WorldWideScience

Sample records for radioactive lanthanum processing

  1. Lanthanum chromite colloidal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setz, Luiz Fernando Grespan

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanum chromite (LaCrO 3 ) is currently the most studied material for applications such as solid oxide fuel cell inter connector (HTSOFC). The complexity of microstructures and geometries of HTSOFC devices, require a precise control of processing parameters to get the desired combination of properties and this, the use of techniques involving concentrated ceramic slips conformation are appropriate, therefore, is well controlled, assist in obtaining homogeneous parts, reproductive and complex geometries. Thus, studies involving the surface chemistry, the stability conditions and slips flow behaviour in the forming conditions, provide important elements for processes control in the inter connectors manufacture, where more applied settings have slots and channels for the gases passage. Thus, surface chemistry, stability and rheological behaviour of strontium and cobalt doped LaCrO 3 (La) 0.80 Sr 0. 2 0 Cr 0.92 Co 0.08 O 3 ) slips prepared with ethanol and water, were studied. The doped lanthanum chromite was produced by combustion synthesis in the IPEN/SP labs. The influence of parameters: pH (water), dispersant concentration, homogenization times and conditions, solid concentration, different ratios binder:plasticizer in the stability and the flow behavior of ceramic suspensions prepared were evaluated. The La) 0.80 Sr 0. 2 0 Cr 0.92 Co 0.08 O 3 products obtained by casting aqueous slips in a plaster mould, using alkaline pH and anionic polyelectrolyte and tapes obtained by using ethanol as a dispersant medium, after sintering at 1600 degree C/4 hours presented theoretical density > 94%, suitable for use as HTSOFC inter connector. (author)

  2. Method of producing a solution of radioactive lanthanum-140 from radioactive barium-140 in an isotope generator and installation to carry out the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, K.; Jacobs, G.; Sauerwein, K.

    1979-01-01

    A method of separating radioactive lanthanum-140 from radioactive Ba-140 is proposed. The lanthanum-140 will be washed out of a sulphate precipitate and separated from Ba-140-sulphate by a granular filter mass of CaSO 4 and BaSO 4 . Details of the process are given. (UWI) [de

  3. Process for obtaining cobalt and lanthanum nickelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapcov, V.; Samusi, N.; Gulea, A.; Horosun, I.; Stasiuc, V.; Petrenco, P.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to the process for obtaining polycrystalline ceramics of cobalt and lanthanum nickelate with the perovskite structure from coordinative hetero metallic compounds. The obtained products can be utilized in the industry in the capacity of catalysts. Summary of the invention consists in obtaining polycrystalline ceramics LaCoO 3 and LaNiO 3 with the perovskite structure by pyrolysis of the parent compounds, namely, the coordinative hetero metallic compounds of the lanthanum cobalt or lanthanum nickel. The pyrolysis of the parent compound runs during one hour at 800 C. The technical result of the invention consists in lowering the temperature of the parent compound pyrolysis containing the precise ratio of metals necessary for ceramics obtaining

  4. Analyzing relation between the radioactivity in lanthanum products and the origins of RE chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Rongsheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the relation between the radioactivity in Lanthanum products and the origins of RE Chlorides. Methods: Using JY-38 plus sequential ICP spectrometer to examine the content of the uranium in the RE Chlorides. Using FJ-2603 low background alpha, beta measurement apparatus to measure total alpha and total beta activities of Lanthanum products. Results: The content of the uranium in the RE Chlorides is much lower in Baotou's than Hunan's. The radioactivity in Lanthanum products are made from the RE Chlorides of Baotou is much lower than that in Hunan's too. The radioactivity in Lanthanum products depends on the origins of RE Chlorides. Conclusion: The basic data were provided for radioactivity in Lanthanum products which are made from RE Chlorides of different places of China. The mathematical model was founded for the reasonable use of resource RE Chlorides

  5. Lanthanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels of phosphate in the blood can cause bone problems. Lanthanum is in a clsas of medications ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  6. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed

  7. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow

  8. Lanthanum chromite colloidal processing; Processamento coloidal de cromito de lantanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setz, Luiz Fernando Grespan

    2009-07-01

    Lanthanum chromite (LaCrO{sub 3}) is currently the most studied material for applications such as solid oxide fuel cell inter connector (HTSOFC). The complexity of microstructures and geometries of HTSOFC devices, require a precise control of processing parameters to get the desired combination of properties and this, the use of techniques involving concentrated ceramic slips conformation are appropriate, therefore, is well controlled, assist in obtaining homogeneous parts, reproductive and complex geometries. Thus, studies involving the surface chemistry, the stability conditions and slips flow behaviour in the forming conditions, provide important elements for processes control in the inter connectors manufacture, where more applied settings have slots and channels for the gases passage. Thus, surface chemistry, stability and rheological behaviour of strontium and cobalt doped LaCrO{sub 3} (La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3}) slips prepared with ethanol and water, were studied. The doped lanthanum chromite was produced by combustion synthesis in the IPEN/SP labs. The influence of parameters: p H (water), dispersant concentration, homogenization times and conditions, solid concentration, different ratios binder:plasticizer in the stability and the flow behavior of ceramic suspensions prepared were evaluated. The La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} products obtained by casting aqueous slips in a plaster mould, using alkaline p H and anionic polyelectrolyte and tapes obtained by using ethanol as a dispersant medium, after sintering at 1600 deg C/4h presented theoretical density > 94%, suitable for use as HTSOFC inter connector. (author)

  9. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer- APPENDICES Appendices-Volume 1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report consists of all the appendices for the report described below: In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values as appendices. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest

  10. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer- APPENDICES Appendices-Volume 1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    This report consists of all the appendices for the report described below: In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values as appendices. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from

  11. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, P.

    1978-01-01

    This article gives an outline of the present situation, from a Belgian standpoint, in the field of the radioactive wastes processing. It estimates the annual quantity of various radioactive waste produced per 1000 MW(e) PWR installed from the ore mining till reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The methods of treatment concentration, fixation, final storable forms for liquid and solid waste of low activity and for high level activity waste. The storage of radioactive waste and the plutonium-bearing waste treatement are also considered. The estimated quantity of wastes produced for 5450 MW(e) in Belgium and their destination are presented. (A.F.)

  12. Method of processing radioactive metallic sodium with recycling alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko; Mitsuzuka, Norimasa.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To employ high safety alcohol procession and decrease the amount of wastes in the procession of radioactive metallic sodium discharged from LMFBR type reactors. Method: Radioactive metallic sodium containing long half-decay period nuclides such as cesium, strontium, barium, cerium, lanthanum or zirconium is dissolved in an alcohol at about 70% purity. After extracting the sodium alcoholate thus formed, gaseous hydrochloride is blown-in to separate the sodium alcoholate into alcohol and sodium chloride, and regenerated alcohol is used again for dissolving sodium metal. The sodium chloride thus separated is processed into solid wastes. (Furukawa, Y.)

  13. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuramoto, Naohiko.

    1992-01-01

    When granular materials comprising radioactive wastes containing phosphorus are processed at first in a fluidized bed type furnace, if the granular materials are phosphorus-containing activated carbon, granular materials comprising alkali compound such as calcium hydroxide and barium hydroxide are used as fluidizing media. Even granular materials of slow burning speed can be burnt stably in a fluidizing state by high temperature heat of the fluidizing media, thereby enabling to take a long burning processing time. Accordingly, radioactive activated carbon wastes can be processed by burning treatment. (T.M.)

  14. Radioactive waste processing container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Kanjiro; Koyanagi, Naoaki; Sakamoto, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Ikuo.

    1992-01-01

    A radioactive waste processing container used for processing radioactive wastes into solidification products suitable to disposal such as underground burying or ocean discarding is constituted by using cements. As the cements, calcium sulfoaluminate clinker mainly comprising calcium sulfoaluminate compound; 3CaO 3Al 2 O 3 CaSO 4 , Portland cement and aqueous blast furnace slug is used for instance. Calciumhydroxide formed from the Portland cement is consumed for hydration of the calcium sulfoaluminate clinker. According, calcium hydroxide is substantially eliminated in the cement constituent layer of the container. With such a constitution, damages such as crackings and peelings are less caused, to improve durability and safety. (I.N.)

  15. PROCESS USING POTASSIUM LANTHANUM SULFATE FOR FORMING A CARRIER PRECIPITATE FOR PLUTONIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angerman, A.A.

    1958-10-21

    A process is presented for recovering plutonium values in an oxidation state not greater than +4 from fluoride-soluble fission products. The process consists of adding to an aqueous acidic solution of such plutonium values a crystalline potassium lanthanum sulfate precipitate which carries the plutonium values from the solution.

  16. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtiss, D.H.; Heacock, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a process for treating radioactive waste whereby a mud of radioactive waste and cementing material is formed in a mixer. This mud is then transferred from the mixer to a storage and transport container where it is allowed to harden. To improve transport efficiency an alkali silicate or an alkaline-earth metal silicate is added to the mud. For one hundred parts by weight of radioactive waste in the mud, twenty to one hundred parts by weight of cementing material are added and five to fifty parts by weight of silicate, the amount of waste in the mud exceeding the combined amount of cementing and silicate material [fr

  17. Radioactive gas processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Minemoto, Masaki; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Okazaki, Akira; Kumagaya, Koji.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of a gas processing system which has hitherto been much complicated by the recyclic use of molecular sieve regeneration gas, by enabling to release the regeneration gas to outside in a once-through manner. Constitution: The system comprises a cooler for receiving and cooling gases to be processed containing radioactive rare gases, moisture-removing pipelines each connected in parallel to the exit of the cooler and having switching valves and a moisture removing column disposed between the valves and a charcoal absorber in communication with the moisture removing pipelines. Pipelines for flowing regeneration heating gases are separately connected to the moisture removing columns, and molecular sieve is charged in the moisture removing column by the amount depending on the types of the radioactive rare gases. (Aizawa, K.)

  18. PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

    1961-11-14

    A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

  19. Radioactive waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Chino, Koichi.

    1992-01-01

    In a waste processing device for solidifying, pellets formed by condensing radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant, by using a solidification agent, sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide or sodium nitrate is mixed upon solidification. In particular, since sodium sulfate in a resin regenerating liquid wastes absorbs water in the cement upon cement solidification, and increases the volume by expansion, there is a worry of breaking the cement solidification products. This reaction can be prevented by the addition of sodium chloride and the like. Accordingly, integrity of the solidification products can be maintained for a long period of time. (T.M.)

  20. Radioactive waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaguma, Masahiko; Takahara, Nobuaki; Hara, Satomi.

    1996-01-01

    In a processing device for filtering laundry liquid wastes and shower drains incorporated with radioactive materials, a fiber filtration device is disposed and an activated carbon filtration device is also disposed subsequent to the fiber filtration device. In addition, a centrifugal dewatering device is disposed for dewatering spent granular activated carbon in the activated carbon filtration device, and a minute filtering device is disposed for filtering the separated dewatering liquid. Filtrates filtered by the minute filtration device are recovered in a collecting tank. Namely, at first, suspended solid materials in laundry liquid wastes and shower drains are captured, and then, ingredients concerning COD are adsorbed in the activated carbon filtration device. The radioactive liquid wastes of spent granular activated carbon in the activated carbon filtration device are reduced by dewatering them by the centrifugal dewatering device, and then the granular activated carbon is subjected to an additional processing. Further, it is separated by filtration using the minute filtration device and removed as cakes. Since the filtrates are recovered to the collecting tank and filtered again, the water quality of the drains is not degraded. (N.H.)

  1. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Ken-ichi; Kawamura, Hideki; Takeuchi, Kunifumi.

    1997-01-01

    Base rock is dug in a substantially cylindrical shape, bentonite blocks in an amount for a predetermined lift are disposed on the inner side of the dug wall surfaces. Concrete blocks constituting a structure of an underground silo are disposed at the inner side. Barrier blocks are disposed to the inner side thereof, and vessels incorporated with radioactive wastes are disposed to the inner side. The bentonite disposed to the inner side of the dug wall surfaces, the concrete structure of the underground silo and the barrier members are divided in the vertical direction into a plurality of blocks, and these blocks are stacked successively from the lowermost layer together with the containing vessels of the radioactive wastes, and after stacking them to a predetermined height, a filler is filled up to the circumference of the vessels. With such a constitution, the underground silo is not fallen down or vibrated even upon occurrence of an earthquake. In addition, bending stresses are scarcely caused thereby making reinforcement of iron reinforcing materials unnecessary. Accordingly, the sealing performance is improved, and processing cost is reduced. (T.M.)

  2. Radioactive wastes processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Yoshiyuki; Fukujoji, Seiya.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To exactly recognize the deposition state of mists into conduits thereby effectively conduct cleaning. Constitution: A drier for performing drying treatment of liquid wastes, a steam decontaminating tower for decontaminating the steams generated from the drier and a condenser for condensating the decontaminating steams are connected with each other by means of conduits to constitute a radioactive wastes processing apparatus. A plurality of pressure detectors are disposed to the conduits, the pressure loss within the conduits is determined based on the detector output and the clogged state in the conduits due to the deposition of mists is detected by the magnitude of the pressure loss. If the clogging exceeds a certain level, cleaning water is supplied to clean-up the conduits thereby keep the operation to continue always under sound conditions. (Sekiya, K.)

  3. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

    1985-08-30

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

  4. Effect of voltage on the characteristics of magnesium-lanthanum deposits synthesized by an electrodeposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahli, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Energétique, Université de Constantine 1 (Algeria); Chetehouna, K.; Gascoin, N. [INSA-CVL, Univ. Orléans, PRISME, EA 4229, F-18020, Bourges (France); Bellel, N. [Laboratoire de Physique Energétique, Université de Constantine 1 (Algeria); Tadini, P., E-mail: tadini.pietro@gmail.com [INSA-CVL, Univ. Orléans, PRISME, EA 4229, F-18020, Bourges (France)

    2017-04-15

    This work deals with the characterization of magnesium-lanthanum powders deposits produced with an electrodeposition technique using an aqueous solution based on magnesium chloride and lanthanum(III) nitrate. In recent years, the interest for magnesium-based alloys is growing due to their potential use as solid state systems for hydrogen storage. This work is a preliminary study on the synthesis of magnesium-lanthanum powders oriented to their later evaluation in systems for hydrogen storage. Magnesium and Lanthanum are deposited on a copper plate used as a cathode. Chemical composition, structure and morphology are investigated by EDS, XRD, FTIR and SEM. The effect of voltage on powders characteristics is studied considering three values (3, 3.5 and 4 V). EDS analysis shows the presence of three major elements (Mg, La and O) with a little amount of Cl. The weight percentages of Mg and O increase whereas the one of La decreases with the growth of voltage. Morphological characterization reveals that heterogeneous chemical structures are formed on the surface of the electrode and the size of aggregates decreases with the increase of voltage. From the results of X-ray analysis the deposits reveal the significant presence of two phases: Mg(OH){sub 2} and La(OH){sub 3}. The peaks originating from the Mg(OH){sub 2} phase has a non-monotonic behavior and those of La(OH){sub 3} phase increase with the increase of voltage. FTIR analysis confirms the presence of the two phases identified in XRD diffractograms and exhibits that their corresponding transmittance values increase for higher voltage values. - Highlights: • Synthesis of magnesium-lanthanum deposits by an electrodeposition process. • Voltage effect is investigated using different physicochemical analysis techniques (EDS, XRD, FTIR and SEM). • The EDS analysis shows the presence of three major elements (Mg, La and O) and a little amount of Cl. • Two phases, namely Mg(OH){sub 2} and La(OH){sub 3} are

  5. Radioactive waste processing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Minoru.

    1993-01-01

    Storing space for radioactive wastes (storage tunnels) are formed underground of the sea bottom along coast. A plurality of boreholes through which sea water flows are pored vertically in a direction intersecting underground streams of brine in the ground between the tunnels and seaside. Sea water introduction pipes are joined to the upper side walls of the boreholes. The sea water introduction pipes have introduction ports protruded under the sea level of the coastal sea area region. Since sea water flows from the introduction ports to the boreholes passing through the sea water introduction pipes, sea water is always filled in the boreholes. Therefore, brine is sufficiently supplied toward the land by sea water from the boreholes, the underground stream of brine is negligibly small. This can prevent radioactive contamination due to flow of the underground water when radioactive wastes are buried in the underground near coast. (I.N.)

  6. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Kamiya, Kunio; Yusa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To form radioactive wastes into a pellet-like solid body having high strength. Structure: Liquid waste containing a radioactive material is heated into a powdery body. Granular solid matter such as sand greater in diameter than grain size of the powdery body are mixed into the powdery body, and thereafter the mixture is formed by a granulator into a pellet-like solid body. The thus formed material is introduced into a drum can, into which a thermoplastic material such as asphalt is poured into the can and cooled so that the asphalt is impregnated inside the pellet to obtain a solid having high strength. (Furukawa, Y.)

  7. Radioactive waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Shuji.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid wastes are supplied to a ceramic filter to conduct filtration. In this case, a device for adding a powdery inorganic ion exchanger is disposed to the upstream of the ceramic filter. When the powdery inorganic ion exchanger is charged to the addition device, it is precoated to the surface of the ceramic filter, to conduct separation of suspended matters and separation of ionic nuclides simultaneously. Liquid wastes returned to a collecting tank are condensed while being circulated between the ceramic filter and the tank and then contained in a condensation liquid waste tank. With such a constitution, both of radioactive nuclides accompanied by suspended matters in the radioactive liquid wastes and ionic nuclides can be captured efficiently. (T.M.)

  8. Radioactive waste processing and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This compilation contains 4144 citations of foreign and domestic reports, journal articles, patents, conference proceedings, and books pertaining to radioactive waste processing and disposal. Five indexes are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  9. Radioactive waste processing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Suzuki, Osamu; Ishizaki, Kanjiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a vessel of a reduced weight and with no external leaching of radioactive materials. Constitution: The vessel main body is constituted, for example, with light weight concretes or foamed concretes, particularly, foamed concretes containing fine closed bubbles in the inside. Then, layers having dense texture made of synthetic resin such as polystylene, vinylchloride resin, etc. or metal plate such as stainless plate are integrally disposed to the inner surface of the vessel main body. The cover member also has the same structure. (Sekiya, K.)

  10. Processing method for radioactive sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Yuichi; Kaneko, Masaaki.

    1993-01-01

    The concentration of radioactive sludges contained in a storage tank is controlled, thereafter, a filter is charged into a processing vessel to continuously conduct dewatering. Then, the radioactive sludges and an oxidizer are mixed by stirring using a stirring impeller and by vibrations using a vibrator. At the same time, thermic rays are irradiated by using infrared ray lamps to heat and decompose them. Since thermic rays reach the center of the radioactive sludges by the infrared ray lamps, ion exchange resins are sufficiently decomposed and carbonized into inorganic material. Then, a filling hardener such as mortar cement having a good flowability is charged to solidify the wastes. With such procedures, radioactive sludges can be stored under a stable condition for a long period of time by decomposing organic materials into inorganic materials and solidifying them. Further, an operator's radiation exposure dose can remarkably be reduced by applying a predetermined and a stabilization treatment in an identical processing vessel. (N.H.)

  11. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katada, Katsuo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the management for radioactive wastes containers thereby decrease the amount of stored matters by arranging the radioactive wastes containers in the order of their radioactivity levels. Method: The radiation doses of radioactive wastes containers arranged in the storing area before volume-reducing treatment are previously measured by a dosemeter. Then, a classifying machine is actuated to hoist the containers in the order to their radiation levels and the containers are sent out passing through conveyor, surface contamination gage, weight measuring device and switcher to a volume-reducing processing machine. The volume-reduced products are packed each by several units to the storing containers. Thus, the storing containers after stored for a certain period of time can be transferred in an assembled state. (Kawakami, Y.)

  12. Radioactive liquid waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Tetsuya; Kuramitsu, Kiminori; Ishii, Tomoharu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a system for processing radioactive liquid wastes containing laundry liquid wastes, shower drains or radioactive liquid wastes containing chemical oxygen demand (COD) ingredients and oil content generated from a nuclear power plant. Namely, a collecting tank collects radioactive liquid wastes. A filtering device is connected to the exit of the collective tank. A sump tank is connected to the exit of the filtering device. A powdery active carbon supplying device is connected to the collecting tank. A chemical fluid tank is connected to the collecting tank and the filtering device by way of chemical fluid injection lines. Backwarding pipelines connect a filtered water flowing exit of the filtering device and the collecting tank. The chemical solution is stored in the chemical solution tank. Then, radioactive materials in radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant are removed by the filtering device. The water quality standard specified in environmental influence reports can be satisfied. In the filtering device, when the filtering flow rate is reduced, the chemical fluid is supplied from the chemical fluid tank to the filtering device to recover the filtering flow rate. (I.S.)

  13. Process and device for processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for processing liquid radioactive wastes. It includes the heating of the liquid wastes so that the contained liquids are evaporated and a practically anhydrous mass of solid particles inferior in volume to that of the wastes introduced is formed, then the transformation of the solid particles into a monolithic structure. This transformation includes the compressing of the particles and sintering or fusion. The solidifying agent is a mixture of polyethylene and paraffin wax or a styrene copolymer and a polyester resin. The device used for processing the radioactive liquid wastes is also described [fr

  14. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Tadao.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a radioactive gaseous waste processing device used in BWR power plants. A heater is disposed to the lower portion of a dryer for dehydrating radioactive off gases. Further, a thermometer is disposed to a coolant return pipeway on the exit side of the cooling portion of the dryer and signals sent from the thermometer are inputted to an automatic temperature controller. If the load on the dryer is reduced, the value of the thermometer is lowered than a set value, then an output signal corresponding to the change is supplied from the automatic temperature controller to the heater to forcively apply loads to the dryer. Therefore, defrosting can be conducted completely without operating a refrigerator, and the refrigerator can be maintained under a constant load by applying a dummy load when the load in the dryer is reduced. (I.N.)

  15. Radioactive liquid waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Susumu; Kuroda, Noriko; Matsumoto, Hiroyo.

    1991-01-01

    The present device comprises a radioactive liquid wastes concentration means for circulating radioactive liquid wastes between each of the tank, a pump and a film evaporator thereby obtaining liquid concentrates and a distilled water recovery means for condensing steams separated by the film evaporator by means of a condenser. It further comprises a cyclizing means for circulating the resultant distilled water to the upstream after the concentration of the liquid concentrates exceeds a predetermined value or the quality of the distilled water reaches a predetermined level. Further, a film evaporator having hydrophilic and homogeneous films is used as a film evaporator. Then, the quality of the distilled water discharged from the present device to the downstream can always satisfy the predetermined conditions. Further, by conducting operation at high concentration while interrupting the supply of the processing liquids, high concentration up to the aimed concentration can be attained. Further, since the hydrophilic homogeneous films are used, carry over of the radioactive material accompanying the evaporation is eliminated to reduce the working ratio of the vacuum pump. (T.M.)

  16. Radioactive liquid wastes processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauda, Kenzo; Koshiba, Yukihiko; Yagi, Takuro; Yamazaki, Hideki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To carry out optimum photooxidizing procession following after the fluctuation in the density of organic materials in radioactive liquid wastes to thereby realize automatic remote procession. Constitution: A reaction tank is equipped with an ultraviolet lamp and an ozone dispersing means for the oxidizing treatment of organic materials in liquid wastes under the irradiation of UV rays. There are also provided organic material density measuring devices to the inlet and outlet of the reaction tank, and a control device for controlling the UV lamp power adjusting depending on the measured density. The output of the UV lamp is most conveniently adjusted by changing the applied voltage. The liquid wastes in which the radioactivity dose is reduced to a predetermined level are returned to the reaction tank by the operation of a switching valve for reprocession. The amount of the liquid wastes at the inlet is controlled depending on the measured ozone density by the adjusting valve. In this way, the amount of organic materials to be subjected to photolysis can be kept within a certain limit. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. The evolution mechanism of the dislocation loops in irradiated lanthanum doped cerium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Yinbin; Aidhy, Dilpuneet; Chen, Wei-Ying; Mo, Kun; Oaks, Aaron; Wolf, Dieter; Stubbins, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium dioxide, a non-radioactive surrogate of uranium dioxide, is useful for simulating the radiation responses of uranium dioxide and mixed oxide fuel (MOX). Controlled additions of lanthanum can also be used to form various levels of lattice oxide or anion vacancies. In previous transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experimental studies, the growth rate of dislocation loops in irradiated lanthanum doped ceria was reported to vary with lanthanum concentration. This work reports findings of the evolution mechanisms of the dislocation loops in cerium oxide with and without lanthanum dopants based on a combination of molecular statics and molecular dynamics simulations. These dislocation loops are found to be b=1/3〈111〉 interstitial type Frank loops. Calculations of the defect energy profiles of the dislocation loops with different structural configurations and radii reveal the basis for preference of nucleation as well as the driving force of growth. Frenkel pair evolution simulations and displacement cascade overlaps simulations were conducted for a variety of lanthanum doping conditions. The nucleation and growth processes of the Frank loop were found to be controlled by the mobility of cation interstitials, which is significantly influenced by the lanthanum doping concentration. Competition mechanisms coupled with the mobility of cation point defects were discovered, and can be used to explain the lanthanum effects observed in experiments

  18. Radioactive gas waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, Koichi.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention concerns a radioactive gas waste processing device which extracts exhaust gases from a turbine condensator in a BWR type reactor and releases them after decaying radioactivity thereof during temporary storage. The turbine condensator is connected with an extracting ejector, a preheater, a recombiner for converting hydrogen gas into steams, an off gas condensator for removing water content, a flow rate control valve, a dehumidifier, a hold up device for removing radiation contaminated materials, a vacuum pump for sucking radiation decayed-off gases, a circulation water tank for final purification and an exhaustion cylinder by way of connection pipelines in this order. An exhaust gas circulation pipeline is disposed to circulate exhaust gases from an exhaust gas exit pipeline of the recycling water tank to an exhaust gas exit pipeline of the exhaust gas condensator, and a pressure control valve is disposed to the exhaust gas circulation pipeline. This enable to perform a system test for the dehumidification device under a test condition approximate to the load of the dehumidification device under actual operation state, and stabilize both of system flow rate and pressure. (T.M.)

  19. Radioactive decontamination apparatus and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, O.L.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus for removing radioactive contamination from metal objects is disclosed, consisting of three of three separate pieces. The first is an electro- polishing tank, pump and filter assembly, ventilation duct and filter assembly, and DC power supply. The second is a rinse tank and a pump and filter assembly therefor. The third is a divot crane. The electro-polishing tank assembly and the rinse tank assembly are each separately mounted on pallets to facilitate moving. The filter systems of the electro-polishing tank and the rinse tank are designed to remove the radioactive contamination from the fluids in those tanks. Heavy items or highly contaminated items are handled with the divot crane constructed of stainless steel. The electro- polishing tank and the rinse tank are also made of stainless steel. The ventilation system on the electro- polishing tank exhausts acid fumes resulting from the tank heaters and the electro-polishing process. Inside the electro-polishing tank are two swinging arms that carry two stainless steel probes that hang down in the electrolyte fluid. These negative DC probes and are electrically isolated from the tank and the rest of the system. Across the top center of the tank is a copper pipe, which is also electrically isolated from the tank. This is the positive side of the DC system. To decontaminate a metal object, it is suspended from the positive copper pipe, with good electrical contact, into the electrolyte fluid. The negative probes are then moved on their swinging arms to a close proximity to the object being decontaminated, without making contact

  20. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Ichiro; Hashimoto, Yasuo.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the volume-reduction effect, as well as enable simultaneous procession for the wastes such as burnable solid wastes, resin wastes or sludges, and further convert the processed materials into glass-solidified products which are much less burnable and stable chemically and thermally. Method: Auxiliaries mainly composed of SiO 2 such as clays, and wastes such as burnable solid wastes, waste resins and sludges are charged through a waste hopper into an incinerating melting furnace comprising an incinerating and a melting furnace, while radioactive concentrated liquid wastes are sprayed from a spray nozzle. The wastes are burnt by the heat from the melting furnace and combustion air, and the sprayed concentrated wastes are dried by the hot air after the combustion into solid components. The solid matters from the concentrated liquid wastes and the incinerating ashes of the wastes are melted together with the auxiliaries in the melting furnace and converted into glass-like matters. The glass-like matters thus formed are caused to flow into a vessel and gradually cooled to solidify. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    In a radioactive gaseous waste processing device, a dehumidifier in which a lot of hollow thread membranes are bundled and assembled is disposed instead of a dehumidifying cooling device and a dehumidifying tower. The dehumidifier comprises a main body, a great number of hollow thread membranes incorporated in the main body, a pair of fixing members for bundling and fixing both ends of the hollow thread membranes, a pair of caps for allowing the fixing members to pass through and fixing them on both ends of the main body, an off gas flowing pipe connected to one of the caps, a gas exhaustion pipe connected to the other end of the cap and a moisture removing pipeline connected to the main body. A flowrate control valve is connected to the moisture removing pipeline, and the other end of the moisture removing pipeline is connected between a main condensator and an air extraction device. Then, cooling and freezing devices using freon are no more necessary, and since the device uses the vacuum of the main condensator as a driving source and does not use dynamic equipments, labors for the maintenance is greatly reduced to improve economical property. The facilities are reduced in the size thereby enabling to use space effectively. (N.H.)

  2. Gaseous radioactive waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizawa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To prevent explosion of hydrogen gas within gaseous radioactive waste by removing the hydrogen gas by means of a hydrogen absorber. Structure: A coolant extracted from a reactor cooling system is sprayed by nozzle into a gaseous phase (hydrogen) portion within a tank, thus causing slipping of radioactive rare gas. The gaseous radioactive waste rich in hydrogen, which is purged in the tank, is forced by a waste gas compressor into a hydrogen occlusion device. The hydrogen occlusion device is filled with hydrogen occluding agents such as Mg, Mg-Ni alloy, V-Nb alloy, La-Ni alloy and so forth, and hydrogen in the waste gas is removed through reaction to produce hydrogen metal. The gaseous radioactive waste, which is deprived of hydrogen and reduced in volume, is stored in an attenuation tank. The hydrogen stored in the hydrogen absorber is released and used again as purge gas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  3. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshihiko; Maruko, Morihisa; Takamura, Yoshiyuki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively separate radioactive claddings from the slurry of wasted ion exchange resins containing radioactive claddings. Method: Wasted ion exchange resins having radioactive claddings (fine particles of iron oxides or hydroxide adhered with radioactive cobalt) are introduced into a clad separation tank. Sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide is introduced to the separation tank to adjust the pH value to 3 - 6. Then, sodium lauryl sulfate is added for capturing claddings and airs are blown from an air supply nozzle to generate air bubbles. The claddings are detached from the ion exchange resins and adhered to the air bubbles. The air bubbles adhered with the claddings float up to the surface of the liquid wastes and then forced out of the separation tank. (Ikeda, J.)

  4. Radioactive waste gas processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Minemoto, Masaki; Takezawa, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively separate and remove only hydrogen from hydrogen gas-containing radioactive waste gases produced from nuclear power plants without using large scaled facilities. Constitution: From hydrogen gas-enriched waste gases which contain radioactive rare gases (Kr, Xe) sent from the volume control tank of a chemical volume control system, only the hydrogen is separated in a hydrogen separator using palladium alloy membrane and rare gases are concentrated, volume-decreased and then stored. In this case, an activated carbon adsorption device is connected at its inlet to the radioactive gas outlet of the hydrogen separator and opened at its outlet to external atmosphere. In this system, while only the hydrogen gas permeates through the palladium alloy membrane, other gases are introduced, without permeation, into the activated carbon adsorption device. Then, the radioactive rare gases are decayed by the adsorption on the activated carbon and then released to the external atmosphere. (Furukawa, Y.)

  5. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Kikuchi, Makoto; Yusa, Hideo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain solidified radioactive wastes at high packing density by packing radioactive waste pellets in a container and then packing and curing a thermosetting resin therein. Method: Radioactive liquid wastes are dried into power and subjected to compression molding. The pellets thus obtained are supplied in a predetermined amount from the hopper to the inside of a drum can. Then, thermosetting plastic and a curing agent are filled in the drum can. Gas between the pellets is completely expelled by the intrusion of the thermosetting resin and the curing agent among the pellets. Thereafter, the drum can is heated by a heater and curing is effected. After the curing, the drum can is sealed. (Kawakami, Y.)

  6. Method of processing radioactive gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masayuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the quantity of radioactive gas discharged at the time of starting a nuclear power plant. Method: After the stoppage of a nuclear power plant air containing a radioactive gas is extracted from a main condenser by operating an air extractor. The air is sent into a gaseous waste disposal device, and then introduced into the activated carbon adsorptive tower of a rare gas holdup device where xenon and krypton are trapped. Thereafter, the air passes through pipelines and returned to the main condenser. In this manner, the radioactive gas contained in air within the main condenser is removed during the stoppage of the operation of the nuclear power plant. After the plant has been started, when it enters the normal operation, a flow control valve is closed and another valve is opened, and a purified gas exhausted from the rare gas holdup device is discharged into the atmosphere through an exhaust cylinder. (Aizawa, K.)

  7. Radioactive liquid waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inakuma, Masahiko; Takahara, Nobuaki; Hara, Satomi.

    1996-01-01

    Laundry liquid wastes and shower drains containing radioactive materials generated in a nuclear power plant are removed with radioactive materials by a fiber filtration device and an activated carbon filtration device to satisfy standers of water quality described in the environmental effect investigation report. Spent activated carbon is dehydrated together with the back-wash liquid from the fiber filtration device and the activated carbon filtration device using a Nutsche-type filtration dryer. With such procedures, the scale of the facility is minimized, space for devices, maintenance for equipments and radiation dose rate are reduced. (T.M.)

  8. Radioactive liquid waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Takashi; Baba, Tsutomu; Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Matsuda, Masami; Chino, Koichi; Ikeda, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    As an adsorbent used for removing radioactive nuclides such as cesium and strontium from radioactive liquid wastes generated from a reprocessing plant, a silicon compound having siloxane bonds constituted by silicon and oxygen and having silanol groups constituted by silicon, oxygen and hydrogen, or an inorganic material mainly comprising aluminosilicate constituted with silicon, oxygen and aluminum is used. In the adsorbent of the present invention, since silica main skeletons are partially decomposed in an aqueous alkaline solution to newly form silanol groups having a cation adsorbing property, pretreatment such as pH adjustment is not necessary. (T.M.)

  9. Method of processing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Susumu; Moriya, Tetsuo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Kariya, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve contamination proofness, water proofness, close bondability and stretching performance of strippable paints coated to substrates liable to be contaminated with radioactive materials. Method: Strippable paints are previously coated on substrates which may possibly be contaminated with radioactive materials. After the contamination, the coated membranes are stripped and removed. Alternatively, the strippable paints may be coated on the already contaminated substrates and, after drying, the paints are stripped and removed. The strippable paints used herein have a composition comprising a styrene-butadiene block copolymer containing from 60 to 80 wt% of styrene as a main ingredient and from 0.3 to 5 % by weight of a higher alkyl amine compound having 12 to 18 carbon atoms blended with the copolymer. (Ikeda, J.)

  10. Radioactive liquid water processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Noda, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Fumio.

    1993-01-01

    Alkaline earth metals and heavy metals are added to radioactive liquid wastes containing a surface active agent comprising alkali metal salts of higher fatty acids. These metals form metal soaps with the surface active agent dissolved in the liquid wastes and crystallized. The crystallized metal soaps are introduced to a filtering column filled with a burnable polymeric fibrous filtering material. The filtering material is burnt. This can remove the surface active agent to remove COD without using an active carbon. (T.M.)

  11. Process for separating radioactive gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Shigeru; Awada, Yoshihisa.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To efficiently and safely separate and recover raw gases such as krypton which requires radioactive attenuation by a long term storage. Structure: A mixture of krypton and xenon is separated by liquefaction from raw gases at a first distillation column, using latent heat of liquid nitrogen. The krypton and xenon mixture separated by liquefaction at the first distillation column is separated into krypton and xenon, by controlling operation pressure of a second distillation column at about 3 - 5 atm., using sensible heat of low temperature nitrogen gas discharged from a top of the first distillation column and a condenser. (Aizawa, K.)

  12. Fixation process for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theysohn, F.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement on the method of solidification of radioactive liquid waste in bitumen with the aid of extruders is described. So far, it has been difficult to remove large amounts of water. The waste sludge, as proposed here, is pre-dried in the extruder and then mixed with the bitumen. The extruder is inclined upward in the transport direction, and its barrel extruders have through holes parallel to the direction of transport in the raised sides of the passages, so that water runs back. Also the waste steam nozzles are arranged before the bitumen inlet. (UWI) [de

  13. Radioactive waste processing and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    Reference to 2140 publications related to radioactive waste, announced in Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) Volumes 28 (July Dec. 1973), 29 (Jan.--June 1974), and 30 (July--Dec. 1974), are presented. The references are arranged by the original NSA abstract number, which approximately places them in chronological order. Sequence numbers appear beside each reference and the NSA volume and abstract numbers appear at the end of the citations. Three indexes are provided: Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number. This document supplements the preceding six in the TID3311 series. (U.S.)

  14. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matagi, Yoshihiko; Takahara, Akira; Ootsuka, Katsuyuki.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid the reduction in the atmospheric insulation by preventing the generation of CO 2 , H 2 O, etc. upon irradiation of microwave heat. Method: Radioactive wastes are charged into a hopper, supplied on a conveyor, fed each by a predetermined amount to a microwave furnace and heated by microwaves applied from a microwave guide. Simultaneously, inert gases are supplied from a supply line. The Radioactive wastes to be treated are shielded by the inert gases to prevent the combustion of decomposed gases produced from the wastes upon irradiation of microwave heat to thereby prevent the generation of CO 2 , H 2 , etc., as well as the generated decomposed gases are diluted with the inert gases to decrease the dissociation of the decomposed gases to prevent the reduction in the atmospheric insulation. Since the spent inert gases can be recovered for reuse, the amount of gaseous wastes released to the atmosphere can be decreased and the working life of the high performance air filters can be extended. (Sekiya, K.)

  15. Method for processing radioactive wastes containing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Takeshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To bake, solidify and process even radioactive wastes highly containing sodium. Structure: H and or NH 4 zeolites of more than 90g per chemical equivalent of sodium present in the waste is added to and left in radioactive wastes containing sodium, after which they are fed to a baker such as rotary cylindrical baker, spray baker and the like to bake and solidify the wastes at 350 to 800 0 C. Thereby, it is possible to bake and solidify even radioactive wastes highly containing sodium, which has been impossible to do so previously. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Process for reducing radioactive contamination in phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, J.W.; Gaynor, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    In a process for reducing radioactive contamination of phosphogypsum, anhydrite crystals are obtained through dehydration of the phosphogypsum in strong sulfuric acid: a portion of the anhydrite crystals is converted to subtantially radiation free gypsum by crystallizing out on radiation free gypsum seed crystals. These coarse radiation free gypsum crystals are then separated from the small anhydrite crystal relics containing substantially all of the radioactive contamination

  17. Radioactive waste processing and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    References to 1841 publications related to radioactive waste, announced in Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) Volumes 31 (Jan.--June 1975), 32 (July--Dec. 1975), and 33 (Jan.--June 1976), are cumulated in this bibliography. The references are arranged by the original NSA abstract number, which approximately places them in chronological order. Sequence numbers appear beside each reference and the NSA volume and abstract number appears at the end of each bibliographic citation. A listing of the subject descriptors used to describe each reference for machine storage and retrieval is shown. Four indexes are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number. These indexes refer to the sequence numbers for the references

  18. Method for processing powdery radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Toshihide; Nakayama, Yasuyuki.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify radioactive wastes with ease and safety at a high reaction speed but with no boiling by impregnating the radioactive wastes with chlorostyrene. Method: Beads-like dried ion exchange resin, powdery ion exchange resin, filter sludges, concentrated dried waste liquor or the like are mixed or impregnated with a chlorostyrene monomer dissolving therein a polymerization initiator such as methyl ethyl ketone peroxide and benzoyl peroxide. Mixed or impregnated products are polymerized to solid after a predetermined of time through curing reaction to produce solidified radioactive wastes. Since inflammable materials are used, this process has a high safety. About 70% wastes can be incorporated. The solidified products have a strength as high as 300 - 400 kg/cm 3 and are suitable to ocean disposal. The products have a greater radioactive resistance than other plastic solidification products. (Seki, T.)

  19. Microwave processing of radioactive materials-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.L.; Berry, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is the first of two papers that reviews the major past and present applications of microwave energy for processing radioactive materials, with particular emphasis on processing radioactive wastes. Microwave heating occurs through the internal friction produced inside a dielectric material when its molecules vibrate in response to an oscillating microwave field. For this presentation, we shall focus on the two FCC-approved microwave frequencies for industrial, scientific, and medical use, 915 and 2450 MHz. Also, because of space limitations, we shall postpone addressing plasma processing of hazardous wastes using microwave energy until a later date. 13 refs., 4 figs

  20. Method of processing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Susumu.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive solid wastes generated from nuclear power plants are pressed and reduced in the volume by a compressor into compression products. Next, the compression products are put into a vessel in a tank and a solidifying material at low viscosity such as vinyl monomer is supplied and impregnated into the inner gaps of the compression products while the pressure in the tank is reduced by a vacuum pump. Subsequently, the compression products are heated and pressurized in the tank to polymerize and solidify the solidifying material. Then, a plurality of solidified compression products are placed in the inside of a drum can and fixed at the periphery thereof together with fixing material such as mortars and plastics. Accordingly, even when underground water should intrude after underground disposal, there is no more risk of causing swelling pressure due to water absorption. Accordingly, there is no more possiblity to cause cracks in the wastes due to the swelling pressure, and wastes of excellent stability and integrity can be obtained. (I.N.)

  1. Overpack for processing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Hidekazu.

    1997-01-01

    A glass solidification material in which radioactive wastes are sealed and solidified in glass is covered by an inner layer vessel made of corrosion resistant materials, and the outer side thereof is covered with an outer layer vessel made of a reinforced material. The inner layer vessel made of corrosion materials comprises corrosion materials such as titanium, copper, stainless steel and nickel based alloy, and the outer layer vessel made of a reinforced material comprises a reinforced material such as carbon steel. If it is constituted by using carbon steel having a thickness as much as of from 50 to 200mm, it is durable sufficiently under ground of about 1000m. Although the outer layer vessel made of the reinforced material is corroded by oxidation by oxygen contained in underwater after lapse of time of several years, it is endurable sufficiently to initial oxidative corrosion by determined the thickness to 50mm or more, and after oxygen is consumed, reductive corrosion with extremely slow progressing speed begins. Since the inner vessel made of the corrosion resistant material is formed, the lifetime is extended, and the glass solidification materials can be confined stably for a long period of time. (N.H.)

  2. Radioactive gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruki, Shin-ichiro.

    1991-01-01

    Radioactive off-gases extracted from a turbine main condensator by using an air extractor flown by way of an off-gas preheater and enter to an off-gas recombiner. Hydrogen in the off-gases is combined with oxygen into steams by the effect of catalysts in the off-gas recombiner. In this case, the off-gases are heated to a high temperature by the reaction heat due to the effect of the catalysts and discharged from the exit of the off-gas recombiner. The off-gases at a high temperature are returned once to the off-gas preheater at the upstream to be used as a heat source for the off-gas preheater. With such a constitution, since the amount of heat for exchange required for heating to about 160degC can be supplied, a heated steam supply device which has been disposed to the off-gas preheater can be saved. Further, the off-gases cooled through heat exchange upon heating the off-gas preheater are flown to the off-gas condensator and the steams are returned into the condensates. Since cooled off-gases enter into a cooling water supply device, the load thereof can be reduced compared with a conventional case. (T.M.)

  3. Process for cleaning radioactively contaminated metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihram, R.G.; Snyder, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for removing radioactive scale from a ferrous metal surface, including the steps of initially preconditioning the surface by contacting it with an oxidizing solution (such as an aqueous solution of an alkali metal permanganate or hydrogen peroxide), then, after removal or decomposition of the oxidizing solution, the metallic surface is contacted with a cleaning solution which is a mixture of a mineral acid and a complexing agent (such as sulfuric acid and oxalic acid), and which preferably contains a corrosion inhibitor. A final step in the process is the treatment of the spent cleaning solution containing radioactive waste materials in solution by adding a reagent selected from the group consisting of calcium hydroxide or potassium permanganate and an alkali metal hydroxide to thereby form easily recovered metallic compounds containing substantially all of the dissolved metals and radioactivity. (auth)

  4. Storage process of large solid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Bruno; Thiery, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    Process for the storage of large size solid radioactive waste, consisting of contaminated objects such as cartridge filters, metal swarf, tools, etc, whereby such waste is incorporated in a thermohardening resin at room temperature, after prior addition of at least one inert charge to the resin. Cross-linking of the resin is then brought about [fr

  5. Radioactive wastes processing and disposing container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Jiro; Kato, Hiroaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a processing and disposing container at low level radioactive wastes, excellent in corrosion and water resistance, as well as impact shock resistance for the retrieval storage over a long period of time. Constitution: The container is constituted with sands and pebbles as aggregates and glass fiber-added unsaturated polyester resins as binders. The container may entirely be formed with such material or only the entire inner surface may be formed with the material as liners. A container having excellent resistance to water, chemicals, freezing or melting, whether impact shock, etc. can be obtained, thereby enabling retrieval storage for radioactive wastes at the optimum low level. (Takahashi, M.)

  6. Cushioning for processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Hidekazu.

    1997-01-01

    A cushioning to be inserted between a vessel containing hole formed in an underground base rock and a processing overpack comprises from 40 to 20% by weight of swellable bentonite, from 40 to 60% by weight of highly heat conductive silica sand and from 10 to 20% by weight of iron powder. The grain size of the bentonite and the iron powder may be several μm to several ten μm, and the grain size of the silica sand may be several ten μm to one hundred and several ten μm. Then, if underground water permeates to the cushioning, the bentonite absorbs the underground water and swells to fill gaps, and the tissue of blocks is densified to prevent intrusion of underground water. Oxygen incorporated in the underground water is used by the oxidation of the iron powder to prevent oxidative corrosion of the processing overpack. In addition, the silica sand allows the heat of the overpack to release to underground base rock thereby preventing temperature elevation. Accordingly, excellent effects of combination of water checking performance and degassing performance can be obtained. (T.M.)

  7. Solidifying processing device for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueto, Kumiko; Toyohara, Naomi; Tomita, Toshihide; Sato, Tatsuaki

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a solidifying device for radioactive wastes. Solidifying materials and mixing water are mixed by a mixer and then charged as solidifying and filling materials to a wastes processing container containing wastes. Then, cleaning water is sent from a cleaning water hopper to a mixer to remove the solidifying and filling materials deposited in the mixer. The cleaning liquid wastes are sent to a separator to separate aggregate components from cleaning water components. Then, the cleaning water components are sent to the cleaning water hopper and then mixed with dispersing materials and water, to be used again as the mixing water upon next solidifying operation. On the other hand, the aggregate components are sent to a processing mechanism as radioactive wastes. With such procedures, since the discharged wastes are only composed of the aggregates components, and the amount of the wastes are reduced, facilities and labors for the processing of cleaning liquid wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  8. Processing and electrical conductivity of lanthanum gallate core-shell heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes, Eduarda

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The electrical properties of a lanthanum gallate solid electrolyte were modified by selectively doping the grain boundaries with Fe. This was achieved by sandwiching a La0.95Sr0.05Ga0.90Mg0.10O3-δ (LSGM dense pellet between LaFeO3 samples. Annealing at 1550°C in air for several hours promoted Fe diffusion into LSGM via the grain boundaries. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analyses showed that iron was located at the grain boundary while the grain bulk preserved the LSGM composition. Impedance spectra obtained at low temperature consist of the two usual bulk and grain boundary contributions. A significant increase in total conductivity was observed for the iron-doped samples, the effect being greater for the grain boundary contribution. The total conductivity measured for the iron-containing material revealed a slight decrease with decreasing oxygen partial pressure, suggesting the onset of p-type electronic conduction. Estimates of the p-type electronic conductivity (σp were obtained by fitting the low temperature impedance spectra to a simple equivalent circuit including one parallel electronic branch. The value for σp in air at 300°C is 3.1×10-6 S/cm and the activation energy is 75.1 kJ/mol between 300 and 400°C.

    Las propiedades elécticas de un electrolito sólido de galato de lantano se han modificado mediante un dopado eléctrico de Fe en borde de grano. Esto se consiguió preparando una estructura de sandwich con una plantilla densa de La0.95Sr0.05Ga0.90Mg0.10O3-δ (LSGM entre las muestras de LaFeO3. Un tratamiento de varias horas a 1550ºC en aire favoreció la difusión de Fe a lo largo de los bordes de grano. Los análisis mediante microscopia electrónica de barrido y espectroscopía de energía dispersada muestran que el hierro se localiza en borde de grano mientras que se preserva la composición de LSGM en el interior de grano. En las muestras dopadas con hierro se observa un aumento de

  9. Method of controlling radioactive waste processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikawa, Hiroji; Sato, Takao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To minimize the pellet production amount, maximize the working life of a solidifying device and maintaining the mechanical strength of pellets to a predetermined value irrespective of the type and the cycle of occurrence of the secondary waste in the secondary waste solidifying device for radioactive waste processing systems in nuclear power plants. Method: Forecasting periods for the type, production amount and radioactivity level of the secondary wastes are determined in input/output devices connected to a control system and resulted signals are sent to computing elements. The computing elements forecast the production amount of regenerated liquid wastes after predetermined days based on the running conditions of a condensate desalter and the production amounts of filter sludges and liquid resin wastes after predetermined days based on the liquid waste processing amount or the like in a processing device respectively. Then, the mass balance between the type and the amount of the secondary wastes presently stored in a tank are calculated and the composition and concentration for the processing liquid are set so as to obtain predetermined values for the strength of pellets that can be dried to solidify, the working life of the solidifying device itself and the radioactivity level of the pellets. Thereafter, the running conditions for the solidifying device are determined so as to maximize the working life of the solidifying device. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. PROCESS OF DECONTAMINATING MATERIAL CONTAMINATED WITH RADIOACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.; Acken, M.F.

    1958-09-16

    A process is described for decontaminating metallic objects, such as stainless steel equipment, which consists in contacting such objects with nltric acid in a concentration of 35 to 60% to remove the major portion of the contamination; and thereafter contacting the partially decontaminated object with a second solution containing up to 20% of alkali metal hydroxide and up to 20% sodium tartrate to remove the remaining radioactive contaminats.

  11. Microbial processes in radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazso, L.; Farkas-Galgoczi, G.; Diosi, G.

    2002-01-01

    Microbial processes could potentially affect the performance of a radioactive waste disposal system and related factors that could have an influence on the mobility of radionuclides are outlined. Analytical methods, including sampling of water, rock and surface swabs from a potential disposal site, are described and the quantitative as well as qualitative experimental results obtained are given. Although the results contribute to an understanding of the impact of microbial processes on deep geological disposal of nuclear waste, there is not yet sufficient information for a model which will predict the consequences of these processes. (author)

  12. Evaluation procedure for radioactive waste treatment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitty, W.J.

    1979-11-01

    An aspect of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's nuclear waste management R and D programs has been to develop an evaluation procedure for radioactive waste treatment processes. This report describes the process evaluation method. Process worth is expressed as a numerical index called the Figure-of-Merit (FOM), which is computed using a hierarchial, linear, additive, scoring model with constant criteria weights and nonlinear value functions. A numerical example is used to demonstrate the procedure and to point out some of its strengths and weaknesses. Potential modifications and extensions are discussed, and an extensive reference list is included

  13. Processing method of radioactive metal wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetake, Naoto; Urata, Megumu; Sato, Masao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the volume and increase the density of radioactive metal wastes easily while preventing scattering of radioactivity and process them into suitable form to storage and treatment. Method: Metal wastes mainly composed of zirconium are discharged from nuclear power plants or fuel re-processing plants, and these metals such as zirconium and titanium vigorously react with hydrogen and rapidly diffuse as hydrides. Since the hydrides are extremely brittle and can be pulverized easily, they can be volume-reduced. However, since metal hydrides have no ductility, dehydrogenation is applied for the molding fabrication in view of the subsequent storage and processing. The dehydrogenation is easy like the hydrogenation and fine metal pieces can be molded in a small compression device. For the dehydrogenation, a temperature is slightly increased as compared with that in the hydrogenation, pressure is reduced through the vacuum evacuation system and the removed hydrogen is purified for reuse. The upper limit for the temperature of the hydrogenation is 680 0 C in order to prevent the scttering of radioactivity. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Method of processing radioactive metal wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yoichi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Tsuzura, Katsuhiko.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable long and safety storage for radioactive metal wastes such as used fuel cans after the procession or used pipe, instruments and the likes polluted with various radioactive substances, by compacting them to solidify. Method: Metal wastes such as used fuel cans, which have been cut shorter and reprocessed, are pressed into generally hexagonal blocks. The block is charged in a capsule of a hexagonal cross section made of non-gas permeable materials such as soft steels, stainless steels and the likes. Then, the capsule is subjected to static hydraulic hot pressing as it is or after deaeration and sealing. While various combinations are possible for temperature, pressure and time as the conditions for the static hydraulic hot pressing, dense block with no residual gas pores can be obtained, for example, under the conditions of 900 0 C, 1000 Kg/cm 2 and one hour where the wastes are composed of zircaloy. (Kawakami, Y.)

  15. Processing method of radioactive cleaning drain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Shigemitsu; Murakami, Tadashi; Kitao, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Upon processing of radioactive cleaning drains, contained Co-60 is removed by a selectively adsorbing adsorbent. In addition, after removing suspended materials by a filtering device, Co-60 as predominant nuclides in the drain is selectively adsorbed. The concentration of objective Co-60 is in the order of 0.1 Bq/cc, and non-radioactive metal ions such as Na + ions are present in the order of ppm in addition to Co-60. A granular adsorbent for selectively adsorbing Co-60 is oxine-added activated carbon, and has a grain size of from 20 to 48 mesh. The granular adsorbent is used while being filled in an adsorbing tower. Since a relatively simple device comprising the filtering device and the adsorbing tower in combination is provided, the reduction of the construction cost can be expected. In addition, since no filtering aid is used in the filtering device, the amount of secondary wastes is small. (N.H.)

  16. Discarding processing method for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Shiro; Kato, Hiroaki; Hatakeyama, Takao; Oura, Masato.

    1992-01-01

    At first, in a discrimination step, extremely low level radioactive wastes are discriminated to metals and concretes and further, the metal wastes are discriminated to those having hollow portions and those not having hollow portions, and the concrete wastes are discriminated to those having block-like shape and those having other shapes respectively. Next, in a processing step, the metal wastes having hollow portions are applied with cutting, devoluming or packing treatment and block-like concrete wastes are applied with surface solidification treatment, and concrete wastes having other shapes are applied with crushing treatment respectively. Then, the extremely low level radioactive wastes contained in a container used exclusively for transportation are taken out, in a movable burying facility with diffusion inhibiter kept at a negative pressure as required, in a field for burying operation, and buried in a state that they are isolated from the outside. Accordingly, they can be buried safely and efficiently. (T.M.)

  17. Method and equipment of processing radioactive laundry wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takamori; Suzuki, Takeo; Tabata, Masayuki; Takada, Takao; Yamaguchi, Shin-ichi; Noda, Tetsuya.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively process radioactive laundry wastes generated due to water-washing after dry-cleaning of protective clothings which have been put on in nuclear facilities. Method: Dry cleaning soaps and ionic radioactive materials contained in radioactive laundry wastes are selectively adsorbed to decontaminate by adsorbents. Then, the adsorbents having adsorbed dry cleaning soaps and ionic radioactive materials are purified by being removed with these radioactive materials. The purified adsorbents are re-used. (Seki, T.)

  18. Inverse osmotic process for radioactive laundry waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebara, K; Takahashi, S; Sugimoto, Y; Yusa, H; Hyakutake, H

    1977-01-07

    Purpose: To effectively recover the processing amount reduced in a continuous treatment. Method: Laundry waste containing radioactive substances discharged from a nuclear power plant is processed in an inverse osmotic process while adding starch digesting enzymes such as amylase and takadiastase, as well as soft spherical bodies such as sponge balls of a particle diameter capable of flowing in the flow of the liquid wastes along the inverse osmotic membrane pipe and having such a softness and roundness as not to damage the inverse osmotic membrane. This process can remove the floating materials such as thread dusts or hairs deposited on the membrane surface by the action of the soft elastic balls and remove paste or the like through decomposition by the digesting enzymes. Consequently, effective recovery can be attained for the reduced processing amount.

  19. Radioactive Dry Process Material Treatment Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Hung, I. H.; Kim, K. K. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The project 'Radioactive Dry Process Material Treatment Technology Development' aims to be normal operation for the experiments at DUPIC fuel development facility (DFDF) and safe operation of the facility through the technology developments such as remote operation, maintenance and pair of the facility, treatment of various high level process wastes and trapping of volatile process gases. DUPIC Fuel Development Facility (DFDF) can accommodate highly active nuclear materials, and now it is for fabrication of the oxide fuel by dry process characterizing the proliferation resistance. During the second stage from march 2005 to February 2007, we carried out technology development of the remote maintenance and the DFDF's safe operation, development of treatment technology for process off-gas, and development of treatment technology for PWR cladding hull and the results was described in this report.

  20. Inverse osmotic process for radioactive laundry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Katsuya; Takahashi, Sankichi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Yusa, Hideo; Hyakutake, Hiroshi.

    1977-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively recover the processing amount reduced in a continuous treatment. Method: Laundry waste containing radioactive substances discharged from a nuclear power plant is processed in an inverse osmotic process while adding starch digesting enzymes such as amylase and takadiastase, as well as soft spherical bodies such as sponge balls of a particle diameter capable of flowing in the flow of the liquid wastes along the inverse osmotic membrane pipe and having such a softness and roundness as not to damage the inverse osmotic membrane. This process can remove the floating materials such as thread dusts or hairs deposited on the membrane surface by the action of the soft elastic balls and remove paste or the like through decomposition by the digesting enzymes. Consequently, effective recovery can be attained for the reduced processing amount. (Furukawa, Y.)

  1. Processing vessel for high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Hiromichi

    1998-01-01

    Upon transferring an overpack having canisters containing high level radioactive wastes sealed therein and burying it into an underground processing hole, an outer shell vessel comprising a steel plate to be fit and contained in the processing hole is formed. A bury-back layer made of dug earth and sand which had been discharged upon forming the processing hole is formed on the inner circumferential wall of the outer shell vessel. A buffer layer having a predetermined thickness is formed on the inner side of the bury-back layer, and the overpack is contained in the hollow portion surrounded by the layer. The opened upper portion of the hollow portion is covered with the buffer layer and the bury-back layer. Since the processing vessel having a shielding performance previously formed on the ground, the state of packing can be observed. In addition, since an operator can directly operates upon transportation and burying of the high level radioactive wastes, remote control is no more necessary. (T.M.)

  2. Entrapment process of radioactive gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagneraud, Francis; Gagneraud, Michel.

    1981-01-01

    Process for collecting chemically inert gaseous radioactive waste in melted substances, whereby the gaseous waste is injected under pressure in a molten substance to its saturation point followed by fast cooling. This substance is constituted of glass, ceramics, metallurgical drosses and slag masses in fusion. Its cooling is carried out by quenching by means of running water or a gas fluid, or by casting into vessels with great thermal inertia such as cast iron or similar, before recovery and confinement in receptacles for storage [fr

  3. Process for storing radioactive waste in ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.; Gouvenot, D.; Pagny, P.

    1983-01-01

    A process for storing radioactive waste in a cavity in the ground is claimed. The waste is conditioned and isolated from the ground by at least one retention barrier. A grout consisting of 1000 parts by weight of water, 40 to 400 parts by weight of cement, 80 to 1000 parts by weight of at least one clay chosen from the group including montmorillonite, illite and vermiculite, as well as 25 to 1200 parts by weight of kieselguhr and/or natural or artificial pozzuolanas is introduced into gaps in the soil areas surrounding the cavity

  4. Potential of membrane processes in management of radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Surender; Jain, Savita; Raj, Kanwar

    2010-01-01

    Various categories of radioactive liquid waste are generated during operations and maintenance of nuclear installations. The potential of membrane processes for the treatment of low-level radioactive liquids is discussed in this paper

  5. High-temperature corrosion of lanthanum in equimole mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochergin, V.P.; Obozhina, R.N.; Dragoshanskaya, T.I.; Startsev, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results of investigation into the process of lanthanum corrosion in the molted equimole NaCl-KCl mixture after the change of test time, temperature and lanthanum trichloride were summarized. It was shown that polarization of lanthanum anode in equimole NaCl-KCl melt is controlled by La 3+ diffusion from near-electrode layer to electrolyte depth, which results in decrease of corrosion rate in time. The established electrochemical properties of metallic lanthanum in equimole NaCl-KCl mixture must be considered when improving the technology of electrochemical production of lanthanum or its alloys of molten chlorides of lanthanum and alkaline metals

  6. Hydrothermal processing of radioactive combustible waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worl, L.A.; Buelow, S.J.; Harradine, D.; Le, L.; Padilla, D.D.; Roberts, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrothermal processing has been demonstrated for the treatment of radioactive combustible materials for the US Department of Energy. A hydrothermal processing system was designed, built and tested for operation in a plutonium glovebox. Presented here are results from the study of the hydrothermal oxidation of plutonium and americium contaminated organic wastes. Experiments show the destruction of the organic component to CO 2 and H 2 O, with 30 wt.% H 2 O 2 as an oxidant, at 540 C and 46.2 MPa. The majority of the actinide component forms insoluble products that are easily separated by filtration. A titanium liner in the reactor and heat exchanger provide corrosion resistance for the oxidation of chlorinated organics. The treatment of solid material is accomplished by particle size reduction and the addition of a viscosity enhancing agent to generate a homogeneous pumpable mixture

  7. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumada, Norimitsu; Shibata, Setsuo; Wakabayashi, Toshikatsu; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the procession of liquid wastes containing insoluble salts of boric acid and calcium in a process for solidifying under volume reduction of radioactive liquid wastes containing boron. Method: A soluble calcium compound (such as calcium hydroxide, calcium oxide and calcium nitrate) is added to liquid wastes whose pH value is adjusted neutral or alkaline such that the molar ratio of calcium to boron in the liquid wastes is at least 0.2. Then, they are agitated at a temperature between 40 - 70 0 C to form insoluble calcium salt containing boron. Thereafter, the liquid is maintained at a temperature less than the above-mentioned forming temperature to age the products and, thereafter, the liquid is evaporated to condensate into a liquid concentrate containing 30 - 80% by weight of solid components. The concentrated liquid is mixed with cement to solidify. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Phase stability and processing of strontium and magnesium doped lanthanum gallate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feng

    Fuel Cells are one of the most promising energy transformers with respect to ecological and environmental issues. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) are all solid-state devices. One of the challenges to improve a SOFC is to lower the operating temperature while maintaining or increasing its output voltage. Undoped LaGaO3 is an insulator, doping transforms it into an oxygen-ionic conductor. Sr and Mg doped LaGaO3 (LSGM) perovskite is a new oxygen-ionic conductor with higher conductivity than yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). This material is a candidate for a wide variety of electrochemical devices. In order to realize this potential, the phase stability and processing of this material needs to be investigated in detail. In this study, a systematic investigation of the LSGM materials in terms of phase stability, phase transition, sintering, microstructure and electrical conductivity as functions of temperature, doping content and A/B cation ratio has been carried out. The generalized formula of the materials investigated is (La1--xSrx)A(Ga1--yMg y)BO3--delta. Optimized processing parameters have been obtained by investigating their impact on density change and microstructure. Consequently, a suitable compositional window of the LSGM perovskite has been identified for SOFC electrolyte applications. Based on detailed diffraction analysis, it is found that the undoped LaGaO3 takes on the orthorhombic (Pbnm) symmetry at room temperature. This structure changes to rhombohedral (R3c) at 147 +/- 2°C or changes to monoclinic (I2/a) when the doping level increases from 0.1 to 0.2 moles. We have optimized the compositional window to make the single perovskite phase with high oxygen ionic conductivity (x = 0.10 to 0.20 with A/B ratio between 0.98 to 1.02). The best processing condition, starting from glycine nitrate process (GNP) combustion synthesized ultra-fine LSGM powder, is sintering in air at 1500°C for 2 hours. The doped material has higher oxygen ionic conductivity than

  9. Investigation of the relaxor behavior of sol gel processed lanthanum lead titanium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limame, K.; Sayouri, S.; Yahyaoui, M.M.; Housni, A.; Jaber, B.

    2016-01-01

    A series of La doped lead titanate samples, with composition Pb_1_−_xLa_xTi_1_−_x_/_4O_3 (PLTx), where x=0.00; 0.02; 0.04; 0.06; 0.07; 0.08; 0.10; 0.12; 0.14; 0.16; 0.18; 0.21 and 0.22 was prepared using the sol–gel process. Addition of La gives rise to the two well-known phenomena: diffuseness and relaxation around the ferro-to-paraelectric transition; the two parameters related to these phenomena, and which give a satisfactory interpretation of them, have been estimated using the Uchino's quadratic law. This diffuse phase transition (DPT) has been investigated with the help of the Landau–Devonshire cluster theory and the model of Cheng et al., to show that polar regions may be generated around the DPT and far from the temperature, T_m, of the maximum of the dielectric permittivity, which have as a direct consequence a non vanishing polarization even if T>T_m.

  10. Investigation of the relaxor behavior of sol gel processed lanthanum lead titanium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limame, K. [Centre Régional des Metiers de l' Education et de la Formation (CRMEF) de Fès, Rue deKuwait, BP 49, Fès (Morocco); Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Sayouri, S., E-mail: ssayouri@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Yahyaoui, M.M. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Housni, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Appliquée, (LPTA), FSDM, B.P. 1796, Fès-Atlas, Fès (Morocco); Institut Supérieur des Professions Infirmières et Techniques de Santé (ISPITS), Fès (Morocco); Jaber, B. [Centre National pour la Recherche Scientifique et Technique (CNRST), Angle Avenue Allal El Fassi avenue des FAR, Quartie Hay Ryad, BP8027 Nation Unies, Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-08-01

    A series of La doped lead titanate samples, with composition Pb{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x/4}O{sub 3} (PLTx), where x=0.00; 0.02; 0.04; 0.06; 0.07; 0.08; 0.10; 0.12; 0.14; 0.16; 0.18; 0.21 and 0.22 was prepared using the sol–gel process. Addition of La gives rise to the two well-known phenomena: diffuseness and relaxation around the ferro-to-paraelectric transition; the two parameters related to these phenomena, and which give a satisfactory interpretation of them, have been estimated using the Uchino's quadratic law. This diffuse phase transition (DPT) has been investigated with the help of the Landau–Devonshire cluster theory and the model of Cheng et al., to show that polar regions may be generated around the DPT and far from the temperature, T{sub m}, of the maximum of the dielectric permittivity, which have as a direct consequence a non vanishing polarization even if T>T{sub m}.

  11. A process for solidifying radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergan, L.M.; Cordier, J.-P.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for solidifying radioactive liquid waste, its pH is adjusted, solids precipitated and then it is concentrated to about 50% solids content using a thin film evaporator, the concentrate then being dried to powder in a heated mixer. The mixer has a heated wall and working means, e.g. a rotor and helical screw, to shear the dried concentrate from the internal walls, subdivide it into a dry particulate powder, and advance the powder to the mixer outlet. The dried particles are then encapsulated in a suitable matrix. Vapour from the mixer and evaporator is condensed and recycled after any particles have been removed from it. The mixer may both dry the concentrate and mix the dry particles with the encapsulating matrix, and possibly, part of the mixer may be used for pH adjustment and precipitation. (author)

  12. Method of processing radioactive rare gase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagusagawa, Atsushi; Tuda, Kazuaki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a safety processing method without using mechanical pumps or pressure-proof containers and, accordingly, with no risk for the leakage of radioactive rare gas. Method: A container filled with zeolige is inserted with a cover being opened into an autoclave. Meanwhile, krypton-containing gases are supplied to an adsorption tower filled with adsorbents, cooled, adsorbed and then heated to desorb adsorbed krypton. The krypton-containing gases are introduced due to the pressure difference to the autoclave thereby causing krypton to adsorb at ambient temperature to zeolite. Then, the inside of the autoclave is heated to desorb krypton and adsorbed moistures from zeolite and the pressure is elevated. After sending the gases under pressure to the adsorption tower, the zeolite-filled container is taken out from the autoclave, tightly closed and then transferred to a predetermined site. (Takahashi, M.)

  13. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  14. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kikuchi, M; Funabashi, K; Yusa, H; Horiuchi, S

    1978-12-21

    Purpose: To decrease the volume of radioactive liquid wastes essentially consisting of sodium hydroxide and boric acid. Method: The concentration ratio of sodium hydroxide to boric acid by weight in radioactive liquid wastes essentially consisting of sodium hydroxide and boric acid is adjusted in the range of 0.28 - 0.4 by means of a pH detector and a sodium concentration detector. Thereafter, the radioactive liquid wastes are dried into powder and then discharged.

  15. The production of grain oriented lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2O7) ceramics by uniaxial hot-forging process for improved fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceylan, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The layered-structural ceramics, such as lanthanum titanate (La 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), have been known for their good electrical and optical properties at high frequencies and temperatures. However, few studies have been conducted on the mechanical properties of these ceramics. The interest in ceramic hot-forging (HF) has been greatly increased recently due to the enhancement in fracture toughness via bridging effect of oriented grains. In this study, grain oriented lanthanum titanate was produced by the hot-forging process. The characterizations of the samples were achieved by density measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers indentation and three-point bending test. According to X-ray diffraction patterns, the orientation factor (f) was found to be 0.73 for certain hot-forging conditions resulting an improved fracture toughness. The improved fracture toughness of La 2 Ti 2 O 7 (3.2 MPa m 1/2 ) reached to the value of monolithic alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) between 3 and 4 MPa m 1/2

  16. Thermal process for immobilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, L.E.; Isaacson, R.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Schulz, W.W.

    1971-01-01

    The Thermalt process involves an exothermic, thermite-like reaction of aluminum metal with basalt, quartz sand, and radioactive waste. The resulting melt when solidified is a silicious stone-like material that is similar in chemical composition to basalt. The process utilizes low cost ingredients: basalt rock, which occurs naturally in the Hanford region, inexpensive aluminum metal such as aluminum scrap which need not be pure, and the waste which is predominately sodium nitrate salt. The waste itself along with the basalt provides the oxygen necessary for the reaction. The exothermic reaction provides the necessary heat to melt the ingredients thus eliminating the need for external heat sources such as furnaces which are necessary with most other melt methods. The final product is highly stable and essentially nonleachable; leach rates appear as low or lower than other melt products described in the literature. Initial studies indicate the process is effective for both low-level and high-level wastes. (U.S.)

  17. NPP radioactive waste processing and solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforov, A.S.; Polyakov, A.S.; Zakharova, K.P.

    1983-01-01

    The problems of proce-sing NPP intermediate level- and low-level liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) are considered. Various methods are compared of LWR solidification on the base of bituminization, cement grouting and inclusion into synthetic resins. It is concluded that the considered methods ensure radioactive radionuclides effluents into open hydronetwork at the level below the sanitary, standards

  18. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ye; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2015-01-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr 3 ) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr 3 detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R 2 =0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. - Highlights: • An airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was developed to measure radionuclide after a nuclear accident. • A spectrum correction algorithm was proposed to obtain precise information on the detected radioactivity within a small area. • The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. • The corresponding spectrum correction coefficients increase first and then stay constant

  19. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ye [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Tang, Xiao-Bin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2015-10-11

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr{sub 3} detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R{sup 2}=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. - Highlights: • An airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was developed to measure radionuclide after a nuclear accident. • A spectrum correction algorithm was proposed to obtain precise information on the detected radioactivity within a small area. • The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. • The corresponding spectrum correction coefficients increase first and then stay constant.

  20. Method of processing radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootaka, Hisashi; Aizu, Tadashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the volume-reducing effect for the radioactive solids wastes by freezing and then pulverizing them. Method: Miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes produced from a nuclear power plant and packed in vinyl resin bags are filled in a drum can and nitrogen gas at low temperature (lower than 0 0 C) from a cylinder previously prepared by filling liquid nitrogen (at 15kg/cm 2 , -196 0 C) to freeze the radioactive solid wastes. Thereafter, a hydraulic press is inserted into the drum can to compress and pulverize the thus freezed miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes into powder. The powder thus formed does not expand even after removing the hydraulic press from the drum can, whereby the volume reduction of the radioactive solid wastes can be carried out effectively. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Method of processing low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Ichiro; Sugai, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively reduce the radioactivity density of low-level radioactive liquid wastes discharged from enriched uranium conversion processing steps or the likes. Method: Hydrazin is added to low-level radioactive liquid wastes, which are in contact with iron hydroxide-cation exchange resins prepared by processing strongly acidic-cation exchange resins with ferric chloride and aqueous ammonia to form hydrorizates of ferric ions in the resin. Hydrazine added herein may be any of hydrazine hydrate, hydrazine hydrochloride and hydranine sulfate. The preferred addition amount is more than 100 mg per one liter of the liquid wastes. If it is less than 100 mg, the reduction rate for the radioactivety density (procession liquid density/original liquid density) is decreased. This method enables to effectively reduce the radioactivity density of the low-level radioactive liquid wastes containing a trace amount of radioactive nucleides. (Yoshihara, H.)

  2. Method of processing radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motojima, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the efficiency of removing radioactive cesium from radioactive liquid waste by employing zeolite affixed to metallic compound ferrocyanide as an adsorbent. Method: Regenerated liquid waste of a reactor condensation desalting unit, floor drain and so forth are collected through respective supply tubes to a liquid waste tank, and the liquid waste is fed by a pump to a column filled with zeolite containing a metallic compound ferrocyanide, such as with copper, zinc, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel or the like. The liquid waste from which radioactive cesium is removed is dried and pelletized by volume reducing and solidifying means. (Yoshino, Y.)

  3. Radioactive waste processing method and device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Tateyama, Shinji.

    1998-01-01

    A powdery activated carbon is charged to radioactive liquid wastes to form a mixed slurry. The slurry is subjected to solid/liquid separation, and a high-molecular water absorbent is charged to the separated activated carbon sludge wastes to process them while stirring. The high-molecular water absorbent comprises a graft polymer of starch and acrylonitrile or a cross-linked polymer of sodium acrylate and a cross-linking agent. The high-molecular water absorbing agent is previously charged to a vessel for containing the wasted active carbon sludges. The device of the present invention comprises a filtration device for solid/liquid separation of the mixed slurry, a sludge-containing vessel, a device for charging the high-molecular water absorbent and a sludge stirring device. The device of charging the high-molecular water absorbent comprises a plurality of weighing devices for weighing the change of the weight of the charged products and a conveyor for transferring the sludge-containing vessels. With such a constitution, stable sludge can be obtained, and activated carbon sludge wastes can be burnt without crushing them. (T.M.)

  4. Underground processing method for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Yoshihiro

    1998-01-01

    In the present invention, even a processing vessel not having a satisfactory radiation shielding property can be covered by a waterproof material easily and safety. Namely, a large number of small waterproof blocks are laid on the bottom of a discarding hole of a shaft and then a large number of the above-mentioned blocks are stacked along the inner surface of the discarding hole to an appropriate height. A discarding vessel containing radioactive wastes is inserted to the containing space surrounded by each of the blocks, and then a single large waterproof block is settled on the upper portion of the discarding vessel and the discarding hole is closed. The discarding vessel is thus surrounded by the blocks. With such procedures, the small waterproof blocks are disposed while being reliably positioned with no gap by manual operation by operators before containing the discarding vessel into the discarding hole and then the large waterproof blocks can be settled simply by a remote control after containing the discarding vessel. (N.H.)

  5. Radioactive waste disposal process geological structure for the waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, G.; Jaouen, C.

    1983-01-01

    The process described here consists to carry out the two phases of storage operation (intermediate and definitive) of radioactive wastes (especially the vitrified ones) in a geological dispositif (horizontal shafts) at an adequate deepness but suitable for a natural convection ventilation with fresh air from the land surface and moved only with the calorific heat released by the burried radioactive wastes when the radioactive decay has reached the adequate level, the shafts are totally and definitely occluded [fr

  6. Defense Waste Processing Facility radioactive operations -- Part 2, Glass making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.T.; Rueter, K.J.; Ray, J.W.; Hodoh, O.

    1996-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation's first and world's largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly 3 year non-radioactive test program, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March, 1996. The results of the first 8 months of radioactive operations are presented. Topics include facility production from waste preparation batching to canister filling

  7. Microbial processes in radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Karsten [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology

    2000-04-15

    Independent scientific work has unambiguously demonstrated life to be present in most deep geological formations investigated, down to depths of several kilometres. Microbial processes have consequently become an integral part of the performance safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories. This report presents the research record from the last decade of the microbiology research programme of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and gives current perspectives of microbial processes in HLW disposal. The goal of the microbiology programme is to understand how microbes may interact with the performance of a future HLW repository. First, for those who are not so familiar with microbes and their ways of living, the concept of 'microbe' is briefly defined. Then, the main characteristics of recognised microbial assemblage and microbial growth, activity and survival are given. The main part of the report summarises data collected during the research period of 1987-1999 and interpretations of these data. Short summaries introduce the research tasks, followed by reviews of the results and insight gained. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) produce sulphide and have commonly been observed in groundwater environments typical of Swedish HLW repositories. Consequently, the potential for sulphide corrosion of the copper canisters surrounding the HLW must be considered. The interface between the copper canister and the buffer is of special concern. Despite the fact that nowhere are the environmental constraints for life as strong as here, it has been suggested that SRB could survive and locally produce sulphide in concentrations large enough to cause damage to the canister. Experiments conducted thus far have indicated the opposite. Early studies in the research programme revealed previously unknown microbial ecosystems in igneous rock aquifers at depths exceeding 1000 m. This discovery triggered a thorough exploration of the

  8. Microbial processes in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Karsten

    2000-04-01

    Independent scientific work has unambiguously demonstrated life to be present in most deep geological formations investigated, down to depths of several kilometres. Microbial processes have consequently become an integral part of the performance safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories. This report presents the research record from the last decade of the microbiology research programme of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and gives current perspectives of microbial processes in HLW disposal. The goal of the microbiology programme is to understand how microbes may interact with the performance of a future HLW repository. First, for those who are not so familiar with microbes and their ways of living, the concept of 'microbe' is briefly defined. Then, the main characteristics of recognised microbial assemblage and microbial growth, activity and survival are given. The main part of the report summarises data collected during the research period of 1987-1999 and interpretations of these data. Short summaries introduce the research tasks, followed by reviews of the results and insight gained. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) produce sulphide and have commonly been observed in groundwater environments typical of Swedish HLW repositories. Consequently, the potential for sulphide corrosion of the copper canisters surrounding the HLW must be considered. The interface between the copper canister and the buffer is of special concern. Despite the fact that nowhere are the environmental constraints for life as strong as here, it has been suggested that SRB could survive and locally produce sulphide in concentrations large enough to cause damage to the canister. Experiments conducted thus far have indicated the opposite. Early studies in the research programme revealed previously unknown microbial ecosystems in igneous rock aquifers at depths exceeding 1000 m. This discovery triggered a thorough exploration of the

  9. Processing radioactive wastes using membrane (UF/HF/RO) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years many technologies have been utilized to process low level radioactive waste streams generated by the nuclear industry, including: demineralization, evaporation, reverse osmosis and filtration. In the early 1980's interest was generated in membrane technologies and their application to radioactive wastes. This interest was generated based on the capabilities shown by membrane systems in non-radioactive environments and the promise that reverse osmosis systems showed in early testing with radioactive wastes. Membrane technologies have developed from the early development of reverse osmosis system to also include specifically designed membranes for ultrafiltration and hyperfiltration applications

  10. Method of processing radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi; Soda, Kenzo; Mihara, Shigeru.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain satisfactory plastic solidification products rapidly and smoothly by adding oxidizers to radioactive liquid wastes. Method: Sulfuric acid, etc. are added to radioactive liquid wastes to adjust the pH value of the liquid wastes to less than 3.0. Then, ferrous sulfates are added such that the iron concentration in the liquid wastes is 100 mg/l. Then, after adjusting pH suitably to the drying powderization by adding alkali such as hydroxide, the liquid wastes are dried and powderized. The resultant powder is subjected to plastic solidification by using polymerizable liquid unsaturated polyester resins as the solidifying agent. The thus obtained solidification products are stable in view of the physical property such as strength or water proofness, as well as stable operation is possible even for those radioactive liquid wastes in which the content ingredients are unknown. (Takahashi, M.)

  11. Radioactive demonstration of the ''late wash'' Precipitate Hydrolysis Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the DWPF Precipitate Hydrolysis Process as it would occur in the ''late wash'' flowsheet in the absence of hydroxylamine nitrate. Radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 from the April, 1983, in-tank precipitation demonstration in Tank 48 was used for these tests

  12. Fuel cells with doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Man; Goodenough, John B.; Huang, Keqin; Milliken, Christopher

    Single cells with doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte material were constructed and tested from 600 to 800°C. Both ceria and the electrolyte material were mixed with NiO powder respectively to form composite anodes. Doped lanthanum cobaltite was used exclusively as the cathode material. While high power density from the solid oxide fuel cells at 800°C was achieved. our results clearly indicate that anode overpotential is the dominant factor in the power loss of the cells. Better anode materials and anode processing methods need to be found to fully utilize the high ionic conductivity of the doped lanthanum galiate and achieve higher power density at 800°C from solid oxide fuel cells.

  13. Fuel cells with doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Man [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Center for Materials Science and Engineering; Goodenough, J.B. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Center for Materials Science and Engineering; Huang Keqin [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Center for Materials Science and Engineering; Milliken, C. [Cerematec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Single cells with doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte material were constructed and tested from 600 to 800 C. Both ceria and the electrolyte material were mixed with NiO powder respectively to form composite anodes. Doped lanthanum cobaltite was used exclusively as the cathode material. While high power density from the solid oxide fuel cells at 800 C was achieved, our results clearly indicate that anode overpotential is the dominant factor in the power loss of the cells. Better anode materials and anode processing methods need to be found to fully utilize the high ionic conductivity of the doped lanthanum gallate and achieve higher power density at 800 C from solid oxide fuel cells. (orig.)

  14. Process for the encapsulation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, O.; Plows, J.P.; Hill, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive waste material, particularly radioactive ion exchange resin in the wet condition, is encapsulated in a polyurethane by dispersing the waste in an aqueous emulsion of an organic polyol, a polyisocyanate and an hydraulic cement and allowing the emulsion to set to form a monolithic block. If desired the emulsion may also contain additional filler e.g. sand or aggregate to increase the density of the final product. Preferred polyurethanes are those made from a polyester polyol and an organic diisocyanate, particularly hexamethylene diisocyanate. (author)

  15. Synthesis, processing and characterization of the solid oxide half-cells cathode/electrolyte of strontium-doped lanthanum manganite/Yttria-stabilized zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Rubens

    2010-01-01

    The ceramic films of strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) and strontium doped lanthanum manganite/Yttria-stabilized zirconia (LSM/YSZ) are used as cathodes of the high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (HTSOFC). These porous ceramic films had been deposited on the YSZ dense ceramic substrate, used as electrolyte, structural component of the module, thus conferring a configuration of half-cell called auto-support. The study of the half-cell it is basic, therefore in the interface cathode/electrolyte occurs the oxygen reduction reaction, consequently influencing in the performance of the HTSOFC. In this direction, the present work contributes for the processing of thin films, using the wet powder spraying technique, adopted for the conformation of the ceramic films for allowing the attainment of porous layers with thicknesses varied in the order of micrometers. The LSM powders were synthesized by the citrate technique and the LSM/YSZ powders synthesized by the solid mixture technique. In the stage of formation were prepared organic suspensions of LSM and LSM/YSZ fed by gravity in a manual aerograph. For the formation of the YSZ substrate was used a hydraulic uniaxial press. The attainment of solid oxide half-cells cathode/electrolyte was possible of crystalline structures hexagonal for phase LSM and cubic for phase YSZ. The half-cells micrographs show that the YSZ substrate is dense, enough to be used as solid electrolyte, and the LSM and LSM/YSZ films are presented porous with approximately 30 μm of thickness and good adherence between the cathodes and the electrolyte. The presence of composite cathode between the LSM cathode and YSZ substrate, presented an increase in the electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction. (author)

  16. Airborne radioactive effluents: releases and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grissom, M.C.

    1982-10-01

    This bibliography contains 870 citations on airborne radioactive waste included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from January 1981 through August 1982. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  17. Processing method for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro

    1991-01-01

    Drainages, such as water after used for washing operators' clothes and water used for washing hands and for showers have such features that the radioactive concentration is extremely low and detergent ingredients and insoluble ingredients such as waste threads, hairs and dirts are contained. At present, waste threads are removed by a strainer. Then, after measuring the radioactivity and determining that the radioactivity is less than a predetermined concentration, they are released to circumstances. However, various organic ingredients such as detergents and dirts in the liquid wastes are released as they are and it is not preferred in respect of environmental protection. Then, in the present invention, activated carbon is filled in a container orderly so that the diameter of the particles of the activated carbon is increased in the upper layer and decreased in the lower layer, and radioactive liquid wastes are passed through the container. With such a constitution. Both of soluble substances and insoluble substances can be removed efficiently without causing cloggings. (T.M.)

  18. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Kuribayashi, Nobuhide; Minami, Yuji; Kamiyama, Hisashi

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To greatly reduce the quantity of radioactive liquid wastes by subjecting the same to drying treatment, and to granulate the thus formed dry powders to prevent scattering thereof thereby to fill a storage vessel safely with the powders without contaminating the surroundings. Constitution: Radioactive liquid wastes within a storage tank are supplied to a drier where the wastes are subjected to evaporation treatment, and pulverized. The thus dried powders are temporarily stored in a hopper by means of a screw feeder. The dry powders which have reached a predetermined quantity are supplied to a stirrer-granulator by means of a quantitative screw feeder, and mixed and stirred with a binder sent from a binder storage tank through a binder quantity determining device, whereby the powders are granulated. After the granulation, the granulated powders are extruded by a centrifugal force, and filled in the storage vessel by way of a conduit. (Yoshino, Y.)

  19. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Fumio; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Matsuda, Masami.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the performance of removing metal ions in ion exchange resins for use in clean-up of service water or waste water in BWR type reactors. Method: A column filled with activated carbon is disposed at the pre- or post-stage of a clean-up system using ion exchange resins disposed for the clean-up of service water or waste water of a nuclear reactor so that organics contained in water may be removed through adsorption. Since the organic materials are thus adsorbed and eliminated, various types of radioactive ions contained in radioactive liquid are no more masked and the performance of removing ions in the ion exchanger resins of the clean-up device can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Defense Waste Processing Facility -- Radioactive operations -- Part 3 -- Remote operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, W.M.; Kerley, W.D.; Hughes, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina is the nation's first and world's largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly three years of non-radioactive testing, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. Radioactive glass is poured from the joule heated melter into the stainless steel canisters. The canisters are then temporarily sealed, decontaminated, resistance welded for final closure, and transported to an interim storage facility. All of these operations are conducted remotely with equipment specially designed for these processes. This paper reviews canister processing during the first nine months of radioactive operations at DWPF. The fundamental design consideration for DWPF remote canister processing and handling equipment are discussed as well as interim canister storage

  1. Solidification processing method for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Akimitsu; Tanaka, Keiji; Heta, Katsutoshi.

    1991-01-01

    The pressure in a vessel containing radioactive wastes is previously reduced and cement mortar prepared by kneading cement, sand and kneading agent with water is poured under shaking substantially to the upper end of the vessel. After the lowering of the mortar level due to the deforming has been terminated, the pressure is increased gradually. Then, the cement mortar is further poured substantially to the upper end of the vessel again. With such a two step pouring method, spaces other than the radioactive wastes in the vessel can be filled substantially completely with the cement mortar. Accordingly, it is possible to avoid the problem in view of the strength due to the formation of gaps at the inside of the vessel, or leaching of radioactive materials due to the intrusion of water into the gaps. Further, if washing water is reutilized as water for kneading or washing after the precipitation of the solid contents, the amount of the secondary wastes generated can be reduced. (T.M.)

  2. Technical evaluation of proposed Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, R.; Glukhov, A.; Markowski, F.

    1996-06-01

    This technical report is a comprehensive evaluation of the proposal by the Ukrainian State Committee on Nuclear Power Utilization to create a central facility for radioactive waste (not spent fuel) processing. The central facility is intended to process liquid and solid radioactive wastes generated from all of the Ukrainian nuclear power plants and the waste generated as a result of Chernobyl 1, 2 and 3 decommissioning efforts. In addition, this report provides general information on the quantity and total activity of radioactive waste in the 30-km Zone and the Sarcophagus from the Chernobyl accident. Processing options are described that may ultimately be used in the long-term disposal of selected 30-km Zone and Sarcophagus wastes. A detailed report on the issues concerning the construction of a Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility (CRWPF) from the Ukrainian Scientific Research and Design institute for Industrial Technology was obtained and incorporated into this report. This report outlines various processing options, their associated costs and construction schedules, which can be applied to solving the operating and decommissioning radioactive waste management problems in Ukraine. The costs and schedules are best estimates based upon the most current US industry practice and vendor information. This report focuses primarily on the handling and processing of what is defined in the US as low-level radioactive wastes

  3. Development of bituminization process for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segawa, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Masao; Miyao, Hidehiko; Mizuno, Ryukichi

    1973-01-01

    For the bituminization of radioactive wastes from a fuel reprocessing plant, the leachability, irradiation stability and burning property of bitumen products have been studied. Sodium nitrate was used for simulated evaporator concentrate, and mixed with distillation bitumen or blown bitumen; the sodium nitrate content in the mixture was 30 to 60 wt%. The distillation bitumen is superior to the blown bitumen in leachability and flash point, but inferior in the increase of volume by irradiation. Since the volume increase is not large, the distillation bitumen is satisfactory for the bituminization of the evaporator concentrate from a fuel reprocessing plant. (Mori, K.)

  4. Processing of radioactive ruthenium with aluminosilicate gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Takuji; Ichinose, Yasuhiro; Ito, Katsuo

    1979-01-01

    Coprecipitation of radioactive Ru with hydroxides has been studied for the purpose of the management of the high level waste from the nuclear fuel reprocessing. Aluminosilicate gel used as coprecipitant was prepared by addition of aqueous sodium hydroxide to sodium aluminate-sodium silicate solution containing ruthenium nitrate. Ruthenium quantitatively precipitates under the conditions, aluminate > 4 x 10 -2 M, Al/Si 0 C. However, volatilization rate of Ru is suppressed by coating with mullite phase into which aluminosilicate gel transformes above 900 0 C. The amount of Ru volatilized in Ar-flow was reduced to about 10% of that in air-flow. (author)

  5. Automatized material and radioactivity flow control tool in decommissioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, I.; Vasko, M.; Daniska, V.; Schultz, O.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation the automatized material and radioactivity flow control tool in decommissioning process is discussed. It is concluded that: computer simulation of the decommissioning process is one of the important attributes of computer code Omega; one of the basic tools of computer optimisation of decommissioning waste processing are the tools of integral material and radioactivity flow; all the calculated parameters of materials are stored in each point of calculation process and they can be viewed; computer code Omega represents opened modular system, which can be improved; improvement of the module of optimisation of decommissioning waste processing will be performed in the frame of improvement of material procedures and scenarios.

  6. A novel device for processing radioactive combustibles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelan, P.F.; Thompson, T.K.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is assisting EG ampersand G Rocky Flats, Colorado, with the development of a special incinerator for wastes contaminated with plutonium, a radioactive element. This paper describes one conceptual design that was developed by T.K. Thompson, Inc., under contract to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The design is a tentative proposal that tries to address the many constraints that are peculiar to this project. It has not been endorsed or accepted by EG ampersand G Rocky Flats, and it is subject to revision. Nevertheless, it is noteworthy because of the novel concepts it embodies. Before examining the design itself, it is instructive to understand the constraints imposed by safety and operational concerns. There are three main requirements related to safety: There may be no emissions of radioactive material either to the atmosphere or into the building that houses the incinerator. The outer surfaces of the combustion chamber must be kept below 140oF so that the lead-lined rubber gloves will not melt if the operator reaches inside the glovebox while the incinerator is hot. The combustion chambers and other locations where plutonium-containing ash could accumulate must be designed in such a way that it would be impossible for a critically accident to occur. 3 figs

  7. Process for reducing radioactive contamination in waste product gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, P.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for reducing the radioactive contamination in waste product gypsum in which waste product gypsum is reacted with a dilute sulfuric acid containing barium sulfate to form an acid slurry at an elevated temperature, the slurry is preferably cooled, the acid component is separated from the solid, and the resulting solid is separated into a fine fraction and a coarse fraction. The fine fraction predominates in barium sulfate and radioactive contamination. The coarse fraction predominates in a purified gypsum product of reduced radioactive contamination

  8. Membrane preparation and process development for radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    The membrane manufacturing technology with hydrophilic function that can minimize fouling when it applies to the radioactive liquid waste treatment process was developed. Thermodynamic and rheological analysis for polysulfone casting solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone was performed. On the basis of the results of preparation of the hydrophilic polymer membrane solution, the hollow fiber membrane for radioactive liquid waste treatment was manufactured and its performance analysis was carried out. As a results, it turns out the hydrophilic hollow fiber membrane has more 90 % of flux increment effect and also more 2.5 times fouling reducing effect than one prepared with only polysulfone. In addition, as investigating the separation property of radioactive liquid waste for the electrofilteration membrane process, a proper range for application of radioactive liquid wastes was established through the thorough electrofiltration analysis of various wastes containing metal salt, surfactants and oil

  9. Membrane preparation and process development for radioactive waste treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. W.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, S. K. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-01-15

    The membrane manufacturing technology with hydrophilic function that can minimize fouling when it applies to the radioactive liquid waste treatment process was developed. Thermodynamic and rheological analysis for polysulfone casting solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone was performed. On the basis of the results of preparation of the hydrophilic polymer membrane solution, the hollow fiber membrane for radioactive liquid waste treatment was manufactured and its performance analysis was carried out. As a results, it turns out the hydrophilic hollow fiber membrane has more 90 % of flux increment effect and also more 2.5 times fouling reducing effect than one prepared with only polysulfone. In addition, as investigating the separation property of radioactive liquid waste for the electrofilteration membrane process, a proper range for application of radioactive liquid wastes was established through the thorough electrofiltration analysis of various wastes containing metal salt, surfactants and oil.

  10. Evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in an alkaline NaCl solution with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and lanthanum chloride inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Biner; Wang, Yishan; Zuo, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Inhibition effect of LaCl 3 and SDBS for AA 2024 in NaCl solution (pH 10) was studied. • At the beginning the active polarization behavior of the alloy changed to passivation. • The passive behavior gradually disappeared with time and pitting happened at S-phases. • The compounded inhibitors showed good inhibition but cannot totally inhibit pitting. • The adsorption of SDBS played the key role for inhibition to the corrosion process. - Abstract: The evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in 0.58 g L −1 NaCl solution (pH 10) with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and lanthanum chloride inhibitors was studied with electrochemical and surface analysis methods. With the addition of the compounded LaCl 3 and SDBS inhibitors, in the early stage the polarization behavior of AA 2024-T3 changed from active corrosion to passivation, and both the general corrosion and pitting corrosion were inhibited. However, with the immersion time extended, the passive behavior gradually disappeared and pitting happened at the Cu-rich phases. After 24 h immersion, the compounded inhibitors still showed good inhibition for general corrosion, but the polarization curve again presented the characteristic similar to active polarization. The compounded inhibitors also inhibited the pitting corrosion to some extent. The acting mechanism of the inhibitors SDBS and La 3 Cl on the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in the test solution was discussed.

  11. Industrial-Scale Processes For Stabilizing Radioactively Contaminated Mercury Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, T. E.; Grondin, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes two industrial-scaled processes now being used to treat two problematic mercury waste categories: elemental mercury contaminated with radionuclides and radioactive solid wastes containing greater than 260-ppm mercury. The stabilization processes were developed by ADA Technologies, Inc., an environmental control and process development company in Littleton, Colorado. Perma-Fix Environmental Services has licensed the liquid elemental mercury stabilization process to treat radioactive mercury from Los Alamos National Laboratory and other DOE sites. ADA and Perma-Fix also cooperated to apply the >260-ppm mercury treatment technology to a storm sewer sediment waste collected from the Y-12 complex in Oak Ridge, TN

  12. Radioactive waste processing and disposal: A bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1982-05-01

    The Technical Information Center, beginning in 1958, has periodically issued bibliographies on radioactive wastes. This compilation contains 3382 citations of foreign and domestic research reports, journal articles, patents, conference proceedings, and books entered in the DOE Energy Data Base since December 1980. The citations are arranged by subject category as shown in the table of contents. Within a given category the arrangement is alphanumeric by report number. Citations of unnumbered documents are arranged in reverse chronological order after the reports. Each complete bibliographic record is followed by an abstract or a listing of the subject descriptors used to describe the contents of the reference for machine storage and retrieval. In many cases phrases or clauses that augment the title are also included. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate, Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  13. Method of processing radioactive cesium liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Hiroaki; Asaoka, Sachio; Kondo, Tadami; Suzuki, Isao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To convert and settle cesium, mainly, Cs-137 in liquid wastes in the form of pollucites, that is, cesium-containing ores. Constitution: Water, silica, alumina and alkali metal source are mixed with radioactive liquid wastes containing cesium as the main metal element ingredient, to which an onium compound is further added and they are brought into reaction till pollucite ores (Cs 16 (Al 16 Si 32 O 96 )) are formed. Since most portion of cesium is thus settled in the form of pollucites, storage safety can be attained. Further, the addition of the onium compound can moderate the condition and shorten the time till the pollucite ores are formed. The onium compound usable herein includes tetramethyl ammonium. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Site selection process for radioactive waste repository (radioactive facility) in Cuba as a fundamental safety criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vital, Jose Luis Peralta; Castillo, Reinaldo Gil; Chales Suarez, Gustavo; Rodriguez Reyes, Aymee

    1999-01-01

    The paper show the process of search carried out for the selection of the safest site in the National territory, in order to sitting the Facility (Repository) that will disposal the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes, as well as the possible Storage Facility for nuclear spent Fuel (radioactive wastes of high activity). We summarize the obtained Methodology and the Criterions of exclusion adopted for the development of the Process of site selection, as well as the current condition of the researches that will permit the obtaining of the nominative objectives. (author)

  15. Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation's first and the world's largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge trademark level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs

  16. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal [Radioactive Waste Management Unit (RWMU), Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Altinsehir Yolu 5 km. Halkali, 34303K Cekmece, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: Erdal.Osmanlioglu@taek.gov.tr

    2007-01-15

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite.

  17. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2007-01-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite

  18. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2007-01-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite.

  19. Radioactive waste processing and disposal: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, L.H.

    1981-04-01

    The Technical Information Center, beginning in 1958, has periodically issued bibliographies on radioactive wastes. This compilation contains 3700 citations of foreign and domestic research reports, journal articles, patents, conference proceedings, and books entered in the DOE Energy Data Base since Nov. 1979. These references, as well as references from the period January 1967 through November 1979, are available for on-line searching and retrieval using the DOE/RECON system. The citations are arranged by subject category as shown in the table of contents. Within a given category the arrangement is alphanumeric by report number. Citations of unnumbered documents are arranged in reverse chronological order after the reports. Each complete bibliographic record is followed by an abstract or a listing of the subject descriptors used to describe the contents of the reference for machine storage and retrieval. In many cases phrases or clauses that augment the title are also included Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate, Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  20. Quality assurance in processing radioactive waste for land disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    To provide the appropriate assurances as to the quality of processed radioactive waste it is necessary to consider the complete range of activities involved in the formation and operation of a radioactive waste processing facility. To this end, an outline has been given to the individual elements which should be addressed in quality assurance proposals to the authorising Departments. In general terms, the quality checks on product material should be aimed at demonstrating that the radioactive waste product is what was agreed at the time of process approval. In addition, at the discretion of the authorising Departments, the waste processor will be required to confirm that the product meets any specific acceptance criteria such as the capability to retain the immobilised radionuclides when in contact with water. (author)

  1. Radioactive sealed sources production process for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paulo de S.; Ngunga, Daniel M.G.; Camara, Julio R.; Vasquez, Pablo A.S.

    2017-01-01

    providing products and services to the private and governmental Brazilian users of industrial radiography and nucleonic control systems. Radioactive sealed sources are commonly used in nondestructive tests as radiography to make inspections and verify the internal structure and integrity of materials and in nucleonic gauges to control level, density, viscosity, etc. in on-line industrial processes. One of the most important activities carried out by this laboratory is related to the inspection of source projectors devices used in industrial radiography and its constituent parts as well as remote handle control assembly drive cable and guide tube systems. The laboratory also provide for the users iridium-192, cobalt-60 and selenium-75 sealed sources and performs quality control tests replacing spent or contaminated radiative sources. All discard of radioactive source is treated as radioactive waste. Additionally, administrative and commercial processes and protocols for exportation and transport of radioactive material are developed by specialized departments. In this work are presented the mean processes and procedures used by the Sealed Source Production Laboratory such as the arrival of the radioactive material to the laboratory and the source projectors, mechanical inspections, source loading, source leaking tests, etc. (author)

  2. Radioactive sealed sources production process for industrial radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Paulo de S.; Ngunga, Daniel M.G.; Camara, Julio R.; Vasquez, Pablo A.S., E-mail: psantos@ipen.br, E-mail: hobeddaniel@gmail.com, E-mail: jrcamara@ipen.br, E-mail: pavsalva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    providing products and services to the private and governmental Brazilian users of industrial radiography and nucleonic control systems. Radioactive sealed sources are commonly used in nondestructive tests as radiography to make inspections and verify the internal structure and integrity of materials and in nucleonic gauges to control level, density, viscosity, etc. in on-line industrial processes. One of the most important activities carried out by this laboratory is related to the inspection of source projectors devices used in industrial radiography and its constituent parts as well as remote handle control assembly drive cable and guide tube systems. The laboratory also provide for the users iridium-192, cobalt-60 and selenium-75 sealed sources and performs quality control tests replacing spent or contaminated radiative sources. All discard of radioactive source is treated as radioactive waste. Additionally, administrative and commercial processes and protocols for exportation and transport of radioactive material are developed by specialized departments. In this work are presented the mean processes and procedures used by the Sealed Source Production Laboratory such as the arrival of the radioactive material to the laboratory and the source projectors, mechanical inspections, source loading, source leaking tests, etc. (author)

  3. Encephalopathy caused by lanthanum carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Pilar; Cacharro, Luis Maria; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Rosado, Consolacion; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate-binding agent, which is widely used in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. Until now, no significant side-effects have been described for the clinical use of lanthanum carbonate, and there are no available clinical data regarding its tissue stores. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old patient who was admitted with confusional syndrome. The patient received 3750 mg of lanthanum carbonate daily. Examinations were carried out, and the etiology of the encephalopathy of the patient could not be singled out. The lanthanum carbonate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were high, and the syndrome eased after the drug was removed. The results of our study confirm that, in our case, the lanthanum carbonate did cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although lanthanum carbonate seems a safe drug with minimal absorption, this work reveals the problem derived from the increase of serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, and the possibility that it may cross the BBB. Further research is required on the possible pathologies that increase serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, as well as the risks and side-effects derived from its absorption.

  4. Distribution of lanthanum and neodymium in Di(2-ethlhexyl) phosphoric acid and tributylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraikaew, J.; Suparith, N.; Pruantonsai, P.

    1994-01-01

    Lanthanum and neodymium are among the high quantity elements in mixed rare earth from monazite processing. The popular rare earth separation process is liquid-liquid extraction. This research was carried out to study lanthanum and neodymium distribution in two extractants, di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and tributylphosphate. The experimental results show that neodymium distributes in both extractants better than lanthanum. The distribution of both elements are higher at low acidity than at high acidity. Quick and rough investigation by calculating the ratio of distribution coefficient of neodymium to lanthanum in each extractant indicated that La-nd separation efficiency of Di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid is higher than that of tributylphosphate

  5. Boiling water reactor liquid radioactive waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The standard sets forth minimum design, construction and performance requirements with due consideration for operation of the liquid radioactive waste processing system for boiling water reactor plants for routine operation including design basis fuel leakage and design basis occurrences. For the purpose of this standard, the liquid radioactive waste processing system begins at the interfaces with the reactor coolant pressure boundary, at the interface valve(s) in lines from other systems and at those sumps and floor drains provided for liquid waste with the potential of containing radioactive material. The system terminates at the point of controlled discharge to the environment, at the point of interface with the waste solidification system and at the point of recycle back to storage for reuse. The standard does not include the reactor coolant clean-up system, fuel pool clean-up system, sanitary waste system, any nonaqueous liquid system or controlled area storm drains

  6. Liquid radioactive waste processing system for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard sets forth design, construction, and performance requirements, with due consideration for operation, of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System for pressurized water reactor plants for design basis inputs. For the purpose of this Standard, the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System begins at the interfaces with the reactor coolant pressure boundary and the interface valve(s) in lines from other systems, or at those sumps and floor drains provided for liquid waste with the potential of containing radioactive material; and it terminates at the point of controlled discharge to the environment, at the point of interface with the waste solidification system, and at the point of recycle back to storage for reuse

  7. Application of membrane technologies for liquid radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Membrane separation processes have made impressive progress since the first synthesis of membranes almost 40 years ago. This progress was driven by strong technological needs and commercial expectations. As a result the range of successful applications of membranes and membrane processes is continuously broadening. In addition, increasing application of membrane processes and technologies lies in the increasing variations of the nature and characteristics of commercial membranes and membrane apparatus. The objective of the report is to review the information on application of membrane technologies in the processing of liquid radioactive waste. The report covers the various types of membranes, equipment design, range of applications, operational experience and the performance characteristics of different membrane processes. The report aims to provide Member States with basic information on the applicability and limitations of membrane separation technologies for processing liquid radioactive waste streams

  8. The EIX process for radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neville, M.D.; Jones, C.P.; Turner, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Electrical Ion Exchange process to elute ion-exchange materials by ion migration and perform redox and pH changing reactions. Ion exchange media are physically incorporated into an electrode structure with a binder. An electrical driving force is used to enhance absorption at the front fave. Through the choice of absorption media and the applied potential polarity, EIX systems have been shown to absorb cations of IA, IIA, transition and post-transition metals as well as anions. The main applications of EIX relate to the removal/recovery of metals from aqueous streams; these and other uses of the process, along with testing levels, are listed

  9. Process innovations in the management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theyyunni, T.K.

    1995-01-01

    Innovative processes and techniques were investigated for their possible application in the management of low, intermediate and high level radioactive wastes. High decontamination, high volume reduction, process simplicity and operational safety are some of the objectives of these investigation. Based on the favourable results, it is hoped that many of these process innovations can be introduced in the waste management schemes with beneficial results. (author)

  10. Alternative process for treating radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puget, Flavia P.; Massarani, Giulio

    2002-01-01

    In this work an alternative process for treating a wastewater containing dissolved uranium is considered. In order to develop this work, a continuous separation unit, characterized by the solvent extraction, carried out inward the ejector is used. Alamina 336 (a mixture of tri-octyl and tri-decyl amines) is used as extractant in this process. The splitting of the amine-water emulsion formed is carried out in a gravitational separation tank. The result showed that it is possible to reach an efficiency of about 95% for the uranium extraction, for metal concentration in the feed of 10 ppm and a Q fa /Q fo ratio around 500. Furthermore, an efficiency of about 50% is reached for metal concentration in the feed of 1 ppm and for aQ fa /Q fo ratio around 1000, when the liquid flow rate is equal 1200 L/h. (author)

  11. Process and plant for manipulating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baatz, H.; Rittscher, D.

    1979-01-01

    To prepare waste for engineered storage, it is vitrified or calcined (pelleted) into solid pieces in a hot cell. Subsequently the pieces are filled into a radiation protection container made of spherulite cast iron, in which there is a liquid metal. The pieces are embedded in this metal matrix. During the embedding process, the radiation protection container may be heated externally or internally (lost heat device). (DG) [de

  12. Feed Basis for Processing Relatively Low Radioactivity Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the characterization of potential feed for processing relatively low radioactive waste tanks. The feed characterization is based on waste characterization data extracted from the waste characterization system. This data is compared to salt cake sample results from Tanks 37, 38 and 41

  13. Plasma separation process: Disposal of PSP radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    Radioactive wastes, in the form of natural uranium contaminated scrap hardware and residual materials from decontamination operations, were generated in the PSP facilities in buildings R1 and 106. Based on evaluation of the characteristics of these wastes and the applicable regulations, the various options for the processing and disposal of PSP radioactive wastes were investigated and recommended procedures were developed. The essential features of waste processing included: (1) the solidification of all liquid wastes prior to shipment; (2) cutting of scrap hardware to fit 55-gallon drums and use of inerting agents (diatomaceous earth) to eliminate pyrophoric hazards; and (3) compaction of soft wastes. All PSP radioactive wastes were shipped to the Hanford Site for disposal. As part of the waste disposal process, a detailed plan was formulated for handling and tracking of PSP radioactive wastes, from the point of generation through shipping. In addition, a waste minimization program was implemented to reduce the waste volume or quantity. Included in this document are discussions of the applicable regulations, the types of PSP wastes, the selection of the preferred waste disposal approach and disposal site, the analysis and classification of PSP wastes, the processing and ultimate disposition of PSP wastes, the handling and tracking of PSP wastes, and the implementation of the PSP waste minimization program. 9 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs

  14. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes by using zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, T; Mimura, H

    1975-09-18

    The object is to processing radioactive liquid waste by zeolites to be fixed to a solidified body having a very small lixiviation property. The nuclide in radioactive liquid waste is exchanged and adsorbed into natural or synthetic zeolites, which are then burnt to a temperature lower than 1000/sup 0/C -- melting point. Thus, the zeolite structure is broken to form fine amorphous silicate aluminate or silicate aluminate of the nuclide exchanged and adsorbed. Both are very hard to be soluble in water. Further, the lixiviation from the solidified body is limited to the surface thereof, and it will no longer be detected in a few days.

  15. Processing method for discharged radioactive laundry water waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo; Kitsukawa, Ryozo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Kiuchi, Yoshimasa; Hattori, Yasuo.

    1995-01-01

    In order to process discharged radioactive laundry water wastes safely and decrease radioactive wastes, bubbling of a surface active agent in a detergent which causes a problem upon its condensation is suppressed, so that the liquid condensate are continuously and easily dried into a powder. A nonionic surface active agent is used against the bubbling of the surface active agent. In addition, the bubbling in an the evaporation can is reduced, and the powderization is facilitated by adding an appropriate inorganic builder. (T.M.)

  16. Radioactive waste disposal assessment - overview of biosphere processes and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.

    1992-09-01

    This report provides an overview of biosphere processes and models in the general context of the radiological assessment of radioactive waste disposal as a basis for HMIP's response to biosphere aspects of Nirex's submissions for disposal of radioactive wastes in a purpose-built repository at Sellafield, Cumbria. The overview takes into account published information from the UK as available from Nirex's safety and assessment research programme and HMIP's disposal assessment programme, as well as that available from studies in the UK and elsewhere. (Author)

  17. Radioactivity partitioning of oil sludge undergoing incineration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Suhaimi Hamzah; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus

    1997-01-01

    Oil sludge waste is a controlled item under the Atomic Energy Act (Act 304) 1984 of which the radioactivity content shall be subjected to analysis. Apart from that the treatment method also shall be approved by Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB). Thus, an analysis of the oil sludge for MSE fluidized incinerator was conducted to comply with above requirements using various techniques. Further screening analysis of fly ash as well as bed material were done to study the effect of incinerating the sludge. This paper highlights the analysis techniques and discusses the results with respect to the radioactivity level and the fate of radionuclides subjected to the processing of the waste

  18. Radioactive waste processing method for a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kuriyama, O

    1976-06-04

    Object is to subject radioactive liquid waste in a nuclear power plant to reverse permeation process after which it is vaporized and concentrated thereby decreasing the quantity of foam to be used to achieve effective concentration of the liquid waste. Liquid waste containing a radioactive material produced from a nuclear power plant is first applied with pressure in excess of osmotic pressure by a reverse permeation device and is separated into clean water and concentrated liquid by semi-permeable membrane. Next, the thus reverse-permeated and concentrated waste is fed to an evaporator which control foaming by the foam and then further reconcentrated for purification of the liquid waste.

  19. Radioactive waste processing method and processing device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi; Noge, Kenji; Matsuda, Masami; Takeshi, Kiyotaka

    1998-01-01

    Each predetermined amount of aggregates such as cements and sands as water-hardening solidification materials and kneading water are charged from a solidification material containing vessel, an aggregate containing vessel and a kneading water containing vessel to a kneading vessel of a paste supply device. The cements, the sands and the kneading water are kneaded by the rotation of a kneader. A produced solidification material paste is charged from the kneader to a drum through a paste transporting pump. Miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes have been filled in a drum. The solidification paste produced while supplying the cements, the sands and the kneading water into the kneader is discharged from the kneader. Since increase of viscosity of the solid material paste in the kneader is suppressed, the solidification paste can be easily flown into narrow gaps between radioactive miscellaneous solid wastes in the drum. (I.N.)

  20. Process for treating radioactive salt cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method and an apparatus to heat certain particles. These certain particles are heated to make them more desirable. In the heating of these particles, it is often desirable to expand the particles to make a light-weight aggregate. The light-weight aggregate may be used in making a building material or the like. In carrying out the process of heating these particles, there is used air for combustion of the combustible fuel and only a minimum of air for carrying of the particles or expansion of the particles

  1. Decoding Environmental Processes Using Radioactive Isotopes for the Post-Radioactive Contamination Recovery Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumiishi, Misa; Nishimura, Taku; Osawa, Kazutoshi; Renschler, Chris

    2017-04-01

    The continual monitoring of environmental radioactive levels in Fukushima, Japan following the nuclear plant accident in March 2011 provides our society with valuable information in two ways. First, the collected data can be used as an indicator to assess the progress of decontamination efforts. Secondly, the collected data also can be used to understand the behavior of radioactive isotopes in the environment which leads to further understanding of the landform processes. These two aspects are inseparable for us to understand the effects of radioactive contamination in a dynamic environmental system. During the summer of 2016, 27 soil core samples were collected on a farmer's land (rice paddies and forest) in Fukushima, about 20 km northwest of the nuclear plant. Each core was divided into 2.0 - 3.0 cm slices for the Cs-134, Cs-137, and I-131 level measurement. The collected data is being analyzed from multiple perspectives: temporal, spatial, and geophysical. In the forest area, even on the same hillslope, multiple soil types and horizon depths were observed which indicates the challenges in assessing the subsurface radioactive isotope movements. It appears that although highly humic soils show higher or about the same level of radioactivity in the surface layers, as the depth increased, the radioactivity decreased more in those samples compared with more sandy soils. With regard to the direction a slope faces and the sampling altitudes, the correlation between those attributes and radioactivity levels is inconclusive at this moment. The altitude might have affected the fallout level on a single hillslope-basis. However, to determine the correlation, further sampling and the detailed analysis of vegetation and topography might be necessary. Where the surface soil was scraped and new soil was brought in, former rice paddy surface layers did show three-magnitude levels lower of radioactivity in the top layer when compared with forest soils. At the foot of forest

  2. Method of processing liquid wastes containing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kaname; Shirai, Takamori; Nemoto, Kuniyoshi; Yoshikawa, Jun; Matsuda, Takeshi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the number of solidification products by removing, particularly, Co-60 that is difficult to remove in a radioactive liquid wastes containing a water-soluble chelating agent, by adsorbing Co-60 to a specific chelating agent. Method: Liquid wastes containing radioactive cobalt and water-soluble chelating agent are passed through the layer of less water-soluble chelating agent that forms a complex compound with cobalt in an acidic pH region. Thus, the chelating compound of radioactive cobalt (particularly Co-60) is eliminated by adsorbing the same on a specific chelating agent layer. The chelating agent having Co-60 adsorbed thereon is discarded as it is through the cement- or asphalt-solidification process, whereby the number of solidification products to be generated can significantly be suppressed. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Final processing vessel for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejima, Takaya; Hiraki, Akimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    An inorganic inner layer comprising dense inorganic material such as organic polymer-impregnated concretes is formed to about 10 - 50 mm in average thickness at the inside of a metal vessel. Further, the surface of the vessel is formed as a flat surface with no or only small reinforcing protrusions. Thus, if the final processing vessel should be dropped during transportation or handling by mistake, since impact shocks do not concentrate to protrusions as usual, no local stress concentration occurs to the inorganic inner liner layer. Accordingly, the risk of rapture can be reduced greatly. Further, since impact shock resistance layer put between the metal vessel and the inorganic inner liner layer absorbs shocks, a further sufficient strength can be obtained against dropping accident. (T.M.)

  4. Processing method for miscellaneous radioactive solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masami; Komori, Itaru; Nishi, Takashi.

    1995-01-01

    Miscellaneous solid wastes are subjected to heat treatment at a temperature not lower than a carbonizing temperature of organic materials in the wastes and not higher than the melting temperature of inorganic materials in the wastes, for example, not lower than 200degC but not higher than 660degC, and then resultant miscellaneous solid wastes are solidified using a water hardening solidification material. With such procedures, the organic materials in the miscellaneous solids are decomposed into gases. Therefore, solid materials excellent in long term stability can be formed. In addition, since the heat treatment is conducted at a relatively low temperature such as not higher than 660degC, the generation amount of off gases is reduced to simplify an off gas processing system, and since molten materials are not formed, handing is facilitated. (T.M.)

  5. Nanoscale assembly of lanthanum silica with dense and porous interfacial structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Benjamin; Motuzas, Julius; Miller, Christopher R; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C

    2015-02-03

    This work reports on the nanoscale assembly of hybrid lanthanum oxide and silica structures, which form patterns of interfacial dense and porous networks. It was found that increasing the molar ratio of lanthanum nitrate to tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in an acid catalysed sol-gel process alters the expected microporous metal oxide silica structure to a predominantly mesoporous structure above a critical lanthanum concentration. This change manifests itself by the formation of a lanthanum silicate phase, which results from the reaction of lanthanum oxide nanoparticles with the silica matrix. This process converts the microporous silica into the denser silicate phase. Above a lanthanum to silica ratio of 0.15, the combination of growth and microporous silica consumption results in the formation of nanoscale hybrid lanthanum oxides, with the inter-nano-domain spacing forming mesoporous volume. As the size of these nano-domains increases with concentration, so does the mesoporous volume. The absence of lanthanum hydroxide (La(OH)3) suggests the formation of La2O3 surrounded by lanthanum silicate.

  6. Low-level radioactive waste from rare metals processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, J.; Hendricks, D.W.; Feldman, J.; Giardina, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews the situations at the existing Teledyne Wah Chang Co., Inc. located at Albany, Oregon, and the former Carborundum Corp./Amax Specialty Metals, Inc., facilities located at Parkersburg, West Virginia, and Akron, New York, in order to show the extent of the radioactivity problem at rare metals processing facilities and the need to identify for radiological review other rare metal and rare earth processing sites

  7. Experimental study on pyrolysis incineration process for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Mingxie; Qiu Mingcai; Wang Peiyi; Zhou Lianquan; Liu Xiaoqin

    1993-01-01

    In order to treat combustible radioactive wastes containing plastics and rubber in a considerable amount, a pyrolysis incineration process has been developed. Laboratory study and pilot test for the technology were performed. The results obtained in pilot test show that the waste containing a larger amount of plastics and rubber can be burnt perfectly in given technologic conditions, with a high volume-reduction factor obtained, and the process is easy to control

  8. Radioactive waste processing facility and underground processing method for radioactive wastes using the facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuyuki

    1998-01-01

    There are disposed a communication pit laterally extended in an underground base rock, an access pit extended from the ground surface to the communication pit, discarding pits laterally extended at a plurality of longitudinal positions of the communication pit and layered buffer materials for keeping a radioactive waste-sealing container at substantially the center of the discarding pit. The layered buffer material comprises fan-shaped buffer blocks divided so that the axial end faces of inner and outer layers are displaced with each other in the axial direction of the discarding pit and so that the circumferential end faces of the inner and the outer layers are circumferentially displaced with each other. Even if the base lock should move, the layered buffer material reduces the propagation of the movement to the radioactive waste-sealing vessel thereby enabling to enhance supporting strength. (N.H.)

  9. Process for disposal of aqueous solutions containing radioactive isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Peter; Neilson, Jr., Robert M.; Becker, Walter W.

    1979-01-01

    A process for disposing of radioactive aqueous waste solutions whereby the waste solution is utilized as the water of hydration to hydrate densified powdered portland cement in a leakproof container; said waste solution being dispersed without mechanical inter-mixing in situ in said bulk cement, thereafter the hydrated cement body is impregnated with a mixture of a monomer and polymerization catalyst to form polymer throughout the cement body. The entire process being carried out while maintaining the temperature of the components during the process at a temperature below 99.degree. C. The container containing the solid polymer-impregnated body is thereafter stored at a radioactive waste storage dump such as an underground storage dump.

  10. Process for disposal of aqueous solutions containing radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Becker, W.W.

    1979-01-01

    A process for disposing of radioactive aqueous waste solutions whereby the waste solution is utilized as the water of hydration to hydrate densified powdered portland cement in a leakproof container; said waste solution being dispersed without mechanical inter-mixing in situ in said bulk cement, thereafter the hydrated cement body is impregnated with a mixture of a monomer and polymerization catalyst to form polymer throughout the cement body. The entire process being carried out while maintaining the temperature of the components during the process at a temperature below 99 0 C. The container containing the solid polymer-impregnated body is thereafter stored at a radioactive waste storage dump such as an underground storage dump

  11. Chemical precipitation processes for the treatment of aqueous radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Chemical precipitation by coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation has been commonly used for many years to treat liquid (aqueous) radioactive waste. This method allows the volume of waste to be substantially reduced for further treatment or conditioning and the bulk of the waste to de discharged. Chemical precipitation is usually applied in combination with other methods as part of a comprehensive waste management scheme. As with any other technology, chemical precipitation is constantly being improved to reduce cost to increase the effectiveness and safety on the entire waste management system. The purpose of this report is to review and update the information provided in Technical Reports Series No. 89, Chemical Treatment of Radioactive Wastes, published in 1968. In this report the chemical methods currently in use for the treatment of low and intermediate level aqueous radioactive wastes are described and illustrated. Comparisons are given of the advantages and limitations of the processes, and it is noted that good decontamination and volume reduction are not the only criteria according to which a particular process should be selected. Emphasis has been placed on the need to carefully characterize each waste stream, to examine fully the effect of segregation and the importance of looking at the entire operation and not just the treatment process when planning a liquid waste treatment facility. This general approach includes local requirements and possibilities, discharge authorization, management of the concentrates, ICRP recommendations and economics. It appears that chemical precipitation process and solid-liquid separation techniques will continue to be widely used in liquid radioactive waste treatment. Current research and development is showing that combining different processes in one treatment plant can provide higher decontamination factors and smaller secondary waste arisings. Some of these processes are already being incorporated into new and

  12. A process for treating radioactive water-reactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziewinski, J.; Lussiez, G.; Munger, D.

    1995-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and other locations in the complex of experimental and production facilities operated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have generated an appreciable quantity of hazardous and radioactive wastes. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) enacted by the United States Congress in 1976 and subsequently amended in 1984, 1986, and 1988 requires that every hazardous waste must be rendered nonhazardous before disposal. Many of the wastes generated by the DOE complex are both hazardous and radioactive. These wastes, called mixed wastes, require applying appropriate regulations for radioactive waste disposal and the regulations under RCRA. Mixed wastes must be treated to remove the hazardous waste component before they are disposed as radioactive waste. This paper discusses the development of a treatment process for mixed wastes that exhibit the reactive hazardous characteristic. Specifically, these wastes react readily and violently with water. Wastes such as lithium hydride (LiH), sodium metal, and potassium metal are the primary wastes in this category

  13. Decontamination processes for low level radioactive waste metal objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longnecker, E.F.; Ichikawa, Sekigo; Kanamori, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    Disposal and safe storage of contaminated nuclear waste is a problem of international scope. Although the greatest volume of such waste is concentrated in the USA and former Soviet Union, Western Europe and Japan have contaminated nuclear waste requiring attention. Japan's radioactive nuclear waste is principally generated at nuclear power plants since it has no nuclear weapons production. However, their waste reduction, storage and disposal problems may be comparable to that of the USA on an inhabited area basis when consideration is given to population density where Japan's population, half that of the USA, lives in an area slightly smaller than that of California's. If everyone's backyard was in California, the USA might have insoluble radioactive waste reduction, storage and disposal problems. Viewing Japan's contaminated nuclear waste as a national problem requiring solutions, as well as an economic opportunity, Morikawa began research and development for decontaminating low level radioactive nuclear waste seven years ago. As engineers and manufacturers of special machinery for many years Morikawa brings special electro/mechanical/pneumatic Skills and knowledge to solving these unique problems. Genden Engineering Services and Construction Company (GESC), an affiliate of Japan Atomic Power Company, recently joined with Morikawa in this R ampersand D effort to decontaminate low level radioactive nuclear waste (LLW) and to substantially reduce the volume of such nuclear waste requiring long term storage. This paper will present equipment with both mechanical and chemical processes developed over these several years by Morikawa and most recently in cooperation with GESC

  14. THE USE OF POLYMERS IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, E.; Fondeur, F.

    2013-04-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), one of the largest U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, has operated since the early 1950s. The early mission of the site was to produce critical nuclear materials for national defense. Many facilities have been constructed at the SRS over the years to process, stabilize and/or store radioactive waste and related materials. The primary materials of construction used in such facilities are inorganic (metals, concrete), but polymeric materials are inevitably used in various applications. The effects of aging, radiation, chemicals, heat and other environmental variables must therefore be understood to maximize service life of polymeric components. In particular, the potential for dose rate effects and synergistic effects on polymeric materials in multivariable environments can complicate compatibility reviews and life predictions. The selection and performance of polymeric materials in radioactive waste processing systems at the SRS are discussed.

  15. A very high energy imaging for radioactive wastes processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.; Pettier, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    The X imaging occurs at a lot of steps of the radioactive wastes processing: selection for conditioning, physical characterization with a view to radiological characterization, quality control of the product before storage, transport or disposal. Size and volume of the objects considered here necessitate to work with very high energy systems. Here is shown, through some examples, in which conditions this X imaging is carried out as well as the contribution of the obtained images. (O.M.)

  16. Processing and monitoring liquid, radioactive effluents from the Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehlein, G.; Huppert, K.L.; Winter, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (WAK) serves as a demonstration plant for the processing of highly-irradiated uranous oxide. The high active waste concentrates find interim storage at the WAK until they are solidified at a later stage. In contrast to this, the slightly- and the medium-active liquid wastes are transported to the decontamination facility of the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe, where they are immediately processed. These liquid wastes contain about 1 per thousand of the activity inventary of the fuel elements processed. Monitoring of the radioactive waste water of the WAK is carried out by the Nuclear Research Centre's department radiation protection and safety. (orig.) [de

  17. Processing of miscellaneous radioactive effluents by continous flocculation decantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, D.; Matton, P.; Petteau, J.L.; Roofthooft, R.

    1985-01-01

    In the nuclear power plant of Chooz an installation for flocculation and chemical precipitation has been built to treat miscellaneous radioactive effluents continuously. It is an industrial prototype of 5 m 3 /h resulting of several years of research, first on lab scale in a discontinous system and finally in a continuous pilot plant of small size (500 l/h). The process is based on the adsorption of radioactivity on a floc of copper-ferrocyanide precipitated by ferric chloride. The water is then filtered. After a series of preliminary tests and modifications, it has been possible to develop a technique which satisfies the specified decontamination conditions and to reduce the discharges of radioactivity to the Meuse to only 5 - 10% of the authorized limits. The process aims principally at the treatment of laundry waste, but other effluents such as drains from the rocks, pool water and used decontamination solutions (of the primary pumps) have been treated. A technico-economic evaluation of the process in comparison with evaporation is clearly in favour of the flocculation. 31 figs, 40 tables, 12 refs

  18. USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WESTCOTT, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary

  19. USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WESTCOTT, J.L.; JOCHEN; PREVETTE

    2007-01-01

    Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State are being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary

  20. Radioactive waste management of experimental DUPIC fuel fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Yang, M. S.; Hong, K. P.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) is a dry processing technology to manufacture CANDU compatible DUPIC fuel from spent PWR fuel material. Real spent PWR fuel was used in IMEF M6 hot cell to carry out DUPIC experiment. Afterwards, about 200 kg-U of spent PWR fuel is supposed to be used till 2006. This study has been conducted in some hot cells of PIEF and M6 cell of IMEF. There are various forms of nuclear material such as rod cut, powder, green pellet, sintered pellet, fabrication debris, fuel rod, fuel bundle, sample, and process waste produced from various manufacturing experiment of DUPIC fuel. After completing test, the above nuclear wastes and test equipment etc. will be classified as radioactive waste, transferred to storage facility and managed rigorously according to domestic and international laws until the final management policy is determined. It is desirable to review management options in advance for radioactive waste generated from manufacturing experiment of DUPIC nuclear fuel as well as residual nuclear material and dismantled equipment. This paper includes basic plan for DUPIC radwaste, arising source and estimated amount of radioactive waste, waste classification and packing, transport cask, transport procedures

  1. Method of processing radioactive nuclide-containing liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Masahide; Tomoshige, Shozo; Kondo, Kozo; Suzuki, Kazunori; Todo, Fukuzo; Yamanaka, Akihiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To solidify radioactive nuclides in to a much compact state and facilitate the storage. Method: Liquid wastes such as drain liquids generated from a nuclear power plant at a low density of 1 x 10 -6 - 10 -4 μCi/ml are previously brought into contact with a chelate type ion exchange resin such as of phenolic resin or ion exchange resin to adsorb the radioactive nuclides on the resin and the nuclides are eluted with sulfuric acid or the like to obtain liquid concentrates. The liquid concentrates are electrolyzed in an ordinary electrolytic facility using platinum or the like as the anode, Al or the like as the cathode, under the presence of 1 - 20 g/l of non-radioactive heavy metals such as Co and Ni in the liquid and while adjusting pH to 2 - 8. The electrolysis liquid residue is returned again to the electrolysis tank as it is or in the form of precipitates coagulated with a polymeric floculant. The supernatant liquid upon floculating treatment is processed with the chelate type ion exchange resin into hazardless liquid. (Sekiya, K.)

  2. Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive sludges from four tanks were tested in a lab-scale apparatus. Maximum hydrogen generation rates varied from 5 x10 -7 g H 2 /hr/g of sludge from the least reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 51) to 2 x10 -4 g H 2 /hr/g of sludge from the most reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 11). The time required for the hydrogen generation to reach a maximum varied from 4.1 to 25 hours. In addition to hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were produced and the pH of the reaction slurry increased. In all cases, the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were generated before the hydrogen. The results are in agreement with large-scale studies using simulated sludges

  3. Calcium and lanthanum solid base catalysts for transesterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K. Y. Simon; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.

    2015-07-28

    In one aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises calcium hydroxide and lanthanum hydroxide, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g. In another aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises a calcium compound and a lanthanum compound, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g, and a total basicity of about 13.6 mmol/g. In further another aspect, a heterogeneous catalyst comprises calcium oxide and lanthanum oxide, wherein the catalyst has a specific surface area of more than about 10 m.sup.2/g. In still another aspect, a process for preparing a catalyst comprises introducing a base precipitant, a neutral precipitant, and an acid precipitant to a solution comprising a first metal ion and a second metal ion to form a precipitate. The process further comprises calcining the precipitate to provide the catalyst.

  4. Processing of combustible radioactive waste using incineration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maestas, E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Member countries numerous incineration concepts are being studied as potential methods for conditioning alpha-bearing and other types of combustible radioactive waste. The common objective of these different processes is volume reduction and the transformation of the waste to a more acceptable waste form. Because the combustion processes reduce the mass and volume of waste to a form which is generally more inert than the feed material, the resulting waste can be more uniformly compatible with safe handling, packaging, storage and/or disposal techniques. The number of different types of combustion process designed and operating specifically for alpha-bearing wastes is somewhat small compared with those for non-alpha radioactive wastes; however, research and development is under way in a number of countries to develop and improve alpha incinerators. This paper provides an overview of most alpha-incineration concepts in operation or under development in OECD/NEA Member countries. The special features of each concept are briefly discussed. A table containing characteristic data of incinerators is presented so that a comparison of the major programmes can be made. The table includes the incinerator name and location, process type, capacity throughput, operational status and application. (author)

  5. Low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing in plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauchyn, V.; Khvedchyn, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2013-01-01

    Methods of low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing comprise: cementation, bituminization, curing in polymer matrices, combustion and pyrolysis. All these methods are limited in their application in the field of chemical, morphological, and aggregate composition of material to be processed. The thermal plasma method is one of the universal methods of RAW processing. The use of electric-arc plasma with mean temperatures 2000 - 8000 K can effectively carry out the destruction of organic compounds into atoms and ions with very high speeds and high degree of conversion. Destruction of complex substances without oxygen leads to a decrease of the volume of exhaust gases and dimension of gas cleaning system. This paper presents the plasma reactor for thermal processing of low and intermediate level radioactive waste of mixed morphology. The equipment realizes plasma-pyrolytic conversion of wastes and results in a conditioned product in a single stage. As a result, the volume of conditioned waste is significantly reduced (more than 10 times). Waste is converted into an environmentally friendly form that suits long-term storage. The leaching rate of macro-components from the vitrified compound is less than 1.10 -7 g/(cm 2 .day). (authors)

  6. Separation processes for high-level radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, D.G.

    1992-11-01

    During World War II, production of nuclear materials in the United States for national defense, high-level waste (HLW) was generated as a byproduct. Since that time, further quantities of HLW radionuclides have been generated by continued nuclear materials production, research, and the commercial nuclear power program. In this paper HLW is defined as the highly radioactive material resulting from the processing of spent nuclear fuel. The HLW is the liquid waste generated during the recovery of uranium and plutonium in a fuel processing plant that generally contains more than 99% of the nonvolatile fission products produced during reactor operation. Since this paper deals with waste separation processes, spent reactor fuel elements that have not been dissolved and further processed are excluded

  7. Packaging of radioactive sludges at the Saclay effluent processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerre, Pierre; Mestre, Emile; Bourdrez, Jean; Leconnetable, Jean

    1964-10-01

    The authors describe technical and technological aspects of the packaging workshop for radioactive sludges produced by processes of co-precipitation of Saclay effluents. This facility is an achievement of studies which aimed at improving working conditions for the plant staff. This workshop implements a process of solidification of filtered sludge by mixing with a hydraulic binding agent. After some generalities on the decontamination process applied to effluents produced by the Saclay research centre, the authors present and describe the adopted process, propose a physical description of the facility: building, chemical engineering equipment (filtration, packaging, and handling). They describe facility operation: introduction of a block into the cell, block filling, output of a packaged container. They briefly discuss the first results of facility exploitation [fr

  8. Low-level radioactive waste processing at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The Solid Radwaste Processing Source Book is presented as a supplement to the Liquid Radwaste Source Book released in 1990 and updated in 1991. The publication is the result of an industry-wide survey, and is intended as a resource for technical and managerial decisions involving of the processing of solid radioactive waste including ''wet'' and ''dry'' active waste as found at both Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactor sites. In addition to information on processes, vendors, volumes, and in-plant management activities, technology under consideration for future use and computer applications are listed. Together with key personnel and contact information contained in the Liquid Source Books, the collected data will be of great use when seeking specific, unbiased experience on which to base decisions related to so processing, disposal policy, or potential economic and regulatory impact

  9. The acid digestion process for radioactive waste: The radioactive waste management series. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecille, L.; Simon, R.

    1983-01-01

    This volume focuses on the acid digestion process for the treatment of alpha combustible solid waste by presenting detailed performance figures for the principal sub-assemblies of the Alona pilot plant, Belgium. Experience gained from the operation of the US RADTU plant, the only other acid digestion pilot plant, is also summarized, and the performances of these two plants compared. In addition, the research and development programmes carried out or supported by the Commission of the European Communities are reviewed, and details of an alternative to acid digestion for waste contamination described. Topics considered include review of the treatment of actinides-bearing radioactive wastes; alpha waste arisings in fuel fabrication; Alona Demonstration Facility for the acid digestion process at Eurochemic Mol (Belgium); the treatment of alpha waste at Eurochemic by acid digestion-feed pretreatment and plutonium recovery; US experience with acid digestion of combustible transuranic waste; and The European Communities R and D actions on alpha waste

  10. Process and closure system for a radioactive waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andre.

    1974-01-01

    The closure process described is for a cylindrical radioactive waste drum. It makes use of a closure system for the drum comprising two lids separated by a twin flange seal. It consists essentially in placing a double flange 'O' ring inside the upper lip of the drum, and after filling has been completed, fitting the first lid on the twin flange 'O' ring and pushing down this lid whilst squashing the upper flange and then putting on the second lid in the usual prescribed manner. A description is also given of the drum sealing apparatus [fr

  11. Foaming and Antifoaming in Radioactive Waste Pretreatment and Immobilization Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasan, Darsh T.; Nikolov, Alex D.; Lamber, D.P.; Calloway, T. Bond; Stone, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has reported severe foaminess in the bench scale evaporation of the Hanford River Protection - Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WPT) envelope C waste. Excessive foaming in waste evaporators can cause carryover of radionuclides and non-radioactive waste to the condensate system. The antifoams used at Hanford and tested by SRNL are believed to degrade and become inactive in high pH solutions. Hanford wastes have been known to foam during evaporation causing excessive down time and processing delays

  12. Solid radioactive waste processing facility of the NPP Leningrad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichard, Swetlana

    2008-01-01

    On behalf of the Russian Company Rosenergoatom NUKEM Technologies GmbH is planning and constructing a complete facility for the processing of solid low- and medium-active radioactive wastes. The NPP Leningrad comprises 4 units of RBMK-1000 reactors, the plant life has been extended by 15 years, the first unit is to be decommissioned in 2018. The construction of four new units is planned. NUKEM is in charge of planning, manufacture, construction and startup of the following facilities: sorting, internal transport, combustion and waste gas cleaning, emission surveillance, compacting, packaging and radiological measurement.

  13. Waste processing system for product contaminated with radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotoyama, Koichi; Takaya, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Suehiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to processing contaminated products while separating them into metals at high contamination level and non-metals at low contamination level. Constitution: Pulverized radioactive wastes conveyed on a conveyor belt are uniformly irradiated by a ring-illumination device and then they are picked-up by a television camera or the like. The picked-up signals are sent to an image processing device, applied with appropriate binarization and metal objects are separated by utilizing the light absorbing property of non-metal and light reflection property of metals. The graviational center for the metal object is calculated from the binarized image, the positional information is provided to a robot controller and the metal object is transferred to another position by a robot. Since only the metal object at high radioactive contamination level can be taken out separately, it is no more necessary to process the entire wastes as the high level decontamination products, to thereby provide an economical advantage. (Sekiya, K.)

  14. On the data processing related to environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Isamu

    1984-01-01

    The monitoring and measurement of environmental radioactivity have been undertaken by many organizations in Japan. The Japan Chemical Analysis Center has been entrusted by the government to gather and edit these measured results. The computer processing of these data started in 1978, and it is expected that by the end of fiscal year 1984, all fallout data since 1957 and all radioactivity monitoring data since 1969 can be registered. The computer programs for processing the data such as the output of tables and figures have also been developed, and the edition of reports has been made. The replacement of the computer and the development of a new processing system capable of handing Kanji (Japanese-Chinese characters) are now scheduled. This document outlines the data system such as the quality, quantity and origin of the measured data and the frequency of report publication. Some results of the analysis of fallout nuclides, space gamma dose rate and the total β-activity in rain are presented. The effects of the nuclear explosion tests in China are very obvious in these figures. A chronological table of the explosion tests in China is also presented. The different effects of time lag at the different places of measurement are also seen. The effects of the presence of nuclear power plants were also investigated at some sites of the plants, but no discernible effect was observed. (Aoki, K.)

  15. Melt processing of radioactive waste: A technical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.E.; Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear operations have resulted in the accumulation of large quantities of contaminated metallic waste which are stored at various DOE, DOD, and commercial sites under the control of DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste will accumulate at an increasing rate as commercial nuclear reactors built in the 1950s reach the end of their projected lives, as existing nuclear powered ships become obsolete or unneeded, and as various weapons plants and fuel processing facilities, such as the gaseous diffusion plants, are dismantled, repaired, or modernized. For example, recent estimates of available Radioactive Scrap Metal (RSM) in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex have suggested that as much as 700,000 tons of contaminated 304L stainless steel exist in the gaseous diffusion plants alone. Other high-value metals available in the DOE complex include copper, nickel, and zirconium. Melt processing for the decontamination of radioactive scrap metal has been the subject of much research. A major driving force for this research has been the possibility of reapplication of RSM, which is often very high-grade material containing large quantities of strategic elements. To date, several different single and multi-step melting processes have been proposed and evaluated for use as decontamination or recycling strategies. Each process offers a unique combination of strengths and weaknesses, and ultimately, no single melt processing scheme is optimum for all applications since processes must be evaluated based on the characteristics of the input feed stream and the desired output. This paper describes various melt decontamination processes and briefly reviews their application in developmental studies, full scale technical demonstrations, and industrial operations

  16. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  17. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  18. Return transport of processed radioactive waste from France and Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    The report on returning transport and interim storage of processed radioactive waste from France and Great Britain in vitrified block containers covers the following issues: German contracts with radioactive waste processing plants concerning the return of processed waste to Germany; optimized radioactive waste processing using vitrified block containers; the transport casks as basic safety with respect to radiation protection; interim storage of processes high-level waste by GNS in Gorleben; licensing, inspections and declarations; quality assurance and control.

  19. Production and processing of spinel semi-porous sintered blocks to CAD-CAM with lanthanum-glass infiltration for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenco, A.A.C.; Ogasawara, T.; Costa Neto, C.A.; Santos, F.V.C.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to obtain direct synthesis and sintering spinel by using powder mixing method for CAD-CAM ceramics manufacturing. Powders of alumina and magnesia (71.8 wt% Al2O3 and 28.2 wt% MgO) were mixed with 5 wt% of PVA and PEG binders and homogenized using ball mill (12h), then deagglomerated and submitted to uniaxial pressing into discs and plates (54 to 221.96 MPa), followed by isostatic pressing (186.03 MPa) and sintering at 1500 deg C(GrI) , 1600 C(GrII) and 1700 deg C(GrIII). Characterizations: XRD, density and four-point flexural strength and (for GrIII) elasticity modulus and Vickers microhardness. Lanthanum-glass was infiltrated into samples from all three Groups. Conclusions: (1) Plenty success for the pediatrician method; (2) Maximum density achieved for GrIII, best mechanical strength for GrII (compared to that of commercial product ), this last one being the most indicated for In-Ceram manufacturing via CAD-CAM route; (3) The flexural strength of GrI might be improved a lot after Lanthanum-glass infiltration. (author)

  20. Handling and processing of radioactive waste from nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this report is to provide technical information and reference material on different steps and components of radioactive waste management for staff in establishments that use radionuclides and in research centres in Member States. It provides technical information on the safe handling, treatment, conditioning and storage of waste arising from the various activities associated with the production and application of radioisotopes in medical, industrial, educational and research facilities. The technical information cited in this report consists mainly of processes that are commercialised or readily available, and can easily be applied as they are or modified to solve specific waste management requirements. This report covers the sources and characteristics of waste and approaches to waste classification, and describes the particular processing steps from pretreatment until storage of conditioned packages

  1. Method of volume-reducing processing for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Koei; Yamauchi, Noriyuki; Hirayama, Toshihiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To process the processing products of radioactive liquid wastes and burnable solid wastes produced from nuclear facilities into stable solidification products by heat melting. Method: At first, glass fiber wastes of contaminated air filters are charged in a melting furnace. Then, waste products obtained through drying, sintering, incineration, etc. are mixed with a proper amount of glass fibers and charged into the melting furnace. Both of the charged components are heated to a temperature at which the glass fibers are melted. The burnable materials are burnt out to provide a highly volume-reduced products. When the products are further heated to a temperature at which metals or metal oxides of a higher melting point than the glass fiber, the glass fibers and the metals or metal oxides are fused to each other to be combined in a molecular structure into more stabilized products. The products are excellent in strength, stability, durability and leaching resistance at ambient temperature. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Method of electrolytic processing for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Yoshiharu; Tamai, Hideaki.

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes containing sodium compounds are electrolized using mercury as a cathode. As a result, they are separated into sodium-containing metal amalgam and residues. Metals containing sodium are separated from amalgam, purified and re-utilized, while mercury is recycled to the electrolysis vessel. The foregoing method can provide advantageous effect such as: (1) volume of the wastes to be processed can be reduced, (2) since processing can be carried out at a relatively low temperature, low boiling elements can be handled with no evaporization, (3) useful elements can be recovered and (4) other method than glass solidification can easily be employed remarkable volume-reduction of solidification products can be expected. (K.M.)

  3. Radioactive waste package assay facility. Volume 3. Data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creamer, S.C.; Lalies, A.A.; Wise, M.O.

    1992-01-01

    This report, in three volumes, covers the work carried out by Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd, and two major sub-contractors: Harwell Laboratory (AEA Technology) and Siemens Plessey Controls Ltd, on the development of a radioactive waste package assay facility, for cemented 500 litre intermediate level waste drums. Volume 3, describes the work carried out by Siemens Plessey Controls Ltd on the data-processing aspects of an integrated waste assay facility. It introduces the need for a mathematical model of the assay process and develops a deterministic model which could be tested using Harwell experimental data. Relevant nuclear reactions are identified. Full implementation of the model was not possible within the scope of the Harwell experimental work, although calculations suggested that the model behaved as predicted by theory. 34 figs., 52 refs., 5 tabs

  4. Astrophysical r- and rp-processes, and radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Richard N.

    1998-01-01

    The modern description of the r-process follows naturally from α-rich freezeout, thought to occur in the hot neutrino wind just beyond the nascent neutron star in a type II supernova. Initially, all pre-existing nuclei are reduced to α-particles and neutrons. As the environment cools, nuclei up to about mass 90 to 100 u are synthesized, in nuclear statistical equilibrium, in about 1 s. In the next few seconds, the remaining neutrons are captured to form the r-process progenitors, which then decay to the r-process nuclides. The rp-process occurs in a high-temperature H-rich environment. It is one of the processes that synthesize the p-process nuclei, the most neutron-poor nuclei in the periodic table. It is thought to occur during the explosion of a C-O white dwarf in a type Ia supernova or in a binary system during accretion onto a white dwarf or a neutron star. It appears to be capable of forming the p-nuclei up to about mass 90 u. Both processes pass through nuclei that are far from stability. Thus, their description requires the masses, half-lives, decay modes, and structure of these nuclei. The next generation of radioactive beam facilities promises to allow the study of many such nuclei. (author)

  5. Process for processing and conditioning radioactive effluents of low and medium activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taponier, Jean; Pierlas, Rene.

    1979-01-01

    Preferably continuous process for processing radioactive effluents of low and medium activity, comprising an effluent pre-treatment: precipitation of radioactive compounds to form a stable suspension that can be concentrated. Then a mix is made of 0.6 to 2 parts of cement by weight for one part by weight of suspension, from 0.5 to 5% by weight, in relation to the cement, of asbestos fibre and, if necessary, added water for the cement to set, this suspension containing from 15 to 75% by weight of dry extract and a suspension agent. The homogeneous mix achieved is poured into a container [fr

  6. Data Processing and Programming Applied to an Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinidad, J. A.; Gasco, C.; Palacios, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    This report is the original research work presented for the attainment of the author master degree and its main objective has been the resolution -by means of friendly programming- of some of the observed problems in the environmental radioactivity laboratory belonging to the Department of Radiological Surveillance and Environmental Radioactivity from CIEMAT. The software has been developed in Visual Basic for applications in Excel files and it solves by macro orders three of the detected problems: a) calculation of characteristic limits for the measurements of the beta total and beta rest activity concentrations according to standards MARLAP, ISO and UNE and the comparison of the three results b) Pb-210 and Po-210 decontamination factor determination in the ultra-low level Am-241 analysis in air samples by alpha spectrometry and c) comparison of two analytical techniques for measuring Pb-210 in air ( direct-by gamma spectrometry- and indirect -by radiochemical separation and alpha spectrometry). The organization processes of the different excel files implied in the subroutines, calculations and required formulae are explained graphically for its comprehension. The advantage of using this kind of programmes is based on their versatility and the ease for obtaining data that lately are required by tables that can be modified as time goes by and the laboratory gets more data with the special applications for describing a method (Pb-210 decontamination factors for americium analysis in air) or comparing temporal series of Pb-210 data analysed by different methods (Pb-210 in air). (Author)

  7. Experimental study on intermediate level radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakura, Tadashi; Abe, Hirotoshi; Okazawa, Takao; Hattori, Seiichi; Maki, Yasuro

    1977-01-01

    In the disposal of intermediate level radioactive wastes, multilayer package will be adopted. The multilayer package consists of cement-solidified waste and a container such as a drum - can with concrete liner or a concrete container. So, on the waste to be cement-solidified in such container, experimental study was carried out as follows. (1) Cement-solidification method. (2) Mechanical behaviour of cement-solidified waste. The mechanical behaviour of the containers was studied by the finite element method and experiment, and the function of pressure-balancing valves was also studied. The following data on processing intermediate level radioactive wastes were obtained. (1) In the case of cement-solidified waste, the data to select the suitable solidifying material and the standard mixing proportion were determined. (2) The basic data concerning the uniaxial compressive strength of cement-solidified waste, the mechanical behaviour of cement-solidified waste packed in a drum under high hydrostatic pressure, the shock response of cement-solidified waste at the time of falling and so on were obtained. (3) The pressure-balancing valves worked at about 0.5 Kg/cm 2 pressure difference inside and outside a container, and the deformation of a drum cover was 10 to 13 mm. In case of the pressure difference less than 0,5 Kg/cm 2 , the valves shut, and water flow did occur. (auth.)

  8. Method of processing cellulose filter sludge containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Setsuo; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Kusakabe, Takao; Kawakami, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    To cellulose filter sludges deposited with radioactive wastes, 1 to 15% of cellulase based on the solid content of the filter sludges is caused to act in an aqueous medium with 4 to 8 pH at 10 to 50degC. If the pH value exceeds 8, hydrolyzing effect of cellulase is decreased, whereas a tank is corroded if the pH value is 4 or lower. If temperature is lower than 10degC, the rate of the hydrolysis reaction is too low to be practical. It is appropriate that the temperature is at the order of 40degC. If it exceeds 50degC, the cellulase itself becomes unstable. It is most effective that the amount of cellulase is about 8% and its addition by more than 15% is not effective. In this way, liquids in which most of filter sludges are hydrolyzed are processed as low level radioactive wastes. (T.M.)

  9. Processes for the administration give the radio-active lightning rod in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres de Miranda, L.E.; Vicente, R.

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive lightning rods were manufactured in Brazil until 1989, when the national nuclear authority lifted the licenses to using radioactive sources in this consumer product. Since then, the installed devices are being replaced by Franklin type rods and being collected for treatment as radioactive waste. In this report we present options for the treatment of this radioactive waste. The conclusions may serve as input to the process of decision on the overall management strategic to be adopted by the authorities

  10. Processing method and device for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Yukita, Atsushi.

    1997-01-01

    When only suspended particulate ingredients are contained as COD components in radioactive washing liquid wastes, the liquid wastes are heated by a first process, for example, an adsorption step to adsorb the suspended particulate ingredients to an activated carbon, and then separating and removing the suspended particulate ingredients by filtration. When both of the floating particle ingredients and soluble organic ingredients are contained, the suspended particulate ingredients are separated and removed by the first process, and then soluble organic ingredients are removed by other process, or both of the suspended particulate ingredients and the soluble organic ingredients are removed by the first process. In an existent method of adding an activated carbon and then filtering them at a normal temperature, the floating particle ingredients cover the layer of activated carbon formed on a filter paper or fabric to sometimes cause clogging. However, according to the method of the present invention, since disturbance by the floating particle ingredients does not occur, the COD components can be separated and removed sufficiently without lowering liquid waste processing speed. (T.M.)

  11. RP process studies with radioactive beams at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K E [Argonne National Lab., Physics Div., Argonne, IL (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Reactions of interest to nuclear astrophysics have been studied with radioactive beams at the ATLAS accelerator. Using a modified ISOL technique, beams of {sup 18}F(T{sub 1/2}=110 min) and {sup 56}Ni(T{sub 1/2}=6.1 d) have been produced. The reactions {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O, {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}){sup 19}Ne, and {sup 56}Ni(d,p){sup 57}Ni have been investigated. The results indicate that the {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}) route is a small contributor to the breakout from the hot CNO cycle into the rp process, while the {sup 56}Ni(p,{gamma}){sup 57}Cu rate is about ten times larger than previously assumed. (orig.)

  12. Study of plastic solidification process on solid radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Weiguan; Zhang Yinsheng; Qian Wenju

    1994-01-01

    Comparisons between the plastic solidification conditions of incinerated ash and waste cation resin by using thermosetting plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS) and polyethylene (PE), and identified physico-chemical properties and irradiation resistance of solidified products were presented. These solidified products have passed through different tests as compression strength, leachability, durability, stability, permeability and irradiation resistance (10 6 Gy) etc. The result showed that the solidified products possessed stable properties and met the storage requirement. The waste tube of radioimmunoassay, being used as solidification medium to contain incinerated ash, had good mechanical properties and satisfactory volume reduction. This process may develop a new way for disposal solid radioactive waste by means of re-using waste

  13. Dispersion model for airborne radioactive particulates inside a process building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.C.; Stoddard, D.H.

    1984-02-01

    An empirical model, predicting the spread of airborne radioactive particles after they are released inside a building, has been developed. The basis for this model is a composite of data for dispersion of airborne activity recorded during 12 case incidents. These incidents occurred at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) during approximately 90 plant-years of experience with the chemical and metallurgical processing of purified neptunium and plutonium. The model illustrates that the multiple-air-zone concept, used in the designs of many nuclear facilities, can be an efficient safety feature to limit the spread of airborne activity from a release. This study also provides some insight into an apparently anomalous behavior of airborne particulates, namely, their migration against the prevailing flow of ventilation air. 2 references, 12 figures, 4 tables

  14. Radioactive environmental impact assessment for a production project of titanium dioxide by chlorination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Guohua

    2010-01-01

    Based on the analysis of shifting direction of radionuclide in production process and the environmental investigation and monitoring, the radioactive environmental impact from a production project of titanium dioxide by chlorination process has been analyzed and assessed. The result of radioactive environmental investigation shows that values of assessment factors are in the range of environmental radioactive background. The radioactive environmental sensitive spot has been delineated. The results of radioactive environmental prediction show that the additional doses to workers and residents are 0.59 mSv/a and 9.28 × 10-4 mSv/a respectively which are less than the annual dose limits of administration. The radioactive environmental impact of the production project of the titanium dioxide by chlorination process will meet the needs of national regulations and standards if radiation protection and environmental protection measures are implemented and radioactive environmental monitoring are strengthened. (author)

  15. Removal of Lanthanum (III) From Aqueous Solution Using Non-Living Water Hyacinth Roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A.; Amer, H.A.; Shawky, S.; Shawky, S.; Kandil, A.T.

    2013-01-01

    Removal of lanthanum (III) from aqueous solution using dried roots of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) has been investigated. The roots have been characterized by determining the ash percentage, the ph of the slurry, the elemental composition, the thermal gravimetric analysis, the surface area, the pore size, the zeta potential and ph of zero point charge. A surface area of 128 m 2 /g has been found and the micropore structure of the roots has been confirmed. Zeta potential and ph of zero point charge of the roots surfaces showed that they are positively charged within the ph range from 2 to 7.5. Sorption is rapid and depends on ph, weight of roots, concentration of lanthanum (III) and ionic strength. The sorption of lanthanum (III) was confirmed by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy and the release of Ca +2 , Mg +2 and K +1 after sorption of lanthanum (III) have been indicated an ion exchange mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated surface complexation mechanism, and sorption isotherms and kinetics were discussed. The roots were tested for removal of radioactive lanthanum ( 140 La) from simulated radioactive waste. Accepted June 2013.

  16. Application of thermal technologies for processing of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-12-01

    The primary objective of this publication is to provide an overview of the various thermal technologies for processing various solid, liquid, organic and inorganic radioactive waste streams. The advantages, limitations and operating experience of various thermal technologies are explained. This publication also goes beyond previous work on thermal processes by addressing the applicability of each technology to national or regional nuclear programmes of specific relative size (major advanced programmes, small to medium programmes, and emerging programmes with other nuclear applications). The most commonly used thermal processing technologies are reviewed, and the key factors influencing the selection of thermal technologies as part of a national waste management strategy are discussed. Accordingly, the structure and content of this publication is intended to assist decision-makers, regulators, and those charged with developing such strategies to identify and compare thermal technologies for possible inclusion in the mix of available, country-specific waste management processes. This publication can be used most effectively as an initial cutting tool to identify whether any given technology will best serve the local waste management strategy in terms of the waste generated, technical complexity, available economic resources, environmental impact considerations, and end product (output) of the technology. If multiple thermal technologies are being actively considered, this publication should be instrumental in comparing the technologies and assisting the user to reach an informed decision based on local needs, economics and priorities. A detailed set of conclusions is provided in Section 7

  17. A process for the bituminization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Ziv, E.; Manor, D.; Levin, I.

    1977-06-01

    A process is described for the incorporation of sodium nitrate solutions in bitumen, with a view to the bituminization of radioactive wastes. This process has involved the development of a chemical process and its technological application. A double jacket reactor equipped with an anchor-type stirrer has been built. Sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) solutions with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) are fed into the reactor simultaneously with a bitumen emulsion while heated oil is circulated through the double jacket. After all the water has evaporated, the mixture is ''simmered'' at 170/180 deg C for up to 5 hours in order to get a homogeneous product which will be suitable for final storage. The product contains small salt crystals (10/50 μm) and has high viscosity (200/2000 poise at 160 deg C and 12 rpm), so that the possibility of sedimentation is eliminated. In comparative experiments with molten bitumen, large salt aggregates, inhomogeneously distributed, make the product unsuitable. It has been found that NaOH is responsible for the polimerization of the bitumen, which raises its viscosity. The degree of polimerization depends on the NaOH concentration and ''simmering'' time and temperature. NaOH is added to NaNO 3 in order to raise the mixture's viscosity and thereby prevent sedimentation

  18. Complexometric determination of lanthanum and calcium in lanthanum chromite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novoselova, I.M.

    1989-01-01

    Methods of complexometric determination of lanthanum and calcium in lanthanum chromite, based on sequential titration of La and Ca by EDTA solution, where as an indicator eriochrome brack T with NaCl mixture in the ratio of 1:100 is used, are determined. Cr (3) effect was removed by its oxidation up to Cr (6) with perchloric acid; at first La was determined in presence of urotropine buffer, then Ca at pH 9.5-10 in presence of ammonia buffer. For reaction acceleration method of back titration of EDTA excess by zinc salt solution was used. Standard deviation in La and Ca determination is not over 0.2 and 0.1 % respectively

  19. Thermal treatment of radioactive wastes by the PLASMARC process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffelner, W.; Haefeli, V.; Fuenfschilling, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The plasma plant for the thermal treatment of radioactive wastes to be supplied to ZWILAG is briefly described and the results of experiments with simulated waste are provided. The experiments led to the conclusion that the plant is well suited for handling low- and intermediate level radioactive wastes. (author) 1 fig., 3 tabs

  20. Central processing and interim storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenger, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Within the ZWILAG project, the buildings for the temporary storage of all categories of radioactive wastes including the spent fuel elements are being readied at a central location. The intermediate storage installations are enhanced by a conditioning and burning plant for weak radioactive operating waste from the nuclear power plants and from the area of responsibility of the state. (author) 2 figs

  1. Feasibility of large volume casting cementation process for intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhuying; Chen Baisong; Zeng Jishu; Yu Chengze

    1988-01-01

    The recent tendency of radioactive waste treatment and disposal both in China and abroad is reviewed. The feasibility of the large volume casting cementation process for treating and disposing the intermediate level radioactive waste from spent fuel reprocessing plant in shallow land is assessed on the basis of the analyses of the experimental results (such as formulation study, solidified radioactive waste properties measurement ect.). It can be concluded large volume casting cementation process is a promising, safe and economic process. It is feasible to dispose the intermediate level radioactive waste from reprocessing plant it the disposal site chosen has resonable geological and geographical conditions and some additional effective protection means are taken

  2. Method of processing nitrate-containing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Norito; Nagase, Kiyoharu; Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Ouchi, Jin.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently concentrate nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes by electrolytically dialyzing radioactive liquid wastes to decompose the nitrate salt by using an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having ion exchange membranes and anodes made of special materials. Method: Nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes are supplied to and electrolytically dialyzed in a central chamber of an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having cationic exchange membranes and anionic exchange membranes made of flouro-polymer as partition membranes, whereby the nitrate is decomposed to form nitric acid in the anode chamber and alkali hydroxide compound or ammonium hydroxide in the cathode chamber, as well as concentrate the radioactive substance in the central chamber. Coated metals of at least one type of platinum metal is used as the anode for the electrolytic cell. This enables efficient industrial concentration of nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes. (Yoshihara, H.)

  3. Liquid radioactive waste processing improvement of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nery, Renata Wolter dos Reis; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Monteiro, Jose Luiz Fontes

    2005-01-01

    The study evaluate an inorganic ion exchange to process the low level liquid radwaste of PWR nuclear plants, so that the level of the radioactivity in the effluents and the solid waste produced during the treatment of these liquid radwaste can be reduced. The work compares two types of ion exchange materials, a strong acid cation exchange resin, that is the material typically used to remove radionuclides from PWR nuclear plants wastes, and a mordenite zeolite. These exchange material were used to remove cesium from a synthetic effluent containing only this ion and another effluent containing cesium and cobalt. The breakthrough curves of the zeolite and resin using a fix bed reactor were compared. The results demonstrated that the zeolite is more efficient than the resin in removing cesium from a solution containing cesium and cobalt. The results also showed that a bed combining zeolite and resin can process more volume of an effluent containing cesium and cobalt than a bed resin alone. (author)

  4. Application of advanced oxidative process in treatment radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Catia; Sakata, Solange K.; Ferreira, Rafael V.P.; Marumo, Julio T.

    2009-01-01

    The ion exchange resin is used in the water purification system in both nuclear research and power reactors. Combined with active carbon, the resin removes dissolved elements from water when the nuclear reactor is operating. After its consumption, it becomes a special type of radioactive waste. The usual treatment to this type of waste is the immobilization with Portland cement, which is simple and low cost. However, its low capacity of immobilization and the increase volume of waste have been the challenges. The development of new technologies capable of destroying this waste completely by increasing its solidification is the main target due to the possibility of both volume and cost reduction. The objective of this work was to evaluate ion exchange resin degradation by Advanced Oxidative Process using Fenton's Reagent (H 2 O 2 / Fe +2 ) in different concentration and temperatures. One advantage of this process is that all additional organic compounds or inorganic solids produced are oxidized easily. The degradation experiments were conducted with IRA-400 resin and Fenton's Reagents, varying the H 2O 2 concentration (30% e 50%) and heat temperature (25, 60 and 100 deg C). The resin degradation was confirmed by the presence of BaCO 3 as a white precipitate resulting from the reaction between the Ba(OH) 2 and the CO 2 from the resin degradation. All experiments run in duplicate. Higher degradation was observed with Fenton's Reagent (Fe +2 /H 2 O 2 30%) at 100 deg C after 2 hours. (author)

  5. Process for recovering xenon from radioactive gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Tsuneo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To recover pure xenon economically and efficiently by amply removing radioactive krypton mixed in xenon without changing the rectifying capacity of an xenon rectifying system itself. Method: Xe containing radioactive Kr(Kr-85) is rectified to reduce the concentration of radioactive Kr. Thereafter, non-radioactive Kr or Ar is added to Xe and further the rectification is carried out. The raw material Xe from the Xe adsorption system of, for example, a radioactive gaseous waste disposal system is cooled to about 100 0 C by a heat-exchanger and thereafter supplied to a rectifying tower to carry out normal rectification of Xe thereby to reduce the concentration of Kr contained in Xe at the tower bottom to the rectification limit concentration. Then, non-radioactive Kr is supplied via a precooler to the tower bottom to continue the rectification, thus the Xe fractions at the tower bottom, in which the concentration of radioactive Kr is reduced, being compressed and recovered. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Leaching behavior of lanthanum, nickel and iron from spent catalyst using inorganic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, W.; Prilitasari, N. M.; Iskandar, Y.; Bratakusuma, D.; Petrus, H. T. B. M.

    2018-01-01

    Highly technological applications of rare earth metals (REs) and scarcity of supply have become an incentive torecover the REs from various resources, which include high grade and low grade ores, as well as recycledwaste materials. Spent hydrocracking catalyst contain lanthanum and a variety of valuable metals such as nickel and iron. This study investigated the recovery of lanthanum, nickel and iron from spent hydrocracking catalyst by leaching using various inorganic acid (sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, and nitric acid). The effect of acid concentration, type of acid and leaching temperature was conducted to study the leaching behavior of each valuable metal from spent-catalyst. It has been shown that it is possible to recover more than 90% of lanthanum, however the leaching efficiency of nickel and iron in this process was very low. It can be concluded that the leaching process is selective for lanthanum recovery from hydrocracking spent-catalyst.

  7. Device for adsorbing exhaled radioactive gases and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, H.; Panetta, P.F.

    1976-01-01

    Sorption means are provided for sorbing radioactive gases, as in the exhalations of a living subject, especially for nuclear diagnostic test studies, comprising means for adsorbing the radioactive gas onto activated carbon, the carbon being contained in a plurality of independent, series-connected, chambers. The sorption means are especially adapted for the adsorption of radioactive inert gases such as xenon-133 ( 133 Xe). There can also be provided indicator means for indicating the flow-through of xenon comprising an indicator which changes color upon contact with xenon, such as dioxygenylhexafluoroantimoniate. 14 claims, 7 drawing figures

  8. Liquid radioactive waste processing system in Improved OPR-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soonmin; Kim, Kiljung; Park, Jungsu

    2008-01-01

    The design goal of liquid rad waste system is to minimize the release of radioactive materials to the environment, the occupational radiation exposure to workers, and the solid rad waste volume generated from LRS operation. In 1998, KOPEC in conjunction with KHNP (Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.) started a special task study which had been focused on the worldwide advanced technologies in the liquid rad waste process area by considering the design goals above. As a result of this task, KOPEC and KHNP finally decided to adopt a reverse osmosis processing method for Improved OPR-1000 in Korea. The advanced LRS design incorporating the R/O process has been introduced into Shin-Wolsong 1 and 2 (SWN 1 and 2) as well as Shin-Kori 1 and 2 (SKN 1 and 2), which are recently under construction, and also is adopted for Shin-Kori 3 and 4 (SKN 3 and 4) and Shin-Ulchin 1 and 2 (SUN 1 and 2), which are planned for the near future construction as the first APR-1400 type of Korean reactors. The LRS shop performance test for SKN 1 and 2 (Improved OPR-1000 R/O package system) was conducted by DOOSAN and DTS (Diversified Technologies Services, Inc) in January, 2008. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate the performance of actual R/O system to be installed in SKN 1 and 2 site. In this paper, overall system configuration and the shop performance test result is presented based on Improved OPR-1000 LRS R/O Package system

  9. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burillo, J. C.; Reyes C, M.; Montero C, M. E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E. F. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Reyes, I.; Espino, M. S., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m{sup 3}. The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  10. Method of radioactive waste processing and equipment therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Skaba, V.; Ditl, P.

    1988-01-01

    Mushy or liquid radioactive wastes are mixed with chemical additives, e.g., aluminium sulfate, colloidal silicon oxide, formic acid and cement suspension. The mix is heated to 100 to 320 degC. By drying the waste and by chemical reaction, a bulk intermediate product will be obtained which is homogenized with molten bitumen or organic polymers. The mass is then poured into containers where it will harden and will then be transported to the depository. The advantage of the method is that the final product is a stable mass resistant to separation, leaching and erosion, showing long-term storage safety. The main components of the installation are a mixed reactor, a doser of bulk material and a homogenizer which are series connected in that order. The apparatus is mounted on a support structure which may be divided into at least two parts. The advantage of this facility is that it is easily transported and can thereby be used for processing waste at source. (E.S.). 2 figs

  11. Biodegradation of bituminous products from processing liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibensky, L.; Krejci, F.; Hladky, E.; Halama, D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the possible ways of disturbing the stability of bituminous products from liquid radioactive waste processing, is biodegradation caused by common microorganisms. Pseudomonas bacteria and a Bacillus cereus culture were selected for experimental study of cultivation of microorganisms. Experiments with mixed cultures were also performed. Pitches, ajatin and imidazoline were used as inhibitors. The thin layer and the emulsion methods were used in assessing biological corrosion. The results of the experiments are discussed with respect to the dependence of bacterial growth on bitumen biodegradation, the effect of pH on bitumen degradation and the effect of inhibitors on bitumen biodegradation. The salts contained in bituminous products were not found to significantly affect the rate of destruction. The degree of degradation was found to mainly depend on the bitumen, its chemical composition, and on the conditions of storage. It was also found that inhibitor additions in some cases modified the properties of the matrix such that it became more liquid. The coefficient of extractibility thus increased of matrix salts. The recultivation of bacteria on a full-value medium resulted in the loss of the inhibitory effect. In some cases, the inhibitor even stimulated the growth of microorganisms. The use of inhibitors in an effort to achieve biostability of bituminous products thus did not solve the problem. (Z.M.). 2 tabs., 9 refs

  12. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burillo, J. C.; Reyes C, M.; Montero C, M. E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E. F.; Reyes, I.; Espino, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m 3 . The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  13. Management of radioactive waste at INR-technical support for processing of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujoreanu, D.; Popescu, I.V.; Bujoreanu, L.

    2009-01-01

    The Institute for nuclear research (INR) subsidiary of the Romanian authority for nuclear activities has its own radwaste treatment plant (STDR). STDR is supposed to treat and condition radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel facility, the TRIGA reactor, post irradiation examination laboratories and other research laboratories of NRI. The main steps of waste processing are: pretreatment (collection, characterization, segregation, decontamination)., treatment (waste volume reduction, radionuclide removal, compositional change), conditioning (immobilization and containerization), interim storage of the packages in compliance with safety requirements for the protection of human health and environmental protection, transport of the packages containing radioactive waste, disposal.

  14. Increasing operational efficiency in a radioactive waste processing plant - 16100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, T.W.; Watson, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    The solid waste plant at Harwell in Oxfordshire, contains a purpose built facility to input, assay, visually inspect and sort remote handled intermediate level radioactive waste (RHILW). The facility includes a suite of remote handling cells, known as the head-end cells (HEC), which waste must pass through in order to be repackaged. Some newly created waste from decommissioning works on site passes through the cells, but the vast majority of waste for processing is historical waste, stored in below ground tube stores. Existing containers are not suitable for long term storage, many are already badly corroded, so the waste must be efficiently processed and repackaged in order to achieve passive safety. The Harwell site is currently being decommissioned and the land is being restored. The site is being progressively de-licensed, and redeveloped as a business park, which can only be completed when all the nuclear liabilities have been removed. The recovery and processing of old waste in the solid waste plant is a key project linked to de-licensing of a section of the site. Increasing the operational efficiency of the waste processing plant could shorten the time needed to clear the site and has the potential to save money for the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). The waste processing facility was constructed in the mid 1990's, and commissioned in 1999. Since operations began, the yearly throughput of the cells has increased significantly every year. To achieve targets set out in the lifetime plan (LTP) for the site, throughput must continue to increase. The operations department has measured the overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) of the process for the last few years, and has used continuous improvement techniques to decrease the average cycle time. Philosophies from operational management practices such as 'lean' and 'kaizen' have been employed successfully to drive out losses and increase plant efficiency. This paper will describe how the solid waste plant

  15. Removing radioactive noble gases from nuclear process off-gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofredo, A.

    1977-01-01

    A system is claimed for separating, concentrating and storing radioactive krypton and xenon in the off-gases from a boiling water reactor, wherein adsorption and cryogenic distillation are both efficiently used for rapid and positive separation and removal of the radioactive noble gases, and for limiting such gases in circulation in the system to low inventory at all times, and wherein the system is self-regulating to eliminate operator options or attention

  16. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi 5 -phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified

  17. Process Analysis in Chemical Plant by Means of Radioactive Tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, T.; Hamada, K.; Osada, K. [Showa Denko K.K., Tokyo (Japan)

    1967-06-15

    Following the movement of solids and fluids is important in chemical processes to determine mixing efficiency and residence time. Since it is necessary to follow many complex substances such as raw materials, intermediates and reactants in plant investigations, it is often necessary to ascertain whether the behaviour of the radioisotope tracer and the substance to be traced are identical. The most difficult problem is to determine the best method of labelling, a factor which is a substantial key to the success of an experiment. Usually, there are three labelling techniques: radioisotope labelling, pre-.activation of the material and post-activation of the material. This paper deals with practical examples of the double-tracer technique, a combination of conventional radioisotope labelling and post-activation methods by means of activation analysis. In process analysis by means of tracers, a practical measurement method should also be devised and developed for each experiment. Phosphorus-32 and gold (non-radioactive) were used to measure retention time in a carbon-black plant. The radioisotope was pumped into a feed-stock pipe positioned before the reactor and samples were taken from each process of the plant, including the bag filter, mixer and product tank. After sampling from each step of the process, {sup 32}P in a semi-infinite powder sample was measured in situ by beta counting, and the gold was measured by gamma counting after activating the sample in a reactor. The experiment showed that both tracers had the same residence time, which was shorter than expected. Useful data were also obtained from the dispersion pattern of the material flow for future operation controls, including the time required to change from one grade of product to another. Practical tracer techniques to measure mixing characteristics in high-speed gas flows using {sup 85}Kr have been developed. A study of the measurement method was conducted by calculating the differential values of

  18. Cement solidification method for miscellaneous radioactive solid, processing device and processing tool therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Shigeru; Suzuki, Kazunori; Hasegawa, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    A basket made of a metal net and a lid with a spacer constituting a processing tool for processing miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes is formed as a mesh which scarcely passes the miscellaneous solids but pass mortars. The size of the mesh is usually from about 10 to 30mm. Since this mesh allows fine solids approximate to powders such as burning ashes and heat insulation materials, they fall to the bottom of a dram can, to cause corrosion. Then, the corners of the bottom and the bottom of the dram can are coated with cement. The miscellaneous solid wastes are contained, and the lid of a metal net having a spacer at the upper portion thereof is set, a provisional lid is put on, and it is evacuated, and mortars are injected. Since there is a possibility that light and fine radioactive powders are exposed on the surface of the mortars coagulated and hardened by curing, conditioning for further adding mortars is applied for securing the mortars in order to prevent scattering of the radioactive powders. With such procedures, a satisfactory safe solidified products can be formed. (T.M.)

  19. Selecting device for processing method of radioactive gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Ryoichi; Komoda, Norihisa.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To extend the period of replacement of a filter for adsorbing radioactive material by discharging waste gas containing radioactive material produced from an atomic power equipment after treating it by a method selected on the basis of the results of measurement of wind direction. Structure: Exhaust gas containing radioactive material produced from atomic power equipment is discharged after it is treated by a method selected on the basis of the results of wind direction measurement. For Instance, in case of sea wind the waste gas passes through a route selected for this case and is discharged through the waste gas outlet. When the sea wind disappears (that is, when a land wind or calm sets in), the exhaust gas is switched to a route for the case other than that of the sea wind, so that it passes through a filter consisting of active carbon where the radioactive material is removed through adsorption. The waste gas now free from the radioactive material is discharged through the waste gas outlet. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Nanostructured Lanthanum Halides and CeBr3 for Nuclear Radiation and Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guss, Paul; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guise, Ron; Yuan, Ding

    2010-01-01

    Scintillator materials are used to detect, and in some cases identify, gamma rays. Higher performance scintillators are expensive, hard to manufacture, fragile, and sometimes require liquid nitrogen or cooling engines. But whereas lower-quality scintillators are cheap, easy to manufacture, and more rugged, their performance is lower. At issue: can the desirable qualities of high-and low-performance scintillators be combined to achieve better performance at lower cost? Preliminary experiments show that a LaF 3 :Ce oleic acid-based nanocomposite exhibits a photopeak when exposed to 137 Cs source gamma-radiation. The chemical synthesis of the cerium-doped lanthanum halide nanoparticles are scalable and large quantities of material can be produced at a time, unlike typical crystal growth processes such as the Bridgeman process. Using a polymer composite (Figure 1), produced by LANL, initial measurements of the unloaded and 8% LaF 3 :Ce-loaded sample have been made using 137 Cs sources. Figure 2 shows an energy spectrum acquired for CeF 3 . The lighter plot is the measured polymer-only spectrum and the black plot is the spectrum from the nanocomposite scintillator. As the development of this material continues, the energy resolution is expected to improve and the photopeak-to-Compton ratio will become greater at higher loadings. These measurements show the expected Compton edge in the polymer-only sample, and the Compton edge and photo-peak expected in the nanophosphor composites that LANL has produced. Using a porous VYCORR with CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots, Letant has demonstrated that he has obtained signatures of the 241Am photopeak with energy resolution as good at NaI (Figure 3). We begin with the fact that CeBr 3 crystals do not have a self-activity component as strong as the lanthanum halides. The radioactive 0.090% 138 La component of lanthanum leads to significant self-activity, which will be a problem for very large detector volumes. Yet a significant

  1. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes by solidification with cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To subject radioactive liquid wastes to a cement solidification treatment after heating and drying it by a thin film scrape-off drier to render it into the form of power, and then molding it into pellets for the treatment. Structure: Radioactive liquid wastes discharged from a nuclear power plant or nuclear reactor are supplied through a storage tank into a thin film scrape-off drier. In the drier, the radioactive liquid wastes are heated to separate the liquid, and the residue is taken out as dry powder from the scrape-off apparatus. The powder obtained in this way is molded into pellets of a desired form. These pellets are then packed in a drum can or similar container, into which cement paste is then poured for solidification. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Process for treatment of detergent-containing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, K.; Chino, K.; Funabashi, K.; Horiuchi, S.; Motojima, K.

    1984-01-01

    A detergent-containing radioactive liquid waste originating from atomic power plants is concentrated to have about 10 wt. % detergent concentration, then dried in a thin film evaporator, and converted into powder. Powdered activated carbon is added to the radioactive waste in advance to prevent the liquid waste from foaming in the evaporator by the action of surface active agents contained in the detergent. The activated carbon is added in accordance with the COD concentration of the radioactive liquid waste to be treated, and usually at a concentration 2-4 times as large as the COD concentration of the liquid waste to be treated. A powdery product having a moisture content of not more than 15 wt. % is obtained from the evaporator, and pelletized and then packed into drums to be stored for a predetermined period

  3. An innovative approach to solid Low Level Radioactive Waste processing and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancake, D.C. Jr.; Sodaro, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will focus on a new system of Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) accumulation, processing and packaging, as-well as the implementation of a Laboratory-wide training program used to introduce new waste accumulation containers to all of the on-site radioactive waste generators, and to train them on the requirements of this innovative waste characterization and documentation program

  4. Method of processing solidification product of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daime, Fumiyoshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the long-time stability of solidification products by providing solidification products with liquid tightness, gas tightness, abrasion resistance, etc., of the products in the course of the solidification for the treatment of radioactive wastes. Method: The surface of solidification products prepared by mixing solidifying agents with powder or pellets is entirely covered with high molecular polymer such as epoxy resin. The epoxy resin has excellent properties such as radiation-resistance, heat resistance, water proofness and chemical resistance, as well as have satisfactory mechanical properties. This can completely isolate the solidification products of radioactive wastes from the surrounding atmosphere. (Yoshino, Y.)

  5. Radiological and hygienic aspects in radioactive waste processing and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanova, V.D.

    1978-01-01

    The present review of reports deals with radiation-hygienic aspects of treatment and bUrial of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants (NPP). The main principle of handling these wastes, which has been accepted in the USSR, is the treatment of the wastes directly at NPP with subsequent burial of the concentrates at the site. It is permissible to store wastes with mean specific activity in metal containers only temporarily. The most reliable method for fixing radioactive substances from wastes composition with mean specific activity is the method of consolidation by enclosing them in bitumen. Only excessive (disbalanced waters) that have been subjected to special water treatment may be discharged into NPP cooling ponds - if the content of radionuclides in this water is not in excess of the accepted standard at the point of discharge. An indirect radiological method has been developed for obtaining information on 90 Sr content in water; it may be further accepted for other radionuclides. An improved method is suggested for purification of salt-containing liquid wastes with low specific activity by using filters with ionexchange resins. Evaluation of safety at the Central Station of Radioactive Wastes Burial showed reliability of the methods used for treatment and burial of radioactive wastes. Measures for further decrease in the level of personnel irradiation and for environmental protection are enumerated

  6. Radiological and hygienic aspects in radioactive waste processing and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanova, V D

    1978-01-01

    The present review of reports deals with radiation-hygienic aspects of treatment and burial of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants (NPP). The main principle of handling these wastes, which has been accepted in the USSR, is the treatment of the wastes directly at NPP with subsequent burial of the concentrates at the site. It is permissible to store wastes with mean specific activity in metal containers only temporarily. The most reliable method for fixing radioactive substances from wastes composition with mean specific activity is the method of consolidation by enclosing them in bitumen. Only excessive (disbalanced waters) that have been subjected to special water treatment may be discharged into NPP cooling ponds - if the content of radionuclides in this water is not in excess of the accepted standard at the point of discharge. An indirect radiological method has been developed for obtaining information on /sup 90/Sr content in water; it may be further accepted for other radionuclides. An improved method is suggested for purification of salt-containing liquid wastes with low specific activity by using filters with ionexchange resins. Evaluation of safety at the Central Station of Radioactive Wastes Burial showed reliability of the methods used for treatment and burial of radioactive wastes. Measures for further decrease in the level of personnel irradiation and for environmental protection are enumerated.

  7. Processing method and device for radioactive waste containing surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukita, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Ryozo; Izumida, Tatsuo; Nishi, Takashi; Hattori, Yasuo.

    1997-01-01

    Washing liquid wastes generated in washing facilities in a nuclear power plant are collected in a liquid waste collecting tank. A suspension containing a powdery active carbon is supplied to the liquid waste collecting tank. Organic ingredients such as of a surfactant, oil ingredients and radioactive materials in the form of ions contained in the washing liquid wastes are adsorbed to the powdery active carbon. The washing liquid wastes containing the powdery active carbon and granular radioactive materials are led into an active carbon separating and drying device. The powdery active carbon and granular radioactive materials contained in the washing liquid wastes are filtered and separated by a filtering plate, and accumulated as filtered materials on the surface of the filtering plate. The purified washing liquid wastes are discharged to the outside. The filtered materials are dried by hot steams (or hot water) and dried air. The filtered materials are peeled from the filtering plate. The filtered materials, in other word, dried powdery active carbon and granular radioactive materials are transported to and burnt in an incinerator. (I.N.)

  8. The study for management process of radioactive solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Jumpei; Sugimoto, Masahiko [Energy and Nuclear System Center, Engineering Company, Kobe Steel Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    For the purpose of contributing to decide treatment method for solid waste stored by JNC, a series of investigation was conducted for domestic and overseas technologies about volume-reduction and immobilization of radioactive solid waste, focused on the melting technologies. Based on the result of investigation, melting and off-gas treatment were classified and summarized based on the result of investigation. Treatment and disposal cost for each melting method were estimated under definite conditions. Followings are obtained: (1) Melters for radioactive metal have been in operation since 1980's. On the other hand, melter for solid waste is under construction in Japan and Switzerland, never in operation. (2) Plasma arc melter and induction heat melter is developed for radioactive solid waste. They are classified into 5 method since there are 4 induction heat melter is developed. (3) Construction cost for each kind of melter are about 700-950 million yen, estimated by using open melting capacity and cost ratio of existing facility. (4) Volume of the molten waste to be filled up per disposal container, supposing 200 liter drum about 70-140 liter depends on the volume of receptacle and sub-heat material. Decision of the melter need detailed estimation of filling factor since they have large effects on disposal cost. (5) For adopting radioactive solid waste melter, it needs to estimate of melting capacity taking consideration into wide range composition of the JNC waste. In addition, it is necessary to develop estimating method of inventory for JNC waste since radioactivity composition is differ from that of nuclear power station. (author)

  9. Container for processing and disposing radioactive wastes and industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Kunio; Kasahara, Yuko; Kasai, Noboru; Sudo, Giichi; Ishizaki, Kanjiro.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the performance of containers for radioactive wastes for ocean disposal and on-land disposal such as impact strength, chemical resistance, fire resistance, corrosion resistance, water impermeability and the like. Constitution: Steel fiber-reinforced concrete previously molded in a shape of a container is impregnated with polymerizable impregnating agent selected from the group consisting of a polymerizable monomer, liquid mixture of a polymerizable monomer and an oligomer, a polymer solution, a copolymer solution and the liquid mixture thereof. Then, the polymerizable impregnating agent is polymerized to solidify in the concrete by way of heat-polymerization or radiation-induced polymerization to form a waste container. The container thus obtained can be improved with the impact resistance and wear resistance and further improved with salt water resistance, acid resistance, corrosion resistance and solidity by the impregnation of the polymer, as well as can effectively be prevented from leaching out of radioactive substances. (Furukawa, Y.)

  10. Italian experience on the processing of solid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.; De Angelis, G.

    1989-12-01

    Experimental work is under way in Italy for treatment and conditioning of different types of solid radioactive wastes. The following wastes are taken into account in this paper: Magnox fuel element debris, solid compactable wastes, radiation sources and contaminated carcasses. The metallic debris, consisting of Magnox splitters and braces, are conditioned, after drying and separation of corrosion products, by means of a two component epoxy system (base product + hardener). Solid compactable wastes are reduced in volume by using a press. The resulting pellets are transferred to a final container and conditioned with a cement mortar of a suitable consistency. As to the radiation sources, mainly contained in lightning-rods, gas detectors and radioactive thickness gauges, the encapsulation in a cementitious grout is a common practice for their incorporation. Early experiments, with satisfactory results, have also been conducted for the cementation of contaminated carcasses. (author)

  11. Tomogram forming process and apparatus using radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to nuclear medicine and particularly to a tomogram forming apparatus which permits, with great efficiency, the very sensitive quantitative determination and the accurate spatial localization of the radioactivity of a body section of a patient to whom a substance labelled with radioactive isotopes has been administered. This scanner is characterized in that it includes several highly focused collimators placed one after the other, according to an arrangement which surrounds a scanning field. Each collimator is mobile with respect to the adjacent one and a system enables the arrangement to be rotated about the scanning field from one scanning position to another. Another device enables the collimators to be moved so that, for each scanning position, the focus of each collimator uniformly samples at least half the scanning field [fr

  12. Process and device for conditioning low and medium activity radioactive effluents with hydraulic binders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Magnin, G.; Renault, G.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical processing of borated radioactive effluents is claimed. Tetrahydrated calcium borate crystals are prepared by lime additions, the volume is reduced by evaporation under reduced pressure and the product obtained is mixed with hydraulic binders [fr

  13. The Future: Innovative Technologies for Radioactive Waste Processing and Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Safe, proliferation resistant and economically efficient nuclear fuel cycles that minimize waste generation and environmental impacts are key to sustainable nuclear energy. Innovative approaches and technologies could significantly reduce the radiotoxicity, or the hazard posed by radioactive substances to humans, as well as the waste generated. Decreasing the waste volume, the heat load and the duration that the waste needs to be isolated from the biosphere will greatly simplify waste disposal concepts

  14. Process for ultimate storage of radioactive fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baukal, W.; Gruenthaler, K.H.; Neumann, K.

    1980-01-01

    In order to exclude cracking in the cooling phase during sealing of radioactive oxidic fission products in glass melts, metallic filling elements - e.g. wires, tissues - are proposed to be incorporated in the mould before the glass melt is poured in. Especially nickel alloys with corrosion proof surface layers, e.g. titanium nitride, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminium oxide, suit best. These elements reduce thermal stresses and effect high thermal conductance towards the mould wall. (UWI) [de

  15. Process of liquid radioactive waste treatment in nuclear power plant and development trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiean; Wang Xin; Liu Dan; Zhu Laiye; Chen Bin

    2014-01-01

    The popular liquid radioactive waste treatment methods in nuclear power plants (NPP) are Chemical precipitation, evaporation, ion exchange, membrane treatment, chemical coagulation and activated carbon absorption and so on. 'Filter + activated carbon absorption (Chemical coagulation) + ion exchange' has a good prospect for development, as its simple process, high decontamination factor, low energy consumption and smaller secondary wastes. Also the process is used in Sanmen and Haiyang Projects. The severe incident in NPP set an even higher demand on liquid radioactive waste treatment. The new type treatment materials, optimization of the existed treatment, combination of treatment and the mobile treatment facility is the development trend in liquid radioactive waste treatment in NPP. (authors)

  16. The Development of Treatment Process Technology for Radioactive Gravel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shon, Dong Bin; Kim, Gye Nam; Park, Hye Min; Kim, Ki Hong; Kim, Wan Suk; Lee, Kun Woo; Lee, Ki Won; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The soil washing method holds great promise for the decontamination of contaminated soil as it is very efficient at removal and is time-effective for a great deal of contaminated soils. In addition, this method compensates for a weak point in that is generates a great deal of uranium-contaminated leachate with a short reaction time. Therefore, the soil washing method technology is a good method to remove the initial radioactive substance. The soil dimension compositions consist of clay with small particle sizes, and gravel of larger particle sizes than clay. Also, large gravel creates several problems. Gravel weakens the intensity of the equipment. In addition, intercept soil is discharged in the equipment. And interfere with the pedal recurrence occurs. Therefore, it is necessary to classify the soil. The gravel particle size ranges from 0.5cm to 7.5cm and the granulated gravel particle size ranges from 7.5cm to 20cm. We suppose that the radioactive concentrations are stronger in soil particles larger than the soil particle size (below a 0.5cm diameter). The purpose of this study is to develop a soil washing system for uranium gravel and to define the most suitable operational conditions for the individual elemental equipment in a soil washing system for decontaminating the radioactive gravel from contaminated soil

  17. Preparation of lanthanum ferrite powder at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andoulsi, R.; Horchani-Naifer, K.; Ferid, M., E-mail: karima_horchani@yahoo.com [Physical Chemistry Laboratory of Mineral Materials and their Applications, Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2012-01-15

    Single lanthanum ferrite phase was successfully prepared at low processing temperature using the polymerizable complex method. To implement this work, several techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and BET surface area measurements were used. Throw the obtained results, it was shown that steps of preparing the powder precursor and temperature of its calcination are critical parameters for avoiding phase segregation and obtaining pure lanthanum ferrite compound. Thus, a single perovskite phase was obtained at 600 deg C. At this temperature, the powder was found to be fine and homogeneous with an average crystallite size of 13 nm and a specific surface area of 12.5 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}. (author)

  18. Process for selectively concentrating the radioactivity of thorium containing magnesium slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.A.; Christiansen, S.H.; Simon, J.; Morin, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    In a process for separating magnesium from a magnesium slag using water and carbon dioxide, the improvement described comprises: (a) forming an aqueous magnesium slurry from the magnesium slag, which slag contains radioactive thorium and its daughters, and water; (b) solubilizing magnesium from the magnesium slurry by reacting the aqueous magnesium slurry with carbon dioxide wherein the carbon dioxide is at a pressure from greater than ambient to about 1,000 psig (about 7,000 kPa); (c) selectively concentrating by filtering the radioactive thorium and its daughters such that the radioactive thorium and its daughters are separated from the solubilized magnesium filtrate; and (d) reducing volume and/or weight of radioactive solids for disposal as radioactive waste

  19. The Hybrid Treatment Process for treatment of mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.; Kindle, C.H.

    1992-04-01

    This paper describes a new process for treating mixed hazardous and radioactive waste, commonly called mixed waste. The process is called the Hybrid Treatment Process (HTP), so named because it is built on the 20 years of experience with vitrification of wastes in melters, and the 12 years of experience with treatment of wastes by the in situ vitrification (ISV) process

  20. Training manual for process operation and management of radioactive waste treatment facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shon, J. S.; Kim, K. J.; Ahn, S. J. [and others

    2004-12-01

    Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility (RWTF) has been operating for safe and effective treatment of radioactive wastes generated in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). In RWTF, there are evaporation, bituminization and solar evaporation processes for liquid waste, solid waste treatment process and laundry process. As other radioactive waste treatment facilities in foreign countries, the emergency situation such as fire and overflow of liquid waste can be taken place during the operation and result in the spread of contamination of radioactivity. So, easy and definite operating procedure is necessary for the safe operation of the facility. This manual can be available as easy and concise training materials for new employees and workers dispatched from service agency. Especially, in case of emergency urgently occurred during operation, everyone working in the facility can quickly stop the facility following this procedure.

  1. Training manual for process operation and management of radioactive waste treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, J. S.; Kim, K. J.; Ahn, S. J.

    2004-12-01

    Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility (RWTF) has been operating for safe and effective treatment of radioactive wastes generated in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). In RWTF, there are evaporation, bituminization and solar evaporation processes for liquid waste, solid waste treatment process and laundry process. As other radioactive waste treatment facilities in foreign countries, the emergency situation such as fire and overflow of liquid waste can be taken place during the operation and result in the spread of contamination of radioactivity. So, easy and definite operating procedure is necessary for the safe operation of the facility. This manual can be available as easy and concise training materials for new employees and workers dispatched from service agency. Especially, in case of emergency urgently occurred during operation, everyone working in the facility can quickly stop the facility following this procedure

  2. Effects of the wet air on the properties of the lanthanum oxide and lanthanum aluminate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Jin Hyung; Choi, Doo Jin

    2006-01-01

    Lanthanum oxide and lanthanum aluminate thin films were deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown films were stored in wet ambient and dry ambient for days and annealed after storage and also the structural and the electrical properties of the films were investigated. As the storage time increased, the La 2 O 3 films stored in wet ambient showed rapid reaction with moisture and the properties degraded. In case of the LAO films, although the thickness of the film also increased during hydration, the properties of the film did not so much changed due to the role of the incorporated aluminum. The LAO films showed better hydration resistance characteristics and so more suitable for conventional wet cleaning process in semiconductor fabrication

  3. Processing and Pre-Treatment of Solid Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerre, P. [Service de Controle des Radiations et de Genie Radioactif, Commissariat a L' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1960-07-01

    As solid radioactive waste varies in form, dimensions and volume, the Atomic Energy Commission first of all reduces the volume by breaking up and compressing the waste. Since the temporary storage of such waste is always attended by the risk of contamination, an efficient packing system has been devised and adopted. This consists of embedding the waste in the heart of a specially-designed block of concrete possessing the following characteristics: Great strength Maximum insolubility Resistance to corrosion Maximum imperviousness Protection against radiation. It is thus quite safe to store these blocks with a view to final dumping. (author)

  4. Lanthanum Containing Polymer's Modification to PP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Shaojun; Zhang Ming

    2004-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP)'s low impact strength limits its usages. Adding some a rare earth polymer can enhance PP's tensile strength and impact strength. Acrylic lanthanum was prepared by the reaction between lanthanum oxide and acrylic acid. The IR spectrum prove that and optimum reacting conditions are that the bulk ratio of La(AA) 3 and MMA is not less than one and temperature is about 80 ℃. Lanthanum containing Polymer were added into PP. When percent of addition only was 3%, strength were enhanced 10% , and impact strength 40%. SEM shows the compatibility of rare earth polymer and PP; lanthanum containing polymer can form physical crosslinking between PP's molecules, then every particle's surface connect with several PP molecules and the PP mechanical property were enhanced.

  5. Signal amplification of dopamine using lanthanum hexacyanoferrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rare earth metal hexacyanoferrates, for e.g., lanthanum ... to facilitate the electrochemical reactions of biological molecules.9,10 In general ... bic acid and potassium hexacyanoferrate (Merck) were ... were prepared using doubly distilled water.

  6. Properties of gallium lanthanum sulphide glass

    OpenAIRE

    Bastock, P.; Craig, C.; Khan, K.; Weatherby, E.; Yao, J.; Hewak, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses has been studied in order to ascertain properties across the entire glass forming region. This is the first comprehensive study of GLS glass over a wide compositional range.

  7. Processing method for contaminated water containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, Toshiaki; Fukagawa, Ken-ichiro.

    1994-01-01

    For absorbing contaminated water containing radioactive substances, a sheet is prepared by covering water absorbing pulps carrying an organic water absorbent having an excellent water absorbability is semi-solidified upon absorption water with a water permeable cloth, such as a non-woven fabric having a shape stability. As the organic water absorbent, a hydrophilic polymer which retains adsorbed water as it is used. In particular, a starch-grafted copolymer having an excellent water absorbability also for reactor water containing boric acid is preferred. The organic water absorbent can be carried on the water absorbing pulps by scattering a granular organic water absorbent to the entire surface of the water absorbing cotton pulp extended thinly to carry it uniformly and putting them between thin absorbing paper sheets. If contaminated water containing radioactive materials are wiped off by using such a sheet, the entire sheet is semi-solidified along with the absorption with no leaching of the contaminated water, thereby enabling to move the wastes to a furnace for applying combustion treatment. (T.M.)

  8. Optimal operation planning of radioactive waste processing system by fuzzy theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin Yeong; Lee, Kun Jai

    2000-01-01

    This study is concerned with the applications of linear goal programming and fuzzy theory to the analysis of management and operational problems in the radioactive processing system (RWPS). The developed model is validated and verified using actual data obtained from the RWPS at Kyoto University in Japan. The solution by goal programming and fuzzy theory would show the optimal operation point which is to maximize the total treatable radioactive waste volume and minimize the released radioactivity of liquid waste even under the restricted resources. (orig.)

  9. Commercial processing and disposal alternatives for very low levels of radioactive waste in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benda, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    The United States has several options available in the commercial processing and disposal of very low levels of radioactive waste. These range from NRC licensed low level radioactive sites for Class A, B and C waste to conditional disposal or free release of very low concentrations of material. Throughout the development of disposal alternatives, the US promoted a graded disposal approach based on risk of the material hazards. The US still promotes this approach and is renewing the emphasis on risk based disposal for very low levels of radioactive waste. One state in the US, Tennessee, has had a long and successful history of disposal of very low levels of radioactive material. This paper describes that approach and the continuing commercial options for safe, long term processing and disposal. (author)

  10. Bifunctional lanthanum phosphate substrates as novel adsorbents and biocatalyst supports for perchlorate removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, Sasidharan [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Prajeesh, Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil; Anupama, Vijaya Nadaraja [Process Engineering and Environmental Technology Division, CSIR – National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Industrial Estate P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695019 (India); Krishnakumar, Bhaskaran [Process Engineering and Environmental Technology Division, CSIR – National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Industrial Estate P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695019 (India); Academy of Scientific and Industrial Research (AcSIR) (India); Hareesh, Padinhattayil [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Nair, Balagopal N. [R and D Centre, Noritake Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan); Warrier, Krishna Gopakumar [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Academy of Scientific and Industrial Research (AcSIR) (India); Hareesh, Unnikrishnan Nair Saraswathy, E-mail: hareesh@niist.res.in [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Academy of Scientific and Industrial Research (AcSIR) (India)

    2014-06-30

    Graphical abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign thermal gelation process, performed the role of dual functional sorbent facilitating perchlorate adsorption and bioremediation through the growth of perchlorate reducing microbial colonies. - Highlights: • Lanthanum phosphate monoliths as efficient perchlorate adsorbents. • And also as substrates for biofilm (perchlorate reducing bacteria) growth. • Environmentally benign thermal gelation process for substrate fabrication. • 98% adsorption efficiency for perchlorate concentrations up to 100 μg/L. • The regenerated monoliths show nearly 100% reusability. - Abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign colloidal forming process employing methyl cellulose, are reported here as excellent adsorbents of perchlorate with >98% efficiency and with 100% reusability. Additionally, the effectiveness of such substrates as biocatalyst supports that facilitate biofilm formation of perchlorate reducing microbes (Serratia marcescens NIIST 5) is also demonstrated for the first time. The adsorption of perchlorate ions is attributed to the pore structure of lanthanum phosphate substrate and the microbial attachment is primarily ascribed to its intrinsic hydrophobic property. Lanthanum phosphate thus emerges as a dual functional material that possesses an integrated adsorption/bioremediation property for the effective removal of ClO{sub 4}{sup −} which is an increasingly important environmental contaminant.

  11. Bifunctional lanthanum phosphate substrates as novel adsorbents and biocatalyst supports for perchlorate removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, Sasidharan; Prajeesh, Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil; Anupama, Vijaya Nadaraja; Krishnakumar, Bhaskaran; Hareesh, Padinhattayil; Nair, Balagopal N.; Warrier, Krishna Gopakumar; Hareesh, Unnikrishnan Nair Saraswathy

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign thermal gelation process, performed the role of dual functional sorbent facilitating perchlorate adsorption and bioremediation through the growth of perchlorate reducing microbial colonies. - Highlights: • Lanthanum phosphate monoliths as efficient perchlorate adsorbents. • And also as substrates for biofilm (perchlorate reducing bacteria) growth. • Environmentally benign thermal gelation process for substrate fabrication. • 98% adsorption efficiency for perchlorate concentrations up to 100 μg/L. • The regenerated monoliths show nearly 100% reusability. - Abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign colloidal forming process employing methyl cellulose, are reported here as excellent adsorbents of perchlorate with >98% efficiency and with 100% reusability. Additionally, the effectiveness of such substrates as biocatalyst supports that facilitate biofilm formation of perchlorate reducing microbes (Serratia marcescens NIIST 5) is also demonstrated for the first time. The adsorption of perchlorate ions is attributed to the pore structure of lanthanum phosphate substrate and the microbial attachment is primarily ascribed to its intrinsic hydrophobic property. Lanthanum phosphate thus emerges as a dual functional material that possesses an integrated adsorption/bioremediation property for the effective removal of ClO 4 − which is an increasingly important environmental contaminant

  12. Melt-processing method for radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroaki

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive solid wastes are charged into a water-cooled type cold crucible induction melting furnace disposed in high frequency coils, and high frequency currents are supplied to high frequency coils which surround the melting furnace to melt the solid wastes by induction-heating. In this case, heat plasmas are jetted from above the solid wastes to the solid wastes to conduct initial heating to melt a portion of the solid wastes. Then, high frequency currents are supplied to the high frequency coils to conduct induction heating. According to this method, even when waste components of various kinds of materials are mixed, a portion of the solid wastes in the induction melting furnace can be melted by the initial heating by jetting heat plasmas irrespective of the kinds and the electroconductivity of the materials of the solid wastes. With such procedures, entire solid wastes in the furnace can be formed into a molten state uniformly and rapidly. (T.M.)

  13. Selection of radioactive waste disposal site considering natural processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.

    1991-01-01

    To dispose the radioactive waste, it is necessary to consider the transfer of material in natural environment. The points of consideration are 1) Long residence time of water 2) Independence of biosphere from the compartment containing the disposal site in the natural hydrologic cycle 3) Dilution with the natural inactive isotope or the same group of elements. Isotope dilution for 129 I and 14 C can be expected by proper selection of the site. 241 Am and 239 Pu will be homogenized into soil or sediment with insoluble elements such as iron and aluminium. For 237 Np and 99 Tc anionic condition is important for the selection. From the point of view of hydrologic cycle, anoxic dead water zone avoiding beneath mountain area is preferable for the disposal site. (author)

  14. Production of adsorbent from palm shell for radioactive iodine scrubbing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Azman Che Mat Isa; Ku Halim Ku Hamid; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Mohamad Puad Abu; Abdul Halim Badaruddin; Mohammad Nizammudin Abd Aziz; Muhd Ridwan Abdul Rahim

    2010-01-01

    The biggest biomass source in Malaysia comes from oil palm industry. According to the statistic of year 2004, Malaysia produced 40 million tones per year of biomass which 30 million tones of biomass originated from the oil palm industries. Therefore, the biomass waste such as palm kernel shell can be used to produce granular adsorbent for radioactive materials. For that reason, a newly system, called Rocking Kiln - Fluidized Bed (RK - FB) was developed to utilize large amount of the biomass to produce high value added product. Charcoal or chemically produced activated carbon could be produced by using the kiln. Washing process was introduced to remove particles, minerals and volatile matters from charcoal produced and then would create more surface area in the adsorbent by creating more active sites. In this research, the adsorbent produced was used to scrub iodine 131. In nuclear power reactor, iodine isotope 131 is produced during nuclear fission, and this elementary radioactive iodine may pollute exhaust air streams that could cause thyroid cancer. For removal of radioactive iodine, normally a potassium iodide - impregnated activated carbon (KI - AC) is used. Thus, a process will be developed to produce KI - AC and this product will be used to calculate the efficiency to remove the radioactive iodine 131.The results obtain show that adsorbent produced has a high potential to be used in radioactive adsorbing and likely more economics. This paper will elaborate further the experimental set-up of in Kiln - Fluidized Bed (RK - FB), adsorbent quality and radioactive scrubbing process. (author)

  15. Electrical conductivity studies of nanocrystalline lanthanum silicate synthesized by sol-gel route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nallamuthu, N.; Prakash, I.; Satyanarayana, N.; Venkateswarlu, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Nanocrystalline La 10 Si 6 O 27 material was synthesized by sol-gel method. → TG/DTA curves predicted the thermal behavior of the material. → FTIR spectra confirmed the formation of SiO 4 and La-O network in the La 10 Si 6 O 27 . → XRD patterns confirmed the formation of pure crystalline La 10 Si 6 O 27 phase. → The grain interior and the grain boundary conductivities are evaluated. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline apatite type structured lanthanum silicate (La 10 Si 6 O 27 ) sample was synthesized by sol-gel process. Thermal behavior of the dried gel of lanthanum silicate sample was studied using TG/DTA. The structural coordination of the dried gel of lanthanum silicate, calcined at various temperatures, was identified from the observed FTIR spectral results. The observed XRD patterns of the calcined dried gel were compared with the ICDD data and confirmed the formation of crystalline lanthanum silicate phase. The average crystalline size of La 10 Si 6 O 27 was calculated using the Scherrer formula and it is found to be ∼80 nm. The observed SEM images of the lanthanum silicate indicate the formation of the spherical particles and the existence of O, Si and La in the lanthanum silicate are confirmed from the SEM-EDX spectrum. The grain and grain boundary conductivities are evaluated by analyzing the measured impedance data, using winfit software, obtained at different temperatures, of La 10 Si 6 O 27 sample. Also, the observed grain and grain boundary conductivity behaviors of the La 10 Si 6 O 27 sample are analysed using brick layer model. The electrical permittivity and electrical modulus were calculated from the measured impedance data and were analyzed by fitting through the Havriliak and Negami function to describe the dielectric relaxation behavior of the nanocrystalline lanthanum silicate.

  16. Scanning Auger microscopy study of lanthanum partitioning in sphene-based glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, W.H.; Hayward, P.J.; Watson, D.G.; Allen, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Glass-ceramics are being investigated as possible hosts for the radioactive wastes that would result from recycling irradiated nuclear fuels. The partitioning of lanthanum in sphene-based glass-ceramics has been studied by scanning Auger electron microscopy for lanthanum concentrations from 0.2 to 2.0 mol.%. Sphene crystals (CaTiSiO 5 ) were located in the silica-rich glass matrix by recording digital Auger images of the calcium and titanium distributions. The sphene crystals were typically 0.5 to 5 μm in size and occupied approximately 40% of the total specimen volume. Auger spot analyses revealed that lanthanum was strongly partitioned into the sphene phase of phosphorus-free glass-ceramics; however, when a small amount of phosphorus was included in the glass-ceramic composition as a crystal nucleating agent, the lanthanum was concentrated in a third minor phase which also contained calcium, phosphorus and oxygen. Chemical shift effects in the Auger spectra of silicon, titanium and phosphorus showed evidence for electron-stimulated desorption of oxygen. (author)

  17. Heat transfer enhanced microwave process for stabilization of liquid radioactive waste slurry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    The objectve of this CRADA is to combine a polymer process for encapsulation of liquid radioactive waste slurry developed by Monolith Technology, Inc. (MTI), with an in-drum microwave process for drying radioactive wastes developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), for the purpose of achieving a fast, cost-effectve commercial process for solidification of liquid radioactive waste slurry. Tests performed so far show a four-fold increase in process throughput due to the direct microwave heating of the polymer/slurry mixture, compared to conventional edge-heating of the mixer. We measured a steady-state throughput of 33 ml/min for 1.4 kW of absorbed microwave power. The final waste form is a solid monolith with no free liquids and no free particulates

  18. Effects of food processing on the radioactivity of vegetables and cereals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel-Debet, S.; Real, J.

    1995-01-01

    The decrease of radioactivity for 134 Cs, 85 Sr, 106 Ru, 57 Co, 110m Ag during food processing was measured. Washing and bleaching vegetables directly contaminated by a single aerosol deposit led to a radioactivity decrease (depending on the vegetable, the radionuclide and the time of deposition) up to 90% for caesium. The efficiency of these processes was less important when the vegetables were contaminated by root transfer, except for peeling of root vegetables. Canning of vegetables indirectly contaminated by caesium, strontium, cobalt and ruthenium, after paring and bleaching, was rather interesting with residual radioactivity varying from 30 to 50% for green beans and from 5 to 20% for carrots. Measurements of stable caesium and strontium in cereals before and after industrial processing showed an important activity decrease; retention factors varied from 0.1 to 0.2 for wheat milling and 0.1 to 0.4 for rice processing. (authors). 6 refs., 9 tabs., 1 figs

  19. Design and fabrication of a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process radioactive bench-scale system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlquist, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents some of the design considerations and fabrication techniques for building a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) radioactive bench-scale system. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system uses a plasma torch to process a variety of radioactive materials into a final vitrified waste form. The processed waste will contain plutonium and trace amounts of other radioactive materials. The glovebox used in this system is located directly below the plasma chamber and is called the Hearth Handling Enclosure (HHE). The HHE is designed to maintain a confinement boundary between the processed waste and the operator. Operations that take place inside the HHE include raising and lowering the hearth using a hydraulic lift table, transporting the hearth within the HHE using an overhead monorail and hoist system, sampling and disassembly of the processed waste and hearth, weighing the hearth, rebuilding a hearth, and sampling HEPA filters. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system is located at the TREAT facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho

  20. Design of Biochemical Oxidation Process Engineering Unit for Treatment of Organic Radioactive Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainus Salimin; Endang Nuraeni; Mirawaty; Tarigan, Cerdas

    2010-01-01

    Organic radioactive liquid waste from nuclear industry consist of detergent waste from nuclear laundry, 30% TBP-kerosene solvent waste from purification or recovery of uranium from process failure of nuclear fuel fabrication, and solvent waste containing D 2 EHPA, TOPO, and kerosene from purification of phosphoric acid. The waste is dangerous and toxic matter having low pH, high COD and BOD, and also low radioactivity. Biochemical oxidation process is the effective method for detoxification of organic waste and decontamination of radionuclide by bio sorption. The result process are sludges and non radioactive supernatant. The existing treatment facilities radioactive waste in Serpong can not use for treatment of that’s organics waste. Dio chemical oxidation process engineering unit for continuous treatment of organic radioactive liquid waste on the capacity of 1.6 L/h has been designed and constructed the equipment of process unit consist of storage tank of 100 L capacity for nutrition solution, 2 storage tanks of 100 L capacity per each for liquid waste, reactor oxidation of 120 L, settling tank of 50 L capacity storage tank of 55 L capacity for sludge, storage tank of 50 capacity for supernatant. Solution on the reactor R-01 are added by bacteria, nutrition and aeration using two difference aerators until biochemical oxidation occurs. The sludge from reactor of R-01 are recirculated to the settling tank of R-02 and on the its reverse operation biological sludge will be settled, and supernatant will be overflow. (author)

  1. Processing of radioactive waste solutions in a vacuum evaporator-crystallizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, J.C.; Donovan, R.I.; Van der Cook, R.E.; Christensen, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    Results of the first 18 months' operation of Hanford's vacuum evaporator-crystallizer are reported. This process reduces the volume of radioactive waste solutions and simultaneously converts the waste to a less mobile salt cake. The evaporator-crystallizer is operating at better than design production rates and has reduced the volume of radioactive wastes by more than 15 million gallons. A process description, plant performance data, mechanical difficulties, and future operating plans are discussed. Also discussed is a computer model of the evaporator-crystallizer process

  2. Production of microspheres for the computer automated radioactive particle tracking technique (CARPT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson S.; Pinto, Jose Carlos C.S.; Nele, Marcio

    2013-01-01

    The CARPT technique is a non-destructive test that uses a radiotracer in the form of a single particle to determine patterns of fluid displacement or to develop numerical models for multiphase dynamic systems. Through it, velocity profiles of fluids or even concentration profiles of a phase can be visualized and the diagnose of phenomena in industrial processes related to fluid dynamics can be performed (e.g. recirculations, eddies, segregation zones or diffusivities ). In this work, spherical shaped particles composed of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and lanthanum oxide, about 0,2 mm in diameter, were obtained. They showed a satisfactory behavior in water after they had been dried for 24 h. In this manner, the synthesized spheres with a mean density of 1003,2 ± 0,1 kg/m 3 , containing a lanthanum oxide fractional mass of about 5 %, are prompt to be tested as a new type of radioactive tracer particle. (author)

  3. Conditioned of process of water removal product radioactive and non-radioactive genesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis mode of soluble organic matter in natural humic water drainage channels left bank of Pripyat and its dependence on the hydrodynamic and hydrological factors. Proved the existence of the concentration of 90 Sr in the water on the content of fulvic acid in it. Quantified removal of humic acids of groundwater and surface runoff. Emphasizes the primary role in the removal of humic substances and significant - in the mobilization of 90 Sr processes of secondary swamping of the surface watershed and eutrophication of waterways, which have acquired extensive development on the alienation of the territory for 25 years after the Chernobyl disaster.

  4. Corrosion and electrochemical properties of lanthanum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Matveeva, T.V.

    The kinetics of the corrosion rate of lanthanum at 25 0 in air of different relative humidities, distilled water, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, potassium hydroxide of different concentrations and at 100 0 C in distilled water and potassium hydroxide have been studied. In air at 22--100% relative humidity, the corrosion rate of lanthanum increases with time and with increasing humidity. In distilled water and in potassium hydroxide solutions, the corrosion rate of lanthanum increases with time and decreasees when the concentration of alkali exceeds 20%. With increasing concentration of the acids, the corrosion rate of lanthanum increases in hydrochloric acid and nitric acid and passes through a maximum in sulfuric acid (20%) and phosphoric acid (60%). The values of the corrosion rates of lanthanum in 40% nitric acid, 35% hydrochloric acid, 20% sulfuric acid, 60% phosphoric acid, and 40% hydrofluoric acid are 8 x 10 5 ; 4.4 x 10 4 ; 1.3 x 10 3 ; 9 g/m 2 h respectively

  5. The study of interaction of lanthanum-, cerium- and neodymium chlorides with sodium borohydride in pyridine- and tetrahydrofuran medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.; Rotenberg, T.G.; Dymova, T.N.

    1976-01-01

    Bis-tetrahydrofurans of lanthanum and neodymium borohydrides and bis-pyridinates of lanthanum, cerium and neodymium borohydrides were obtained by interacting sodium borohydride with lanthanum-, cerium and neodymium chlorides in pyridine and tetrahydrofuran media. All operations involving reagent combination, sampling and phase separation are performed in inert atmosphere using argonvacuum equipment. The reaction in pyridine was virtually instantaneous and accompanied by flocculanet precipitation. The interaction of lanthanum chloride and neodymium chloride with sodium borohydride in tetrahydrofuran (THF) was a slow (23-30 hr) heterophase process. The interaction rate was affected by size reduction of the intial substances, temperature, reagent proportion and mixing rate. The reaction time was twice reduced with boiling tetrahydrofuran

  6. Description of a Multipurpose Processing and Storage Complex for the Hanford Site's radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, D.H.; Wolfe, B.A.; Hoertkorn, T.R.

    1993-05-01

    The mission of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site has changed from defense nuclear materials production to that of waste management/disposal and environmental restoration. ne Multipurpose Processing and Storage Complex (MPSC) is being designed to process discarded waste tank internal hardware contaminated with mixed wastes, failed melters from the vitrification plant, and other Hanford Site high-level solid waste. The MPSC also will provide interim storage of other radioactive materials (irradiated fuel, canisters of vitrified high-level waste [HLW], special nuclear material [SNM], and other designated radioactive materials)

  7. Main approaches to solving the problems of radioactive waste processing and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, V.M.; Syrkus, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    papers devoted to the problems of processing and disposal of radioactive wastes, formed during nuclear facility operation and after decommissioning are reviewed. Techniques for gaseous and liquid waste solidification, as well as solid waste processing by mechanical fragmentation and combustion are considered. Possibilities of radioactive waste disposal in cosmic space, their burial at the bed of seas ansd oceans, in geological storages are discussed. Special attention disposal. The conclusion is made that today there are no any uniform way for radiactive waste disposal and standard technical means for its realization. Solution of the problems considered should be of a complex character and it is carried out within international research programs

  8. Experience base for Radioactive Waste Thermal Processing Systems: A preliminary survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayberry, J.; Geimer, R.; Gillins, R.; Steverson, E.M.; Dalton, D.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-04-01

    In the process of considering thermal technologies for potential treatment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory mixed transuranic contaminated wastes, a preliminary survey of the experience base available from Radioactive Waste Thermal Processing Systems is reported. A list of known commercial radioactive waste facilities in the United States and some international thermal treatment facilities are provided. Survey focus is upon the US Department of Energy thermal treatment facilities. A brief facility description and a preliminary summary of facility status, and problems experienced is provided for a selected subset of the DOE facilities

  9. Digital processing method for monitoring the radioactivity of stack releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vialettes, H.; Leblanc, P.; Perotin, J.P.; Lazou, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The digital processing method proposed is adapted for data supplied by a fixed-filter detector normally used for analogue processing (integrator system). On the basis of the raw data (pulses) from the detector, the technique makes it possible to determine the rate of activity released whereas analogue processing gives only the released activity. Furthermore, the method can be used to develop alarm systems on the basis of a possible exposure rate at the point of fall-out, and by including in the program a coefficient which allows for atmospheric diffusion conditions at any given time one can improve the accuracy of the results. In order to test the digital processing method and demonstrate its advantages over analogue processing, various atmospheric contamination situations were simulated in a glove-box and analysed simultaneously, using both systems, from the pulses transmitted by the same sampling and fixed-filter detection unit. The experimental results confirm the advantages foreseen in the theoretical research. (author)

  10. An appraisal of the hydrogeological processes involved in shallow subsurface radioactive waste management in Canadian terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisak, G.E.; Jackson, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    The hydrogeological aspects of the problem of low-level radioactive waste management are introduced with a discussion of the Canadian nuclear power program; the nature of radioactive wastes and their rates of production; and the half-lives and health effects of ''waste'' radionuclides. As well, a general account is given of the present Canadian policy and procedures for licensing radioactive waste management sites. Following this introductory material, a detailed account is presented of the geohydrologic processes controlling the transport of radionuclides in groundwater flow systems and the attendant geochemical processes causing the retardation of the radionuclides. These geohydrologic and geochemical processes (i.e., hydrogeological processes) can be evaluated by the measurement of certain variables such as aquifer dispersivity, groundwater velocity, hydraulic conductivity, cation-exchange capacity, and total competing cations. To assess the possible importance of each variable in Canadian terrain, a comprehensive discussion of presently available (Canadian) data that have been compiled pertaining to each variable is presented. A description is then given of the hydrogeology of and the waste management experiences at radioactive waste management sites at Chalk River, Ontario; Bruce, Ontario; Whiteshell, Manitoba; and Suffield, Alberta. Along with this description there is a brief evaluation of those geohydrologic and geochemical processes that may be of importance at these sites. As a consequence of the above, site criteria outlining the nature of desirable hydrogeological environments for radioactive waste management areas are presented for those situations where the groundwater flow system acts as (a) a barrier to the migration of escaped radioactivity and (b) a joint dispersion-retardation system for liquid wastes. (author)

  11. Peculiarities of the radioactive particles transport phenomena in the facilitated diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavryushenko, D.A.; Sisojev, V.M.; Cherevko, K.V.; Vlasenko, T.S.

    2017-01-01

    The work is devoted to the up to date problem that is the description of the radioactive particle diffusion processes. One of the aims of the present study is to estimate the effects caused by the irradiation of the liquid systems on the ongoing transport processes. That can allow predicting the behavior of the liquid systems in the presence of the radioactive sources. The main objective of the present work is studying the radioactive particles diffusion phenomena with the possible facilitated diffusion processes being considered. The phenomena are studied based on the fundamental relations of the nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamics. The diffusive flows are evaluated with the special attention given to the accounting of the entropy effects due to the appearance of the new radioactive particles in the system. The developed approach is used to estimate the diffusive flow of the radioactive particles for the case of the plane-parallel pore with the semi-transparent walls. The choice of a model can be justified as it might be used to describe the production of the radioactive contaminated water when the radionuclide face the diffusion process after being washed from the radioactive wastes and the rests of the nuclear fuel. Within the suggested model it is shown that the diffusion coefficient depends on the structural properties of the liquid systems that might be changed under the influence of the irradiation. The obtained equations for calculating the diffusive flows show the definite stabilizing effect in respect to the concentration difference in between the boundaries of the plane-parallel pore. It leads to the decreased changes of the diffusive flow when the concentrations of the radioactive particles at the boundaries are changed in comparison with those observed for the constant diffusion coefficient. The observed behavior for the ideal solution model is explained by the entropy effects. The qualitative analysis of the possible influence of the changes in

  12. Low-level radioactive waste processing at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This survey was limited to systems and materials used to process waste liquids contaminated with radionuclides. Since the chemical and radiological character of collected liquids may change dramatically, the survey describes waste and cleanup process streams encountered during normal outage or power production conditions. Influents containing specific organic compounds, salts, or solids common to local sources, and the special techniques developed to remove or concentrate these materials are not detailed in this report. The names and phone numbers of the individuals responsible for investigating and solving these problems, however, provides easy access to data which will save time and expense when facing abnormal processing, purchasing, or engineering challenges. The Liquid Radwaste Source Book contains information collected from 31 of 36 BWR's as well as contact information from all licensed commercial units. Since some sites share common radwaste processing facilities, not all units are represented by individual data sheets

  13. Effects of processing techniques on the radioactive contamination of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, P.; Delmas, J.; Grauby, A.

    Following contamination of cultures of rice, grapes and various vegetables by 90 Sr and 137 Cs, the effect of processing and cooking techniques on the contamination of the food-stuff was investigated [fr

  14. Study into an organization for collecting, processing and removing of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of a study into a new organization for the collection, processing and removal of radioactive waste. At present these activities are carried out by the Dutch Energy Research Foundation (ECN). The new organization has to offer guarantees for a qualititatively responsible retrieval and processing of radioactive waste. It also has to be certain that the waste offered will not be send back, or even refused, if stagnation occurs in the removal. Finally the tariffs have to be not so prohibitive that they hinder a responsible handling with radioactive waste by the producers. An organization is advised which is self-employed with regard to management, directorate and materials. It is recommended to submit this organization in a limited liability company. This form of government may be supplemented optionally with a slight form of a cooperative association. (author). 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 11 tabs

  15. Polonium-210 in the environment around a radioactive waste disposal area and phosphate ore processing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, III, W J; Markham, O D

    1984-04-01

    Polonium-210 concentrations were determined for soil, vegetation and small mammal tissues collected at a solid radioactive waste disposal area, near a phosphate ore processing plant and at two rural areas in southeastern Idaho. Polonium concentrations in media sampled near the radioactive waste disposal facility were equal to or less than values from rural area samples, indicating that disposal of solid radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site has not resulted in increased environmental levels of polonium. Concentrations of /sup 210/Po in soils, deer mice hide and carcass samples collected near the phosphate processing plant were statistically greater than the other sampling locations; however, the mean /sup 210/Po concentration in soils and small mammal tissues from sampling areas near the phosphate plant were only four and three times greater, respectively, than control values. No statistical difference was observed for /sup 210/Po concentrations in vegetation among any of the sampling locations.

  16. A reliable technique for transfer of radioactivity filled vial from transport container to the processing station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothalkar, Chetan; Dey, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    In Technetium Column Generator Production Facility (TCGPF project) of BRIT, a facility for unloading vial containing radioactive liquid sodium molybdate- 99 Mo solution from the transport cask into the processing station and unsealing the vial to transfer the liquid to a storage bottle has been developed. This is specifically conceptualized for safe handling of radioactivity and minimizing the radiation dose exposure to the personnel working at the time of transferring the radioactivity from the transport cask to a place for further processing. The facility, designed to handle around 1850 GBq activity, has two cells enclosed in 102mm thick lead wall and connected by a gravity actuated trolley conveyor. The first cell handles the transport cask carrying the vial-containing radioactivity, which houses two types of vial lifting gadgets assisted by manually operatable tongs. Gadgets use compressed air. In an experiment, it is found that the HDPE vial lifting gadget using suction cup continue to function up to 30-40 minutes after power failure. The experience shows that gadget using 3-point radial gripper to lift the glass vial will remain in grab position, even if the compressed air supply stops. In this facility the dose receivable, while handling radioactivity by the operator, is likely to be negligibly small (approx. 3.15 x 10 -4 mSv per year at the rate four glass vials/week and 2.25 x 10 -4 mSv per year considering at the rate 1 vial/week for HOPE vial transfer). (author)

  17. Application of reverse osmosis membrane technology for liquid radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Juan

    2010-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) processing should bear an acceptable level of residual radioactivity for discharge and meet the request of energy saving and waste minimization. Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane technology has been developed as a novel process for LRW processing. Five basic operating parameters of flux, recovery factor, rejection factor, concentration factor and decontamination factor were described, and the latter two parameters were the most important. Concentration factor and decontamination factor should be as high as possible and simultaneously the operating cost for membrane filtration should be low. Technical design considerations for membrane process were discussed and optimized from the aspects of pretreatment, membrane module choice and arrangement and membrane clear out. Application and investigation of RO membrane technology for LRW processing were introduced and it should be noted that the RO membrane technology has been introduced into overseas nuclear power plants for LRW processing and interiorly in the stage of investigation. (authors)

  18. Applying commercial robotic technology to radioactive material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasz, E.L.; Sievers, R.H. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The development of robotic systems for glove box process automation is motivated by the need to reduce operator radiation dosage, minimize the generation of process waste, and to improve the security of nuclear materials. Commercial robotic systems are available with the required capabilities but are not compatible with a glove box environment. Alpha radiation, concentrated dust, a dry atmosphere and restricted work space result in the need for unique adaptations to commercial robotics. Implementation of these adaptations to commercial robotics require performance trade-offs. A design and development effort has been initiated to evaluate the feasibility of using a commercial overhead gantry robot for glove box processing. This paper will present the initial results and observations for this development effort. 1 ref

  19. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides information on the origin, characteristics and methods of processing of radioactive wastes, as well as the philosophy and practice of their storage and disposal. Chapters are devoted to the following topics: radioactive wastes, characteristics of radioactive wastes, processing liquid and solid radioactive wastes, processing wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, processing gaseous radioactive wastes, fixation of radioactive concentrates, solidification of high-level radioactive wastes, use of radioactive wastes as raw material, radioactive waste disposal, transport of radioactive wastes and economic problems of radioactive wastes disposal. (C.F.)

  20. Innovative processes for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacary, V.; Barre, Y.; Plasari, E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Because of the high salinity (0.5 to 2 M) of liquid wastes and the variability of their composition, the method which is the most appropriate and commonly used to remove the contaminants consists in the in situ formation of adsorbent particles in the waste stream. This technique is often called coprecipitation. To increase the efficiency of this treatment, a study is performed to point out the impact of the choice of the process and the influence of operating parameters (mean residence time, stirring speed, etc.) on the formation of crystals and ultimately on their ability to capture radionuclide. Barium sulphate was chosen as a reference because it is a well known precipitate and a material used in the decontamination facilities to remove radiostrontium. Two issues are encountered with the classic treatments which are consequences of the variability of effluents composition. On the one hand when high activity effluents have to be treated, the efficiency of the classic processes can not be sufficient and the liquid must be once again decontaminated. Thus the volume of disposal waste produced by the treatment is doubled. On the other hand when low activity effluents have to be treated, the classic processes produce a low activity waste. Consequently the volume of storage occupied by this waste is disproportionate with regard to its low activity. To return the more flexible process, various configurations were tested. They can be classified in two categories: improvements of the classic treatments and new types of reactors. Because of the good results which are obtained, these processes are patent pending. To support the experimental investigations, a modelling study at the reactor scale is initiated to distinguish the influence of each process parameter. These models assume that the surface of adsorbent particles is continuously renewed by crystal growth. The aim of this work is to determine the decisive parameters which allow the

  1. Additional methods for the processing of solid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittlova, E.; Svrcek, A.; Hazucha, E. at el.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of the work performed within the A 01-159-812/05 State Project concerned with the technology of and technical means for the processing of solid wastes arising during the operation of nuclear power plants. This included the development of the incineration equipment, development of the process of air filter disposal and equipment therefor, manufacture of a saw for fragmentation of wood, manufacture of a sorting box, ultimate solution of the problem of waste sorting, and use of high-pressure compression technology. (author). 1 tab., 9 refs

  2. Process for draining off radioactive wastes mixed with bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegmaier, W.; Kluger, W.; Boden, H.; Schneider, F.

    1979-01-01

    The process is to be improved by lowering the temperature of the mixture leaving a spiral evaporator, which was previously about 160 0 C quite considerably. According to the invention, an additional outlet case is added after the extruder, which has heating and cooling ducts, so that the temperature can be controlled, without blocking the spiral. Details are shown. (UWI) [de

  3. Design of facilities for processing pyrophoric radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bristow, H.A.S.; Hunter, S.D.

    1976-01-01

    The safe processing of large quantities of plutonium-bearing material poses difficult problems the solution of which sometimes involves conflicting requirements. The difficulties are increased when plutonium of a high burnup is used and the position becomes considerably more complicated when the chemical nature of the material being handled is such that it is pyrophoric. This paper describes the design principles and methods used to establish a facility capable of manufacturing large quantities of mixed plutonium/uranium carbide. The facility which included process stages such as milling, granulation, pellet pressing, furnacing and pin filling, was largely a conversion of an existing processing line. The paper treats the major plant hazards individually and indicates the methods used to counter them, outlining the main design principles employed and describing their application to selected items of equipment. Examples of the problems encountered with typical items of equipment are discussed. Some guide-lines are listed which should be of general value to designers and developers working on equipment for processing plutonium-bearing solids. The methods described have been successfully employed to provide a plant for the manufacture of mixed plutonium/uranium carbide on a scale of many hundreds of kilograms with no serious incident.(author)

  4. State of the art and development of radioactive material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.; Hladik, O.

    1981-01-01

    The radioisotope production at the Rossendorf Nuclear Research Centre is reviewed, considering irradiation facilities (nuclear reactor, cyclotron), processing of activated materials, in particular of nuclear fuel after short-term irradiation and the chemical separation of fission products, and the production of sup(99m)Tc radiopharmaceuticals

  5. Adsorbtion of oxygen and cesium on lanthanum hexaboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodetskij, D.A.; Tskhakaya, V.K.; Shchudlo, Yu.G.; Yarygin, V.I.; Yas'ko, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Oxygen and cesium adsorption on lanthanum hexaboride was investigated. Especial attention was paid to structural investigations of the LaB 6 (100)-O system. Diffraction pictures and curves of changes in work function in the process of oxygen disorption have been obtained. At oxygen adsorption on a crystal heated up to different temperatures in the range of 900-1400 K the same diffraction pictures as at corresponding annealing temperatures observed were. It is noted that adsorption heat changes slightly in the LaB 6 -O-Cs system

  6. Development of very low-level radioactive waste sequestration process criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, N.; Wong, P., E-mail: nicholas.chan@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Segregating radioactive waste at the source and reclassifying radioactive waste to lower waste classes are the key activities to reduce the environmental footprint and long-term liability. In the Canadian Standards Association's radioactive waste classification system, there are 2 sub-classes within low-level radioactive waste: very short-lived radioactive waste and very low-level radioactive waste (VLLW). VLLW has a low hazard potential but is above the Canadian unconditional clearance criteria as set out in Schedule 2 of Nuclear Substances and Devices Regulations. Long-term waste management facilities for VLLW do not require a high degree of containment and isolation. In general, a relatively low-cost near-surface facility with limited regulatory control is suitable for VLLW. At Canadian Nuclear Laboratories' Chalk River Laboratories site an initiative, VLLW Sequestration, was implemented in 2013 to set aside potential VLLW for temporary storage and to be later dispositioned in the planned VLLW facility. As of May 2015, a total of 236m{sup 3} resulting in approximately $1.1 million in total savings have been sequestered. One of the main hurdles in implementing VLLW Sequestration is the development of process criteria. Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) are used as a guide or as requirements for determining whether waste is accepted by the waste management facility. Establishment of the process criteria ensures that segregated waste materials have a high likelihood to meet the VLLW WAC and be accepted into the planned VLLW facility. This paper outlines the challenges and various factors which were considered in the development of interim process criteria. (author)

  7. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-01-01

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  8. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  9. Applying commercial robotic technology to radioactive material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasz, E.L.; Sievers, R.H. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The development of robotic systems to automate nuclear material processing in glove boxes is motivated by the need to reduce operator radiation exposure, minimize the generation of process waste, and to improve security of nuclear materials. Commercial robotic systems can furnish the needed manipulation capabilities by are not readily compatible with the glove box environment and physical restrictions. Alpha radiation, concentrated dust, a dry atmosphere and restricted work space require unique adaptations of commercial robotics. Tradeoffs between meeting desired functional capabilities and extensive customization are necessary. The reported design and development efforts include evaluating the feasibility of using a commercial gantry robot for glove box pyrochemical and smelting operations. This paper presents the initial results and observations for this development effort

  10. Behavior of radioactive elements (uranium and thorium) in Bayer process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, C.; Kazama, S.; Sakamoto, A.; Hirayanagi, K.

    1986-01-01

    It is essential that alumina used for manufacturing electronic devices should contain an extremely low level of alpha-radiation. The principal source of alpha-radiation in alumina is uranium, a minor source being thorium. Uranium in bauxite dissolves into the liquor in the digestion process and is fixed to the red mud as the desilication reaction progresses. A part of uranium remaining in the liquor precipitates together with aluminum hydroxide in the precipitation process. The uranium content of aluminum hydroxide becomes lower as the precipitation velocity per unit surface area of the seed becomes slower. Organic matters in the Bayer liquor has an extremely significant impact on the uranium content of aluminum hydroxide. Aluminum hydroxide free of uranium is obtainable from the liquor that does not contain organic matters

  11. Plasma processing of compacted drums of simulated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geimer, R.; Batdorf, J.; Larsen, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to identify and develop technologies that have potential application in the treatment of DOE wastes. One particular waste of concern within the DOE is transuranic (TRU) waste, which is generated and stored at several DOE sites. High temperature DC arc generated plasma technology is an emerging treatment method for TRU waste, and its use has the potential to provide many benefits in the management of TRU. This paper begins by discussing the need for development of a treatment process for TRU waste, and the potential benefits that a plasma waste treatment system can provide in treating TRU waste. This is followed by a discussion of the results of a project conducted for the DOE to demonstrate the effectiveness of a plasma process for treating supercompacted TRU waste. 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Processing device for discharged water from radioactive material handling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Takao; Kono, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Katsuaki; Kataiki, Koichi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a mechanical floating material-removing means for removing floating materials in discharged water, an ultrafiltration device for separating processed water discharged from the removing means by membranes, a reverse osmotic filtration device for separating the permeated water and a condensing means for evaporating condensed water. Since processed water after mechanically removing floating materials is supplied to the ultrafiltration device, the load applied on the filtering membrane is reduced, to simplify the operation control as a total. In addition, since the amount of resultant condensed water is reduced, and the devolumed condensed water is condensed and dried, the condensing device is made compact and the amount of resultant wastes is reduced. (T.M.)

  13. Radioactive alpha wastes processing at the nuclear center of Mol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorde, N. van de

    1978-01-01

    This process is based on calcination at very high temperature (1500 0 C) of wastes, mainly burnable, with selected non-burnable wastes, such as glass, metal, sludge, ion echanger, etc. Incineration wastes melt at this temperature and an insoluble granitic mass is obtained. This operation is performed in a special oven equipped with a gas purification device installed in a place like alpha bearing wastes treatment working spot where the staff can work in an air-supplied suit. Two incineration units are planned, the first one with a capacity of 150 kg/hr in view to treat a large amount of wastes with a low plutonium content (max. 10 mg/l), the second smaller with a capacity of 10 kg/hr, specially designed to process wastes with a high Pu content. This project for the first unit, at least is now tested with beta gamma wastes processing. Alpha bearing wastes pocessing will start at the end of 1978, we are now building the second unit [fr

  14. Process for final storage of high level radioactive fission product solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.R.B.; Fries, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this process for the storage of an aqueous solution of radioactive nuclides, the solution is diluted with system water, which is obtained from a reservoir below the bottom of the sea in a porous geological stratum. After dilution, the diluted solution is injected into the same geological stratum under the bottom of the sea. (orig.) [de

  15. Management of radioactive liquid waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendixsen, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Highly radioactive liquid wastes (HLLW) are routinely produced during spent nuclear fuel processing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This paper discusses the processes and safe practices for management of the radioactive process waste streams, which processes include collection, concentration, interim storage, calcination to granular solids, and long-term intermediate storage. Over four million gallons of HLLW have been converted to a recoverable granular solid form through waste liquid injection into a high-temperature, fluidized bed wherein the wastes are converted to their respective solid oxides. The development of a glass ceramic solid for the long-term permanent disposal of the high level waste (HLW) solids is also described

  16. Post-process intensification of photographic silver images, using radioactive compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A method of post-process intensification of silver images on a developed and fixed photographic film or plate is described, comprising the steps of (a) converting silver of the developed film or plate to a radioactive compound by contracting the film or plate with an aqueous alkaline solution of an organo-S 35 compound which reacts selectively with silver in a photographic film or plate; (b) placing the film or plate treated in step (a) in direct contact with a receiver film which is sensitive to beta radiation whereby the receiver film is exposed by radiation from the radioactive compound; and (c) developing and fixing the resulting intensified receiver film. (author)

  17. Measurements of the radioactivity of power plant by-products processed into construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowski, S.A.; Dudelewski, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of the recycling of residual products comprising, inter alia, fly ash and slags accuring from the combustion of black and brown coal in modern coal dust boilers in the power industry has been topical for a number of years. Numerous discussions and articles in technical periodicals and the daily press have revolved around the problem of the radioactivity of construction materials or construction elements obtained from fly ash or slags of power plant. In Poland, this was a forbidden subject until the publication in 1980 by the Warsaw institute of construction technology of standard no. 234 entitled: 'Recommendations for establishing the natural radioactivity of products processed into construction materials'. (orig.) [de

  18. Organic waste process containing at least one radioactive element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roy, F.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of an organic waste process containing at least one element from the group comprising strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium. It comprises the introduction of the organic waste and gaseous oxygen in a bath of melted salt containing an alkaline carbonate, the bath being maintained at a high temperature between 400 and 1000 0 C and at a pressure of 0.5 to 10 bars, so that the organic waste is burnt and oxidised at least partly, the element selected being retained by the bath of melted salt [fr

  19. Microwave-assisted synthesis of lanthanum conversion coating on Mg-Li alloy and its corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Dalei; Jing Xiaoyan; Wang Jun; Lu Shanshan; Yang Piaoping; Wang Yanli; Zhang Milin

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → The method of microwave is used to synthesize lanthanum conversion coating. → Lanthanum conversion coating on Mg-Li alloy was studied. → Different conditions between room temperature and microwave were compared. → The corrosion behavior of lanthanum conversion coatings was studied. → The corrosion mechanism of lanthanum conversion coatings was studied. - Abstract: Lanthanum-based conversion coating on Mg-Li alloy has been prepared by a microwave-assisted method. X-ray diffractions (XRD) indicate that the intermetallic compounds of lanthanum are formed on Mg-Li alloy surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the coating has different morphologies and special structures. The corrosion resistance was assessed by means of potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The results indicate that this coating significantly reduces the corrosion rate of Mg-Li alloy in NaCl solution. A comparing experiment indicates that the coating prepared by microwave-assisted process has superior corrosion resistance to the coating obtained at room temperature.

  20. MethodS of radioactive waste processing and disposal in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstykh, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of investigations into radioactive waste processing and disposal in the United Kingdom are discussed. Methods for solidification of metal and graphite radioactive wastes and radioactive slime of the Magnox reactors are described. Specifications of different installations used for radioactive waste disposal are given. Climatic and geological conditions in the United Kingdom are such that any deep storages of wastes will be lower than the underground water level. That is why dissolution and transport by underground waters will inevitably result in radionuclide mobility. In this connection an extended program of investigations into the main three aspects of disposal problem namely radionucleide release in storages, underground water transport and radionuclide migration is realized. The program is divided in two parts. The first part deals with retrival of hydrological and geochemical data on geological formations, development of specialized methods of investigations which are necessary for identification of places for waste final disposal. The second part represents theoretical and laboratory investigations into provesses of radionuclide transport in the system of ''sttorage-geological formation''. It is concluded that vitrification on the base of borosilicate glass is the most advanced method of radioactive waste solidification

  1. Operation and control of ion-exchange processes for treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelity, L.A.

    1967-01-01

    A manual dealing with the application of ion-exchange materials to the treatment of radioactive wastes and reviewing the facilities currently using this method. This book is one of three commissioned by the IAEA on the principal methods of concentrating radioactive wastes. The content of this document is: (i) Historical review related to removal of radioactivity; (ii) Principles of ion exchange (iii) Ion-exchange materials; (iv) Limitations of ion exchangers; (v) Application of ion exchange to waste processing; (vi) Operational procedures and experiences; (vii) Cost-of-treatment by ion-exchange. The document also gives a list of producers of ion-exchange material and defines some relevant terms. 101 refs, 31 figs, 27 tabs

  2. Operation and control of ion-exchange processes for treatment of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emelity, L A [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1967-12-01

    A manual dealing with the application of ion-exchange materials to the treatment of radioactive wastes and reviewing the facilities currently using this method. This book is one of three commissioned by the IAEA on the principal methods of concentrating radioactive wastes. The content of this document is: (i) Historical review related to removal of radioactivity; (ii) Principles of ion exchange (iii) Ion-exchange materials; (iv) Limitations of ion exchangers; (v) Application of ion exchange to waste processing; (vi) Operational procedures and experiences; (vii) Cost-of-treatment by ion-exchange. The document also gives a list of producers of ion-exchange material and defines some relevant terms. 101 refs, 31 figs, 27 tabs.

  3. Bituminization process of radioactive liquid wastes by domestic bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, H.L.

    1977-11-01

    A study has been carried out of the incorporation of intermediate level wastes in bitumen. Two kinds of wastes: a) an evaporator concentrate from a PWR (containing boric acid), b) second cycle wastes from the Purex process (containing sodium salts), were satisfactorily incorporated into a mixture of straight and blown domestic bitumen, to yield a product containing 50wt% solids. The products were stable to radiation exposure of 5'8x10 8 rads. Leach rates were measured in both distilled and sea water over periods up to 200 days at 5 0 C and 25 0 C and at both 1 atm and 8 atm pressure. Results confirmed that long term storage of the products would be satisfactory

  4. Techniques of radioactive soil processing at rehabilitation of contamination territories - 59199

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Victor; Chesnokov, Alexander; Danilovich, Alexey; Zverkov, Yury; Koltyshev, Sergey; Semenov, Sergey; Shisha, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Rehabilitation of nuclear- and radiation objects assumes dealing with and removal of considerable volumes of a radioactive soil. A similar situation was faced at the remediation of such sufficiently large objects, as old radioactive waste storages at the territory of 'Kurchatov Institute' and elimination of consequences of radiation accident at Podolsk plant of nonferrous metals. At rough estimates the volumes of a radioactive soil at territory of 'Kurchatov institute' were 15-20 thousand m 3 , volumes of a removed soil at carrying out of urgent measures in territory of Kirovo-Chepetsk chemical plant exceeded 20-25 thousand m 3 , volumes of a low active waste at the territory of Podolsk plant may reach 20 thousand m 3 . Such considerable volumes demand creation of technologies of their processing, an effective measuring technique of levels of their contamination and ways of considerable (in times) decrease of their volumes at the expense of decontamination or separation. Works have been aimed at the decision of these problems at carrying out of rehabilitation of territory 'Kurchatov institute'. During works technologies of radiation and water-gravitational separation of a radioactive soil have been offered and are realized in practice. A facility of water -gravitational separation of the soil was created and used within 5 years. It allowed decreasing of volumes of the low active waste in 5-6 times. In further the facility was supplied by a facility of radiation separation of the soil that has raised its efficiency. On turn there is a start-up question in experimental operation of facility of radiation separation of low active slag for Podolsk plant of nonferrous metals. The decision of these problems will allow to gain experience of creation of through technology of the processing of a radioactive soil and decrease in its volumes for using it as a design decisions for rehabilitation of other large scale radioactive-contaminated territories and industrial objects

  5. Decontamination process applied to radioactive solid wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Milton B.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G.

    2009-01-01

    The process of decontamination is an important step in the economic operation of nuclear facilities. A large number of protective clothing, metallic parts and equipment get contaminated during the handling of radioactive materials in laboratory, plants and reactors. Safe and economic operation of these nuclear facilities will have a bearing on the extent to which these materials are reclaimed by the process of decontamination. The most common radioactive contaminants are fission products, corrosion products, uranium and thorium. The principles involved in decontamination are the same as those for an industrial cleaning process. However, the main difference is in the degree of cleaning required and at times special techniques have to be employed for removing even trace quantities of radioactive materials. This paper relate decontaminations experiences using acids and acids mixtures (HCl, HF, HNO 3 , KMnO 4 , C 2 H 2 O 4 , HBF 4 ) in several kinds of radioactive solid wastes from nuclear power plants. The result solutions were monitored by nuclear analytical techniques, in order to contribute for radiochemical characterization of these wastes. (author)

  6. Study of the Treatment of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Nong Son Uranium Ore Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ba Tien; Trinh Giang Huong; Luu Cao Nguyen; Harvey, L.K.; Tran Van Quy

    2011-01-01

    Liquid waste from Nong Son uranium ore processing is treated with concentrated acid, agglomerated, leached, run through ion exchange and then treated with H 2 O 2 to precipitate yellowcake. The liquid radioactive waste has a pH of 1.86 and a high content of radioactive elements, such as: [U] 143.898 ppm and [Th] = 7.967 ppm. In addition, this waste contains many polluted chemical elements with high content, such as arsenic, mercury, aluminum, iron, zinc, magnesium, manganese and nickel. The application of the general method as one stage precipitation or precipitation in coordination with BaCl 2 is not effective. These methods generated a large amount of sludge with poor settling characteristics. The volume of final treated waste was large. This paper introduces the investigation of the treatment of this liquid radioactive waste by the method of two stage of precipitation in association with polyaluminicloride (PAC) and polymer. The impact of factors: pH, neutralizing agents, quantity of PAC and polymer to effect precipitation and improve the settling characteristics during processing was studied. The results showed that the processing of liquid radioactive waste treatment through two stages: first stage at pH = 3 and the second stage at pH = 8.0 with limited PAC and polymer (A 101) resulted in significant reduced volume of the treated waste. The discharged liquid satisfied the requirement of the National Technical Regulation on Industrial Waste Water (QCVN 24:2009). (author)

  7. Solid radioactive waste processing system for light water cooled reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Design, construction and performance requirements are given for the operation of the solid radioactive waste processing system for light water-cooled reactor plants. All radioactive or contaminated materials, including spent air and liquid filter elements, spent bead resins, filter sludge, spent powdered resins, evaporator and reverse osmosis concentrates, and dry radioactive wastes are to be processed in appropriate portions of the system. Sections of the standard cover: overall system requirements; equipment requirement; controls and instrumentation; physical arrangement; system capacity and redundancy; operation and maintenance; and system construction and testing. Provisions contained in this standard are to take precedence over ANS-51.1-1973(N18.2-1973) and its revision, ANS-51.8-1975(N18.2a-1975), Sections 2.2 and 2.3. The product resulting from the solid radioactive waste processing system must meet criteria imposed by standards and regulations for transportation and burial (Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 100 to 199). As a special feature, all statements in this standard which are related to nuclear safety are set off in boxes

  8. Demonstration of the Defense Waste Processing Facility vitrification process for Tank 42 radioactive sludge -- Glass preparation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Fellinger, T.L.; Marshall, K.M.; Crawford, C.L.; Cozzi, A.D.; Edwards, T.B.

    1999-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently processing and immobilizing the radioactive high level waste sludge at SRS into a durable borosilicate glass for final geological disposal. The DWPF has recently finished processing the first radioactive sludge batch, and is ready for the second batch of radioactive sludge. The second batch is primarily sludge from Tank 42. Before processing this batch in the DWPF, the DWPF process flowsheet has to be demonstrated with a sample of Tank 42 sludge to ensure that an acceptable melter feed and glass can be made. This demonstration was recently completed in the Shielded Cells Facility at SRS. An earlier paper in these proceedings described the sludge composition and processes necessary for producing an acceptable melter fee. This paper describes the preparation and characterization of the glass from that demonstration. Results substantiate that Tank 42 sludge after mixing with the proper amount of glass forming frit (Frit 200) can be processed to make an acceptable glass

  9. Foaming and Antifoaming and Gas Entrainment in Radioactive Waste Pretreatment and Immobilization Processes. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasan, Darsh T.

    2007-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford site are in the process of stabilizing millions of gallons of radioactive waste slurries remaining from production of nuclear materials for the Department of Energy (DOE). The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS is currently vitrifying the waste in borosilicate glass, while the facilities at the Hanford site are in the construction phase. Both processes utilize slurry-fed joule-heated melters to vitrify the waste slurries. The DWPF has experienced difficulty during operations. The cause of the operational problems has been attributed to foaming, gas entrainment and the rheological properties of the process slurries. The rheological properties of the waste slurries limit the total solids content that can be processed by the remote equipment during the pretreatment and meter feed processes. Highly viscous material can lead to air entrainment during agitation and difficulties with pump operations. Excessive foaming in waste evaporators can cause carryover of radionuclides and non-radioactive waste to the condensate system. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the surface phenomena, suspension rheology and bubble generation of interactions that lead to foaming and air entrainment problems in the DOE High Level and Low Activity Radioactive Waste separation and immobilization processes were pursued under this project. The first major task accomplished in the grant proposal involved development of a theoretical model of the phenomenon of foaming in a three-phase gas-liquid-solid slurry system. This work was presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis (9). The second major task involved the investigation of the inter-particle interaction and microstructure formation in a model slurry by the batch sedimentation method. Both experiments and modeling studies were carried out. The results were presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis. The third task involved the use of laser confocal microscopy to study

  10. Geochemical processes to mobilization of radionuclides from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragea, M.

    2005-01-01

    On time to alteration the waste by natural weather in isolated area of waste dumps we can notice chemical, biochemical and geochemical modification. Disposability and flow of water are two of the most important parameter which affect the waste chemistry and migration of contamination from wastes. The water behaves like a mechanism of transport for cationic and anionic components and influenced solubility and salt migration from dump. The salt migration towards residue surfaces is affected by short distance between water and surface. The salts are redissolving and moving through the capillary towards the surface when precipitate. The reactions inside of waste are influenced by geochemical point of view mainly by the amount of sulfated salts and chloride, by the disposability of water, pH and by the chemical mineral heterogeneous of waste. Obviously, if the process of alteration by atmospherically agents and those effects about waste can be minimized we could minimize even chemical modification in order to form the salts. This paper examines the mechanism by which 226 Ra and U nat can enter in groundwater and those, which control its concentration. (author)

  11. A general theory for radioactive processes in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo, R.; Meruane, T.

    1998-01-01

    The formal theory of radiative processes in centrosymmetric coordination compounds of the Ln X 3+ is a trivalent lanthanide ion and X -1 =Cl -1 , Br -1 ) is put forward based on a symmetry vibronic crystal field-ligand polarisation model. This research considers a truncated basis set for the intermediate states of the central metal ion and have derived general master equations to account for both the overall observed spectral intensities and the measured relative vibronic intensity distributions for parity forbidden but vibronically allowed electronic transitions. In addition, a procedure which includes the closure approximation over the intermediate electronic states is included in order to estimate quantitative crystal field contribution to the total transition dipole moments of various and selected electronic transitions. This formalism is both general and flexible and it may be employed in any electronic excitations involving f N type configurations for the rare earths in centrosymmetric co-ordination compounds in cubic environments and also in doped host crystals belonging to the space group Fm 3m. (author)

  12. Application of electro-osmosis to radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Electro-osmotic dewatering (EOD) is a remotely controllable process for the final stage of slurry concentration after gravity settling or filtration prior to immobilization in cement. It operates by using an electric field instead of pressure as the driving force across a microporous non-conducting membrane - partitioning the solid and liquid components by charge separation. The high solids retention factor (> 99.99%) yields decontamination factors > 1000. Dewatering of a wide range of suspensions can be accomplished at a variety of membranes - including fabrics (eg cotton) for LLW, and ceramics or glass for MLW. Volume reduction factors of 10 can be achieved for low conductivity streams. Planar and tubular membrane designs have been considered for compact full-scale plants. Cost-benefit analyses indicate that, in common with other techniques, large savings on immobilization and disposal costs (> 87%) can be made by this further dewatering stage after gravity settling prior to cementing. Estimates for EOD of capital and running costs amount to 2% and 1.3% respectively of the savings made over 10 years, with electrical power contributing only 0.15%. (author)

  13. Radioactive Waste Conditioning, Immobilisation, And Encapsulation Processes And Technologies: Overview And Advances (Chapter 7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, Carol M. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken SC (United States); Lee, William E. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials; Ojovan, Michael I. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2012-10-19

    The main immobilization technologies that are available commercially and have been demonstrated to be viable are cementation, bituminization, and vitrification. Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either alkali borosilicate glass or alkali aluminophosphate glass. The exact compositions of nuclear waste glasses are tailored for easy preparation and melting, avoidance of glass-in-glass phase separation, avoidance of uncontrolled crystallization, and acceptable chemical durability, e.g., leach resistance. Glass has also been used to stabilize a variety of low level wastes (LLW) and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) low level wastes (MLLW) from other sources such as fuel rod cladding/decladding processes, chemical separations, radioactive sources, radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soils, medical research applications, and other commercial processes. The sources of radioactive waste generation are captured in other chapters in this book regarding the individual practices in various countries (legacy wastes, currently generated wastes, and future waste generation). Future waste generation is primarily driven by interest in sources of clean energy and this has led to an increased interest in advanced nuclear power production. The development of advanced wasteforms is a necessary component of the new nuclear power plant (NPP) flowsheets. Therefore, advanced nuclear wasteforms are being designed for robust disposal strategies. A brief summary is given of existing and advanced wasteforms: glass, glass-ceramics, glass composite materials (GCM’s), and crystalline ceramic (mineral) wasteforms that chemically incorporate radionuclides and hazardous species atomically in their structure. Cementitious, geopolymer, bitumen, and other encapsulant wasteforms and composites that atomically bond and encapsulate

  14. Processing methods for operation test data of radioactive aerosols monitor based on accumulation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Cuiming; Xi Pingping; Ma Yinghao; Tan Linglong; Shen Fu

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a radioactive aerosol continuous monitor based on accumulation sampling and measuring and three methods for processing the operation data. The monitoring results are processed by the 3 methods which are applied both under the conditions of natural background and at workplaces of a nuclear facility. How the monitoring results are assessed and how to calculate the detection limit when using the 3 different methods are explained. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 methods are discussed. (authors)

  15. Effect of lead dioxide on the radiation decomposition of hydrated lanthanum nitrate (Preprint No. RES-05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.F.; Bedekar, A.G.; Chiplunkar, N.R.

    1988-02-01

    The rate of radiation induced decomposition of lanthanum nitrate is found to increase in the presence of lead dioxide as a heterophase impurity. Further, the rate also increases with increasing mole percent of the oxide. The results are explained on the basis of energy transfer processes taking place at the interface between nitrate and oxide crystals. (aut hor). 9 refs

  16. Hydrocarbon conversion with cracking catalyst having co-combustion promoters lanthanum and iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csicsery, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A composition useful in hydrocarbon conversion processes such as catalytic cracking comprises 0.05 to 10 weight percent lanthanum associated with a refractory support. The composition may also include 0.02 to 10 weight percent iron. The refractory support is a zeolitic crystalline aluminosilicate

  17. Strategy for research on radioactive waste processing and conditioning in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavedon, J.M.; Tallec, M.

    2001-01-01

    Research on radioactive medium level waste processing and conditioning aims at offering processing routes for waste forms and materials of potential value that are not yet provided easy handling by existing industrial processes. These studies are mandatory under the Dec 31, 1991 law and are coordinated by CEA. The strategy relies on the completion and rationalization of the existing processing routes, within acceptable technical and economic limits. Waste processing techniques aim at reducing the volume and the chemical diversity of medium activity waste, and are based on incineration-vitrification. Conditioning techniques call for high performance matrices and standardized containers, the latter keeping an ability to contain bulk waste. (author)

  18. Trimethylphosphide isomerization in lanthanum ions presence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharias, M.A.; Massabni, A.M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The integration between the trimethilphosphide and the lanthanum ions carry to the formation of solid complexes in a relation of 6:1 where the ligand is the phosphonate what is resultant of the isomerization of trimetylphosphite. By the RMN -1 H and infra-red spectra the products were characterized. (L.M.J.) [pt

  19. Process for producing zeolite adsorbent and process for treating radioactive liquid waste with the zeolite adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motojima, K.; Kawamura, F.

    1984-01-01

    Zeolite is contacted with an aqueous solution containing at least one of copper, nickel, cobalt, manganese and zinc salts, preferably copper and nickel salts, particularly preferably copper salt, in such a form as sulfate, nitrate, or chloride, thereby adsorbing the metal on the zeolite in its pores by ion exchange, then the zeolite is treated with a water-soluble ferrocyanide compound, for example, potassium ferrocyanide, thereby forming metal ferrocyanide on the zeolite in its pores. Then, the zeolite is subjected to ageing treatment, thereby producing a zeolite adsorbent impregnated with metal ferrocyanide in the pores of zeolite. The adsorbent can selectively recover cesium with a high percent cesium removal from a radioactive liquid waste containing at least radioactive cesium, for example, a radioactive liquid waste containing cesium and such coexisting ions as sodium, magnesium, calcium and carbonate ions at the same time at a high concentration. The zeolite adsorbent has a stable adsorbability for a prolonged time

  20. Process and device for determining the spatial distribution of a radioactive substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This invention describes a process for determining the spatial distribution of a radioactive substance consisting in determining the positions and energy losses associated to the interactions of the Compton effect and the photoelectric interactions that occur owing to the emission of gamma photons by the radioactive material and in deducing an information on the spatial distribution of the radioactive substance, depending on the positions and energy losses associated to the interactions of the Compton effect of these gamma photons and the positions and energy losses associated to the subsequent photoelectric interactions of these same photons. The invention also concerns a processing system for identifying, among the signals representing the positions and energy losses of the interactions of the Compton effect and the photoelectric interactions of the gamma photons emitted by a radioactive source, those signals that are in keeping with the gamma photons that have been subjected to an initial interaction of the Compton effect and a second and last photoelectric interaction. It further concerns a system for determining, among the identified signals, the positions of the sources of several gamma photons. This detector of Compton interaction can be used with conventional Auger-type imaging system (gamma camera) for detecting photoelectric interactions [fr

  1. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundari, Noor Anis; Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi

    2015-01-01

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10 −5 Ci/m 3 . The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod’s model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0.01 hour −1

  2. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundari, Noor Anis, E-mail: nooranis@batan.go.id; Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi [Sekolah Tinggi Teknologi Nuklir – Badan Tenaga Nuklir Nasional Jl. Babarsari P.O. BOX 6101 YKBB Yogyakarta 55281 Telp : (0274) 48085, 489716, Fax : (0274) 489715 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10{sup −5} Ci/m{sup 3}. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod’s model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0

  3. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundari, Noor Anis; Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi

    2015-12-01

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10-5 Ci/m3. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod's model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0.01 hour-1.

  4. Evaluation of transport safety analysis processes of radioactive material performed by a regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattar, Patricia Morais

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive substances have many beneficial applications, ranging from power generation to uses in medicine, industry and agriculture. As a rule, they are produced in different places from where they are used, needing to be transported. In order for transport to take place safely and efficiently, national and international standards must be complied with. This research aims to assess the safety analysis processes for the transport of radioactive material carried out by the regulatory body in Brazil, from the point of view of their compliance with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards. The self-assessment methodology named SARIS, developed by the AIEA, was used. The following steps were carried out: evaluation of the Diagnosis and Processes Mapping; responses to the SARIS Question Set and complementary questions; SWOT analysis; interviews with stakeholders and evaluation of a TranSAS mission conducted by the IAEA in 2002. Considering only SARIS questions, processes are 100% adherent. The deepening of the research, however, led to the development of twenty-two improvement proposals and the identification of nine good practices. The results showed that the safety analysis processes of the transport of radioactive material are being carried out in a structured, safe and reliable way but also that there is much opportunity for improvement. The formulation of an action plan, based on the presented proposals, can bring to the regulatory body many benefits. This would be an important step towards convening an external evaluation, providing greater reliability and transparency to the regulatory body´s processes. (author)

  5. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teillac, J.

    1988-01-01

    This study of general interest is an evaluation of the safety of radioactive waste management and consequently the preservation of the environment for the protection of man against ionizing radiations. The following topics were developed: radiation effects on man; radioactive waste inventory; radioactive waste processing, disposal and storage; the present state and future prospects [fr

  6. Mercury reduction and removal during high-level radioactive waste processing and vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibling, R.E.; Fowler, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A reference process for immobilizing the high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass has been developed at the Savannah River Plant. This waste contains a substantial amount of mercury from separations processing. Because mercury will not remain in borosilicate glass at the processing temperature, mercury must be removed before vitrification or must be handled in the off-gas system. A process has been developed to remove mercury by reduction with formic acid prior to vitrification. Additional benefits of formic acid treatment include improved sludge handling and glass melter redox control

  7. Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominick, J.

    2008-01-01

    This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and

  8. Use of radioactive sodium-22 to study the processes of soil salinization and desalinization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzubaidi, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    This study deals with the salinization of four undisturbed soil columns of silt loam soil, collected with special plexiglass columns. The salinization was effected by adding a certain volume of salt solution consisting of a mixture of NaCl, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2 and containing 0.5 mCi of sodium-22. The salt solution was added to the surface of the first two columns and then the soil columns were leached with distilled water, while for the other two columns, the salt solution was added from the bottom of the columns using a syphon technique. The first two columns represent a model for the desalinization process of saline soils, while the latter two columns represent a model for the salinization process under the effect of high groundwater table. The downward and upward movements of sodium through the soil columns were recorded by measuring sodium radioactivity periodically, using a special scanner which continuously and automatically detected the radioactivity of sodium with the help of a gamma spectrometer. The final distribution curves for sodium movement throughout these soil columns versus time were obtained by computer. The data obtained indicate that radioactive sodium can be used with success to study the movement of salts in soil. The results also bring a new and better understanding of the nature of the salt movement during the processes of salinization and desalinization, the most important soil processes in the arid and semi-arid regions. (author)

  9. Radioactive liquid effluent management - state of art and the role of membrane processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panicker, S.T.; Prabhakar, S.; Misra, B.M.; Ramani, M.P.S.

    1990-01-01

    This report reviews the conventional methods involving filtration, chemical precipitation, evaporation and ion exchange, employed for the treatment of low level radioactive effluents. The role of membrane processes, particularly reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration has been assessed with a view to increase the effectiveness of the existing methods. After overviewing the practices followed in major countries, a possible scheme has been proposed. (author). 66 refs., 4 tabs., figs

  10. Optimization of copper ore concentration processing by means of radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petryka, L.; Przewlocki, K.

    1989-01-01

    Flotation of polymetallic ores in the Polish Lower Silesian Basin was taken as an example for the optimization of copper ore processing using radioactive tracers. An original stochastic mathematical model (stream model) was proposed to minimize copper losses in tailing. A detailed procedure of measurement is presented as well as the experimental data and their interpretation. On the basis of this research copper losses in tailing can be reduced to one third. (author)

  11. Radioactive tracer technique in process optimization: applications in the chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Process optimization is concerned with the selection of the most appropriate technological design of the process and with controlling its operation to obtain maximum benefit. The role of radioactive tracers in process optimization is discussed and the various circumstances under which such techniques may be beneficially applied are identified. Case studies are presented which illustrate how radioisotopes may be used to monitor plant performance under dynamic conditions to improve production efficiency and to investigate the cause of production limitations. In addition, the use of sealed sources to provide information complementary to the tracer study is described. (author)

  12. Fabrication of large-volume, low-cost ceramic lanthanum halide scintillators for gamma ray detection : final report for DHS/DNDO/TRDD project TA-01-SL01.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Yang, Pin; Chen, Ching-Fong; Sanchez, Margaret R.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2008-10-01

    This project uses advanced ceramic processes to fabricate large, optical-quality, polycrystalline lanthanum halide scintillators to replace small single crystals produced by the conventional Bridgman growth method. The new approach not only removes the size constraint imposed by the growth method, but also offers the potential advantages of both reducing manufacturing cost and increasing production rate. The project goal is to fabricate dense lanthanum halide ceramics with a preferred crystal orientation by applying texture engineering and solid-state conversion to reduce the thermal mechanical stress in the ceramic and minimize scintillation light scattering at grain boundaries. Ultimately, this method could deliver the sought-after high sensitivity and <3% energy resolution at 662 keV of lanthanum halide scintillators and unleash their full potential for advanced gamma ray detection, enabling rapid identification of radioactive materials in a variety of practical applications. This report documents processing details from powder synthesis, seed particle growth, to final densification and texture development of cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3}) ceramics. This investigation demonstrated that: (1) A rapid, flexible, cost efficient synthesis method of anhydrous lanthanum halides and their solid solutions was developed. Several batches of ultrafine LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3} powder, free of oxyhalide, were produced by a rigorously controlled process. (2) Micron size ({approx} 5 {micro}m), platelet shape LaBr{sub 3} seed particles of high purity can be synthesized by a vapor phase transport process. (3) High aspect-ratio seed particles can be effectively aligned in the shear direction in the ceramic matrix, using a rotational shear-forming process. (4) Small size, highly translucent LaBr{sub 3} (0.25-inch diameter, 0.08-inch thick) samples were successfully fabricated by the equal channel angular consolidation process. (5) Large size, high density

  13. Disposal of radioactive waste from mining and processing of mineral sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    All mineral sands products contain the naturally radioactive elements uranium and thorium and their daughters. The activity levels in the different minerals can vary widely and in the un mined state are frequently widely dispersed and add to the natural background radiation levels. Following mining, the minerals are concentrated to a stage where radiation levels can present an occupational hazard and disposal of waste can result in radiation doses in excess of the public limit. Chemical processing can release radioactive daughters, particularly radium, leading to the possibility of dispersal and resulting in widespread exposure of the public. The activity concentration in the waste can vary widely and different disposal options appropriate to the level of activity in the waste are needed. Disposal methods can range from dilution and dispersal of the material into the mine site, for untreated mine tailings, to off site disposal in custom built and engineered waste disposal facilities, for waste with high radionuclide content. The range of options for disposal of radioactive waste from mineral sands mining and processing is examined and the principles for deciding on the appropriate disposal option are discussed. The range of activities of waste from different downstream processing paths are identified and a simplified method of identifying potential waste disposal paths is suggested. 15 refs., 4 tabs

  14. Definition and preparation of glassy matrices by innovating processes to confine radioactive wastes and industrial toxic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The confinement by vitrification of high-level radioactive wastes is studied in the CEA for fifteen years. These studies have lead to the preparation of glassy matrices by innovating processes. These processes can be applied to non-radioactive toxic materials treatment too. In this work are more particularly described the glassy matrix long-dated behaviour and the different vitrification processes used (by direct induction in cold crucible, by transferred arc plasma). (O.L.). 1 tab

  15. Electrochemical properties of lanthanum nitride with calcium nitride additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesunova, R.P.; Fishman, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the electrochemical properties of lanthanum nitride with calcium nitride added. The lanthanum nitride was obtained by nitriding metallic lanthanum at 870 K in an ammonia stream. The product contained Cl, Pr, Nd, Sm, Fe, Ca, Cu, Mo, Mg, Al, Si, and Be. The calcium nitride was obtained by nitriding metallic calcium in a nitrogen stream. The conductivity on the LaN/C 3 N 2 system components are shown as a function of temperature. A table shows the solid solutions to be virtually electronic conductors and the lanthanum nitride a mixed conductor

  16. Development of DGR System Concept for Radioactive Waste from Pyro-processing of CANDU SNFs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Young; Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Jong Youl; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Hyeon A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, DGR concept for radioactive waste from pyro-processing of CANDU SNFs is developed. Identical material balance for PWR (MB 2.6.0) and mass ratio of radioactive nuclides to binding material for LiCl-KCl waste is applied to determine specification of waste form, packing/disposal canister. Optimum thermal dimensioning is estimated to be 40 m for disposal tunnel and 8 m for disposal hole pitch through ABAQUS thermal analyses. To reduce volume and toxicity of PWR SNFs, the P and T technology using pyro-processing and SFR is under development in KAERI. CANDU SNFs are not considered as a subject of P and T because of its low fissile content caused by use of natural uranium as a fuel material. However, contention that not only PWR SNFs but also CANDU SNFs must be re-used is raised constantly. To evaluate impact of application of P and T on CANDU SNFs in the perspective of disposal, DGR system concept for radioactive waste from pyroprocessing of CANDU SNFs based on material balance version 2.6.0 is developed in this study. The disposal area is expected to be about 20,800 m 2 for disposal of 842,000 CANDU fuel bundles.

  17. Development of DGR System Concept for Radioactive Waste from Pyro-processing of CANDU SNFs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Young; Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Jong Youl; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Hyeon A [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, DGR concept for radioactive waste from pyro-processing of CANDU SNFs is developed. Identical material balance for PWR (MB 2.6.0) and mass ratio of radioactive nuclides to binding material for LiCl-KCl waste is applied to determine specification of waste form, packing/disposal canister. Optimum thermal dimensioning is estimated to be 40 m for disposal tunnel and 8 m for disposal hole pitch through ABAQUS thermal analyses. To reduce volume and toxicity of PWR SNFs, the P and T technology using pyro-processing and SFR is under development in KAERI. CANDU SNFs are not considered as a subject of P and T because of its low fissile content caused by use of natural uranium as a fuel material. However, contention that not only PWR SNFs but also CANDU SNFs must be re-used is raised constantly. To evaluate impact of application of P and T on CANDU SNFs in the perspective of disposal, DGR system concept for radioactive waste from pyroprocessing of CANDU SNFs based on material balance version 2.6.0 is developed in this study. The disposal area is expected to be about 20,800 m{sup 2} for disposal of 842,000 CANDU fuel bundles.

  18. The Optimization of Radioactive Waste Management in the Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachar, Matej; Necas, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a basic characterization of nuclear installation decommissioning process especially in the term of radioactive materials management. A large amount of solid materials and secondary waste created after implementation of decommissioning activities have to be managed considering their physical, chemical, toxic and radiological characteristics. Radioactive materials should be, after fulfilling all the conditions defined by the authorities, released to the environment for the further use. Non-releasable materials are considered to be a radioactive waste. Their management includes various procedures starting with pre-treatment activities, continuing with storage, treatment and conditioning procedures. Finally, they are disposed in the near surface or deep geological repositories. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of all possible ways of releasing the material from nuclear installation area, optimization of the material management process should be done. Emphasis is placed on the radiological parameters of materials, availability of waste management technologies, waste repositories and on the radiological limits and conditions for materials release or waste disposal. Appropriate optimization of material flow should lead to the significant savings of money, disposal capacities or raw material resources. Using a suitable calculation code e.g. OMEGA, the evaluation of the various material management scenarios and selection of the best one, based on the multi-criterion analysis, should be done. (authors)

  19. The ETSON study on treatment processes for the sustainable management of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnus, Francois; Metcalf, Phil; Wasselin-Trupin, Virginie; Pfingsten, Wilfred; Smidts, Olivier; Miksova, Jitka; Tokaresvski, Oleksei

    2016-01-01

    ETSON (European Technical Safety Organisation Network): • European association of nuclear assessment bodies; • Objective: - develop and promote best practice in nuclear safety assessment; - foster the convergence of technical nuclear safety practices within the EU and beyond; - assist with planning of nuclear safety research programmes; - facilitate the application of the European directives on nuclear, radiation and radioactive waste and spent fuel safety. • ETSON Activities: - forum for voluntary exchange on both analyses and R&D in the fields of nuclear, radiation and radioactive waste safety; - Issue technical and scientific opinions; - 13 expert groups; one dedicated to Waste management and decommissioning issues (WM&D Group); • WM&D work programme: - Elaborate a common position on decommissioning strategies; - Prepare elements for technical guidance on the operational safety of underground disposal facilities; - Organise an international workshop on sustainable waste management processes prior to disposal

  20. US and Russian innovative technologies to process low-level liquid radioactive wastes: The Murmansk initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, R.S.; Duffey, R.B.; Penzin, R.; Sorlie, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper documents the status of the technical design for the upgrade and expansion to the existing Low-level Liquid Radioactive Waste (LLLRW) treatment facility in Murmansk, the Russian Federation. This facility, owned by the Ministry of Transportation and operated by the Russian company RTP Atomflot in Murmansk, Russia, has been used by the Murmansk Shipping Company (MSCo) to process low-level liquid radioactive waste generated by the operation of its civilian icebreaker fleet. The purpose of the new design is to enable Russia to permanently cease the disposal at sea of LLLRW in the Arctic, and to treat liquid waste and high saline solutions from both the Civil and North Navy Fleet operations and decommissioning activities. Innovative treatments are to be used in the plant which are discussed in this paper

  1. Processing radioactive wastes and uranium mill tailings for safe ecologically-acceptable disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchak, F.

    1985-01-01

    Radioactive and associated chemical contaminants present in uranium mill tailings, for example, are isolated from the environment. A matrix product is formed by combining selected clays and lime with the soluble radioactive and chemical contaminants. The clays absorb the majority of all the contaminants. The lime neutralizes the contaminants and cements the clay silicates and absorbed contaminants. The resulting product is of a matrix-like nature and is reverted into a limestone by the uptake of carbon dioxide in a recarbonization process. The radionuclides and chemical contaminants in the resulting product are converted into insoluble oxides or hydroxides which do not appreciably leach out into the ground water. The release of radon gasses is substantially inhibited in the final product, and the release of radon gasses is virtually nonexistent in the final limestone

  2. The Poco de Caldas project: Natural analogues of processes in a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.A.; McKinley, I.G.; Shea, M.E.; Smellie, J.A.T.

    1993-01-01

    The safe disposal of radioactive wastes by burial in deep geologic formations requires long-term predictions of the future behavior of the wastes nd their engineered repository. Such predictions can be tested by evaluating processes analogous to those which will occur in a repository, which have been long active in the natural geochemical environment. The title project is a comprehensive study of two ore deposits in Minas Gerais, Brasil, aimed at looking at uranium and thorium series radionuclide and rare earth element mobility, the development and movement of redox fronts, and the nature of natural groundwater colloids. A multidisciplinary team of experts from 27 laboratories carried out a fully integrated study of the geology, geomorphology, hydrogeology, geochemistry, hydrochemistry and geomicrobiology of the two sited for nearly four years. This book contains 20 papers covering the detailed findings, with particular emphasis on their significance for radioactive waste disposal, especially on the use of the data in testing models of radionuclide movement

  3. Textile Dye Removal from Aqueous Solution using Modified Graphite Waste/Lanthanum/Chitosan Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusrini, E.; Wicaksono, B.; Yulizar, Y.; Prasetyanto, EA; Gunawan, C.

    2018-03-01

    We investigated various pre-treatment processes of graphite waste using thermal, mechanical and chemical methods. The aim of this work is to study the performance of modified graphite waste/lanthanum/chitosan composite (MG) as adsorbent for textile dye removal from aqueous solution. Effect of graphite waste resources, adsorbent size and lanthanum concentration on the dye removal were studied in batch experiments. Selectivity of MG was also investigated. Pre-heated graphite waste (NMG) was conducted at 80°C for 1 h, followed by mechanical crushing of the resultant graphite to 75 μm particle size, giving adsorption performance of ˜58%, ˜67%, ˜93% and ˜98% of the model dye rhodamine B (concentration determined by UV-vis spectroscopy at 554 nm), methyl orange (464 nm), methylene blue (664 nm) and methyl violet (580 nm), respectively from aqueous solution. For this process, the system required less than ˜5 min for adsorbent material to be completely saturated with the adsorbate. Further chemical modification of the pre-treated graphite waste (MG) with lanthanum (0.01 – V 0.03 M) and chitosan (0.5% w/w) did not improve the performance of dye adsorption. Under comparable experimental conditions, as those of the ‘thermal-mechanical-pre-treated-only’ (NMG), modification of graphite waste (MG) with 0.03 M lanthanum and 0.5% w/w chitosan resulted in ˜14%, ˜47%, ˜72% and ˜85% adsorption of rhodamine B, methyl orange, methylene blue and methyl violet, respectively. Selective adsorption of methylene blue at most to ˜79%, followed by methyl orange, methyl violet and rhodamine B with adsorption efficiency ˜67, ˜38, and ˜9% sequentially using MG with 0.03 M lanthanum and 0.5% w/w chitosan.

  4. High level radioactive waste siting processes: critical lessons from Canadian siting successes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    While not without controversy, Canada's Crown Corporations, municipalities, agencies and private companies have had success in siting and achieving approval for operating: toxic and hazardous waste facilities; dry radioactive materials storage facilities; the Federal low-level radioactive waste disposal facility; and, several large and small domestic landfills. The cumulative experience gained from these siting and approval processes provides valuable advice in support of the siting and approval of high-level radioactive disposal facilities. Among the critical elements for the success of these siting efforts are: 1) the tinting, scope and character of the siting process reflects the cultural and social values of affected people; 2) the siting and approval processes has integrity -- characterized as rational processes in pursuit of the public interest; 3) sufficient time and resources are dedicated to listening carefully and examining issues seen to be important by the public; 4) all information is shared -- even if the information is potentially detrimental to the approval of the facility; 5) proponent has a prioritized multiple focus on 'health, safety and environment issues', on 'insuring that the environmental assessment process is socially acceptable' as well as on the 'approval considerations'; 6) the implementing agency seeks cooperation and win-win solutions with the local community; 7) the community has the option of opting-out of the process and the do-nothing and/or the not here option continues to be considered by the proponent; 8) local emergency response people are well-trained and accepting of the facility; 9) the community has a strong role in determining the terms, conditions and compensation related to the future facility. (author)

  5. Properties of lanthanum hexaboride a compilation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, D J

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanum hexaboride is useful because it possesses a high melting point (2210C), a low work function, one of the highest known electron emissivities, and is stable in vacuum. This volume summarises the extant data on the properties of this material, including the: bulk modulus, conductivity, crystal structure, Debye temperature, defect structure, elastic constants, electronic structure, emissivity, Fermi surface, hardness, heat capacity, magnetoresistance, reflectivity, resistivity, specific heat, surface structure, thermal conductivity, thermoelectric power, toughness and work function. The

  6. Comparison of the accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Hayashi, Gohei; Endo, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we have reviewed the basic features of the accident processes and radioactivity releases that occurred in the Chernobyl accident (1986) and in the Fukushima-1 accident (2011). The Chernobyl accident was a power-surge accident that was caused by a failure of control of a fission chain reaction, which instantaneously destroyed the reactor and building, whereas the Fukushima-1 accident was a loss-of-coolant accident in which the reactor cores of three units were melted by decay heat after losing the electricity supply. Although the quantity of radioactive noble gases released from Fukushima-1 exceeded the amount released from Chernobyl, the size of land area severely contaminated by 137 Cesium ( 137 Cs) was 10 times smaller around Fukushima-1 compared with around Chernobyl. The differences in the accident process are reflected in the composition of the discharged radioactivity as well as in the composition of the ground contamination. Volatile radionuclides (such as 132 Te- 132 I, 131 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs) contributed to the gamma-ray exposure from the ground contamination around Fukishima-1, whereas a greater variety of radionuclides contributed significantly around Chernobyl. When radioactivity deposition occurred, the radiation exposure rate near Chernobyl is estimated to have been 770 μGy h −1 per initial 137 Cs deposition of 1000 kBq m −2 , whereas it was 100 μGy h −1 around Fukushima-1. Estimates of the cumulative exposure for 30 years are 970 and 570 mGy per initial deposition of 1000 kBq m −2 for Chernobyl and Fukusima-1, respectively. Of these exposures, 49 and 98% were contributed by radiocesiums ( 134 Cs + 137 Cs) around Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively

  7. Process for affixing radioactive contamination on contaminated materials or wastes. Its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubouin, Guy; Aude, Georges; Tassigny, Christian de.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a process for affixing radioactive contamination on materials or waste matter in order to ensure that the materials are transferred in complete safety or to package them when their activity is low. Under this process at least one coat of a resin polymerizable at ambient temperature, for example an epoxy resin, a polyester resin, a vinyl resin or a mixture of thermohardening resin and thermoplastic resin, is sprayed on to the contaminated material part by means of an electrostatic gun [fr

  8. New facility for processing and storage of radioactive and toxic chemical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, F.E. III

    1976-01-01

    A new facility for the processing and storage of radioactive and toxic chemical waste is described. The facility is located in the science and engineering complex of the Santa Barbara campus of the University of California, near the Pacific Ocean. It is designed to provide a safe and secure processing and storage area for hazardous wastes, while meeting the high aesthetic standards and ecological requirements of campus and community regulatory boards. The ventilation system and fire prevention features will be described in detail. During the design phase, a small laboratory was added to provide an area for the radiation protection and industrial hygiene programs. Operational experience with this new facility is discussed

  9. Preparation and characterization of perovskite structure lanthanum gallate and lanthanum aluminate based oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shuai

    2009-01-01

    The present work was initiated to study the synthesis and properties of lanthanum gallate based oxides as intermediate temperature electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells. The wet chemical method, polymer complexing route, was used to prepare the precursor powders. To further investigate the polymer complexing method, it was also applied to the preparation of lanthanum aluminate based oxides.   Single perovskite phase La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.83Mg0.17O2.815 can be prepared by the polymer complexing meth...

  10. Preliminary tests of an infrared process monitor for polyethylene encapsulation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.L.; Jones, R.W.; McClelland, J.F.; Kalb, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Polyethylene encapsulation is a process that is being investigated for the solidification of radioactive nitrate salts at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Rocky Flats Plant. In the encapsulation process, radioactive-salt waste is mixed with polyethylene pellets, heated, and extruded as a molten stream. Upon cooling, the mixture solidifies to a monolithic waste form with excellent properties for long-term waste storage. This paper describes a novel method to monitor the composition of the salt/polymer stream as it exits the extruder. The monitor is based on a technique known as transient infrared spectroscopy (TIRS). The TIRS monitor is able to capture the real-time mid-infrared spectrum of the processed waste stream as it exits the extruder. The wealth of chemical information contained in a mid-infrared spectrum makes this technique very appealing for on-line monitoring and process control. Data from the monitor can be used to guide processing, minimize waste volume, and certify the composition of the final waste form

  11. Processing method and processing device for liquid waste containing surface active agent and radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Baba, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Ryozo; Yukita, Atsushi.

    1998-01-01

    Washing liquid wastes containing surface active agents and radioactive materials are sent to a deaerating vessel. Ozone is blown into the deaerating vessel. The washing liquid wastes dissolved with ozone are introduced to a UV ray irradiation vessel. UV rays are irradiated to the washing liquid wastes, and hydroxy radicals generated by photodecomposition of dissolved ozone oxidatively decompose surface active agents contained in the washing liquid wastes. The washing liquid wastes discharged from the UV ray irradiation vessel are sent to an activated carbon mixing vessel and mixed with powdery activated carbon. The surface active agents not decomposed in the UV ray irradiation vessel are adsorbed to the activated carbon. Then, the activated carbon and washing liquid wastes are separated by an activated carbon separating/drying device. Radioactive materials (iron oxide and the like) contained in the washing liquid wastes are mostly granular, and they are separated and removed from the washing liquid wastes in the activated carbon separating/drying device. (I.N.)

  12. Short-lived radioactive nuclides in meteorites and early solar system processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussidon, M.; Gounelle, M.

    2007-01-01

    Now extinct, short-lived radioactive nuclides, such as 7 Be (T 1/2 = 53 days), 10 Be (T 1/2 = 1.5 Ma), 26 Al (T 1/2 = 0.74 Ma), 36 Cl (T 1/2 = 0.3 Ma), 41 Ca (T 1/2 = 0.1 Ma), 53 Mn (T 1/2 = 3.7 Ma) and 60 Fe (T 1/2 = 1.5 Ma), were present in the proto-solar nebula when the various components of meteorites formed. The presence of these radioactive isotopes requires a 'last-minute' origin, either nucleosynthesis in a massive star dying close in space and time to the nascent solar system or production by local irradiation of part of the proto-solar disk by high-energy solar cosmic rays. In this review, we list: (i) the different observations indicating the existence of multiple origins for short-lived radioactive nuclides, namely 7 Be, 10 Be and 36 Cl for irradiation scenario and 60 Fe for injection scenario; (ii) the constraints that exist on their distribution (homogeneous or heterogeneous) in the accretion disk; (iii) the constraints they brought on the timescales of nebular processes (from Ca-Al-rich inclusions to chondrules) and of the accretion and differentiation of planetesimals. (authors)

  13. Characterisation of radioactivity carrying aerosol in a mineral sand processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffries, C.; Morawska, L.

    1998-01-01

    The techniques used to separate heavy mineral sand into mineral products produce a large amount of airborne particulate. Some of these particles are radioactive which is due to the thorium and, to a lesser extent, the uranium content of mineral sands. This study has investigated both the radioactive and respirable particle components (<10 μm) of the aerosol in a dry sand processing plant in Brisbane, Australia. A number of different measurement techniques have been used to characterise the aerosol in the plant. The mass, number and activity distributions have been determined by an eight stage cascade impactor and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) with both instruments measuring 0.4 to 10 μm. Measurements of radon progeny concentrations and the extent of radon progeny attachment to micrometer sized particles has been investigated, as well as the extent of airborne thorium and uranium. The preliminary results from two sites are presented and comments are made on the relationship between total and radioactive aerosol

  14. Forward osmosis - a novel membrane process for concentration of low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Bindal, R.C.; Tewari, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging membrane process in which osmotic pressure differential across a semi-permeable membrane between the solution to be concentrated (feed) and a concentrated solution of high osmotic pressure (draw solution) than the feed is used to effect separation of water from dissolved solutes. With time, feed stream gets concentrated with dilution of draw solution and this technology recently being used as more energy efficient alternative to reverse osmosis (RO) in some of the application areas, particularly for the concentration of low volume high value products. The use of pressure driven membrane processes like reverse osmosis (RO) and ultrafiltration (UF) are already demonstrated in the treatment of radioactive laundry, laboratory effluents and some other applications in nuclear industry. The application of FO membrane process to concentrate simulated inactive ammonium-diuranate (ADU) filtered effluent solution (by mixing uranyl nitrate and ammonium nitrate) using indigenously developed cellulose acetate (CA) and thin-film composite polyamide (TFCP) membranes has been published recently from our laboratory. In this presentation, we briefly discuss our views on possibility of using FO membrane process with proper selection of membrane for concentration of low level radioactive wastes generated in various steps of nuclear fuel cycle in most effective way. (author)

  15. The Hybrid Treatment Process for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.; Kindle, C.H.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a new process for treating mixed hazardous and radioactive waste, commonly called mixed waste. The process is called the Hybrid Treatment Process (HTP), so named because it is built on the 20 years of experience with vitrification of wastes in melters, and the 12 years of experience with treatment of wastes by the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. It also uses techniques from several additional technologies. Mixed wastes are being generated by both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and by commercial sources. The wastes are those that contain both a hazardous waste regulated under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and a radioactive waste with source, special nuclear, or byproduct materials. The dual regulation of the wastes increases the complexity of the treatment, handling, and storage of the waste. The DOE is the largest holder and generator of mixed waste. Its mixed wastes are classified as either high-level, transuranic (TRU), or low-level waste (LLW). High-level mixed wastes will be treated in vitrification plants. Transuranic wastes may be disposed of without treatment by obtaining a no-migration variance from the EPA. Lowlevel wastes, however, will require treatment, but treatment systems with sufficient capacity are not yet available to DOE. Various facilities are being proposed for the treatment of low-level waste. The concept described in this paper represents one option for establishing that treatment capacity

  16. Development of a process to reduce the uranium concentration of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentealba Toro, Edgardo David

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of radioactive waste management is to prevent the discharge of waste into the biosphere, a function carried out in Chile by the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN), which stores around 500 [L] of these organic and inorganic waste in cans coming from research of Universities and CCHEN' laboratories. Within the inorganic liquid waste are concentrations of Uranyl salts with sulfates, chlorides and phosphates. The purpose of this work is to develop at laboratory level a process to concentrate and precipitate uranium salts (Sulfate and Uranyl Chloride) present in radioactive liquid effluents, because in the case of these very long period wastes in liquid state, the most widely used processes are aimed at concentrating or extracting radioactive compounds through separation processes, for their conditioning and final storage under conditions whose radiological risk is minimized. The selected process is liquid-liquid extraction, being evaluated solvents such as benzene and kerosene with the following extractants: tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO), di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA) and Cyanex© 923. To determine the extraction conditions, which allow to reduce the concentration of uranium to values lower than 10 ppm, the extractant concentration was modified from 0.05 to 0.41 [M] with solvent volume / residue (VO/VA) ratios of 0.2 to 0.5, at an initial concentration of 8,446 [gU/L] and subsequent precipitation of uranium extracted by a reaction with ammonium carbonate. From these experimental tests the maximum extraction conditions were determined. To the generated effluents, a second stage of extraction was necessary in order to reduce its concentration below 10 [mg / L]. The experimental tests allowed to reduce the concentration under 2.5 [mgU/L], equivalent to 99.97% extraction efficiency. The tests with Cyanex© 923 in replacement of the TOPO, allowed to obtain similar results and even better in some cases, due to the fact that final

  17. Initial demonstration of DWPF process and product control strategy using actual radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.K.; Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.; Beam, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will vitrify high-level nuclear waste into borosilicate glass. The waste will be mixed with properly formulated glass-making frit and fed to a melter at 1150 degrees C. Process control and product quality are ensured by proper control of the melter feed composition. Algorithms have been developed to predict the processability of the melt and the durability of the final glass based on this feed composition. To test these algorithms, an actual radioactive waste contained in a shielded facility at SRS was analyzed and a frit composition formulated using a simple computer spreadsheet which contained the algorithms. This frit was then mixed with the waste and the resulting slurry fed to a research scale joule-heated melter operated remotely. Approximately 24 kg of glass were successfully prepared. This paper will describe the frit formulation, the vitrification process, and the glass durability

  18. Solidification of low-level radioactive liquid waste using a cement-silicate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandlund, R.W.; Hayes, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Extensive use has been made of silicate and Portland cement for the solidification of industrial waste and recently this method has been successfully used to solidify a variety of low level radioactive wastes. The types of wastes processed to date include fuel fabrication sludges, power reactor waste, decontamination solution, and university laboratory waste. The cement-silicate process produces a stable solid with a minimal increase in volume and the chemicals are relatively inexpensive and readily available. The method is adaptable to either batch or continuous processing and the equipment is simple. The solid has leaching characteristics similar to or better than plain Portland cement mixtures and the leaching can be further reduced by the use of ion-exchange additives. The cement-silicate process has been used to solidify waste containing high levels of boric acid, oils, and organic solvents. The experience of handling the various types of liquid waste with a cement-silicate system is described

  19. Lanthanum trilactate: Vibrational spectroscopic study - infrared/Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, M.; Novák, Vít; Bartůněk, V.; Člupek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 87, Nov (2016), s. 123-128 ISSN 0924-2031 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : lanthanum trilactate * tris(2-hydroxypropanoato-O1,O2) * lanthanum tris[2-(hydroxy-kappa O)propanoato-kappa O] * Raman spectra * infrared spectra * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.740, year: 2016

  20. Review process for low-level radioactive waste disposal license application under Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittiglio, C.L. Jr.

    1987-08-01

    This document estimates the level of effort and expertise that is needed to review a license application within the required time. It is intended to be used by the NRC staff as well as States and interested parties to provide a better understanding of what the NRC envisions will be involved in licensing a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Development of new treatment process for low level radioactive waste at Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Kenichi; Sugaya, Atsushi; Saito, Yasuo; Tanaka, Kenji; Akutsu, Shigeru; Hirata, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    The Low-level radioactive Waste Treatment Facility (LWTF) was constructed at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) and cold testing has been carried out since 2006. The waste which will be treated in the LWTF is combustible/incombustible solid waste and liquid waste. In the LWTF, the combustible/incombustible solid waste will be incinerated. The liquid waste will be treated by a radio-nuclides removal process and subsequently solidified in cement. This report describes the essential technologies of the LWTF and results of R and D work for the nitrate-ion decomposition technology for the liquid waste. (author)

  2. Alternative processes for managing existing commercial high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    A number of alternatives are discussed for managing high-level radioactive waste presently stored at the West Valley, New York, plant owned by Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. These alternatives (liquid storage, conversion to cement, shale fracturing, shale cement, calcination, aqueous silicate, conversion to glass, and salt cake) are limited to concepts presently under active investigation by ERDA. Each waste management option is described and examined regarding the status of the technology; its applications to managing NFS waste; its advantages and disadvantages; the research and development needed to implement the option; safety considerations; and estimated costs and time to implement the process

  3. Bio-accumulation of lanthanum from lanthanum modified bentonite treatments in lake restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waajen, G.; Van Oosterhout, F.; Lürling, M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lanthanum (La) modified bentonite (LMB) is one of the available mitigating agents used for the reduction of the phosphorus (P) recycling in eutrophic lakes. The potential toxicity of the La from LMB to aquatic organisms is a matter of concern. In this study the accumulation of La was

  4. Disintegration and dissolution of spent radioactive cationic exchange resins using Fenton-like oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Zhong; Xu, Lejin [Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jianlong, E-mail: wangjl@tsinghua.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Radioactive Wastes Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The spent radioactive resins could be oxidized by Fenton-like process. • The influencing factors on resin oxidation were evaluated. • Chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction rate was more than 99%. • SEM and Raman spectrum were used to analyze the resins morphological change. - Abstract: The treatment and disposal of the spent radioactive resins is essential for the sustainable development of the nuclear industry. In this paper, the disintegration and dissolution of spent cationic resins were studied by Fenton-like process. The influencing factors on resin dissolution, such as pH, temperature, type and concentration of catalysts were evaluated. The results showed that the spent resins could be effectively dissolved at pH < 1, [Fe{sup 2+}] = 0.2 M and T = 97 ± 2 °C. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction rate was more than 99%. The scanning electron microscopy and the Raman spectrum were used to observe the morphological changes of the spent resins during the dissolution process. Fenton-like oxidation is an efficient method for the volume reduction and stabilization of the spent resins before further immobilization.

  5. Disintegration and dissolution of spent radioactive cationic exchange resins using Fenton-like oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Zhong; Xu, Lejin; Wang, Jianlong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The spent radioactive resins could be oxidized by Fenton-like process. • The influencing factors on resin oxidation were evaluated. • Chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction rate was more than 99%. • SEM and Raman spectrum were used to analyze the resins morphological change. - Abstract: The treatment and disposal of the spent radioactive resins is essential for the sustainable development of the nuclear industry. In this paper, the disintegration and dissolution of spent cationic resins were studied by Fenton-like process. The influencing factors on resin dissolution, such as pH, temperature, type and concentration of catalysts were evaluated. The results showed that the spent resins could be effectively dissolved at pH < 1, [Fe 2+ ] = 0.2 M and T = 97 ± 2 °C. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction rate was more than 99%. The scanning electron microscopy and the Raman spectrum were used to observe the morphological changes of the spent resins during the dissolution process. Fenton-like oxidation is an efficient method for the volume reduction and stabilization of the spent resins before further immobilization

  6. Processing of concentrated radioactive wastes into cement and bitumens following calcination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Sazavsky, P.; Ditl, P.; Prikryl, P.

    1985-01-01

    A brief characteristic is presented of the most frequently used processes of solidification of liquid radioactive wastes, viz., bituminization, cementation and their combination with calcination. The effect of individual parameters is assessed on the choice of the type of solidification process as is their importance in the actual process, in temporary storage, during transportation and under conditions of long-term storage. It has been found that a combination of the procedures could lead to a modular system of methods and equipment. This would allow to approach optimal solidification of wastes in the present period and to establish a research reserve for the development of more modern, economically advantageous and safer procedures. A rough estimate is made of the costs of the solidification of 1 m 3 of radioactive concentrate from the V-1 power plant at a production of 380 m 3 /year, this for the cementation-calcination and bituminization-calcination procedures. The said rough economic analysis only serves to identify the major operating components which have the greatest effect on the economic evaluation of the solidification procedures. (Z.M.)

  7. Assessment of Radioactivity Inventory - a key parameter in the clearance for recycling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Arne; Lundgren, Klas

    2014-01-01

    Decommissioning studies for nuclear power reactors are to be performed in order to assess the decommissioning costs and the waste volumes, as well as to provide data for the licensing and construction of the LILW repositories. An important part of this work is to estimate the amount of radioactivity in the different types of decommissioning waste. Studsvik has performed these assessments for all Swedish NPPs as well as other nuclear facilities in Sweden using thorough on-site sampling and robust calculations developed by Studsvik's team of senior experts. Precision has been found to be relatively high close to the reactor cores, but then declines as distance from the core increases. The decommissioning waste from a LWR can be separated into different categories such as: - Material affected by the neutron flux from the reactor core, - Process systems, - Waste handling systems, - Contaminated structures. The determined specific activities for different systems (or part of systems) are combined with data on weights and contaminated surface areas in order to assess the total activity. A key issue in the assessments has been efforts to reduce the uncertainties. Combining the unique knowledge in assessment of radioactivity inventories, the large data bank the waste processing represents and the knowledge and records from the laboratories, the activity determination codes can be validated and the waste processing analysis supported with additional data. (authors)

  8. Process Knowledge Characterization of Radioactive Waste at the Classified Waste Landfill Remediation Project Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOTSON, PATRICK WELLS; GALLOWAY, ROBERT B.; JOHNSON JR, CARL EDWARD

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and application of process knowledge (PK) to the characterization of radioactive wastes generated during the excavation of buried materials at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF). The CWLF, located in SNL/NM Technical Area II, is a 1.5-acre site that received nuclear weapon components and related materials from about 1950 through 1987. These materials were used in the development and testing of nuclear weapon designs. The CWLF is being remediated by the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Project pursuant to regulations of the New Mexico Environment Department. A goal of the CWLF project is to maximize the amount of excavated materials that can be demilitarized and recycled. However, some of these materials are radioactively contaminated and, if they cannot be decontaminated, are destined to require disposal as radioactive waste. Five major radioactive waste streams have been designated on the CWLF project, including: unclassified soft radioactive waste--consists of soft, compatible trash such as paper, plastic, and plywood; unclassified solid radioactive waste--includes scrap metal, other unclassified hardware items, and soil; unclassified mixed waste--contains the same materials as unclassified soft or solid radioactive waste, but also contains one or more Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents; classified radioactive waste--consists of classified artifacts, usually weapons components, that contain only radioactive contaminants; and classified mixed waste--comprises radioactive classified material that also contains RCRA constituents. These waste streams contain a variety of radionuclides that exist both as surface contamination and as sealed sources. To characterize these wastes, the CWLF project's waste management team is relying on data obtained from direct measurement of radionuclide activity content to the maximum extent possible and, in cases where

  9. Synthesis of calcium doped lanthanum manganite by mechanosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolarin, A.M.; Sanchez, F.; Palomares, S.; Aguilar, J.A.; Torres-Villasenor, G.

    2007-01-01

    Lanthanum manganite doped with calcium, Ca 1/3 La 2/3 MnO 3-δ , was prepared by a high-energy ball milling. The precursors used were Mn 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 and CaO, mixed in the stoichiometric ratio to obtain this manganite. The mechano-chemical process was performed at room temperature in a SPEX 8000D mixer/mill, using hardened steel balls and stainless steel vials, in air atmosphere. X-ray diffraction was used to elucidate the phase transformation as a function of the milling time. The Rietveld refinement was used in order to characterize structurally the manganites. The morphology and particle size of powder compound obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscope. The particle size of this powder material was measured with zeta size analyzer, and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) from TEM was used to elucidate the crystalline structure of this powder compound. The results showed that it is possible to obtain calcium doped lanthanum manganite by mechano-synthesis, using a weight ratio of ball to powder of 12:1, after 3 h of milling. The evolution of the phase transformation during the milling time is reported. Increases in milling time produce exponential decrease in the particle size, up to 680 nm after 1 h of milling. After the milling process it is obtained a powder compound with an orthorhombic structure (S.G. Pbnm). A prolonged milling time (>9 h) produce an important reduction in the particle size but this is accompanied with a high iron contamination caused by metallic residues originated from vial and balls and also, after 9 h of milling time, it was found an important distortion in orthorhombic structure, obtaining two types of parameters

  10. Filtering and concentrating device for processing radioactive waste and operation method therefor, processing facility for radioactive wastes and processing method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Ken-ichi; Yamazaki, Masami

    1998-01-01

    A filtering and concentrating device is prepared by assembling a porous ceramic filtering material having a pore diameter of 1 μm or less secured by a support to a filtering device main body. The porous ceramic filtering material preferably comprises a surface portion having pores having a diameter of 1 μm or less and a hollow ceramic material having filtering flow channels having a diameter greater than the pores on the surface portion. The ratio of the diameter and the thickness of the hollow ceramic material is determined to greater than 50 : 1. The filtering and concentrating device precisely filter and concentrate radioactive liquid wastes containing an insoluble solid content generated from a nuclear power plant to conduct solid/liquid separation thereby forming a filtrate and concentrated wastes having a mass concentration of 20% or more. With such a constitution, stable filtration and concentration can be conducted while reducing occurrence of clogging of filtering materials. In addition, the frequency for the exchange of filtering materials can be reduced. (I.N.)

  11. Release process for non-real property containing residual radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranek, N.L.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.; Hensley, J.; Burns, D.; Fleming, R.; Warren, S.; Wallo, A.

    1997-01-01

    It is DOE's objective to operate its facilities and to conduct its activities so that radiation exposures to members of the public are maintained within acceptable limits and exposures to residual radioactive materials are controlled. To accomplish this, DOE has adopted Order DOE 5400.51 'Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment', and will be promulgating IO CR Part 834 to codify and clarify the requirements of DOE 5400.5. Under both DOE 5400.5 and 10 CR Part 834, radioactively contaminated DOE property is prohibited from release unless specific actions have been completed prior to the release. This paper outlines a ten-step process that, if followed, will assist DOE Operations and contractor personnel in ensuring that the required actions established by Order DOE 5400.5 and 10 CR Part 834 have been appropriately completed prior to the release for reuse or recycle of non-real property (e.g., office furniture, computers, hand tools, machinery, vehicles and scrap metal). Following the process will assist in ensuring that radiological doses to the public from the released materials will meet applicable regulatory standards and be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

  12. Low-level radioactive waste disposal technology development through a public process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.P.; Hysong, R.J.; Edwards, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    When Pennsylvania's legislature ratified the Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact in 1985, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania became the host state designee for the compact's low-level radioactive waste (LLWR) disposal facility. Programs necessary for the establishment of this facility became the responsibility of the Department of Environmental Resources' (DER), Bureau of Radiation Protection's, Division of Nuclear Safety (DNS). It was realized early in the process that the technical aspects of this program, while challenging, probably were not the largest obstacle to completing the facility on schedule. The largest obstacle was likely to be public acceptance. Recognizing this, the DNS set out to develop a program that would maximize public involvement in all aspects of site and facility development. To facilitate public involvement in the process, the DNS established a LLRW advisory committee and a strategy for holding public meetings throughout Pennsylvania. As a result of the significant public involvement generated by these efforts, Pennsylvania passed, in February of 1988, one of the most stringent and technically demanding LLRW disposal laws in the nation. Hopefully, increased public confidence will reduce to a minimum public opposition to the facility

  13. Process for dissolving the radioactive corrosion products from internal surfaces in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns a process for dissolving in the coolant flowing in a reactor the radioactive substances from the corrosion of the internal surfaces of the reactor to which they cling. When a reactor is operating, the fission occurring in the fuel generates gases and fission substances, such as iodine 131 and 133, cesium 134 and 137, molybdenum 99, xenon 133 and activates the structural materials of the reactor such as nickel by giving off cobalt 58 and similar substances. Under this invention an oxygen rich solution is injected in the reactor coolant after the temperature and pressure reduction stage, during the preparation prior to refuelling and repairs. The oxygen in the solution speeds up the release of cobalt 58 and other radioactive substances from the internal surfaces of the reactor and their dissolving in the oxygenated cold coolant at the start of the cooling procedures of the installation. This allows them to be removed by an ion exchanger before the reactor is emptied. By utilising this process, about half a day may be gained in refuelling time when this has to be done once a week [fr

  14. Effect of water purification process in radioactive content: analysis on small scale purification plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez del Rio, H.; Quiroga S, J. C.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F.

    2009-10-01

    Water from small scale purification plants is a low cost alternative for consumers in comparison to the bottled commercial presentations. Because of its low cost per liter, the consumption of this product has increased in recent years, stimulating in turn the installation of purification systems for these small businesses. The purpose of this study was to estimate the efficiency of small scale purification systems located in the cities of Zacatecas and Guadalupe, Zacatecas, to reduce the radioactive content of water. It was measured the total alpha and beta activity in water samples of entry and exit to process, through the liquid scintillation technique. In general it was observed that the process is more efficient in removing alpha that beta activity. The fraction of total alpha activity removed varied between 27 and 100%, while between 0 and 77% of the total beta activity was removed by the analyzed plants. In all cases, the total radioactivity level was lower than the maximum permissible value settled by the official mexican standard for drinking water. (Author)

  15. Small-scale demonstration of high-level radioactive waste processing and solidification using actual SRP waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okeson, J.K.; Galloway, R.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Woolsey, G.B.; Ferguson, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    A small-scale demonstration of the high-level radioactive waste solidification process by vitrification in borosilicate glass is being conducted using 5-6 liter batches of actual waste. Equipment performance and processing characteristics of the various unit operations in the process are reported and, where appropriate, are compared to large-scale results obtained with synthetic waste

  16. Selective isotope determination of lanthanum by diode-laser-initiated resonance-ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.P.; Shaw, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    A diode-laser step has been incorporated into a resonance-ionization mass spectrometry optical excitation process to enhance the isotopic selectivity of the technique. Lanthanum isotope ratio enhancements as high as 10 3 were achieved by use of a single-frequency cw diode laser tuned to excite the first step of a three-step excitation--ionization optical process; the subsequent steps were excited by use of a pulsed dye laser. Applying the same optical technique, we measured atomic hyperfine constants for the high-lying even-parity 4 D 5/2 state of lanthanum at 30 354 cm --1 . The general utility of this spectral approach is discussed

  17. Identification of tetraphenylborate radiolysis products in a simulated feedstock for radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibling, R.E.; Bartlett, M.G.; Carlson, R.E.; Testino, S.A. Jr.; Kunkel, G.J.; Browner, R.F.; Busch, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    The first step towards immobilization of the soluble radioactive species in borosilicate glass is the addition of sodium tetraphenylborate (TPB) and sodium titanate to the radioactive aqueous solution. Initial studies of the TPB hydrolysis process have found that some component of the radiolysis mixture inactivates the Cu catalyst. The interaction of organic materials with the catalyst, and the subsequent interference with the hydrolysis process, would have presented problems with the use of the vitrification process. Prevention of the catalyst deactivation is obtained by washing the irradiated TPB precipitate in the Late Wash Facility prior to hydrolysis to remove the soluble radiolysis products. Identification of the organic radiolysis products, their distribution in the Late Wash Facility, and their interactions with the Cu catalyst has become an important analytical issue. To further investigate the reaction products of the TPB precipitation process, a simulated feedstock was created from compounds known to be present in the starting materials. This simulated feedstock was precipitated with sodium TPB and then exposed to Co-60 gamma radiation to simulate two years of additional storage time prior to the hydrolysis process. The irradiated product was divided into two parts, the filtered supernatant liquid and the precipitate slurry, which contains the TPB and the solid sodium titanate. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography, over 50 organic and inorganic species have been identified in the aqueous portion of a simulated feedstock for TPB hydrolysis. The major organic species present are benzene, phenol, benzamide and a variety of substituted phenylphenols. The major inorganic species present are sodium, nitrite, and oxalate ions

  18. Developing a deliberative process for ethically informed radioactive waste management decision making in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    In the UK and internationally, there is widespread recognition that decision-making processes over long-term radioactive waste management are subject to a broad array of inherent technical, political, social, psychological and ethical issues. This paper seeks to specifically address the ethical aspects of long-term radioactive waste management and siting by proposing a framework for evaluating and integrating stakeholders' ethical values into a political decision-making process. Evaluation and integration of the ethical issues and related values takes place within the context of a comprehensive program of stakeholder engagement; a process necessary in fostering support amongst stakeholder groups and potentially affected communities - allowing legitimate and defensible political decisions to be made. In pluralistic democracies such as the UK, there is a recognition that a broad array of ethical values are held by the affected stakeholder groups, and the tools used to integrate ethical values into a stakeholder engagement process must be designed to reflect this pattern of moral diversity. This paper outlines the implications of this diversity for participatory decision making and addresses it by outlining a 'tool' or procedure for stakeholder deliberation as part of a broader 'toolbox' of deliberative methods: a tool that allows not only the elicitation of stakeholders' moral values, but also a critical re-evaluation of those values in light of ethical principles agreed upon by the participants themselves. Drawing upon the theoretical framework of ethical pragmatism, the goal is to turn what philosopher John Rawls has termed an ethical 'reflective equilibrium' into a practical procedure for stakeholder deliberation. The paper describes how the model of reflective equilibrium can be used as a basis for designing this deliberative procedure, in a way that is multi-staged and iterative in nature; with a goal to providing the means for stakeholder participants to

  19. Impact of microbial activity on the radioactive waste disposal: long term prediction of biocorrosion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, Marie; Schütz, Marta Kerber; Esnault, Loïc; Féron, Damien; Bildstein, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    This study emphasizes different experimental approaches and provides perspectives to apprehend biocorrosion phenomena in the specific disposal environment by investigating microbial activity with regard to the modification of corrosion rate, which in turn can have an impact on the safety of radioactive waste geological disposal. It is found that iron-reducing bacteria are able to use corrosion products such as iron oxides and "dihydrogen" as new energy sources, especially in the disposal environment which contains low amounts of organic matter. Moreover, in the case of sulphate-reducing bacteria, the results show that mixed aerobic and anaerobic conditions are the most hazardous for stainless steel materials, a situation which is likely to occur in the early stage of a geological disposal. Finally, an integrated methodological approach is applied to validate the understanding of the complex processes and to design experiments aiming at the acquisition of kinetic data used in long term predictive modelling of biocorrosion processes. © 2013.

  20. The issue resolution process in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Transportation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, J.A.; Denny, S.

    1987-01-01

    The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program consists of various technical and institutional program activities which engender concern from the general public and from policymakers at federal, state, and local levels. Most familiar are the concerns centered around selection of a site for a repository; however, the transportation portion of the OCRWM program also engenders similar concerns for safety, efficiency and effectiveness. The major Transportation institutional issues were detailed in the Institutional Plan, issued in 1986, and include topics such as liability, defense waste, routing, emergency response, risk identification and mitigation, cash integrity, inspection and enforcement of high-level waste shipments and use of overweight trucks as part of the modal mix. This paper will define the process being used to identify and resolve institutional issues, show how the technical and institutional issues interface and are addressed, and briefly describe four specific activities which illustrate the process of resolving institutional issues in the Transportation program

  1. Decontamination of radioactive process waste water by foam separation. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, K.; Aziz, M.; Beheir, Sh.G.; Benyamin, K.; Samy, S.; Salama, H.N.

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of new studies and previous work from this laboratory, several foam separation techniques are considered feasible methods to carry out the separation of radioactive nuclides from simulated radioactive process waste water. Anionic or cationic collectors were used depending on the type of charge on the ion or precipitate to be removed. Sodium lauryl sulphate, aerosol-18 potassium oleate, acetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, dodecyl pyridinium chloride and gelation were examined as the collector. Aluminium hydroxide, iron (III) oxyhydroxide and hydrous manganese dioxide were studied as the adsorbing floc adsorbing colloid flotation and copper ferrocyanide as the co precipitating agent in co precipitate flotation. The effects of varying the collector, the adsorbing colloid floc, co precipitant and metal ion concentrations, the PH, the gas flow rate, the ionic strength, length of the flotation column and multistage separation on the percentage removal, volume reduction and enrichment ratio were investigated. According to experimental results, adsorbing colloid flotation, whenever applicable, is the preferred method for decontamination. Radionuclide removal up to 100% were obtained. 4 figs., 13 tabs

  2. Decontamination of radioactive process waste water by foam separation. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakir, K; Aziz, M; Beheir, Sh G; Benyamin, K; Samy, S; Salama, H N [Nuclear Chemistry, and Radiation Protection Departments, Hot Laboratories and Nuclear Research Centers, atomic Energy Authority, P.O. Box 13759, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    On the basis of new studies and previous work from this laboratory, several foam separation techniques are considered feasible methods to carry out the separation of radioactive nuclides from simulated radioactive process waste water. Anionic or cationic collectors were used depending on the type of charge on the ion or precipitate to be removed. Sodium lauryl sulphate, aerosol-18 potassium oleate, acetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, dodecyl pyridinium chloride and gelation were examined as the collector. Aluminium hydroxide, iron (III) oxyhydroxide and hydrous manganese dioxide were studied as the adsorbing floc adsorbing colloid flotation and copper ferrocyanide as the co precipitating agent in co precipitate flotation. The effects of varying the collector, the adsorbing colloid floc, co precipitant and metal ion concentrations, the PH, the gas flow rate, the ionic strength, length of the flotation column and multistage separation on the percentage removal, volume reduction and enrichment ratio were investigated. According to experimental results, adsorbing colloid flotation, whenever applicable, is the preferred method for decontamination. Radionuclide removal up to 100% were obtained. 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  3. Analysis of Uranium and Thorium in Radioactive Wastes from Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunandjar

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of analysis method for uranium and thorium in radioactive wastes generated from nuclear fuel cycle process have been carried out. The uranium and thorium analysis methods in the assessment are consist of Titrimetry, UV-VIS Spectrophotometry, Fluorimetry, HPLC, Polarography, Emission Spectrograph, XRF, AAS, Alpha Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry methods. From the assessment can be concluded that the analysis methods of uranium and thorium content in radioactive waste for low concentration level using UV-VIS Spectrometry is better than Titrimetry method. While for very low concentration level in part per billion (ppb) can be used by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Alpha Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry. Laser Fluorimetry is the best method of uranium analysis for very low concentration level. Alpha Spectrometry and ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) methods for isotopic analysis are favourable in the precision and accuracy aspects. Comparison of the ICP-MS and Alpha Spectrometry methods shows that the both of methods have capability to determining of uranium and thorium isotopes content in the waste samples with results comparable very well, but the time of its analysis using ICP-MS method is faster than the Alpha Spectrometry, and also the cost of analysis for ICP-MS method is cheaper. NAA method can also be used to analyze the uranium and thorium isotopes, but this method needs the reactor facility and also the time of its analysis is very long. (author)

  4. Revised energy levels of singly ionized lanthanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzelçimen, Feyza; Tonka, Mehdi; Uddin, Zaheer; Bhatti, Naveed Anjum; Windholz, Laurentius; Kröger, Sophie; Başar, Gönül

    2018-05-01

    Based on the experimental wavenumbers of 344 spectral lines from calibrated Fourier transform (FT) spectra as well as wavenumbers of 81 lines from the wavelength tables from literature, the energy of 115 fine structure levels of singly ionized lanthanum has been revised by weighted global fits. The classifications of the lines are provided by numerous previous investigations of lanthanum by different spectroscopic methods and authors. For the high accurate determination of the center of gravity wavenumbers from the experimental spectrum, the hyperfine constants of the involved levels have been taken into account, if possible. For the 94 levels with known hyperfine constants the accuracy of energy values is better than 0.01 cm-1. For 34 levels the magnetic dipole hyperfine constants A have been determined from FT spectra as part of this work. For four of these 34 levels even electric quadrupole hyperfine constants B could be estimated. For levels, which have experimentally unknown hyperfine constants and which are connected only by lines not found in the FT spectra but taken from literature, the uncertainties of energy values are about a factor of 10 higher. A list of all revised level energies together with a compilation of hyperfine structure data is given as well as a list of all lines used.

  5. Molten metal technologies advance waste processing systems for liquid radioactive waste treatment for PWRs and BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, Gary; Vance, Jene N.

    1997-01-01

    Molten Metal Technologies (MMT) has recently acquired a proprietary filtration process for specific use in radioactive liquid waste processing systems. The filtration system has been incorporated in to a PWR liquid radwaste system which is currently being designed for the ComEd Byron Nuclear Station. It has also been adopted as the prefiltration step up from of the two RO systems which were part of the VECTRA acquisition and which are currently installed in the ComEd Dresden and Lacily Nuclear Stations. The filtration process has been successfully pilot-tested at both Byron and Dresden and is currently being tested at LaSalle. The important features of the filtration process are the high removal efficiencies for particulates, including colloidal particles, and the low solid waste volume generation per gallon filtered which translates into very small annual solid waste volumes. This filtration process system has been coupled with the use of selective ion exchange media in the PWR processing system to reduce the solid waste volumes generated compared to the current processing methods and to reduce the curie quantities discharged to the environs. In the BWR processing system, this filtration method allows the coupling of an RO system to provide for recycling greater than 95% of the liquid radwaste back to the plant for reuse while significantly reducing the solid waste volumes and operating costs. This paper discusses the process system configurations for the MMT Advanced Waste Processing Systems for both PWRs and BWRs. In addition, the pilot test data and full-scale performance projections for the filtration system are discussed which demonstrate the important features of the filtration process

  6. Separating and stabilizing phosphate from high-level radioactive waste: process development and spectroscopic monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumetta, Gregg J; Braley, Jenifer C; Peterson, James M; Bryan, Samuel A; Levitskaia, Tatiana G

    2012-06-05

    Removing phosphate from alkaline high-level waste sludges at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State is necessary to increase the waste loading in the borosilicate glass waste form that will be used to immobilize the highly radioactive fraction of these wastes. We are developing a process which first leaches phosphate from the high-level waste solids with aqueous sodium hydroxide, and then isolates the phosphate by precipitation with calcium oxide. Tests with actual tank waste confirmed that this process is an effective method of phosphate removal from the sludge and offers an additional option for managing the phosphorus in the Hanford tank waste solids. The presence of vibrationally active species, such as nitrate and phosphate ions, in the tank waste processing streams makes the phosphate removal process an ideal candidate for monitoring by Raman or infrared spectroscopic means. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were acquired for all phases during a test of the process with actual tank waste. Quantitative determination of phosphate, nitrate, and sulfate in the liquid phases was achieved by Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for the monitoring of these species in the tank waste process streams.

  7. Lanthanum deposition corresponds to white lesions in the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Urata, Haruo; Tanaka, Takehiro; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2018-05-23

    Although lanthanum deposition in the stomach has been most frequently reported to occur as white lesions, no study has investigated whether the white lesions observed during esophagogastroduodenoscopy are truly lanthanum-related. Here, we retrospectively investigated the amount of lanthanum in endoscopic biopsy specimens. We reviewed four patients showing gastric white spots or annular whitish mucosa in the gastric white lesions (Bw) and peripheral mucosa where the white substance was not endoscopically observed (Bp) during biopsy. We also reviewed three patients with diffuse whitish mucosa and three patients with no whitish lesions. We performed scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry to quantify the lanthanum elements (wt%) in the biopsy specimens. The amount of lanthanum in the Bw ranged from 0.15-0.31 wt%, whereas that of Bp was 0.00-0.13 wt%. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The amount of lanthanum in the Bw, endoscopically presented with white spots or annular whitish mucosa, was significantly higher than that of no whitish lesions (0.05-0.14 wt%, P < 0.05). The amount of lanthanum was also higher in the diffuse whitish mucosa (0.21-0.23 wt%) compared with no whitish lesions (P < 0.01). This study is the first to reveal that pathological lanthanum deposition corresponds to the endoscopically observed white lesions in the gastric mucosa. Therefore, during esophagogastroduodenoscopy, physicians should pay attention to possible presence of white lesions in patients treated with oral lanthanum carbonate to ensure prompt identification of associated issues. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. effect of post-precipitation treatment on the pore-structure stability of sol-gel derived lanthanum zirconate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, Jalajakumari; Kumar, K.N.P.; Nair, P.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, Julian R.H.; Burggraaf, Anthonie J.; Burggraaf, Anthonie

    1998-01-01

    The importance of post-precipitation treatments (pore-fluid exchange and its removal) on the evolution of the texture of coprecipitated lanthanum zirconate has been investigated. The nature of the pore fluid and the type of fluid-removal (drying) process have shown a profound effect on the aggregate

  9. Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrella, R.

    1994-10-01

    Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results

  10. Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrella, R.

    1994-10-01

    Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

  11. Thermoelectric properties of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, E.; Danielson, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    The lanthanum sulfides are promising candidate materials for high-efficiency thermoelectric applications at temperatures up to 1300 0 C. The nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfides (LaS /SUB x/ , where 1.33 2 //rho/ can be chosen. The thermal conductivity remains approximately constant with stoichiometry, so a material with an optimum value of α 2 //rho/ should possess the optimum figure-of-merit. Data for the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides is presented, together with structural properties of these materials

  12. The rare earth element (REE) lanthanum (La) induces hormesis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agathokleous, Evgenios; Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Calabrese, Edward J

    2018-07-01

    Lanthanum is a rare earth element (REE) which has been extensively studied due to its wide application in numerous fields with a potential accumulation in the environment. It has long been known for its potential to stimulate plant growth within a hormetic-biphasic dose response framework. This article provides evidence from a series of high resolution studies published within the last two decades demonstrating a substantial and significant occurrence of lanthanum-induced hormesis in plants. These findings suggest that hormetic responses should be built into the study design of hazard assessment study protocols and included in the risk assessment process. Hormesis also offers the opportunity to substantially improve cost benefit estimates for environmental contaminants, which have the potential to induce beneficial/desirable effects at low doses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Processing of strontium-doped lanthanum manganite suspensions for cathode production of the solid oxide fuel cell; Processamento das suspensoes de manganito de lantanio dopado com estroncio para fabricacao do catodo da celula a combustivel de oxido solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, R.; Vargas, R.A.; Andreoli, M.; Seo, E.S.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais. Lab. de SOFC - Insumos e Componentes

    2008-07-01

    The ceramic material, strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (La{sub 0,85}Sr{sub 0,15}MnO{sub 3} - LSM), has been used as cathode in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs). The cathode attainment as component of the SOFCs has been studied for diverse routes of synthesis and thin films forming in Yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} - YSZ) electrolyte. In this work, the LSM was synthesized by the citrate technique and deposited in YSZ substrate using the forming technique wet powder spraying. Rheological studies of suspensions and chemical, physical and microstructural characterizations of LSM powders were made, aiming at the deposition for thin films formation until 50 mum. The half unit cells LSM/YSZ sintered were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, for verification of porosity and adherence. In this sense, this work is a contribution for production of porous cathode using the forming technique wet powder spraying in the SOFCs. (author)

  14. Pecularities of carrying out radioactive wastes vitrification process without preliminary calcination of wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinovich, A.A.; Kulichenko, V.V.; Bel'tyukov, V.A.; Nikiforov, A.S.; Nikipelov, B.V.; Stepanov, S.E.; Baskov, L.I.; Kulakov, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Vitrification technology is considered for liquid radioactive wastes by means of electric furnace where heating of glass-paste is done by electric current passing through the melt. Continious process of gehydration, calcination and vitrification is going on in one apparatus. Testing if the method has been performed by use of a model solution, containing sodium and aluminium nitrates. To obtain phosphoric acid has been added into the solution. Lay-out of the device and its description as well as technical parameters of the electric furnace are given. The results are stated for determination of the optimum operation conditions for the device. To reduce entrainment of solid components, molasses has been added in the solution. Parameters are given for the process of the solution containing 80 g/l molasses processing. It has been shown that edding molasses to the solution permitted to reduse power consumption of the process due to the heat generation during oxidation-reduction reaction on the melt surface. The results are given for investigations of the nitrogen oxides catching in scrubbers. These results have shown that introduction of molasses reduces nitrigen oxides concentration. The results of the experimental works have shown the possibility of the continious process of dehydration, calcination and vitrification in single device with application of remote control and monitoring by means of automatics. (I.T.) [ru

  15. Preparation of lanthanum sulfide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of lanthanum complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Peisen; LI Huanyong; JIE Wanqi

    2011-01-01

    γ-La2S3 nanoparticles were successfully prepared by thermal decomposition of lanthanum complex La(Et2S2CN)3·phen at low temperature. The obtained sample was characterized by the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and element analysis. The decomposition mechanism of lanthanum complex was studied by thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). The results showed that the obtained samples were cubic phase particles with uniform sizes among 10-30 nm and γ-La2S3 was prepared by decomposition of La(Et2S2CN)3 phen via La4(Et2S2CN)3 as an intermediate product. The band gap of γ-La2S3 was 2.97 eV, which was bigger than bulk crystal because of pronounced quantum confinement effect.

  16. Lanthanum additions and the toughness of ultra-high strength steels and the determination of appropriate lanthanum additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, Warren M.; Maloney, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of commercial heats of AF1410 steel suggest that under appropriate conditions additions of rare-earth elements can significantly enhance fracture toughness. This improvement in toughness is not due to an extremely low inclusion volume fraction but is apparently due to the formation of larger and more widely spaced inclusions. The purpose of this work is to discuss our experience in using rare-earth additions to laboratory scale vacuum induction melted and subsequently vacuum arc remelted heats of ultra-high strength steels to achieve inclusion distributions similar to those observed in commercial heats modified with lanthanum additions. The results indicate that lanthanum additions of 0.015 wt.% to low sulfur steels which have been well deoxidized using carbon-vacuum deoxidation can result in lanthanum rich inclusions which are similar in size, volume fraction and spacing to those obtained in commercially produced heats of ultra-high strength steel to which lanthanum has been added. The heat of steel to which lanthanum additions of 0.015 wt.% were made had significantly higher toughness than did the heat of the same steel in which the sulfur had been gettered as small and closely spaced particles of MnS and which had an inclusion volume fraction similar to that of the heat modified by the addition of 0.015 wt.% lanthanum. This improvement in toughness was attributed to an increase in inclusion spacing. An addition of 0.06 wt.% lanthanum was excessive. Such an addition of lanthanum resulted in a huge volume fraction of large cuboidal inclusions which primarily contain lanthanum and oxygen and which are extremely detrimental to toughness

  17. Yttrium and lanthanum recovery from low cerium carbonate, yttrium carbonate and yttrium concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Mari Estela de

    2006-01-01

    In this work, separation, enrichment and purification of lanthanum and yttrium were performed using as raw material a commercial low cerium rare earth concentrate named LCC (low cerium carbonate), an yttrium concentrate named 'yttrium carbonate', and a third concentrated known as 'yttrium earths oxide. The first two were industrially produced by the late NUCLEMON - NUCLEBRAS de Monazita e Associados Ltda, using Brazilian monazite. The 'yttrium earths oxide' come from a process for preparation of lanthanum during the course of the experimental work for the present thesis. The following techniques were used: fractional precipitation with urea; fractional leaching of the LCC using ammonium carbonate; precipitation of rare earth peroxycarbonates starting from the rare earth complex carbonates. Once prepared the enriched rare earth fractions the same were refined using the ion exchange chromatography with strong cationic resin without the use of retention ion and elution using the ammonium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. With the association of the above mentioned techniques were obtained pure oxides of yttrium (>97,7%), lanthanum (99,9%), gadolinium (96,6%) and samarium (99,9%). The process here developed has technical and economic viability for the installation of a large scale unity. (author)

  18. Process and device for subdividing a glass tube filled with a radioactive gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffarella, T.E.; Radda, G.J.; Watts, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process is described for subdividing into individual sealed segments an elongated glass tube coated internally with a luminescent material and filled with a radioactive gas, this tube having a longitudinal axis. It consists in directing a focused laser beam on to the surface of the tube in an ambient atmosphere with a pressure greater than that of the gas in the tube and to create a relative, repetitive and alternating movement between the laser beam and the surface of the tube. This movement is transversal to the longitudinal axis of the tube, so as to heat and soften the tube along a cutting line until the tube divides and presents new ends where it contracts, causing these ends to seal up [fr

  19. Gas generation in deep radioactive waste repositories: a review of processes, controls and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    Gas generation within radioactive waste repositories may produce two general problems: 1) breaching of engineered and natural barriers due to high gas pressures; 2) enhanced radiological risk due to reduced groundwater travel times and/or greater aqueous or gaseous activities reaching the biosphere. As a result of these concerns, HMIP must be aware of the current status of relevant research, together with any associated deficiencies. This report addresses the current status of published research on near-field gas generation from worldwide sources and documents the important gas generating processes, the factors controlling them and models available to simulate them. In the absence of suitable models, outline technical specifications for corrosion and microbial degradation gas generation models are defined and the deficiencies in the current understanding of gas generation are highlighted; a conceptual research programme to correct these deficiencies is presented. (author)

  20. Technical and Economic Problems Associated with the Development of Methods of Processing and Using Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiriet, L.; Sauteron, J.; Oger, C.

    1968-01-01

    The paper briefly reviews the various techniques used in processing the radioactive wastes which unavoidably result from the generation of electric power from nuclear sources. The paper goes on to define the relative importance, in nuclear fuel cycles, of the problem raised by these wastes. Emphasis is placed on the economic influence of management policies on the cost of power generation, and hence on the relative position of nuclear energy. A substantial percentage of these wastes can be economically utilized. Attention is drawn to the major technical and economic features of the industry which will come into being as a result of this utilization. The major uses anticipated are discussed: radiation sources, heat sources, auxiliary power generation. The paper concludes that satisfactory solutions have already been found to these problems, and describes possible improvements. (author) [fr

  1. Accident consequence analysis models applied to licensing process of nuclear installations, radioactive and conventional industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senne Junior, Murillo; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Jordao, Elizabete

    2002-01-01

    The industrial accidents happened in the last years, particularly in the eighty's decade, had contributed in a significant way to call the attention to government authorities, industry and society as a whole, demanding mechanisms for preventing episodes that could affect people's safety and environment quality. Techniques and methods already thoroughly used in the nuclear, aeronautic and war industries were then adapted for performing analysis and evaluation of the risks associated to other industrial activities, especially in the petroleum, chemistry and petrochemical areas. Some models for analyzing the consequences of accidents involving fire and explosion, used in the licensing processes of nuclear and radioactive facilities, are presented in this paper. These models have also application in the licensing of conventional industrial facilities. (author)

  2. Removal of nickel and strontium from simulated radioactive wastewater via a pellet coprecipitation-microfiltration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiangdan Jin; Ping Gu; Guanghui Zhang; Xuan Shang; Li'an Hou

    2014-01-01

    In order to increase the decontamination factor (DF) and concentration factor (CF) for the treatment of radioactive wastewater, a pellet coprecipitation microfiltration process which aimed at removing the neutron activation product 63 Ni and fission product 90 Sr was studied. In this study average DFs were (4.60 ± 0.42) × 10 3 for nickel and 559 ± 24 for strontium, respectively. When about 1.8 m 3 wastewater was treated, the sludge volume was significantly minimised after 24 h settling and CF reached over 1 × 10 3 . DFs and CF values were improved by 1-2 orders of magnitude in this study compared with those achieved by conventional methods. (author)

  3. Biochemistry Oxidation Process for Treatment the Simulation of Organic Liquid Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunandjar; Zainus Salimin; Sugeng Purnomo; Ratiko

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear industry activities generate the organic liquid wastes such as detergent waste from laundry, solvent waste of 30% TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate) in kerosene from purification or recovery of uranium from rejection of nuclear fuel element fabrication, and solvent waste containing D 2 EHPA (di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid) and TOPO (trioctyl phospine oxide) in kerosene from phosphoric acid purification. The wastes are included in category of the hazard and poison materials which also radioactive, so that the wastes have to be treated to detoxification of the hazard and poison materials and decontamination of the radionuclides. The research of biochemistry oxidation process for treatment the simulation of organic liquid radioactive waste from laundry using mixture of aerobe bacteria of bacillus sp, pseudomonas sp, arthrobacter sp, and aeromonas sp have been carried out. The waste containing detergent 1,496 g/Litre, activity 10 -1 Ci/m 3 , with COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) 128, BOD (Biological Oxygen Demand) 68 and TSS (Total Suspended Solid) 1000 ppm, it is treated by biochemistry oxidation with addition of bacteria which be fed nutrition of nitrogen and phosphor, and aeration. The result show that the bacteria can decompose the detergent to become carbon dioxyde and water so that can fulfill the quality standard of water group-B with content of BOD and COD are 6 and 10 ppm respectively, the time of decomposition is needed 106 hours to be fulfill the quality standard of water. The longer of process time will give bigger the total solid content in sludge, because the biomass generated from the colony of bacteria which life and dead to so much. (author)

  4. Development of advanced membrane process for treatment of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kune Woo; Choi, W. K.; Lee, J. W.; Jung, G. H.

    2002-01-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Development of advanced membrane process for treatment of radioactive liquid wastes'. 1. Surface modification technique of microfiltration membrane. Microporous hydrophobic polypropylene(PP) membrane were modified by radiation-induced grafting using hydrophilic monomers such as arylic acid(AAc), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate(HEMA) and styrenesulfonic acid(SSS). The effect of grafting conditions was investigated. Also, copolymeric condition of AAc and EGDMA for nylon membrane was studied. The structure of grafted PP membrane was examined by using FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, SEM and contact angle. The grafted membrane was characterized by measureing the water flux, the ion exchange capacity or the binding capacity of the metal ions. A study on the permeation behavior of simulated waste water containing oil emulsion and characterization of membrane fouling was carried out in the crossflow membrane filtration process using capillary type PP microfiltration membrane modified by radiation induced grafting of HEMA. The effects of various operating parameters were investigated. 2. Electrofiltration Technology. In this section, the process conditions for fouling prevention of membrane by evaluating the effects of operational parameters such as external electric field strength, crossflow velocity, transmembrane pressure, etc. on the permeate flux in electrofiltration were established and the process applicability for oil emulsion wastes containing surfactant using parallel plate type electrofiltration module was evaluated

  5. Development of advanced membrane process for treatment of radioactive liquid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kune Woo; Choi, W. K.; Lee, J. W.; Jung, G. H

    2002-01-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Development of advanced membrane process for treatment of radioactive liquid wastes'. 1. Surface modification technique of microfiltration membrane. Microporous hydrophobic polypropylene(PP) membrane were modified by radiation-induced grafting using hydrophilic monomers such as arylic acid(AAc), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate(HEMA) and styrenesulfonic acid(SSS). The effect of grafting conditions was investigated. Also, copolymeric condition of AAc and EGDMA for nylon membrane was studied. The structure of grafted PP membrane was examined by using FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, SEM and contact angle. The grafted membrane was characterized by measureing the water flux, the ion exchange capacity or the binding capacity of the metal ions. A study on the permeation behavior of simulated waste water containing oil emulsion and characterization of membrane fouling was carried out in the crossflow membrane filtration process using capillary type PP microfiltration membrane modified by radiation induced grafting of HEMA. The effects of various operating parameters were investigated. 2. Electrofiltration Technology. In this section, the process conditions for fouling prevention of membrane by evaluating the effects of operational parameters such as external electric field strength, crossflow velocity, transmembrane pressure, etc. on the permeate flux in electrofiltration were established and the process applicability for oil emulsion wastes containing surfactant using parallel plate type electrofiltration module was evaluated.

  6. Improvement of the IRIS Process for Incineration of Various Radioactive Waste Compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemort, F.; Charvillat, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Incineration represents a promising weight and volume reduction technique for alpha-contaminated organic waste. Following several years of laboratory research initiated in 1983 on a nonradioactive prototype unit at the CEA's Rhone Valley (Marcoule) Research Center, an innovative process, IRIS, has been developed to meet the need for processing nuclear glove box waste containing large amounts of chlorine. In March 1999, the first highly chlorinated alpha-contaminated waste was incinerated in the industrial facility based on the IRIS process at the CEA's Valduc Center. The nonradioactive prototype at Marcoule and the radioactive facility at Valduc demonstrated that the process is highly effective with a continuously fed rotating tubular kiln and with a very effective control of corrosion by pyrolytic decomposition of the waste initially at 550 C. The ash quality meets specification requirements (< 1% carbon, < 1% chlorine) and the volume and weight reduction factors are sufficient (around 30). The offgas treatment system exhibits very high operating efficiency complying with gaseous emission standards

  7. The Efficiency of Strontium-90 Desorption Using Iron (III) Solutions in the Decontamination Process of Radioactive Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Vladimirovna Cheremisina; Vasiliy Sergeev; Varvara Alabusheva; Alexander Fedorov; Alexandra Iliyna

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation on the estimated efficiency of iron (III) chloride solutions in the decontamination process of radioactive soils with 90 Sr, according to kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the desorption process. The specific 90 Sr radioactivity of soil samples was (3.9±0.3)·104 Bq·g. The adsorption isotherms of Sr 2+ and Fe 3+ are described with the Langmuir equation. The values of Gibbs energy G0298 = -4.65 kJ·mol -1 and equilibrium ion exchange constant ...

  8. A contractor's approach to engineering process plant for radioactive liquor processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braide, W.M.; Fletcher, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Protection of personnel from damaging sources of radiation is the overriding consideration which influences the fundamental design of plant for processing active liquors in the Nuclear Industry. The conventional design procedures of the Chemical Plant Contractor have therefore to be modified to meet the specific technology and additional safety requirements. Ways in which the added factor of radiation influences the design philosophy for Nuclear Plant compared to conventional Chemical Plant are described. Design philosophy is demonstrated by design studies for active liquor storage and evaporation plant. (author)

  9. A contractors's approach to engineering process plant for radioactive liquor processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braide, W.M.; Fletcher, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Protection of personnel from damaging sources of radiation is the overriding consideration which influences the fundamental design of plant for processing active liquors in the Nuclear Industry. The conventional design procedures of the Chemical Plant Contractor have therefore to be modified to meet the specific technology and additional safety requirements. This paper describes ways in which the added factor of radiation influences the design philosophy for Nuclear Plant compared to conventional Chemical Plant. The design philosophy is demonstrated by design studies for active liquor storage and evaporation plant. (author)

  10. Developing a deliberative process for ethically informed radioactive waste management decision making in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, Matthew [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Environmental Risk

    2006-09-15

    In the UK and internationally, there is widespread recognition that decision-making processes over long-term radioactive waste management are subject to a broad array of inherent technical, political, social, psychological and ethical issues. This paper seeks to specifically address the ethical aspects of long-term radioactive waste management and siting by proposing a framework for evaluating and integrating stakeholders' ethical values into a political decision-making process. Evaluation and integration of the ethical issues and related values takes place within the context of a comprehensive program of stakeholder engagement; a process necessary in fostering support amongst stakeholder groups and potentially affected communities - allowing legitimate and defensible political decisions to be made. In pluralistic democracies such as the UK, there is a recognition that a broad array of ethical values are held by the affected stakeholder groups, and the tools used to integrate ethical values into a stakeholder engagement process must be designed to reflect this pattern of moral diversity. This paper outlines the implications of this diversity for participatory decision making and addresses it by outlining a 'tool' or procedure for stakeholder deliberation as part of a broader 'toolbox' of deliberative methods: a tool that allows not only the elicitation of stakeholders' moral values, but also a critical re-evaluation of those values in light of ethical principles agreed upon by the participants themselves. Drawing upon the theoretical framework of ethical pragmatism, the goal is to turn what philosopher John Rawls has termed an ethical 'reflective equilibrium' into a practical procedure for stakeholder deliberation. The paper describes how the model of reflective equilibrium can be used as a basis for designing this deliberative procedure, in a way that is multi-staged and iterative in nature; with a goal to providing the

  11. Effect of lanthanum doping on electrical and electromechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    temperature, Tc increased with the increase of lanthanum content. ... By adding oxide group softeners, hardeners and stabi- ... pressed with 2% polyvinyl alcohol as binder under a ... study are dependent on temperature and are shown in.

  12. Problem of radioactive pollution as a result of Uranium ores processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovin, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Laszkiewicz, G.; Lee, L.; Koshik, Yu.; Shmatko, G.; Semenets, G.; Merkulov, V.

    2001-01-01

    Composition and properties of radioactive wastes accumulated within Dnieprodzerzhinsk and Dnepropetrovsk region as well as conditions of their storage promote the further growth of radioactive and chemical pollution. Prevention of growth of further environment pollution needs special measures including elimination of pollution sources, waste isolation and their second burial. Utilization of radioactive wastes and deactivation of living zone are the problems that must be solved at municipal, state and international level

  13. Influence of radioactive contamination to agricultural products due to dry and wet deposition processes during a nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Han, Moon Hee; Choi, Yong Ho; Lee, Chang Woo

    2002-01-01

    Combined with deposition model onto the ground of radionuclides, the influence of radioactive contamination to agricultural products was analyzed due to wet deposition as well as dry deposition from radioactive air concentration during a nuclear emergency. The previous dynamic food chain model, in which initial input parameter is only radionuclide concentrations on the ground, was improved for the evaluating of radioactive contamination to agricultural products from either radionuclide concentrations in air or radionuclide concentrations on the ground. As the results, in case of deposition onto the ground, wet deposition was more dominant process than dry deposition. While the contamination levels of agricultural products were dependent on the a variety of factors such as radionuclides and rainfall rate. It means that the contamination levels of agricultural products are determined from which is more dominant process between deposition on the ground and interception onto agricultural plants

  14. Room temperature synthesis of high temperature stable lanthanum phosphate–yttria nano composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, Sasidharan; Raj, Athira N.; Jyothi, C.K.; Warrier, K.G.K.; Padmanabhan, P.V.A.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A facile aqueous sol–gel route involving precipitation–peptization mechanism followed by electrostatic stabilization is used for synthesizing nanocrystalline composite containing lanthanum phosphate and yttria. Highlights: ► A novel lanthanum phosphate–Y 2 O 3 nano composite is synthesized for the first time using a modified facile sol gel process. ► The composite becomes crystalline at 600 °C and X-ray diffraction pattern is indexed for monoclinic LaPO 4 and cubic yttria. ► The composite synthesized was tested up to 1300 °C and no reaction between the phases of the constituents is observed with the morphologies of the phases being retained. -- Abstract: A facile aqueous sol–gel route involving precipitation–peptization mechanism followed by electrostatic stabilization is used for synthesizing nanocrystalline composite containing lanthanum phosphate and yttria. Lanthanum phosphate (80 wt%)–yttria (20 wt%) nano composite (LaPO 4 –20%Y 2 O 3 ), has an average particle size of ∼70 nm after heat treatment of precursor at 600 °C. TG–DTA analysis reveals that stable phase of the composite is formed on heating the precursor at 600 °C. The TEM images of the composite show rod shape morphology of LaPO 4 in which yttria is acquiring near spherical shape. Phase identification of the composite as well as the phase stability up to 1300 °C was carried out using X-ray diffraction technique. With the phases being stable at higher temperatures, the composite synthesized should be a potential material for high temperature applications like thermal barrier coatings and metal melting applications.

  15. Adsorption of lithium-lanthanum films on W (112) face

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupalo, M.S.; Smereka, T.P.; Palyukh, B.M.; Babkin, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    The method of contact potential difference is employed to study the electron adsorption properties (the work function phi and adsorption heat q) lithium films on a lanthanized W(112) surface. It is found that the work function of mixed lithium-lanthanum films is intermediate between phi of the summands. The presence of lanthanum on a W(112) face reduces the adsorption heat of lithium

  16. Pressure behaviour of the superconducting transition temperature of lanthanum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glocker, R.

    1977-01-01

    The dissertation has the following chapters: 1) Introduction, 2) Fundamentals of the microscopic theory of superconductivity, 3) Calculation of the first momentum of the Eliashberg function, 4) Determination of the average values of frequency, 5) The relativistic cellular method and its application to lanthanum, 6) Results of the calculation of the electron-phonon coupling cosntants for f.c.c. lanthanum, 7) Phonon dispersion and phonon state density. (orig.) [de

  17. Conditioning of radioactive waste from the waste collection centers of the German states as illustrated by radioactive waste from industrial production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellmacher, J.; Sickert, T.

    2011-01-01

    The amount of negligible heat generating waste in Germany is increasing due to deconstruction of decommissioned nuclear facilities. Until 2040 277.000 m 3 are expected. By conditioning processes the wastes are transferred into a chemical stabile and water insoluble state and packaged in appropriate containers for final repository disposal. The radioactive waste in the collection containers are coated with wax for immobilization of the surface contamination, in the next step the containers are filled with pressurized geopolymer, a thixotropic fluid (under pressure the viscosity is decreased, so that cavities are filled). The conditioned material, the so called interim product is stored in trays for the final packaging in appropriate containers.

  18. Deposition barium titanate (BaTiO3) doped lanthanum with chemical solution deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriani, Y.; Nurhadi, N.; Jamaludin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of Barium Titanate (BaTiO 3 ) thin films used Chemical Solution Deposition (CSD) method and prepared with spin coater. BaTiO 3 is doped with lanthanum, 1%, 2%, and 3%. The thermal process use annealing temperature 900°C and holding time for 3 hours. The result of characterization with x-ray diffraction (XRD) equipment show that the addition of La 3+ doped on Barium Titanate caused the change of angle diffraction.The result of refine with GSAS software shows that lanthanum have been included in the structure of BaTiO 3 . Increasing mol dopant La 3+ cause lattice parameter and crystal volume become smaller. Characterization result using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipment show that grain size (grain size) become smaller with increasing mole dopant (x) La 3+ . The result of characterization using Sawyer Tower methods show that all the samples (Barium Titanante and Barium Titanate doped lanthanum) are ferroelectric material. Increasing of mole dopant La 3+ cause smaller coercive field and remanent polarization increases. (paper)

  19. Moessbauer characterization of the iron species from the radioactive waste processing products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filoti, G; Spanu, V; Kunscer, V; Turcanu, C N [Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest (Romania)

    1997-02-01

    As part of the programme carried out in Romania in connection with the management of non-fuel cycle radioactive wastes, an experimental study has been performed on the low aqueous waste (LLAW) processing products using mainly an ``in situ`` {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy characterization method. The study was focused on the LLAW treatment products obtained by chemical precipitation and on the conditioning of the products obtained by cementation. Starting from a series of Moessbauer spectra obtained on precipitates prepared in various experimental condition it was shown that th composition and structure of the final products strongly depend on the process parameters i.e. reagent composition and their concentration, the order and rate of the chemical addition, the ageing time, the presence of the coagulation promoters, etc. Sometimes important effects were evidenced even at minor changes of the process parameters. The Moessbauer and other structural measurements on the cemented matrices resulted from the above mentioned precipitates or from other simulated LLAW concentrates have been also performed. (author). 11 refs, 3 figs, 7 tabs.

  20. Moessbauer characterization of the iron species from the radioactive waste processing products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filoti, G.; Spanu, V.; Kunscer, V.; Turcanu, C.N.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the programme carried out in Romania in connection with the management of non-fuel cycle radioactive wastes, an experimental study has been performed on the low aqueous waste (LLAW) processing products using mainly an ''in situ'' 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy characterization method. The study was focused on the LLAW treatment products obtained by chemical precipitation and on the conditioning of the products obtained by cementation. Starting from a series of Moessbauer spectra obtained on precipitates prepared in various experimental condition it was shown that th composition and structure of the final products strongly depend on the process parameters i.e. reagent composition and their concentration, the order and rate of the chemical addition, the ageing time, the presence of the coagulation promoters, etc. Sometimes important effects were evidenced even at minor changes of the process parameters. The Moessbauer and other structural measurements on the cemented matrices resulted from the above mentioned precipitates or from other simulated LLAW concentrates have been also performed. (author). 11 refs, 3 figs, 7 tabs

  1. Investigation of Natural Radioactivity in a Monazite Processing Plant in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Yajima, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Yonehara, Hidenori; Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Kanda, Reiko

    2017-09-01

    Monazite is a naturally occurring radioactive material that is processed for use in a variety of domestic applications. At present, there is little information available on potential radiation doses experienced by people working with monazite. The ambient dose rate and activity concentration of natural radionuclides in raw materials, products, and dust in work sites as well as the Rn and Rn concentrations in work sites were measured in a monazite processing plant in Japan. Dose estimations for plant workers were also conducted. The activity concentration of the U series in raw materials and products for the monazite processing plant was found to be higher than the relevant values described in the International Atomic Energy Agency Safety Standards. The ambient dose rates in the raw material yard were higher than those in other work sites. Moreover, the activity concentrations of dust in the milling site were higher than those in other work sites. The Rn concentrations in all work sites were almost the same as those in regular indoor environments in Japan. The Rn concentrations in all work sites were much higher than those in regular indoor environments in Japan. The maximum value of the effective dose for workers was 0.62 mSv y, which is lower than the reference level range (1-20 mSv y) for abnormally high levels of natural background radiation published in the International Commission of Radiological Protection Publication 103.

  2. Social acceptance process model for ensuring the high-level radioactive waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Ryutaro; Tanaka, Satoru; Nagasaki, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    Generally speaking, a vast, advanced and unfamiliar science and technology are unacceptable to the public for fear of their unknown nature. Here, the social acceptance process model was examined on the basis of the analysis of the cause phenomenon and numerical grounds, by referring to the problems on the application of literature documentation for location examination of a high-level radioactive waste disposal site in Toyo town in Kochi Pref. in April 2007. In analyzing the Toyo town case, we have found a possibility that the majority of local residents knew very little about the object opposed by the fringe route processing. To ensure a healthy decision making by the public, it is vital to convey fundamental information using sufficient wide-area PR media before the issue becomes actual. After the issue becomes actual, dialog with residents through a careful technology assessment is indispensable. The authors focus attention on the decision-making process of human beings from the social and psychological viewpoints, and point out that it is desirable for promoting social acceptance by adopting two approaches: a direct approach aiming at better intelligibility for the different resident layers and a deductive approach in technological essence. (author)

  3. Regional LLRW [low-level radioactive waste] processing alternatives applying the DOE REGINALT systems analysis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beers, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    The DOE Low-Level Waste Management Progam has developed a computer-based decision support system of models that may be used by nonprogrammers to evaluate a comprehensive approach to commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) management. REGINALT (Regional Waste Management Alternatives Analysis Model) implementation will be described as the model is applied to a hypothetical regional compact for the purpose of examining the technical and economic potential of two waste processing alternaties. Using waste from a typical regional compact, two specific regional waste processing centers will be compared for feasibility. Example 1 will assume will assume that a regional supercompaction facility is being developed for the region. Example 2 will assume that a regional facility with both supercompation and incineration is specified. Both examples will include identical disposal facilities, except that capacity may differ due to variation in volume reduction achieved. The two examples will be compared with regard to volume reduction achieved, estimated occupational exposure for the processing facilities, and life cylcle costs per generated unit waste. A base case will also illustrate current disposal practices. The results of the comparisons will be evaluated, and other steps, if necessary, for additional decision support will be identified

  4. Testing and evaluation of alternative process systems for immobilizing radioactive mixed particulate waste in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weingardt, K.M.; Weber, J.R.

    1994-03-01

    Radioactive and Hazardous Mixed Wastes have accumulated at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Ongoing operations and planned facilities at Hanford will also contribute to this waste stream. To meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions most of this waste will need to be treated to permit disposal. In general this treatment will need to include stabilization/solidification either as a sole method or as part of a treatment train. A planned DOE facility, the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A, is scoped to provide this required treatment for containerized contact-handled (CH), mixed low-level waste (MLLW) at Hanford. An engineering development program has been conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to select the best system for utilizing a cement based process in WRAP Module 2A. Three mixing processes were developed for analysis and testing; in-drum mixing, continuous mixing, and batch mixing. Some full scale tests were conducted and 55 gallon drums of solidified product were produced. These drums were core sampled and examined to evaluate mixing effectiveness. Total solids loading and the order of addition of waste and binder constituents were also varied. The highest confidence approach to meet the WRAP Module 2A waste immobilization system needs appears to be the out-of-drum batch mixing concept. This system is believed to offer the most flexibility and efficiency, given the highly variable and troublesome waste streams feeding the facility

  5. Evaluation of spiral wound reverse osmosis for four radioactive waste processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen Gupta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    A pilot-scale spiral wound reverse osmosis rig was used to treat four significantly different radioactive waste streams, three of which were generated at the Chalk River Laboratories at AECL. These streams included: 1. A chemical decontamination (CD/DC) waste stream which is routinely treated by the plant-scale membrane system at CRL; 2. Reactor waste which is a dilute radioactive waste stream (containing primarily tritium and organic acids), and it an effluent from the operating reactors at AECL; 3. An ion exchange regenerant waste stream which contains a mixture of stream (1) (CD/DC), blended with secondary waste from ion exchange regeneration; 4. Boric acid simulated waste which is a by-product waste of the PWR reactors. This was the only stream treated that was not generated as a waste liquid at AECL. For the first three streams specified above, reverse osmosis was used to remove chemical and radiochemical impurities from the water with efficiencies usually exceeding 99%. In these three cases the 'permeate' or clean water was the product of the process. In the case of stream 4, reverse osmosis was used in a recovery application for the purpose of recycling boric acid back to the reactor, with the concentrate being the 'product'. Reverse osmosis technology was successfully demonstrated for the treatment of all four streams. Prefiltration and oxidation (with photocatalytic continuous oxidation technology) were evaluated as pretreatment alternatives for streams 1, 2, and 3. The results indicated that the effective crossflow velocity through and membrane vessel was more important in determining the extent of membrane fouling than the specific pretreatment strategy employed. (author)

  6. On the self-diffusion process in liquid metals and alloys by the radioactive tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganovici, L.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of self-diffusion process in liquid metals and alloys is presented. There are only a few pure metals for which diffusion coefficients in a liquid state are known. The thesis aims at increasing the number of liquid metals for which diffusion coefficients are available, by determining these values for liquids: Cd, Tl, Sb and Te. The self-diffusion coefficients of Te in some tellurium based liquid alloys such as Tl 2 Te, PbTe and Bi 90 Te 10 were also determined. Self-diffusion coefficients have been measured using two radioactive tracer methods: a) the capillary-reservoir method; b) the semi-infinite capillary method. The self-diffusion coefficients were derived from the measured radioactive concentration profile, using the solutions of Fick's second law for appropriate initial and limit conditions. The temperature dependence study of self-diffusion coefficients in liquids Cd, Tl, Sb and Te, was used to check some theoretical models on the diffusion mechanism in metallic melts. The experimental diffusion data interpreted in terms of the Arrhenius type temperature dependence, was used to propose two simple empiric relations for determining self diffusion coefficients of group I liquid metals and for liquid semi-metals. It was established a marked decrease of self-diffusion coefficients of liquid Te close to the solidification temperature. The diffusivity of Te in liquid Tl 2 Te points to an important decrease close to the solidification temperature. A simplified model was proposed for the diffusion structural unit in this alloy and the hard sphere model for liquid metals was checked by comparing the theoretical and experimental self-diffusion coefficients. (author)

  7. Radioactive waste management in France, how successive crises helped the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamborini, J.

    2000-01-01

    Since the start of the nuclear program in the early 70s, the acceptance of nuclear power by the public is an evolving process which involves many different actors and more and more, the local one. The radioactive waste management field also suffered from this deterioration of public opinion concerning nuclear power. Therefore, this text explains how National Radioactive Waste Agency (ANDRA) changed its policy in this matter notably through its experience in the implementation of its high-level (HLW), long-lived waste management program. ANDRA was created in 1979 to manage waste generated by the nuclear power programme. In 1984, ANDRA was asked to ensure the replacement of the Centre de la Manche, by undertaking studies for a new disposal facility with a capacity of 1 million cubic meters. Discussions with local elected representatives and the social fabric were a key element in the successful implementation of the new disposal facility. It is important to recognise, however, that social consensus about the site was not immediate: it required more than 400 public meetings and the creation of a local information committee consisting of elected representatives, associations and ANDRA In 1987, concurrently with the construction of the Centre de l'Aube, investigations started on the implementation of underground laboratories as a preliminary step to the construction of a repository for long-lived HLW. The approach used was very similar to that for surface disposal sites. However, three years after scientific and technical work campaigns had been launched on the pre-selected sites, all reconnaissance activities had to be stopped due to the opposition of the public and elected representatives. The government finally decreed a moratorium on the management of all long-lived HLW

  8. Synthesis and Stability of Lanthanum Superhydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geballe, Zachary M. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Liu, Hanyu [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Mishra, Ajay K. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Permanent address: HP& SRPD, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai-85 India; Ahart, Muhtar [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Somayazulu, Maddury [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Meng, Yue [HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Baldini, Maria [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC 20015 USA; Hemley, Russell J. [Institute of Materials Science and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 USA

    2017-12-15

    Recent theoretical calculations predict that megabar pressure stabilizes very hydrogen-rich simple compounds having new clathrate-like structures and remarkable electronic properties including room-temperature superconductivity. X-ray diffraction and optical studies demonstrate that superhydrides of lanthanum can be synthesized with La atoms in an fcc lattice at 170 GPa upon heating to about 1000 K. The results match the predicted cubic metallic phase of LaH10 having cages of thirty-two hydrogen atoms surrounding each La atom. Upon decompression, the fcc-based structure undergoes a rhombohedral distortion of the La sublattice. The superhydride phases consist of an atomic hydrogen sublattice with H-H distances of about 1.1 Å, which are close to predictions for solid atomic metallic hydrogen at these pressures. With stability below 200 GPa, the superhydride is thus the closest analogue to solid atomic metallic hydrogen yet to be synthesized and characterized.

  9. The effect of lanthanum applications on drought tolerance in barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, S.; Maheswaran, J.; Peverill, K.; Meehan, B.; Stokes, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Glasshouse investigations carried out by the authors on both perlite and soil, have repeatedly shown that several plant species, when treated with lanthanum, retain greater amounts of moisture under water stressed conditions. Dry matter increases under water stress have been observed in some cases. Barley plants watered to 50% field capacity, and show-ing signs of water stress, yielded 18% more dry matter when treated with 5 kg/ha and 10 kg/ha of lanthanum than control plants (P<0.05). The results of these experiments suggest that increased dry matter production in crops under periods of water stress, is likely when previously treated with lanthanum. Consequently, it is conceivable that lanthanum may have potential as an agent that induces drought tolerance in grain crops, grown in low rainfall areas. Subsequent field trials using barley as a test crop at Walpeup, in the Mallee region of Victoria have shown that in a below average rainfall year, combined soil and foliar applications of lanthanum can significantly increase grain yield. This effect was not evident when barley grown on the same soil type was treated with lanthanum under above average rainfall conditions

  10. Process for improving the separation efficiency in the isolation of radioactive isotopes in elementary or chemically bonded form from liquids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidberger, R.; Kirch, R.; Kock, W.

    1986-01-01

    In the process for the improvement of the separation efficiency in the isolation of radioactive isotopes in elementary or chemically bonded form from liquids or gases by ion exchange and adsorption, non-radioactive isotopes of the element to be isolated are added to the fluid before the isolation, whereas at the same time a large surplus of the non-radioactive isotopes to the radioactive isotopes is achieved by addition of only small quantities of compounds of the non-radioactive isotopes. (orig./RB) [de

  11. Express control of migration processes of radioactive substances during drilling works in 'Ukryttya' object local zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pravdivyj, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Technical proposals are prepared to create a procedure for operative control of drilling works. Such a procedure will permit detecting the displacement of radioactively contaminated ground along borehole bore and correcting the drilling work procedure, which would prevent radioactive substance spreading, in boreholes of 'Ukryttya' object local zone and those of Exclusion Zone

  12. [Current status on storage, processing and risk communication of medical radioactive waste in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Kida, Tetsuo; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Maehara, Yoshiaki; Tsukamoto, Atsuko; Koizumi, Mitsue; Kimura, Yumi; Horitsugi, Genki

    2013-03-01

    Decay-in-storage for radioactive waste including that of nuclear medicine has not been implemented in Japan. Therefore, all medical radioactive waste is collected and stored at the Japan Radioisotope Association Takizawa laboratory, even if the radioactivity has already decayed out. To clarify the current situation between Takizawa village and Takizawa laboratory, we investigated the radiation management status and risk communication activities at the laboratory via a questionnaire and site visiting survey in June 2010. Takizawa laboratory continues to maintain an interactive relationship with local residents. As a result, Takizawa village permitted the acceptance of new medical radioactive waste containing Sr-89 and Y-90. However, the village did not accept any non-medical radioactive waste such as waste from research laboratories. To implement decay-in-storage in Japan, it is important to obtain agreement with all stakeholders. We must continue to exert sincere efforts to acquire the trust of all stakeholders.

  13. Use of fixation techniques in processing radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliga, M.

    1977-01-01

    The current state of radioactive waste disposal from the Bohunice nuclear power plant is described. The method of vacuum cementation was chosen for solidifying liquid radioactive wastes. This method makes it possible to obtain a product whose properties, namely strength, leachability, and radiation stability allow for the production of blocks without packing material. Also solved was the fixation of liquid radioactive waste using bituminization based on mixing liquid radioactive waste with aqueous bitumen emulsion in a film evaporator in which the mixture of liquid radioactive wastes and bitumen emulsion evaporate producing solid bitumen. The parameters are given of the cementation and bituminization lines which are designed for use in nuclear power plants with WWER type reactors. (J.B.)

  14. Process for nondestructively testing with radioactive gas using a chill set sealant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    An article surface is nondestructively tested for substantially invisible surface voids by absorbing a radioactive gas thereon. The adsorbed radioactive gas is disproportionately retained on those surfaces presented by the substantially invisible surface voids as compared to the remaining surfaces of the article contacted by the radioactive gas. The radiation released by the radioactive gas remaining adsorbed is used to identify the substantially invisible voids. To immobilize the radioactive gas adjacent or within the surface voids, a sealant composition is provided which is capable of being chill set. The temperatures of the article surface to be tested and the sealant composition are then related so that the article surface is at a temperature below the chill set temperature of the sealant composition and the sealant composition is at a temperature above its chill set temperature. The article portion to be tested is then coated with sealant composition to form a chill set coating thereon of substantially uniform thickness. (U.S.)

  15. Application of functionalized calixarenes to the processing of radioactive effluents by supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Clement

    1994-01-01

    In a first part, this research thesis presents the general context of nuclear waste processing (nature of wastes to be processed, characteristics of the used method and products), and proposes an overview of results obtained during previous campaigns which were based on the use of the technique of supported liquid membranes, but with other types of extracting components. The second part focuses on the tracking of complexing and extractive properties of all functionalized calixarenes which had been synthesised by different research teams. Several experiments have been performed to determine the extraction efficiency and selectivity of these organic compounds with respect to the studied radio-elements. The third part reports the detailed study of a specific family of functionalized calixarenes for which two thermodynamic models of membrane transport described in the literature have been applied. Validity limits are discussed with respect to operation conditions. Some results are finally given on the caesium and actinide (neptunium, plutonium) decontamination of synthetic concentrates which simulate actual radioactive wastes [fr

  16. Potential of radioactive and other waste disposals on the continental margin by natural dispersal processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, W.B.F.; Farre, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Mass wasting, an erosional process, has recently been active at deepwater waste disposal sites on the mid-Atlantic margin of the United States. On the continental slope there is a subsea drainage network consisting of canyons, gullies, and chutes, and there are meandering channels, erosional scars, and debris aprons present on the continental rise. Fresh-looking blocks of 40 to 45 million-year-old marl and chalk (from cobble to boulder size) are strewn among canisters of low-level radioactive wastes. Some of the blocks have traveled from their original place of deposition for distances in excess of 170 km. Waste containers on the continental slope and rise cannot be considered to be disposed of permanently. The drainage network of the slope provides a natural process for collecting wastes over a catchment area, and for concentrating it with interim storage in canyons. Erosion by slumping, sliding, and debris flows ultimately will transport the wastes from the continental slope and disperse it over potentially large areas on the continental rise and abyssal plain. If it is desirable that the wastes be buried in the seafloor and isolated from the environment, then the continental slope and rise are not attractive repositories. If, however, it is deemed beneficial that the wastes ultimately be dispersed over a wide area, then the continental slope could be used as a disposal site

  17. Initialization of Safety Assessment Process for the Croatian Radioactive Waste repository on Trgovska gora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokner, V.; Levanat, I.; Subasic, D.

    2000-01-01

    An iterative process of safety assessment, presently focusing on the site-specific evaluation of the post-closure phase for the prospective LILW repository on Trgovska gora in Croatia, has recently been initiated. The primary aim of the first assessment iterations is to provide the experts involved, the regulators and the general public with a reasonable assurance that the applicable long term performance and safety objectives can be met. Another goal is to develop a sufficient understanding of the system behavior to support decisions about the site investigation, the facility design, the waste acceptance criteria and the closure conditions. In this initial phase, the safety assessment is structured in a manner following closely methodology of the ISAM. The International Programme for Improving Long Term Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities the IAEA coordinated research program started in 1997. Results of the safety assessment first iteration will be organized and presented in the form of a preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR), expected to be completed in the second part of the year 2000. As the first report on the initiated safety assessment activities, the PSAR will describe the concept and aims of the assessment process. Particular emphasis will be placed on description of the key elements of a safety assessment approach by: a) defining the assessment context; b) providing description of the disposal system; c) developing and justifying assessment scenarios; d) formulating and implementing models; and e) interpreting the scoping calculations. (author)

  18. Industries processing naturally occurring radioactive materials: twenty years of emission data in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzi, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the dose assessment of discharges to air of two industries processing NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials) in the Netherlands. An industrial plant producing elemental phosphorus (thermal process, unique within Europe) reports since 1987 its emission data to the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (VROM: Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment). This plant accounts for the highest release of Po-210 to air in the Netherlands, with a yearly average of approximately 500 GBq. Other significant NORM discharges to air arise from an industrial plant with blast-furnaces for steel production. Yearly discharges fall under permit, and are reported, since 1993. RIVM, the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, is tasked by the Ministry to assess the dose to the general public arising from these discharges to air. Air transport modelling is used to determine both air concentration (for inhalation exposure) and deposition rate of the radionuclides. A (conservative) committed ingestion dose is determined by modelling the uptake of radionuclides from contaminated farmland, and assuming a food basket to be fairly representative for the population of the Netherlands. Discharges to water in the Netherlands have decreased in the past twenty years, due both to the closure of two phosphoric acid plants a decade ago and the improved treatment of waste fluids by other NORM industries. The collective dose assessed from discharges to air since 1987 is presented here. (author)

  19. The development of a digital signal processing and plotting package to support testing of hazardous and radioactive material packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwigsen, J.S.; Uncapher, W.L.; Arviso, M.; Lattier, C.N.; Hankinson, M.; Cannone, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Federal regulations allow package designers to use analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing to support certification of packages used to transport hazardous or radioactive materials. In recent years, many certified packages were subjected to a combination of analysis and testing. A major part of evaluating structural or thermal package response is the collection, reduction and presentation of instrumentation measurement data. Sandia National Laboratories, under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, has developed a comprehensive analysis and plotting package (known as KAPP) that performs digital signal processing of both transient structural and thermal data integrated with a comprehensive plotting package designed to support radioactive material package testing

  20. Radiant-heat spray-calcination process for the solid fixation of radioactive waste. Part 1, Non-radioactive pilot unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allemann, R.T.; Johnson, B.M. Jr.

    1960-11-14

    The fixation of radioactive waste in a stable solid media by means of calcination of these aqueous solutions has been the subject of considerable-effort throughout the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and by atomic energy organizations in other countries. Several methods of doing this on a continuous or semi-continuous basis have been devised, and a fev have been demonstrated to be feasible for the handling of non-radioactive, or low-activity, simulated wastes. Notable among methods currently under development are: (a) batch-operated pot calcination of waste generated from reprocessing stainless steel clad fuel elements (Darex process) and Purex waste, (b) combination rotary kiln and ball mill calcination of aluminum nitrate (TBP-25 and Redox process), and (c) fluidized bed calcination of TBP-25 and Purex wastes. Although a considerable amount of engineering experience has been obtained on the calcination of dissolved salts in a fluidized bed, and the other methods have been the subjects of a great deal of study, none of them have been developed to-the extent which would rule out the desirability of further investigation of other possible methods of calcination.

  1. Removing Phosphorus from Aqueous Solutions Using Lanthanum Modified Pine Needles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianze Wang

    Full Text Available The renewable pine needles was used as an adsorbent to remove phosphorus from aqueous solutions. Using batch experiments, pine needles pretreated with alkali-isopropanol (AI failed to effectively remove phosphorus, while pine needles modified with lanthanum hydroxide (LH showed relatively high removal efficiency. LH pine needles were effective at a wide pH ranges, with the highest removal efficiency reaching approximately 85% at a pH of 3. The removal efficiency was kept above 65% using 10 mg/L phosphorus solutions at desired pH values. There was no apparent significant competitive behavior between co-existing anions of sulfate, nitrate, and chloride (SO4(2-, NO3(- and Cl(-; however, CO3(2- exhibited increased interfering behavior as concentrations increased. An intraparticle diffusion model showed that the adsorption process occurred in three phases, suggesting that a boundary layer adsorption phenomena slightly affected the adsorption process, and that intraparticle diffusion was dominant. The adsorption process was thermodynamically unfavorable and non-spontaneous; temperature increases improved phosphorus removal. Total organic carbon (TOC assays indicated that chemical modification reduced the release of soluble organic compounds from 135.6 mg/L to 7.76 mg/L. This new information about adsorption performances provides valuable information, and can inform future technological applications designed to remove phosphorus from aqueous solutions.

  2. Cerium doped lanthanum halides: fast scintillators for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selles, O.

    2006-12-01

    This work is dedicated to two recently discovered scintillating crystals: cerium doped lanthanum halides (LaCl 3 :Ce 3+ and LaBr 3 :Ce 3+ ).These scintillators exhibit interesting properties for gamma detection, more particularly in the field of medical imaging: a short decay time, a high light yield and an excellent energy resolution. The strong hygroscopicity of these materials requires adapting the usual experimental methods for determining physico-chemical properties. Once determined, these can be used for the development of the industrial manufacturing process of the crystals. A proper comprehension of the scintillation mechanism and of the effect of defects within the material lead to new possible ways for optimizing the scintillator performance. Therefore, different techniques are used (EPR, radioluminescence, laser excitation, thermally stimulated luminescence). Alongside Ce 3+ ions, self-trapped excitons are involved in the scintillation mechanism. Their nature and their role are detailed. The knowledge of the different processes involved in the scintillation mechanism leads to the prediction of the effect of temperature and doping level on the performance of the scintillator. A mechanism is proposed to explain the thermally stimulated luminescence processes that cause slow components in the light emission and a loss of light yield. Eventually the study of afterglow reveals a charge transfer to deep traps involved in the high temperature thermally stimulated luminescence. (author)

  3. Investigation of gas-phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Construction of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) was begun during World War 2 to produce enriched uranium for defense purposes. These plants, which utilized UF 6 gas, were used primarily for this purpose through 1964. From 1959 through 1968, production shifted primarily to uranium enrichment to supply the nuclear power industry. Additional UF 6 -handling facilities were built in feed and fuel-processing plants associated with the uranium enrichment process. Two of the five process buildings at Oak ridge were shut down in 1964. Uranium enrichment activities at Oak Ridge were discontinued altogether in 1985. In 1987, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to proceed with a permanent shutdown of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). DOE intends to begin decommissioning and decontamination (D ampersand D) of ORGDP early in the next century. The remaining two GDPs are expected to be shut down during the next 10 to 40 years and will also require D ampersand D, as will the other UF 6 -handling facilities. This paper presents an investigation of gas- phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping using powerful fluorinating reagents that convert nonvolatile uranium compounds to volatile UF 6 . These reagents include ClF 3 , F 2 , and other compounds. The scope of D ampersand D at the GDPs, previous work of gas-phase decontamination, four concepts for using gas-phase decontamination, plans for further study of gas-phase decontamination, and the current status of this work are discussed. 13 refs., 15 figs

  4. The Treatment of Low Level Radioactive Liquid Waste Containing Detergent by Biological Activated Sludge Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainus Salimin

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of low level radioactive liquid waste containing persil detergent from laundry operation of contaminated clothes by activated sludge process has been done, for alternative process replacing the existing treatment by evaporation. The detergent concentration in water solution from laundry operation is 14.96 g/l. After rinsing operation of clothes and mixing of laundry water solution with another liquid waste, the waste water solution contains about ≤ 1.496 g/l of detergent and 10 -3 Ci/m 3 of Cs-137 activity. The simulation waste having equivalent activity of Cs-137 10 -3 Ci/m 3 , detergent content (X) 1.496, 0.748, 0.374, 0.187, 0.1496 and 0.094 g/l on BOD value respectively 186, 115, 71, 48, 19, and 16 ppm was processed by activated sludge in reactor of 18.6 l capacity on ambient temperature. It is used Super Growth Bacteria (SGB) 102 and SGB 104, nitrogen and phosphor nutrition, and aeration. The result show that bacteria of SGB 102 and SGB 104 were able to degrade the persil detergent for attaining standard quality of water release category B in which BOD values 6 ppm. It was need 30 hours for X ≤ 0.187 g/l, 50 hours for 0.187 < X ≤ 0.374 g/l, 75 hours for 0.374 < X ≤ 0.748, and 100 hours for 0.748 < X ≤ 1.496 g/l. On the initial period the bacteria of SGB 104 interact most quickly to degrade the detergent comparing SGB 102. Biochemical oxidation process decontaminate the solution on the decontamination factor of 350, Cs-137 be concentrate in sludge by complexing with the bacteria wall until the activity of solution be become very low. (author)

  5. Evaluation of radioactive emissions of lignite-fired power plants in Turkey using the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueke, Tayfun

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive emissions of 13 lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are of great concern to the public and to scientists alike. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these power plants, according to their radioactive emissions by using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Control criteria are in particular 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 238 U emissions from the power plants. These control criteria are weighted according to the objective assessment. The calculations are repeated for three different objective assessments of control criteria namely the mortality risk coefficients for inhalation, ingestion, external exposure of 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 238 U. It has been calculated that the Can lignite-fired power plant is ranking first while the Soma-B plant is ranking last according to the radioactive emissions of the power plants when the average of three different objective control criteria are used in the calculations. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of radioactive emissions of lignite-fired power plants in Turkey using the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueke, Tayfun [Mugla Sitki Kocman Univ., Mugla (Turkey). Dept. of Energy Systems Engineering

    2013-11-15

    Radioactive emissions of 13 lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are of great concern to the public and to scientists alike. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these power plants, according to their radioactive emissions by using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Control criteria are in particular {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 238}U emissions from the power plants. These control criteria are weighted according to the objective assessment. The calculations are repeated for three different objective assessments of control criteria namely the mortality risk coefficients for inhalation, ingestion, external exposure of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 238}U. It has been calculated that the Can lignite-fired power plant is ranking first while the Soma-B plant is ranking last according to the radioactive emissions of the power plants when the average of three different objective control criteria are used in the calculations. (orig.)

  7. Effects of cooking process on the changes of concentration and total amount of radioactive caesium in beef, wild plants and fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabeshi, Hiromi; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Rieko; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Hachisuka, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    In order to obtain information about effects of the cooking process on the changes of concentration and amount of radioactive materials in foods, we determined the concentration of radioactive caesium in several foods such as beef, edible wild plants, blueberries and mushrooms, before and after cooking. Our results showed that drying after soaking in liquid seasoning and the removal of astringent taste were effective in removing radioactive caesium from foods. More than 80% of radioactive caesium could be removed by these cooking methods. These results suggest that cooking processes such as boiling and soaking in liquid seasoning or water are effective to remove radioactive caesium from foods. Moreover, appropriate food additives such as baking soda were useful to promote the removal of radioactive caesium from foods. On the other hand, simple drying, jam making, grilling and tempura cooking could not remove radioactive caesium from foods. In addition, we showed that the concentration of radioactive caesium in foods was raised after simple drying, although the amount of radioactive caesium was unchanged. It would be necessary to monitor radioactive caesium concentration in processed foods because they might have undergone dehydration by cooking, which could result in concentrations exceeding regulatory levels. (author)

  8. The regulatory action in the problem of radioactive sources processed as scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, Walter Adrian; Cateriano, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-01

    The loss of control of a radioactive source can result in a radiological emergency, especially if that source is treated as scrap. This paper presents a case registered in Argentina about discovery of a radioactive source of Kr-85, 9.25 GBq, used in a computer for industrial measurement of thickness. The radioactive source, without registration or identification, was registered by a portal for detection of radioactive material in the middle of the scrap that entered daily in the oven of a important steel company. From there, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (RNA) conducted an investigation to determine the origin of the radioactive source, and in parallel made, in the laboratories of measurement, identification of radioactive material inside the source. This led to a company in financial and judicial bankruptcy, which had not notified the RNA about this situation, and also possessed, according to records, other eleven sources with similar characteristics. Finally the actions and regulatory effort allowed the localization of all the radioactive sources of this company, and its storage and deposit in an authorised repository

  9. Processes give selection location like fundamental approach gives the security for the repositories radioactive waste (radioactive installation) in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta Vidal, J.L.; Gil Castillo, R.O.; Chales Suarez, G.; Rodriguez Reyes, A.

    1998-01-01

    On the base for the best international practice, the requirements given by the IAEA, specialized national experience, the technician economic conditions and social matters give Cuba, it has been documented in the country the process the documented location for evacuation and storage the worn-out fuel lingeringly

  10. Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M.; Takeda, M.; Makino, M.; Owada, T.; Miyagi, I.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive materials from the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP) in March 2011 spread over a large area, increasing the atmospheric electric conductivity by their ionizing effect, and reducing the vertical (downward) component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG). PG data at Kakioka, 150 km away from the FNPP, showed independent changes compared to the radiation dose rate, and a comparison of these data revealed the local dynamics of the radioactive dust. (1) The initial drop of the PG to almost zero during 14-15 March is most likely due to radioactive dust suspended in the air near the ground during cloudy weather. (2) An episode of PG increase to more than 50 V m-1 on 16 March is most likely due to the re-suspension of the radioactive dust from the surface and subsequent removal from Kakioka by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3) Low but finite values of the PG during 16-20 March most likely reflect a reduced amount of radioactive material near the ground after the above wind transported away the majority of the suspended radioactive dust. (4) Very low values of the PG after substantial rain on 20-22 March most likely reflect settlement of the radioactive material by rain-induced fallout. (5) Temporal recovery of daily variations from the end of March to the middle of April with low nighttime fair-weather baseline PG most likely reflects re-suspension of the radioactive dust into the air from the ground and trees, and subsequent transport to the other region or fallout to the ground until late April. (6) Weakening of the daily variation and gradual recovery of the nighttime fair-weather baseline after mid-April suggests a complete settlement of the radioactive material to the ground with partial migration to the subsurface.

  11. Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive materials from the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP in March 2011 spread over a large area, increasing the atmospheric electric conductivity by their ionizing effect, and reducing the vertical (downward component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG. PG data at Kakioka, 150 km away from the FNPP, showed independent changes compared to the radiation dose rate, and a comparison of these data revealed the local dynamics of the radioactive dust. (1 The initial drop of the PG to almost zero during 14–15 March is most likely due to radioactive dust suspended in the air near the ground during cloudy weather. (2 An episode of PG increase to more than 50 V m−1 on 16 March is most likely due to the re-suspension of the radioactive dust from the surface and subsequent removal from Kakioka by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3 Low but finite values of the PG during 16–20 March most likely reflect a reduced amount of radioactive material near the ground after the above wind transported away the majority of the suspended radioactive dust. (4 Very low values of the PG after substantial rain on 20–22 March most likely reflect settlement of the radioactive material by rain-induced fallout. (5 Temporal recovery of daily variations from the end of March to the middle of April with low nighttime fair-weather baseline PG most likely reflects re-suspension of the radioactive dust into the air from the ground and trees, and subsequent transport to the other region or fallout to the ground until late April. (6 Weakening of the daily variation and gradual recovery of the nighttime fair-weather baseline after mid-April suggests a complete settlement of the radioactive material to the ground with partial migration to the subsurface.

  12. Radiation sources and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honious, H.B.; Janzow, E.F.; Malson, H.A.; Moyer, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to radiation sources comprising a substrate having an electrically-conductive non-radioactive metal surface, a layer of a metal radioactive isotope of the scandium group, which in addition to scandium, yttrium, lanthanum and actinium, includes all the lanthanide and actinide series of elements, with the actinide series usually being preferred because of the nature of the radioactive isotopes therein, particularly americium-241, curium-244, plutonium-238, californium-252 and promethium-147, and a non-radioactive bonding metal codeposited on the surface by electroplating the isotope and bonding metal from an electrolytic solution, the isotope being present in the layer in minor amount as compared to the bonding metal, and with or without a non-radioactive protective metal coating covering the isotoype and bonding metal on the surface, the coating being sufficiently thin to permit radiation to pass through the coating. The invention also relates to a process for providing radiation sources comprising codepositing a layer of the metal radioactive isotope with a non-radioactive bonding metal from an electrolytic solution in which the isotope is present in minor molar amount as compared to the bonding metal such that the codeposited layer contains a minor molar amount of the isotope compared to the bonding metal by electroplating on an electrically-conductive non-radioactive metal surface of a cathode substrate, and with or without depositing a nonradioactive protective metal coating over the isotope and bonding metal on the surface, the coating being sufficiently thin to permit radiation to pass through the coating

  13. Characterization of waste products prepared from radioactive contaminated clayey soil cemented according to the GEODUR process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodersen, K.; Vinther, A.

    1990-11-01

    Radioactive contaminated soil may arise due to accidents of various types or may be detected during decommisioning of nuclear installations. Ordinary surface soil cannot normally be conditioned using conventional cementation processes since the content of humic materials retards or prevents the solidification. An additive available from the Danish firm Geodur A/S makes it possible to circumvent this difficulty and to produce a monolithic, nondusting waste type using rather small amounts of cement. The report describes work on characterization of such a cemented waste product prepared on basis of clayey top soil from the Risoe area. The claimed advantages of the process was verified, and data for the compression strength (low), hydraulic conductivity (satisfactory) and other pore structure-related properties are given for the obtained products. Unfortunately the behaviour of cesium and strontium, representing two of the most relevant radionuclides, was not too promising. The retention of cesium is satisfactory, but less good than for the untreated soil. Greatly improved cesium retention after drying of the materials was noticed. Good retention of strontium is only obtained after reaction of the material with carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The behaviour of the two isotopes in other types of cemented waste is somewhat similar, but the decrease in retention compared with untreated soil makes the process less interesting as a possibility for remedial actions after accidents, etc. Some further studies of the cemented soil waste are beeing made within the frame of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Studies. Elements forming low solublity components in the high pH environment in the cemented soil will probably be retained quite efficiently. This was demonstrated in case of Zn. (author) 11 tabs., 22 ills., 8 refs

  14. Microbial degradation processes in radioactive waste repository and in nuclear fuel storage areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram, J.H.; Rogers, R.D.; Gazso, L.G.

    1997-01-01

    The intent of the workshop organizers was to convene experts in the fields of corrosion and spent nuclear fuels. The major points which evolved from the interaction of microbiologists, material scientists, and fuel storage experts are as follows: Corrosion of basin components as well as fuel containers or cladding is occurring; Water chemistry monitoring, if done in the storage facility does not take into account the microbial component; Microbial influenced corrosion is an area that many have not considered to be an important contributor in the aging of metallurgical materials especially those exposed to a radiation field; Many observations indicate that there is a microbial or biological presence in the storage facilities but these observations have not been correlated with any deterioration or aging phenomena taking place in the storage facility; The sessions on the fundamentals of microbial influenced corrosion and biofilm pointed out that these phenomena are real, occurring on similar materials in other industries and probably are occurring in the wet storage of spent fuel; All agreed that more monitoring, testing, and education in the field of biological mediate processes be performed and financially supported; Loosing the integrity of fuel assemblies can only cause problems, relating to the future disposition of the fuel, safety concerns, and environmental issues; In other rad waste scenarios, biological processes may be playing a role, for instance in the mobility of radionuclides in soil, decomposition of organic materials of the rad waste, gas production, etc. The fundamental scientific presentations discussed the full gamut of microbial processes that relate to biological mediated effects on metallic and non-metallic materials used in the storage and containment of radioactive materials

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Lanthanum Carbonate Octahydrate for the Treatment of Hyperphosphatemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anqi He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a new approach to prepare lanthanum carbonate via reactions between lanthanum chloride and NaHCO3. In the reaction, small amount of NaHCO3 solution was firstly added to the acidic lanthanum chloride solution to generate lanthanum carbonate nuclei and then NaHCO3 is added to the lanthanum chloride at a constant speed. This approach makes both precipitation reaction and neutralization reaction take place simultaneously. Consequently, lanthanum carbonate is produced at low pH environment (pH below 4.0 so that the risk of generating lanthanum carbonate hydroxide is reduced. The product of the above reaction is validated by EDTA titration, elemental analysis, and XRD characterization. In addition, we established a FTIR spectroscopic method to identify La(OHCO3 from La2(CO32·8H2O. Lanthanum carbonate exhibits considerable ability to bind phosphate.

  16. Mechanical properties of dense to porous alumina/lanthanum hexaaluminate composite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negahdari, Zahra; Willert-Porada, Monika; Pfeiffer, Carolin

    2010-01-01

    For development of new composite materials based on lanthanum hexaaluminate and alumina ceramics, a better understanding of the microstructure-properties relationship is essential. In this paper, attention was focused on the evaluation of mechanical properties of lanthanum hexaaluminate/alumina particulate composite. It was found out that the lanthanum hexaaluminate content plays a critical role in determination of the microstructure and mechanical properties of the composite ceramics. In situ formation of plate-like lanthanum hexaaluminate in the ceramic matrix was accompanied with formation of pores so that the microstructure shifted from dense to porous. Increasing the lanthanum hexaaluminate content up to a certain value enhanced the fracture toughness, increased the hardness, and increased the elastic modulus of the composite materials. Further increase in the lanthanum hexaaluminate content degraded the hardness as well as the elastic modulus of composite ceramics. The influence of lanthanum hexaaluminate on mechanical properties was described by means of microstructure, porosity, and intrinsic characteristics of lanthanum hexaaluminate.

  17. Molten salt synthesis of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Zongying; Xing Xianran; Li Lu; Xu Yeming

    2008-01-01

    Lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (Pb 0.95 La 0.03 )(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 (PLZT) was synthesized by one step molten salt method with the starting materials of PbC 2 O 4 , La 2 O 3 , ZrO(NO 3 ) 2 .2H 2 O and TiO 2 in the NaCl-KCl eutectic mixtures in the temperature range of 700-1000 deg. C. The single phase of (Pb 0.95 La 0.03 )(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 powders was prepared at a temperature as low as 850 deg. C for 5 h. The effects of process parameters, such as soaking temperature and time, salt species, and the amount of flux with respect to the starting materials were investigated. The growth process of the PLZT particles in the molten salt undergoes a transition from a diffusion controlled mechanism to an interfacial reaction controlled mechanism at 900 deg. C

  18. Corrosion of Alloy 690 process pot by sulfate containing high level radioactive waste at feed stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, P.; Soudamini, N.; Kaushik, C.P.; Jagannath; Mishra, R.K.; Kale, G.B.; Raj, K.; Das, D.; Sharma, B.P.

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of Alloy 690 process pot to sulfate containing high level radioactive waste leads to (a) depletion of Cr from the alloy, (b) intergranular attack and (c) building up of Cr 2 O 3 -Ni 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 mixed oxide surface layer containing Na and Cs sulfate precipitates. Time dependence of material loss from Alloy 690 is found to follow a linear relationship of the type Δw (material loss) = -7.05 + 0.05t. Corrosion rate calculated for 2400 h exposure is 3.66 mpy. Cr and Ni leach rates obtained for the same sample are 1.61 g m -2 d -1 and 2.52 g m -2 d -1 , respectively. Ni leach rates followed a linear time dependence relationship of the type dNL Ni /dt (leach rate) = -0.09 + 0.027t, whereas Cr leach rates obeyed a non-linear relationship of the type dNL Cr /dt (leach rate) = 0.241 + 0.027t - 1.33 x 10 -4 t 1/2

  19. The used epoxy matrix in immobilization sludge process of alpha emitter radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walman, E.; Salimin, Z.; Johan, B.

    1998-01-01

    Immobilization of alpha emitter radioactive waste containing of ion complex of uranyl carbonate on uranium concentration ≤ 50 mg/l has been carried out using epoxy matrix. The first step of process is the coagulation of uranium with 1.3 mole/l of Ca(OH) 2 coagulant concentration on pH 8 to precipitate the calcium uranyl carbonate on uranium concentration ≤ g/l. The immobilization of calcium uranyl carbonate with epoxy matrix was done on variation of the ratio of resin epoxy and hardener of 1 : 1 (giving the maximum value of density and compressive strength), the increasing of precipitate loading capacity give the decreasing of compressive strength of embedded waste. The test of compressive strength and leaching was done for the embedded waste after its curing time using Paul Weber equipment and 7 days immersion of samples in normal water. On the precipitate loading capacity of 70%, the quality of embedded waste still conform to the standard quality value i.e. density 1.2 g/cm 3 , compressive strength 10 kN/cm 2 and there is not any release of radionuclide during leaching test (undetectable).. (author)

  20. The removal of 134Cs from radioactive process waste water by coprecipitate flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.; Shakir, K.; Benyamin, K.

    1986-01-01

    The coprecipitate flotation of 134 Cs from radioactive process waste water using copper ferrocyanide as a coprecipitating agent and sodium lauryl sulphate, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide or gelatin as collector was extensively investigated to establish the best conditions for caesium removal with each of the collectors under test. The investigated parameters include the collector dosage, the Cu 2+ /Fe(CN) 6 4- ratio, the caesium, potassium, sodium and calcium ion concentrations, the ageing time period of the Cu 2+ - Fe(CN) 6 4- - 134 Cs - water system and the bubbling time duration. The results indicate that copper ferrocyanide has a high affinity for caesium and can preferentially co-precipitate it in presence of relatively high amounts of other alkali or alkaline earth cations. For the alkali metals the affinity increases in the order Na < K < Cs. Under the optimal conditions removals higher than 99% could be achieved with any of the tested collectors. The results are discussed in terms of the ion exchange properties of copper ferrocyanide and collector behaviour. Advantages of the coflotation technique over other methods are enumerated. (Auth.)

  1. The impact on environment and population of the sands with radioactive heavy minerals processing activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurelian, F.; Popescu, M.; Georgescu, D.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a case study concerning the impact on environment and population of a Pilot Station, which was used between 1970 and 1996 to obtain mono-mineral concentrates (ilmenite, zircon, garnet, rutile, monazite) by processing alluvial and seashore sands. The processing technological flow sheet was constituted only of physical separation processes, where were operating equipments such as shaking tables, electric and magnetic separators, attrition equipments, etc. The paper is structured on three levels and presents: - A brief description of the Pilot Station activity, sand types processed and its physical, chemical and mineralogic characteristics. The obtained products were: garnets with 10 ppm uranium and 60 ppm thorium, ilmenite with 10 ppm uranium and 20 ppm thorium, zircon with 450 ppm uranium and 750 ppm thorium and monazite with 3,000 ppm uranium and 20,000 ppm thorium. The sterile accumulated during the Pilot Station functioning time is also characterized. - The impact of the Pilot Station activity on environment (soil, air). The contamination sources are identified and characterized. The only one contamination pathway is represented by 'radioactive dust' resulted from the sands processing activity. The contamination processes are explained and justified. The contaminated soil surface was investigated through: gamma rate doses determination (at the surface and on a depth o f up to 40 cm), measurement of Rn 222 + Rn 220 concentration at one meter distance from the surface and for 40 cm soil depth, analysis of uranium, radium and thorium for samples collected from a soil depth ranging between 10 and 40 cm. There were elaborated maps showing gamma rate doses distribution and the specific activity for the surface as well as for the different soil depths. It was established the contamination level and its value was compared to the ones stipulated by Romanian Nuclear Authority norms, namely 0.2 Bq/g for the specific activity (Ra 226 + Th 232) and 0.3

  2. Processing method of radiation concrete waste and manufacturing method for radioactive waste solidifying filling mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukekiyo, Mitsuaki; Okamoto, Masamichi

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive concrete wastes are crushed and pulverized. Fine solid granular materials caused by the pulverization are classified and the grain size is controlled so that the maximum grain size is 2.5mm, with the grains having a grain size of up to 0.15mm being up to 30% by weight to form fine aggregates. Separated and recovered fine concrete powders are classified and the size of the powder is controlled within a range of from 3,000 to 15,000cm 2 /g which is smaller than cement particles to form fine powders having a stable quality suitable as a mixing agent. The fine aggregates and the mixing agent are mixed to form a filling mortar (filler) for solidifying radioactive wastes. The filling mortar is filled together with other radioactive wastes in a drum to form a waste body in a drum. With such a constitution, crushed radioactive concrete wastes can be reutilized completely. (I.N.)

  3. Devoluming method of acidic radioactive liquid waste and processing system therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takamori; Honda, Tadahiro

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes such as liquid wastes discharged from chemical decontamination (containing free acids, metal salts dissolved in acids, not-dissolved iron rust and radioactive metals) are introduced to an acid recovering device using a diffusion permeation membrane and separated to a deacidified liquid and separated acid liquid. The separated acid liquid mainly comprising free acids is recovered to a tank for recovered acids, and used repeatedly for removing crud. The deacidified liquid mainly comprising salts is concentrated in a reverse osmosis membrane (RO) concentration device. RO concentrated liquid containing radioactive metals is dried, and salts are decomposed in a drying/salt-decomposing device and separated into metal oxides and a mixed gas of an acidic gas and steams. The gas is cooled in an acid absorbing device and recovered as free acids. The metal oxides containing radioactive metals are solidified. (I.N.)

  4. Licensing process for the installation of radioactive waste treatment by plasma technology in Kozloduy NPP (Bulgaria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Martinez, S.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this project, which lasted approximately four years, is to have a facility for reduction volume of radioactive waste and waste generated during the decommissioning of the four units that have completed its operational life.

  5. Proceeding of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research of Nuclear Science and Technology: Book II. Nuclear Chemistry, Process Technology, and Radioactive Waste Processing and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The proceeding contains papers presented on Scientific Meeting and Presentation on on Basic Research of Nuclear Science and Technology, held in Yogyakarta, 25-27 April 1995. This proceeding is second part of two books published for the meeting contains papers on nuclear chemistry, process technology, and radioactive waste management and environment. There are 62 papers indexed individually. (ID)

  6. Effect of Radioactivity of Technetium-99m on the Autosterilization Process of non-sterile Tetrofosmin Kits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyastuti Widyastuti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Technetium-99m labeled radiopharmaceutical is commonly used in nuclear medicines as a diagnostic agent, by mixing the sterile kit with Tc-99m. Manufacturing of kits requires an aseptic facility which need to be well designed and maintained according to cGMP, since mostly kits can not be terminally sterilized. Radiopharmaceuticals as pharmaceuticals containing radionuclide is assumed to have an autosterilization property, but correlation between radioactivity and capability of killing microorganisms has to be studied so far. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of radioactivity on the autosterilization process of radiopharmaceuticals. The study was carried out by adding Tc-99m of various radioactivity into non-sterile tetrofosmin kits, then the samples were tested for sterility. Sterile tetrofosmin kit and non-sterile kit with no Tc-99m added will be used as a negative control and positive control respectively. The sterility was tested using standard direct inoculation method, by inoculating samples in culture media for both bacteria and fungi and observing qualitatively within 14 days. The results showed that the samples with radioactivity of 1, 3 and 5 mCi changed the clarity of the media to turbid, conformed with the performance of positive controls but samples with radioactivity of 10 mCi and 20 mCi did not change the clarity of the media, conformed with the performance of negative control, indicating neither growth of bacteria nor fungi. It is concluded that Tc-99m behaves as an autosterilizing agent at certain radioactivity. Therefore the preparation of Tc-99m radiopharmaceutical can be considered as terminal sterilization rather than aseptic preparation.

  7. Treatment of Medical Radioactive Liquid Waste Using Forward Osmosis (FO) Membrane Process

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Songbok

    2018-04-07

    The use of forward osmosis (FO) for concentrating radioactive liquid waste from radiation therapy rooms in hospitals was systematically investigated in this study. The removal of natural and radioactive iodine using FO was first investigated with varying pHs and draw solutions (DSs) to identify the optimal conditions for FO concentration. Results showed that FO had a successful rejection rate for both natural and radioactive iodine (125I) of up to 99.3%. This high rejection rate was achieved at a high pH, mainly due to electric repulsion between iodine and membrane. Higher iodine removal by FO was also attained with a DS that exhibits a reverse salt flux (RSF) adequate to hinder iodine transport. Following this, actual radioactive medical liquid waste was collected and concentrated using FO under these optimal conditions. The radionuclides in the medical waste (131I) were removed effectively, but the water recovery rate was limited due to severe membrane fouling. To enhance the recovery rate, hydraulic washing was applied, but this had only limited success due to combined organic-inorganic fouling of the FO membrane. Finally, the effect of FO concentration on the reduction of septic tank volume was simulated as a function of recovery rate. To our knowledge, this study is the first attempt to explore the potential of FO technology for treating radioactive waste, and thus could be expanded to the dewatering of the radioactive liquid wastes from a variety of sources, such as nuclear power plants.

  8. Decommissioning of evaporation technology for processing liquid radioactive waste in UJV Rez, a. s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tous, M.; Otcovsky, T.; Podlaha, J.

    2015-01-01

    The UJV Rez, a. s. is the main leader in processing institutional radioactive waste (RAW) in the Czech Republic and the Waste Management Department has been established since the research reactor VVR-S (now LVR-15) was put in operation. Due to the large activities in nuclear research and engineering in the past, a big capacity of waste management technologies was needed. The low pressure compactor for volume reduction of solid RAW, as well as chemical pre-treatment technology of liquid RAW were installed and later the evaporation technology for effective processing the liquid RAW with the cementation and bituminization unit for final conditioning of concentrated liquid RAW were used. During the years of research reactor operation and research activities in UJV Rez, a. s. there were two installed evaporation technologies in row. After the latest evaporator lifetime, changes in liquid RAW production and together with higher decontamination factor requirements, this technology was decided to be decommissioned. The decommissioned evaporation technology was installed and put in operation in 1991. This technology was used for processing liquid aqueous RAW produced from internal research activities and of course for external producers and institutions (e.g. universities, medicine, research institutes, industry). The approved decommissioning plan was prepared and the licence for immediate decommissioning was obtained in 2012. Then the decommissioning project started. The preparing stages as dosimetric survey, expected material balance and of course initial decontamination activities were performed. Evaporation technology dismantling and processing the arising RAW were done by the internal staff of Waste Management Department. The total volume of produced RAW was 49,5 m 3 of RAW. The secondary liquid RAW (from decontamination) of amount 1,4 m 3 , contaminated sludge of amount 0,5 m 3 , solid RAW (construction steel) of amount 39,1 m 3 , solid compressible RAW (protective

  9. Cytocompatibility of a free machining titanium alloy containing lanthanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, Frank; Siemers, Carsten; Willumeit, Regine; Rösler, Joachim

    2009-09-01

    Titanium alloys like Ti6Al4V are widely used in medical engineering. However, the mechanical and chemical properties of titanium alloys lead to poor machinability, resulting in high production costs of medical products. To improve the machinability of Ti6Al4V, 0.9% of the rare earth element lanthanum (La) was added. The microstructure, the mechanical, and the corrosion properties were determined. Lanthanum containing alloys exhibited discrete particles of cubic lanthanum. The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance were slightly decreased but are still sufficient for many applications in the field of medical engineering. In vitro experiments with mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7) and human bone-derived cells (MG-63, HBDC) were performed and revealed that macrophages showed a dose response below and above a LaCl3 concentration of 200 microM, while MG-63 and HBDC tolerated three times higher concentrations without reduction of viability. The viability of cells cultured on disks of the materials showed no differences between the reference and the lanthanum containing alloy. We therefore propose that lanthanum containing alloy appears to be a good alternative for biomedical applications, where machining of parts is necessary.

  10. Microbial processes relevant for the long-term performance of radioactive waste repositories in clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meleshyn, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A number of investigations on occurrence and viability of microbes in compacted clays have been aimed at studying possible microbial effects on long-term performance of a deep geological repository (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SF). Compacted clays are considered in current DGR designs either as a buffer material or as a host rock. The primary purpose of the present work was to qualitatively evaluate the relevance of microbial activity for the long-term performance of a DGR and to identify which safety-relevant processes and properties can be potentially influenced by this activity. The present analysis identified eight clay properties essential for maintaining safety functions of containment and retardation of the disposal system - swelling pressure, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, anion sorption capacity, porosity, permeability, fluid pressure, plasticity - which can potentially be influenced by microbial processes in clay buffer and Clay-stone within a DGR for HLW/SF. Iron(III)- and sulphate-reducing, fermentative, methane-producing and oxidizing microbes can be considered to be present in any clay formation. Each habitat includes a massive number of microbial niches with perhaps only a small proportion of the species being metabolically active at the habitat's conditions, the remainder becoming not extinct. Moreover, clays contain electron donors and electron acceptors in amounts sufficient for these microbes to remain active during very long periods of time. Additional sources of electron donors or electron acceptors will inevitably be added to the repository system as a result of DGR excavation, placement of radioactive waste as well as backfilling and sealing of the DGR. In no case should the potential impact of microbes be underestimated based on a possible argument of comparably low biomass of the microbes in contact with metal surfaces or dissolved

  11. Lanthanum manganate based cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhl Joergensen, M.

    2001-07-01

    Composite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The aim was to study the oxygen reduction process in the electrode in order to minimise the voltage drop in the cathode. The electrodes contained a composite layer made from lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM) and yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) and a layer of pure LSM aimed for current collection. The performance of the composite electrodes was sensitive to microstructure and thickness. Further, the interface between the composite and the current collecting layer proved to affect the performance. In a durability study severe deg-radation of the composite electrodes was found when passing current through the electrode for 2000 hours at 1000 deg. C. This was ascribed to pore formation along the composite interfaces and densification of the composite and current collector microstructure. An evaluation of the measurement approach indicated that impedance spectroscopy is a very sensitive method. This affects the reproducibility, as small undesirable variations in for instance the microstructure from electrode to electrode may change the impedance. At least five processes were found to affect the impedance of LSM/YSZ composite electrodes. Two high frequency processes were ascribed to transport of oxide ions/oxygen intermediates across LSM/YSZ interfaces and through YSZ in the composite. Several competitive elementary reaction steps, which appear as one medium frequency process in the impedance spectra, were observed. A low frequency arc related to gas diffusion limitation in a stagnant gas layer above the composite structure was detected. Finally, an inductive process, assumed to be connected to an activation process involving segregates at the triple phase boundary between electrode, electrolyte and gas phase, was found. (au)

  12. Europium-Doped Lanthanum Hafnate Nanoparticles: Structure, Photoluminescence, and Radioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Kareem; Pokhrel, Madhab; Mao, Yuanbing

    Due to their novel physical properties, nanostructured phosphors are of interest for radiation-based imaging and therapeutics. Herein, the structural and luminescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum hafnate (La2Hf2O7:xmol%Eu3+, x = 0 - 35) nanoparticles are investigated for use as scintillators. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy confirm samples prepared through a combined co-precipitation and low-temperature molten salt synthetic process homogenously form spherical nanocrystals of 36 nm in the ordered pyrochlore phase. Ultraviolet and X-ray excitation of these samples induce strong red emissions in the 580 - 590 and 612 - 630 nm range corresponding to the 5D0->7 F1 magnetic dipole and 5D0->7 F2 electric dipole transitions of Eu3+. Optical response and quantum yield are optimized at 5% Eu3+; a proposed trade-off between quenching mechanisms (defect-states/cross-relaxation) and dopant concentration is discussed. Owing to their high density, large effective atomic number, and bright luminescence, these La2Hf2O7:xmol%Eu3+ nanoparticles warrant further investigation for scintillator applications. The authors thank the support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense (award #HDTRA1- 10-1-0114).

  13. Tm3+ activated lanthanum phosphate: a blue PDP phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma display panels (PDPs) are gaining attention due to their high performance and scalability as a medium for large format TVs. The performance and life of a PDP strongly depends upon the nature of phosphors. Currently, Eu 2+ activated barium magnesium aluminate (BAM) is being used as a blue component. Because of its low life, efforts are being made to explore new blue emitting phosphors. One of the alternatives to BAM is Tm 3+ activated lanthanum phosphate (LPTM) phosphor. LPTM phosphor samples are prepared by a solid-state as well as sol-gel process in presence of flux. The phosphor of the present investigation, having uniform and spherical shape particles in the range of 0.1-2 μm, is appropriate for thin phosphor screens required for PDP applications. It exhibits a narrow band emission in the blue region, peaking at 452 nm and also a number of narrow bands in the UV region when excited by 147 and 173 nm radiation from a xenon gas mixture. Various possible transitions responsible for UV and visible emission from Tm 3+ ion are presented. These phosphors also exhibit good color saturation and better stability when excited with VUV radiation. To achieve higher brightness, they are blended with other UV excited blue emitting phosphors such as BAM. Results related to morphology, excitation, after glow decay, emission and degradation of these phosphors in the powder form as well as in plasma display panels are presented and discussed

  14. Mechanical properties of lanthanum and yttrium chromites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulik, S.W.; Armstrong, T.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In an operating high-temperature (1000{degrees}C) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the interconnect separates the fuel (P(O{sub 2}){approx}10{sup -16} atm) and the oxidant (P(O2){approx}10{sup 0.2} atm), while being electrically conductive and connecting the cells in series. Such severe atmospheric and thermal demands greatly reduce the number of viable candidate materials. Only two materials, acceptor substituted lanthanum chromite and yttrium chromite, meet these severe requirements. In acceptor substituted chromites (Sr{sup 2+} or Ca{sup 2+} for La{sup 3+}), charge compensation is primarily electronic in oxidizing conditions (through the formation of Cr{sup 4+}). Under reducing conditions, ionic charge compensation becomes significant as the lattice becomes oxygen deficient. The formation of oxygen vacancies is accompanied by the reduction of Cr{sup 4+} ions to Cr{sup 3+} and a resultant lattice expansion. The lattice expansion observed in large chemical potential gradients is not desirable and has been found to result in greatly reduced mechanical strength.

  15. Synthesis and stability of lanthanum superhydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geballe, Zachary M.; Liu, Hanyu; Mishra, Ajay K.; Ahart, Muhtar; Somayazulu, Maddury; Baldini, Maria [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Meng, Yue [HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, IL (United States); Hemley, Russell J. [Institute of Materials Science and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Recent theoretical calculations predict that megabar pressure stabilizes very hydrogen-rich simple compounds having new clathrate-like structures and remarkable electronic properties including room-temperature superconductivity. X-ray diffraction and optical studies demonstrate that superhydrides of lanthanum can be synthesized with La atoms in an fcc lattice at 170 GPa upon heating to about 1000 K. The results match the predicted cubic metallic phase of LaH{sub 10} having cages of thirty-two hydrogen atoms surrounding each La atom. Upon decompression, the fcc-based structure undergoes a rhombohedral distortion of the La sublattice. The superhydride phases consist of an atomic hydrogen sublattice with H-H distances of about 1.1 Aa, which are close to predictions for solid atomic metallic hydrogen at these pressures. With stability below 200 GPa, the superhydride is thus the closest analogue to solid atomic metallic hydrogen yet to be synthesized and characterized. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Optical and photoemission studies of lanthanum hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, D.J.; Peterson, D.T.; Weaver, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The results of optical absorptivity and photoemission measurements on lanthanum hydrides, LaH/sub x/ (1.98 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 2.89) are reported. The low energy (hν less than or equal to 0.5 eV) optical features in LaH/sub x/ are attributed to the filling of octahedral sites. Higher energy interband absorption involves states within the d-band complex, analogous to other dihydrides. As x increases above 2.0, the optical features change rapidly due to the increase in the number of occupied octahedral sites. Various band structure studies suggest that LaH 3 might be a semiconductor. Photoemission results show that as x increases, the d-derived states at E/sub F/ are drawn down and that for LaH 2 89 only very weak valence band emission is observed. The hydrogen-derived bonding bands are shown centered approx. 5 eV below E/sub F/. Observed chemical shifts in the La 5p/sub 1/2 3/2/ cores are discussed for 1.98 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 2.89

  17. Processing method for liquid waste containing various kinds of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyabe, Keiji; Nabeshima, Masahiro; Ozeki, Noboru; Muraki, Tsutomu.

    1996-01-01

    Various kind of radioactive materials and heavy metal elements dissolved in liquid wastes are removed from the liquid wastes by adsorbing them on chitin or chitosan. In this case, a hydrogen ion concentration in the liquid wastes is adjusted to a pH value of from 1 to 3 depending on the kinds of the radioactive materials and heavy metal elements to be removed. Since chitin or chitosan has a special ion exchange performance or adsorbing performance, chemical species comprising radioactive materials or heavy metals dissolved in the liquid wastes are adsorbed thereto by ion adsorption or physical adsorption. With such procedures, radioactive materials and heavy metal elements are removed from the liquid wastes, and the concentration thereof can be reduced to such a level that they can be discharged into environments. On the other hand, since chitin or chitosan adsorbing the radioactive materials and heavy metal elements has a structure of polysaccharides, it is easily burnt into gaseous carbon dioxide. Accordingly, the amount of secondary wastes can remarkably be reduced. (T.M.)

  18. Radioactive Air Emmission Notice of Construction (NOC) for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MENARD, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to modify pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07 for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility. The rewrite of this NOC incorporates all the approved revisions (Sections 5.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 9.0), a revised potential to emit (PTE) based on the revised maximally exposed individual (MEI) (Sections 8.0, 10.0, 11.0, 12.0, 13.0, 14.0, and 15.0), the results of a study on fugitive emissions (Sections 6.0, 10.0, and 15.0), and reflects the current operating conditions at the WRAP Facility (Section 5.0). This NOC replaces DOE/RL-93-15 and DOE/RL-93-16 in their entirety. The primary function of the WRAP Facility is to examine, assay, characterize, treat, verify, and repackage radioactive material and mixed waste. There are two sources of emissions from the WRAP Facility: stack emissions and fugitive emissions. The stack emissions have an unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 1.13 E+02 millirem per year. The abated TEDE for the stack emissions is estimated at 5.63 E-02 millirem per year to the MEI. The fugitive emissions have an unabated TEDE estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 5.87 E-04. There is no abatement for the fugitive emissions.

  19. Radioactive Air Emmission Notice of Construction (NOC) Application for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MENARD, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to modify pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07 for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility. The rewrite of this NOC incorporates all the approved revisions (Sections 5.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 9.0), a revised potential to emit (PTE) based on the revised maximally exposed individual (MEI) (Sections 8.0, 10.0, 11.0, 12.0, 13.0, 14.0, and 15.0), the results of a study on fugitive emissions (Sections 6.0, 10.0, and 15.0), and reflects the current operating conditions at the WRAP Facility (Section 5.0). This NOC replaces DOE/RL-93-15 and DOE/RL-93-16 in their entirety. The primary function of the WRAP Facility is to examine, assay, characterize, treat, verify, and repackage radioactive material and mixed waste. There are two sources of emissions from the WRAP Facility: stack emissions and fugitive emissions. The stack emissions have an unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 1.13 E+02 millirem per year. The abated TEDE for the stack emissions is estimated at 5.63 E-02 millirem per year to the MEI. The fugitive emissions have an unabated TEDE estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 5.87 E-04. There is no abatement for the fugitive emissions

  20. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the Waste Receiving And Processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the Waste Receiving And Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility (also referred to as WRAP 1) includes: examining, assaying, characterizing, treating, and repackaging solid radioactive and mixed waste to enable permanent disposal of the wastes in accordance with all applicable regulations. The solid wastes to be handled in the WRAP 1 facility include low-level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, TRU mixed wastes, and low-level mixed wastes (LLMW). Airborne releases from the WRAP 1 facility will be primarily in particulate forms (99.999 percent of total unabated emissions). The release of two volatilized radionuclides, tritium and carbon-14 will contribute less than 0.001 percent of the total unabated emissions. Table 2-1 lists the radionuclides which are anticipated to be emitted from WRAP 1 exhaust stack. The Clean Air Assessment Package 1988 (CAP-88) computer code (WHC 1991) was used to calculate effective dose equivalent (EDE) from WRAP 1 to the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEI), and thus demonstrate compliance with WAC 246-247. Table 4-1 shows the dose factors derived from the CAP-88 modeling and the EDE for each radionuclide. The source term (i.e., emissions after abatement in curies per year) are multiplied by the dose factors to obtain the EDE. The total projected EDE from controlled airborne radiological emissions to the offsite MEI is 1.31E-03 mrem/year. The dose attributable to radiological emissions from WRAP 1 will, then, constitute 0.013 percent of the WAC 246-247 EDE regulatory limit of 10 mrem/year to the offsite MEI