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Sample records for radioactive matters guide

  1. Applicant guide for the demands of expedition and agreement approval of the parcel or radioactive matter models for civil use transported on the public highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    This guide applies to the models of parcels or radioactive materials for which an approval of the competent authorities is required by the regulations of the dangerous goods transportations. It is about models used for: radioactive materials under special shape, lowly dispersible radioactive materials, packages containing 0.1 kg or more of uranium hexafluoride, any package containing fissile materials, the B(U) type packages, and the B(M) type packages; the C type packages. (N.C.)

  2. Classification of Radioactive Waste. General Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication is a revision of an earlier Safety Guide of the same title issued in 1994. It recommends revised waste management strategies that reflect changes in practices and approaches since then. It sets out a classification system for the management of waste prior to disposal and for disposal, driven by long term safety considerations. It includes a number of schemes for classifying radioactive waste that can be used to assist with planning overall national approaches to radioactive waste management and to assist with operational management at facilities. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. The radioactive waste classification scheme; Appendix: The classification of radioactive waste; Annex I: Evolution of IAEA standards on radioactive waste classification; Annex II: Methods of classification; Annex III: Origin and types of radioactive waste

  3. Classification of Radioactive Waste. General Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-11-15

    This publication is a revision of an earlier Safety Guide of the same title issued in 1994. It recommends revised waste management strategies that reflect changes in practices and approaches since then. It sets out a classification system for the management of waste prior to disposal and for disposal, driven by long term safety considerations. It includes a number of schemes for classifying radioactive waste that can be used to assist with planning overall national approaches to radioactive waste management and to assist with operational management at facilities. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. The radioactive waste classification scheme; Appendix: The classification of radioactive waste; Annex I: Evolution of IAEA standards on radioactive waste classification; Annex II: Methods of classification; Annex III: Origin and types of radioactive waste.

  4. Ontario hydro radioactive material transportation field guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, W.

    1987-01-01

    The recent introduction of both the AECB Transport Packaging of Radioactive Material Regulations and Transport Canada's Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations have significantly altered the requirements for transporting radioactive material in Canada. Extensive additional training as well as certification of several hundred Ontario Hydro employees has been necessary to ensure compliance with the additional and revised regulatory requirements. To assist in the training of personnel, an 'active' corporate Ontario Hydro Field Guide for Radioactive Material Transport document has been developed and published. The contents of this Field Guide identify current Ontario Hydro equipment and procedures as well as the updated relevant regulatory requirements within Canada. In addition, to satisfying Ontario Hydro requirements for this type of information over two thousand of these Field Guides have been provided to key emergency response personnel throughout the province of Ontario to assist in their transportation accident response training

  5. Applicant guide for the demands of expedition and agreement approval of the parcel or radioactive matter models for civil use transported on the public highway; Guide du requerant pour les demandes d'approbation d'expedition et d'agrement des modeles de colis ou de matieres radioactives a usage civil transportes sur la voie publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-03-15

    This guide applies to the models of parcels or radioactive materials for which an approval of the competent authorities is required by the regulations of the dangerous goods transportations. It is about models used for: radioactive materials under special shape, lowly dispersible radioactive materials, packages containing 0.1 kg or more of uranium hexafluoride, any package containing fissile materials, the B(U) type packages, and the B(M) type packages; the C type packages. (N.C.)

  6. Condensed matter physics with radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, H.

    1996-01-01

    An overview of the present uses of radioactive ion beams from ISOLDE for condensed matter research is presented. As simple examples of such work, tracer studies of diffusion processes with radioisotopes and blocking/channeling measurements of emitted particles for lattice location are discussed. Especially the application of nuclear hyperfine interaction techniques such as PAC or Moessbauer spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to study local electronic and structural properties at impurities. Recently, interesting information on impurity properties in semiconductors has been obtained using all these methods. The extreme sensitivity of nuclear techniques makes them also well suited for investigations of surfaces, interfaces, and biomolecules. Some ideas for future uses of high energy radioactive ion beams beyond the scope of the present projects are outlined: the study of diffusion in highly immiscible systems by deep implantation, nuclear polarization with the tilted-foil technique, and transmutation doping of wide-bandgap semiconductors. (orig.)

  7. Radioactivity handbook. Volume 2: radioactive disintegrations, radiations-matter interactions, applications of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.; Bonfand, E.; Rimbert, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    This volume is the second one of a group of three. The first one exposed nuclides, with neutrons and protons in a stable building: atomic nucleus. Here is the second one with unstable, radioactive nucleus. After the description of different kinds of disintegrations, it is justified to follow radiations in matter and modifications attached to them; different uses of radioactivity are developed in medicine, age determination, industrial utilization and biology

  8. Mind over Matter. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This teacher's guide aims to develop an understanding among students in grades 5-9 about the biological effects of drug use. The guide provides background information on the anatomy of the brain, nerve cells and neurotransmission, and the effects of drugs on the brain. Drugs described in this guide include marijuana, opiates, inhalants,…

  9. Guide for the control and recording of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This guide present the aspects related to the control and recording of radioactive wastes in their points of origin. Then it is of great importance to fulfill these instructions so as to achieve a successful management of radioactive waste

  10. Always more radioactive matters to manage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, J.

    2009-01-01

    The national agency for radioactive waste management published at the end of June (2009)its new three-yearly inventory of radioactive matters and wastes. for this edition, the numbers are stopped at the 31. december 2007. The volume of conditioned wastes represents 1.15 millions of cubic meters. 62% of these wastes come from nuclear industry. The sectors of research and defence each produce 17% of the whole. The remaining 4% come from others industries and medical sector. currently, 824 609 cubic meters are stored. The most being low and intermediate activity at short life (68%) and very low activity (20%). with 2293 cubic meters the high level activity wastes represent 0.2% of the total volume but constitute 94.98% of the total radioactivity. They come from the reprocessing of spent fuels of electronuclear industry and content fission products and minor actinides. They are not still stored but mixed to a glass matrix melt in stainless steel container. (N.C.)

  11. Standard guide for sampling radioactive tank waste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide addresses techniques used to obtain grab samples from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste created during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Guidance on selecting appropriate sampling devices for waste covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1). Vapor sampling of the head-space is not included in this guide because it does not significantly affect slurry retrieval, pipeline transport, plugging, or mixing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. Guide to radioactive waste management literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houser, B.L.; Holoway, C.F.; Madewell, D.G.

    1977-10-01

    Increased public concern about radioactive waste management has called attention to this aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle. Socio-economic planning and technical development are being undertaken to assure that such wastes will be managed safely. This Guide to Radioactive Waste Management Literature has been compiled to serve scientists, engineers, administrators, legislators, and private citizens by directing them to sources of information on various aspects of the subject. References were selected from about 6000 documents on waste management in the computerized information centers in Oak Ridge. The documents were selected, examined, indexed, and abstracted between 1966-1976 by several knowledgeable indexers, principally at the Nuclear Safety Information Center. The selected references were further indexed and classified into 12 categories. Each category is discussed in enough detail to give some understandng of present technology in various phases of waste management and some appreciation of the attendant issues and problems. The bibliographic part of this guide exists in computerized form in the Health Physics Information System and is available through the Oak Ridge Information Center Complex for searching from remote terminals

  13. Guide to radioactive waste management literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houser, B.L.; Holoway, C.F.; Madewell, D.G.

    1977-10-01

    Increased public concern about radioactive waste management has called attention to this aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle. Socio-economic planning and technical development are being undertaken to assure that such wastes will be managed safely. This Guide to Radioactive Waste Management Literature has been compiled to serve scientists, engineers, administrators, legislators, and private citizens by directing them to sources of information on various aspects of the subject. References were selected from about 6000 documents on waste management in the computerized information centers in Oak Ridge. The documents were selected, examined, indexed, and abstracted between 1966-1976 by several knowledgeable indexers, principally at the Nuclear Safety Information Center. The selected references were further indexed and classified into 12 categories. Each category is discussed in enough detail to give some understandng of present technology in various phases of waste management and some appreciation of the attendant issues and problems. The bibliographic part of this guide exists in computerized form in the Health Physics Information System and is available through the Oak Ridge Information Center Complex for searching from remote terminals.

  14. Guide relative to the modalities of statements and to the codification of criteria relative to the significant events involving the safety, the radiation protection or the environment applicable to the base nuclear installations and to the transport of radioactive matters; Guide relatif aux modalites de declaration et a la codification des criteres relatifs aux evenements significatifs impliquant la surete, la radioprotection ou l'environnement applicable aux installations nucleaires de base et au transport de matieres radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    It is necessary to analyze the events detected on an installation in order to be sure that an already occurred event does not be repeated, by taking into account the appropriate remedial measures, to avoid a worsen situation could occur by analyzing the potential consequences of precursory events of more serious ones, to promote the correct practices to improve the safety. The present guide has for vocation to define the arrangements enforceable to nuclear operators about the statements modalities of such events when these ones concern the safety of nuclear facilities, transport of radioactive matters, radiation protection or environmental protection. In any case it can substitute to the specific obligations coming from the work code, public health code and environment code, licensing decrees about releases. (N.C.)

  15. Original jurisdiction in matters relating to transport of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Decisions on actions for avoidance of government supervision in matters of transport of radioactive substances are placed under the original jurisdiction of administrative courts. (Kassel Administrative Court, decision of 20 December 1988 - 8 A 699/88). (orig.) [de

  16. Design guides for radioactive-material-handling facilities and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doman, D.R.; Barker, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Fourteen key areas relating to facilities and equipment for handling radioactive materials involved in examination, reprocessing, fusion fuel handling and remote maintenance have been defined and writing groups established to prepare design guides for each areas. The guides will give guidance applicable to design, construction, operation, maintenance and safety, together with examples and checklists. Each guide will be reviewed by an independent review group. The guides are expected to be compiled and published as a single document

  17. Guide for disposition of radioactive-material sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.; Selby, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    This guide has been prepared to assist DOE Energy Technology Centers in disposing of radioactive-material sources. The guide describes the steps and requirements necessary to dispose of unwanted sources. The steps include obtaining approvals, source characterization, source disposition, packaging requirements, and shipment preparation. A flow chart is provided in the guide to assist the user in the necessary sequential steps of source disposition

  18. The transport safety of radioactive matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landier, D.; Louet, Ch.A.; Robert, Ch.; Binet, J.; Malesys, P.; Pourade, C.; Le Meur, A.; Robert, M.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.Y.; Hello, E.; Laumond, A.; Regnault, Ph.; Gourlay, M.; Bruhl, G.; Malvache, P.; Dumesnil, J.; Cohen, B.; Sert, G.; Pain, M.; Green, L.; Hartenstein, M.; Stewart, J.; Cottens, E.; Liebens, M.; Marignac, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Since the control of transport of radioactive materials was given to A.S.N. 10 years ago, A.S.N. has strengthened the radioactive material transport inspections, in particular of the designers, manufacturers, carriers and consignors. A.S.N. has implemented INES scale for incidents during transport. It has participated as much as possible to IAEA working groups in order to improve the international regulatory framework. And, supported by I.R.S.N., A.S.N. has performed a periodic safety review of existing package models and has approved new models incorporating innovative design features. Finally, A.S.N. has tested its emergency responses to procedures to an accident involving the transport of radioactive materials. All these actions taken together have led to improvement in and reinforcement of the safety culture among the transport operators; this has been acknowledged by a recent audit T.R.A.N.S.A.S. performed by IAEA. In spite of all these actions, there are not approved by the competent authority. As A.S.N. is in charge of every field in radioprotection, this should help to intensify the control. In addition, the different kinds of transport are also tackled as rail transport with S.N.C.F. radiological risk training, air transport through nuclear medicine. Some experience feedback are given such radioactive waste transport to the storage facilities in the Aube or how to protect the population after a nuclear transport incident with the O.R.S.E.C.-T.M.S. plans. (N.C.)

  19. Frederick Soddy and the practical significance of radioactive matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, M.I.

    1979-01-01

    A short account is given of Soddy's interest in the practical significance of radioactive matter, illustrated by his work on mesothorium as a radium substitute and by his publications pointing out the possible exploitation of atomic energy in an industrial society. (U.K.)

  20. Predisposal management of high level radioactive waste. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated in the generation of electricity in nuclear power plants and in the use of radioactive material in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized. The principles and requirements that govern the safety of the management of radioactive waste are presented in 'The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management', 'Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety' and 'Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, Including Decommissioning'. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide regulatory bodies and the operators that generate and manage radioactive waste with recommendations on how to meet the principles and requirements established in Refs for the predisposal management of HLW. This Safety Guide applies to the predisposal management of HLW. For liquid HLW arising from the reprocessing of spent fuel the recommendations of this Safety Guide apply from when liquid waste from the first extraction process is collected for storage and subsequent processing. Recommendations and guidance on the storage of spent fuel, whether or not declared as waste, subsequent to its removal from the storage facility of a reactor are provided in Refs. For spent fuel declared as waste this Safety Guide applies to all activities subsequent to its removal from the storage facility of a reactor and prior to its disposal. Requirements pertaining to the transport of spent fuel, whether or not declared as waste, and of all forms of HLW are established. This Safety Guide provides recommendations on the safety aspects of managing HLW, including the planning, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of equipment or facilities for the predisposal management of HLW. It addresses the following elements: (a) The characterization and processing (i.e. pretreatment

  1. A guide for controlling consumer products containing radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Consumer products are considered regardless of the purpose for which the radionuclide is added. For example, the purpose may be to make use of the ionising radiation emitted by the substance in the product itself (e.g. radioluminescent devices antistatic devices and ionisation chamber smoke detectors), or to make use of some other property of the material where the presence of radiation in the final product is merely adventitious (e.g. thorium gas mantles, ceramics with uranium glazes, and products containing radioactive tracers added to facilitate manufacturing and inspection processes). The Guide does not cover some products containing natural radioactive substances which have not been intentionally added, such as building materials. The Guide does not cover medicinal products and pharmaceuticals, nuclear powered cardiac pacemakers, or electronic equipment, such as television receivers, that emit X-rays. Unlike the 1970 Guide, this Guide does not consider those products, such as EXIT signs, containing gaseous tritium light sources, that would not be supplied directly to members of the public. The Guide is concerned mainly with the exposure arising from consumer products of those persons who are not subject to any regulatory controls for purposes of radiation protection in normal circumstances. Members of the public come under this heading, but not workers involved in the manufacture of consumer products. These workers will normally be subject to separate control. Radiological protection concepts and policy for the control of radioactive consumer products and licensing and post-licensing surveillance are developed

  2. Security of Radioactive Sources. Implementing Guide (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    There are concerns that terrorist or criminal groups could gain access to high activity radioactive sources and use these sources maliciously. The IAEA is working with Member States to increase control, accounting and security of radioactive sources to prevent their malicious use and the associated potential consequences. Based on extensive input from technical and legal experts, this implementation guide sets forth guidance on the security of sources and will serve as a useful tool for legislators and regulators, physical protection specialists and facility and transport operators, as well as for law enforcement officers.

  3. Categorization of Radioactive Sources. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to establish safety standards to protect health and minimize danger to life and property - standards which the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which a State can apply by means of its regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. A comprehensive body of safety standards under regular review, together with the IAEA's assistance in their application, has become a key element in a global safety regime. In the mid-1990s, a major overhaul of the IAEA's safety standards programme was initiated, with a revised oversight committee structure and a systematic approach to updating the entire corpus of standards. The new standards that have resulted are of a high calibre and reflect best practices in Member States. With the assistance of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its safety standards. Safety standards are only effective, however, if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services - which range in scope from engineering safety, operational safety, and radiation, transport and waste safety to regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations - assist Member States in applying the standards and appraise their effectiveness. These safety services enable valuable insights to be shared and I continue to urge all Member States to make use of them. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety is a national responsibility, and many Member States have decided to adopt the IAEA's safety standards for use in their national regulations. For the Contracting Parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions. The standards are also applied by designers, manufacturers and operators around the world to enhance nuclear and radiation safety in power generation, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education

  4. Matter-wave scattering and guiding by atomic arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaishnav, J. Y.; Walls, J. D.; Apratim, M.; Heller, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that linear arrays of atoms can guide matter waves, much as fiber optics guide light. We model the atomic line as a quasi-one-dimensional array of s-wave point scatterers embedded in two-dimensions. Our theoretical study reveals how matter-wave guiding arises from the interplay of scattering phenomena with bands and conduction along the array. We discuss the conditions under which a straight or curved array of atoms can guide a beam focused at one end of the array

  5. Benchmarking Microwave Cavity Dark Matter Searches using a Radioactive Source

    CERN Multimedia

    Caspers, F

    2014-01-01

    A radioactive source is proposed as a calibration device to verify the sensitivity of a microwave dark matter search experiment. The interaction of e.g., electrons travelling in an arbitrary direction and velocity through an electromagnetically “empty” microwave cavity can be calculated numerically. We give an estimation of the energy deposited by a charged particle into a particular mode. Numerical examples are given for beta emitters and two particular cases: interaction with a field free cavity and interaction with a cavity which already contains an electromagnetic field. Each particle delivers a certain amount of energy related to the modal R/Q value of the cavity. The transferred energy is a function of the particles trajectory and its velocity. It results in a resonant response of the cavity, which can be observed using a sensitive microwave receiver, provided that the deposited energy is significantly above the single photon threshold.

  6. Methodological guide: management of industrial sites potentially contaminated by radioactive substances; Guide methodologique: gestion des sites industriels potentiellement contamines par des substances radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    At the request of the Ministries of Health and the Environment, IPSN is preparing and publishing the first version of the methodological guide devoted to managing industrial sites potentially contaminated by radioactive substances. This guide describes a procedure for defining and choosing strategies for rehabilitating such industrial sites. (author)

  7. Standard guide for radioactive pathway methodology for release of sites following decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide guidance in determining site-specific conversion factors for translating between dose limits and residual radioactive contamination levels on equipment structures, and land areas. This guide is to serve as a guide to acceptable methodology for translating the yet to be determined dose limits into allowable levels of residual radioactive materials that can be left at a site following decommissioning

  8. MARS, a new beamline for radioactive matter studies at SOLEIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Schlutig, Sandrine; Hermange, Herve; Sitaud, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    MARS (Multi Analyses on Radioactive Samples) beamline is the hard X-ray bending magnet beamline dedicated to the study of radioactive matter of the new French synchrotron SOLEIL. The beamline, which has been built thanks to a close partnership and support by the CEA, has been designed to provide X-rays in the energy range of 3.5 keV to 35 keV. This allows to encompass M and L absorption edges of actinides, as well as K edges of transition metals (that are present in alloys and fuel claddings) up to heavy halogens, rare gases and alkalis (fission products in nuclear fuels). The MARS project aims to extend the possibilities of synchrotron based X-ray characterizations towards a wider variety of radioactive elements and a wider variety of techniques than what is currently available at other facilities. Thus, its specific and innovative infrastructure has been optimized in order to carry out analyses on materials with activities up to 18.5 GBq per sample for α and β emitters and 2 GBq for γ and n emitters. So, today, more than 70 different elements and more than 350 different isotopes have been proposed for studies on the beamline by the involved user community. The arrangement of the different elements in the optics hutch is based on an original scheme which permits to have two alternative optical configurations (monochromatic or dispersive) depending on the nature of experiments to be performed. At least three main techniques are progressively being proposed on the three complementary end-stations located in the experimental hutch: transmission and high resolution powder diffraction (TXRD and HRXRD), standard and dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS and EDXAS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). In addition, by using the KB optics, a micro-focused beam will be available on the second station of the monochromatic branch. The beamline is currently under commissioning. The first two experimental stations, using the monochromatic branch, are scheduled to be

  9. Legislator's guide to low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, J.M.; Melson, L.G.

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of the guide is to provide state legislators and their staff with information on low-level radioactive waste management, issues of special concern to the states, and policy options. During 1979, producers of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) faced a crisis. Two of the three commercial disposal sites were temporarily closed and some LLW producers were running short on storage space. For hospitals, clinics, research organizations, and some industries, this meant potential curtailment of activities that produced these materials. Commercial nuclear reactors were not as hard hit during the crisis because they have larger storage areas. The two sites at Beatty, Nevada, and Hanford, Washington, reopened and the immediate crisis was averted. However, the longer term problem of shortage of disposal capacity was just beginning to be recognized. States should be concerned with this problem for several reasons. First, all states produce LLW although the volumes differ among states. Second, states have the responsibility to protect the public health and welfare of their citizens. Third, states may be given the authority to regulate LLW disposal if they enter into agreements with the federal government (Agreement States Program), and 26 states have that authority. Fourth, because of the long-term monitoring and surveillance necessary at a disposal site, states rather than private industry will be held responsible for ensuring that the disposal site is performing safely. Finally, Congress established a policy in 1980 that each state is responsible for the safe disposal of LLW generated within its borders. This policy also includes provisions that could lead to excluding states from using disposal facilities unless they have entered into regional agreements with other states. Two primary options exist for a state: developing its own disposal facility for LLW generated within its borders or joining with other states to develop a regional disposal facility

  10. Radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive material. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on meeting the requirements for the establishment of radiation protection programmes (RPPs) for the transport of radioactive material, to optimize radiation protection in order to meet the requirements for radiation protection that underlie the Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. This Guide covers general aspects of meeting the requirements for radiation protection, but does not cover criticality safety or other possible hazardous properties of radioactive material. The annexes of this Guide include examples of RPPs, relevant excerpts from the Transport Regulations, examples of total dose per transport index handled, a checklist for road transport, specific segregation distances and emergency instructions for vehicle operators

  11. Guide to sampling airborne radioactive materials in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The ANSI N13.1-1969 Guide to Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear Facilities is currently being revised. The revision is being drafted by a working group under the auspices of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. The main differences between the original standard and the proposed revision are a narrowed scope, a greater emphasis on the design process, and the verification of meeting performance criteria. Compliance with the revised standard will present new challenges, especially in the area of performance validation. The progress made in the revision and key portions of the standard are discussed. The DOE has recently petitioned EPA for alternate approaches to complying with air-sampling regulations. Dealing with compliance issues until the revised standard is adopted will be a challenge for both designers and regulators. The objective of this paper is to briefly describe the content of the proposed revision in order to point out significant differences from the old standard and to describe the new challenges that the proposed revision will present

  12. Guide to sampling airborne radioactive materials in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, J.A. [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The ANSI N13.1-1969 Guide to Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear Facilities is currently being revised. The revision is being drafted by a working group under the auspices of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. The main differences between the original standard and the proposed revision are a narrowed scope, a greater emphasis on the design process, and the verification of meeting performance criteria. Compliance with the revised standard will present new challenges, especially in the area of performance validation. The progress made in the revision and key portions of the standard are discussed. The DOE has recently petitioned EPA for alternate approaches to complying with air-sampling regulations. Dealing with compliance issues until the revised standard is adopted will be a challenge for both designers and regulators. The objective of this paper is to briefly describe the content of the proposed revision in order to point out significant differences from the old standard and to describe the new challenges that the proposed revision will present.

  13. Guide relative to the regulatory requirements applicable to the radioactive materials transport in airport area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-02-01

    This guide makes an inventory of all the points necessary for the correct functioning of the transport of radioactive materials in airport zone. Stowage of the parcels, program of radiological protection (P.R.P.), operation of transport, quality assurance, radiation dose evaluation, radiation monitoring, dose optimization, storage management, are the principal points of this guide. (N.C.)

  14. Methodological guide: management of industrial sites potentially contaminated by radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    At the request of the Ministries of Health and the Environment, IPSN is preparing and publishing the first version of the methodological guide devoted to managing industrial sites potentially contaminated by radioactive substances. This guide describes a procedure for defining and choosing strategies for rehabilitating such industrial sites. (author)

  15. National plan of radioactive wastes and matters 2007-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This Plan aims to propose a global framework allowing the management of radioactive wastes, whatever the producers in order to control the safety and the choice of adapted disposal sites. The first part is devoted to the description of solutions of radioactive wastes management for existing or engaged wastes. The second part concerns radioactive materials of the nuclear industry which are not considered as wastes, but as recycling materials for future nuclear reactors. For instance, this part discusses the particular case of the depleted uranium. The third part examines the different channels of the long dated management. The last part brings together the all data and in particular problematic points which must be discussed and analyzed in a logic framework. Propositions and recommendations are provided. (A.L.B.)

  16. Planning and Preparing for Emergency Response to Transport Accidents Involving Radioactive Material. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on various aspects of emergency planning and preparedness for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material, including the assignment of responsibilities. It reflects the requirements specified in Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, and those of Safety Series No. 115, International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Framework for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 3. Responsibilities for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 4. Planning for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 5. Preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; Appendix I: Features of the transport regulations influencing emergency response to transport accidents; Appendix II: Preliminary emergency response reference matrix; Appendix III: Guide to suitable instrumentation; Appendix IV: Overview of emergency management for a transport accident involving radioactive material; Appendix V: Examples of response to transport accidents; Appendix VI: Example equipment kit for a radiation protection team; Annex I: Example of guidance on emergency response to carriers; Annex II: Emergency response guide.

  17. Suggestions on technical guide of implantation of radioactive seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongmin; Huang Gang; Lv Zhongwei; Liu Jianjun; Chen Kemin; Chen Yongde

    2009-01-01

    Implantation of radioactive seeds is an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of malignant tumors. With the development of imaging technique and the use of treatment planning system (TPS) it has been more and more employed in clinical settings. The technique has been widely practiced in various malignant tumors, such as prostate cancer, lung caner, pancreatic cancer, hepatocarcinoma, etc. In order to standardize the clinical application of this technology, the authors propose some suggestions concerning the management of radioactive seeds, the indications and contraindications as well as the method of operation as a technical guidance. (authors)

  18. Suggestions on technical guide of implantation of radioactive seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongmin, Wang; Gang, Huang; Zhongwei, Lv; Jianjun, Liu [Department of Radiology, Luwan Branch of Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ., Shanghai (China); Kemin, Chen; Yongde, Chen

    2009-09-15

    Implantation of radioactive seeds is an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of malignant tumors. With the development of imaging technique and the use of treatment planning system (TPS) it has been more and more employed in clinical settings. The technique has been widely practiced in various malignant tumors, such as prostate cancer, lung caner, pancreatic cancer, hepatocarcinoma, etc. In order to standardize the clinical application of this technology, the authors propose some suggestions concerning the management of radioactive seeds, the indications and contraindications as well as the method of operation as a technical guidance. (authors)

  19. Impact factors on radioactive waste management. Legal and institutional matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, P.

    1979-03-01

    This paper deals with clear definitions of the responsibilities of all parties involved on short and long-term, adequate financial assurance and some international standards with regard to the specifications on conditioning, storage and disposal. Furthermore, a light is thrown on the specific institutional problems in radioactive waste management, that might arise from the application of the various fuel cycles considered in the INFCE Study

  20. Preparation of a guide on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremov, G.F.; Pasysaev, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    There is shown the method on enhancing of radioecological literacy of population including mining regions under the framework of ISTC project development. Authors make a base of necessity of liquidation of radioactive waste on Kazakhstan territory. The recommend some basic types of terminal disposal for that. (author)

  1. Planning and preparing for emergency response to transport accidents involving radioactive material. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance to the public authorities and others (including consignors, carriers and emergency response authorities) who are responsible for developing and establishing emergency arrangements for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material. It may assist those concerned with establishing the capability to respond to such transport emergencies. It provides guidance for those Member States whose involvement with radioactive material is just beginning. It also provides guidance for those Member States that have already developed their radioactive material industries and the attendant emergency plans but that may need to review and improve these plans

  2. Analysis of radioactive-matter interaction near thermodynamical equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damamme, G.

    1993-01-01

    We study the absorption/emission process of photon by matter in the framework of a radiativo-collisionnal model of atom, a thermodynamical approach being used. The considered matter description is the atomic sphere one. First we give the expression of the balance equation around an equilibrium state. Then we express the atomic populations in function of the characteristics of the radiation and of the free electrons and of their time history. This permit us to interpret the photon balance as being due to true emission/absorption process of photons as well as fluorescence terms, all these processes being affected by relaxation effects. The total energy balance between matter and radiation can also be analyzed in the same way and conduct to introduce one photon effective interactions terms for each radiative proper mode, terms also affected by retardation effects. Such a taking into account of atom populations has no consequence on the radiative flux equation (i.e. the transfer opacity) but can considerably modify the energy balance between matter and radiation. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs

  3. Guide to the design, testing and use of packaging for the safe transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This guide gives to designers, manufacturers and users of packaging, advice supplementary to, or in amplification of, the recommendations made by the International Atomic Energy Agency for the safe transport of radioactive materials as given in IAEA Safety Series No. 6 (1973) and the advisory material given in IAEA Safety Series No. 37 (1973). This guide should be read and used in conjunction with these recommendations, the appropriate national regulations and any applicable regulations or requirements of the carriers concerned. (author)

  4. A users guide for the radioactive waste management code 'SIMULATION 2'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.; Tymons, B.J.

    1984-09-01

    This report is a users' guide to the radioactive waste management program SIMULATION. It gives a complete description of the calculational method used (with worked examples) a specification of the input data requirements, and samples of printout from the program. (author)

  5. A users guide to the radioactive waste inventory program 'DATABASE'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, G.A.; Tymons, B.J.

    1984-09-01

    The program computes an inventory of radioactive waste accumulation in a form such that a variety of interrogation, collation and summary functions can be used to access the stored information. Database is designed to be used online, that is the user will communicate with it at a computer terminal, and the program will display the result of each enquiry. It has the potential to automate much of the searching and adding up which was involved in compiling and using waste inventories in the past. (author)

  6. Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste from Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on the predisposal management of all types of radioactive waste (including spent nuclear fuel declared as waste and high level waste) generated at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. These waste management facilities may be located within larger facilities or may be separate, dedicated waste management facilities (including centralized waste management facilities). The Safety Guide covers all stages in the lifetime of these facilities, including their siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation, and shutdown and decommissioning. It covers all steps carried out in the management of radioactive waste following its generation up to (but not including) disposal, including its processing (pretreatment, treatment and conditioning). Radioactive waste generated both during normal operation and in accident conditions is considered

  7. The transport safety of radioactive matters; La surete des transports des matieres radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landier, D.; Louet, Ch.A.; Robert, Ch. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France); Binet, J. [Commission europeenne, DG Energie et transports, Bruxelles (Belgium); Malesys, P. [TN International, 75 - Paris (France); Pourade, C. [Societe Dangexpress, 78 - St Remy l' Honore (France); Le Meur, A.; Robert, M. [Societe Nationale des Chemins de fer Francais, 75 - Paris (France); Turquet de Beauregard, G.Y.; Hello, E. [CIS bio, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Laumond, A. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Regnault, Ph.; Gourlay, M. [AREVA NC, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France); Bruhl, G. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dir. de la Protection et de la Surete Nucleaire, 92 (France); Malvache, P.; Dumesnil, J. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Cohen, B. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Sert, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France); Pain, M. [Ministere de l' Interieur, et de l' Amenagement du Territoire, Dir. de la Defense et la Securite Civiles, 75 - Paris (France); Green, L.; Hartenstein, M. [World Nuclear Transport Institute, London (United Kingdom); Stewart, J. [Ministere des Transport, Royaume Uni (United Kingdom); Cottens, E.; Liebens, M. [Agence Federale de Controle Nucleaire (Belgium); Marignac, Y. [Wise, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-02-15

    Since the control of transport of radioactive materials was given to A.S.N. 10 years ago, A.S.N. has strengthened the radioactive material transport inspections, in particular of the designers, manufacturers, carriers and consignors. A.S.N. has implemented INES scale for incidents during transport. It has participated as much as possible to IAEA working groups in order to improve the international regulatory framework. And, supported by I.R.S.N., A.S.N. has performed a periodic safety review of existing package models and has approved new models incorporating innovative design features. Finally, A.S.N. has tested its emergency responses to procedures to an accident involving the transport of radioactive materials. All these actions taken together have led to improvement in and reinforcement of the safety culture among the transport operators; this has been acknowledged by a recent audit T.R.A.N.S.A.S. performed by IAEA. In spite of all these actions, there are not approved by the competent authority. As A.S.N. is in charge of every field in radioprotection, this should help to intensify the control. In addition, the different kinds of transport are also tackled as rail transport with S.N.C.F. radiological risk training, air transport through nuclear medicine. Some experience feedback are given such radioactive waste transport to the storage facilities in the Aube or how to protect the population after a nuclear transport incident with the O.R.S.E.C.-T.M.S. plans. (N.C.)

  8. Predisposal management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated in the generation of electricity in nuclear power reactors and in the use of radioactive material in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized. The principles and requirements that govern the safety of the management of radioactive waste are presented in 'The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management', 'Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety' and 'Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, Including Decommissioning'. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide regulatory bodies and the operators that generate and manage radioactive waste with recommendations on how to meet the principles and requirements established in Refs for the predisposal management of LLW. This Safety Guide deals with the safety issues associated with the predisposal management of LLW from nuclear fuel cycle facilities, large research and development installations and radioisotope production facilities. This includes all steps and activities in the management of waste, from its initial generation to its final acceptance at a waste disposal facility or the removal of regulatory control. The predisposal management of radioactive waste includes decommissioning. The term 'decommissioning' encompasses both the process of decommissioning a facility and the management of the waste that results (prior to its disposal). Recommendations on the process of decommissioning are provided in Refs. Recommendations on the management of the waste resulting from decommissioning are included in this Safety Guide. Although the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores is part of the nuclear fuel cycle, the management of the operational waste (e.g. waste rock, tailings and effluent treatment waste) from these activities is not within the scope of this Safety Guide. The LLW that is

  9. 77 FR 36017 - Regulatory Guide 7.3, Procedures for Picking Up and Receiving Packages of Radioactive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0139] Regulatory Guide 7.3, Procedures for Picking Up and... Guide (RG) 7.3, ``Procedures for Picking Up and Receiving Packages of Radioactive Material.'' The guide..., please contact the NRC's Public Document Room (PDR) reference staff at 1-800-397-4209, or 301-415-4737...

  10. Management of Radioactive Waste from the Mining and Milling of Ores. Safety Guide (Spanish ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on the safe management of radioactive waste resulting from the mining and milling of ores, with the purpose of protecting workers, the public and the environment from the consequences of these activities. It supplements Safety Standards Series No. WS-R-1, Near Surface Disposal of Radioactive Waste. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Administrative, legal and regulatory framework; 3. Protection of human health and the environment; 4. Strategy for waste management; 5. Safety considerations in different phases of operations; 6. Safety assessment; 7. Quality assurance; 8. Monitoring and surveillance; 9. Institutional control for the post-closure phase.

  11. Methodological guide. Management of sites potentially polluted by radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Within the frame of an approach for the management and rehabilitation of polluted sites, this updated version of a previous report proposes a set of methodological tools. It presents the main components of the general approach while distinguishing the interpretation of the environment status and a management plan. In both cases, a conceptual scheme is designed on the base of a diagnosis. In the first case, the interpretation aims at examining the compatibility between the pollution level and the observed uses. For the management plan, uses can be chosen: this is the case for industrial land reconversion. Therefore, this guide addresses the different issues and aspects of the diagnosis, interpretation of the environment status, and management plan. A last part deals with involvement of the different actors

  12. Compliance assurance for the safe transport of radioactive material. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this Safety Guide are to assist competent authorities in the development and maintenance of compliance assurance programmes in connection with the transport of radioactive material, and to assist applicants, licensees and organizations in their interactions with competent authorities. In order to increase cooperation between competent authorities and to promote the uniform application of international regulations and recommendations, it is desirable to adopt a common approach to regulatory activities. This Safety Guide is intended to assist in accomplishing such a uniform application by recommending most of the actions for which competent authorities need to provide in their programmes for ensuring compliance with the Transport Regulations. This Safety Guide addresses radiation safety aspects of the transport of radioactive material; that is, the subjects that are covered by the Transport Regulations. Radioactive material may have other dangerous properties, however, such as explosiveness, flammability, pyrophoricity, chemical toxicity and corrosiveness; these properties are required to be taken into account in the regulatory control of the design and transport of packages. Physical protection and systems for accounting for and control of nuclear material are also discussed in this Safety Guide. These subjects are not within the scope of the Transport Regulations, but information on them is included here because they must be taken into account in the overall regulatory control of transport, especially when the regulatory framework is being established. Section 1 informs about the background, the objective, the scope and the structure of this publication. Section 2 provides recommendations on the responsibilities and functions of the competent authority. Section 3 provides information on the various national and international regulations and guides for the transport of radioactive material. Section 4 provides recommendations on carrying out

  13. Lowering the radioactivity of the photomultiplier tubes for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Contreras, H.; Goetzke, L.W.; Fernandez, A.J.M.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Bologna Univ., Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Arazi, L.; Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Gross, E.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Priel, N.; Vitells, O. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Arisaka, K.; Lyashenko, A.; Meng, Y.; Pantic, E.; Teymourian, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Arneodo, F.; Di Giovanni, A. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Auger, M.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Behrens, A.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F. [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Balan, C.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Bauermeister, B.; Fattori, S.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Beltrame, P. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Brown, A.; Lang, R.F.; Macmullin, S.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Brown, E.; Levy, C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Bruenner, S.; Hampel, W.; Kaether, F.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Rauch, L.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H.; Weber, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Schumann, M. [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cussonneau, J.P.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Lavina, L.S.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, Subatech, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (France); Ferella, A.D.; Fulgione, W.; Laubenstein, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [Bologna Univ., Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino and Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P.; Wall, R. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Orrigo, S.E.A. [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); IFIC, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Persiani, R. [Universite de Nantes, Subatech, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (FR); Bologna Univ., Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (IT); INFN, Bologna (IT); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    The low-background, VUV-sensitive 3-inch diameter photomultiplier tube R11410 has been developed by Hamamatsu for dark matter direct detection experiments using liquid xenon as the target material. We present the results from the joint effort between the XENON collaboration and the Hamamatsu company to produce a highly radio-pure photosensor (version R11410-21) for the XENON1T dark matter experiment. After introducing the photosensor and its components, we show the methods and results of the radioactive contamination measurements of the individual materials employed in the photomultiplier production. We then discuss the adopted strategies to reduce the radioactivity of the various PMT versions. Finally, we detail the results from screening 286 tubes with ultra-low background germanium detectors, as well as their implications for the expected electronic and nuclear recoil background of the XENON1T experiment. (orig.)

  14. Standard guide for characterization of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes for thermal treatment

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide identifies methods to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes before a waste is processed at high temperatures, for example, vitrification into a homogeneous glass ,glass-ceramic, or ceramic waste form. This includes waste forms produced by ex-situ vitrification (ESV), in-situ vitrification (ISV), slagging, plasma-arc, hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) and/or cold-pressing and sintering technologies. Note that this guide does not specifically address high temperature waste treatment by incineration but several of the analyses described in this guide may be useful diagnostic methods to determine incinerator off-gas composition and concentrations. The characterization of the waste(s) recommended in this guide can be used to (1) choose and develop the appropriate thermal treatment methodology, (2) determine if waste pretreatment is needed prior to thermal treatment, (3) aid in development of thermal treatment process control, (4) develop surrogate wa...

  15. A guide to the suitability of elastomeric seal materials for use in radioactive material transport packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vince, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Elastomeric seals are a frequently favoured method of sealing Radioactive Material Transport (RMT) packages. The sealing technology has been proven for many years in a wide range of industrial applications. The requirements of the RMT package applications, however, are significantly different from those commonly found in other industries. This guide outlines the Regulatory performance requirements placed on an RMT package sealing system by TS-R-1, and then summarises the material, environment and geometry characteristics of elastomeric seals relevant to RMT applications. Tables in the guide list typical material properties for a range of elastomeric materials commonly used in RMT packages

  16. Security in the transport of radioactive material: Implementing guide. Spanish edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This guide provides States with guidance in implementing, maintaining or enhancing a nuclear security regime to protect radioactive material (including nuclear material) in transport against theft, sabotage or other malicious acts that could, if successful, have unacceptable radiological consequences. From a security point of view, a threshold is defined for determining which packages or types of radioactive material need to be protected beyond prudent management practice. Minimizing the likelihood of theft or sabotage of radioactive material in transport is accomplished by a combination of measures to deter, detect, delay and respond to such acts. These measures are complemented by other measures to recover stolen material and to mitigate possible consequences, in order to further reduce the risks

  17. Security in the Transport of Radioactive Material. Implementing Guide (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This guide provides States with guidance in implementing, maintaining or enhancing a nuclear security regime to protect radioactive material (including nuclear material) in transport against theft, sabotage or other malicious acts that could, if successful, have unacceptable radiological consequences. From a security point of view, a threshold is defined for determining which packages or types of radioactive material need to be protected beyond prudent management practice. Minimizing the likelihood of theft or sabotage of radioactive material in transport is accomplished by a combination of measures to deter, detect, delay and respond to such acts. These measures are complemented by other measures to recover stolen material and to mitigate possible consequences, in order to further reduce the risks.

  18. Security in the Transport of Radioactive Material. Implementing Guide (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This guide provides States with guidance in implementing, maintaining or enhancing a nuclear security regime to protect radioactive material (including nuclear material) in transport against theft, sabotage or other malicious acts that could, if successful, have unacceptable radiological consequences. From a security point of view, a threshold is defined for determining which packages or types of radioactive material need to be protected beyond prudent management practice. Minimizing the likelihood of theft or sabotage of radioactive material in transport is accomplished by a combination of measures to deter, detect, delay and respond to such acts. These measures are complemented by other measures to recover stolen material and to mitigate possible consequences, in order to further reduce the risks.

  19. Methodological guide for the acceptance of waste with a natural radioactivity in the classified elimination facilities. Part 1: methodological guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazala, Ch.; Cessac, B.; Gay, D.

    2006-01-01

    This document is part of the thought implemented by the Direction of pollution prevention and risk (D.P.P.R.) from the Department of Ecology and Sustainable Development as part of a working group on means for detecting radioactivity at the entrance of waste storage centers (said gantries group). The D.P.P.R. has entrusted the implementation to the I.R.S.N.. The completion of the guide was conducted under the supervision of a steering committee composed of representatives of industrial producers of this control type, operators of storage centers, associations for environmental protection, experts and administration. The content and structure of the guide and the accompanying sheets result of discussions within the Steering Committee between D.P.P.R. and I.R.S.N.. (N.C.)

  20. Guide relative to the regulatory requirements applicable to the radioactive materials transport in airport area; Guide relatif aux exigences reglementaires applicables au transport des matieres radioactives en zone aeroportuaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    This guide makes an inventory of all the points necessary for the correct functioning of the transport of radioactive materials in airport zone. Stowage of the parcels, program of radiological protection (P.R.P.), operation of transport, quality assurance, radiation dose evaluation, radiation monitoring, dose optimization, storage management, are the principal points of this guide. (N.C.)

  1. The management system for the safe transport of radioactive material. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide information to organizations that are developing, implementing or assessing a management system for activities relating to the transport of radioactive material. Such activities include, but are not limited to, design, fabrication, inspection and testing, maintenance, transport and disposal of radioactive material packaging. This publication is intended to assist those establishing or improving a management system to integrate safety, health, environmental, security, quality and economic elements to ensure that safety is properly taken into account in all activities of the organization. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Management system; 3. Management responsibility; 4. Resource management; 5. Process implementation; 6. Measurement, assessment and improvement; Appendix: Graded approach for management systems for the safe transport of radioactive materials; Annex I: Two examples of management systems; Annex II: Examples of management system standards; Annex III: Example of a documented management system (or quality assurance programme) for an infrequent consignor; Annex IV: Example of a documented management system (or quality assurance programme) description for an infrequent carrier; Annex V: Example of a procedure for control of records; Annex VI: Example of a procedure for handling packages containing radioactive materials, including receipt and dispatch; Annex VII: Example of a packaging maintenance procedure in a complex organization; Annex VIII: Example of an internal audit procedure in a small organization; Annex IX: Example of a corrective and preventive action procedure

  2. Health problems in connection with radiation from radioactive matter in fertilizers, soils and rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laag, J.

    1988-01-01

    Under the last world congress of the International Society of Soil Science in Hamburg in August 1986, the working group ''Soil and Geomedicine'' was set up. The symposium on health problems in connection with radiation from radioactive matter in fertilizers, soils and rocks was a joint arrangement of this working group and a permanent committe of The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. The book presents the full text of 13 of the papers presented at the symposium. Separate abstacts have been submitted for 12 of these papers

  3. Best practice guide for radioactivity measurement laboratories in a post-accident situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Published for laboratories likely to be asked to perform radioactivity measurements at the time of or after a radiological or nuclear accident in France or abroad, this guide aims at defining the best practices in terms of laboratory organisation (sample flow management, personnel radioprotection, sample identification and recording, sample cross-contamination risks, result transmission, archiving of data, results and samples, waste dismissal), and in terms of metrology (adaptation to needs in terms of detection limit and measurement uncertainty, preferred use of gamma spectrometry, analysis strategies)

  4. Management of waste from the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education safety guide

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on the > fulfilment of the safety requirements established in Safety Standards > Series No. WS-R-2, Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, > Including Decommissioning. It covers the roles and responsibilities of > different bodies involved in the predisposal management of radioactive > waste and in the handling and processing of radioactive material. It > is intended for organizations generating and handling radioactive > waste or handling such waste on a centralized basis for and the > regulatory body responsible for regulating such activities.  > Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the > environment; 3. Roles and responsibilities; 4. General safety > considerations; 5. Predisposal management of radioactive waste; 6. > Acceptance of radioactive waste in disposal facilities; 7. Record > keeping and reporting; 8. Management systems; Appendix I: Fault > schedule for safety assessment and environmental impact assessment; > Ap...

  5. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-09-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives.

  6. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as … well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives

  7. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives

  8. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives.

  9. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives

  10. A guide to archival collections relating to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapon testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    This ninth edition of A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing constitutes History Associates Incorporated's (HAI) final report of its document collection, processing, and declassification efforts for the Nevada Field Office of the Department of Energy. The most significant feature of this edition is the updated HAI collection effort information. We confirmed the accuracy of this information using our screening, processing, and transmittal records. Unlike previous editions, funding limitations prevented us from systematically revising the collection descriptions and point-of-contact information for this final edition. This guide has been prepared by professional historians who have a working knowledge of many of the record collections included in the following pages. In describing materials, they have tried to include enough information so that persons unfamiliar with the complexities of large record systems will be able to determine that nature of the information in, and the quality of, each record collection

  11. Ecological transport and radiation doses from ground water borne radioactive matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.; Bergstroem, U.; Evans, S.

    1978-12-01

    Turnover of radioactive matter entering the biosphere with ground water has been studied with regard to exposure and dose to critical groups and populations. The main alternatives considered for outflow of radioactive effluents to the biosphere are: outflow in a valley containing wells, outflow to a fresh-water lake, and outflow in a coastal region of the Baltic Sea. Mathematical models of a set of coupled ecosystems on local, regional- intermediate- and global levels have been used for calculations of doses. The intermediate system refers to the Baltic Sea. The mathematical analysis, based on first order kinetics for the exchange of matter in a system according to compartment principles, also includes products in decay chains, i.e. daughter nuclides generated by decay of nuclides under ecological cycling. The time dependent exposures have been studied for certain long-lived nuclides of radiological interest in waste from reprosessed fuel. Dose and dose commitment have been calculted for different release patterns comprising idealised episodes for outflow to the biosphere during short periods and outflow governed by constant leakage from a source on the border between geosphere and biosphere. (author)

  12. When Nothing Matters Anymore: A Survival Guide for Depressed Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobain, Bev

    This guide provides adolescents with information on depression. An introduction discusses symptoms of depression and lists famous people who were known to be depressed. Part 1, "What's Wrong," explores how it feels to be depressed, the causes and types of depression, and the connections between depression, suicide, and drug and alcohol abuse. A…

  13. Mind Over Matter: The Brain's Response to Drugs. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This teacher's guide aims to develop an understanding among students grades 5 through 9 of the physical reality of drug use. Contents include: (1) "Brain Anatomy"; (2) "Nerve Cells and Neurotransmission"; (3) "Effects of Drugs on the Brain"; (4) "Marijuana"; (5) "Opiates"; (6) "Inhalants"; (7) "Hallucinogens"; (8) "Steroids"; (9) "Stimulants";…

  14. Standard Guide for Unrestricted Disposition of Bulk Materials Containing Residual Amounts of Radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the techniques for obtaining approval for release of materials encountered in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) from restricted use. This would be addressed in the decommissioning plan (E 1281). It applies to materials that do not meet any of the requirements for regulatory control because of radioactivity content. Fig. 1 shows the logic diagram for determining the materials that could be considered for release. Materials that negotiate this logic tree are referred to as “candidate for release based on dose.” 1.2 The objective of this guide is to provide a methodology for distinguishing between material that must be carefully isolated to prevent human contact from that that can be recycled or otherwise disposed of. It applies to material in which the radioactivity is dispersed more or less uniformly throughout the volume of the material (termed residual in bulk form) as opposed to surface contaminated objects. 1.3 Surface contaminated objects are materials externally co...

  15. Some historical background to the IAEA Definition and Recommendations concerning high-level radioactive wastes or other high-level radioactive matter unsuitable for dumping at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The need for internationally acceptable standards and regulations for preventing pollution of the sea by radioactive materials was recognized by the United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea, which adopted the Convention on the High Seas in April 1958. Article 25 of the Convention provides that ''every State shall take measures to prevent pollution of the seas from the dumping of radioactive wastes, taking into account any standards and regulations which may be formulated by the competent international organizations.'' The Conference also adopted a resolution recommending that the IAEA pursue studies and take action to assist States in controlling the discharge of radioactive materials into the sea. When the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter was adopted at the Intergovernmental Conference in London, 1972, the IAEA was given specific responsibilities to define criteria and standards for dealing with the questions of sea disposal of radioactive wastes. The IAEA Definition and Recommendations concerning ''high-level radioactive wastes or other high-level radioactive matter unsuitable for dumping at sea'' identify material, the radioactive content of which is at such a level that the Parties to the Convention would wish to prevent any participating State from issuing a special permit even after a detailed appraisal of the safety of the proposed operation, and even for the sector of the marine environment furthest removed from man, i.e. the deep sea with depth greater than 4000 m. Some historical background to these problems is discussed and some of the Japanese findings of the deep sea survey in the Pacific are introduced for comparison with the North Atlantic data which formed a basis of the IAEA Definition and Recommendations for the London Dumping Convention

  16. Advisory Material for the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (2012 Ed.). Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-06-15

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on achieving and demonstrating compliance with IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSR-6, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (2012 Edition), which establishes the requirements to be applied to the national and international transport of radioactive material. Transport is deemed to comprise all operations and conditions associated with and involved in the movement of radioactive material, including the design, fabrication and maintenance of packaging, and the preparation, consigning, handling, carriage, storage in transit and receipt at the final destination of packages. This publication supersedes IAEA Safety Standards Series No. TS-G-1.1 Rev. 1, which was issued in 2008.

  17. Advisory Material for the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations on achieving and demonstrating compliance with IAEA Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 2005 Edition, establishing safety requirements to be applied to the national and international transport of radioactive material. Transport is deemed to comprise all operations and conditions associated with and involved in the movement of radioactive material; these include the design, fabrication and maintenance of packaging, and the preparation, consigning, handling, carriage, storage in transit and receipt at the final destination of packages. This publication supersedes IAEA Safety Series No. TS-G-1.1, 2002 Edition

  18. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  19. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  20. methanization of organic matters. Guide for project developers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-02-01

    This document aims at informing potential project developers (farmers, local communities, industrials) all along the creation of a methanization unit. It precisely indicates administrative procedures required to complete a project. It first presents some generalities about methanization (matters and their performance, methanization cycle, biogas), describes methanization processes (dry and humid), and valorisation processes (co-generation, hot water production, gas injection into the public network), presents digestate characteristics, and discusses benefits and drawbacks of methanization. The different steps of a project management are then analysed. Additional procedures are indicated, and risks and traps of methanization projects are highlighted. The document comes along with a large number of appendices which can be documents released by professional or public bodies

  1. Predisposal Management of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide regulatory bodies and the operators that generate and manage radioactive waste with recommendations on how to meet the principles and requirements established for the predisposal management of low and intermediate level waste. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the environment; 3. Roles and responsibilities; 4. General safety considerations; 5. Safety features for the predisposal management of LILW; 6. Record keeping and reporting; 7. Safety assessment; 8. Quality assurance; Annex I: Nature and sources of LILW from nuclear facilities; Annex II: Development of specifications for waste packages; Annex III: Site conditions, processes and events for consideration in a safety assessment (external natural phenomena); Annex IV: Site conditions, processes and events for consideration in a safety assessment (external human induced phenomena); Annex V: Postulated initiating events for consideration in a safety assessment (internal phenomena).

  2. Time-Averaged Adiabatic Potentials: Versatile Matter-Wave Guides and Atom Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesanovsky, Igor; Klitzing, Wolf von

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel class of trapping potentials, time-averaged adiabatic potentials (TAAP), which allows the generation of a large variety of traps for quantum gases and matter-wave guides for atom interferometers. Examples include stacks of pancakes, rows of cigars, and multiple rings or sickles. The traps can be coupled through controllable tunneling barriers or merged altogether. We present analytical expressions for pancake-, cigar-, and ring-shaped traps. The ring geometry is of particular interest for guided matter-wave interferometry as it provides a perfectly smooth waveguide of widely tunable diameter and thus adjustable sensitivity of the interferometer. The flexibility of the TAAP would make possible the use of Bose-Einstein condensates as coherent matter waves in large-area atom interferometers

  3. A guide to radiation and radioactivity levels near high energy particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An estimate of likely radiation and radioactivity levels is needed at the design stage of an accelerator for deciding the radiation safety features to be incorporated in the infrastructure of the machine and for predicting where radiation damage possibilities will have to be taken into account. Both these aspects can have a significant influence on the machine layout and cost. Failure to make a reasonable assessment at the right time may have far reaching consequences for future costs. The purpose of this guide is to bring together basic data and methods that have been found useful in assessing radiation situations around accelerators and to provide a practical means of arriving at the radiation and induced radioactivity levels that could occur under a wide variety of circumstances. An attempt is made to present the information in a direct and unambiguous way with sufficient confidence that the necessity for large safety factors is avoided. In many cases assumptions and simplifications have been made and reliance placed on extrapolating from experimental data into regions where the basic physics is too complicated to make meaningful absolute calculations. Wherever possible such extrapolations have been tied to real or otherwise acceptable data originating from independent sources. (Author)

  4. Schedules of Provisions of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (2009 Ed.). Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This Safety Guide is issued in support of Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1, 2009 Edition). It lists the paragraph numbers of the Transport Regulations that are relevant for specified types of consignment, classified according to their UN numbers. It does not provide additional recommendations. The intended users are consignors and consignees, carriers, shippers, regulators, and end users involved in the transport of radioactive material. A person or organization intending to transport a particular type of consignment of radioactive material must meet requirements in all sections of the Transport Regulations. This Safety Guide aids users by providing a listing of the relevant requirements of the Transport Regulations for each type of radioactive material, package or shipment. Once a consignor has classified the radioactive material to be shipped, the appropriate UN number can be assigned and the paragraph numbers of the requirements that apply for the shipment can be found in the corresponding schedule

  5. The management system for the disposal of radioactive waste. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on developing and implementing management systems for all phases of facilities for the disposal of radioactive waste and related activities. It covers the management systems for managing the different stages of waste disposal facilities, such as siting, design and construction, operation (i.e. the activities, which can extend over several decades, involving receipt of the waste product in its final packaging (if it is to be disposed of in packaged form), waste emplacement in the waste disposal facility, backfilling and sealing, and any subsequent period prior to closure), closure and the period of institutional control (i.e. either active control - monitoring, surveillance and remediation; or passive control - restricted land use). The management systems apply to various types of disposal facility for different categories of radioactive waste, such as: near surface (for low level waste), geological (for low, intermediate and/or high level waste), boreholes (for sealed sources), surface impoundment (for mining and milling waste) and landfill (for very low level waste). It also covers management systems for related processes and activities, such as extended monitoring and surveillance during the period of active institutional control in the post-closure phase, safety and performance assessments and development of the safety case for the waste disposal facility and regulatory authorization (e.g. licensing). This Safety Guide is intended to be used by organizations that are directly involved in, or that regulate, the facilities and activities described in paras 1.15 and 1.16, and by the suppliers of nuclear safety related products that are required to meet some or all of the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3 'The Management System for Facilities and Activities'. It will also be useful to legislators and to members of the public and other parties interested in the nuclear

  6. Radiation Protection and Radioactive Waste Management in the Operation of Nuclear Power Plants. Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations to the regulatory body, focused on the operational aspects of radiation protection and radioactive waste management in nuclear power plants, and on how to ensure the fulfilment of the requirements established in the relevant Safety Requirements publications. It will also be useful for senior managers in licensee or contractor organizations who are responsible for establishing and managing programmes for radiation protection and for the management of radioactive waste. This Safety Guide gives general recommendations for the development of radiation protection programmes at nuclear power plants. The issues are then elaborated by defining the main elements of a radiation protection programme. Particular attention is paid to area classification, workplace monitoring and supervision, application of the principle of optimization of protection (also termed the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle), and facilities and equipment. This Safety Guide covers all the safety related aspects of a programme for the management of radioactive waste at a nuclear power plant. Emphasis is placed on the minimization of waste in terms of both activity and volume. The various steps in predisposal waste management are covered, namely processing (pretreatment, treatment and conditioning), storage and transport. Releases of effluents, the application of authorized limits and reference levels are discussed, together with the main elements of an environmental monitoring programme

  7. Management of waste from the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    activity measurement systems (such as those employing liquid scintillation counters). Gaseous waste is generated at a number of facilities in the production and radiolabelling of chemical compounds and organisms and in the treatment of solid and liquid waste. In view of the variable range of waste types encountered and the possibility of changes occurring in the ways in which the waste is generated and then managed, particular attention should be paid to the safety issues that may arise in their management and regulatory control. Regimes for both management and regulatory control should be sensitive and responsive to these factors. In facilities in which only small amounts of waste are generated, there may be limited knowledge among the staff of the safety issues relating to radioactive waste management. The safety culture among the staff may not be particularly focused on radioactive waste management because of this limited knowledge and/or because insufficient emphasis is placed on the related issues by the operating organization. Good operating practice can significantly reduce the amounts of radioactive waste generated but in general such waste cannot be entirely eliminated. The waste may contain sufficient quantities of radionuclides that it has the potential to present serious risks to human health and the environment if it is not managed properly. This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on the fulfilment of the safety requirements established in Ref. It covers the roles and responsibilities of different bodies involved in the predisposal management of radioactive waste and in the handling and processing of radioactive material

  8. Management of waste from the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    activity measurement systems (such as those employing liquid scintillation counters). Gaseous waste is generated at a number of facilities in the production and radiolabelling of chemical compounds and organisms and in the treatment of solid and liquid waste. In view of the variable range of waste types encountered and the possibility of changes occurring in the ways in which the waste is generated and then managed, particular attention should be paid to the safety issues that may arise in their management and regulatory control. Regimes for both management and regulatory control should be sensitive and responsive to these factors. In facilities in which only small amounts of waste are generated, there may be limited knowledge among the staff of the safety issues relating to radioactive waste management. The safety culture among the staff may not be particularly focused on radioactive waste management because of this limited knowledge and/or because insufficient emphasis is placed on the related issues by the operating organization. Good operating practice can significantly reduce the amounts of radioactive waste generated but in general such waste cannot be entirely eliminated. The waste may contain sufficient quantities of radionuclides that it has the potential to present serious risks to human health and the environment if it is not managed properly. This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on the fulfilment of the safety requirements established in Ref. It covers the roles and responsibilities of different bodies involved in the predisposal management of radioactive waste and in the handling and processing of radioactive material

  9. Risk Informed Approach for Nuclear Security Measures for Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control. Implementing Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides guidance to States for developing a risk informed approach and for conducting threat and risk assessments as the basis for the design and implementation of sustainable nuclear security systems and measures for prevention of, detection of, and response to criminal and intentional unauthorised acts involving nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. It describes concepts and methodologies for a risk informed approach, including identification and assessment of threats, targets, and potential consequences; threat and risk assessment methodologies, and the use of risk informed approaches as the basis for informing the development and implementation of nuclear security systems and measures. The publication is an Implementing Guide within the IAEA Nuclear Security Series and is intended for use by national policy makers, law enforcement agencies and experts from competent authorities and other relevant organizations involved in the establishment, implementation, maintenance or sustainability of nuclear security systems and measures related to nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control

  10. Nuclear Security Systems and Measures for the Detection of Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control. Implementing Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear terrorism and the illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive material threaten the security of all States. There are large quantities of diverse radioactive material in existence, which are used in areas such as health, the environment, agriculture and industry. The possibility that nuclear and other radioactive material may be used for terrorist acts cannot be ruled out in the current global situation. States have responded to this risk by engaging in a collective commitment to strengthen the protection and control of such material, and to establish capabilities for detection and response to nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. Through its nuclear security programme, the IAEA supports States to establish, maintain and sustain an effective nuclear security regime. The IAEA has adopted a comprehensive approach to nuclear security. This approach recognizes that an effective national nuclear security regime builds on: the implementation of relevant international legal instruments; information protection; physical protection; material accounting and control; detection of and response to trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive material; national response plans; and contingency measures. Within its nuclear security programme, the IAEA aims to assist States in implementing and sustaining such a regime in a coherent and integrated manner. Each State carries the full responsibility for nuclear security, specifically: to provide for the security of nuclear and other radioactive material and associated facilities and activities; to ensure the security of such material in use, storage or in transport; to combat illicit trafficking; and to detect and respond to nuclear security events. This is an Implementing Guide on nuclear security systems and measures for the detection of nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. The objective of the publication is to provide guidance to Member States for the

  11. Guide book of radioactive wastes collecting. Producers, from collection to storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document, more particularly devoted to radioactive waste producers (except electronuclear industry), defines the technical specifications and the financial conditions relative to the taking over of their wastes by the ANDRA, the French national agency of radioactive wastes. Content: general principles, instructions manual of the taking over demand, practical conditions of wastes collecting, packaging and containers, specifications for each category of waste, particular cases, price table, disputes. (J.S.)

  12. INFX GUIDE: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BILATERAL AGREEMENTS FOR COOPERATION IN THE FIELD OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT (INFX: INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION EXCHANGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, K. M.; Lakey, L. T.; Leigh, I. W.; Jeffs, A. G.

    1985-07-01

    As the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have increased the magnitude and scope of their cooperative activities with other nations in the nuclear fuel cycle and waste management field, a need has developed for ready sources of information concerning foreign waste management programs, DOE technology exchange policies, bilateral fuel cycle and waste management agreements and plans and activities to implement those agreements. The INFX (International InLormation E~change) Guide is one of a series of documents that have been prepared to provide that information. The INFX Guide has been compiled under the charter of PNL's International Support Office (IPSO) to maintain for DOE a center to collect, organize, evaluate and disseminate information on foreign and international radioactive waste management programs. Because the information in this document is constantly subject to change, the document is assembled in loose-leaf form to accommodate frequent updates.

  13. The transport of radioactive matters. Situation of transport events occurred in France from 1999 to 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This report presents transport events involving radioactive material, occurred on French territory from 1999 to 2007, listed in the I.R.S.N. database. 901 events have been recorded. For each of them, about 70 parameters have been collected from the analysis of the notifications and reports of the events (type of event, type of package, level on the INES scale). This synthesis informs about the annual evolution of transport events involving radioactive material and about their seriousness level. It also presents a short description of the incidents with radiological aspect and of the main events occurred in 2007. Then, an analysis of the most frequent types of events from 1999 to 2007 and of their evolution tendencies is presented. It gives a view of the elements that could be deduced from this feedback, in order to improve the safety of the radioactive material transports. (authors)

  14. Stowing of radioactive packages, materials or objects for their transport. Guide nr 27, Release of 30 August 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    A good package stowing is part of an in-depth defence approach to ensure the safety of transport operations in the case of radioactive materials. This guide thus presents a set of recommendations to ensure this safety, recalls regulatory requirements, and presents recommendations made by the ASN for specific stowing training. This document concerns all kinds of transports (road, rail, river, sea, and air). After having indicated the different regulatory references, standards and recommendations, it proposes an overview of the applicable regulatory framework and technical requirements for stowing in France and in the EU in the case of road transport, of rail transport and of sea transport, and in France and in the world for the case of air transport. The next part details regulatory requirements and recommendations made by the ASN for the stowing of radioactive loads: commitment of the company's management, specific training for concerned personnel, definition of packing and stowing plans or of specific instructions, selection of the stowing system, adequacy of the used stowing equipment, documentation to achieve a good stowing, stowing quality control. Then, recommendations are made for the undertaking of a specific training on radioactive load stowing: training modalities, training content, training objectives (for designers, operators and controllers)

  15. Stepwise approach to decision making for long-term radioactive waste management. Experience, issues and guiding principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive waste exists as a result of both past and current practices. One of the most challenging tasks is the management of long-lived waste that must be isolated from the human environment for many thousands, or even hundreds of thousands, of years. Although significant technical progress has been made in developing management schemes that, according to technical experts, would ensure long-term safety (e.g. engineered geologic disposal), the rate of progress towards implementing such solutions has been slower than expected. The contrast between expected and observed rates may be partly attributable to an earlier technical optimism. More significant, however, are the setbacks, which have arisen mainly from an underestimation of the societal and political dimensions. In long-term radioactive waste management, consideration is increasingly being given to concepts such as stepwise decision making and adaptive staging in which the public, and especially the local public, are to be meaningfully involved in the review and planning of developments. The key feature of these concepts is development by steps or stages that are reversible, within the limits of practicability. This is designed to provide reassurance that decisions can be reversed if experience shows them to have adverse or unwanted effects. A stepwise approach to decision making has thus come to the fore as being of value in advancing long-term radioactive waste management solutions in a societally acceptable manner. Despite its early identification within the radioactive waste management community as an important means for reaching solutions and decisions in which there is broad-based confidence, the bases for and application of stepwise decision making has not been widely reviewed. Guiding principles of any such process are still being formulated, its roots in empirical social science research have not been fully reviewed, nor the difficulties of its implementation analysed. The report reviews current

  16. BPEO as a Guide to Decision Making in the Authorisation of Radioactive Waste Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, Michael; Collier, David; Stone, Andrew; Keep, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    The Environment Agency (EA) and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) are the independent public bodies responsible for regulating the disposal of radioactive wastes in the UK in order to ensure protection of people and the environment. Operators at nuclear sites must obtain authorisation from the relevant Agency, granted under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 (RSA93), in order to make disposals of radioactive waste. Draft Statutory Guidance to the EA on the Regulation of Radioactive Discharges into the Environment from Nuclear Licensed Sites was published by the Government in October 2000. The Guidance establishes an obligation on the EA to ensure that proper consideration is given to the identification and evaluation of alternatives, in order to ensure that the Best Practicable Environmental Option (BPEO) is chosen, before authorisations can be granted. Such a requirement supplements and reinforces current regulatory practice in the UK, whereby nuclear site operators may be required (under Improvement Conditions attached to existing authorisations) to review waste management strategies on a regular basis in order to demonstrate that they represent the BPEO. SEPA shares a common interest with EA in use of the BPEO concept in the regulation of radioactive waste management, for both operational licensing and decommissioning projects. There has been no single standard methodology or guidance to Agency staff on application of the BPEO concept to radioactive waste management. BPEO studies presented by nuclear site operators have therefore been considered on a case-by-case basis. In the light of this, and taking account of the specific requirements emerging from the new Statutory Guidance, EA and SEPA have jointly supported the development of guidance for use by the Agencies in reviewing and assessing BPEO studies submitted in relation to authorisations granted under RSA93. This paper describes activities that have been undertaken to support the

  17. Advisory material for the IAEA regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Since the first edition in 1961, the Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material of the IAEA (IAEA Regulations) have served as the basis of safety for the transport of radioactive material worldwide. In the discussions leading to the first edition of the IAEA Regulations, it was realized that there was need for a publication to supplement the Regulations which could give information of individual provisions as to their purpose, their scientific background and how to apply them in practice. In response, the Agency published Safety Series No. 7, entitled, in its first edition in 1961, 'Notes on Certain Aspects of the Regulations'. An additional source of information on the Regulations, providing advice on 'how' the user should comply with them which could be augmented from time to time in the light of latest experience, was provided by the Agency, initially in relation to the 1973 edition of the Regulations. This was entitled 'Advisory Material for the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' and designated Safety Series No. 37. This document is the result of combining the two Safety Series in a single publication. Thus the primary purpose of this publication is to provide guidance to users on proven and acceptable ways of complying with the Regulations. This Advisory Material is not a stand-alone text and it only has significance when used as a companion to the IAEA Safety Standards Series No. ST-1, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (1996 edition)

  18. Lowering the radioactivity of the photomultiplier tubes for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C.

    2015-01-01

    The low-background, VUV-sensitive 3-inch diameter photomultiplier tube R11410 has been developed by Hamamatsu for dark matter direct detection experiments using liquid xenon as the target material. We present the results from the joint effort between the XENON collaboration and the Hamamatsu company

  19. Building arrangement and site layout design guides for on site low level radioactive waste storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMullen, J.W.; Feehan, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Many papers have been written by AE's and utilities describing their onsite storage facilities, why they are needed, NRC regulations, and disposal site requirements. This paper discusses a typical storage facility and address the design considerations and operational aspects that are generally overlooked when designing and siting a low level radioactive waste storage facility. Some topics to be addressed are: 1. Container flexibility; 2. Modular expansion capabilities; 3. DOT regulations; 4. Meterological requirements; 5. OSHA; 6. Fire protection; 7. Floods; 8. ALARA

  20. A guide to archival collections relating to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapon testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This guide has been prepared by professional historians who have a working knowledge of many of the record collections, included in the following pages. In describing materials, they have tried to include enough information so that persons unfamiliar with the complexities of large record systems will be able to determine the nature of the information in, and the quality of, each record collection. The guide is organized alphabetically by the means of the record repositories, not by the organizations which have custody of the records. It should be noted that arrangement by location does not reveal at a single glance all of the materials that may have originated in a specific laboratory, research center, or government agency. For example, records originated in one of the Atomic Energy Commission's national laboratories may, in some cases, be listed under the Federal Records Centers to which they have been retired. Thus, this guide includes an index of agencies originating documents and pages listing those agencies

  1. Guide to the safe handling of radioactive wastes at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This guide discusses the responsibilities of the regulatory authorities, the design considerations of waste management systems and the source and characteristics of waste. Present techniques for treating, conditioning, storing and disposing of gaseous, liquid and solid wastes on and from the site are summarized, and a consensus of good practice in waste management based on current knowledge and experience is given. The guide also contains brief chapters on transport of wastes, monitoring systems, safety analyses and a review of future trends in waste management

  2. Pollution of atmospheric air with toxic and radioactive particulate matter investigated by means of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagielak, J.

    1978-01-01

    The application of spectrometric methods of nuclear techniques to the investigations of atmospheric air pollution by toxic and radioactive elements and results of these investigations conducted in the highly industrialized and urbanized regions of Poland have been presented. The method of precipitation of the samples, the measurements and analysis of radiation spectra of alpha and gamma radiation emitted by isotopes present in the samples have been described. The concentrations of toxic metal dust in the air have been evaluated by neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analysis. Appropriate methods of measurement, calibration of instrument and the discussion of results have been presented. The work presents the results of investigations performed in Siersza within the years 1973-1974 and in Warsaw in the period of 1975-1977, which have permitted to estimate the mean monthly values of concentration in the atmospheric air of the following radioisotopes: 7 Be, 54 Mn, 95 Zr, 103 Ru, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 131 I, 137 Cs, 140 Ba, 141 Ce, 144 Ce, 226 Ra, Th-nat, U-nat and the following stable elements: Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, Zn, As, Se, Sb, W, Pb. The analysis of changes in concentration of each particular artificial radioisotope in the air for the region of Poland in connection with Chinese nuclear explosions have been given. On the basis of the performed environmental investigations the method of analysis of relations between the concentrations of particular elements present in the dust has been discussed. The applications of this method have been presented. The hazard to the population and the environment caused by the radioactive and toxic dust present in the atmospheric air has been estimated. (author)

  3. Performance assessment review guide for DOE low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodge, R.L.; Hansen, W.R.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Layton, D.W.; Lee, D.W.; Maheras, S.T.; Neuder, S.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Curl, R.U.; Grahn, K.F.; Heath, B.A.; Turner, K.H.

    1991-10-01

    This report was prepared under the direction of the Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel. The intent is to help Department of Energy sites prepare performance assessments that meet the Panel's expectations in terms of detail, quality, content, and consistency. Information on the Panel review process and philosophy are provided, as well as important technical issues that will be focused on during a review. This guidance is not intended to provide a detailed review plan as in NUREG-1200, Standard Review Plan for Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (January 1988). The focus and intent of the Panel's reviews differ significantly from a regulatory review. The review of a performance assessment by the Panel uses the collective professional judgment of the members to ascertain that the approach taken the methodology used, the assumptions made, etc., are technically sound and adequately justified. The results of the Panel's review will be used by Department of Energy Headquarters in determining compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management.''

  4. User's guide for shipping Type B quantities of radioactive and fissile material, including plutonium, in DOT-6M specification packaging configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    The need for developing a user's guide for shipping Type B quantities of radioactive and fissile material, including plutonium, in a US Department of Transportation Specification 6M (DOT-6M) packaging was identified by the US Department of Energy (DOE)-Headquarters, Transportation Management Division (EM-261) because the DOT-6M packaging is widely used by DOE site contractors and the DOE receives many questions about approved packaging configuration. Currently, EM-261 has the authority to approve new DOT-6M packaging configurations for use by the DOE Operations Offices. This user's guide identifies the DOE-approved DOT-6M packaging configurations and explains how to have new configurations approved by the DOE. The packaging configurations described in this guide are approved by the DOE, and satisfy the applicable DOT requirements and the identified DOE restrictions. These packaging configurations are acceptable for transport of Type B quantities of radioactive and fissile material, including plutonium

  5. Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma adjacent to large blood vessels using 1.5T MRI-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation combined with iodine-125 radioactive seed implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zheng-Yu, E-mail: linsinlan@yahoo.com.cn [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Chen, Jin, E-mail: snow8968851@163.com [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Deng, Xiu-Fen, E-mail: dxf197286@yahoo.com.cn [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: The objective is to study the technology associated with and feasibility of the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) adjacent to large blood vessels using 1.5T MRI-guided radiofrequency ablation combined with iodine-125 (I-125) radioactive seed implantation. Methods: Sixteen patients with a total of 24 HCC lesions (average maximum diameter: 2.35 {+-} 1.03 cm) were pathologically confirmed by biopsy or clinically diagnosed received 1.5T MRI-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment. Each patient had one lesion adjacent to large blood vessels ({>=}3 mm); after the ablation, I-125 radioactive seeds were implanted in the portions of the lesions that were adjacent to the blood vessels. Results: All the ablations and I-125 radioactive seed implantations were successful; a total of 118 seeds were implanted. The ablated lesions exhibited hypointense signals on the T2WI sequence with a thin rim of hyperintense signals; they also exhibited significant hyperintense signals on the T1WI sequence with clear boundaries. The average follow-up period was 11.1 {+-} 6.2 months. There were 23 complete responses and one partial response in the 24 lesions. The alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels of the patients significantly decreased. Conclusion: The 1.5T MRI-guided RFA combined with I-125 radioactive seed implantation for the treatment of HCC adjacent to large blood vessels is an effective technology.

  6. Guide to good practice: bagless transfer systems for use on radioactive facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillyman, E.

    1988-09-01

    The development of the bagless posting system has improved the degree of safety possible during posting operations. It has provided the means of significantly reducing the large amounts of contaminated plastic waste created during bag posting and has provided the means of minimising personal exposure both in glovebox plutonium handling and in heavily shielded facilities. This report is intended to provide a guide to the types of bagless posting systems that are available both for glovebox and shielded facilities use. Included are references to developments which have utilised the bagless posting principle for sealing and utility change operations. Details of particular system types can be obtained from the identified design office or commercial organisation. (author)

  7. Influence of hydrogen in the presence of organic matter on bacterial activity under radioactive waste disposal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chautard, C. [IRSN, PRP-DGE/SEDRAN/BERIS, B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); CEA, DEN/DTN/SMTM/LMTE, bat 307, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Ritt, A. [IRSN, PRP-DGE/SRTG/LAME, B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Libert, M. [CEA, DEN/DTN/SMTM/LMTE, bat 307, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); De Windt, L. [Mines-ParisTech, Geosciences Dpt., 77305 Fontainebleau Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    According to the French design for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), waste will be emplaced in an environment involving metallic materials into a geological clay formation. The presence of microorganisms has recently been evidenced in such environments. Therefore, based on current knowledge, the introduction of microbial species during the construction and operational phases, as well as the survival of bacteria after the disposal closure, have to be accounted for within the context of safety assessment. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity is notably expected to have an impact on corrosion processes, and thus influence the evolution of metallic and clay materials involved in a HLW disposal cell. The present work investigates the potential development of a SRB, Thermo-desulfovibrio hydrogeniphilus, in order to better assess its metabolism in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that is representative of the DOM present in an argillaceous pore water, as well as hydrogen that will be produced by the anaerobic corrosion of metallic materials. After 49 days of batch experiments, hydrogen enhances the bacterial development in presence of a low amount of DOM, whereas the DOM alone does not seem to sustain bacteria activities. (authors)

  8. A preliminary redrafting of the Italian technical guide no.26 on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tocci, M.

    1993-01-01

    The recent National Energy Plan confirms the need for reprocessing of the nuclear spent fuel arising from the Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that were definitively put out of operation after Chernobyl accident. Two campaigns concerning the Italian spent fuel reprocessing are starting at this time. The first-one is related to LATINA (MAGNOX, GCR 160 MWe) while the second one will concern GARIGLIANO (BWR 160 MWe), CAORSO (BWR 840 MWe) and TRINO (PWR, 200 MWe). The first campaign will involve about 600 tons of MAGNOX spent fuel arising from LATINA NPP which will be reprocessed in the next future by BNFL (British Nuclear Fuel Limited) at Sellafield. The vitrified High Level Wastes (HLW) shall return to Italy starting from 1994. ENEA-DISP (Italian directorate for Nuclear Safety) has received from BNFL the technical specifications of the glass blocks. The approval of those specifications is scheduled by the end of 1993, in order to allow the delivery of the wastes. During the licensing iter ENEA-DISP will use its own Technical Guide N. 26, which identifies and specifies the basic criteria and requirements for an appropriate waste management policy. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs

  9. Security in the transport of radioactive material: Implementing guide. Spanish edition; La seguridad fisica en el transporte de materiales radiactivos. Guia de aplicacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    This guide provides States with guidance in implementing, maintaining or enhancing a nuclear security regime to protect radioactive material (including nuclear material) in transport against theft, sabotage or other malicious acts that could, if successful, have unacceptable radiological consequences. From a security point of view, a threshold is defined for determining which packages or types of radioactive material need to be protected beyond prudent management practice. Minimizing the likelihood of theft or sabotage of radioactive material in transport is accomplished by a combination of measures to deter, detect, delay and respond to such acts. These measures are complemented by other measures to recover stolen material and to mitigate possible consequences, in order to further reduce the risks.

  10. Parametric resonance in neutrino oscillation: A guide to control the effects of inhomogeneous matter density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Masafumi; Ota, Toshihiko; Saito, Masako; Sato, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the inhomogeneous matter density on the three-generation neutrino oscillation probability are analyzed. Realistic profile of the matter density is expanded into a Fourier series. Taking in the Fourier modes one by one, we demonstrate that each mode has its corresponding target energy. The high Fourier mode selectively modifies the oscillation probability of the low-energy region. This rule is well described by the parametric resonance between the neutrino oscillation and the matter effect. The Fourier analysis gives a simple guideline to systematically control the uncertainty of the oscillation probability caused by the uncertain density of matter. Precise analysis of the oscillation probability down to the low-energy region requires accurate evaluation of the Fourier coefficients of the matter density up to the corresponding high modes.

  11. The development of guided inquiry-based learning devices on photosynthesis and respiration matter to train science literacy skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choirunnisak; Ibrahim, M.; Yuliani

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a guided inquiry-based learning devices on photosynthesis and respiration matter that are feasible (valid, practical, and effective) to train students’ science literacy. This research used 4D development model and tested on 15 students of biology education 2016 the State University of Surabaya with using one group pretest-posttest design. Learning devices developed include (a) Semester Lesson Plan (b) Lecture Schedule, (c) Student Activity Sheet, (d) Student Textbook, and (e) testability of science literacy. Research data obtained through validation method, observation, test, and questionnaire. The results were analyzed descriptively quantitative and qualitative. The ability of science literacy was analyzed by n-gain. The results of this research showed that (a) learning devices that developed was categorically very valid, (b) learning activities performed very well, (c) student’s science literacy skills improved that was a category as moderate, and (d) students responses were very positively to the learning that already held. Based on the results of the analysis and discussion, it is concluded that the development of guided inquiry-based learning devices on photosynthesis and respiration matter was feasible to train students literacy science skills.

  12. Handheld single photon emission computed tomography (handheld SPECT) navigated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery of computer tomography-guided radioactively marked pulmonary lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Joachim; Putora, Paul Martin; Schneider, Tino; Zeisel, Christoph; Brutsche, Martin; Baty, Florent; Markus, Alexander; Kick, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Radioactive marking can be a valuable extension to minimally invasive surgery. The technique has been clinically applied in procedures involving sentinel lymph nodes, parathyroidectomy as well as interventions in thoracic surgery. Improvements in equipment and techniques allow one to improve the limits. Pulmonary nodules are frequently surgically removed for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons; here video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is the preferred technique. VATS might be impossible with nodules that are small or located deep in the lung. In this study, we examined the clinical application and safety of employing the newly developed handheld single photon emission tomography (handheld SPECT) device in combination with CT-guided radioactive marking of pulmonary nodules. In this pilot study, 10 subjects requiring surgical resection of a pulmonary nodule were included. The technique involved CT-guided marking of the target nodule with a 20-G needle, with subsequent injection of 25-30 MBq (effective: 7-14 MBq) Tc-99m MAA (Macro Albumin Aggregate). Quality control was made with conventional SPECT-CT to confirm the correct localization and exclude possible complications related to the puncture procedure. VATS was subsequently carried out using the handheld SPECT to localize the radioactivity intraoperatively and therefore the target nodule. A 3D virtual image was superimposed on the intraoperative visual image for surgical guidance. In 9 of the 10 subjects, the radioactive application was successfully placed directly in or in the immediate vicinity of the target nodule. The average size of the involved nodules was 9 mm (range 4-15). All successfully marked nodules were subsequently completely excised (R0) using VATS. The procedure was well tolerated. An asymptomatic clinically insignificant pneumothorax occurred in 5 subjects. Two subjects were found to have non-significant discrete haemorrhage in the infiltration canal of the needle. In a single subject, the

  13. Nuclear Security Systems and Measures for the Detection of Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control. Implementing Guide (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides guidance to Member States for the development, or improvement of nuclear security systems and measures for the detection of criminal or unauthorized acts with nuclear security implications involving nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. It describes the elements of an effective nuclear security detection architecture which is composed of an integrated set of nuclear security systems and measures, and is based on an appropriate legal and regulatory framework for the implementation of the national detection strategy. The publication is an implementing guide within the IAEA Nuclear Security Series and is intended for use by national policy makers, legislative bodies, competent authorities, institutions, and individuals involved in the establishment, implementation, maintenance or sustainability of nuclear security systems and measures for the detection of nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control

  14. The PACKTRAM database on national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. User's guide for compiled system program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The PACKTRAM system program enables Member States to prepare data diskettes on national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material, for submission to the IAEA, and facilitates data manipulation and report preparation for the IAEA. The system program is provided as a 424 kbyte executable file, for which this document is the User Guide. The system is fully menu-driven and requires an IBM-compatible personal computer with a minimum of 640 kbyte random access memory, a hard drive and one 3-1/2 inch diskette drive. 3 refs, 6 tabs

  15. Use of cold neutrons for condensed matter research at the neutron guide laboratory ELLA in Juelich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaetzler, R.; Monkenbusch, M.

    1998-01-01

    Cold neutrons produced in the FRJ-2 DIDO reactor are guided into the external hall ELLA. It hosts 10 instruments that are red by three major neutron guides. Cold neutrons allow for diffraction and small angle scattering experiments resolving mesoscopic structures (1 to 100 nm). Contrast variation by isotopic substitution in chemically identical species yields information uniquely accessible bi neutrons. Inelastic scattering of cold neutrons allows investigating slow molecular motions because the low neutron velocity results in large relative velocity changes even at small energy transfers. The SANS machines and the HADAS reflectometer serve as structure probes and the backscattering BSS1 and spin-echo spectrometers NSE as main dynamics probes. Besides this the diffuse scattering instrument DNS and the lattice parameter determination instrument LAP deal mainly with crystals and their defects. Finally the beta-NMR and the EKN position allow for methods other than scattering employing nuclear reactions for solid state physics, chemistry and biology/medicine. (author)

  16. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources.

  17. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources

  18. Applicant's guide related to requests of shipping approval and of acceptance of parcel models or radioactive products aimed at civilian use transported on public road - Guide nr 7 - Index 0, release of the 07/04/2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This guide presents the recommendations made by the ASN to applicants in order to facilitate approval requests and shipping approvals related to the transportation of radioactive products. After a recall of the legal context, these recommendations address the documents to be provided in support of an approval request or of a shipping approval, the content of the safety file, the instruction delay, the approval certificate, and changes brought to the parcel model. Appendices contain issues raised by expertise based on experiences, the European PDSR (Package Design Safety Report), and a model for the elaboration of a certificate project

  19. Technical guides/ methodological guide in case of tripping of a radioactivity detection gantry; Guides techniques / guide methodologique en cas de declenchement d'un portique de detection de radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The most of operators of reprocessing plants or waste disposal plants have equipment to detect radiation as gantry. To answer to a clarification need procedures can be followed during the tripping of a gantry. Procedures have been made by cards, they follow the regulation in force in the area of radiation protection and environment protection. With these cards there are an annexe giving the terms noticed in the cards, a glossary on radioactivity as well a list of organisms approved by the government to proceed to control for the workers protection against the hazards of ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  20. Dispersion of radioactive material in air and water and consideration of population distribution in site evaluation for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA issues Safety Requirements and Safety Guides pertaining to nuclear power plants and activities in the field of nuclear energy, on the basis of its Safety Fundamentals publication on The Safety of Nuclear Installations. The present Safety Guide, which supplements the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, concerns the effects of a nuclear power plant on the surrounding region and the consideration of population distribution in the siting of a plant. This Safety Guide makes recommendations on how to meet the requirements of the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, on the basis of knowledge of the mechanisms for the dispersion of effluents discharged into the atmosphere and into surface water and groundwater. Relevant site characteristics and safety considerations are discussed. Population distribution, the projected population growth rate, particular geographical features, the capabilities of local transport networks and communications networks, industry and agriculture in the region, and recreational and institutional activities in the region should be considered in assessing the feasibility of developing an emergency response plan. In the selection of a site for a facility using radioactive material, such as a nuclear power plant, account should be taken of any local features that might be affected by the facility and of the feasibility of off-site intervention, including emergency response and protective actions. This is in addition to the evaluation of any features of the site itself that might affect the safety of the facility. This Safety Guide recommends methods for the assessment of regional and local characteristics. This Safety Guide supersedes four earlier IAEA Safety Guides, namely: Atmospheric Dispersion in Nuclear Power Plant Siting (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S3 (1980)); Site Selection and Evaluation for Nuclear Power Plants with Respect to Population Distribution (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S4 (1980)); Hydrological

  1. Dispersion of radioactive material in air and water and consideration of population distribution in site evaluation for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA issues Safety Requirements and Safety Guides pertaining to nuclear power plants and activities in the field of nuclear energy, on the basis of its Safety Fundamentals publication on The Safety of Nuclear Installations. The present Safety Guide, which supplements the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, concerns the effects of a nuclear power plant on the surrounding region and the consideration of population distribution in the siting of a plant. This Safety Guide makes recommendations on how to meet the requirements of the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, on the basis of knowledge of the mechanisms for the dispersion of effluents discharged into the atmosphere and into surface water and groundwater. Relevant site characteristics and safety considerations are discussed. Population distribution, the projected population growth rate, particular geographical features, the capabilities of local transport networks and communications networks, industry and agriculture in the region, and recreational and institutional activities in the region should be considered in assessing the feasibility of developing an emergency response plan. In the selection of a site for a facility using radioactive material, such as a nuclear power plant, account should be taken of any local features that might be affected by the facility and of the feasibility of off-site intervention, including emergency response and protective actions. This is in addition to the evaluation of any features of the site itself that might affect the safety of the facility. This Safety Guide recommends methods for the assessment of regional and local characteristics. This Safety Guide supersedes four earlier IAEA Safety Guides, namely: Atmospheric Dispersion in Nuclear Power Plant Siting (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S3 (1980)). Site Selection and Evaluation for Nuclear Power Plants with Respect to Population Distribution (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S4 (1980)). Hydrological

  2. A guide to TIRION 4 - a computer code for calculating the consequences of releasing radioactive material to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, L.S.

    1978-12-01

    TIRION 4 is the most recent program in a series designed to calculate the consequences of releasing radioactive material to the atmosphere. A brief description of the models used in the program and full details of the various control cards necessary to run TIRION 4 are given. (author)

  3. Management situation and prospect of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Pil Jun

    1985-04-01

    This book tell US that management situation and prospect of radioactive waste matter, which includes importance of energy, independence, limitation of fossil fuel energy, density of nuclear energy, strategy of supply of energy resource in Korea, nuclear energy development and radioactive waste matter, summary of management of radioactive waste, statistics of radioactive waste, disposal principle of radioactive waste, management on radioactive waste after using, disposal of Trench, La Marche in French, and Asse salt mine in Germany.

  4. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  5. A user's guide to the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated software package:a low-level radioactive waste disposal performance assessment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Arnold, Bill Walter; Mattie, Patrick D.

    2007-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory, has over 30 years experience in the assessment of radioactive waste disposal and at the time of this publication is providing assistance internationally in a number of areas relevant to the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems. In countries with small radioactive waste programs, international technology transfer program efforts are often hampered by small budgets, schedule constraints, and a lack of experienced personnel. In an effort to surmount these difficulties, Sandia has developed a system that utilizes a combination of commercially available software codes and existing legacy codes for probabilistic safety assessment modeling that facilitates the technology transfer and maximizes limited available funding. Numerous codes developed and endorsed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and codes developed and maintained by United States Department of Energy are generally available to foreign countries after addressing import/export control and copyright requirements. From a programmatic view, it is easier to utilize existing codes than to develop new codes. From an economic perspective, it is not possible for most countries with small radioactive waste disposal programs to maintain complex software, which meets the rigors of both domestic regulatory requirements and international peer review. Therefore, revitalization of deterministic legacy codes, as well as an adaptation of contemporary deterministic codes, provides a credible and solid computational platform for constructing probabilistic safety assessment models. This document is a reference users guide for the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated modeling software package developed as part of a cooperative technology transfer project between Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) in Taiwan for the preliminary assessment of several candidate low

  6. Management of sites potentially polluted by radioactive substances - Methodological guidebook; Gestion des sites potentiellement pollues par des substances radioactives - Guide methodologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-12-15

    This document is the update of the 'methodological guidelines for the management of industrial areas potentially contaminated by radioactive substances', published in 2001 by IRSN. Revisions intended to bring coherence between management of areas polluted by radioactive substances and the general policy applied to polluted sites described in a document published in Feb. 2007 by the French Ministry in charge of Environment. Requirements introduced both by the law relative to waste management of June 28, 2006 and the ministerial order of 17 November 2008 were introduced. The involvement of all stakeholders during the process was stressed. The updating mainly lead to introduce a clear distinction between polluted areas where uses are established and those without use or at redevelopment stage. When the uses are established, an 'Interpretation of the condition of environment' is conducted. Alternatively, the remediation process follows a 'management plan'. The revision also led to the disappearance of the 'doubt removal' phase which has been incorporated as an entire part in the site characterisation. Among other significant changes, it may be noted the evolution of the 'risk assessment' tools from simplified risk assessment and detailed risk assessment to a single tool allowing the quantitative assessment of exposure (EQER). Finally, the guidelines highlight stakeholder involvement in identifying the different participants and in reminding the benefits of a consultative approach. Whatever the remediation process: interpretation of the condition of environment or management plan; site characterisation is required as soon as a pollution is suspected. It includes literature reviews and field investigations primarily to confirm or deny the presence of pollution and, where appropriate, to determine its location, nature and level. The effort accorded to site characterisation must be proportionate to identified issues. The

  7. Investigating microbial transformations of soil organic matter: synthesizing knowledge from disparate fields to guide new experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, S. A.; Tiemann, L. K.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Lehmeier, C. A.; Min, K.

    2015-04-01

    Discerning why some soil organic matter (SOM) leaves soil profiles relatively quickly while other compounds, especially at depth, can be retained for decades to millennia is challenging for a multitude of reasons. Simultaneous with soil-specific advances, multiple other disciplines have enhanced their knowledge bases in ways potentially useful for future investigations of SOM decay. In this article, we highlight observations highly relevant for those investigating SOM decay and retention but often emanating from disparate fields and residing in literature seldom cited in SOM research. We focus on recent work in two key areas. First, we turn to experimental approaches using natural and artificial aquatic environments to investigate patterns of microbially mediated OM transformations as environmental conditions change, and highlight how aquatic microbial responses to environmental change can reveal processes likely important to OM decay and retention in soils. Second, we emphasize the importance of establishing intrinsic patterns of decay kinetics for purified substrates commonly found in soils to develop baseline rates. These decay kinetics - which represent the upper limit of the reaction rates - can then be compared to substrate decay kinetics observed in natural samples, which integrate intrinsic decay reaction rates and edaphic factors essential to the site under study but absent in purified systems. That comparison permits the site-specific factors to be parsed from the fundamental decay kinetics, an important advance in our understanding of SOM decay (and thus persistence) in natural systems. We then suggest ways in which empirical observations from aquatic systems and purified substrate-enzyme reaction kinetics can be used to advance recent theoretical efforts in SOM-focused research. Finally, we suggest how the observations in aquatic and purified substrate-enzyme systems could be used to help unravel the puzzles presented by oft-observed patterns of SOM

  8. CT-guided radioactive 125I-seed implantation for the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma: a clinical observation of 19 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jian; Zheng Yunfeng; Zhang Huan; Wang Zhongmin; Chen Kemin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the dynamic changes of serum tumor markers after CT-guided radioactive 125 I-seed implantation treatment in patients with pancreatic carcinoma and to assess the therapeutic effectiveness of 125 I-seed implantation. Methods: CT-guided radioactive 125 I-seed implantation was performed in 19 patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer. Treatment planning system was used to reconstruct 3-dimentional images of the tumor, and the quantity and distribution of 125 I-seeds to be implanted were thus determined. Under CT guidance 125 I-seeds were embedded into pancreatic cancer. Before and after the 125 I-seed implantation the levels of serum tumor markers, including CEA, CA19-9 and CA50, were determined by using radioimmunoassay method. The clinical effects were observed and the therapeutic results were statistically analyzed. Results: The pain stared to be relieved 2 to 5 days after implantation. The total effective rate (CR + PR) at one and three months after treatment was 68.42% (13 /19) and 63.16% (12 /19) respectively. One month after 125 I-seed implantation, the levels of serum CEA, CA19-9 and CA50 were significantly different to that determined before implantation in all cases (P 125 I-seed implantation is a safe and effective interventional treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer with reliable short-term result and remarkable pain-relieving effect. Moreover, this therapy can significantly lower the levels of many serum tumor markers, which play some suggestive roles in evaluating the clinical curativeness. (authors)

  9. Organisation and operation of radioactivity surveillance and control in the vicinity of nuclear plants. A practical guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Guidance is presented for the development of environmental monitoring programmes and procedures relevant to the operation of nuclear plants. The essential aim of an environmental monitoring programme is to ensure that the exposure of the general public does not exceed certain set limits. A certain uniformity of criteria in the organization of monitoring networks around nuclear installations may prove to be very useful. These criteria are set out in detail. Progress is reported on the following studies: monitoring of radioactive contamination of atmosphere, water, soils and foodstuffs: monitoring of external radiation

  10. Radioactivity and its measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Garfinkel, S B

    1980-01-01

    Begins with a description of the discovery of radioactivity and the historic research of such pioneers as the Curies and Rutherford. After a discussion of the interactions of &agr;, &bgr; and &ggr; rays with matter, the energetics of the different modes of nuclear disintegration are considered in relation to the Einstein mass-energy relationship as applied to radioactive transformations. Radiation detectors and radioactivity measurements are also discussed

  11. User's guide to MARINRAD: model for assessing the consequences of release of radioactive material into the oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koplik, C.M.; Kaplan, M.F.; Nalbandian, J.Y.; Simonson, J.H.; Clark, P.G.

    1984-05-01

    Marine Radionuclide Transport and Dose (MARINRAD) is a system of the computer programs designed to evaluate the consequences from release of radioactive waste into the ocean. The FORTRAN program MARRAD, which is part of the MARINRAD software, computes nuclide concentration caused by ocean transport and generates food chain concentration factors. The FORTRAN program MAROUT, which is also part of MARINRAD, evaluates a pathways-to-man dose model, generates print reports, and produces graphic plots. MARINRAD's top-down modular design provides flexible software that can be easily modified for a user's specific problem. MARINRAD was developed under contract with the Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 18 references, 23 figures, 42 tables

  12. INFX guide: summary of US DOE plans and policies for international cooperation in the field of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Kelman, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide, in one source, an overview and summary of major international cooperative activities such as long-term personnel exchanges, planning of complementary R and D programs, and testing programs like the one at Stripa for use by DOE and DOE contractor personnel responsible for planning such programs. The contents are as follows: waste management-general, high-level waste immobilization; transuranic wastes; low-level radioactive waste; airborne wastes; waste isolation in geologic repositories; marine disposal; spent fuel storage; transportation; uranium mill tailings; decontamination and decommissioning; and appendices which are for bilaterial waste management agreements; INFX policies and procedures, DOE contractor personnel and international agencies

  13. High-performance liquid chromatographic characterization of dissolved organic matter from low-level radioactive waste leachates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, F.; Elchuk, S.; Walker, Z.H.

    1996-01-01

    Leachates from a waste degradation experiment, containing ∼700-3700 mg C/I of dissolved organic matter (DOM), were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography (LC), using various separation strategies. Scaling up of the separation scheme to a semi-preparative scale, suitable for hyphenated techniques, was also investigated. Separations with reversed-phase columns suggested that ∼70-93% of the DOM was hydrophilic, and ion-pair chromatography of this fraction showed the presence of several discrete compounds. Labile and non-labile complexes were formed by adding 60 Co radiotracer. Size-exclusion chromatography indicated that the DOM was primarily in the <1000-1500 Da molecular mass range. (author)

  14. Contents of management plans for incidents and accidents involving the transport of radioactive substances. Guide no. 17, Version of 22/12/2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This guide presents the essential topics to be developed in a management plan for incidents and accidents involving the transport of radioactive substances for civil use. It does not aim to be exhaustive and could be added to by each party involved in the transport, who can make the necessary adaptations and additions, taking account of the particularities of its shipments and its organisation, as well as those of the company or group to which it belongs. The radioactive substances transport incident and accident management plan is a document comprising a descriptive part and an operational part. It presents the overall response of the party involved in the transport operation to an incident or accident situation concerning one of its shipments and the steps it intends to make in order to support the authorities in charge of this situation, in the best possible conditions. This response is designed to cover the cases of incidents or accidents whether or not they lead to a radiological emergency situation. The guide exclusively concerns: - road transport; - rail transport; - the 'road' and 'rail' parts of multimodal transport operations. The case of an incident or an accident occurring during a particular stop such as a transit site, in a transhipment area (port, airport, railway station, etc.), or in a transport infrastructure, is also covered by the radioactive substances transport incident and accident management plan, which then supports the entities in charge of managing this situation (operator of the transhipment area or the transport infrastructure and - as applicable - their supervisory authorities). The level of risk associated with transport incidents and accidents varies widely, according to the nature and quantities of the materials being carried, the number of shipments made and the package model used. The incident and accident management plan must therefore be tailored to the specific nature of the shipments by the party concerned. The radioactive

  15. Radioactive transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive Transformations describes Ernest Rutherford's Nobel Prize-winning investigations into the mysteries of radioactive matter. In this historic work, Rutherford outlines the scientific investigations that led to and coincided with his own research--including the work of Wilhelm Rӧntgen, J. J. Thomson, and Marie Curie--and explains in detail the experiments that provided a glimpse at special relativity, quantum mechanics, and other concepts that would shape modern physics. This new edition features a comprehensive introduction by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek which engagingly explains how Rutherford's early research led to a better understanding of topics as diverse as the workings of the atom's nucleus, the age of our planet, and the fusion in stars.

  16. Help guide for the application of regulatory requirements on the transport of radioactive material; Guia de ayuda para la aplicacion de requisitos reglementarios sobr el transporte de material radiactivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Rodriguez, S.; Acena Moreno, V.; Zamora Martin, F.; Rubio de Juan, E.

    2011-07-01

    The regulation of transport of radioactive material by road in Spain refers to compliance with the requirements of the European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) in force. The structure presented by this legislation, which is international, and the inclusion in it of requirements that apply to other dangerous goods makes it difficult to consult the requirements that specifically apply to the transport of radioactive material. Therefore, the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) has found it necessary to publish a guide that facilitates users to comply with its provisions and, consequently, this transport security.

  17. Management of radioactive waste: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Paulo Sant'ana; Taynara Cristina Cordeiro

    2016-01-01

    The issue of disposal of radioactive waste around the world is not solved by now and the principal reason is the lack of an efficient technologic system. The fact that radioactive waste decays of radioactivity with time are the main reasons for setting nuclear or radioactive waste apart from the other common hazardous wastes management. Radioactive waste can be classified according to the state of matter and level of radioactivity and this classification can be differently interpreted from co...

  18. MOTOR 2.0: module for transformation of organic matter and nutrients in soil; user guide and technical documentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assinck, F.B.T.; Rappoldt, C.

    2004-01-01

    MOTOR is a MOdule describing the Transformation of Organic matteR and nutrients in soil. It calculates the transformations between pools of organic matter and mineral nitrogen in soil. Pools are characterized by a carbon and nitrogen content and can be labelled. MOTOR is a flexible tool because the

  19. Guide to the declaration procedure and coding system for criteria concerning significant events related to safety, radiation protection or the environment, applicable to basic nuclear installations and the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacoste, Andre-Claude

    2005-01-01

    This guide notably contains various forms associated with the declaration of significant events, and explanations to fill them in: significant event declaration form for a basic nuclear installation, significant event declaration form for radioactive material transport, significant event report for a basic nuclear installation, significant event report for radioactive material transport, declaration criteria for significant events related to the safety of non-PWR basic nuclear installations, declaration criteria for significant events related to PWR safety, significant events declared further to events resulting in group 1 unavailability and non-compliance with technical operating specifications, declaration criteria for significant events concerning radiation protection for basic nuclear installations, declaration criteria for significant events concerning environmental protection, applicable to basic nuclear installations, and declaration criteria for significant events concerning radioactive material transport

  20. Radioactive air sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Maiello, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of radioactive air sampling has matured and evolved over decades, it has lacked a single resource that assimilates technical and background information on its many facets. Edited by experts and with contributions from top practitioners and researchers, Radioactive Air Sampling Methods provides authoritative guidance on measuring airborne radioactivity from industrial, research, and nuclear power operations, as well as naturally occuring radioactivity in the environment. Designed for industrial hygienists, air quality experts, and heath physicists, the book delves into the applied research advancing and transforming practice with improvements to measurement equipment, human dose modeling of inhaled radioactivity, and radiation safety regulations. To present a wide picture of the field, it covers the international and national standards that guide the quality of air sampling measurements and equipment. It discusses emergency response issues, including radioactive fallout and the assets used ...

  1. ORNL radioactive waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards

  2. Handbook for Response to Suspect Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliff, William C.; Pappas, Richard A.; Arthur, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    This document provides response actions to be performed following the initial port, airport, or border crossing discovery of material that is suspected of being radioactive. The purpose of this guide is to provide actions appropriate for handling radioactive material

  3. An Act to regulate the keeping and use of radioactive substances, irradiating apparatus and certain electronic products, and for matters incidental thereto (No. 440 of 1975)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Radiation Safety Act 1975 which applies to radioactive substances and irradiating apparatus is a framework Act governing activities involving their possession and applications including their disposal. It makes provision for the duties and powers of the authorities responsible for administering the Act (the Radiological Council), licensing requirements and exemptions therefrom, registration of such substances and apparatus, inspection procedures and liability under the Act. The Radioactive Substances Act 1954, the Radioactive Substances Act Amendment Acts 1960 and 1964 are repealed. (NEA) [fr

  4. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    According to the Section 24 of the Finnish Radiation Decree (1512/91), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety shall specify the concentration and activity limits and principles for the determination whether a waste can be defined as a radioactive waste or not. The radiation safety requirements and limits for the disposal of radioactive waste are given in the guide. They must be observed when discharging radioactive waste into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste disposal plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilization of nuclear energy of natural resources. (4 refs., 1 tab.)

  5. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Niello, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    The book summarizes general concepts on radiation, nuclear structure, radioactivity and the interaction of the nuclear radiation with matter. It describes also the basic principles of radio dosimetry. Natural and artificial sources of radiation are reviewed as well as the effects of radiation in man. Medical and industrial applications of ionizing radiation and the pollution produced by the discharge of radioactive materials are outlined. A short review is made of the safety rules and the regulations concerning the protection of the environment [es

  6. Sellafield (release of radioactivity)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J; Goodlad, A; Morris, M

    1986-02-06

    A government statement is reported, about the release of plutonium nitrate at the Sellafield site of British Nuclear Fuels plc on 5 February 1986. Matters raised included: details of accident; personnel monitoring; whether radioactive material was released from the site; need for public acceptance of BNFL activities; whether plant should be closed; need to reduce level of radioactive effluent; number of incidents at the plant.

  7. Examination advice of the location-independent Environmental-impact report and advice-direction guides for the location-dependent environmental-impact report concerning storage and processing of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This document is the examination advice made by the Provisional Committee for the environmental-impact reporting (VCmer) in view of the decision-making in behalf of which the location-independent environmental-impact report (MER) has been drawn up. Besides the examination by the VCmer of the location-independent MER in accordance with article 41z, part 1 and 2, this document covers an advice for direction guides for the, still to be drawn up, location-dependent MER on the storage and processing of radioactive wastes produced in the Netherlands, in accordance with article 41n, part 1 of the enactment m.e.r. The MER has been drawn up in behalf of the decision-making about location, design and construction of an aboveground, temporal storage of radioactive waste for the coming 50-100 years. In the MER two scenarios are distinguished: scenario 1 in fact reflects the actual situation in which, besides the amount of low- and medium-level radioactive waste, the high-level radioactive waste from the two nuclear power plants in the Netherlands have to be taken into account. Scenario 2 includes, besides the waste production of scenario 1, an extension with regard to the waste which would be produced in a 30-year operation time of a, still to be isntalled, nuclear power of 2000 MWe, to be increased up to 4000 MWe eventually. In this scenario finally about three quarter of the total volume of all radioactive waste would be produced by nuclear power plants. In that case emphasis will lay upon an installation which in particular has to be appropriate for a longtime, be it still temporary, storage of radioactive waste originating, largely, from the new nuclear power plant to be build in the Netherlands. (author)

  8. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  9. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Spanish Edition); Control de fuentes huérfanas y otros materiales radiactivos en las industrias de reciclado y producción de metales. Guía de seguridad específica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives.

  10. A study on the establishment of the regulatory guide to the characteristics and classification criteria of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Jae; Paek, Min Hoon; Park, Jong Gil; Han, Byeong Seop; Cheong, Jae Hak; Lee, Hae Chan; Yang, Jin Yeong; Hong, Hei Kwan; Park, Jin Baek [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    The objectives of this study are the development of regulatory guidance to the establishment of the necessary technology standard of the characteristics and classification criteria of low and intermediate level radioactive waste for the safe operation of the waste repositories. In followings, the contents of our report will be presented in two parts. Survey of the characteristics of radioactive waste : investigate and analyze the source, types and characteristics of domestic radioactive waste as a basis for this study, radiochemical analysis of radioactive waste based on foreign and domestic data base, determination of the methodology for the application of the characteristic analysis of waste classification technology. Establishment of the classification criteria of the radioactive waste : collection and analysis of foreign and domestic data base on the classification methodology and criteria, development of low and intermediate level waste classification criteria and the set up of the classification methodology through the analysis of waste data, establishment of the systematic classification methodology of the low and intermediate radioactive waste through the careful survey of the current domestic regulation.

  11. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  12. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  13. National plan of radioactive wastes and matters 2007-2009; Plan national de gestion des matieres et des dechets radioactifs 2007-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-01-15

    This Plan aims to propose a global framework allowing the management of radioactive wastes, whatever the producers in order to control the safety and the choice of adapted disposal sites. The first part is devoted to the description of solutions of radioactive wastes management for existing or engaged wastes. The second part concerns radioactive materials of the nuclear industry which are not considered as wastes, but as recycling materials for future nuclear reactors. For instance, this part discusses the particular case of the depleted uranium. The third part examines the different channels of the long dated management. The last part brings together the all data and in particular problematic points which must be discussed and analyzed in a logic framework. Propositions and recommendations are provided. (A.L.B.)

  14. Validation of the What Matters Index: A brief, patient-reported index that guides care for chronic conditions and can substitute for computer-generated risk models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John H; Ho, Lynn; Soloway, Laura; Moore, L Gordon

    2018-01-01

    Current health care delivery relies on complex, computer-generated risk models constructed from insurance claims and medical record data. However, these models produce inaccurate predictions of risk levels for individual patients, do not explicitly guide care, and undermine health management investments in many patients at lesser risk. Therefore, this study prospectively validates a concise patient-reported risk assessment that addresses these inadequacies of computer-generated risk models. Five measures with well-documented impacts on the use of health services are summed to create a "What Matters Index." These measures are: 1) insufficient confidence to self-manage health problems, 2) pain, 3) bothersome emotions, 4) polypharmacy, and 5) adverse medication effects. We compare the sensitivity and predictive values of this index with two representative risk models in a population of 8619 Medicaid recipients. The patient-reported "What Matters Index" and the conventional risk models are found to exhibit similar sensitivities and predictive values for subsequent hospital or emergency room use. The "What Matters Index" is also reliable: akin to its performance during development, for patients with index scores of 1, 2, and ≥3, the odds ratios (with 95% confidence intervals) for subsequent hospitalization within 1 year, relative to patients with a score of 0, are 1.3 (1.1-1.6), 2.0 (1.6-2.4), and 3.4 (2.9-4.0), respectively; for emergency room use, the corresponding odds ratios are 1.3 (1.1-1.4), 1.9 (1.6-2.1), and 2.9 (2.6-3.3). Similar findings were replicated among smaller populations of 1061 mostly older patients from nine private practices and 4428 Medicaid patients without chronic conditions. In contrast to complex computer-generated risk models, the brief patient-reported "What Matters Index" immediately and unambiguously identifies fundamental, remediable needs for each patient and more sensibly directs the delivery of services to patient categories based on

  15. Radioactive waste management regulatory framework in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcenas, M.; Mejia, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the current regulatory framework concerning the radioactive waste management in Mexico. It is intended to show regulatory historical antecedents, the legal responsibilities assigned to institutions involved in the radioactive waste management, the sources of radioactive waste, and the development and preparation of national standards for fulfilling the legal framework for low level radioactive waste. It is at present the most important matter to be resolved. (author)

  16. A guide to the use of TIRION. A computer programme for the calculation of the consequences of releasing radioactive material to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.D.

    1976-11-01

    A brief description is given of the contents of TIRION, which is a computer program that has been written for use in calculations of the consequences of releasing radioactive material to the atmosphere. This is followed by a section devoted to an account of the control and data cards that make up the input to TIRION. (author)

  17. The low-level waste handbook: A user's guide to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, H.

    1986-11-01

    This report provides a detailed, section-by-section analysis of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. Appendices include lists of relevant law and legislation, relevant Congressional committees, members of Congress mentioned in the report, and exact copies of the 1980 and 1985 Acts

  18. A study on the development of regulatory guide to stability conformation and classification criteria of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Jae; Paek, Min Hoon; Park, Jong Gil; Han, Byeong Seop; Cheong, Jae Hak; Lee, Hae Chan; Yang, Jin Yeong; Hong, Hei Kwan; Park, Jin Baek [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-15

    The objectives of this study are to examine basic principles and terms and to suggest and recommend definite methods and criteria necessary for the classification and stability conformation of radioactive wastes. In this study, following studies were performed : investigate the domestic regulations related with the stability conformation and classification of radioactive wastes in order to keep mutual relationship and consistency between the regulations, investigate the sources, types and characteristics of domestic radioactive wastes as a basis for this study, investigate the classification criteria and methods of others countries in a general point of view and in the view point of disposal method, select the classification criteria factors for the domestic case and general case in the both general and domestic points of view, investigate the general test items for the stability conformation of radioactive waste forms and analysis on the test items and criteria of others countries for the mined cavity disposal and shallow land disposal in the view point of disposal method, experimental leaching and immersion tests for the borate and spent resin wastes as a study on the stability conformation of waste forms, selection of acceptance criteria for the both of disposal methods in the domestic and general cases.

  19. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Kamiya, Kunio; Yusa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To form radioactive wastes into a pellet-like solid body having high strength. Structure: Liquid waste containing a radioactive material is heated into a powdery body. Granular solid matter such as sand greater in diameter than grain size of the powdery body are mixed into the powdery body, and thereafter the mixture is formed by a granulator into a pellet-like solid body. The thus formed material is introduced into a drum can, into which a thermoplastic material such as asphalt is poured into the can and cooled so that the asphalt is impregnated inside the pellet to obtain a solid having high strength. (Furukawa, Y.)

  20. Radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkina, L.E.; Mazurek, V.; Myascedov, D.N.; Prokhorov, P.; Kachalov, V.A.; Ziv, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioactive layer in a radioactive source is sealed by the application of a sealing layer on the radioactive layer. The sealing layer can consist of a film of oxide of titanium, tin, zirconium, aluminum, or chromium. Preferably, the sealing layer is pure titanium dioxide. The radioactive layer is embedded in a finish enamel which, in turn, is on a priming enamel which surrounds a substrate

  1. Safe and Secure Transportation of Radioactive Materials in Pakistan and Future Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muneer, Muhammad; Ejaz, Asad

    2016-01-01

    PNRA is the sole organization in the country responsible to regulate all matters pertaining to ionizing radiations. For the safety of transport of radioactive material in the country, PNRA has adopted IAEA TS-R-1 as a national regulation. To cover the security aspects and emergency situations, if any, during the transportation of radioactive material, PNRA has issued the regulatory guide on ‘Transportation of Radioactive Material by Road in Pakistan’. In Pakistan, low to medium activity radioactive sources are transported from one place to another by road for the purpose of industrial radiography, well logging, medical application, etc. According to national policy, sealed radioactive sources of half life greater than 1 year and with initial activity of 100 GBq or more imported in the country are required to be returned to country of origin (exported) after its use. Although the activities related to transport of radioactive material remained safe and secure and no major accident/incident has been reported so far, however, the improvement/enhancement in the regulatory infrastructure is a continuous process. In future, more challenges are expected to be faced in the safety of transport packages. This paper will describe the steps taken by PNRA for the safety and security of transport of radioactive material in the country and future challenges. (author)

  2. A Combined Experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of Particulate Matter Emissions from a Wall-Guided Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide D. Sciortino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The latest generation of high-efficiency gasoline direct injection (GDI engines continues to be a significant source of dangerous ultra-fine particulate matter (PM emissions. The forthcoming advent in the 2017–2020 timeframe of the real driving emission (RDE standards affords little time for the identification of viable solutions. The present research work aims to contribute towards a much-needed improved understanding of the process of PM formation in theoretically-homogeneous stoichiometric spark-ignition combustion. Experimental measurements of engine-out PM have been taken from a wall-guided GDI engine operated at part-load; through parallel computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations of the test-engine, the process of mixture preparation was investigated. About 80% of the total particle number is emitted on average in the 5–50 nm range, with the vast majority being below the regulated lower limit of 23 nm. The results suggest that both improved charge homogeneity and lower peak combustion temperature contribute to lower particle number density (PNDen and larger particle size, as engine speed and load increase. The effect of engine load is stronger and results from greater injection pressure through better fuel droplet atomisation. Increases in pre-combustion homogeneity of 6% are associated with one order of magnitude reductions of PNDen. A simplified two-equation functional model was developed, which returns satisfactory qualitative predictions of PNDen as a function of basic engine control variables.

  3. Radioactivity metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, J.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the radioactivity metrology are reviewed. Radioactivity primary references; absolute methods of radioactivity measurements used in the Laboratoire de Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants; relative measurement methods; traceability through international comparisons and interlaboratory tests; production and distribution of secondary standards [fr

  4. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teillac, J.

    1988-01-01

    This study of general interest is an evaluation of the safety of radioactive waste management and consequently the preservation of the environment for the protection of man against ionizing radiations. The following topics were developed: radiation effects on man; radioactive waste inventory; radioactive waste processing, disposal and storage; the present state and future prospects [fr

  5. The application of the German reg. guides ('elements of calculation') for radioactive discharges via exhaust air and waste water on fuel element fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Rudolph, W.

    1978-01-01

    The fuel element fabricating plants at Hanau are handlung uranium, plutonium and thorium. The process essentially of converting these heavy metals into oxide, carbide or metal compounds. Thereby occur radioactive discharges into the exhaust air and the waste water. The most important pathway for exposure from these substances is inhalation, the released radionuclides mostly being α-emitters. Compared to this the external irradiation from immersion in γ, β, and neutron radiation is of less importance. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Radioactive battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaton, R.L.; Silver, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive battery is described that is comprised of a container housing an electrolyte, two electrodes immersed in the electrolyte and insoluble radioactive material disposed adjacent one electrode. Insoluble radioactive material of different intensity of radioactivity may be disposed adjacent the second electrode. If hydrobromic acid is used as the electrolyte, Br 2 will be generated by the radioactivity and is reduced at the cathode: Br 2 + 2e = 2 Br - . At the anode Br - is oxidized: 2Br - = Br 2 + 2e. (U.S.)

  7. User's guide for the KBERT 1.0 code: For the knowledge-based estimation of hazards of radioactive material releases from DOE nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browitt, D.S.; Washington, K.E.; Powers, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    The possibility of worker exposure to radioactive materials during accidents at nuclear facilities is a principal concern of the DOE. The KBERT software has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories under DOE support to address this issue by assisting in the estimation of risks posed by accidents at chemical and nuclear facilities. KBERT is an acronym for Knowledge-Based system for Estimating hazards of Radioactive material release Transients. The current prototype version of KBERT focuses on calculation of doses and consequences to in-facility workers due to accidental releases of radioactivity. This report gives detailed instructions on how a user who is familiar with the design, layout and potential hazards of a facility can use KBERT to assess the risks to workers in that facility. KBERT is a tool that allows a user to simulate possible accidents and observe the predicted consequences. Potential applications of KBERT include the evaluation of the efficacy of evacuation practices, worker shielding, personal protection equipment and the containment of hazardous materials

  8. Safety guidebook relative to the disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formation; Guide de surete relatif au stockage definitif des dechets radioactifs en formation geologique profonde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The French nuclear safety authority (ASN) initiated in 2003 a revision process of the objectives to be considered during the research and work steps of the implementation of a radioactive waste storage facility in deep geologic formations. The purpose of this document is to define the safety objectives that have to be retained at each step of this implementation, from the site characterization to the closure of the facility. This update takes into account the works carried out by the ANDRA (French national agency of radioactive wastes) in the framework of the law from December 30, 1991, and the advices of the permanent experts group about these works. It takes also into consideration the international research works in this domain and the choices defined in the program law no 2006-739 from June 28, 2006 relative to the sustainable management of radioactive materials and wastes. The main modifications concern: the notion of reversibility, the definition of the safety functions of disposal components, the safety goals and the design principles assigned to waste packages, the control of nuclear materials and the monitoring objectives of the facility. The documents treats of the following points: 1 - the objectives of public health and environment protection; 2 - the safety principles and the safety-related design bases of the facility; and 3 - the method used for demonstrating the disposal safety. (J.S.)

  9. Radioactive Waste Management BasisApril 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, B K

    2011-08-31

    This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  10. Are mushrooms radioactive?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randa, Z.; Benada, J.; Singert, M.; Horyna, J.

    1988-01-01

    Tabulated is the content of 137 Cs in dry matter of higher mushrooms collected in the years 1986 to 1987. The radioactive level of mushrooms collected in Czechoslovakia such as Boletus badius and B. chrysenteron reached 20 to 50 kBq/kg of dry matter. The individual dose at mean consumption of these mushrooms was estimated at 0.2 to 0.3 mSv/year which amounted to 20 to 30% of the dose from the natural background. (J.B.). 1 tab

  11. Gate of radioactivity detection. guide on the methodology to follow in the case of activating; Portique de detection de radioactivite. Guide sur la methodologie a suivre en cas de declenchement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Most of operators of waste treatment centers are tooled up with gates of radioactivity detection. To meet to a need of clarification of procedures that can be followed during an activating of gates, cards have been established by a work group constituted by representatives of different entities concerned by the subject. These cards propose procedures to follow in the case of activating of gates in respecting the running legislation in the field of environment protection and radiation protection. Annexe with the terms mentioned in the cards are given, a lexicon on radioactivity and a list of organisms able and licensed to provide monitoring for the workers protection against the ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  12. Radioactive waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Shuji.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid wastes are supplied to a ceramic filter to conduct filtration. In this case, a device for adding a powdery inorganic ion exchanger is disposed to the upstream of the ceramic filter. When the powdery inorganic ion exchanger is charged to the addition device, it is precoated to the surface of the ceramic filter, to conduct separation of suspended matters and separation of ionic nuclides simultaneously. Liquid wastes returned to a collecting tank are condensed while being circulated between the ceramic filter and the tank and then contained in a condensation liquid waste tank. With such a constitution, both of radioactive nuclides accompanied by suspended matters in the radioactive liquid wastes and ionic nuclides can be captured efficiently. (T.M.)

  13. Long-Term Results of a Phase II Trial of Ultrasound-Guided Radioactive Implantation of the Prostate for Definitive Management of Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate (RTOG 98-05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Hunt, Daniel; Lee, W. Robert; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Gillin, Michael; Morton, Gerard; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Sandler, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive I 125 implantation of the prostate for organ confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate clinical stage T1b, T1c, or T2a; no nodal or metastatic disease; prostate-specific antigen level of ≤10 ng/ml; and a Gleason score of ≤6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive I 125 seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 101 patients from 27 institutions were accrued to this protocol; by design, no single institution accrued more than 8 patients. There were 94 eligible patients. The median follow up was 8.1 years (range, 0.1-9.2 years). After 8 years, 8 patients had protocol-defined biochemical (prostate-specific antigen) failure (cumulative incidence, 8.0%); 5 patients had local failure (cumulative incidence, 5.5%); and 1 patient had distant failure (cumulative incidence, 1.1%; this patient also had biochemical failure and died of causes not related to prostate cancer). The 8-year overall survival rate was 88%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Three patients had maximum late toxicities of Grade 3, all of which were genitourinary. No Grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: The long-term results of this clinical trial have demonstrated that this kind of trial can be successfully completed through the RTOG and that results in terms of biochemical failure and toxicity compare very favorably with other brachytherapy published series as well as surgical and external beam radiotherapy series. In addition, the prospective, multicenter design highlights the probable

  14. Civilian use transport of radioactive substances on public road. Volume 1: Shipment accreditation and approval requests. Guide Nr 7, Revision 2 of 15 February 2016. Volume 2: safety file of package models, European guide 'Package Design Safety Report'. Civilian use transport of radioactive packages or substances on public road. Volume 3: Compliance of package models not subject to accreditation. Guide Nr 7, Revision 7 of the 2015/11/13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having recalled the regulatory context and sanctions susceptible to be applied, the first volume presents the accreditation process for a package model: file content, tests programme, safety file, certification studies, documents to be produced, accreditation prorogation request, accreditation extension or package model modifications, instruction delays. Some peculiar cases are described. Models of accreditation certificate are provided, and obligations concerning packaging design, fabrication, use and maintenance are briefly discussed. The second volume is a European technical guide which is intended to assist in the preparation of the Package Design Safety Report (PDSR) to demonstrate compliance of a package design for the transport of radioactive material with the regulatory requirements. It covers package designs requiring competent authority approval, and also covers package designs not requiring competent authority approval. In its first two chapters, this document provides a generic structure and contents of a PDSR which applies to all package types. The contents are described in a comprehensive way to cover all important aspects. Some of these aspects may not be applicable to specific package type and details can be found in the annexes which provide further guidance for the scope of the contents of a PDSR, specifically for each package type. The third volume presents recommendations made by the ASN for all stakeholders to guarantee the compliance to regulation of package models which are 'not submitted to competent authority approval'. After an indication and a comment of the regulatory context, it presents requirements to be applied for the design of those package models, and then describes and comments the structure and content of a safety file for such package models (generalities, authorised contents, packaging description, safety demonstration, receipt, use and maintenance instruction, management system). The last part presents the

  15. The assumption of heterogeneous or homogeneous radioactive contamination in soil/sediment: does it matter in terms of the external exposure of fauna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, K

    2014-12-01

    The classical approach to environmental radioprotection is based on the assumption of homogeneously contaminated media. However, in soils and sediments there may be a significant variation of radioactivity with depth. The effect of this heterogeneity was investigated by examining the external exposure of various sediment and soil organisms, and determining the resulting dose rates, assuming a realistic combination of locations and radionuclides. The results were dependent on the exposure situation, i.e., the organism, its location, and the quality and quantity of radionuclides. The dose rates ranged over three orders of magnitude. The assumption of homogeneous contamination was not consistently conservative (if associated with a level of radioactivity averaged over the full thickness of soil or sediment that was sampled). Dose assessment for screening purposes requires consideration of the highest activity concentration measured in a soil/sediment that is considered to be homogeneously contaminated. A more refined assessment (e.g., higher tier of a graded approach) should take into consideration a more realistic contamination profile, and apply different dosimetric approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The assumption of heterogeneous or homogeneous radioactive contamination in soil/sediment: does it matter in terms of the external exposure of fauna?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, K.

    2014-01-01

    The classical approach to environmental radioprotection is based on the assumption of homogeneously contaminated media. However, in soils and sediments there may be a significant variation of radioactivity with depth. The effect of this heterogeneity was investigated by examining the external exposure of various sediment and soil organisms, and determining the resulting dose rates, assuming a realistic combination of locations and radionuclides. The results were dependent on the exposure situation, i.e., the organism, its location, and the quality and quantity of radionuclides. The dose rates ranged over three orders of magnitude. The assumption of homogeneous contamination was not consistently conservative (if associated with a level of radioactivity averaged over the full thickness of soil or sediment that was sampled). Dose assessment for screening purposes requires consideration of the highest activity concentration measured in a soil/sediment that is considered to be homogeneously contaminated. A more refined assessment (e.g., higher tier of a graded approach) should take into consideration a more realistic contamination profile, and apply different dosimetric approaches. - Highlights: • Defining contamination as homogeneous may not be conservative for dose assessment. • The impact of source heterogeneity on dose is closely linked to the exposure scenario. • Dosimetric calculations (method and tool) should differ from screening to higher tiers

  17. Radioactive mineral deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1948-01-01

    This publication was designed as a guide for uranium and thorium prospectors in Australia. Physical properties, such as color, streak, luster, hardness, fracture, and specific gravity of the uranium and thorium-bearing minerals are summarized and the various methods suitable for detecting radioactivity in minerals are described. Two colored plates show samples of pitchblende (uraninite), autunite, carnotite, monazite, and others of the most important minerals sources of uranium and thorium.

  18. Development of a regulatory guide about the content and criteria for the elaboration of the radioactive waste management plans in Spanish nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez de la Higuera, Julia; Alvarez Alonso, M. Angeles; Simon Cirujano, Maria I.; Suarez Llorente, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Full text:The Spanish legislation requires the licensees to develop, among other documents, a Radioactive Waste Management Plan (RWMP) as an official report in the application for the operation and for the dismantling and decommissioning of a nuclear facility. These Plans should describe the types of waste, inventory, characterization, treatment, conditioning and storage of wastes. The Spanish regulatory body, Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), promoted a working group to analyze the content and scope of the RWMP, bringing together the electric power industry association (UNESA), the waste management organisation (ENRESA) and the nuclear fuel industry (ENUSA). The objective of the RWMP is to establish the criteria and instructions to ensure a safe and optimized management, taking into account the normative and technological developments. The Plan is based on support Studies that contain the basic information for the analysis of the waste management options and deals with: (1) Actual generation and management options in the facility; (2) Classification of the facility in waste generation zones; (3) Experience analysis and identification of potential management improvements; (4) Selection, justification and introduction of new management modes. The RWMP will develop the following issues: a) Waste generation and management (for each waste type, information in terms of the origin, physico-chemical and radiological properties, volume of production and implemented management routes); b) Classification of the facility in waste zones. The facility will differentiate those areas where contaminated or activated wastes can be produced (Radioactive Waste Zone - RWZ) or not (Conventional Waste Zone - CWZ). To avoid mixing and allow this separation, two lines of defense will be established. The first one is the classification and setting marks in the Zones and the second one the controls on the non-radioactive wastes at the exit of the facility: a) Selection of foreseen lines

  19. Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Guide and Series / Methamphetamine Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine (Meth) Print Order Free Publication in: English Spanish ... paranoia, aggressiveness, and hallucinations. The Brain's Response to Methamphetamine Hi, my name's Sara Bellum. Welcome to my ...

  20. Measuring arrangement for simultaneous and continuous determination of the total and radioactive amounts of reactive matters in flowing inert gases. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figge, K.; Martinen, H.; Schulz, W.

    1976-01-01

    In order to investigate the metabolism behaviour of radiocarbon-labelled substances, a special apparatus has been designed which enables a fully automatic as well as continuous and simultaneous determination of the total and the 14 C-labelled carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the respiratory air of small animals. The CO 2 which is exhaled by the experimental animals is absorbed quantitatively in a novel absorber-scintillator cocktail. The quantity of combined total CO 2 is then determined by measuring the specific conductivity whereas the amount of radioactive CO 2 is assessed via scintillation measurement. The measuring accuracy achieved is around 10 N cm 3 or about 5 nCi, whereas the CO 2 recovery is above 98%. In addition to the recording in a linear recorder, the data are transferred to punching tapes and can be evaluated in an EDP unit. (orig.) [de

  1. De Minimis waste impacts analysis methodology. IMPACTS - BRC user's guide and methodology for radioactive wastes below regulatory concern. Draft report for comment. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forstom, J.M.; Goode, D.J.

    1986-07-01

    This report describes the methodology and computer program used by NRC to evaluate radiological impacts associated with petitions to have specific slightly contaminated radioactive waste streams designated as ''below regulatory concern.'' These wastes could be treated and disposed of at facilities which are not licensed for low-level radioactive waste management. The IMPACTS-BRC computer program is implemented on IBM-PC microcomputers using the FORTRAN programming language. Radiological impacts (doses) are estimated for several pathways including direct gamma radiation exposure, worker inhalation and exposure, offsite atmospheric and water releases, and intruder exposures. Annual impacts are calculated for the maximum individual, critical groups, and general population. The treatment and disposal options include onsite incineration, incineration at municipal and hazardous waste facilities, and disposal at sanitary landfills and hazardous waste landfills. Modifications to the program (from Volume 1) are primarily for microcomputer compatibility and to provide information needed to evaluate the petitions. Default environmental and facility parameters are developed representing conservative assumptions about site selection and operational procedures. In particular, the parameters of the groundwater pathway model are modified to represent more conservative assumptions than the original model (Volume 1)

  2. INDAR: a computer code for the calculation of critical group radiation exposure from routine discharges of radioactivity to seas and estuaries - description and users' guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, P.R.; Wilmott, S.

    1988-12-01

    The computer program INDAR enables detailed estimates to be made of critical group radiation exposure arising from routine discharges of radioactivity for coastal sites where the discharge is close to the shore and the shoreline is reasonably straight, and for estuarine sites where radioactivity is rapidly mixed across the width of the estuary. Important processes which can be taken into account include the turbulence generated by the discharge, the effects of a sloping sea bed and the variation with time of the lateral dispersion coefficient. The significance of the timing of discharges can also be assessed. INDAR uses physically meaningful hydrographic parameters directly. For most sites the most important exposure pathways are seafood consumption, external exposure over estuarine sediments and beaches, and the handling of fishing gear. As well as for these primary pathways, INDAR enables direct calculations to be made for some additional exposure pathways. The secondary pathways considered are seaweed consumption, swimming, the handling of materials other than fishing gear and the inhalation of activity. (author)

  3. New radioactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.; Sandulescu, A.

    1996-01-01

    Some atomic nuclei reorganize their structure by ejection of big protons and neutrons aggregates. The observation of these new radioactivities specifies the theories of the nuclear dynamics. (authors)

  4. Radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Yoshio; Shimizu, Makoto.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of radioactivity in the ocean with marine life are various. Activities in this field, especially the measurements of the radioactivity in sea water and marine life are described. The works first started in Japan concerning nuclear weapon tests. Then the port call to Japan by U.S. nuclear-powered naval ships began. On the other hand, nuclear power generation is advancing with its discharge of warm water. The radioactive pollution of sea water, and hence the contamination of marine life are now major problems. Surveys of the sea areas concerned and study of the radioactivity intake by fishes and others are carried out extensively in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  5. Radioactivity Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, R.B.; Browne, E.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioactivity Handbook will be published in 1985. This handbook is intended primarily for applied users of nuclear data. It will contain recommended radiation data for all radioactive isotopes. Pages from the Radioactivity Handbook for A = 221 are shown as examples. These have been produced from the LBL Isotopes Project extended ENDSF data-base. The skeleton schemes have been manually updated from the Table of Isotopes and the tabular data are prepared using UNIX with a phototypesetter. Some of the features of the Radioactivity Handbook are discussed here

  6. Antibody guided irradiation of brain glioma by arterial infusion of radioactive monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor and blood group A antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epenetos, A.A.; Courtenay-Luck, N.; Pickering, D.; Hooker, G.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenzie, C.G. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Durbin, H. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (UK). Labs.)

    1985-05-18

    In a patient with recurrent grade IV glioma of the brain resistant to conventional treatment an antibody guided isotopic scan showed uptake by the tumour of a monoclonal antibody (9A) that was developed against epidermal growth factor receptor but cross reacted with blood group A antigen. As a therapeutic attempt antibody labelled with 1665 MBq (45.0 mCi) iodine-131 was delivered to the tumour area by infusion into the internal carotid artery. Computed tomography showed regression of the tumour after treatment, and an appreciable and sustained clinical improvement was noted without any toxicity. Delivery of irradiation guided by monoclonal antibody delivered by arterial infusion of the tumour area may be of clinical value in the treatment of brain gliomas resistant to conventional forms of treatment.

  7. Emergency Response to Radioactive Material Transport Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-shinawy, R.M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Although transport regulations issued by IAEA is providing a high degree of safety during transport opertions,transport accidents involving packages containing radioactive material have occurred and will occur at any time. Whenever a transport accident involving radioactive material accurs, and many will pose no radiation safety problems, emergency respnose actioms are meeded to ensure that radiation safety is maintained. In case of transport accident that result in a significant relesae of radioactive material , loss of shielding or loss of criticality control , that consequences should be controlled or mitigated by proper emergency response actions safety guide, Emergency Response Plamming and Prepardness for transport accidents involving radioactive material, was published by IAEA. This guide reflected all requirememts of IAEA, regulations for safe transport of radioactive material this guide provide guidance to the publicauthorites and other interested organziation who are responsible for establishing such emergency arrangements

  8. Radioactivity. Centenary of radioactivity discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Tubiana, M.; Bimbot, R.

    1997-01-01

    This small booklet was edited for the occasion of the exhibitions of the celebration of the centenary of radioactivity discovery which took place in various locations in France from 1996 to 1998. It recalls some basic knowledge concerning radioactivity and its applications: history of discovery, atoms and isotopes, radiations, measurement of ionizing radiations, natural and artificial radioactivity, isotope dating and labelling, radiotherapy, nuclear power and reactors, fission and fusion, nuclear wastes, dosimetry, effects and radioprotection. (J.S.)

  9. Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  10. Security guide for subcontractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This security guide of the Department of Energy covers contractor and subcontractor access to DOE and Mound facilities. The topics of the security guide include responsibilities, physical barriers, personnel identification system, personnel and vehicular access controls, classified document control, protecting classified matter in use, storing classified matter repository combinations, violations, security education clearance terminations, security infractions, classified information nondisclosure agreement, personnel security clearances, visitor control, travel to communist-controlled or sensitive countries, shipment security, and surreptitious listening devices.

  11. Classification of Radioactive Waste. General Safety Guide (Russian Edition); Классификация радиоактивных отходов. Руководство по безопасности

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-02-15

    This publication is a revision of an earlier Safety Guide of the same title issued in 1994. It recommends revised waste management strategies that reflect changes in practices and approaches since then. It sets out a classification system for the management of waste prior to disposal and for disposal, driven by long term safety considerations. It includes a number of schemes for classifying radioactive waste that can be used to assist with planning overall national approaches to radioactive waste management and to assist with operational management at facilities. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. The radioactive waste classification scheme; Appendix: The classification of radioactive waste; Annex I: Evolution of IAEA standards on radioactive waste classification; Annex II: Methods of classification; Annex III: Origin and types of radioactive waste.

  12. National Centre for Radioactive Ion Beams (NCRIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    A dedicated National Centre for RIB (NCRIB) proposed discussed at several forums is presented. The production of (RIB) radioactive ion beams and applications of beams leading to competitive studies in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, condensed matter, bio-science and radioactive isotope production etc. are mentioned

  13. Analysis of radioactivity concentration in naturally occurring radioactive materials used in coal-fired plants in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Geom; Kim, Si Young; Ji, Seung Woo; Park, Il; Kim, Min Jun; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Coals and coal ashes, raw materials and by-products, in coal-fired power plants contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). They may give rise to internal exposure to workers due to inhalation of airborne particulates containing radioactive materials. It is necessary to characterize radioactivity concentrations of the materials for assessment of radiation dose to the workers. The objective of the present study was to analyze radioactivity concentrations of coals and by-products at four coal-fired plants in Korea. High purity germanium detector was employed for analysis of uranium series, thorium series, and potassium 40 in the materials. Radioactivity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 40}K were 2⁓53 Bq kg{sup -1}, 3⁓64 Bq kg{sup -1}, and 14⁓431 Bq kg{sup -1} respectively in coal samples. For coal ashes, the radioactivity concentrations were 77⁓133 Bq kg{sup -1}, 77⁓105 Bq kg{sup -1}, and 252⁓372 Bq kg{sup -1} in fly ash samples and 54⁓91 Bq kg{sup -1}, 46⁓83 Bq kg{sup -1}, and 205⁓462 Bq kg{sup -1} in bottom ash samples. For flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, the radioactivity concentrations were 3⁓5 Bq kg{sup -1}, 2⁓3 Bq kg{sup -1}, and 22⁓47 Bq kg{sup -1}. Radioactivity was enhanced in coal ash compared with coal due to combustion of organic matters in the coal. Radioactivity enhancement factors for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 40}K were 2.1⁓11.3, 2.0⁓13.1, and 1.4⁓7.4 for fly ash and 2.0⁓9.2, 2.0⁓10.0, 1.9⁓7.7 for bottom ash. The database established in this study can be used as basic data for internal dose assessment of workers at coal-fred power plants. In addition, the findings can be used as a basic data for development of safety standard and guide of Natural Radiation Safety Management Act.

  14. Radioactive action code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    A new coding system, 'Hazrad', for buildings and transportation containers for alerting emergency services personnel to the presence of radioactive materials has been developed in the United Kingdom. The hazards of materials in the buildings or transport container, together with the recommended emergency action, are represented by a number of codes which are marked on the building or container and interpreted from a chart carried as a pocket-size guide. Buildings would be marked with the familiar yellow 'radioactive' trefoil, the written information 'Radioactive materials' and a list of isotopes. Under this the 'Hazrad' code would be written - three symbols to denote the relative radioactive risk (low, medium or high), the biological risk (also low, medium or high) and the third showing the type of radiation emitted, alpha, beta or gamma. The response cards indicate appropriate measures to take, eg for a high biological risk, Bio3, the wearing of a gas-tight protection suit is advised. The code and its uses are explained. (U.K.)

  15. Simulated Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  16. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  17. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.

    1982-01-01

    Following a definition of the term 'radioactive waste', including a discussion of possible criteria allowing a delimitation of low-level radioactive against inactive wastes, present techniques of handling high-level, intermediate-level and low-level wastes are described. The factors relevant for the establishment of definitive disposals for high-level wastes are discussed in some detail. Finally, the waste management organization currently operative in Austria is described. (G.G.)

  18. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl reactor accident on April 26, 1986, many individual values for radioactivity in the air, in foodstuffs and in the soil were measured and published. Prof. Dr. Rolf Steiner, Wiesbaden, the author of this paper, evaluated the host of data - mostly official pollution data -, drew conclusions regarding the radioactivity actually released at Chernobyl, and used the data to test the calculation model adotped by the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig./RB) [de

  19. Radioactivity and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, J.N.; Baalman, R.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    This book details the knowledge of the biological effects of ionizing radiation from the discovery of radium to about 1980. Research findings and conclusions are presented largely as the investigators saw and reported them except where the work under discussion was markedly iconoclastic and obviously wrong according to the author's comments. Findings from over 100 personal interviews and literature searches including unpublished or little-known materials are summarized. The material in the book is divided into six sections. The first section deals with naturally occurring radioactive elements. The next section covers material on man-made radioisotopes. Inhalation toxicology (radioactive dusts and particles and respirable gases) is the subject of Section 3. Section 4 deals with environmental matters - radioecology, fallout from nuclear weapons tests, transport of radionuclides, testing and standard settings, and Section 5 consists of information on laboratory and field instrumentation. The development of the therapy for exposure and of nuclear medicine is traced in the final section

  20. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    A system of combining a calciner for concentrated radioactive liquid waste and an incinerator for miscellaneous radioactive solid waste is being developed. Both the calciner and the incinerator are operated by fluidized bed method. The system features the following points: (1) Inflammable miscellaneous solids and concentrated liquid can be treated in combination to reduce the volume. (2) Used ion-exchange resin can be incinerated. (3) The system is applicable even if any final waste disposal method is adopted; calcinated and incinerated solids obtained as intermediate products are easy to handle and store. (4) The system is readily compatible with other waste treatment systems to form optimal total system. The following matters are described: the principle of fluidized-bed furnaces, the objects of treatment, system constitution, the features of the calciner and incinerator, and the current status of development. (J.P.N.)

  1. The radiation protection and the radioactive wastes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servais, F.; Woiche, Ch.; Hunin, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter concerns the radiation protection in relation with the radioactive waste management. Three articles make the matter of this file, the management of radioactive medical waste into hospitals, a new concept of waste storage on site, the protection devices on the long term with some lessons for the radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  2. Radioactive wastes in Oklo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar, M.; Flores R, J.H.; Pena, P.; Lopez, A.

    2006-01-01

    The acceptance of the Nuclear Energy as electric power supply implies to give answer to the population on the two main challenges to conquer in the public opinion: the nuclear accidents and the radioactive wastes. Several of the questions that are made on the radioactive wastes, its are the mobility migration of them, the geologic stability of the place where its are deposited and the possible migration toward the aquifer mantels. Since the half lives of the radioactive waste of a Nuclear Reactor are of several hundred of thousands of years, the technical explanations to the previous questions little convince to the public in general. In this work summary the results of the radioactive waste generated in a natural reactor, denominated Oklo effect that took place in Gabon, Africa, it makes several thousands of millions of years, a lot before the man appeared in the Earth. The identification of at least 17 reactors in Oklo it was carried out thanks to the difference in the concentrations of Uranium 235 and 238 prospective, and to the analysis of the non-mobility of the radioactive waste in the site. It was able by this way to determine that the reactors with sizes of hardly some decimeter and powers of around 100 kilowatts were operating in intermittent and spontaneous form for space of 150,000 years, with operation cycles of around 30 minutes. Recent studies have contributed information valuable on the natural confinement of the radioactive waste of the Oklo reactors in matrixes of minerals of aluminum phosphate that caught and immobilized them for thousands of millions of years. This extracted information from the nature contributes guides and it allows 'to verify' the validity of the current proposals on the immobilization of radioactive wastes of a nuclear reactor. This work presents in clear and accessible form to the public in general on the secure 'design', operation, 'decommissioning' and 'storage' of the radioactive waste of the reactors that the nature put

  3. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katada, Katsuo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the management for radioactive wastes containers thereby decrease the amount of stored matters by arranging the radioactive wastes containers in the order of their radioactivity levels. Method: The radiation doses of radioactive wastes containers arranged in the storing area before volume-reducing treatment are previously measured by a dosemeter. Then, a classifying machine is actuated to hoist the containers in the order to their radiation levels and the containers are sent out passing through conveyor, surface contamination gage, weight measuring device and switcher to a volume-reducing processing machine. The volume-reduced products are packed each by several units to the storing containers. Thus, the storing containers after stored for a certain period of time can be transferred in an assembled state. (Kawakami, Y.)

  4. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The dossier published in this issue deals with all matters relating to radioactive waste management. It describes in detail the guidelines implemented by France in this field and provides a general overview of actions carried out at international level. The articles are assembled in several chapters, treating the following subjects: I. Upstream storage management. II. Storage (surface and underground). III. Research to back up the management program. There then follows a description of various processes and equipment developed by research laboratories and industrialists to provide, at the different stages, a number of operations required by the management programs [fr

  5. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Managing radioactive wastes used to be a peripheral activity for the French atomic energy commission (Cea). Over the past 40 years, it has become a full-fledged phase in the fuel cycle of producing electricity from the atom. In 2005, the national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) presented to the government a comprehensive overview of the results drawn from 15 years of research. This landmark report has received recognition beyond France's borders. By broadening this agency's powers, an act of 28 June 2006 acknowledges the progress made and the quality of the results. It also sets an objective for the coming years: work out solutions for managing all forms of radioactive wastes. The possibility of recovering wastes packages from the disposal site must be assured as it was asked by the government in 1998. The next step will be the official demand for the creation of a geological disposal site in 2016

  6. Radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.F.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A problem with ore sorting arrangements is that radiation is difficult to measure accurately while particles are moving at speed past the detector. This is particulary so when dealing with ores such as gold ores which have weak emissions. A method of measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material includes the steps of shielding the radiation detector(s) so that the angle of acceptance of the receptor surface is restricted, and further shielding the shielded portion of the detector with a second material which is less radiation emissive than the material of the first shield. This second shield is between the first shield and the detector

  7. Radioactive waste management in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzi, F.P.; Bundala, F.M.; Nyanda, A.M.; Msaki, P.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive waste, like many other hazardous wastes, is of great concern in Tanzania because of its undesirable health effects. The stochastic effects due to prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation produce cancer and hereditary effects. The deterministic effects due to higher doses cause vomiting, skin reddening, leukemia, and death to exposed victims. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the status of radioactive wastes in Tanzania, how they are generated and managed to protect humans and the environment. As Tanzania develops, it is bound to increase the use of ionizing radiation in research and teaching, industry, health and agriculture. Already there are more than 42 Centers which use one form of radioisotopes or another for these purposes: Teletherapy (Co-60), Brach-therapy (Cs-137, Sr-89), Nuclear Medicine (P-32, Tc-99m, 1-131, 1-125, Ga-67, In-111, Tl-206), Nuclear gauge (Am-241, Cs- 137, Sr-90, Kr-85), Industrial radiography (Am-241, C-137, Co-60, lr-92), Research and Teaching (1-125, Am241/Be, Co-60, Cs-137, H-3 etc). According to IAEA definition, these radioactive sources become radioactive waste if they meet the following criteria: if they have outlived their usefulness, if they have been abandoned, if they have been displaced without authorization, and if they contaminate other substances. Besides the origin of radioactive wastes, special emphasis will also be placed on the existing radiation regulations that guide disposal of radioactive waste, and the radioactive infrastructure Tanzania needs for ultimate radioactive waste management. Specific examples of incidences (theft, loss, abandonment and illegal possession) of radioactive waste that could have led to serious deterministic radiation effects to humans will also be presented. (author)

  8. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. Radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwach, G.

    1986-01-01

    This is an overview of radioactivity monitoring work done in the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf in the wake of the Chernobyl accident. It consists of air, rainwater, food and personnel monitoring. Additional services to the public are: information and development of a database and a computer code for predicting future radionuclide concentration in air, soil, water and food. (G.Q.)

  10. Radioactive waste storage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state's boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected

  11. The P.N.G.-M.D.R.: a tool in the service of the law of the 28. june 2006 relative to the sustainable management of radioactive matters and waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahorgue, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    It has for main missions to draw up balance sheet modes of management existing radioactive waste, to list the predictable needs of storage facilities, to precise theses installations and the times of storage. It gives a precise definition of waste considered as radioactive ones. It is the new coherence of the whole device of the radioactive waste management that is envisaged through the plan without forgetting the consideration of the public preoccupations, worried about the future of the radioactive waste, about practices in polluted site and methods of rehabilitation. (N.C.)

  12. Treatment and storage of radioactive waste at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide gives the general principles that shall be followed when planning and implementing the treatment, storing, transfer, activity monitoring and record keeping of radioactive wastes. The guide does not include provisions for spent fuel or for treatment and discharges of liquids or gases containing radioactive substances. Neither does the guide include any detailed design criteria for treatment facilities or storages. (4 refs.)

  13. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides information on the origin, characteristics and methods of processing of radioactive wastes, as well as the philosophy and practice of their storage and disposal. Chapters are devoted to the following topics: radioactive wastes, characteristics of radioactive wastes, processing liquid and solid radioactive wastes, processing wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, processing gaseous radioactive wastes, fixation of radioactive concentrates, solidification of high-level radioactive wastes, use of radioactive wastes as raw material, radioactive waste disposal, transport of radioactive wastes and economic problems of radioactive wastes disposal. (C.F.)

  14. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This eighth chapter presents the radioactive wastes and waste disposal; classification of radioactive wastes; basis requests of the radioactive waste management; conditions for a radioactive waste disposal; registers and inventories; transport of radioactive wastes from a facility to another and the radioactive waste management plan

  15. Inspection and enforcement by the regulatory body for nuclear power plants. A safety guide. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on fulfilling the requirements for inspection and enforcement by the regulatory body, as set out in the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants; Governmental Organization. This Safety Guide deals with the responsibilities of the regulatory body, the organization of inspection programmes, the inspection resources of the regulatory body, methods of inspection, requirements on the applicant/licensee in regard to regulatory inspection, inspection reports, and regulatory action and enforcement. It is recognized that many of the provisions of this Safety Guide may be applicable to the regulations of other nuclear facilities and related activities including research reactors, fuel processing and manufacturing plants, irradiated fuel processing plants and radioactive waste management facilities. This Safety Guide does not deal specifically with the functions of a regulatory body responsible for such matters; however, the guidance presented here may be applied as appropriate to these activities. 11 refs, 1 fig

  16. Radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkhout, F.

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author)

  17. Radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkhout, F

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author).

  18. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  19. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-15

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  20. Radioactive hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of radioactive substances in hospital laboratories is discussed and the attendant hazards and necessary precautions examined. The new legislation under the Health and Safety at Work Act which, it is proposed, will replace existing legal requirements in the field of health and safety at work by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare already established, is considered with particular reference to protection against ionising radiations. (UK)

  1. Radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.; Hyslop, C.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to show how to assess the detriment resulting from the release of radioactive materials to the environment. The minimum information required for the assessments is given for seven radionuclides of interest from the point of view of environmental contamination. The seven radionuclides are tritium, krypton-85, strontium-90, iodine-131, cesium-137, radium-226 and plutonium-239. Information is given on the radiation doses and the radiation effects on man due to these radioisotopes. (AN)

  2. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Melvin, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is part of the Annual Literature Review issue of Water Environment Research. The review attempts to provide a concise summary of important water-related environmental science and engineering literature of the past year, of which 40 separate topics are discussed. On the topic of radioactive wastes, the present paper deals with the following aspects: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; waste processing and decommissioning; environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides; and remedial actions and treatment. 178 refs

  3. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtgen, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advice the nuclear and non-nuclear industry in matters concerning radioactive contamination and/or low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain the quality assurance system according to the EN45001/ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported

  4. Plastic solidification of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Noboru

    1981-01-01

    Over 20 years have elapsed after the start of nuclear power development, and the nuclear power generation in Japan now exceeds the level of 10,000 MW. In order to meet the energy demands, the problem of the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in nuclear power stations must be solved. The purpose of the plastic solidification of such wastes is to immobilize the contained radionuclides, same as other solidification methods, to provide the first barrier against their move into the environment. The following matters are described: the nuclear power generation in Japan, the radioactive wastes from LWR plants, the position of plastic solidification, the status of plastic solidification in overseas countries and in Japan, the solidification process for radioactive wastes with polyethylene, and the properties of solidified products, and the leachability of radionuclides in asphalt solids. (J.P.N.)

  5. Research programme on radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhardt, A.; Hufschmid, P.; Jordi, S.; Schanne, M.; Vigfusson, J.

    2009-11-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communication (DETEC) takes a look at work done within the framework of the research programme on radioactive wastes. The paper discusses the development of various projects and the associated organisations involved. Both long-term and short-term topics are examined. The long-term aspects of handling radioactive wastes include organisation and financing as well as the preservation of know-how and concepts for marking the repositories. Communication with the general public on the matter is looked at along with public perception, opinion-making and acceptance. Waste storage concepts are looked at in detail and aspects such as environmental protection, monitoring concepts, retrievability and encasement materials are discussed. Finally, ethical and legal aspects of radioactive waste repositories are examined. The paper is completed with appendixes dealing with planning, co-ordination and the responsibilities involved

  6. Treatment of short-lived radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Chiri

    1976-01-01

    Recently short life nuclides have come to be utilized increasingly as diagnostic radioisotopes, and Tc-99m (half-life; 6.05 hours) and Ga-67 (half-life 7.79 hours) are replacing the most nuclides fomerly used in vivo test. Such development of radioactive products inevitably causes the rapid increase of their wastes. At present, the radioactive wastes produced by hospitals and university laboratories in Japan are collected by the Japan Radioisotope Association, and treated by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. These wastes are divided into combustibles and incombustibles to store in the store house in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The present law in Japan contains the contradiction which treats the matter with one several millionth of radioactivity after decay same as the original radioactive matter. Thus solid must be stored permanently, while gas and liquid can be discharged after dilution. (Kobatake, H.)

  7. Development of an application simulating radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riffault, V.; Locoge, N.; Leblanc, E.; Vermeulen, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an application simulating radioactive gamma sources developed in the 'Ecole des Mines' of Douai (France). It generates raw counting data as an XML file which can then be statistically exploited to illustrate the various concepts of radioactivity (exponential decay law, isotropy of the radiation, attenuation of radiation in matter). The application, with a spread sheet for data analysis and lab procedures, has been released under free license. (authors)

  8. Radioactivity telemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouras, Florent; Legrand, Bernard; Montigaud, Jean-Marie; Grandin, Marc

    1969-05-01

    The authors present an assembly which aims at radio-transmitting from mobile stations information on radioactivity. It comprises 20 mobile stations which can be located within the Cadarache Centre or outside of it within a 10 km radius, and a central station which centralises information. The report proposes a general presentation of these stations, their characteristics and principles of operation. It describes operation sequences, central station functions (call programmer, address and memory management, recording, peripherals) and its energy supply, and mobile station functions. The last part presents the installation, its start-up and exploitation, its threshold devices and its safety device

  9. Quantifying Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying Matter explains how scientists learned to measure matter and quantify some of its most fascinating and useful properties. It presents many of the most important intellectual achievements and technical developments that led to the scientific interpretation of substance. Complete with full-color photographs, this exciting new volume describes the basic characteristics and properties of matter. Chapters include:. -Exploring the Nature of Matter. -The Origin of Matter. -The Search for Substance. -Quantifying Matter During the Scientific Revolution. -Understanding Matter's Electromagnet

  10. Environmental Radioactivity. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explains several things which consist radioactivity measurements, regular and high background radioactivity, radioactive contaminated soil and radioactivity in fertilizers, rocks, building materials, food, water, environments, sediments, flora and fauna. Besides, the natural radioactive gas concentration of radon and toron in the environment also been discussed specifically in this chapter.

  11. Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste. General Safety Requirements Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    There are a large number of facilities and activities around the world in which radioactive material is produced, handled and stored. This Safety Requirements publication presents international consensus requirements for the management of radioactive waste prior to its disposal. It provides the safety imperatives on the basis of which facilities can be designed, operated and regulated. The publication is supported by a number of Safety Guides that provide up to date recommendations and guidance on best practices for management of particular types of radioactive waste, for storage of radioactive waste, for assuring safety by developing safety cases and supporting safety assessments, and for applying appropriate management systems. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the environment; 3. Responsibilities associated with the predisposal management of radioactive waste; 4. Steps in the predisposal management of radioactive waste; 5. Development and operation of predisposal radioactive waste management facilities and activities; Annex: Predisposal management of radioactive waste and the fundamental safety principles.

  12. Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste. General Safety Requirements Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    There are a large number of facilities and activities around the world in which radioactive material is produced, handled and stored. This Safety Requirements publication presents international consensus requirements for the management of radioactive waste prior to its disposal. It provides the safety imperatives on the basis of which facilities can be designed, operated and regulated. The publication is supported by a number of Safety Guides that provide up to date recommendations and guidance on best practices for management of particular types of radioactive waste, for storage of radioactive waste, for assuring safety by developing safety cases and supporting safety assessments, and for applying appropriate management systems. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the environment; 3. Responsibilities associated with the predisposal management of radioactive waste; 4. Steps in the predisposal management of radioactive waste; 5. Development and operation of predisposal radioactive waste management facilities and activities; Annex: Predisposal management of radioactive waste and the fundamental safety principles.

  13. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2B, User's guide to the LWR assemblies data base, Appendix 2C, User's guide to the LWR radiological data base, Appendix 2D, User's guide to the LWR quantities data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This User's Guide for the LWR Assemblies data base system is part of the Characteristics Data Base being developed under the Waste Systems Data Development Program. The objective of the LWR Assemblies data base is to provide access at the personal computer level to information about fuel assemblies used in light-water reactors. The information available is physical descriptions of intact fuel assemblies and radiological descriptions of spent fuel disassembly hardware. The LWR Assemblies data base is a user-oriented menu driven system. Each menu is instructive about its use. Section 5 of this guide provides a sample session with the data base to assist the user

  14. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented on the environmental behavior of radioactive wastes. The management of high-level wastes and waste disposal methods were discussed. Some topics included were ore processing, coagulation, absorption and ion exchange, fixation, ground disposal, flotation, evaporation, transmutation and extraterrestrial disposal. Reports were given of the 226 Ra, 224 Ra and tritium activity in hot springs, 90 Sr concentrations in the groundwater and in White Oak Creek, radionuclide content of algae, grasses and plankton, radionuclides in the Danube River, Hudson River, Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Lake Michigan, Columbia River and other surface waters. Analysis showed that 239 Pu was scavenged from Lake Michigan water by phytoplankton and algae by a concentration factor of up to 10,000. Benthic invertebrates and fish showed higher 239 Pu concentrations than did their pelagic counterparts. Concentration factors are also given for 234 Th, 60 Co, Fe and Mr in marine organisms. Two models for predicting the impact of radioactivity in the food chain on man were mentioned. In an accidental release from a light-water power reactor to the ocean, the most important radionuclides discharged were found to be 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239 Pu and activation products 65 Zr, 59 Fe, and 95 Zr

  15. Una guia para los padres sobre lo mas importante: el logro academico plan de educacion de Maryland desde preescolar hasta el 12 grado, 2002-2003. (A Parent's Guide to Achievement Matters Most: Maryland's Plan for PreK-12 Education, 2002-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    To raise the achievement of every student in the state, Maryland implemented "Achievement Matters Most," a new plan for public elementary and secondary schools that sets goals in the areas of achievement, teaching, testing, safety, and family involvement in schools. This Spanish-language guide for parents outlines the goals and…

  16. Industrial Radiography Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Harry D.

    The curriculum guide was developed for teacher use in an 80-hour course for industrial radiographers. The units include: (1) The Structure of Matter and Radiation, (2) Nuclear Reactions and Radioisotopes, (3) The Nature and Consequences of Radiation Exposure, (4) Radiation Attenuation, (5) Absorption of Radiation, (6) Radiation Detection and…

  17. Drush User's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Requena, Juan Pablo Novillo

    2012-01-01

    A practical guide full of examples and step-by-step instructions to start using Drush right from chapter 1. Drupal developers or themers who understand Drupal administration's basic concepts. Drush can make building any kind of website quicker and easier, no matter if it is a development environment, beta, a simple blog or a complex system.

  18. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  19. Integrated coherent matter wave circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, C.; Boshier, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    An integrated coherent matter wave circuit is a single device, analogous to an integrated optical circuit, in which coherent de Broglie waves are created and then launched into waveguides where they can be switched, divided, recombined, and detected as they propagate. Applications of such circuits include guided atom interferometers, atomtronic circuits, and precisely controlled delivery of atoms. We report experiments demonstrating integrated circuits for guided coherent matter waves. The circuit elements are created with the painted potential technique, a form of time-averaged optical dipole potential in which a rapidly moving, tightly focused laser beam exerts forces on atoms through their electric polarizability. Moreover, the source of coherent matter waves is a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Finally, we launch BECs into painted waveguides that guide them around bends and form switches, phase coherent beamsplitters, and closed circuits. These are the basic elements that are needed to engineer arbitrarily complex matter wave circuitry

  20. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Hary, L.F.; Klein, L.S.

    1983-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. All discharges for 1982 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. 1 figure

  1. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory across generations. An International Project of the NEA/RWMC. Foundations and guiding principles for the preservation of records, knowledge and memory across generations: A focus on the post-closure phase of geological repositories. A Collective Statement of the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    generations while maintaining technical and societal oversight of the repository for as long as practicable. The foundations and guiding principles that serve this goal are presented in these two folders. The first one presents the international RK and M project of the NEA/RWMC, while the second one is the Collective Statement of the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee

  2. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  3. Soil organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The nature, content and behaviour of the organic matter, or humus, in soil are factors of fundamental importance for soil productivity and the development of optimum conditions for growth of crops under diverse temperate, tropical and arid climatic conditions. In the recent symposium on soil organic matter studies - as in the two preceding ones in 1963 and 1969 - due consideration was given to studies involving the use of radioactive and stable isotopes. However, the latest symposium was a departure from previous efforts in that non-isotopic approaches to research on soil organic matter were included. A number of papers dealt with the behaviour and functions of organic matter and suggested improved management practices, the use of which would contribute to increasing agricultural production. Other papers discussed the turnover of plant residues, the release of plant nutrients through the biodegradation of organic compounds, the nitrogen economy and the dynamics of transformation of organic forms of nitrogen. In addition, consideration was given to studies on the biochemical transformation of organic matter, characterization of humic acids, carbon-14 dating and the development of modern techniques and their impact on soil organic matter research

  4. Environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Outline summary of a report prepared under contract to the DOE: Research Priorities and UK Estuaries: An Overview identifying Research Requirements. Topics considered include the study of radionuclides released into the NE Irish Sea from BNFL, Sellafields, differences in the isotopic composition of stable lead in various sediments, the concentration and distribution of 'hot particles' derived from BNFL in the Irish Sea and adjacent areas, together with attempts to separate hot particles from sediments, and the composition and properties of marine surfaces in relation to uptake and loss of radionuclides, particularly in relation to the common mussel, Mytilus edulis. The problem of the presence of transuranic radionuclides in the bottom sediments of the NE Irish Sea is considered. Profiles of radioactivity are being developed at the shelf-break in order to determine the transfer of radionuclides from the sea surface to the deep sea and to coastal waters; organisms examined include phytoplankton, zooplankton and crustacea (shrimps). Organisms such as Acantharia have been examined to determine transfer of elements and radionuclides to skeletal structures eg Sr, Ba and Si. (U.K.)

  5. Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einasto J.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, thus properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic web.

  6. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive waste management and disposal requirements options available are discussed. The possibility of beneficial utilization of radioactive wastes is covered. Methods of interim storage of transuranium wastes are listed. Methods of shipment of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes are presented. Various methods of radioactive waste disposal are discussed

  7. Transport of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The report on the transport of radioactive substances covers the following topics: facts on radioactive materials transport, safety of the transport of radioactive substances, legal regulations and guidelines: a multiform but consistent system, transport of nuclear fuels, safety during the transport of nuclear fuel, future transport of spent fuel elements and high-level radioactive wastes in Germany.

  8. Radioactive waste management; the realities as against the myths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, I.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear power generation is now an essential requirement for the mankind in the current energy difficulties. The problem of radioactive waste management is arousing the opposition, but it must not inhibit the utilization of nuclear energy. Radioactive waste management concerns the whole course from its occurrence to its final disposal. The purpose of the management is then to protect absolutely the human beings of present and future generations from the danger of radioactivity. Radioactive wastes are varied much in their kinds and natures. While the management technology is nearly all established, the amounts of wastes are increasing. The following matters are described. Definition of radioactive waste management, fundamental strategies of the management, kinds of radioactive wastes, the present situation of radioactive waste management, and problems in the management. (J.P.N.)

  9. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Isihara, A

    2007-01-01

    More than a graduate text and advanced research guide on condensed matter physics, this volume is useful to plasma physicists and polymer chemists, and their students. It emphasizes applications of statistical mechanics to a variety of systems in condensed matter physics rather than theoretical derivations of the principles of statistical mechanics and techniques. Isihara addresses a dozen different subjects in separate chapters, each designed to be directly accessible and used independently of previous chapters. Topics include simple liquids, electron systems and correlations, two-dimensional

  10. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from utilization of radioisotopes and each step of the nuclear fuel cycle and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are presented. On the safe management of radioactive waste management, international safety standards are established such as ''The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management (IAEA)'' and T he Joint Convention on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management . Basic steps of radioactive waste management consist of treatment, conditioning and disposal. Disposal is the final step of radioactive waste management and its safety is confirmed by safety assessment in the licensing process. Safety assessment means evaluation of radiation dose rate caused by radioactive materials contained in disposed radioactive waste. The results of the safety assessment are compared with dose limits. The key issues of radioactive waste disposal are establishment of long term national strategies and regulations for safe management of radioactive waste, siting of repository, continuity of management activities and financial bases for long term, and security of human resources. (Author)

  11. Radioactive wastes: underground laboratories implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    This article studies the situation of radioactive waste management, more especially the possible storage in deep laboratories. In front of the reaction of public opinion relative to the nuclear waste question, it was essential to begin by a study on the notions of liability, transparence and democracy. At the beginning, it was a matter of underground researches with a view to doing an eventual storage of high level radioactive wastes. The Parliament had to define, through the law, a behaviour able to come to the fore for anybody. A behaviour which won recognition from authorities, from scientists, from industrial people, which guarantees the rights of populations confronted to a problem whom they were not informed, on which they received only few explanations. (N.C.)

  12. The radiation protection and the radioactive wastes management; La radioprotection et la gestion des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servais, F. [CHR Hopital de Warquignies, Service de Medecine Nucleaire (Belgium); Woiche, Ch. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service Interne et de Prevention et Protection (Belgium); Hunin, Ch. [Agence Federale de Controle Nucleaire, Service Controle Etablissements Classes, Brexelles (Belgium)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    This chapter concerns the radiation protection in relation with the radioactive waste management. Three articles make the matter of this file, the management of radioactive medical waste into hospitals, a new concept of waste storage on site, the protection devices on the long term with some lessons for the radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  13. Radiological design guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design

  14. Multimedia instructions for carriers of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahyun, A.; Sordi, G. M.; Simpson, J.; Ghobril, C. N.; Perez, C. F.

    2014-08-01

    For some operators the transport regulations for transporting radioactive material are considered to be complicated and not user friendly and as a result for some operators it is difficult to identify all the transport regulatory requirements they must comply with for each type of package or radioactive material. These difficulties can result in self-checking being ineffective and as a consequence the first and important step in the safety chain is lost. This paper describes a transport compliance guide for operators that is currently under development for the South American market. This paper describes the scope and structure of the guide and examples of the information provided is given, which will be available in English, Portuguese and Spanish. It is intended that when the guide is launched before the end of 2013 it will be accessed using a bespoke software program that can run on Pc platform to provide a checklist for the operator before the shipment begins By identifying the regulatory requirements the guide is also intended to provide operators with an understanding of the structure of the transport regulations and an appreciation of the logic behind the regulatory requirements for each Un numbered package and material type listed in the transport regulations for radioactive material. It is foreseen that the interactive program can be used both operationally on a day-to-day basis and as a training tool, including refresher training, as the guide will be updated when the transport regulations are periodically changed. (Author)

  15. Multimedia instructions for carriers of radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahyun, A.; Sordi, G. M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Simpson, J. [Class 7 Limited, 9 Irk Vale Drive, Chadderton, Oldham OL1 2TW (United Kingdom); Ghobril, C. N. [Governo de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Economia Agricola, 04301-903 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Perez, C. F., E-mail: adelia@atomo.com.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2468, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sau Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    For some operators the transport regulations for transporting radioactive material are considered to be complicated and not user friendly and as a result for some operators it is difficult to identify all the transport regulatory requirements they must comply with for each type of package or radioactive material. These difficulties can result in self-checking being ineffective and as a consequence the first and important step in the safety chain is lost. This paper describes a transport compliance guide for operators that is currently under development for the South American market. This paper describes the scope and structure of the guide and examples of the information provided is given, which will be available in English, Portuguese and Spanish. It is intended that when the guide is launched before the end of 2013 it will be accessed using a bespoke software program that can run on Pc platform to provide a checklist for the operator before the shipment begins By identifying the regulatory requirements the guide is also intended to provide operators with an understanding of the structure of the transport regulations and an appreciation of the logic behind the regulatory requirements for each Un numbered package and material type listed in the transport regulations for radioactive material. It is foreseen that the interactive program can be used both operationally on a day-to-day basis and as a training tool, including refresher training, as the guide will be updated when the transport regulations are periodically changed. (Author)

  16. RADWASS update. Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, D.

    2000-01-01

    By the late 1980s, the issue of radioactive wastes and their management was becoming increasingly politically important. The IAEA responded by establishing a high profile family of safety standards, the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS). By this means, the IAEA intended to draw attention to the fact that well-established procedures for the safe management of radioactive wastes already were in place. The programme was intended to establish an ordered structure for safety documents on waste management and to ensure comprehensive coverage of all relevant subject areas. RADWASS documents are categorized under four subject areas - discharges, predisposal, disposal, and environmental restoration. The programme is overseen through a formalized review and approval mechanism that was established in 1996 for all safety standards activities. The Waste Safety Standards Committee (WASSC) is a standing body of senior regulatory officials with technical expertise in radioactive waste safety. To date, three Safety Requirements and seven Safety Guides have been issued

  17. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    The widely published claims that the public health effects resulting from routine emissions are between 0.01 and 0.1 serious health effects per gigawattyear, and hence are at least a thousand times smaller than those resulting from air pollution by the burning of coal, cannot be true, for two reasons. The authors of these claims have ignored at least two of the more important isotopes, radon-222 and carbon-14, which are presently released to the environment, and thus contribute greatly to the health impact of nuclear energy. The health effects calculated in the earlier work cover only those which occur during the year in which the energy is generated. This means, figuratively speaking, that the authors have confused an annual installment payment with the full cost. This is unacceptable. The contribution to the health impact of nuclear energy arising from the single isotopic species radon-222 emanating from the mill tailings is estimated to 400 lung cancer deaths/GW(e)y, larger even than the most pessimistic estimates of the health impact of energy from coal through atmospheric pollution. We have no assurance that other long-lived isotopes do not contribute comparable amounts to the health impact of nuclear energy. The discussion of the health impact of radon-222 raises the fundamental moral question--how far into the future our responsibility extends. If such a long-termresponsibility is rejected, then we must at least try to predict the environmental buildup of radioactive pollutants, in order to avoid unacceptable and irreversible levels of radiation dose rate. The potential health consequences from long-lived radioisotopes seem to have been largely ignored so far, and should be explored in detail

  18. The detector for dark matter search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin

    2004-01-01

    The dark matter search and dark matter detection is very importance project in Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology. The paper introduces the current status of the dark matter search in the world and points out that the development of detector with larger scale, lower threshold, very low radioactive background and building of underground laboratory is important developing direction. So far, there is no such detector and underground laboratory in our county. We should change such situation as soon as possible. (authors)

  19. Radioactive dumping in the Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J.; Gizewski, P.

    1993-01-01

    Recent revelations concerning the possible environmental hazards posed by the sunken Soviet nuclear submarine Komsomolets and the disposal of radioactive materials in the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans have generated much controversy and debate. Too often, however, the key scientific and policy issues that the dumping raises are treated as two solitudes. In reality, decisions taken by national governments and international agencies in connection with remediation, regulation, and even research must be based on both science and policy. Indeed, a sound approach to the dumping issue must integrate scientific evidence and policy considerations relating to legal, political, social, and economic matters. Radioactive waste disposal is an exceedingly difficult problem. Information detailing the Soviet Navy's past dumping practices, and increasing awareness of the problems that Russia and other states may encounter in the future disposal of radioactive waste, indicate that the global inventory of radioactive wastes requiring storage and disposal is large and growing

  20. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle for use in establishing ''as low as practicable'' guides: nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finney, B.C.; Blanco, R.E.; Dahlman, R.C.; Kitts, F.G.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1975-05-01

    A cost-benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model nuclear fuel reprocessing plant which processes light-water reactor (LWR) fuels, and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining the term ''as low as practicable'' in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The base case model plant is representative of current plant technology and has an annual capacity of 1500 metric tons of LWR fuel. Additional radwaste treatment systems are added to the base case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The cost for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitments are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases is in an early stage of development and is not suitable for immediate use. The methodology used in estimating the costs and the radiological doses, detailed calculations, and tabulations is presented in Appendix A and ORNL-4992. (U.S.)

  1. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle for use in establishing ''as low as practicable'' guides: fabrication of light-water reactor fuels containing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenier, W.S.; Blanco, R.E.; Dahlman, R.C.; Finney, B.C.; Kibbey, A.H.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1975-05-01

    A cost-benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model light-water plutonium recycle reactor fuel fabrication plant, and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining the term ''as low as practicable'' in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The base case model plant is representative of current plant technology and has an annual capacity of 300 metric tons of LWR plutonium recycle fuel. Additional radwaste treatment equipment is added to the base case plants in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The cost for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitment are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Some of the technology used in the advanced cases is in an early stage of development and is not suitable for immediate use. The methodology used in estimating the costsand the radiological doses, detailed calculations, and tabulations are presented in Appendixes A and B. (U.S.)

  2. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle for use in establishing ''as low as practicable'' guides: fabrication of light-water reactor fuel from enriched uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechin, W.H.; Blanco, R.E.; Dahlman, R.C.; Finney, B.C.; Lindauer, R.B.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1975-05-01

    A cost-benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model enriched-uranium, light-water reactor (LWR) fuel fabrication plant, and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining the term ''as low as practicable'' in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The base case model plant is representative of current plant technology and has an annual capacity of 1500 metric tons of LWR fuel. Additional radwaste treatment equipment is added to the base case plants in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The cost for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitment are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Some of the technology used in the advanced cases is in an early stage of development and is not suitable for immediate use. The methodology used in estimating the costs and the radiological doses, detailed calculations, and tabulations are presented in Appendix A and ORNL-4992. (U.S.)

  3. Fire protection in laboratories and factories. Guide for nuclear operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savornin, J.; Hebrard, L.; Michard, J.; Muller, G.; Vasseur, C.

    1987-12-01

    Putting in place a nuclear industry is possible only if is taken into account the systematic risks connecting with the manipulation of radioactive matters. The measures taken are essentially the putting in place of static or dynamic barriers confinement. Therefore in case of fire their efficiencies can be reduced. The basic safety rule no. I-4.a serie U defines the objectives but do not give all the means to arrive. The present guide has for objective to propose the means which allow to satisfy these objectives. It permits to define the importance of precautions to take in terms of possible consequences. This document is not a rule. It has for objective to give advices [fr

  4. Global marine radioactivity database (GLOMARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.; Gayol, J.; Togawa, O.

    1999-01-01

    In response to the request of Member States and under the IAEA's mandate, the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory (MEL) in Monaco has established and maintains a Global Marine Radioactivity Database (GLOMARD). It is a vast project compiling radionuclide measurements taken in the marine environment. It consists of systematic input of all radionuclide concentration data available for sea water, sediment, biota and suspended matter. The GLOMARD is therefore a powerful tool for the researchers of MEL as it integrates the results of analyses in most of the areas of the marine environment which have been investigated

  5. Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Supported by a generous quantity of full-color illustrations and interesting sidebars, Solid Matter introduces the basic characteristics and properties of solid matter. It briefly describes the cosmic connection of the elements, leading readers through several key events in human pre-history that resulted in more advanced uses of matter in the solid state. Chapters include:. -Solid Matter: An Initial Perspective. -Physical Behavior of Matter. -The Gravity of Matter. -Fundamentals of Materials Science. -Rocks and Minerals. -Metals. -Building Materials. -Carbon Earth's Most Versatile Element. -S

  6. Contribution of radioactive 137Cs discharge by suspended sediment, coarse organic matter, and dissolved fraction from a headwater catchment in Fukushima after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwagami, Sho; Onda, Yuichi; Tsujimura, Maki; Abe, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Radiocesium ( 137 Cs) migration from headwaters in forested areas provides important information, as the output from forest streams subsequently enters various land-use areas and downstream rivers. Thus, it is important to determine the composition of 137 Cs fluxes (dissolved fraction, suspended sediment, or coarse organic matter) that migrate through a headwater stream. In this study, the 137 Cs discharge by suspended sediment and coarse organic matter from a forest headwater catchment was monitored. The 137 Cs concentrations in suspended sediment and coarse organic matter, such as leaves and branches, and the amounts of suspended sediment and coarse organic matter were measured at stream sites in three headwater catchments in Yamakiya District, located ∼35 km northwest of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) from August 2012 to September 2013, following the earthquake and tsunami disaster. Suspended sediment and coarse organic matter were sampled at intervals of approximately 1-2 months. The 137 Cs concentrations of suspended sediment and coarse organic matter were 2.4-49 kBq/kg and 0.85-14 kBq/kg, respectively. The 137 Cs concentrations of the suspended sediment were closely correlated with the average deposition density of the catchment. The annual proportions of contribution of 137 Cs discharge by suspended sediment, coarse organic matter, and dissolved fraction were 96-99%, 0.0092-0.069%, and 0.73-3.7%, respectively. The total annual 137 Cs discharge from the catchment was 0.02-0.3% of the deposition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radioactive Waste Management Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world'. One way it achieves this objective is to issue publications in various series. Two of these series are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III, paragraph A.6, of the IAEA Statute, the IAEA safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are primarily written in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own activities. The principal users are Member State regulatory bodies and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series consists of reports designed to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia and politicians, among others. The information is presented in guides, reports on the status of technology and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The series complements the IAEA's safety standards, and provides detailed guidance, experience, good practices and examples on the five areas covered in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. The Nuclear Energy Basic Principles is the highest level publication in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and describes the rationale and vision for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It presents eight Basic Principles on which nuclear energy systems should be based to fulfil nuclear energy's potential to help meet growing global energy needs. The Nuclear Energy Series Objectives are the second level publications. They describe what needs to be

  8. Speech Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse Jørgensen, Stina

    2011-01-01

    About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011.......About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011....

  9. Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Memory Matters KidsHealth / For Kids / Memory Matters What's in ... of your complex and multitalented brain. What Is Memory? When an event happens, when you learn something, ...

  10. Natural atmospheric radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1986-01-01

    After having summed up the different old or new units, used in radioactivity and radioprotection, the origins of atmospheric radioactivity are reported. Next the authors deal with the air content in radon, thoron and their radioactive descendants, insisting on the variations of the radon air content and on the radioactive balance between radon and its descendants. Then a few notions concerning the natural radioactive aerosol are developed: electric charge state, granulometric distribution. The possible effects of natural atmospheric radioactivity on man are studied with a distinction between inner irradiation and outer irradiation, an average assessment is shown. Finally the important problem of radon in inhabitations is approached [fr

  11. Matter and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.F.G. da

    1976-01-01

    Rutherford's and Bhor's atomic models are presented, as well as the general configuration of the atom. In the study of energy, emphasis is given to its forms and unities, to equivalence between mass and energy and to the energy levels of the atom. Electrons and nuclear constituents, nuclear forces, stability and nuclear potential barrier are studied. The concepts of radioactive state, activity and nuclear decay are analysed, as well as nuclear reactions, fission, radioisotope production and cosmic rays. Interactions between radiation and matter are also analysed [pt

  12. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    What You See Ain't What. You Got, Resonance, Vol.4,. No.9,1999. Dark Matter. 2. Dark Matter in the Universe. Bikram Phookun and Biman Nath. In Part 11 of this article we learnt that there are compelling evidences from dynamics of spiral galaxies, like our own, that there must be non-luminous matter in them. In this.

  13. Report of radioactivity survey research in fiscal year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been surveyed, as part of the radioactivity research project by the Science and Technology Agency, radioactivity levels in the environment and safety analysis for radioactive fallouts associated with nuclear weapons tests since 1959 and effluents from nuclear installations. With a remarkable advent of the peaceful applications of radionuclides, radioactivity in the environment has been becoming a matter of concern for the population in Japan. Radioactivity research is considered to become more important because it may provide clues for the basis of its influences upon the human body and environment. This report gives a survey of the radioactivity research project performed in the fiscal year 1988. The following topics are covered: (1) radioactivity levels and dosimetry in the environment, foods, and human body; (2) radioactivity levels surrounding nuclear installations; (3) services in the Radioactivity Survey Data Center; (4) basic survey of evaluation for the results of radioactivity levels; (5) training of technichians for monitoring environmental radioactivity; and (6) survey research for dosimetry and countermeasures at emergency. (N.K.)

  14. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle for use in establishing ''as low as practicable'' guides: milling of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, M.B.; Blanco, R.E.; Dahlman, R.C.; Hill, G.S.; Ryon, A.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1975-05-01

    A cost-benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from model uranium ore processing mills, and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining the term ''as low as practicable'' in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The base case model mills are representative of mills which will process a major fraction of the ore in the next 20 years. Each mill processes 2,000 short tons of ore per day. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base case mill and the waste tailings area in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The cost for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitment are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration and is not suitable for immediate use. The methodology used in estimating the costs, detailed calculations, and tabulations are presented in ORNL-TM-4903, Volume 2. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992. (U.S.)

  15. Security guide for subcontractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.C.

    1993-06-01

    This guide is provided to aid in the achievement of security objectives in the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor/subcontractor program. The objectives of security are to protect information that, if released, would endanger the common defense and security of the nation and to safeguard plants and installations of the DOE and its contractors to prevent the interruption of research and production programs. The security objective and means of achieving the objective are described. Specific security measures discussed in this guide include physical barriers, personnel identification systems, personnel and vehicular access control, classified document control, protection of classified matter in use, storing classified matter, and repository combinations. Means of dealing with security violations and security infractions are described. Maintenance of a security education program is discussed. Also discussed are methods of handling clearance terminations, visitor control, travel to sensitive countries, and shipment security. The Technical Surveillance Countermeasures Program (TSCM), the Computer Security Program, and the Operations Security Plan (OPSEC) are examined.

  16. Incineration of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caramelle, D.; Florestan, J.; Waldura, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that one of the methods used to reduce the volume of radioactive wastes is incineration. Incineration also allows combustible organic wastes to be transformed into inert matter that is stable from the physico-chemical viewpoint and ready to be conditioned for long-term stockage. The quality of the ashes obtained (low carbon content) depends on the efficiency of combustion. A good level of efficiency requires a combustion yield higher than 99% at the furnace door. Removal efficiency is defined as the relation between the CO 2 /CO + CO 2 concentrations multiplied by 100. This implies a CO concentration of the order of a few vpm. However, the gases produced by an incineration facility can represent a danger for the environment especially if toxic or corrosive gases (HCL,NO x ,SO 2 , hydrocarbons...) are given off. The gaseous effluents must therefore be checked after purification before they are released into the atmosphere. The CO and CO 2 measurement gives us the removal efficiency value. This value can also be measured in situ at the door of the combustion chamber. Infrared spectrometry is used for the various measurements: Fourier transform infrared spectrometry for the off-gases, and diode laser spectrometry for combustion

  17. Radioactivity and geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper recalls a few steps of the introduction of radioactivity in geophysics and astrophysics: contribution of radioelements to energy balance of the Earth, age of the Earth based on radioactive disintegration and the discovery of cosmic radiations

  18. Radioactive Waste Management Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This strategy defines methods and means how collect, transport and bury radioactive waste safely. It includes low level radiation waste and high level radiation waste. In the strategy are foreseen main principles and ways of storage radioactive waste

  19. Radioactivity in consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

    1978-08-01

    Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

  20. Radioactivity of bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  1. Immersed radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-03-01

    This document presents a brief overview of immersed radioactive wastes worldwide: historical aspects, geographical localization, type of wastes (liquid, solid), radiological activity of immersed radioactive wastes in the NE Atlantic Ocean, immersion sites and monitoring

  2. Radioactive waste management: a utility view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    The management of radioactive waste continues to be a matter of public concern and discussion. There is broad agreement among members of the technical community that the various types of waste radioactive species can be managed without jeopardizing public health and safety. Despite this consensus, one of the major reasons cited by opponents of commercial nuclear power for their opposition is the lack of a fully deployed waste management program. Such a program has been suggested but implementation is not yet complete. It is essential that a program be undertaken so as to dispel the impression that past inaction on waste disposal represents an inability to deal safely with wastes

  3. Transport of proximity nuclear radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This brief publication gives an overview of the international and national regulatory framework for the transport of radioactive substances, outlines progress orientations identified by the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), indicates the parcel classification and shipment radiological criteria, and how to declare events occurring during the transport of radioactive substances, which number to phone in case of a radiological incident. Finally, the role of the ASN and its field of activity in matters of control are briefly presented with a table of its office addresses in France

  4. Legal and regulator framework of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez Cassanello, Griselda; Mels Siningen, Celeste; Reina, Mariana; Vega, Hernan

    2009-01-01

    The present work intends to develop the legislative and regulatory framework in the matter of radioactive waste. The legal frame of the radioactive waste conformed by the National Constitution, the treaties and conventions, laws and decrees and regulatory norm in Argentine . The subject is approached from the international point of view considering the slogan of 36 The Annual Meeting of the Association Argentine de Nuclear Technology: 'The Nuclear Energy in the Present World'. This work also contains a special paragraph dedicated to the analysis of practical cases related to the subject and the activity of the National Commission of Atomic Energy. (author)

  5. Preparing regulations for radioactive waste transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    The article describes the diferent stages in preparing the regulation on safe transport of radioactive materials. The first stage was the support given by the International Atomic Energy Agency in to provide expertise in drafting the national regulation on this matter. The draft is based on the publication from IAEA Regulation on the safe transport of radioactive materials. Also a description of activities made by the Radiation Protection Department of the Energy Directorate of Guatemala is made by the Chief of the Department Dr. Fernando Robles

  6. Artificial radioactivity is fifty: 1934-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, E.; Biquard, P.; Goldstein, L.

    1984-01-01

    This book has been published on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary celebration of the artificial radioactivity discovery; contributions from men who have been near the Joliot at the beginning of the artificial radioactivity, or whose work have been marked by this discovery are gathered in this book. Subjects have been choosed very freely by the authors; that explains their great diversity. The reader will find precious memories from direct witnesses of this great time; he will find also descriptions of the following works; he will even find audacious dreams on matter utilization possibilities, which may rise to-morrow [fr

  7. Eighteenth annual report of: The Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    This annual report reviews the RWMAC's work programme and progress made in 1997-1998; discusses operational and administrative matters including financial management and policy review; and presents the 1998 RWMAC work programme. Particular chapters are devoted to the management of intermediate and high level radioactive waste and spent fuel; the Dounreay Nuclear Establishment; the radioactive waste discharge authorisations. The document presents the RWMAC's review of the Ministry of Defence's radioactive waste management practices. A separate chapter is devoted to the study of radioactive waste management practices in Spain. Annexes to the report include terms of reference and membership of the Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee; RWMAC financial statement; declaration and register of member's interests; the RWMAC's 1998 work programme; the RWMAC's response to the Government on Proposals for the control and remediation of radioactively contaminated land

  8. Transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuller, C.

    2003-01-01

    In this article author describes the system of transport and processing of radioactive wastes from nuclear power of Slovenske elektrarne, plc. It is realized the assurance of transport of liquid and solid radioactive wastes to processing links from places of their formation, or of preliminary storage and consistent transports of treated radioactive wastes fixed in cement matrix of fibre-concrete container into Rebublic storage of radioactive wastes in Mochovce

  9. Polarized secondary radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaika, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of polarized radioactive nuclei beam production: a) a method nuclear interaction of the non-polarized or polarized charged projectiles with target nuclei; b) a method of polarization of stopped reaction radioactive products in a special polarized ion source with than following acceleration; c) a polarization of radioactive nuclei circulating in a storage ring are considered. Possible life times of the radioactive ions for these methods are determined. General schemes of the polarization method realizations and depolarization problems are discussed

  10. Management of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neerdael, B.; Marivoet, J.; Put, M.; Van Iseghem, P.; Volckaert, G.; Wacquier, W.

    1998-09-01

    The document gives an overview of of different aspects of radioactive waste management in Belgium. The document discusses the radioactive waste inventory in Belgium, the treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste as well as activities related to the characterisation of different waste forms. A separate chapter is dedicated to research and development regarding deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. In the Belgian waste management programme, particular emphasis is on studies for disposal in clay. Main results of these studies are highlighted and discussed

  11. Focus on radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M

    1989-01-01

    Written for children, this book looks at the nature of radioactive materials, how they were discovered, what they are used for and how they affect the environment around us. The emphasis is on the benefits of radioactive materials, particularly in nuclear power stations, in medical diagnostics and radiotherapy, in industry and in agriculture. Nuclear fission and fusion are explained, how radioactive materials are handled and naturally occurring radioactivity are included. (UK).

  12. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1994-01-01

    This booklet is a publication by International Atomic Energy Agency for general awareness of citizens and policy-makers to clarify their concept of nuclear wastes. In a very simple way it tells what is radioactivity, radiations and radioactive wastes. It further hints on various medial and industrial uses of radiations. It discusses about different types of radioactive wastes and radioactive waste management. Status of nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern European countries are also discussed

  13. Radioactive consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Otomaru

    1981-01-01

    Present situation of utilizing the radioactive consumer products and exposure dose were reviewed with published data. Practically, consumer products are divided into three categories, (1) radioactive nuclides intentionally incorporated into radioluminous dye, ionization chambers for smoke detector, eliminator of static electricity, and glow lamp (2) natural radioactive nuclides contained in false teeth, porcelain, glass, and gas mantle (3) natural radioactive nuclides accumulated as industrial waste at the consumption of coal, petroleum, and natural gas or in fertilizer and materials for construction. (Nakanishi, T.)

  14. Aspects of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutoiu, Dan

    2003-01-01

    The origin and types of radioactive waste, the objective and the fundamental principles of radioactive waste management and the classification of radioactive waste are presented. Problems of the radioactive waste management are analyzed. (authors)

  15. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the sources and health effects of radioactive wastes. It reveals the techniques to concentrate and immobilize radioactivity and examines the merits of various disposal ideas. The book, which is designed for the lay reader, explains the basic science of atoms,nuclear particles,radioactivity, radiation and health effects

  16. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This ninth chapter presents de CNEN-NE--5.01 norm 'Transport of radioactive material'; the specifications of the radioactive materials for transport; the tests of the packages; the requests for controlling the transport and the responsibilities during the transport of radioactive material

  17. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Illustrated by drawings, this publication briefly describes radioactive exposure modalities (external or internal irradiation), the ways they are measured and assessed (doses, units), the different natural radioactivity origins, the different radioactivity origins related to human activity, the share of each origin in population exposures

  18. Accumulation of radioactive iron in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateda, Yuzuru

    1985-01-01

    The accumulation and excretion of radioactive iron in some marine organisms was investigated by radio-tracer experiments. The concentration factor, biological half-life, distribution in body, and combining form in some organs, are compared and discussed between mollusks and fishes. The results obtained are: 1) The concentration factor of seaweed was higher than those of worm and fish in uptake from seawater. Abalone showed a higher concentration factor than fish. 2) The first component of excretion curve was small in case of a longer period of uptake from seawater. 3) Abalone and octopus showed a higher radioactivity retention than flounder and black-fish. 4) The fish fed labelled seaweed showed a lower radioactivity retention than fish fed labelled worm. 5) The fish fed radioisotopes with prey showed a higher radioactivity retention than fish fed labelled prey. 6) Biological half-lives were longer in abalone and octopus than in fishes. The biological half-lives of radioactive iron in fishes varied according to the uptake modes. 7) The distribution ratio of radioactive iron in organisms were large in the liver and degestive tract. 8) The GFC profile of 59 Fe in some organs of organisms showed combining form of same molecular weight of proteinous matter. (author)

  19. Inventory of radioactive waste disposals at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    The IAEA was requested by the Contracting Parties to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter (London Convention 1972) to develop and maintain an inventory of radioactive material entering the marine environment from all sources. The rationale for having such an inventory is related to its use as an information base with which the impact of radionuclides from different sources entering the marine environment can be assessed and compared. To respond to the request of the London Convention, the IAEA has undertaken the development of the inventory to include: disposal at sea of radioactive wastes, and accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive materials. This report addresses disposal at sea of radioactive waste, a practice which continued from 1946 to 1993. It is a revision of IAEA-TECDOC-588, Inventory of Radioactive Material Entering the Marine Environment: Sea Disposal of Radioactive Waste, published in 1991. In addition to the data already published in IAEA-TECDOC-588, the present publication includes detailed official information on sea disposal operations carried out by the former Soviet Union and the Russian Federation provided in 1993 as well as additional information provided by Sweden in 1992 and the United Kingdom in 1997 and 1998

  20. Treating radioactive effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of radioactive effluent it is known to produce a floc being a suspension of precipitates carrying radioactive species in a mother liquor containing dissolved non-radioactive salts. It is also known and accepted practice to encapsulate the floc in a solid matrix by treatment with bitumen, cement and the like. In the present invention the floc is washed with water prior to encapsulation in the solid matrix whereby to displace the mother liquor containing the dissolved non-radioactive salts. This serves to reduce the final amount of solidified radioactive waste with consequent advantages in the storage and disposal thereof. (author)

  1. Direct Dark Matter Searches: Status and Perspectives

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    There is overwhelming indirect evidence that dark matter exists, however, the dark matter particle has not yet been directly detected in laboratory experiments. In order to be able to identify the rare dark matter interactions with the target nuclei, such instruments have to feature a very low threshold and an extremely low radioactive background. They are therefore installed in underground laboratories to reduce cosmic ray backgrounds. I will review the status of direct dark matter searches and will discuss the perspectives for the future.

  2. Global marine radioactivity database (GLOMARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    The GLOMARD stores all available data on marine radioactivity in seawater, suspended matter, sediments and biota. The database provides critical input to the evaluation of the environmental radionuclide levels in regional seas and the world's oceans. It can be used as a basis for the assessment of the radiation doses to local, regional and global human populations and to marine biota. It also provides information on temporal trends of radionuclide levels in the marine environment and identifies gaps in available information. The database contains information on the sources of the data; the laboratories performing radionuclide analysis; the type of samples (seawater, sediment, biota) and associated details (such as volume and weight); the sample treatment, analytical methods, and measuring instruments; and the analysed results (such as radionuclide concentrations, uncertainties, temperature, salinity, etc.). The current version of the GLOMARD allows the input, maintenance and extraction of data for the production of various kinds of maps using external computer programs. Extracted data are processed by these programs to produce contour maps representing radionuclide distributions in studied areas. To date, development work has concentrated on the Barents and Kara Seas in the Arctic and the Sea of Japan in the northwest Pacific Ocean, in connection with the investigation of radioactive waste dumping sites, as well as on marine radioactivity assessment of the Mururoa and Fangataufa nuclear weapons tests sites in French Polynesia. Further data inputs and evaluations are being carried out for the Black and Mediterranean Seas. In the framework of the project on Worldwide Marine Radioactivity Studies, background levels of 3 H, 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 239,240 Pu in water, sediment and biota of the world's oceans and seas will be established

  3. D matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, Gary; Wang Liantao

    2004-01-01

    We study the properties and phenomenology of particlelike states originating from D branes whose spatial dimensions are all compactified. They are nonperturbative states in string theory and we refer to them as D matter. In contrast to other nonperturbative objects such as 't Hooft-Polyakov monopoles, D-matter states could have perturbative couplings among themselves and with ordinary matter. The lightest D particle (LDP) could be stable because it is the lightest state carrying certain (integer or discrete) quantum numbers. Depending on the string scale, they could be cold dark matter candidates with properties similar to that of WIMPs or wimpzillas. The spectrum of excited states of D matter exhibits an interesting pattern which could be distinguished from that of Kaluza-Klein modes, winding states, and string resonances. We speculate about possible signatures of D matter from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and colliders

  4. Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Astrophysics conference in Maryland, organized by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland. The topics covered included low mass stars as dark matter, dark matter in galaxies and clusters, cosmic microwave background anisotropy, cold and hot dark matter, and the large scale distribution and motions of galaxies. There were eighty five papers presented. Out of these, 10 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  5. Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, A.; Cotti, U.; De Leon, C. L.; Raya, A; Villasenor, L.

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest scientific mysteries of our time resides in the identification of the particles that constitute a large fraction of the mass of our Universe, generically known as dark matter. We review the observations and the experimental data that imply the existence of dark matter. We briefly discuss the properties of the two best dark-matter candidate particles and the experimental techniques presently used to try to discover them. Finally, we mention a proposed project that has recently emerged within the Mexican community to look for dark matter

  6. Completion of the Radioactive Materials Packaging Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.

    1998-02-01

    The Radioactive Materials Packaging Handbook: Design, Operation and Maintenance, which will serve as a replacement for the Cask Designers Guide (Shappert, 1970), has now been completed and submitted to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) electronics publishing group for layout and printing; it is scheduled to be printed in late spring 1998. The Handbook, written by experts in their particular fields, is a compilation of technical chapters that address the design aspects of a package intended for transporting radioactive material in normal commerce; it was prepared under the direction of M. E. Wangler of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is intended to provide a wealth of technical guidance that will give designers a better understanding of the regulatory approval process, preferences of regulators on specific aspects of package design, and the types of analyses that should be considered when designing a package to carry radioactive materials

  7. The IAEA radioactive waste safety standards programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourtellotte, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA is currently reviewing more than thirty publications in its Safety Series with a view toward consolidating and organizing information pertaining to radioactive waste. the effort is entitled Radioactive Waste Safety Standards programme (RADWASS). RADWASS is a significant undertaking and may have far reaching effects on radioactive waste management both in the international nuclear community and in individual nuclear States. This is because IAEA envisions the development of a consensus on the final document. In this circumstance, the product of RADWASS may ultimately be regarded as an international norm against which future actions of Member States may be measured. This program is organized in five subjects: planning, pre-disposal, disposal, uranium and thorium waste management and decommissioning, which has four levels: safety fundamentals, safety standards, safety guides and safety practices. (author)

  8. Radioactive waste management: International peer reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Bonne, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Agency's peer review service for radioactive waste management - known as the Waste Management Assessment and Technical Review Programme (WATRP) - started in 1989, building upon earlier types of advisory programmes. WATRP's international experts today provide advice and guidance on proposed or ongoing radioactive waste management programmes; planning, operation, or decommissioning of waste facilities; or on legislative, organizational, and regulatory matters. Specific topics often cover waste conditioning, storage, and disposal concepts or facilities; or technical and other aspects of ongoing or planned research and development programmes. The missions can thus contributed to improving waste management systems and plans, and in raising levels of public confidence in them, as part of IAEA efforts to assist countries in the safe management of radioactive wastes. This article presents a brief overview of recent WATRP missions in Norway, Slovak Republic, Czech Republic and Finland

  9. Radiating matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimen, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the history and uses of radioactivity. The narration is completed by bibliographic notes on Otto Hahn with a number of so far unpublished letters and documents and on Leo Szilard, the most far-sighted among the nuclear researchers actively engaged during the war. The first part deals with the discovery of radioactivity and the discovery of uranium fission in 1938 with its military consequences, up to the short-lived euphoria on the 'atomic age' (Geneva conference 1955). This is followed by an account of natural radioactivity in our environment, a brief of useful information on radiation effects and radiation protection, and of typical applications of radioactive beams in science, engineering, and medicine. The final part is concerned with the most important instances of insight into nature triggered by the discovery of radioactivity: From cosmological to chemical evolution, from Democrit's atom theory to modern nuclear physics' particle zoo, from the contest of ideas between acausalists and determinists on what is commonly termed 'coincidence' to the limits of graphic views on nature. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Radiating matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimen, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    The author describes the history and uses of radioactivity. The narration is completed by bibliographic notes on Otto Hahn with a number of so far unpublished letters and documents and on Leo Szilard, the most far-sighted among the nuclear researchers actively engaged during the war. The first part deals with the discovery of radioactivity and the discovery of uranium fission in 1938 with its military consequences, up to the short-lived euphoria on the 'atomic age' (Geneva conference 1955). This is followed by an account of natural radioactivity in our environment, a brief of useful information on radiation effects and radiation protection, and of typical applications of radioactive beams in science, engineering, and medicine. The final part is concerned with the most important instances of insight into nature triggered by the discovery of radioactivity: From cosmological to chemical evolution, from Democrit's atom theory to modern nuclear physics' particle zoo, from the contest of ideas between acausalists and determinists on what is commonly termed 'coincidence' to the limits of graphic views on nature. (orig.) With 40 figs [de

  11. Radioactive waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the more frequent questions that arise when discussing nuclear energy's potential contribution to mitigating climate change concerns that of how to manage radioactive waste. Radioactive waste is produced through nuclear power generation, but also - although to a significantly lesser extent - in a variety of other sectors including medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education. The amount, type and physical form of radioactive waste varies considerably. Some forms of radioactive waste, for example, need only be stored for a relatively short period while their radioactivity naturally decays to safe levels. Others remain radioactive for hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of years. Public concerns surrounding radioactive waste are largely related to long-lived high-level radioactive waste. Countries around the world with existing nuclear programmes are developing longer-term plans for final disposal of such waste, with an international consensus developing that the geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) is the most technically feasible and safe solution. This article provides a brief overview of the different forms of radioactive waste, examines storage and disposal solutions, and briefly explores fuel recycling and stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management decision making

  12. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Ichiro; Hashimoto, Yasuo.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the volume-reduction effect, as well as enable simultaneous procession for the wastes such as burnable solid wastes, resin wastes or sludges, and further convert the processed materials into glass-solidified products which are much less burnable and stable chemically and thermally. Method: Auxiliaries mainly composed of SiO 2 such as clays, and wastes such as burnable solid wastes, waste resins and sludges are charged through a waste hopper into an incinerating melting furnace comprising an incinerating and a melting furnace, while radioactive concentrated liquid wastes are sprayed from a spray nozzle. The wastes are burnt by the heat from the melting furnace and combustion air, and the sprayed concentrated wastes are dried by the hot air after the combustion into solid components. The solid matters from the concentrated liquid wastes and the incinerating ashes of the wastes are melted together with the auxiliaries in the melting furnace and converted into glass-like matters. The glass-like matters thus formed are caused to flow into a vessel and gradually cooled to solidify. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex, calendar year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Klein, L.S.

    1984-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. Routine discharges for 1983 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. There was, however, an unplanned release in December from the X-326 Building Side Purge which exceeded the limits. 1 figure

  14. Radioactivity of wood ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.; Moring, M.

    2000-01-01

    STUK (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority) has investigated natural and artificial radioactivity in wood ash and radiation exposure from radionuclides in ash since 1996. The aim was to consider both handling of ash and different ways of using ash. In all 87 ash samples were collected from 22 plants using entirely or partially wood for their energy production in 1996-1997. The sites studied represented mostly chemical forest industry, sawmills or district heat production. Most plants used fluidised bed combustion technique. Samples of both fly ash and bottom ash were studied. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in samples of, e.g., dried fly ash from fuel containing more than 80% wood were determined. The means ranged from 2000 to less than 50 Bq kg -1 , in decreasing order: 137 Cs, 40 K, 90 Sr, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 134 Cs, 235 U. In bott radionuclide contents decreased in the same order as in fly ash, but were smaller, and 210 Pb was hardly detectable. The NH 4 Ac extractable fractions of activities for isotopes of alkaline elements (K, Cs) in bottom ash were lower than in fly ash, whereas solubility of heavier isotopes was low. Safety requirements defined by STUK in ST-guide 12.2 for handling of peat ash were fulfilled at each of the sites. Use of ash for land-filling and construction of streets was minimal during the sampling period. Increasing this type of ash use had often needed further investigations, as description of the use of additional materials that attenuate radiation. Fertilisation of forests with wood ash adds slightly to the external irradiation in forests, but will mostly decrease doses received through use of timber, berries, mushrooms and game meat. (orig.)

  15. Natural and induced radioactivity in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    radioactivity in unirradiated food. There are no adverse effect from consumption of irradiated food which contains radioactivity well below background level. This publication should provide valuable information to anyone who has interest in food irradiation especially regulatory authorities for food safety and radiation applications as well as to consumers who might be interested in scientific matters of irradiated food.

  16. Natural and induced radioactivity in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    radioactivity in unirradiated food. There are no adverse effect from consumption of irradiated food which contains radioactivity well below background level. This publication should provide valuable information to anyone who has interest in food irradiation especially regulatory authorities for food safety and radiation applications as well as to consumers who might be interested in scientific matters of irradiated food

  17. Radioactivity and food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references

  18. INF Code related matters. Joint IAEA/IMO literature survey on potential consequences of severe maritime accidents involving the transport of radioactive material. 2 volumes. Vol. I - Report and publication titles. Vol. II - Relevant abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-10

    This literature survey was undertaken jointly by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as a step in addressing the subject of environmental impact of accidents involving materials subject to the IMO's Code for the Safe Carriage of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel, Plutonium and High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Flasks on Board Ships, also known as the INF Code. The results of the survey are provided in two volumes: the first one containing the description of the search and search results with the list of generated publication titles, and the second volume containing the abstracts of those publications deemed relevant for the purposes of the literature survey. Literature published between 1980 and mid-1999 was reviewed by two independent consultants who generated publication titles by performing searches of appropriate databases, and selected the abstracts of relevant publications for inclusion in this survey. The IAEA operates INIS, the world's leading computerised bibliographical information system on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The acronym INIS stands for International Nuclear Information System. INIS Members are responsible for determining the relevant nuclear literature produced within their borders or organizational confines, and then preparing the associated input in accordance with INIS rules. INIS records are included in other major databases such as the Energy, Science and Technology database of the DIALOG service. Because it is the INIS Members, rather than the IAEA Secretariat, who are responsible for its contents, it was considered appropriate that INIS be the primary source of information for this literature review. Selected unpublished reports were also reviewed, e.g. Draft Proceedings of the Special Consultative Meeting of Entities involved in the maritime transport of materials covered by the INF Code (SCM 5), March 1996. Many of the formal papers at SCM 5 were included in the literature

  19. INF Code related matters. Joint IAEA/IMO literature survey on potential consequences of severe maritime accidents involving the transport of radioactive material. 2 volumes. Vol. I - Report and publication titles. Vol. II - Relevant abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This literature survey was undertaken jointly by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as a step in addressing the subject of environmental impact of accidents involving materials subject to the IMO's Code for the Safe Carriage of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel, Plutonium and High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Flasks on Board Ships, also known as the INF Code. The results of the survey are provided in two volumes: the first one containing the description of the search and search results with the list of generated publication titles, and the second volume containing the abstracts of those publications deemed relevant for the purposes of the literature survey. Literature published between 1980 and mid-1999 was reviewed by two independent consultants who generated publication titles by performing searches of appropriate databases, and selected the abstracts of relevant publications for inclusion in this survey. The IAEA operates INIS, the world's leading computerised bibliographical information system on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The acronym INIS stands for International Nuclear Information System. INIS Members are responsible for determining the relevant nuclear literature produced within their borders or organizational confines, and then preparing the associated input in accordance with INIS rules. INIS records are included in other major databases such as the Energy, Science and Technology database of the DIALOG service. Because it is the INIS Members, rather than the IAEA Secretariat, who are responsible for its contents, it was considered appropriate that INIS be the primary source of information for this literature review. Selected unpublished reports were also reviewed, e.g. Draft Proceedings of the Special Consultative Meeting of Entities involved in the maritime transport of materials covered by the INF Code (SCM 5), March 1996. Many of the formal papers at SCM 5 were included in the literature

  20. Radiation safety in educational, medical and research institutions. Regulatory guide G-121

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    This regulatory guide is intended to help educational, medical and research institutions design and implement radiation protection programs that meed regulatory requirements. This guide applied to educational, medical or research institutions that require a licence from the CNSC to posses or use radioactive materials. It describes programs to assure that radioactive materials are used safely during licensed activities. (author)

  1. Drainage of radioactive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This Code of Practice covers all the drainage systems which may occur in the radioactive classified area of an establishment, namely surface water, foul, process and radioactive drainage. It also deals with final discharge lines. The Code of Practice concentrates on those aspects of drainage which require particular attention because the systems are in or from radioactive areas and typical illustrations are given in appendices. The Code makes references to sources of information on conventional aspects of drainage design. (author)

  2. Learning more about radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This digest brochure explains what radioactivity is, where it comes from, how it is measured, what are its effects on the body and the way to protect it against these effects, the uses of radioactivity (In the medical field, In industry, In the food industry, and In the cultural world). It ends with some examples of irradiation levels, of natural radioactivity and with the distribution in France of various sources of exposure. (J.S.)

  3. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Almost all IAEA Member States use radioactive sources in medicine, industry, agriculture and scientific research, and countries remain responsible for the safe handling and storage of all radioactively contaminated waste that result from such activities. In some cases, waste must be specially treated or conditioned before storage and/or disposal. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme with the support of the Nuclear Energy Department aimed at establishing appropriate technologies and procedures for managing radioactive wastes. (IAEA)

  4. Handling of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza Mir, Azucena

    1998-01-01

    Based on characteristics and quantities of different types of radioactive waste produced in the country, achievements in infrastructure and the way to solve problems related with radioactive waste handling and management, are presented in this paper. Objectives of maintaining facilities and capacities for controlling, processing and storing radioactive waste in a conditioned form, are attained, within a great range of legal framework, so defined to contribute with safety to people and environment (au)

  5. Development of an application simulating radioactive sources; Conception d'une application de simulation de sources radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riffault, V.; Locoge, N. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Dept. Chimie et Environnement, 59 - Douai (France); Leblanc, E.; Vermeulen, M. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, 59 (France)

    2011-05-15

    This paper presents an application simulating radioactive gamma sources developed in the 'Ecole des Mines' of Douai (France). It generates raw counting data as an XML file which can then be statistically exploited to illustrate the various concepts of radioactivity (exponential decay law, isotropy of the radiation, attenuation of radiation in matter). The application, with a spread sheet for data analysis and lab procedures, has been released under free license. (authors)

  6. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapelushnik, I.; Sheinfeld, M.; Avida, R.; Kadmon, Y.; Ellenbogen, M.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  7. Controlling radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtinger, W.

    1992-01-01

    The guideline of the Ministry for Environmental Protection for controlling radioactive waste with a negligible development of heat defines in detail what data are relevant to the control of radioactive waste and should be followed up on and included in a system of documentation. By introducing the AVK (product control system for tracing the course of waste disposal) the operators of German nuclear power plants have taken the requirements of this guideline into account. In particular, possibilities for determining the degree of radioactivity of radioactive waste, which the BMU-guidelines call for, were put into practice by means of the programming technology of the product control system's module MOPRO. (orig.) [de

  8. Environmental radioactivity 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Environmental Radioactivity in New Zealand and Rarotonga : annual report 1996 was published in May this year. The 1996 environmental radioactivity monitoring programme included, as usual, measurements in New Zealand and the Cook Islands of atmospheric, deposited and dairy product radioactivity. The environment in the New Zealand and Cook Island regions has now virtually returned to the situation in the 'pre-nuclear' era. The contination of monitoring, although at a reduced level of intensity, is basically to ensure that any change from the present state, due to any source of radioactivity does not go undetected or unquestioned. (author)

  9. Security of radioactive sources and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.; D'Amato, E.; Fernandez Moreno, S.

    1998-01-01

    The activities involving the use of radiation sources and radioactive materials are subject to the control of the national bodies dedicated to the nuclear regulation. The main objective of this control is to assure an appropriate level of radiological protection and nuclear safety. In Argentina, this function is carried out by the 'Nuclear Regulatory Authority' (ARN) whose regulatory system for radiation sources and radioactive materials comprises a registration, licensing and inspection scheme. The system is designed to keep track of such materials and to allow taking immediate corrective actions in case some incident occurs. Due to the appearance of a considerable number of illicit traffic events involving radiation sources and radioactive materials, the specialized national and international community has begun to evaluate the adoption of supplementary measures to those of 'safety' guided to its prevention and detection (i.e. 'security measures'). This paper presents a view on when the adoption of complementary 'security' measures to those of 'safety' would be advisable and which they would be. This will be done through the analysis of two hypothesis of illicit traffic, the first one with sources and radioactive materials considered as 'registered' and the second, with the same materials designated as 'not registered'. It will also describe succinctly the measures adopted by the ARN or under its analysis regarding the 'security' measures to sources and radioactive materials. (author)

  10. Radioactive rare gases emission at underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubasov, Yu.V.

    2016-01-01

    The examples of radioactive rare gases emission at underground nuclear explosions conducted in the USSR on the Novaya Zemlya and Semipalatinsk test sites are considered. It is pointed out that in the case of evasive explosion in vertical wells without apparent radioactive gases emission the samples of subsurface gas must contain the traces of radioactive rare gases. Under the inspection of evasive explosion in horizontal workings of rock massif, one should guided by the analysis of atmospheric air samples in the inspected area [ru

  11. Identification of radioactive sources and devices. Reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This publication is intended to be a basic guide and not a comprehensive tool kit to identify and provide detailed emergency handling instructions for radioactive sources, devices and transport containers. In addition, this publication helps to identify sources and highlight the risks they present, and provides information on appropriate action. It is a small but significant step in the international community's continuing efforts to strengthen control of radioactive sources and nuclear material, increase safety and security, and thereby make the benefits of radioactive sources ever more broadly accessible. This publication was partly funded through the Nuclear Security Fund established under the Nuclear Security Plan

  12. The national scheme for monitoring radioactive fallout in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell, assumed responsibility for the national milk monitoring scheme on Jan. 1, 1979. Milk contamination provides a good guide to radioactivity in the British diet. Brief reference is made to U.K. surveys of radioactive fallout in human food prior to January 1979, and current arrangements for the sampling of milk in the U.K. are explained. The milk is analysed for 90 Sr, 137 Cs and stable calcium. Additional samples are collected to check for 131 I or other short-lived isotopes in the event of atmospheric nuclear tests or accidents involving possible releases of radioactivity. (U.K.)

  13. California's response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980: policy and progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    The public and private corporations and institutions in California that use radioactive materials and generate low-level radioactive waste have played a major role in shaping and guiding California's response to the federal Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Working together as the California Radioactive Materials Management Forum (CAL RAD FORUM), these organizations carry out legislative and public education programs with the objective of establishing, in California, a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and maintaining access to existing disposal facilities in other states until the California facility is licensed and operating

  14. Gaseous Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    aseous Matter focuses on the many important discoveries that led to the scientific interpretation of matter in the gaseous state. This new, full-color resource describes the basic characteristics and properties of several important gases, including air, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and nitrogen. The nature and scope of the science of fluids is discussed in great detail, highlighting the most important scientific principles upon which the field is based. Chapters include:. Gaseous Matter An Initial Perspective. Physical Characteristics of Gases. The Rise of the Science of Gases. Kinetic Theory of

  15. X rays and radioactivity: a complete surprise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.; Bordry, M.

    1995-01-01

    The discoveries of X rays and of radioactivity came as complete experimental surprises; the physicists, at that time, had no previous hint of a possible structure of atoms. It is difficult now, knowing what we know, to replace ourselves in the spirit, astonishment and questioning of these years, between 1895 and 1903. The nature of X rays was soon hypothesized, but the nature of the rays emitted by uranium, polonium and radium was much more difficult to disentangle, as they were a mixture of different types of radiations. The origin of the energy continuously released in radioactivity remained a complete mystery for a few years. The multiplicity of the radioactive substances became soon a difficult matter: what was real and what was induced ? Isotopy was still far ahead. It appeared that some radioactive substances had ''half-lifes'': were they genuine radioactive elements or was it just a transitory phenomenon ? Henri Becquerel (in 1900) and Pierre and Marie Curie (in 1902) hesitated on the correct answer. Only after Ernest Rutherford and Frederick Soddy established that radioactivity was the transmutation of one element into another, could one understand that a solid element transformed into a gaseous element, which in turn transformed itself into a succession of solid radioactive elements. It was only in 1913 - after the discovery of the atomic nucleus -, through precise measurements of X ray spectra, that Henry Moseley showed that the number of electrons of a given atom - and the charge of its nucleus - was equal to its atomic number in the periodic table. (authors)

  16. X rays and radioactivity: a complete surprise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radvanyi, P. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bordry, M. [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-12-31

    The discoveries of X rays and of radioactivity came as complete experimental surprises; the physicists, at that time, had no previous hint of a possible structure of atoms. It is difficult now, knowing what we know, to replace ourselves in the spirit, astonishment and questioning of these years, between 1895 and 1903. The nature of X rays was soon hypothesized, but the nature of the rays emitted by uranium, polonium and radium was much more difficult to disentangle, as they were a mixture of different types of radiations. The origin of the energy continuously released in radioactivity remained a complete mystery for a few years. The multiplicity of the radioactive substances became soon a difficult matter: what was real and what was induced ? Isotopy was still far ahead. It appeared that some radioactive substances had ``half-lifes``: were they genuine radioactive elements or was it just a transitory phenomenon ? Henri Becquerel (in 1900) and Pierre and Marie Curie (in 1902) hesitated on the correct answer. Only after Ernest Rutherford and Frederick Soddy established that radioactivity was the transmutation of one element into another, could one understand that a solid element transformed into a gaseous element, which in turn transformed itself into a succession of solid radioactive elements. It was only in 1913 - after the discovery of the atomic nucleus -, through precise measurements of X ray spectra, that Henry Moseley showed that the number of electrons of a given atom - and the charge of its nucleus - was equal to its atomic number in the periodic table. (authors).

  17. Ocean disposal of radioactive waste: Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmet, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    For hundreds of years, the seas have been used as a place to dispose of wastes resulting from human activities and although no high level radioactive waste (HLW) has been disposed of into the sea, variable amounts of packaged low level radioactive waste (LLW) have been dumped at more than 50 sites in the northern part of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. So far, samples of sea water, sediments and deep sea organisms collected on the various sites have not shown any excess in the levels of radionuclides above those due to nuclear weapons fallout except on certain occasions where caesium and plutonium were detected at higher levels in samples taken close to packages at the dumping site. Since 1957, the date of its first meeting to design methodologies to assess the safety of ''radioactive waste disposal into the sea'', the IAEA has provided guidance and recommendations for ensuring that disposal of radioactive wastes into the sea will not result in unacceptable hazards to human health and marine organisms, damage to amenities or interference with other legitimate uses of the sea. Since the Convention for the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter (referred to as the London Dumping Convention) came into force in 1975, the dumping of waste has been regulated on a global scale. The London Dumping Convention entrusted IAEA with specific responsibilities for the definition of high level radioactive wastes unsuitable for dumping at sea, and for making recommendations to national authorities for issuing special permits for ocean dumping of low level radioactive wastes. This paper presents a status report of immersion operations of low-level radioactive waste and the current studies the IAEA is undertaking on behalf of the LDC

  18. Design and operation of radioactive waste incineration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide safety guidance for the design and operation of radioactive waste incineration facilities. The guide emphasizes the design objectives and system requirements to be met and provides recommendations for the procedure of process selection and equipment design and operation. It is recognized that some incinerators may handle only very low or 'insignificant' levels of radioactivity, and in such cases some requirements or recommendations of this guide may not fully apply. Nevertheless, it is expected that any non-compliance with the guide will be addressed and justified in the licensing process. It is also recognized that the regulatory body may place a limit on the level of the radioactivity of the waste to be incinerated at a specific installation. For the purpose of this guide an insignificant level of release of radioactivity may typically be defined as either the continuous or single event release of the design basis radionuclide inventory that represents a negligible risk to the population, the operating personnel, and/or the environment. The guidance on what constitutes a negligible risk and how to translate negligible risk or dose into level of activity can be found in Safety Series No. 89, IAEA, Vienna. 20 refs, 1 fig

  19. Security in transport, storage and disposal of radioactive materials, providing to the department of nuclear medicine in hospitals Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia, San Juan de Dios and Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizondo Valle, Alejandro; Jimenez Mendez, Christian; Leiton Araya, Christopher; Villalobos Rodriguez, Geovanny; Leal Vega, Olga Maritza; Lopez Gatjens, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    The security is analysed for the transport and storage of radioactive sources and the management of radioactive waste product of practices and interventions in nuclear medicine services in hospitals Calderon Guardia, San Juan de Dios and Mexico. The objective is to assess the compliance with current regulations, the effectiveness and efficiency of the same. The security and compliance with current regulations were considered related to the transport of radioactive sources by the two private companies that provide this service, from the Juan Santamaria airport customs to three hospitals evaluated. Compliance with national and international rules on storage of radioactive sources and waste materials were analyzed. For this has been studied Costa Rican law and the recommendations of international organizations related to the subject matter, in the three nuclear medicine services valued. The national and international background related to radiological accidents occurred with radioactive sources during transport, storage and waste were revised, where highlights that in most cases, these accidents occurred for breach of the regulations established. Studies in Costa Rica on radioactive waste management were analysed, and the current status of nuclear medicine services in terms of radiation safety, which helped with the investigation. The compliance and regulations were analyzed by the result of observation and interviews during development, to finally make a series of findings and provide recommendations that are considered relevant. Various variants and indicators that are defined in the theoretical framework were used; also, the strategy of methodology is described. The purpose of the work has been to provide a scientific nature, and that methodology met the objectives, offering an approach from different angles and the actors involved, and a critical and objective analysis strictly in order to contribute to public health. The research is a valuable tool that provides

  20. Dark matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark. That is, not only is the night sky dark, but also most of the matter and the energy in the universe is dark. For every atom visible in planets, stars and galaxies today there exists at least five or six times as much 'Dark Matter' in the universe. Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious but pervasive dark matter, which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe. Dark energy remains even more elusive, as we lack candidate fields that emerge from well established physics. I will describe various attempts to measure dark matter by direct and indirect means, and discuss the prospects for progress in unravelling dark energy.

  1. Dirac matter

    CERN Document Server

    Rivasseau, Vincent; Fuchs, Jean-Nöel

    2017-01-01

    This fifteenth volume of the Poincare Seminar Series, Dirac Matter, describes the surprising resurgence, as a low-energy effective theory of conducting electrons in many condensed matter systems, including graphene and topological insulators, of the famous equation originally invented by P.A.M. Dirac for relativistic quantum mechanics. In five highly pedagogical articles, as befits their origin in lectures to a broad scientific audience, this book explains why Dirac matters. Highlights include the detailed "Graphene and Relativistic Quantum Physics", written by the experimental pioneer, Philip Kim, and devoted to graphene, a form of carbon crystallized in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, from its discovery in 2004-2005 by the future Nobel prize winners Kostya Novoselov and Andre Geim to the so-called relativistic quantum Hall effect; the review entitled "Dirac Fermions in Condensed Matter and Beyond", written by two prominent theoreticians, Mark Goerbig and Gilles Montambaux, who consider many other mater...

  2. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matagi, Yoshihiko; Takahara, Akira; Ootsuka, Katsuyuki.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid the reduction in the atmospheric insulation by preventing the generation of CO 2 , H 2 O, etc. upon irradiation of microwave heat. Method: Radioactive wastes are charged into a hopper, supplied on a conveyor, fed each by a predetermined amount to a microwave furnace and heated by microwaves applied from a microwave guide. Simultaneously, inert gases are supplied from a supply line. The Radioactive wastes to be treated are shielded by the inert gases to prevent the combustion of decomposed gases produced from the wastes upon irradiation of microwave heat to thereby prevent the generation of CO 2 , H 2 , etc., as well as the generated decomposed gases are diluted with the inert gases to decrease the dissociation of the decomposed gases to prevent the reduction in the atmospheric insulation. Since the spent inert gases can be recovered for reuse, the amount of gaseous wastes released to the atmosphere can be decreased and the working life of the high performance air filters can be extended. (Sekiya, K.)

  3. Filters for radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshiba, Yukihiko; Kawashima, Akio

    1980-01-01

    In the crud generated in the reactor cooling water for nuclear power plants, iron oxides (hematite and magnetite) are contained as the main components, and also Co, Mn, Fe, Cr exist as radioactive nuclides. A new filter to separate these cruds, nuclepore membrane filter (NPMF), was investigated for its adaptability, and has been adopted as a practical filter for radioactive liquid wastes. The NPMF has such features as the possibility of complete automation of operation, no generation of secondary wastes, and easy maintenance, because the NPMF has uniform circular holes in poly-carbonate thin films, and shows the properties of stable filtering of particulates, capability of back washing, and others. The elements mounted in a practical system have such construction that the membrane is cut in the form of doughnut, and sandwiched with 100 mesh polyester nets (spacer); the obtained unit filter (cassette) is mounted on the stackable plate of the same size; and 80 pieces of this cassette are formed in a filter of 4 m 2 filtering area. The performance varies with the properties of suspended matters and the turbidity of wastes. For example, the filtered liquid of 0.1 ppm or less can be obtained when the 1 μm filter material is used to treat the liquid waste containing 1 to 100 ppm suspended matters. Usually back washed water is produced by about 1/100 of treated liquid wastes. The lifetime of the membrane is expected to be 1 or 2 years if crud is the main component. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Guided labworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lærke Bang

    For the last 40 years physics education research has shown poor learning outcomes of guided labs. Still this is found to be a very used teaching method in the upper secodary schools. This study explains the teacher's choice of guided labs throught the concept of redesign as obstacle dislodgement...

  5. Physics with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.; Tanihata, I.

    1992-01-01

    Recently developed facilities allow a wide range of new investigations of the reactions and properties of short-lived nuclei. These studies may help to solve puzzles of nuclear structure and the Big Bang. The purpose of nuclear physics is to measure properties of specific nuclides and infer from them global properties common to all nuclides. One goal, for example, is to understand nuclear sizes and matter distributions in terms of basic nuclear forces. Another is to understand the variation throughout the periodic table of the dominant quantum states, which are known as the open-quotes nuclear shell modelclose quotes states and are characterized, much as are atomic states, by a principal quantum number and by orbital and total angular momentum quantum numbers. In turn other nuclear phenomena, such as the collective excitations known as giant resonances, can be understood in terms of the shell-model configurations and basic nuclear parameters. Radioactive nuclear beam studies of reactions of short-lived nuclides have already yielded results with important ramifications in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Nuclear physicists expect unstable nuclides to exhibit unusual structures or features that may test their understanding of known nuclear phenomena at extreme conditions, and perhaps even to reveal previously unknown nuclear phenomena, Astrophysicists, for their part, have known for several decades that processes in both Big Bang nucleosynthesis and stellar nucleosynthesis involve short-lived nuclides. Indeed, the original motivation for developing radioactive nuclear beams was astrophysical. 25 refs., 7 figs

  6. Physics with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.

    1995-01-01

    Recently developed facilities allow a wide range of new investigations of the reactions and properties of short-lived nuclei. These studies may help to solve puzzles of nuclear structure and the Big Bang. The purpose of nuclear physics is to measure properties of specific nuclides and infer from them global properties common to all nuclides, for example, is to understand nuclear sizes and matter distributions in terms of basic nuclear forces. Another is to understand the variation throughout the periodic table of the dominant quantum states, which are known as the open-quotes nuclear shell model close quotes states and are characterized, much as are atomic states, by a principal quantum number and by orbital and total angular momentum quantum numbers. In turn other nuclear phenomena, such as the collective excitations known as giant resonances, can be understood in terms of the shell-model configurations and basic nuclear parameters. Radioactive nuclear beam studies of reactions of short-lived nuclides have already yielded results with important ramifications in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Nuclear physicists expect unstable nuclides to exhibit unusual structures or features that may test their understanding of known nuclear phenomena at extreme conditions, and perhaps even to reveal previously unknown nuclear phenomena, Astrophysicists, for their part, have known for several decades that processes in both Big Bang nucleosynthesis and stellar nucleosynthesis involve short-lived nuclides. Indeed, the original motivation for developing radioactive nuclear beams was astrophysical. (author). 25 refs., 7 figs

  7. Security of radioactive sources in radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    Safety codes and safety standards are formulated on the basis of internationally accepted safety criteria for design, construction and operation of specific equipment, systems, structures and components of nuclear and radiation facilities. Safety codes establish the objectives and set requirements that shall be fulfilled to provide adequate assurance for safety. Safety guides and guidelines elaborate various requirements and furnish approaches for their implementation. Safety manuals deal with specific topics and contain detailed scientific and technical information on the subject. These documents are prepared by experts in the relevant fields and are extensively reviewed by advisory committees of the Board before they are published. The documents are revised when necessary, in the light of experience and feedback from users as well as new developments in the field. In India, radiation sources are being widely used for societal benefits in industry, medical practices, research, training and agriculture. It has been reported from all over the world that unsecured radioactive sources caused serious radiological accidents involving radiation injuries and fatalities. Particular concern was expressed regarding radioactive sources that have become orphaned (not under regulatory control) or vulnerable (under weak regulatory control and about to be orphaned). There is a concern about safety and security of radioactive sources and hence the need of stringent regulatory control over the handling of the sources and their security. In view of this, this guide is prepared which gives provisions necessary to safeguard radiation installations against theft of radioactive sources and other malevolent acts that may result in radiological consequences. It is, therefore, required that the radiation sources are used safely and managed securely by only authorised personnel. This guide is intended to be used by users of radiation sources in developing the necessary security plan for

  8. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  9. Radioactive waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  10. Radioactivity in cigaratte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Tanker, E.; Aksu, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Cigaratte is known to be hazardous to health due to nicotine and tar it contains.This is indicated on cigaratte packets by health warnings.However there is less known hazard of smoking due to intake of radioactive compounds by inhalation. This study dwells upon the radioactive hazard of smoking

  11. Transport of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This address overviews the following aspects: concepts on transport of radioactive materials, quantities used to limit the transport, packages, types of packages, labeling, index transport calculation, tags, labeling, vehicle's requirements and documents required to authorize transportation. These requirements are considered in the regulation of transport of radioactive material that is in drafting step

  12. Management of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokosa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Radioactive Wastes is to protect workers and the public from the radiological risk associated with radioactive waste for the present and future. It application of the principles to the management of waste generated in a radioisotope uses in the industry. Any material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or radioactivity levels greater than ‘exempt quantities’ established by the competent regulatory authorities and for which no further use is foreseen or intended. Origin of the Radioactive Waste includes Uranium and Thorium mining and milling, nuclear fuel cycle operations, Operation of Nuclear power station, Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and Institutional uses of isotopes. There are types of radioactive waste: Low-level Waste (LLW) and High-level Waste. The Management Options for Radioactive Waste Depends on Form, Activity, Concentration and half-lives of the radioactive waste, Storage and disposal methods will vary according to the following; the radionuclides present, and their concentration, and radio toxicity. The contamination results basically from: Contact between radioactive materials and any surface especially during handling. And it may occur in the solid, liquid or gas state. Decontamination is any process that will either reduce or completely remove the amount of radionuclides from a contaminated surface

  13. Induced radioactivity at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A description of some of the problems and some of the advantages associated with the phenomenon of induced radioactivity at accelerator centres such as CERN. The author has worked in this field for several years and has recently written a book 'Induced Radioactivity' published by North-Holland.

  14. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  15. Radioactive waste management policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    The speaker discusses the development of government policy regarding radioactive waste disposal in Canada, indicates overall policy objectives, and surveys the actual situation with respect to radioactive wastes in Canada. He also looks at the public perceptions of the waste management situation and how they relate to the views of governmental decision makers

  16. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  17. K. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is a controversial and emotive subject. This report discusses radioactivity hazards which arise from each stage of the fuel cycle and then relates these hazards to the New Zealand situation. There are three appendices, two of which are detailed considerations of a paper by Dr. B.L.Cohen

  18. Radioactive krypton gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive krypton is separated from a gas mixture comprising nitrogen and traces of carbon dioxide and radioactive krypton by selective adsorption and then cryogenic distillation of the prepurified gas against nitrogen liquid to produce krypton bottoms concentrate liquid, using the nitrogen gas from the distillation for two step purging of the adsorbent. 16 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures

  19. Objectives for radioactive waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    The report falls under the headings: introduction; the nature of radioactive wastes; how to manage radioactive wastes; packaging of radioactive wastes (supervised storage; disposal); waste form evaluation and test requirements (supervised storage; disposal); conclusions. (U.K.)

  20. Radioactive Iodine Treatment for Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism Fact Sheet Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism April, 2012 Download PDFs English Zulu ... prepare for RAI or surgery. How does radioactive iodine treatment work? Iodine is important for making thyroid ...

  1. Completion of the radioactive materials packaging handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.

    1998-01-01

    'The Radioactive Materials Packaging Handbook: Design, Operation and Maintenance', which will serve as a replacement for the 'Cask Designers Guide'(1970), has now been completed and submitted to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) electronics publishing group for layout and printing; it is scheduled to be printed in late spring 1998. The Handbook, written by experts in their particular fields, is a compilation of technical chapters that address the design aspects of a package intended for transporting radioactive material in normal commerce; it was prepared under the direction of M. E. Wangler of the US DOE and is intended to provide a wealth of technical guidance that will give designers a better understanding of the regulatory approval process, preferences of regulators on specific aspects of package design, and the types of analyses that should be considered when designing a package to carry radioactive materials. Even though the Handbook is concerned with both small and large packagings, most of the emphasis is placed on large packagings that are capable of transporting fissile, radioactive sources (e.g. spent fuels). The safety analysis reports for packagings (SARPs) must address the widest range of technical topics in order to meet United States and/or international regulations, all of which are covered in the Handbook. One of the primary goals of the Handbook is to provide information which would guide designers of radioactive materials packages to make decisions that would most likely be acceptable to regulatory agencies during the approval process of the packaging. It was therefore important to find those authors who not only were experts in one or more of the areas that are addressed in a SARP, but who also had been exposed to the regulatory process or had operational experience dealing with a wide variety of package types. Twenty-five such people have contributed their time and talents to the development of this document, mostly on a volunteer basis

  2. Radioactivity and wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, V.H.; Horrill, A.D.; Livens, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    The official assumption is that if levels of radioactivity are safe for humans, they are safe for wildlife too. NCC sponsored a research project by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology to find out what was known in this field. It appears that the assumption is justified to a certain extent in that mammals are identified as the organisms most vulnerable to the damaging effects of radioactivity. Other general principles are put forward: where there are radioactive discharges to the marine environment, coastal muds and saltmarshes can be particularly contaminated; upland habitats, with low nutrient status and subject to high rainfall, are likely to accumulate radioactivity from atmospheric discharges (e.g. Chernobyl, the wildlife effects of which are reported here). The document concludes that no deleterious effects of radioactivity on wild plants and animals have been detected in the UK, but acknowledges that there are still many gaps in our knowledge of the behaviour of radioisotopes in the natural environment. (UK)

  3. Radioactive wastes. Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many documents (journal articles, book chapters, non-conventional documents..) deal with radioactive wastes but very often this topic is covered in a partial way and sometimes the data presented are contradictory. The aim of this article is to precise the definition of radioactive wastes and the proper terms to describe this topic. It describes the main guidelines of the management of radioactive wastes, in particular in France, and presents the problems raised by this activity: 1 - goal and stakes of the management; 2 - definition of a radioactive waste; 3 - radionuclides encountered; 4 - radio-toxicity and radiation risks; 5 - French actors of waste production and management; 6 - French classification and management principles; 7 - wastes origin and characteristics; 8 - status of radioactive wastes in France per categories; 9 - management practices; 10 - packages conditioning and fabrication; 11 - storage of wastes; 12 - the French law from December 30, 1991 and the opportunities of new ways of management; 13 - international situation. (J.S.)

  4. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  5. Environmental radioactive monitoring, evaluation and protection in luminous workshops of a factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Hanbin; Xiang Ming; Tan Jianzu

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent technique is often used to display instrumental indicator in the dark environment. Luminous workshops of a factory smear and depict the glassware by means of fluorescent power with adulterated radioactive matter. Because of adulterated radioactive matters such as 226 Ra, 40 K emit alpha-ray,beta-ray and gamma-ray, while they decay spontaneously, and high dose or cumulative radiation can damage human body in different degrees. Therefore, any radioactive damage to human body caused by over-safety dose should be prevented strictly during the working. To ensure health and safety of working staff in luminous workshop and the public, it is necessary to regularly have radioactive monitoring and evaluation to luminous workshop and its surrounding environment. Through the environment radioactive monitoring, the authors analyze its environmental radioactive level,and try to find out the possible problems so as to propose some protective measures for personal health. (authors)

  6. Method of storing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Toshio; Hiratake, Susumu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the radiation doses externally irradiated from treated radioactive waste and also reduce the separation of radioactive nuclide due to external environmental factors such as air, water or the like. Method: Radioactive waste adhered with radioactive nuclide to solid material is molten to mix and submerge the radioactive nuclide adhered to the surface of the solid material into molten material. Then, the radioactive nuclide thus mixed is solidified to store the waste in solidified state. (Aizawa, K.)

  7. Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Adopted: February 2010 Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials Everything we encounter in our daily lives contains some radioactive material, ...

  8. User's manual and guide to SALT3 and SALT4: two-dimensional computer codes for analysis of test-scale underground excavations for the disposal of radioactive waste in bedded salt deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, E.N.; St John, C.M.; Hart, R.D.

    1984-02-01

    SALT3 and SALT4 are two-dimensional analytical/displacement-discontinuity codes designed to evaluate temperatures, deformation, and stresses associated with underground disposal of radioactive waste in bedded salt. These codes were developed by the University of Minnesota for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation in 1979. The present documentation describes the mathematical equations of the physical system being modeled, the numerical techniques utilized, and the organization of these computer codes. The SALT3 and SALT4 codes can simulate: (a) viscoelastic behavior in pillars adjacent to excavations; (b) transversely isotropic elastic moduli such as those exhibited by bedded or stratified rock; and (c) excavation sequence. Major advantages of these codes are: (a) computational efficiency; (b) the small amount of input data required; and (c) a creep law based on laboratory experimental data for salt. The main disadvantage is that some of the assumptions in the formulation of the codes, i.e., the homogeneous elastic half-space and temperature-independent material properties, render it unsuitable for canister-scale analysis or analysis of lateral deformation of the pillars. The SALT3 and SALT4 codes can be used for parameter sensitivity analyses of two-dimensional, repository-scale, thermomechanical response in bedded salt during the excavation, operational, and post-closure phases. It is especially useful in evaluating alternative patterns and sequences of excavation or waste canister placement. SALT3 is a refinement of an earlier code, SALT, and includes a fully anelastic creep model and thermal stress routine. SALT4 is a later version, and incorporates a revised creep model which is strain-hardening

  9. HBR guides

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Nancy; Dillon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Master your most pressing professional challenges with this seven-volume set that collects the smartest best practices from leading experts all in one place. "HBR Guide to Better Business Writing" and "HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations" help you perfect your communication skills; "HBR Guide to Managing Up and Across" and "HBR Guide to Office Politics" show you how to build the best professional relationships; "HBR Guide to Finance Basics for Managers" is the one book you'll ever need to teach you about the numbers; "HBR Guide to Project Management" addresses tough questions such as how to manage stakeholder expectations and how to manage uncertainty in a complex project; and "HBR Guide to Getting the Right Work Done" goes beyond basic productivity tips to teach you how to prioritize and focus on your work. This specially priced set of the most popular books in the series makes a perfect gift for aspiring leaders looking for trusted advice. Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from ...

  10. White matter tract recovery following medial temporal lobectomy and selective amygdalohippocampectomy for tumor resection via a ROVOT-m port-guided technique: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikant S. Chakravarthi

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a temporal lobectomy and amygdalohippocampectomy using a port technique, in particular, one that demonstrates recovery of the critical (ILF and uncinate fasciculus subcortical white matter tracts. The combination of real-time, rapid, geometrically accurate 3D-planning of white matter tracts is imperative, especially in conjunction with minimally invasive approaches, thereby offering a new, safer perspective into the approach of temporal lobe lesions.

  11. Code of practice for the design of laboratories using radioactive substances for medical purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This Code has been prepared to supplement the radioactive substances acts and regulations implemented in Australia. It is intended as a guide to safe practices but is not legislation. Areas covered include siting, layout, surface finishes, laboratory furniture and fittings, ventilation, containment and release of airborne effluent and storage of radioactive substances

  12. From the discovery of radioactivity to the production of radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimbot, R.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of the projectiles used to explore the nucleus influenced strongly the development of Nuclear Physics. The alpha particles from radioactivity were the projectiles mostly used up to the second world war. This period was marked by fundamental discoveries, as those of artificial radioactivity and of fission. From the 1930's to 1070, light accelerated particles (electrons, protons, deuterons, isotopes of helium) became universally used. A third period began in the 1960's with the emergence of heavy ion accelerators, the use of which led to a true revolution in the study of nuclear matter. Finally, the fourth period started in 1985 when the first secondary beams of radioactive nuclei were produced, and opened new ways in physics. (authors)

  13. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  14. Neutronic measurements of radioactive waste; Les mesures neutroniques des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perot, B

    1997-12-31

    This document presents the general matters involved in the radioactive waste management and the different non destructive assays of radioactivity. The neutronic measurements used in the characterization of waste drums containing emitters are described with more details, especially the active neutronic interrogation assays with prompt or delayed neutron detection: physical principle, signal processing and evaluation of the detection limit. (author).

  15. Radiological Risk Assessment and Survey of Radioactive Contamination for Foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.; Lee, C.W.; Choi, K.S.

    2007-11-01

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, a radiological dose assessment and a survey of a radioactive contamination for foodstuffs have been investigated by many countries such as EU, Japan, USA. In the case of Japan which is similar to our country for the imported regions of foodstuffs, there were some instances of the excess for regulation on the maximum permitted levels of radioactive contamination among some imported foodstuffs. Concerns about the radioactive contamination of foodstuffs are increased because of the recently special situation (Nuclear test of North Korea). The purpose of this study is a radiological dose assessment and a survey of a radioactive contamination for foodstuffs in order to reduce the probability of intake of contaminated foodstuffs. Analytical results of the collected samples are below MDA. In this project, the model of radiological dose assessment via the food chain was also developed and radiological dose assessment was conducted based on surveys results of a radioactive contamination for foodstuffs in the Korean open markets since 2002. The results of radiological dose assessment are far below international reference level. It shows that public radiation exposure via food chain is well controlled within the international guide level. However, the radioactive contamination research of imported foodstuffs should be continuous considering the special situation(nuclear test of North Korea). These results are used to manage the radioactive contamination of the imported foodstuffs and also amend the regulation on the maximum permitted levels of radioactive contamination of foodstuffs

  16. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomek, D.

    1980-01-01

    The prospects of nuclear power development in the USA up to 2000 and the problems of the fuel cycle high-level radioactive waste processing and storage are considered. The problems of liquid and solidified radioactive waste transportation and their disposal in salt deposits and other geologic formations are discussed. It is pointed out that the main part of the high-level radioactive wastes are produced at spent fuel reprocessing plants in the form of complex aqueous mixtures. These mixtures contain the decay products of about 35 isotopes which are the nuclear fuel fission products, about 18 actinides and their daughter products as well as corrosion products of fuel cans and structural materials and chemical reagents added in the process of fuel reprocessing. The high-level radioactive waste management includes the liquid waste cooling which is necessary for the short and middle living isotope decay, separation of some most dangerous components from the waste mixture, waste solidification, their storage and disposal. The conclusion is drawn that the seccessful solution of the high-level radioactive waste management problem will permit to solve the problem of the fuel cycle radioactive waste management as a whole. The salt deposits, shales and clays are the most suitable for radioactive waste disposal [ru

  17. Radioactive Waste in Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Large volumes of hazardous wastes are produced each year, however only a small proportion of them are radioactive. While disposal options for hazardous wastes are generally well established, some types of hazardous waste face issues similar to those for radioactive waste and also require long-term disposal arrangements. The objective of this NEA study is to put the management of radioactive waste into perspective, firstly by contrasting features of radioactive and hazardous wastes, together with their management policies and strategies, and secondly by examining the specific case of the wastes resulting from carbon capture and storage of fossil fuels. The study seeks to give policy makers and interested stakeholders a broad overview of the similarities and differences between radioactive and hazardous wastes and their management strategies. Contents: - Foreword; - Key Points for Policy Makers; - Executive Summary; - Introduction; - Theme 1 - Radioactive and Hazardous Wastes in Perspective; - Theme 2 - The Outlook for Wastes Arising from Coal and from Nuclear Power Generation; - Risk, Perceived Risk and Public Attitudes; - Concluding Discussion and Lessons Learnt; - Strategic Issues for Radioactive Waste; - Strategic Issues for Hazardous Waste; - Case Studies - The Management of Coal Ash, CO 2 and Mercury as Wastes; - Risk and Perceived Risk; - List of Participants; - List of Abbreviations. (authors)

  18. Management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes is perhaps the most controversial and least understood aspect of the use of nuclear materials in generating electrical power, the investigation of biochemical processes through tracer kinetics, and the diagnosis and treatment of disease. In the siting of nuclear power facilities, the disposal of radioactive wastes is invariably posed as the ultimate unanswerable question. In the fall of 1979, biochemical and physiologic research employing radioactive tracers was threatened with a slowdown resulting from temporary closure of sites for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). Radioactive pharmaceuticals used extensively for diagnosis and treatment of human disease have increased dramatically in price, partly as a result of the escalating cost of disposing of radioactive wastes created during production of the labeled pharmaceuticals. These problems have resulted in identification of the disposal of LLW as the most pressing issue in the entire scheme of management of hazardous wastes. How this issue as well as the separate issue of disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) are being addressed at both national and state levels is the subject of this chapter

  19. Looks Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt; Wong, Bang

    2012-01-01

    We’ve all done it—spent hours getting a figure just right for a paper, presenta- tion, or grant application. We use tried and true compositions, standard depic- tions, and intuitive colors and then think to ourselves, this is how you do it. Or is it? A new guide by Felice C. Frankel and Angela H....... DePace, Visual Strategies, eases the process of data presentation and enhances its effectiveness. If you seek inspiration and practical advice on how to craft more useful scientific graphics, this guide might be what you are looking for....

  20. Medication Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Where the Money Goes Have ...

  1. Determination of standards for transportation of radioactive material by aircrafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    These provisions are established on the basis of the Enforcement Regulation for the Law on Aviation. Terms are explained, such as exclusive loading and containers. Spontaneously ignitable liquid radioactive materials and the radioactive substances required to be contained in special vessels and others particularly operated during the transport, are excluded from the radioactive materials permissible for transport. The radioactive substances required to be transported as radioactive loadings don't include empty vessels used to contain radioactive materials and other things contaminated by such materials, when they conform to the prescriptions. The technical standards on radioactive loadings are defined, such as maximum radiation dose rate of 0.5 millirem per hour on the surface of L type loadings, 200 millirem per hour for A, and 1000 millirem per hour at the distance of 1 m for BM and BU types, respectively. Confirmation of the safeness of radioactive loadings may be made through the written documents prepared by the competent persons acknowledged by the Minister of Transport. The requisite of fissile loadings is that such loadings shall not reach critical state during the transport in the specified cases. Radioactive loadings or the containers with such loadings shall be loaded so that the safeness of such loadings is not injured by movement, overturn and fall during the transport. The maximum radiation dose rate of the containers with radioactive loadings shall not be more than 200 millirem per hour on the surface. The written documents describing the handling method and other matters for attention and the measures to be taken on accidents shall be carried with for the transport of radioactive loadings. (Okada, K.)

  2. Quark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csernai, L.; Kampert, K. H.

    1994-10-15

    Precisely one decade ago the GSI (Darmstadt)/LBL (Berkeley) Collaboration at the Berkeley Bevalac reported clear evidence for collective sidewards flow in high energy heavy ion collisions. This milestone observation clearly displayed the compression and heating up of nuclear matter, providing new insights into how the behaviour of nuclear matter changes under very different conditions. This year, evidence for azimuthally asymmetric transverse flow at ten times higher projectile energy (11 GeV per nucleon gold on gold collisions) was presented by the Brookhaven E877 collaboration at the recent European Research Conference on ''Physics of High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions'', held in Helsinki from 17-22 June.

  3. Atmospheric natural radioactivity outdoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1985-01-01

    Following a short account of natural atmospheric radioactivity, radon concentrations are given as well as their variations with time obtained by means of a original apparatus developped in Brest. The radioactive equilibrium of radon and its daughters is then considered, many experiments demonstrating that equilibrium is seldom reached even for 218 Po (RaA). Finally, some characteristics of natural radioactive aerosols are studied: charge, particle size distribution (demonstrating they are fine aerosols since only 30 per cent are made of particles with radii exceeding 0,1 μm) [fr

  4. Predisposal Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of the importance of the safe management of radioactive waste means that, over the years, many well-established and effective techniques have been developed, and the nuclear industry and governments have gained considerable experience in this field. Minimization of waste is a fundamental principle underpinning the design and operation of all nuclear operations, together with waste reuse and recycling. For the remaining radioactive waste that will be produced, it is essential that there is a well defined plan (called a waste treatment path) to ensure the safe management and ultimately the safe disposal of radioactive waste so as to guarantee the sustainable long term deployment of nuclear technologies

  5. Radioactive waste (disposal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, P.

    1985-01-01

    The disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes was discussed. The following aspects were covered: public consultation on the principles for assessing disposal facilities; procedures for dealing with the possible sites which the Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive (NIREX) had originally identified; geological investigations to be carried out by NIREX to search for alternative sites; announcement that proposal for a site at Billingham is not to proceed further; NIREX membership; storage of radioactive wastes; public inquiries; social and environmental aspects; safety aspects; interest groups; public relations; government policies. (U.K.)

  6. Radioactivity; La radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  7. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, P.

    1978-01-01

    This article gives an outline of the present situation, from a Belgian standpoint, in the field of the radioactive wastes processing. It estimates the annual quantity of various radioactive waste produced per 1000 MW(e) PWR installed from the ore mining till reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The methods of treatment concentration, fixation, final storable forms for liquid and solid waste of low activity and for high level activity waste. The storage of radioactive waste and the plutonium-bearing waste treatement are also considered. The estimated quantity of wastes produced for 5450 MW(e) in Belgium and their destination are presented. (A.F.)

  8. Radioactive waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, J.-C.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of confining the radioactive wastes produced from the nuclear industry, after the ore concentration stage, is envisaged. These residues being not released into the environment are to be stored. The management policy consists in classifying them in view of adapting to each type of treatment, the suitable conditioning and storage. This classification is made with taking account of the following data: radioactivity (weak, medium or high) nature and lifetime of this radioactivity (transuranians) physical nature and volume. The principles retained are those of volume reduction and shaping into insoluble solids (vitrification) [fr

  9. Radioactivity of fish II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obo, F; Wakamatsu, C; Hiwatashi, Y; Tamari, T; Yoshitake, N; Tajima, D

    1955-01-01

    Various tissues of fish captured east of Formosa after the Bikini H-Bomb experiment had radioactivities (detected on May 27, 1954) in counts/min/ash from 5 g. fresh tissues: blood 2414, eyeball 49, heart muscle 111, white muscle 11, red muscle (chiai) 123, bone 46, skin 28, pancreas 131, liver 522, stomach muscle 106, stomach contents 52, spermatozoa 47, and spleen 504. High radioactivities in blood and blood synthesizing organs (liver and spleen) were emphasized. The radioactivity in the blood had a half-life of 34 to 35 days and the maximum energy of ..beta..-ray of approximate 0.4 m.e.v.

  10. Radioactive facilities classification criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briso C, H.A.; Riesle W, J.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate classification of radioactive facilities into groups of comparable risk constitutes one of the problems faced by most Regulatory Bodies. Regarding the radiological risk, the main facts to be considered are the radioactive inventory and the processes to which these radionuclides are subjected. Normally, operations are ruled by strict safety procedures. Thus, the total activity of the radionuclides existing in a given facility is the varying feature that defines its risk. In order to rely on a quantitative criterion and, considering that the Annual Limits of Intake are widely accepted references, an index based on these limits, to support decisions related to radioactive facilities, is proposed. (author)

  11. Radiation monitoring in the mining and milling of radioactive ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The present Guide is a revision of IAEA Safety Series No. 43. It explains the recommendations on administrative requirements for the organization of radiation protection in the mining and milling of radioactive ores, and the monitoring requirements, including methods, techniques, instrumentation and strategy. 146 refs, 9 figs, 14 tabs

  12. Radioactivity and Man Minicourse, Career Oriented Pre-Technical Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas Independent School District, TX.

    This instructional guide, intended for student use, develops the subject of radioactivity and man through a series of sequential activities. A technical development of the subject is pursued with examples stressing practical aspects of the concepts. Included in the minicourse are: (1) the rationale, (2) terminal behavioral objectives, (3) enabling…

  13. Procedures for picking up and receiving packages of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    This regulatory guide describes a method acceptable to the NRC staff for licensees to comply with the provisions in 10 CFR Part 20, section 20.205, with respect to arrangements for receipt, pickup, and monitoring of packages containing radioactive material and with respect to reporting of packages which, on receipt, show evidence of leakage or excessive radiation levels. (U.S.)

  14. Radioactive material in residues of health services residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa R, A. Jr.; Recio, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The work presents the operational actions developed by the one organ responsible regulator for the control of the material use radioactive in Brazil. Starting from the appearance of coming radioactive material of hospitals and clinical with services of nuclear medicine, material that that is picked up and transported in specific trucks for the gathering of residuals of hospital origin, and guided one it manufactures of treatment of residuals of services of health, where they suffer radiological monitoring before to guide them for final deposition in sanitary embankment, in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The appearance of this radioactive material exposes a possible one violation of the norms that govern the procedures and practices in that sector in the country. (Author)

  15. Artificial radioactive products in the atmosphere at Paris. [In French

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abribat, M; Pouradier, J; Venet, A M

    1952-01-01

    The radioactivity of solid matter in rain water and air collected near Paris in November 1951, and in April and May 1952, follows the same decay law as that observed for fission products after a nuclear detonation in Nevada in November 1951.

  16. [EDRP public local inquiry] radioactive waste management statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The statutory arrangements which will apply to the proposed EDRP at Dounreay in relation to radioactive waste management matters, and the principles against which it will be assessed, are described. Also included are some preliminary, provisional comments on the waste management implications of the outline application. (U.K.)

  17. Regulatory framework for the management of radioactive wastes in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amato, E.; Siraky, G.; Petraitis, E.; Novo, R.

    2000-01-01

    The legal and regulatory framework within which the radioactive waste management is carried out in Argentina are exposed. The activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) in relation to facility inspections, safety assessments and collaboration with international agencies in the matter are also presented. Further, the regulatory criteria applied to waste management are reported. (author)

  18. Sub-seabed burial of radioactive waste and liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, Patrick.

    1982-10-01

    The author of this report discusses the problems raised by application of the special third party liability system to damage which may result from embedding radioactive waste in the sub-seabed. The matter of general liability of the State for nuclear damage caused to the environment is also dealt with in this paper. (NEA) [fr

  19. Radioactive waste communication policy in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, V.

    1993-01-01

    ENRESA (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A.), is a State-owned company, founded in 1985 and is responsible for radioactive waste management in Spain. ENRESA's activities are developed following a General Radioactive Waste Plan approved by the Spanish Government. As in most countries, Spanish public opinion is concerned with the most activities related to radioactivity or rad-waste management due to different facts but mainly to a lack of information on the matter. This situation provides misuse of information on it by some politicians, green groups and media which increases distrust of public on responsible companies and institutions. To gain public acceptance, it would be necessary to develop long-term information policy, due to the fact that results in communication are reached in the long term. ENRESA is carrying out a Communication Plan (CP) which has been implemented in a continuous way with success around the area of the disposal site of low and intermediate level wastes as well as around an old uranium mill factory in which remedial actions are being implemented. The implantation of CP at a national level is being done stepwise. The more relevant issues related to the radioactive waste situation in Spain, as well as the communication actions are explained in this document

  20. Salinity, can be indicator for radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrascu, V.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactivity being within nature is an incontestable reality. Less than a century, man have diversified and intensified its presence, especially after nuclear weapons and peaceful use of fission power. Secondary, the risks of ionizing radiation effects on live matter have increased. The need of environmental radioactivity assessment and knowledge development in the field is and remains actually in follow time. The nuclear techniques are generally expensive and the radioanalytical methods are no so fast. Sometimes it is necessary to make the rapid and cheapest estimation, without to replace them. This is possible by finding of some accessible correlated parameters and easy to be analyzed. These parameters could indicate the availability of radionuclides in different ecosystems or the availability of ecosystems for different radionuclides. K-40 is a remarkable presence in marine natural radioactivity and plays an important role for euphotic and deep levels. As nutrient it can influence coastal ecosystems and its radiation power can be significant for microbiological processes. This present work analyzed the correlation between salinity and water K-40 radioactivity (beta, gamma) and proposes an empirical connection formula on the base of the good correlation that has been identified

  1. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As if this was not enough, it turns out that if our knowledge of ... are thought to contain dark matter, although the evidences from them are the .... protons, electrons, neutrons ... ratio of protons to neutrons was close to unity then as they were in ...

  2. Quantum matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, Hans Peter; Calcarco, Tommaso; Dressel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Artificial atoms and molecules, tailored from solids, fractional flux quanta, molecular magnets, controlled interaction in quantum gases, the theory of quantum correlations in mott matter, cold gases, and mesoscopic systems, Bose-Einstein condensates on the chip, on the route to the quantum computer, a quantum computer in diamond. (HSI)

  3. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  4. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  5. Interstellar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezger, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of the formation of our galaxy is presented followed by a summary of recent work in star formation and related topics. Selected discussions are given on interstellar matter including absorption characteristics of dust, the fully ionised component of the ISM and the energy density of lyc-photons in the solar neighbourhood and the diffuse galactic IR radiation

  6. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study of gas clouds orbiting in the outer regions of spiral galaxies has revealed that their gravitational at- traction is much larger than the stars alone can provide. Over the last twenty years, astronomers have been forced to postulate the presence of large quantities of 'dark matter' to explain their observations. They are ...

  7. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Radioactivity in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornaro, Laura

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this practical work is to familiarize the student with radioactivity measures in environmental samples. For that were chosen samples a salt of natural potassium, a salt of uranium or torio and a sample of drinkable water

  9. Radioactivity content of books

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalit, B.Y.; Shukla, V.K.; Ramachandran, T.V.

    1981-01-01

    The natural and fallout radioactivity was measured in a large number of books produced in various countries after 1955. Results of these measurements showed that the books contained radioactivity due to fallout 137 Cs and 226 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K radioisotopes of primordial origin. Books printed in the U.S.A. had low radioactivity of 40K and 226 Ra origin compared to books printed in the European subcontinent. Books printed during high fallout rate (1962-64) or thereafter did not exhibit any significantly higher 137 Cs levels. The maximum radiation dose to the eyes calculated for the radioactivity content of the books was 0.8 μR/hr and the minimum was 0.07 μR/hr; most of the books were in the range 0.3-0.5 μR/hr. (U.K.)

  10. Law of radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Legal device done in order to standardize and promote the exploration and explotation of radioactive minerals by peruvian and foreign investors. This device include the whole process, since the prospection until the development, after previous auction given by IPEN

  11. Radioactive contamination of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytil, I.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model is discussed describing radioactivity transport between the source and the organism. The model is to be applied in assessing the effect of a nuclear installation on the organism. Fortran and Pascal appear to be the most appropriate computer languages. With respect to internal memory requirements, the program file is estimated to consist of a control program and a number of subprograms. Upon setting the radioactivity transport and the output requirements the control program should recall the necessary subprograms. The program file should allow the complete data file and the solutions of all possible radioactivity transport variants to be inputted. It is envisaged that several subprograms will be available for one type of radioactivity transport, this depending on different accuracy of the transport description. Thus, the requirements for input data will also differ. (Z.M.)

  12. Radioactive labelling of insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thygesen, Th.

    Experiments are described with the internal contamination of insects with phosphorus 32 introduced previously in plants of the brassica type using three different techniques. The intake of radioactivity from the plants to the insects is shown. (L.O.)

  13. Radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, H.; Closs, K.D.; Kuhn, K.

    1981-01-01

    The solutions to the technical problem of the disposal of radioactive waste are limited by a) the state of knowledge of reprocessing possibilites, b) public acceptance of the use of those techniques which are known, c) legislative procedures linking licensing of new nuclear power plants to the solution of waste problems, and d) other political constraints. Wastes are generated in the mining and enriching of radioactive elements, and in the operation of nuclear power plants as well as in all fields where radioactive substances may be used. Waste management will depend on the stability and concentration of radioactive materials which must be stored, and a resolution of the tension between numerous small storage sites and a few large ones, which again face problems of public acceptability

  14. Miniature radioactive light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffarella, T.E.; Radda, G.J.; Dooley, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    A miniature radioactive light source for illuminating digital watches is described consisting of a glass tube with improved laser sealing and strength containing tritium gas and a transducer responsive to the gas. (U.K.)

  15. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  16. Radioactive pollution, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants into surface waters as well as the atmosphere is discussed. Man-rem data are compared and expected quantities for disposal by power plants in the Netherlands are tabulated

  17. Radioactive Material Containment Bags

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The audit was requested by Senator Joseph I. Lieberman based on allegations made by a contractor, Defense Apparel Services, about the Navy's actions on three contracts for radioactive material containment bags...

  18. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes)

  19. Radioactivity and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, R N [Fertilizer Association of India, New Delhi

    1977-12-01

    Power generation from radioisotopes is one of the major applications of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes and is in practice in over twenty countries including India. Other well-known applications of radioactive substances are in medicine, industry, scientific and industrial research programs, and nuclear weapons. The only serious disadvantage with the radioisotopes and their waste products is the constant release of radiation energy which contaminates the environment and endangers the life. An attempt has been made to identify the major sources of radioactivity in the environment and assess its potential impact on the environment. Recent developments in safety measures for prevention of contamination and control of radioactivity and in radioactive wastes management are also discussed.

  20. Classification of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. To simplify their management, a number of schemes have evolved for classifying radioactive waste according to the physical, chemical and radiological properties of significance to those facilities managing this waste. These schemes have led to a variety of terminologies, differing from country to country and even between facilities in the same country. This situation makes it difficult for those concerned to communicate with one another regarding waste management practices. This document revises and updates earlier IAEA references on radioactive waste classification systems given in IAEA Technical Reports Series and Safety Series. Guidance regarding exemption of materials from regulatory control is consistent with IAEA Safety Series and the RADWASS documents published under IAEA Safety Series. 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tab

  1. Internal radioactive contamination treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobajas, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    In a radiological emergency, the internal radioactive contamination becomes a therapeutic urgency and must be established as fast as possible. Just when a radioactive contamination accident occurs, it is difficult to know exactly the amount of radioactive materials absorbed and to estimate the dose received.. The decision to be taken after the incorporation of the radioactive material depends on the method and on the Radiological Protection Department collaboration. Any treatment achieving a reduction of the doses received or expected will be useful. The International Radiological Protection Commission doesn't recommend the use of the dose limit, to decide about the intervention necessity. However the LIA can be used as the reference point to establish the necessity and reach of the treatment. The object of the present work, is to introduce the general principles to carry out the internal people decontamination, under the last international recommendations. (Author) 4 refs

  2. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  3. Radioactivity of tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashawati, A.; Al-Dalal, Z.; Al-Akel, B.; Al-Masri, M. S.

    2002-04-01

    This report shows the results of studies related to radioactivity in tobacco and its pathways to human being. Tobacco contains high concentrations of natural radioactive materials especially polonium 210 and lead 210, which may reach a value of 27 mBq/g. The amount of polonium 210 in tobacco is related to the concentration of radon (the main source of polonium 210 in the agricultural areas) in addition to the over use of phosphate fertilizers for tobacco plantation. Radioactive materials present in tobacco enter the human body through smoking where 210 Po concentrates in the Alveolar lung; this may cause health risks including lung cancer. In addition, radiation doses due to smoking have been reported and some results of the studies carried out for radioactivity in tobacco at the Syrian Atomic Energy Commission. (author)

  4. Radioactive pollution in rainfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemtland, R.

    1985-01-01

    Routine measurements of radioactivity in rainfall are carried out at the National Institute for Radiation Hygiene, Norway. The report discusses why the method of ion exchange was selected and gives details on how the measurements are performed

  5. Radioactive gas solidification apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Eiji; Yabu, Tomohiko; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Handling of a solidification container from the completion for the solidifying processing to the storage of radioactive gases by a remote control equipment such as a manipulator requires a great cost and is difficult to realize. In a radioactive gas solidification device for injection and solidification in accumulated layers of sputtered metals by glow discharge, radiation shieldings are disposed surrounding the entire container, and cooling water is supplied to a cooling vessel formed between the container and the shielding materials. The shielding materials are divided into upper and lower shielding materials, so that solidification container can be taken out from the shielding materials. As a result, the solidification container after the solidification of radioactive gases can be handled with ease. Further, after-heat can be removed effectively from the ion injection electrode upon solidifying treatment upon storage, to attain a radioactive gas solidifying processing apparatus which is safe, economical and highly reliable. (N.H.)

  6. Transporting radioactive rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, G.

    1990-01-01

    The case is made for exempting geological specimens from the IAEA Regulations for Safer Transport of Radioactive Materials. It is pointed out that many mineral collectors in Devon and Cornwall may be unwittingly infringing these regulations by taking naturally radioactive rocks and specimens containing uranium ores. Even if these collectors are aware that these rocks are radioactive, and many are not, few have the necessary equipment to monitor the activity levels. If the transport regulations were to be enforced alarm could be generated and the regulations devalued in case of an accident. The danger from a spill of rock specimens is negligible compared with an accident involving industrial or medical radioactive substances yet would require similar special treatment. (UK)

  7. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Abdul Malik Syed Zain

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the basic subjects covered in the radioactive waste management. The subjects are policy and legislation, pre-treatment, classification, segregation, treatment, conditioning, storage, siting and disposal, and quality assurance

  8. Radioactivity of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terpakova, E.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the gamma-spectrometric determination of natural radioactivity in the different building materials and wares applied in Slovakia was performed. The specific activities for potassium-40, thorium, radium as well as the equivalent specific activities are presented

  9. Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S.; Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature

  10. An experiment on radioactive equilibrium and its modelling using the ‘radioactive dice’ approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santostasi, Davide; Malgieri, Massimiliano; Montagna, Paolo; Vitulo, Paolo

    2017-07-01

    In this article we describe an educational activity on radioactive equilibrium we performed with secondary school students (17-18 years old) in the context of a vocational guidance stage for talented students at the Department of Physics of the University of Pavia. Radioactive equilibrium is investigated experimentally by having students measure the activity of 214Bi from two different samples, obtained using different preparation procedures from an uraniferous rock. Students are guided in understanding the mathematical structure of radioactive equilibrium through a modelling activity in two parts. Before the lab measurements, a dice game, which extends the traditional ‘radioactive dice’ activity to the case of a chain of two decaying nuclides, is performed by students divided into small groups. At the end of the laboratory work, students design and run a simple spreadsheet simulation modelling the same basic radioactive chain with user defined decay constants. By setting the constants to realistic values corresponding to nuclides of the uranium decay chain, students can deepen their understanding of the meaning of the experimental data, and also explore the difference between cases of non-equilibrium, transient and secular equilibrium.

  11. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this Norm is to establish, relating to the TRANSPORT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS, safety and radiological protection requirements to ensure an adequate control level of the eventual exposure of persons, properties and environment to the ionizing radiation comprising: specifications on radioactive materials for transport; package type selection; specification of the package design and acceptance test requirements; arrangements relating to the transport itself; administrative requirements and responsibilities. (author)

  12. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book highlights the main issues of public concern related to radioactive waste management and puts them into perspective. It provides an overview of radioactive waste management covering, among other themes, policies, implementation and public communication based on national experiences. Its purpose is to assists in increasing the understanding of radioactive waste management issues by public and national authorities, organizations involved in radioactive waste management and the nuclear industry; it may also serve as a source book for those who communicate with the public. Even in the unlikely event that nuclear power does not further develop around the world, the necessity for dealing with nuclear waste from past usages, from uranium mining and milling, decontamination and decommissioning of existing nuclear facilities and from the uses of radioactive materials in medicine, industry and research would still exist. In many countries, radioactive waste management planning involves making effective institutional arrangements in which responsibilities and liabilities are well established for the technical operation and long term surveillance of disposal systems. Financing mechanisms are part of the arrangements. Continuous quality assurance and quality control, at all levels of radioactive waste management, are essential to ensure the required integrity of the system. As with any other human activity, improvements in technology and economics may be possible and secondary problems avoided. Improvements and confirmation of the efficiency of processes and reduction of uncertainties can only be achieved by continued active research, development and demonstration, which are the goals of many national programmes. International co-operation, also in the form of reviews, can contribute to increasing confidence in the ongoing work. The problem of radioactive wastes is not a unique one; it may be compared with other problems of toxic wastes resulting from many other

  13. Foodstuffs (radioactive contamination)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Donald; Taylor, Teddy; Campbell-Savours, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings are given of the debate in the UK House of Commons on the maximum permitted radioactivity levels for foodstuffs, feeding stuffs and drinking water in the case of abnormal levels of radioactivity or of a nuclear accident. The motion takes note of European Community Document no. 7183/87 and urges the Community to assure a common standard of health protection by adopting a rational set of scientifically based intervention levels for foodstuffs. (UK)

  14. Radiation and environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This book is written based on 25 years authors experience especially in scientifc research of radiation and environmental radioactivity field at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia). Interestingly, from the authors experience in managing the services and consultancies for radiological environmental monitoring, it is also helpful in preparing the ideas for this book. Although this book focuses on Malaysian radiation information environmental radioactivity, but the data collected by the international bodies are also included in this book.

  15. Environmental radioactivity Ispra 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1988-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1987 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  16. Radioactivity in fine papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, H.W.; Singh, B.

    1993-01-01

    The radioactivity of fine papers has been studied through γ-ray spectroscopy with an intrinsic Ge detector. Samples of paper from European and North American sources were found to contain very different amounts of 226 Ra and 232 Th. The processes which introduce radionuclides into paper are discussed. The radioactivity from fine papers makes only a small contribution to an individual's annual radiation dose; nevertheless it is easily detectable and perhaps, avoidable. (Author)

  17. Radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbi, B.

    1996-01-01

    The development of peaceful applications of nuclear energy results in the increase of transport operations of radioactive materials. Therefore strong regulations on transport of radioactive materials turns out to be a necessity in Tunisia. This report presents the different axes of regulations which include the means of transport involved, the radiation protection of the carriers, the technical criteria of security in transport, the emergency measures in case of accidents and penalties in case of infringement. (TEC). 12 refs., 1 fig

  18. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  19. Environmental radioactivity Ispra 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1990-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1989 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  20. Radioactive Substances Act 1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    This Act regulates the keeping and use of radioactive material and makes provision for the disposal and storage of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom. It provides for a licensing system for such activities and for exemptions therefrom, in particular as concerns the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. The Act repeals Section 4(5) of the Atomic Energy Authority Act, 1954 which made temporary provision for discharge of waste on or from premises occupied by the Authority. (NEA) [fr

  1. Radioactive aerosols. [In Russian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natanson, G L

    1956-01-01

    Tabulations are given presenting various published data on safe atmospheric concentrations of various radioactive and non-radioactive aerosols. Methods of determination of active aerosol concentrations and dispersion as well as the technical applications of labeled aerosols are discussed. The effect of atomic explosions are analyzed considering the nominal atomic bomb based on /sup 235/U and /sup 232/Pu equivalent to 20,000 tons of TNT.

  2. Radioactivity and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive wastes generated by nuclear activities must be reprocessed using specific treatments before packaging, storage and disposal. This digest paper gives first a classification of radioactive wastes according to their radionuclides content activity and half-life, and the amount of wastes from the different categories generated each year by the different industries. Then, the radiotoxicity of nuclear wastes is evaluated according to the reprocessing treatments used and to their environmental management (surface storage or burial). (J.S.)

  3. Radioactive certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Outline of radioactive certified reference materials (CRM) for the analysis of nuclear materials and radioactive nuclides were described. The nuclear fuel CRMs are supplied by the three institutes: NBL in the US, CETAMA in France and IRMM in Belgium. For the RI CRMs, the Japan Radioisotope Association is engaged in activities concerning supply. The natural-matrix CRMs for the analysis of trace levels of radio-nuclides are prepared and supplied by NIST in the US and the IAEA. (author)

  4. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy

  5. Strengthening the safety and security of radioactive sources worldwide: a perspective on Philippine contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Allan

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive sources have been used for many decades in a wide variety of applications in all countries. The safety of radioactive sources and the associated radiation protection have been implemented by national and international programs during this time with cooperation through the IAEA intended to achieve application of minimum standards and harmonization of approach. The security of radioactive sources is however relatively new consideration. A perspective on the Philippine contributions to the safety and security of radioactive sources will be provided with reference to the following: What is radioactive source security and why it is important?; International cooperation, including the IAEA Code of Conduct; Regulation for radioactive source security; Implementation of radioactive source security measures for licenses, operators and others; Impact of regulatory and operational matters such as professional development and training, emergency preparedness and response, and radiation protection. (author)

  6. Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouze, J.; Tran Thanh Van, J.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with the papers devoted to the experimental search of signatures of the dark matter which governs the evolution of the Universe as a whole. A series of contributions describe the presently considered experimental techniques (cryogenic detectors, supraconducting detectors...). A real dialogue concerning these techniques has been instaured between particle physicists and astrophysicists. After the progress report of the particle physicists, the book provides the reader with an updated situation concerning the research in cosmology. The second part of the book is devoted to the analysis of the backgrounds at different energies such as the possible role of the cooling flows in the constitution of massive galactic halos. Any search of dark matter implies necessarily the analysis of the spatial distributions of the large scale structures of the Universe. This report is followed by a series of statistical analyses of these distributions. These analyses concern mainly universes filled up with cold dark matter. The last paper of this third part concerns the search of clustering in the spatial distribution of QSOs. The presence of dark matter should affect the solar neighborhood and related to the existence of galactic haloes. The contributions are devoted to the search of such local dark matter. Primordial nucleosynthesis provides a very powerful tool to set up quite constraining limitations on the overall baryonic density. Even if on takes into account the inhomogeneities in density possibly induced by the Quark-Hadron transition, this baryonic density should be much lower than the overall density deduced from the dynamical models of Universe or the inflationary theories

  7. Proton radioactivity lifetimes using Skyrme interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routray, T.R.; Tripathy, S.K.; Mishra, Abhishek; Basu, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    The phenomena of proton radioactivity is recent and has been possible with the advent of the radioactive ion beams facilities. The neutron deficient nuclei lying above the proton drip line has positive Q values for protons and are spontaneous proton emitters. This limits the possibilities of the creation of ever more exotic nuclei in the proton rich side of the β stability valley. Limited number of works have been done in calculating the half lives of proton emitting nuclei using different models. But calculation of lifetimes of the proton emitting nuclei using Skyrme interaction has not yet been reported. More than 110 Skyrme sets are available, constructed for different purposes, all having the common feature of giving finite nuclei ground state properties and saturation conditions in nuclear matter. Skyrme sets constructed in the late 90's, particularly the construction of SLy sets and others Skyrme sets developed thereafter, have additional care in constraining the parameters for applications to nuclear matter under extreme conditions. Stone et al. have analyzed the Skyrme sets on the basis of available constraints and have sorted out finally 27 Skyrmes sets which can be admitted for calculation of isospin rich dense nuclear matter. The objective of the work is to examine the predictions of the Skyrme sets on the half lives of the proton emitters

  8. Radioactive wastes. Commune convention about the safety of spent fuel management and about the radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This common convention do not give detailed safety standards but general obligations whom objective is the development of a safety culture in the world. It concerns the spent fuels (valuable and valued by the reprocessing) and radioactive wastes (matter without any later use). (N.C.)

  9. Disposal of Radioactive Waste. Specific Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication establishes requirements applicable to all types of radioactive waste disposal facility. It is linked to the fundamental safety principles for each disposal option and establishes a set of strategic requirements that must be in place before facilities are developed. Consideration is also given to the safety of existing facilities developed prior to the establishment of present day standards. The requirements will be complemented by Safety Guides that will provide guidance on good practice for meeting the requirements for different types of waste disposal facility. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Safety requirements for planning for the disposal of radioactive waste; 4. Requirements for the development, operation and closure of a disposal facility; 5. Assurance of safety; 6. Existing disposal facilities; Appendices.

  10. Measurement and analysis of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Here are gathered the abstracts presented to the 3. summer university of the year 2001 whose main themes were the destructive (5 conferences) and nondestructive (8 conferences) analyses applied to nuclear industry. The points of view of different organisms (as DSIN: Directorate for the Safety of Nuclear Installations, IPSN: Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety, OPRI: Office of Protection against Ionizing Radiations, TUI: Institute for Transuranium Elements, COGEMA, EDF: Electric Utilities, ANDRA: French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management, CRLC Val d'Aurelle, France) concerning the needs involved in nuclear facilities control, the methods of radionuclide speciation in use internationally, the measurements and analyses of radioactive substances are given too as well as some general concepts concerning 1)the laser-matter interaction 2)the ions production 3)the quality applied to the measurements and analyses 4)the standard in activity metrology. (O.M.)

  11. Effects of radioactivity in the sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-04-15

    The Agency's regulatory work has proved even more important than was originally expected. It is clear that these activities must be continued for several years, as there are several fields not yet covered, and several which must be followed through by incorporation into international conventions or other administrative frameworks. Research in this field is to be conducted under a trilateral agreement between the International atomic Energy Agency, the Government of the Principality of Monaco and the Institute of Oceanography in Monaco. The program will have three major objectives. Firstly, it will be aimed at acquiring knowledge about the movement of water and marine organisms and the deposition of organic and inorganic matter. Secondly, there will be a special study of the distribution in marine organisms of radioactive materials already existing or that may be introduced into various locations. And thirdly, there will be a study of the effects of radioactive materials at various concentration levels on the marine ecology.

  12. The radioactive waste management in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacoste, A.C.; Bodenez, Ph.; Jacq, F.; Grevoz, A.; Bataille, Ch.; Birraux, C.; Vicent, C.; Locufier, A.; Bodenez, Ph.; Dupraz, B.; Leroy, D.; Granger, S.; Taniguchi, T.; Louvat, D.; Sene, M.; Sene, R.; Bonnemains, J.

    2005-01-01

    The actors involved in research will report on fourteen years work in their respective fields: ANDRA on its research on deep geological formation repositories and the Cea on its research into partitioning and transmutation, and packaging and long term storage, will submit their preliminary reports in June 2005. The debate surrounding high-level long-lived waste must not draw a veil over the existence of the other types of radioactive waste whose levels are much lower but representing volumes which are much greater. It is the reason why A.S.N. oversees the drafting of the National Plan for Radioactive Waste Management and recoverable Materials initiated two years ago by the Ministry for ecology and sustainable development following a request from O.P.E.C.S.T. (Parliament Office for Scientific and Technology Choices Assessment). The parliament has to decide on the matter within the deadline of 2006. (N.C.)

  13. Packaging of radioactive wastes for sea disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by the Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, known as the London Dumping Convention was adopted by an inter-governmental conference in London in 1972 and came into force in 1975. In 1977, the IAEA Board of Governors agreed that there is a continuing responsibility for the IAEA to contribute to the effectiveness of the London Dumping Conventions by providing guidance relevant to the various aspects of dumping radioactive wastes at sea. In the light of the above responsibilities, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee Meeting from 3 to 7 December 1979 to assess the current situation concerning the requirements and the practices of packaging radioactive wastes for dumping at sea with a view to providing further guidance on this subject. The present report summarizes the results of this meeting

  14. Low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, T [Radioactive Waste Management Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1980-08-01

    In the development and utilization of nuclear energy, variety of radioactive wastes arise. A largest part is low level radioactive wastes. In Japan, they are concentrated and solidified, and stored in drums. However, no low level wastes have yet been finally disposed of; there are now about 260,000 drums of such wastes stored on the sites. In Japan, the land is narrow, and its structure is geologically unstable, so that the sea disposal is sought. On the other hand, the development of technology for the ground disposal has lagged behind the sea disposal until recently because of the law concerned. The following matters are described: for the sea disposal, preparatory technology studies, environment safety assessment, administrative measures, and international control; for the ground disposal, experiments, surveys, disposal site selection, and the concept of island repositories.

  15. Safety Assessment for the Decommissioning of Facilities Using Radioactive Material. Safety Guide (Spanish Edition); Evaluacion de la seguridad para la clausura de instalaciones que utilizan materiales radiactivos. Guia De Seguridad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to establish safety standards to protect health and minimize danger to life and property - standards which the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which a State can apply by means of its regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. A comprehensive body of safety standards under regular review, together with the IAEA's assistance in their application, has become a key element in a global safety regime. In the mid-1990s, a major overhaul of the IAEA's safety standards programme was initiated, with a revised oversight committee structure and a systematic approach to updating the entire corpus of standards. The new standards that have resulted are of a high calibre and reflect best practices in Member States. With the assistance of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its safety standards. Safety standards are only effective, however, if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services - which range in scope from engineering safety, operational safety, and radiation, transport and waste safety to regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations - assist Member States in applying the standards and appraise their effectiveness. These safety services enable valuable insights to be shared and I continue to urge all Member States to make use of them. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety is a national responsibility, and many Member States have decided to adopt the IAEA's safety standards for use in their national regulations. For the Contracting Parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions. The standards are also applied by designers, manufacturers and operators around the world to enhance nuclear and radiation safety in power generation, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education

  16. Schedules of Provisions of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (2005 Ed.). Safety Guide (Spanish Edition); Listas de disposiciones del reglamento del OIEA para el transporte seguro de materiales radiactivos (Edicion de 2005 corregida)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to establish safety standards to protect health and minimize danger to life and property - standards which the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which a State can apply by means of its regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. A comprehensive body of safety standards under regular review, together with the IAEA's assistance in their application, has become a key element in a global safety regime. In the mid-1990s, a major overhaul of the IAEA's safety standards programme was initiated, with a revised oversight committee structure and a systematic approach to updating the entire corpus of standards. The new standards that have resulted are of a high calibre and reflect best practices in Member States. With the assistance of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its safety standards. Safety standards are only effective, however, if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services - which range in scope from engineering safety, operational safety, and radiation, transport and waste safety to regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations - assist Member States in applying the standards and appraise their effectiveness. These safety services enable valuable insights to be shared and I continue to urge all Member States to make use of them. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety is a national responsibility, and many Member States have decided to adopt the IAEA's safety standards for use in their national regulations. For the contracting parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions. The standards are also applied by designers, manufacturers and operators around the world to enhance nuclear and radiation safety in power generation, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education

  17. Disposal Of Waste Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Seung Mu

    1989-02-01

    This book deals with disposal of waste matter management of soiled waste matter in city with introduction, definition of waste matter, meaning of management of waste matter, management system of waste matter, current condition in the country, collect and transportation of waste matter disposal liquid waste matter, industrial waste matter like plastic, waste gas sludge, pulp and sulfuric acid, recycling technology of waste matter such as recycling system of Black clawson, Monroe and Rome.

  18. Radiological protection. Radioactivity and health. 4. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsch, P.; Feinendegen, L.; Paschke, M.; Feldmann, A.

    1991-12-01

    The brochure tries to make understandable also for nonprofessionals the conncetion between radioactivity and health. After briefly discussing the foundations of radioactivity, radiation emanating from radioactive materials, and the terms of dose, it deals with natural and man-made exposure of man in the age of industry. Its effects on man are thoroughly considered with regard to possible health injuries and genotype changes. The explanation of radioecological correlations, from radioactive effluents from nuclear installations to the determination of radiation exposure of man, takes into account effluents during normal operation and effluents caused by accidents, giving as an example the Chernobyl reactor accident. It is supplemented by describing the risks involved in the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. Subsequent chapters reflect the results obtained in many years of research into questions of radiation hazards, and they are to contribute to a matter-of-fact information about this important area. A comprehensive bibliography facilitates access to specialized literature. (orig.) [de

  19. The basics in transportation of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, W.E.

    1998-06-01

    This bulletin gives a basic understanding about issues and safety standards that are built into the transportation system for radioactive material and waste in the US. An excellent safety record has been established for the transport of commercial low-level radioactive waste, or for that matter, all radioactive materials. This excellent safety record is primarily because of people adhering to strict regulations governing the transportation of radioactive materials. This bulletin discusses the regulatory framework as well as the regulations that set the standards for packaging, hazard communications (communicating the potential hazard to workers and the public), training, inspections, routing, and emergency response. The excellent safety record is discussed in the last section of the bulletin

  20. Competent authority regulatory control of the transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this guide is to assist competent authorities in regulating the transport of radioactive materials and to assist users of transport regulations in their interactions with competent authorities. The guide should assist specifically those countries which are establishing their regulatory framework and further assist countries with established procedures to harmonize their application and implementation of the IAEA Regulations. This guide specifically covers various aspects of the competent authority implementation of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. In addition, physical protection and safeguards control of the transport of nuclear materials as well as third party liability aspects are briefly discussed. This is because they have to be taken into account in overall transport regulatory activities, especially when establishing the regulatory framework

  1. Review and assessment of nuclear facilities by the regulatory body. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for regulatory bodies on reviewing and assessing the various safety related submissions made by the operator of a nuclear facility at different stages (siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning or closure) in the facility's lifetime to determine whether the facility complies with the applicable safety objectives and requirements. This Safety Guide covers the review and assessment of submissions in relation to the safety of nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants. Nuclear power plants. Other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies. Spent fuel reprocessing plants. And facilities for radioactive waste management, such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This Safety Guide also covers issues relating to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation. Objectives, management, planning and organizational matters relating to the review and assessment process are presented in Section 2. Section 3 deals with the bases for decision making and conduct of the review and assessment process. Section 4 covers aspects relating to the assessment of this process. The Appendix provides a generic list of topics to be covered in the review and assessment process

  2. Review and assessment of nuclear facilities by the regulatory body. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for regulatory bodies on reviewing and assessing the various safety related submissions made by the operator of a nuclear facility at different stages (siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning or closure) in the facility's lifetime to determine whether the facility complies with the applicable safety objectives and requirements. This Safety Guide covers the review and assessment of submissions in relation to the safety of nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants. Nuclear power plants. Other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies. Spent fuel reprocessing plants. And facilities for radioactive waste management, such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This Safety Guide also covers issues relating to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation. Objectives, management, planning and organizational matters relating to the review and assessment process are presented in Section 2. Section 3 deals with the bases for decision making and conduct of the review and assessment process. Section 4 covers aspects relating to the assessment of this process. The Appendix provides a generic list of topics to be covered in the review and assessment process

  3. Regulatory inspection of nuclear facilities and enforcement by the regulatory body. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for regulatory bodies on the inspection of nuclear facilities, regulatory enforcement and related matters. The objective is to provide the regulatory body with a high level of confidence that operators have the processes in place to ensure compliance and that they do comply with legal requirements, including meeting the safety objectives and requirements of the regulatory body. However, in the event of non-compliance, the regulatory body should take appropriate enforcement action. This Safety Guide covers regulatory inspection and enforcement in relation to nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants; nuclear power plants; other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies; spent fuel reprocessing plants; and facilities for radioactive waste management, such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This Safety Guide also covers issues relating to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation. Section 2 sets out the objectives of regulatory inspection and enforcement. Section 3 covers the management of regulatory inspections. Section 4 covers the performance of regulatory inspections, including internal guidance, planning and preparation, methods of inspection and reports of inspections. Section 5 deals with regulatory enforcement actions. Section 6 covers the assessment of regulatory inspections and enforcement activities. The Appendix provides further details on inspection areas for nuclear facilities

  4. Guide device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, C.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel handling guide tube centering device for use in nuclear reactors during fuel assembly handling operations. The device comprises an outer ring secured to the flange of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, a rotatable table rotatably coupled to the outer ring, and a plurality of openings through the table. Truncated locating cones are positioned in each of the openings in the table, and the locating cones center the guide tube during fuel handling operations. The openings in the table are located such that each fuel assembly in the nuclear core may be aligned with one of the openings by a suitable rotation of the table. The locating cones thereby provide alignment between the fuel handling mechanism located in the guide tube and the individual fuel assemblies of the cone. The need for a device to provide alignment is especially critical for floating nuclear power plants, where wave motion may exist during fuel handling operations. 5 claims, 4 figures

  5. The ORPHEUS dark matter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abplanalp, M.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Kainer, K.U.; Knoop, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    A progress report of the ORPHEUS dark matter experiment in the Bern Underground Laboratory is presented. A description of the ORPHEUS detector and its sensitivity to WIMPs is given. The detector will consist of 1 to 2 kg Sn granules operating in a magnetic field of approximately 320 G and at a temperature of 50 mK. In the first phase, the detector will be read out by conventional pickup coils, followed by a second phase with SQUID loops. Preliminary results on background and radioactivity measurements are shown. (orig.)

  6. Quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.; Kampert, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    Precisely one decade ago the GSI (Darmstadt)/LBL (Berkeley) Collaboration at the Berkeley Bevalac reported clear evidence for collective sidewards flow in high energy heavy ion collisions. This milestone observation clearly displayed the compression and heating up of nuclear matter, providing new insights into how the behaviour of nuclear matter changes under very different conditions. This year, evidence for azimuthally asymmetric transverse flow at ten times higher projectile energy (11 GeV per nucleon gold on gold collisions) was presented by the Brookhaven E877 collaboration at the recent European Research Conference on ''Physics of High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions'', held in Helsinki from 17-22 June

  7. Inventory of radioactive material entering the marine environment: Sea disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    Variable amounts of packaged low level radioactive waste have been disposed at more than 50 sites in the northern parts of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The last known disposal operation was in 1982, at a site about 550 km off the European continental shelf in the Atlantic Ocean. Since 1957, the IAEA has provided specific guidance and recommendations for ensuring that disposal of radioactive wastes into the sea will not result in unacceptable hazards to human health and marine organisms, damage to amenities or interference with other legitimate uses of the sea. In 1972, the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter designated the IAEA as the competent international authority in matters related to sea disposal of radioactive waste. The Contracting Parties requested the IAEA to develop an inventory of radioactive wastes entering the marine environment from all sources as an information base with which the impact of radioactive materials from disposal operations can be more adequately assessed. The continuous compilation of these data could ensure that the IAEA recommendations on the disposal rate in a single basin are not overstepped. The inventory shows that between 1946 to 1982 an estimated 46 PBq 1 (1.24 MCi) of radioactive waste coming from research, medicine, the nuclear industry and military activities were packaged, usually in metal drums lined with a concrete or bitumen matrix, and disposed of at sea. This inventory includes some unpackaged wastes and liquid wastes which were disposed of from 1950 to 1960. Beta-gamma emitters represent more than 98% of the total radioactivity of the waste and tritium alone represents one third of the total radioactivity disposed at the North East Atlantic sites. The other beta-gamma emitters radionuclides include 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 55 Fe, 58 Co, 60 Co, 125 I and 14 C. The wastes also contain low quantities of alpha-emitting nuclides with plutonium and americium isotopes representing

  8. Radioactive waste disposal via electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that space transportation is a feasible method of removal of radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The high decay heat of the isotopes powers a thermionic generator which provides electrical power for ion thrust engines. The massive shields (used to protect ground and flight personnel) are removed in orbit for subsequent reuse; the metallic fuel provides a shield for the avionics that guides the orbital stage to solar system escape. Performance calculations indicate that 4000 kg. of actinides may be removed per Shuttle flight. Subsidiary problems - such as cooling during ascent - are discussed.

  9. Experimental and numerical study of the degradation of radioactive measurements in the filters of airborne radioactive surveillance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geryes, Tony

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of radioactivity in the filters of airborne radioactive surveillance systems is a major metrology difficulty due to the fact that the absorption of a radiation in the filter media and the mass of aerosols accumulated distort the nuclear counting response. This thesis focuses on the determination of correction factors for the radioactivity loss in the survey filters. In a first step, radioactive filters representing the atmospheric samples have been prepared using the nuclear test bench ICARE. The experimental study on reference filters provided a database to determine correction factors for various filtration conditions. The second part proposes a new numerical method developed to determine the correction factors. It consists of coupling GeoDict for particles filtration simulations and MCNPX simulations for a transport in matter. The good agreement obtained by comparing the numerical and experimental correction factors has permitted to validate the numerical model

  10. Dumping of solid packaged radioactivity in the deep oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, Wm. O.; Van As, D.

    1980-01-01

    With the increasing use of nuclear energy, the quantity of radioactive wastes which are generated is also increasing. Their treatment and disposal is causing a concern in further development of nuclear energy. World's oceans are considered as a possible location for these wastes. A convention on the prevention of marine pollution caused by dumping of wastes and other matter into oceans was adopted at the Intergovernmental Conference held at London in November 1972. The convention prohibits dumping of high-level radioactive wastes in the oceans and has entrusted the IAEA the tasks of defining the high level radioactive wastes and providing recommendations for the issue of special permits for dumping of the radioactive materials which do not fall into the category of high-level wastes. A provisional definition and recommendations formulated by the IAEA and adopted by contractin.o. parties in 1976 are outlined. On the basis of an oceanographic model developed by Shepherd (1976) and considered to be the best available, a revised definition and revised recommendations were formulated. Their salient features are mentioned. The key parameters for specific site assessments are mentioned. The Nuclear Energy Agency also formulated guidelines on sea-disposal packages for radioactive wastes in 1974 and revised them in 1978. Finally it is noted that criteria have not been established for dumping of non-radioactive wastes in the ocean, though such criteria are contained in the IAEA recommendations in case of radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  11. The regulatory actions in the management of disuse radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, W.A.; Cordoba, M.F.; Poletti, M.; Calabria, M.A.; Pirez, C.

    2010-01-01

    During the last years, different incidents related to the discovery of inadvertent radioactive material have been reported through the international information systems available. From the analysis of the information received it can be concluded that those situations are derived from the inadequate application of concepts such as 'safety culture' and 'risk perception' or inadequate physical safety measures towards radioactive sources by the licensee. Among the activities that the regulators perform during the use of radioactive material, the most important are the ones related to avoiding the existence of disused radioactive sources. In this regard, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) has implemented, through its Standards, regulatory mechanisms to adequately control and dispose of radioactive material. Concerning this matter, actions were taken in Argentina with the aim of disposing or keeping the custody in an authorized long term storage of every radioactive source used to measure thickness, humidity, level, weight, etc. that remained within the facilities without use and/or a suitable program to be reutilized within a period larger than six months. The objective of the present piece of work is to present the analysis and results of the actions fulfilled between 2002 and 2009, giving details about the regulatory activities performed in relation to the disposal and withdrawal of radioactive sources and the physical safety measures taken. (authors) [es

  12. Research of high energy radioactivity identification detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Kyun; Lee, Yong Bum; Hwang, Jong Sun; Choi, Seok Ki

    1998-07-01

    {Delta} {Epsilon}-{Epsilon} telescope high radioactivity detector was designed, fabricated, and tested at the 35 MeV proton energy. We developed the computer code to calculate the energy loss of projectile ions in the matter. Using the code, we designed and fabricated a detector to measure 15-50 MeV protons. The detector was successfully tested to measure the energy of protons and deuterons and to identify the ions. In future, we would like to extend the present result to the development of a higher energy proton detector and a heavy ion detector. (author). 10 refs., 3 tabs., 14 figs

  13. Management and storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussat, A.

    1995-01-01

    Management of radioactive waste is a matter of public concern. Such management, however, is today handled industrially in France, and when these techniques are well applied, its is possible to create storage centres. Waste having a short half-life is now stored in the Centre de l'Aube, which replaces the one begun in 1969 in the Department de la Manche. For waste with a long half-life, following the law passed in 1991, ANDRA is pursuing its programme of site prospecting to establish two underground laboratories for studying geological storage. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. Hydrogeochemical radioactive features and prospecting in granopegmatite type uranium ore district in Danfeng area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhangsheng

    2011-01-01

    Hydrochemical radioactive prospecting plays an important role in the all stages of grano-pegmatite type uranium deposit exploration in Danfeng area dut to its fast, simple, economic and high effective advantage. Radioactive anomalous halo in the shallow underground water has identical distribution scopes with the ore-bearing biotite granite-pegmatite, which can be used to delineate uranium ore-forming prospective area, reconnaissance area and detailed prospecting area. Deep underground water close to the ore is characterized by hydrogeochemical radioactive features with high uranium and radon content. Through prospecting engineering of radioactive hydrogeochemical, the situation of blind ore bodies can be used to guide the layout. (authors)

  15. Preclosure Safety Analysis Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.D. Orvis

    2003-01-01

    A preclosure safety analysis (PSA) is a required element of the License Application (LA) for the high- level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This guide provides analysts and other Yucca Mountain Repository Project (the Project) personnel with standardized methods for developing and documenting the PSA. The definition of the PSA is provided in 10 CFR 63.2, while more specific requirements for the PSA are provided in 10 CFR 63.112, as described in Sections 1.2 and 2. The PSA requirements described in 10 CFR Part 63 were developed as risk-informed performance-based regulations. These requirements must be met for the LA. The PSA addresses the safety of the Geologic Repository Operations Area (GROA) for the preclosure period (the time up to permanent closure) in accordance with the radiological performance objectives of 10 CFR 63.111. Performance objectives for the repository after permanent closure (described in 10 CFR 63.113) are not mentioned in the requirements for the PSA and they are not considered in this guide. The LA will be comprised of two phases: the LA for construction authorization (CA) and the LA amendment to receive and possess (R and P) high-level radioactive waste (HLW). PSA methods must support the safety analyses that will be based on the differing degrees of design detail in the two phases. The methods described herein combine elements of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and deterministic analyses that comprise a risk-informed performance-based safety analysis. This revision to the PSA guide was prepared for the following objectives: (1) To correct factual and typographical errors. (2) To provide additional material suggested from reviews by the Project, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staffs. (3) To update material in accordance with approaches and/or strategies adopted by the Project. In addition, a principal objective for the planned revision was to ensure that the methods and

  16. Nuclear plant refurbishment calls for patience. [Construction of radioactive effluent plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henly, Anna

    1989-08-01

    All nuclear power plants produce a small quantity of liquid effluent from wash hand basins, showers and surface drains on the site. The effluent is termed low-level radioactive waste and under the 'Radioactive Substances Act' can be discharged into estuaries or the sea. Before a controlled discharge can be made the effluent has to be chemically treated and have any radioactive particulate matter removed. The replacing of the radioactive effluent plant at the Berkeley nuclear power station in the United Kingdom is described, with particular reference to the vigorous safety standards and quality assurance programme operated by the Central Electricity Generating Board. (author).

  17. Summary of the Law relating to Atomic Energy and Radioactive Subtances as at March 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, D.F.; Ritchie, K.J.S.

    1979-01-01

    This Note contains summaries of new laws and regulations on atomic energy and radioactive substances and amendments made to previous ones in the United Kingdom as at March 1979, including international regulations and agreements. New materials referred to includes the Nuclear Installations (Excepted Matter) Regulations 1978, the Medicines (Radioactive Substances) Order 1978, the Medicines (Committee on Radiation from Radioactive Medicinal Products) Order 1978 and the Medicines (Administration of Radioactive Substances) Regulations 1978. The Note also reproduces other amendments in nuclear legislation, already referred to in a previous Note dated March 1978. (NEA) [fr

  18. Radioactivity in food crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for 137 Cs, 40 K, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for 241 Am, 7 Be, 60 Co, 55 Fe, 3 H, 131 I, 54 Mn, 95 Nb, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 228 Th, 232 Th, and 95 Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g -1 (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins

  19. The ''invisible'' radioactive scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.; Ramsoey, T.

    1999-04-01

    Production and up-concentration of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in the petroleum industry has attracted steadily increasing attention during the last 15 years. Most production engineers today associate this radioactivity with precipitates (scales) and sludges in production tubing, pumps, valves, separators, settling tanks etc., wherever water is being transported or treated. 226 Ra and 228 Ra are the most well known radioactive constituents in scale. Surprisingly little known is the radioactive contamination by 210 Pb and progeny 210 Bi and 210 Po. These are found in combination with 226 Ra in ordinary scale, often in layer of non-radioactive metallic lead in water transportation systems, but also in pure gas and condensate handling systems ''unsupported'' by 226 Ra, but due to transportation and decay of the noble gas 222 Rn in NG/LNG. This latter contamination may be rather thin, in some cases virtually invisible. When, in addition, the radiation energies are low enough for not being detectable on the equipment outer surface, its existence has for most people in the industry been a secret. The report discusses transportation and deposition mechanisms, detection methods and provides some examples of measured results from the North Sea on equipment sent for maintenance. It is concluded that a regular measurement program for this type of contamination should be mandatory under all dismantling processes of transportation and fluid handling equipment for fluids and gases offshore and onshore

  20. Management on radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, K.; Bhatia, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    The basic philosophy governing the radioactive waste management activities in India is to concentrate and contain as much activity as possible and to discharge to the environment only such of these streams that have radioactive content much below the nationally and internationally accepted standards. The concept of ''Zero Release'' is also kept in view. At Tarapur, the effluents are discharged into coastal waters after the radioactivity of the effluents is brought down by a factor 100. The effluents fΩm Rajasthan reactors are discharged into a lake keeping their radioactivity well within permissible limits and a solar evaporation plant is being set up. The plant, when it becomes operational, will be a step towards the concept of ''Zero Release''. At Kalpakkam, the treated wastes are proposed to be diluted by circulating sea water and discharged away from the shore through a long pipe. At Narora, ion exchange followed by chemical precipitation is to be employed to treat effluents and solar evaporation process for total containment. Solid wastes are stored/dispsed in the concrete trenches, underground with the water proofing of external surfaces and the top of the trench is covered with concrete. Highly active wastes are stored/disposed in tile holes which are vaults made of steel-lined, reinforced concrete pipes. Gas cleaning, dilution and dispersion techniques are adopted to treat gaseous radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  1. Radioactivity in food crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  2. Bottom loaded filter for radioactive liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendland, W.G.

    1980-01-01

    A specification is given for a bottom loaded filter assembly for filtering radioactive liquids through a replaceable cartridge filter, which includes a lead-filled jacket enveloping a housing having a chamber therein for the filter cartridge. A track arrangement carries a hatch for sealing the chamber. A spacer plug supports the cartridge within guide means associated with the inlet conduit in the chamber. The plug and cartridge drop out of the chamber when the hatch is unbolted and moved laterally of the chamber along the track. During cartridge replacement a new plug and cartridge are supported in the guide means by a spacer bar inserted across the track means under the chamber. The hatch is then slid under the chamber and bolted to a flange on the housing, engaging an O-ring to seal the chamber. (author)

  3. Bottom loaded filter for radioactive liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendland, W.G.

    1980-01-01

    A bottom loaded filter assembly for filtering radioactive liquids through a replaceable cartridge filter is disclosed. The filter assembly includes a lead-filled jacket enveloping a housing having a chamber therein for the filter cartridge. A track arrangement carries a hatch for sealing the chamber. A spacer plug supports the cartridge within guide means associated with the inlet conduit in the chamber. The plug and cartridge drop out of the chamber when the hatch is unbolted and move laterally of the chamber. During cartridge replacement, a new plug and cartridge are supported in the guide means by a spacer bar inserted across the track means under the chamber. The hatch is then slid under the chamber and bolted to the vessel, engaging an o-ring to seal the chamber

  4. Homebuyer's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindt, Roger P.; Harris, Jack

    Designed to assist prospective buyers in making such important decisions as whether to buy a new or older home and within what price range, the guide provides information on the purchase process. Discussion of the purchase process covers the life-cycle costs (recurring homeownership costs that must be met every month); selection of a home;…

  5. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The norm which establishes the requirements of radiation protection and safety related to the transport of radioactive materials, aiming to keep a suitable control level of eventual exposure of personnels, materials and environment of ionizing radiation, including: specifications on radioactive materials for transport, selection of package type; specification of requirements of the design and assays of acceptance of packages; disposal related to the transport; and liability and administrative requirements, are presented. This norm is applied to: truckage, water carriage and air service; design, fabrication, assays and mantenaince of packages; preparation, despatching, handling, loading storage in transition and reception in the ultimate storage of packages; and transport of void packages which have been contained radioactive materials. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste

  7. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtiss, D.H.; Heacock, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a process for treating radioactive waste whereby a mud of radioactive waste and cementing material is formed in a mixer. This mud is then transferred from the mixer to a storage and transport container where it is allowed to harden. To improve transport efficiency an alkali silicate or an alkaline-earth metal silicate is added to the mud. For one hundred parts by weight of radioactive waste in the mud, twenty to one hundred parts by weight of cementing material are added and five to fifty parts by weight of silicate, the amount of waste in the mud exceeding the combined amount of cementing and silicate material [fr

  8. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  9. Radioactivity - superstition and science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinsch, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    Fairy-tales, myths, superstition - how was it fair, when we could still be afraid for witches and goblins. Where demons floated and nicks danced, the dry science has spreaded and disenchanted the life. If there would not be things like radioactivity, against which can be struggled in the collective well being. Then it is bad, clear, or good, it heals sicks, also clear. But what is now correct? In his usual humorous way the author, Dr. Hermann Hinsch, explains by means of numerous examples the phenomenon ''radioactivity'' and its effects on life. Provocantly but illustratively he illuminates, which position radioactive radiation has in our life and how and where we have already met it wantedly or unwantedly. Perhaps we must then something less shudder, but something more realism at such theme is surely not harmful.

  10. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  11. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  12. Radioactive waste processing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Minoru.

    1993-01-01

    Storing space for radioactive wastes (storage tunnels) are formed underground of the sea bottom along coast. A plurality of boreholes through which sea water flows are pored vertically in a direction intersecting underground streams of brine in the ground between the tunnels and seaside. Sea water introduction pipes are joined to the upper side walls of the boreholes. The sea water introduction pipes have introduction ports protruded under the sea level of the coastal sea area region. Since sea water flows from the introduction ports to the boreholes passing through the sea water introduction pipes, sea water is always filled in the boreholes. Therefore, brine is sufficiently supplied toward the land by sea water from the boreholes, the underground stream of brine is negligibly small. This can prevent radioactive contamination due to flow of the underground water when radioactive wastes are buried in the underground near coast. (I.N.)

  13. Disposal of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This Safety Requirements publication applies to the disposal of radioactive waste of all types by means of emplacement in designed disposal facilities, subject to the necessary limitations and controls being placed on the disposal of the waste and on the development, operation and closure of facilities. The classification of radioactive waste is discussed. This Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements to provide assurance of the radiation safety of the disposal of radioactive waste, in the operation of a disposal facility and especially after its closure. The fundamental safety objective is to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. This is achieved by setting requirements on the site selection and evaluation and design of a disposal facility, and on its construction, operation and closure, including organizational and regulatory requirements.

  14. Reloadable radioactive generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombetti, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    A generator system that can be reloaded with an elutable radioactive material, such as 99 molybdenum, a multiple number of times is described. The system basically comprises a column filled with alumina, a loading vial containing a predetermined amount of the elutable radioactive material, and a rinsing vial containing a sterile solution. The two vials are connected by a conduit so that when communication is achieved between the column and loading vial and an evacuated vial is placed in communication with the bottom of the column, the predetermined amount of the radioactive material in the loading vial will be transferred to the column. The procedure can be repeated as the elutable material in the column is dissipated

  15. Radioactive waste removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To cleanup primary coolants for LMFBR type reactors by magnetically generating a high speed rotational flow in the flow of liquid metal, and adsorbing radioactive corrosion products and fission products onto capturing material of a complicated shape. Constitution: Three-phase AC coils for generating a rotational magnetic field are provided to the outside of a container through which liquid sodium is passed to thereby generate a high speed rotational stream in the liquid sodium flowing into the container. A radioactive substance capturing material made of a metal plate such as of nickel and stainless steel in the corrugated shape with shape edges is secured within a flow channel. Magnetic field at a great slope is generated in the flow channel by the capturing material to adsorb radioactive corrosion products and fission products present in the liquid sodium onto the capturing material and removing therefrom. This enables to capture the ferri-magnetic impurities by adsorption. (Moriyama, K.)

  16. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  17. Radioactivity leakage monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Takuichiro; Noguchi, Noboru.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a device for detecting the leakage ratio of a primary coolant by utilizing the variation in the radioactivity concentration in a reactor container when the coolant is leaked. Constitution: A measurement signal is produced from a radioactivity measuring instrument, and is continuously input to a malfunction discriminator. The discriminator inputs a measurement signal to a concentration variation discriminator when the malfunction is recognized and simultaneously inputs a measurement starting time from the inputting time to a concentration measuring instrument. On the other hand, reactor water radioactivity concentration data obtained by sampling the primary coolant is input to a concentration variation computing device. A comparator obtains the ratio of the measurement signal from the measuring instrument and the computed data signal from the computing device at the same time and hence the leakage rate, indicates the average leakage rate by averaging the leakage rate signals and also indicates the total leakage amount. (Yoshihara, H.)

  18. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous sources of ionizing radiation can lead to human exposure: natural sources, nuclear explosions, nuclear power generation, use of radiation in medical, industrial and research purposes, and radiation emitting consumer products. Before assessing the radiation dose to a population one requires a precise knowledge of the activity of a number of radionuclides. The basis for the assessment of the dose to a population from a release of radioactivity to the environment, the estimation of the potential clinical heath effects due to the dose received and, ultimately, the implementation of countermeasures to protect the population, is the measurement of radioactive contamination in the environment after the release. It is the purpose of this book to present the facts about the presence of radionuclides in the environment, natural and man made. There is no aspect of radioactivity, which has marked the passing century, not mentioned or discussed in this book. refs

  19. Trapping radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning

  20. Handling of radioactive sources in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the following aspects: sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, radiation detectors, personnel and area monitoring, surface pollution, radioactive wastes control and radioactive sources transferring. (The author)