weak emissions. A method of measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material includes the steps of shielding the radiation detector(s) so that the angle of acceptance of the receptor surface is restricted, and further shielding the shielded portion of the detector with a second material which is less radiation emissive than the material of the first shield. This second shield is between the first shield and the detector

  8. A convenient method for estimating the contaminated zone of a subsurface aquifer resulting from radioactive waste disposal into ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masami; Katsurayama, Kousuke; Uchida, Shigeo.

    1981-01-01

    Studies were conducted to estimate the contamination spread resulting from the radioactive waste disposal into a subsurface aquifer. A general equation, expressing the contaminated zone as a function of radioactive decay, the physical and chemical parameters of soil is presented. A distribution coefficient was also formulated which can be used to judge the suitability of a site for waste disposal. Moreover, a method for predicting contaminant concentration in groundwater at a site boundary is suggested for a heterogeneous media where the subsurface aquifer has different values of porosity, density, flow velocity, distribution coefficient and so on. A general equation was also developed to predict the distribution of radionuclides resulting from the disposal of a solid waste material. The distributions of contamination was evaluated for 90 Sr and 239 Pu which obey a linear adsorption model and a first order kinetics respectively. These equations appear to have practical utility for easily estimating groundwater contamination. (author)

  9. Development of stable solidification methods for toxic lead oxide in radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitoshi Mimura; Shingo Ikeda; Yuichi Niibori

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop the advanced solidification methods for the toxic lead oxide contained in radioactive wastes and to examine their chemical durability in terms of leachability and surface alteration; the solidification characteristics and leachability for the following three kinds of solidified products immobilizing lead were examined, and the experimental results were summarized as follows. (a) Mineral solidified products: A-zeolite or fly ash (FA) was used as a binder, and NaAlO 2 and Na 2 SiO 3 were mixed as additives. The leachability of lead ions in pure water was considerably lowered by the heat treatment at higher temperature (1,000 degree C), and the concentration of lead ions leached was under criterion value of 0.3 mg/l. The products prepared by mixing A-zeolite and fly ash also had low leachability under 0.3 mg/l even in the saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. (b) Melted solidified products: A-zeolite or fly ash was used as a binder and glass-forming reagents of B 2 O 3 and NaH 2 PO 4 were used as additives. The XRD peaks assigned PbO were not observed in all products. The products for the mixtures of FA:NaH 2 PO 4 :PbO (2:2:1 and 3:1:1) had low leachability under criterion value in both leachants of deionized water and saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution. (c) Phosphate ceramics products: the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics were produced by using MgKPO 4 , MgHPO 4 , Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 , potassium iron phosphate and sodium iron phosphate, and FA was used as additives. In particular, by using MgHPO 4 , the leachability of the products was lowered less than 0.3 mg/l in both leachants. The phosphate ceramics products and melted solidified products are favorable as the waste solid forms immobilizing lead. In particular, novel ceramics products have advantages in the simple solidification procedure similarly to the cement products. As for mineral solidification, natural zeolites and FA as binder also useful from the viewpoint of cost efficiency

  10. Sacroiliitis: imaging evaluation; Sacroiliite: avaliacao por imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montandon, Cristiano; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos [Clinicas da Imagem e Multimagem, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Costa, Marlos Augusto Bitencourt; Carvalho, Tarcisio Nunes; Montandon Junior, Marcelo Eustaquio [Universidade Federal de Goias, Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: cmontandon@terra.com.br

    2007-01-15

    Sacroiliitis is a non-infectious inflammatory process involving the sacroiliac joint, and is a diagnostic criterion for seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Imaging methods are of great value for confirming the diagnosis of this condition. The present study is a review of cases included in didactic files and in the literature to illustrate the anatomy, techniques, and main imaging findings in x-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for determining the diagnosis of sacroiliitis, also approaching main differential diagnoses. (author)

  11. A radioactive waste repository for Australia: methods for choosing the right site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This study has developed and used an open and objective approach to site selection. A geographic information system was used to assemble continental-scale information. The information was classified according to suitability criteria and processed to show how the most suitable areas for locating Australia's radioactive waste repository can be identified. The test results show that different regions are identified when different selection criteria are used. The results in this discussion paper are indicative only and are intended to provide a focus for more detailed studies at regional and local levels following public comment on the criteria and methodology. The methodology for identifying a suitable site for a national repository for radioactive wastes will be re-applied with more detailed information to areas identified in this study and on the basis of public comments. 6 figs

  12. Methods for the minimization of radioactive waste from decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide Member States and their decision makers (ranging from regulators, strategists, planners and designers, to operators) with relevant information on opportunities for minimizing radioactive wastes arising from the D and D of nuclear facilities. This will allow waste minimization options to be properly planned and assessed as part of national, site and plant waste management policies. This objective will be achieved by: reviewing the sources and characteristics of radioactive materials arising from D and D activities; reviewing waste minimization principles and current practical applications, together with regulatory, technical, financial and political factors influencing waste minimization practices; and reviewing current trends in improving waste minimization practices during D and D

  13. Admissible thermal loading in geological formations. Consequences on radioactive waste disposal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    For the final disposal of conditioned radioactive wastes clay formations have plasticity, low permeability and high sorption capacity in their favour. Their disadvantage lies in their thermal conductivity and moisture content. The aim of this document is to take stock of the state of the art pertaining to the thermal phenomena linked to the dispoasl of conditioned radioactive wastes. The study, limited to normal, non-accident operating conditions, considers vitrified wastes cast in metal containers and disposal of in an underground infrastructure built in clay. The composition and characteristics of clays can vary widely between formations and even between sites, since the nature and content of argillaceous and other minerals depend on age, sedimentation conditions, depth, origin of the sediments, etc. This study is therefore limited to a specific clay in a specific deposit, i.e., the Boom clay located at Mol beneath the CEN/SCK establishment

  14. In vitro method determing sensitivity of anticancer agents by incorporation of radioactive precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakibara, Satoshi

    1983-01-01

    A new sensitivity test of anticancer agents was developed to measure the lethal effects of cancer cells by the incorporation of radioactive precursors. The thousand cancer cells were cultured in a microplate in the presence of anticancer agents. These cells were exposed to radioactive precursors. Two or three days later, the cancer cells were harvested on a glass fiver filter by a multiple automatic cell-harvester and the incorporation of precursors was counted by a liquid scintillation counter. In this study, the in vivo results of drug testing in animal model systems were compared with drug sensitivities. Mice inoculated Ehrlich ascites cells were treated with various kinds of anticancer drugs. The development of the cells was compatible with the result of the sensitivity test. The growths of Lauson and ME-180 cells derived from human cancers implanted subcutaneously to nude mice were also well correlated with this sensitivity test. (author)

  15. A study on the diffusion of gaseous radioactive effluents based on the statistical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Man Gyun; Lee, Goung Jin

    1998-01-01

    A diffusion model of radioactive gaseous effluents is improved to apply for domestic nuclear power plants. Up to now, XOQDOQ computer code package developed by U. S NRC has been used for the assessment of radioactive plume dispersion by normal operation of domestic nuclear power plants. XOQDOQ adopts the straight-line Gaussian plume model which was basically derived for the plane terrain. However, since there are so many mountains in Korea, the several shortcomings of XOQDOQ are improved to consider the complex terrain effects. In this work, wind direction change is considered by modifying the wind rose frequency using meteorological data of the local weather stations. In addition, an effective height correction model, a plume reduction model due to plume penetration into mountain, and a wet deposition model are adopted for more realistic assessments. The proposed methodology is implemented in Yonggwang nuclear power plants, and can be used for other domestic nuclear power plants

  16. Novel reprocessing methods with nuclide separation for volume reduction of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed the reprocessing system with nuclide separation processes based on the chromatographic technique in the hydrochloric acid solution system. Our proposing system consists of the dissolution process, the reprocessing process, the MA separation process, and nuclide separation processes. In our proposing processes, the pyridine resin is used as a main separation media. We expect that our proposing will contribute to that volume reduction of high level radioactive waste by combining the transmutation techniques, usage of valuable elements, and so on. (author)

  17. A method for speciation of trace elements (stable and radioactive) in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.; Bjornstad, H.E.; Pappas, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    Radioactive nuclides and stable trace metals entering natural aquatic systems interact with naturally occurring particles through exchange and sorption processes. The extent of which depends not only on the elements and particles in question, but also on size distribution of particles being most pronounced for colloids having large surface areas to volume ratios. The interaction of radionuclides and trace metals with colloids changes their size and charge characteristics and thereby influences their transport, mobility and bioavailability

  18. Methods for determining the release of radioactive material into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farges, L.; Daw, H.T.

    1976-01-01

    The current policy on the discharge of radioactive effluents calls for the containment of radioactive wastes in most instances. The resulting doses to individuals and populations have been shown by many surveys to be very small (UNSCEAR Report, 1972). Nevertheless, small amounts of radioactive releases are made to the environment during normal operation of nuclear facilities. Whenever discharge of radioactive effluents to the environment is permitted, careful consideration is made of all the relevant factors which might lead to exposure of man. However, with the expansion of nuclear power programmes, more sophistication is required in setting discharge limits to the environment, taking into consideration future sources as well as present sources. The IAEA's recommendations conform to the dose limitation system set out by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The system implies that the individual dose limits should never be exceeded. Furthermore, the ICRP guidelines require that doses be kept as low as reasonably possible, taking social and economic considerations into account. This second objective, usually called optimization, implies the use of differential cost-benefit analysis. At present, decisions are still made by other procedures, for example, by applying safety factors to release limits derived only from the dose limits. However, the ICRP system of dose limitation, including optimization, appears to be a more rational approach to the establishment of release limits. Thus, it is necessary to provide basic material on concepts which are intended for use and decision making by national authorities, and the Agency plans to publish a series of complementary documents on the application of these concepts to various specific cases. (author)

  19. Admissible thermal loading in geological formations. Consequences on radioactive waste disposal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The thermal loading in salt formation is studied for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste embedded in glass. Temperature effect on glass leaching, stability of gel layer on glass surface, quantity of leaching solution available in the borehole and corrosion resistance of materials used for containers are examined. The geological storage medium must satisfy particularly complex requirements: stratigraphy, brine migration, permeability, fissuring, mechanical strength, creep, thermal expansion, cavity structure ..

  20. Cement solidification method for miscellaneous radioactive solid, processing device and processing tool therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Shigeru; Suzuki, Kazunori; Hasegawa, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    A basket made of a metal net and a lid with a spacer constituting a processing tool for processing miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes is formed as a mesh which scarcely passes the miscellaneous solids but pass mortars. The size of the mesh is usually from about 10 to 30mm. Since this mesh allows fine solids approximate to powders such as burning ashes and heat insulation materials, they fall to the bottom of a dram can, to cause corrosion. Then, the corners of the bottom and the bottom of the dram can are coated with cement. The miscellaneous solid wastes are contained, and the lid of a metal net having a spacer at the upper portion thereof is set, a provisional lid is put on, and it is evacuated, and mortars are injected. Since there is a possibility that light and fine radioactive powders are exposed on the surface of the mortars coagulated and hardened by curing, conditioning for further adding mortars is applied for securing the mortars in order to prevent scattering of the radioactive powders. With such procedures, a satisfactory safe solidified products can be formed. (T.M.)

  1. Development of methods for treatment and conditioning of biological radioactive waste in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holub, J [NYCOM, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1997-02-01

    Incineration of biological radioactive waste was performed in a facility manufactured in the Czech Republic for combustion of burnable, radioactive and non-radioactive residues. The equipment has shown an adequate capability for combustion of biological waste. Basic technical parameters of the incinerator SP-603 can guarantee combustion of majority of wastes from different radionuclide users in the country. To ensure proper further handling with the resulting ash, three conditioning options were studied, the bituminization process, incorporation into cement, and embedding of ash into a mixture of bituminous and cementitious materials. Mechanical properties of the conditioned ash were in good compliance with those published elsewhere. Bituminized ash exhibits lowest leachibility, followed by the ash conditioned by means of the mixed process. Potential abnormal operation conditions were evaluated and their consequences assessed. The evaluation encompassed sensitivity analysis of the consequences potentially affecting the operating staff, nearby population and the environment. Cost estimate was carried out using a national approach for the calculation. From the results it can be seen that there are no large differences between the conditioning and disposal of wastes resulting from different conditioning processes. (author). 16 refs, 4 figs, 15 tabs.

  2. Evaluation of site-generated radioactive waste treatment and disposal methods for the Yucca Mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, C.V.; Jardine, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This study identifies the sources of radioactive wastes that may be generated at the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, NV, estimates the waste quantities and characteristics, compares technologies available for waste treatment and disposal, and develops recommended concepts for site-generated waste treatment and disposal. The scope of this study is limited to operations during the emplacement phase, in which 70,000 MTU of high-level waste will be received and emplaced at the proposed repository. The evaluations consider all radioactive wastes generated during normal operations in surface and underground facilities. Wastes generated as a result of accidents are not addressed; accidents that could result in large quantities of radioactive waste are expected to occur very infrequently and temporary, portable systems could be used for any necessary cleanup. The results of this study can be used to develop more definitive plans for managing the site-generated wastes and as a basis for the design of associated facilities at the proposed repository

  3. Development of methods for treatment and conditioning of biological radioactive waste in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holub, J.

    1997-01-01

    Incineration of biological radioactive waste was performed in a facility manufactured in the Czech Republic for combustion of burnable, radioactive and non-radioactive residues. The equipment has shown an adequate capability for combustion of biological waste. Basic technical parameters of the incinerator SP-603 can guarantee combustion of majority of wastes from different radionuclide users in the country. To ensure proper further handling with the resulting ash, three conditioning options were studied, the bituminization process, incorporation into cement, and embedding of ash into a mixture of bituminous and cementitious materials. Mechanical properties of the conditioned ash were in good compliance with those published elsewhere. Bituminized ash exhibits lowest leachibility, followed by the ash conditioned by means of the mixed process. Potential abnormal operation conditions were evaluated and their consequences assessed. The evaluation encompassed sensitivity analysis of the consequences potentially affecting the operating staff, nearby population and the environment. Cost estimate was carried out using a national approach for the calculation. From the results it can be seen that there are no large differences between the conditioning and disposal of wastes resulting from different conditioning processes. (author). 16 refs, 4 figs, 15 tabs

  4. Ratio methods for cost-effective field sampling of commercial radioactive low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.; Thomas, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    In many field studies to determine the quantities of radioactivity at commercial low-level radioactive waste sites, preliminary appraisals are made with field radiation detectors, or other relatively inaccurate devices. More accurate determinations are subsequently made with procedures requiring chemical separations or other expensive analyses. Costs of these laboratory determinations are often large, so that adequate sampling may not be achieved due to budget limitations. In this report, we propose double sampling as a way to combine the expensive and inexpensive aproaches to substantially reduce overall costs. The underlying theory was developed for human and agricultural surveys, and is partially based on assumptions that are not appropriate for commercial low-level waste sites. Consequently, extensive computer simulations were conducted to determine whether the results can be applied in circumstances of importance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report gives the simulation details, and concludes that the principal equations are appropriate for most studies at commercial low-level waste sites. A few points require further research, using actual commercial low-level radioactive waste site data. The final section of the report provides some guidance (via an example) for the field use of double sampling. Details of the simulation programs are available from the authors. Major findings are listed in the Executive Summary. 9 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs

  5. Analysis of cows' milk in the content of radioactive cs137 gamma-spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagidulin, Z.Z.; Isayev, R.Sh.; Guseynova, I.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text : The most intense pollution of the environment Cs137 (after the ban of atmospheric nuclear weapons tests), was the result of the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The consequence of this accident was the accumulation of large amounts of Cs-137 in the atmosphere, which was the source of the global fallout of this isotope in the Earth's surface, including the territory of Azerbaijan. When considering livestock as one of the links of contamination by radioactive substances in food chains should be recognized that the main risk associated with the accumulation of radioactive Cs137 in the soil, plants and animal products originating ultimately in the human diet. The aim of this study was to determine the radioactive Cs137 in cow's milk. Subsequent samples of milk were purchased in stores and have been measured in the native form. Pal Sud milk produced in Azerbaijan. On Health - Russia. Savushkin product - Belarus. As a radiometric measurement setup Cs137 in cow's milk was used semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometer with a detection unit based on the detection of high-purity germanium (manufactured by Canberra) in the lead shielding.

  6. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 2: Supporting documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, J.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains presentation material and a transcript of the workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report.

  7. Analysis of alternative transportation methods for radioactive materials shipments including the use of special trains for spent fuel and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.; Luna, R.E.; Taylor, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Two studies were completed which evaluate the environmental impact of radioactive material transport. The first was a generic study which evaluated all radioactive materials and all transportation modes; the second addressed spent fuel and fuel-cycle wastes shipped by truck, rail and barge. A portion of each of those studies dealing with the change in impact resulting from alternative shipping methods is presented in this paper. Alternatives evaluated in each study were mode shifts, operational constraints, and, in generic case, changes in material properties and package capabilities. Data for the analyses were obtained from a shipper survey and from projections of shipments that would occur in an equilibrium fuel cycle supporting one hundred 1000-MW(e) reactors. Population exposures were deduced from point source radiation formulae using separation distances derived for scenarios appropriate to each shipping mode and to each exposed population group. Fourteen alternatives were investigated for the generic impact case. All showed relatively minor changes in the overall radiological impact. Since the radioactive material transport is estimated to be fewer than 3 latent cancer fatalities (LCF) for each shipment year (compared to some 300,000 yearly cancer fatalities or 5000 LCF's calculated for background radiation using the same radiological effects model), a 15% decrease caused by shifting from passenger air to cargo air is a relatively small effect. Eleven alternatives were considered for the fuel cycle/special train study, but only one produced a reduction in total special train baseline LCF's (.047) that was larger than 5%

  8. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 2: Supporting documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains presentation material and a transcript of the workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC's intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report

  9. On the influence of environmental factors on radon levels in caves of Ribeira valley state parks, SP and evaluation of radioactive equilibrium and equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny; Sobre a influencia de fatores ambientais nos niveis de radonio em cavernas dos parques estaduais do vale do Ribeira, SP e avaliacao do equilibrio radioativo e fator de equilibrio entre radonio e seus descendentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberigi, Simone

    2011-07-01

    In the present study it was carried out the monitoring of radon in caves distributed among three state parks of Sao Paulo. The radon concentration were determinate in Morro Preto and Santana caves, located at PETAR - Parque Estadual Turistico do Alto Ribeira (High Ribeira River Tourist State Park), Diabo cave, situated in PEJ - Parque Estadual de Jacupiranga (Jacupiranga State Park) and Colorida cave located in PEI - Parque Estadual Intervales (Intervales State Park PEI). The monitoring covered measurements between April 2009 and June 2010. Radon concentrations were carried out by using the technique of passive detection with CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors and NRPB diffusion chambers. The detectors were exposed in periods ranging from 30 to 150 days. Radon concentrations varied from 132 Bq/m{sup 3} to 9456 Bq/m{sup 3}. The values of radon concentrations were analyzed together with information about rainfall and internal and external temperature values of the Santana cave environment and regional literature values for a possible relationship between radon variations and weather information. Both the determinations of {sup 22}'6Ra in water samples collected in some caves and rivers and radon emanation from a stalactite collected at Santana cave allowed to verify that the radon in the caves comes from the walls rocks. The verification of the radioactive equilibrium between {sup 222}Rn, {sup 218}Po and '2{sup 14}Po in the exposed detectors was prejudiced by the high tracks densities, committing the methodology effectiveness. The annual effective dose was calculated for three values obtained from the literature for the equilibrium factor. Considering the most realistic scenario, with equilibrium factor of 0.5 and 52 working weeks, the annual effective dose was 5.1 mSv/y. Concerning the worst scenario, which simulates an extreme case, adopting an equilibrium factor equal to 1 and 52 weeks of work per year, the annual effective dose is 10.2 m

  10. A comparison of alternative methods of calculating complementary cumulative distribution functions of health effects following an atmospheric radioactive release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponting, A.C.; Nair, S.

    1984-04-01

    A concept extensively used in studying the consequences of accidental atmospheric radioactive releases is that of the Complementary Cumulative Distribution Function, CCDF. Various methods of calculating CCDFs have been developed with particular applications in putting degraded core accidents in perspective and in identifying release sequences leading to high risks. This note compares three methods with specific reference to their accuracy and computational efficiency. For two of the methods (that used in the US Reactor Safety Study code CRAC2 and extended version of that method), the effects of varying the sector width and considering site-specific population distributions have been determined. For the third method it is only necessary to consider the effects of site-specific population distributions. (author)

  11. Use of radioanalytical methods for determination of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes in radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldo, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    Activated charcoal is a common type of radioactive waste that contains high concentrations of fission and activation products. The management of this waste includes its characterization aiming the determination and quantification of the specific radionuclides including those known as Difficult-to-Measure Radionuclides (RDM). The analysis of the RDM's generally involves complex radiochemical analysis for purification and separation of the radionuclides, which are expensive and time-consuming. The objective of this work was to define a methodology for sequential analysis of the isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium present in a type of radioactive waste, evaluating chemical yield, analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost. Three methodologies were compared and validated that employ ion exchange (TI + EC), extraction chromatography (EC) and extraction with polymers (ECP). The waste chosen was the activated charcoal from the purification system of primary circuit water cooling the reactor IEA-R1. The charcoal samples were dissolved by acid digestion followed by purification and separation of isotopes with ion exchange resins, extraction and chromatographic extraction polymers. Isotopes were analyzed on an alpha spectrometer, equipped with surface barrier detectors. The chemical yields were satisfactory for the methods TI + EC and EC. ECP method was comparable with those methods only for uranium. Statistical analysis as well the analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost revealed that EC method is the most effective for identifying and quantifying U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm present in charcoal. (author)

  12. Application of PHADEC method for the decontamination of radioactive steam piping components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Frano, R.; Pilo, F.; Aquaro, D.

    2013-01-01

    The dismantling of nuclear plants is a complex activity that originates often a large quantity of radioactive contaminated residue. In this paper the attention was focused on the PHADEC (Phosphoric Acid Decontamination) plant adopted for the clearance of Caorso NPP (in Italy) metallic systems and components contaminated by Co 60 (produced by the neutron capture in the iron materials), like the main steam lines, moisture separator of the turbine buildings, etc.. The PHADEC plant consists in a chemical off line treatment: the crud, deposited along the steam piping during life plant as an example, is removed by means of acid attacks in ponds coupled to a high pressure water washing. Due to the fact that the removed contaminated layers, essentially, iron oxides of various chemical composition, depend on components geometry, type of contamination and time of treatment in the PHADEC plant, it becomes of meaningful importance to suggest a procedure capable to improve the control of the PHADEC process parameters. This study aimed thus at the prediction and optimization of the mentioned treatment time in order to improve the efficiency of the plant itself and to achieve, in turn, the minimization of produced wastes. To the purpose an experimental campaign was carried out by analysing several samples, i.e. taken along the main steam piping line. Smear tests as well as metallographic analyses were carried out in order to determine respectively the radioactivity distribution and the crud composition on the inner surface of the components. Moreover the radioactivity in the crud thickness was measured. These values allowed finally to correlate the residence time in the acid attack ponds to the level of the achieved decontamination. (authors)

  13. Study of the degradation of liquid-organic radioactive wastes by electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez A, J. I.

    2015-01-01

    In this study degradation studies were performed on blank samples, in which two electrochemical cells with different electrodes were used, the first is constituted by mesh electrodes Ti/Ir-Ta/Ti and the second by rod electrodes Ti/Ddb, using as reference an electrolytic medium of scintillation liquid and scintillation liquid more water, applying different potentials ranging from 1 to 25 V. After obtaining the benchmarks, the treatment was applied to samples containing organic liquid radioactive waste, in this case a short half-life radioisotope as Sulfur-35, the degradation characterization of organic compounds was performed in infrared spectrometry. (Author)

  14. Gallium-67 activated charcoal: a new method for preparation of radioactive capsules for colonic transit study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Tsai, Shih-Chuan; Lin, Wan-Yu.

    2003-01-01

    Indium-111 is currently the radionuclide of choice for colonic transit study. However, it is expensive and not available in many hospitals. Technetium-99m has been proposed for colonic transit study but the short half-life has limited its use. Gallium-67 citrate is inexpensive and available in most countries. Most importantly, it has a suitable half-life for colonic transit study. Attempts have been made in some studies to use 67 Ga citrate to label activated charcoal, but the results have not been good because of poor stability. In this study, we successfully labelled activated charcoal with 67 Ga citrate by adding alcohol and 5% glucose solution. To evaluate the in vitro stability, the 67 Ga-activated charcoal was incubated in a milieu mimicking the intestinal content, containing lipase, trypsin and glycochenodeoxycholate at different pH values (6.0, 7.0, 7.4 and 8.0) and for different durations (0 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h). For the in vivo study, the 67 Ga-activated charcoal was loaded into a commercial empty enteric capsule. Colonic transit scintigraphy was performed in five volunteers, including three healthy people and two constipated patients, after intake of the radioactive capsule. Images were obtained at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 24h, 48 h, 72 h etc. until no radioactivity was detected in the bowel. Our data show that the in vitro stability of 67 Ga-activated charcoal was good. The labelling efficiency still exceeded 91% at 96 h at pH values of 6.0, 7.0 and 7.4. In the group with a pH value of 8.0, the labelling efficiency gradually fell during the 4-day incubation but was still higher than 88% at the end of the fourth day. In the in vivo study, most capsules disintegrated in the caecum/colon region, and the 67 Ga-activated charcoal mixed very well with bowel content. In addition, the radioactive charcoal could be detected clearly on the 72-h image, which is very important for the evaluation of colonic transit time in patients with constipation. In

  15. Application of PHADEC method for the decontamination of radioactive steam piping components of Caorso plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Frano, R.; Aquaro, D.; Fontani, E.; Pilo, F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Application of PHADEC chemical off-line methodology. • Decontamination of radioactive steam piping components of Caorso turbine building. • Experimental characterization of metallic components, e.g., by SEM analysis. • Measure of the efficiency of treatment by means of the reduction of activity and vs. the treatment time. • Minimization of secondary waste produced during decontamination activity of Caorso BWR plant. - Abstract: The dismantling of nuclear plants is a complex activity that originates often a large quantity of radioactive contaminated residue. In this paper the attention was focused on the PHADEC (PHosphoric Acid DEContamination) plant adopted for the clearance of Caorso NPP (in Italy) metallic systems and components contaminated by Co60 (produced by the neutron capture in the iron materials), like the main steam lines, moisture separator of the turbine buildings, etc. The PHADEC plant consists in a chemical off line treatment: the crud, deposited along the steam piping during life plant as an example, is removed by means of acid attacks in ponds coupled to a high pressure water washing. Due to the fact that the removed contaminated layers, essentially, iron oxides of various chemical composition, depend on components geometry, type of contamination and time of treatment in the PHADEC plant, it becomes of meaningful importance to suggest a procedure capable to improve the control of the PHADEC process parameters. This study aimed thus at the prediction and optimization of the mentioned treatment time in order to improve the efficiency of the plant itself and to achieve, in turn, the minimization of produced wastes. To the purpose an experimental campaign was carried out by analysing several samples, i.e., taken along the main steam piping line. Smear tests as well as metallographic analyses were carried out in order to determine respectively the radioactivity distribution and the crud composition on the inner surface of the

  16. Gallium-67 activated charcoal: a new method for preparation of radioactive capsules for colonic transit study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Kai-Yuan [Department of Radiological Technology, ChungTai Institute of Health Sciences and Technology, Taichung (Taiwan); Tsai, Shih-Chuan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua (Taiwan); Lin, Wan-Yu. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 160 Taichung Harbor Road, Section 3, 40705, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2003-06-01

    Indium-111 is currently the radionuclide of choice for colonic transit study. However, it is expensive and not available in many hospitals. Technetium-99m has been proposed for colonic transit study but the short half-life has limited its use. Gallium-67 citrate is inexpensive and available in most countries. Most importantly, it has a suitable half-life for colonic transit study. Attempts have been made in some studies to use {sup 67}Ga citrate to label activated charcoal, but the results have not been good because of poor stability. In this study, we successfully labelled activated charcoal with {sup 67}Ga citrate by adding alcohol and 5% glucose solution. To evaluate the in vitro stability, the {sup 67}Ga-activated charcoal was incubated in a milieu mimicking the intestinal content, containing lipase, trypsin and glycochenodeoxycholate at different pH values (6.0, 7.0, 7.4 and 8.0) and for different durations (0 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h). For the in vivo study, the {sup 67}Ga-activated charcoal was loaded into a commercial empty enteric capsule. Colonic transit scintigraphy was performed in five volunteers, including three healthy people and two constipated patients, after intake of the radioactive capsule. Images were obtained at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 24h, 48 h, 72 h etc. until no radioactivity was detected in the bowel. Our data show that the in vitro stability of {sup 67}Ga-activated charcoal was good. The labelling efficiency still exceeded 91% at 96 h at pH values of 6.0, 7.0 and 7.4. In the group with a pH value of 8.0, the labelling efficiency gradually fell during the 4-day incubation but was still higher than 88% at the end of the fourth day. In the in vivo study, most capsules disintegrated in the caecum/colon region, and the {sup 67}Ga-activated charcoal mixed very well with bowel content. In addition, the radioactive charcoal could be detected clearly on the 72-h image, which is very important for the evaluation of colonic transit time in patients

  17. Investigation of methods for physical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols and ground dust fractions on radioactive contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem'ev, O.I.; Osintsev, A.Yu.; Gaziev, Ya.I.; Gordeev, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents data about current situation and trends to develop investigation methods for physical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols and ground dust fractions that are observed on the former Semipalatinsk Test Site area and adjacent regions. It was considered one of the options for comprehensive collection of radioactive aerosols as fallout within control area of atmospheric contamination and underlying surface with aerosol products of the man-caused dusting on the former STS area to determine rates of 'dry' deposition and ground-based activity concentration contained in these products of radionuclides at different distances from place of dusting. (author)

  18. First results of Trojan horse method using radioactive ion beams: {sup 18}F(p,α) at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M. [Università KORE, Enna, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and present address RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Binh, D. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and present address Institute of Physics and Electronics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Bishop, S. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama, Japan and present address Physik Department E12, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Coc, A. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de masse, IN2P3, Orsay (France); De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3, Orsay (France)

    2014-05-02

    The abundance of {sup 18}F in Nova explosions is considered to be an important piece of information for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. It is then necessary to study the nuclear processess that both produce and destroy this isotope in Novae. Among these latter reactions, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O is one of the most important {sup 18}F destruction channels. Here we report on an experiment performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of the University of Tokyo. This was the first experiment that used the Trojan Horse method applied to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction.

  19. First results of Trojan horse method using radioactive ion beams: 18F(p,α) at astrophysical energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Binh, D.; Bishop, S.; Coc, A.; De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of 18 F in Nova explosions is considered to be an important piece of information for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. It is then necessary to study the nuclear processess that both produce and destroy this isotope in Novae. Among these latter reactions, the 18 F(p,α) 15 O is one of the most important 18 F destruction channels. Here we report on an experiment performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of the University of Tokyo. This was the first experiment that used the Trojan Horse method applied to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction

  20. Lifetime measurements using radioactive ion beams at intermediate energies and the Doppler shift method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewald, A.; Melon, B.; Pissulla, T.; Rother, W.; Fransen, C.; Moeller, O.; Zell, K.O.; Jolie, J. [IKP, Univ. zu Koeln (Germany); Petkov, P. [Bulg. Acad. of Science, INRNE, Solfia (Bulgaria); Starosta, K.; Przemyslaw, A.; Miller, D.; Chester, A.; Vaman, C.; Voss, P.; Gade, A.; Glasmacher, T.; Stolz, A.; Bazin, D.; Weisshaar, D. [NSCL, MSU, East Lansing (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Absolute transition probabilities are crucial quantities in nuclear structure physics. Therefore, it is important to establish Doppler shift (plunger) techniques also for the measurement of level lifetimes in radioactive ion beam experiments. After a first successful test of the Doppler Shift technique at intermediate energy (52MeV/u) with a stable {sup 124}Xe beam, a plunger has been built and used in two experiments, performed at the NSCL/MSU with the SEGA Ge-array and the S800 spectrometer. The aim of the first experiment was to investigate the plunger technique after a knock-out reaction using a radioactive {sup 65}Ge beam at 100 MeV/u for populating excited states in {sup 64}Ge. The second experiment aimed to measure the lifetimes of the first 2{sup +} states in {sup 110,114}Pd with the plunger technique after Coulomb excitation at beam energies of 54 MeV/u. First results of both experiments will be presented and discussed. (orig.)

  1. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu.

    1996-01-01

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  2. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Megumu

    1996-12-03

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  3. Experimental methods in radioactive ion-beam target/ion source development and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welton, R.F.; Alton, G.D.; Cui, B.; Murray, S.N.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed off-line experimental techniques and apparatuses that permit direct measurement of effusive-flow delay times and ionization efficiencies for nearly any chemically reactive element in high-temperature target/ion sources (TIS) commonly used for on-line radioactive ion-beam (RIB) generation. The apparatuses include a hot Ta valve for effusive-flow delay-time measurements, a cooled molecular injection system for determination of ionization efficiencies, and a gas flow measurement/control system for introducing very low, well-defined molecular flows into the TIS. Measurements are performed on a test stand using molecular feed compounds containing stable complements of the radioactive nuclei of interest delivered to the TIS at flow rates commensurate with on-line RIB generation. In this article, the general techniques are described and effusive-flow delay times and ionization efficiency measurements are reported for fluorine in an electron-beam plasma target/ion source developed for RIB generation and operated in both positive- and negative-ion extraction modes. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  4. Processing method and processing device for liquid waste containing surface active agent and radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Baba, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Ryozo; Yukita, Atsushi.

    1998-01-01

    Washing liquid wastes containing surface active agents and radioactive materials are sent to a deaerating vessel. Ozone is blown into the deaerating vessel. The washing liquid wastes dissolved with ozone are introduced to a UV ray irradiation vessel. UV rays are irradiated to the washing liquid wastes, and hydroxy radicals generated by photodecomposition of dissolved ozone oxidatively decompose surface active agents contained in the washing liquid wastes. The washing liquid wastes discharged from the UV ray irradiation vessel are sent to an activated carbon mixing vessel and mixed with powdery activated carbon. The surface active agents not decomposed in the UV ray irradiation vessel are adsorbed to the activated carbon. Then, the activated carbon and washing liquid wastes are separated by an activated carbon separating/drying device. Radioactive materials (iron oxide and the like) contained in the washing liquid wastes are mostly granular, and they are separated and removed from the washing liquid wastes in the activated carbon separating/drying device. (I.N.)

  5. Characterization of sealed radioactive sources. Uncertainty analysis to improve detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, D.G.; Sommers, J.D.; Adamic, M.L.; Jimenez, M.; Giglio, J.J.; Carney, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    A radioactive 137 Cs source has been analyzed for the radioactive parent 137 Cs and stable decay daughter 137 Ba. The ratio of the daughter to parent atoms is used to estimate the date when Cs was purified prior to source encapsulation (an 'age' since purification). The isotopes were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after chemical separation. In addition, Ba was analyzed by isotope dilution ICP-MS (ID-ICP-MS). A detailed error analysis of the mass spectrometric work has been undertaken to identify areas of improvement, as well as quantifying the effect the errors have on the 'age' determined. This paper reports an uncertainty analysis to identifying areas of improvement and alternative techniques that may reduce the uncertainties. In particular, work on isotope dilution using ICP-MS for the 'age' determination of sealed sources is presented. The results will be compared to the original work done using external standards to calibrate the ICP-MS instrument. (author)

  6. Method of treating the waste liquid of a washing containing a radioactive substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaguchi, Yusuke; Tsuyuki, Takashi; Kaneko, Masato; Sato, Yasuhiko; Yamaguchi, Takashi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To separate waste liquid resulting from washing and which contains a radioactive substance and surface active agent into high purity water and a solid waste substance containing a small quantity of surface active agent. Structure: To waste liquid from a waste liquid tank is added a pH adjusting agent for adjusting the pH to 5.5, and the resultant liquid is sent to an agglomeration reaction tank, in which an inorganic agglomerating agent is added to the waste liquid to cause a major proportion of the radioactive substance and surface active agent to form flocks produced through agglomeration. Then, the waste liquid is sent from the agglomeration reaction tank to a froth separation tank, to which air is supplied through a perforated plate to cause frothing. The over-flowing liquid is de-frothed, and then the insoluble matter is separated as sludge, followed by hydroextraction and drying for solidification. The treated liquid extracted from a froth separation tank is sent to an agglomerating agent recovery tank for separation of the agglomeration agent, and then the residual surface active agent is removed by adsorption in an active carbon adsorption tower, followed by concentration by evaporation in an evaporating can. The concentrated liquid is extracted and then solidified with cement or asphalt. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Characterization of a Gas-Purge Method to Access 11C-Carbon-Dioxide Radioactivity in Blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y.; Green, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-11 (t 1/2 : 20 minutes) labeled radiotracers, such as 11 C-acetate and 11 C-palmitate are widely used in positron emission tomography (PET) for noninvasive evaluation of myocardial metabolism under varied physiological conditions. These tracers are attractive probes of tissue physiology, because they are simply radiolabeled versions of the native biochemical substrates. One of the major metabolites generated by these tracers upon the administration is 11 CO 2 produced via the citric acid cycle. In quantitative modeling of 11 C-acetate and 11 C-palmitate PET data, the fraction of blood 11 C radioactivity present as 11 CO 2 needs to be measured to obtain a correct radiotracer arterial input function. Accordingly, the literature describes a method whereby the total blood 11 C-activity is counted in blood samples treated with base solution, while the fraction of 11 CO 2 is measured after the blood is treated with acid followed by a 10 minutes gas-purge. However, a detailed description of the experimental validation of this method was not provided. The goal of this study was to test the reliability of a 10-minute gas purging method used to assay 11 CO 2 radioactivity in blood. (author)

  8. Research of radioactive waste storage cask/canister materials, spent nuclear fuels and various radioactive waste forms and development of their assessment methods. Final report for Stage 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, D.; Balek, V.; Červinka, R.; Večerník, P.; Člupek, M.; Kouřil, M.; Novák, P.; Stoulil, J.; Silber, R.

    2013-08-01

    The main topics treated are: Research and development of methodologies for canister/cask material degradation assessment; Laboratory research of selected materials of canister/cask with radioactive waste; and Research and assessment of canister/cask materials in natural granite rocks. Two additional documents are appended: Corrosion rate determination for samples in compacted bentonite in anaerobic conditions (methodology), and Roll test for corrosion test in an occluded solution at the interface between a radioactive waste disposal canister and the bentonite cover. (P.A.)

  9. Development of plasma melting technology for treatment of low level radioactive waste. Pt. 9. Treatment method for combustible wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Shinji; Adachi, Kazuo; Amakawa, Masashi

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the incineration method for the miscellaneous solid waste containing the low level radioactive combustibles (wood, PE, PVC) in a plasma furnace. The maximum weights of the respective combustibles to be fed into the plasma furnace and the incineration conditions for continuous feeding of the respective combustibles were examined experimentally. As a result, a experimental equation which expresses the maximum weights of the respective combustibles to be fed in reference to the residence time in the plasma furnace was obtained by using apparent reaction rate constants. Furthermore, a calculation method for the feeding intervals in reference to the weights of the combustibles fed each time was obtained for the continuous feeding in the plasma furnace, and the method was found to be consistent with experimental results. (author)

  10. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  11. Analysis of dangerous components in radioactive waste: choice of the method for processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozhovan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The migration and redistribution of elements in the environment leading to excess abundance of certain elements can be capable of producing adverse effects on an individual under appropriate conditions. The radiotoxicity is assessed for high level activity wastes. The relative toxicity index of high-level waste is given. The dependence of the ingestion hazards from SRS for different nuclides and fission products on the storage time is presented. The relative toxicity index for PWR spent fuel decreases with time and at ∼ 480,000 years is becoming the same as of the natural uranium ore. If the nuclear fuel is reprocessed and plutonium recycled, after ∼ 2000 years the toxicity of the waste becomes less than the toxicity of natural uranium. The real (residual) radiotoxicity and the index of real radiotoxicity are discussed. Russian experience in radioactive waste classification is presented

  12. Comparison of SUREPAK life cycle costs to other methods of low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, S.J.; Little, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Comparisons of costs of low-level radioactive waste management techniques invariably degenerate into parochial arguments over differences in commercial objectives. The purpose of this paper is to establish a common basis for comparing technologies and then to examine the result as a complete cycle instead of a snapshot view taken at an arbitrary point in the progression. One objective is to portray cost sensitivity in terms of the options available for waste management. A second, perhaps less obvious, point is the definition of cost factors hidden from the short-term view. The final objective is to show the cumulative effects of costs externally imposed without reference to the technology employed (e.g., legislated surcharges based on arbitrary parameters)

  13. Test methods for selection of materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste vitrification. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Corbett, R.A.; Morrison, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Candidate materials of construction were evaluated for a facility at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant to vitrify high-level radioactive waste. Limited operating experience was available under the corrosive conditions of the complex vitrification process. The objective of the testing program was to provide a high degree of assurance that equipment will meet or exceed design lifetimes. To meet this objective in reasonable time and minimum cost, a program was designed consisting of a combination of coupon immersion and electrochemical laboratory tests and pilot-scale tests. Stainless steels and nickel-based alloys were tested. Alloys that were most resistant to general and local attack contained nickel, molybdenum (>9%), and chromium (where Cr + Mo > 30%). Alloy C-276 was selected as the reference material for process equipment. Stellite 6 was selected for abrasive service in the presence of formic acid. Alloy 690 and ALLCORR were selected for specific applications

  14. Treatment methods for radioactive mixed wastes in commercial low-level wastes: technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Kempf, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment options for the management of three generic categories of radioactive mixed waste in commercial low-level wastes (LLW) have been identified and evaluated. These wastes were characterized as part of a BNL study in which LLW generators were surveyed for information on potential chemical hazards in their wastes. The general treatment options available for mixed wastes are destruction, immobilization, and reclamation. Solidification, absorption, incineration, acid digestion, wet-air oxidation, distillation, liquid-liquid wastes. Containment, segregation, decontamination, and solidification or containment of residues, have been considered for lead metal wastes which have themselves been contaminated and are not used for purposes of waste disposal shielding, packaging, or containment. For chromium-containing wastes, solidification, incineration, wet-air oxidation, acid digestion, and containment have been considered. For each of these wastes, the management option evaluation has included an assessment of testing appropriate to determine the effect of the option on both the radiological and potential chemical hazards present

  15. Treatment methods for radioactive mixed wastes in commercial low-level wastes: technical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Kempf, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment options for the management of three generic categories of radioactive mixed waste in commercial low-level wastes (LLW) have been identified and evaluated. These wastes were characterized as part of a BNL study in which LLW generators were surveyed for information on potential chemical hazards in their wastes. The general treatment options available for mixed wastes are destruction, immobilization, and reclamation. Solidification, absorption, incineration, acid digestion, wet-air oxidation, distillation, liquid-liquid wastes. Containment, segregation, decontamination, and solidification or containment of residues, have been considered for lead metal wastes which have themselves been contaminated and are not used for purposes of waste disposal shielding, packaging, or containment. For chromium-containing wastes, solidification, incineration, wet-air oxidation, acid digestion, and containment have been considered. For each of these wastes, the management option evaluation has included an assessment of testing appropriate to determine the effect of the option on both the radiological and potential chemical hazards present.

  16. Analysis of high-level radioactive slurries as a method to reduce DWPF turnaround times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.J.; Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Hay, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) samples as slurries rather than as dried or vitrified samples is an effective way to reduce sample turnaround times. Slurries can be dissolved with a mixture of concentrated acids to yield solutions for elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Slurry analyses can be performed in eight hours, whereas analyses of vitrified samples require up to 40 hours to complete. Analyses of melter feed samples consisting of the DWPF borosilicate frit and either simulated or actual DWPF radioactive sludge were typically within a range of 3--5% of the predicted value based on the relative amounts of sludge and frit added to the slurry. The results indicate that the slurry analysis approach yields analytical accuracy and precision competitive with those obtained from analyses of vitrified samples. Slurry analyses offer a viable alternative to analyses of solid samples as a simple way to reduce analytical turnaround times

  17. Apparatus of vaporizing and condensing liquid radioactive wastes and its operation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Hiromitsu; Tajima, Fumio.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent corrosion of material for a vapor-condenser and a vapor heater and to prevent radioactive contamination of heated vapor. Structure: Liquid waste is fed from a liquid feeding tank to a vapor-condenser to vaporize and condense the waste. Uncondensed liquid waste, which is not in a level of a given density, is temporally stored in a batch tank through a switching valve and a pipe. Prior to successive feeding from the liquid feeding tank, the uncondensed liquid waste within the batch tank is returned by a return pump to the condenser, after which a new liquid is fed from the liquid feeding tank for re-vaporization and condensation in the vapor-condenser. Then, similar operation is repeated until the uncondensed liquid waste assumes a given density, and when the uncondensed liquid waste reaches a given density, the condensed liquid waste is discharged into the storage tank through the switching valve. (Ohara, T.)

  18. Assessments of the thermal evolution for a radioactive waste final repository using analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radut, A. C.; Roman, M. R.; Florea, S.; Ionescu, D. V.; Olteanu, G.; Valeca, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the designing process for a radioactive final repository concept, the temperature evolution over time is a significant issue for the stability and long-term safety of entire emplacement. In particular, the maximum value of temperature in the whole structure, during time, must not exceed a certain safety value which depends, beside other criteria, on the bulk material of the repository. A computer code TEMPROC, based on analytical model for the transient thermal heat conduction, described in this paper, was developed inside ''Fuel Performance''Department from ICN Pitesti, in order to evaluate the waste repository's temperature distribution. The program was developed under ''Microsoft FORTRAN Power Station''platform that provides IMSL subroutines library support for numeric algorithm. So the program is relative small, with a good calculus speed. The numerical results obtained with TEMPROC computer code, have been acceptably compared with similar existing data from scientific literature [1]. (authors)

  19. Technical and Economic Problems Associated with the Development of Methods of Processing and Using Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiriet, L.; Sauteron, J.; Oger, C.

    1968-01-01

    The paper briefly reviews the various techniques used in processing the radioactive wastes which unavoidably result from the generation of electric power from nuclear sources. The paper goes on to define the relative importance, in nuclear fuel cycles, of the problem raised by these wastes. Emphasis is placed on the economic influence of management policies on the cost of power generation, and hence on the relative position of nuclear energy. A substantial percentage of these wastes can be economically utilized. Attention is drawn to the major technical and economic features of the industry which will come into being as a result of this utilization. The major uses anticipated are discussed: radiation sources, heat sources, auxiliary power generation. The paper concludes that satisfactory solutions have already been found to these problems, and describes possible improvements. (author) [fr

  20. System analysis methods for geological repository of high level radioactive waste in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weiming; Wang Ju; Li Yunfeng; Jin Yuanxin; Zhao Honggang

    2009-01-01

    Taking Beishan granite site as an example, this paper proposes the conceptual and structural design of repository for high level radioactive waste at first. Then the function, structure, environment and evolution of the repository are described by the methodology of system analysis. Based on these designs and descriptions, a calculation model for the repository is developed with software GoldSim. At last, this calculation model is applied to emulate the space-time distribution of repository radiotoxicity, to analyze the sensitivity of parameters in the model, to optimize the design parameters, and to predict and assess the repository performance. The results of this study can provide technical supports for resources allocation and coordination of R and D projects. (authors)