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Sample records for radioactive generators sintesis

  1. Synthesis of gels with basis of titanium tungstates as matrixes of radioactive generators; Sintesis de geles a base de titanio tungstenatos como matrices de generadores radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galico C, L

    2005-07-01

    synthesis method avoids the manipulation of radioactive material during the synthesis of the gels, process that consumes around 7 hours. Therefore, in base to the studies carried out with titanium molybdates, it is intends in this work, the synthesis of titanium tungstates gels, to be used as matrixes of the generators {sup 188} W / {sup 188} Re. This type of studies has not been reported in the literature, for what is necessary to undertake basic studies on those preparation conditions and the effect of the characteristics of the titanium tungstates gels in the efficiency of the generators. Parameters like the pH of those initial solutions of tungsten and titanium, the molar relation W:Ti and very particularly the drying of the final product are fundamental to determine the preparation conditions of these gels. Therefore, in order to finding new alternatives of production of {sup 188} W {yields} {sup 188} Re, easy to produce and with high titration efficiencies, it is intends in this work, to develop a generator with basis of titanium and tungsten compounds that could be irradiated after their synthesis. (Author)

  2. Radioactive material generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplinski, T.V.; Bolter, B.J.; Heyer, R.E.; Bruno, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive material generator includes radioactive material in a column, which column is connected to inlet and outlet conduits, the generator being embedded in a lead casing. The inlet and outlet conduits extend through the casing and are topped by pierceable closure caps. A fitting, containing means to connect an eluent supply and an eluate container, is adapted to pierce the closure caps. The lead casing and the fitting are compatibly contoured such that they will fit only if properly aligned with respect to each other

  3. Reloadable radioactive generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombetti, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    A generator system that can be reloaded with an elutable radioactive material, such as 99 molybdenum, a multiple number of times is described. The system basically comprises a column filled with alumina, a loading vial containing a predetermined amount of the elutable radioactive material, and a rinsing vial containing a sterile solution. The two vials are connected by a conduit so that when communication is achieved between the column and loading vial and an evacuated vial is placed in communication with the bottom of the column, the predetermined amount of the radioactive material in the loading vial will be transferred to the column. The procedure can be repeated as the elutable material in the column is dissipated

  4. Rechargeable radioactive isotope generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, A.K.; Cerone, F.E.

    1978-01-01

    The description is given of a rechargeable radioactive isotope generator having the following features: a box containing a transport shield, a shielded generator including elements for the absorption and holding of the parent isotope, an eluant tank, a first pipe causing this tank to communicate with the transport shield, a second pipe causing this transport shield to communicate with the shielded generator and a third pipe placing the shielded generator in communication with the outside of the unit. It also includes a shelf across the external front part of the unit a part of which is shielded by external components, a shielded elution flask in which the eluate is poured and a filter set at a point between the flask and the third pipe [fr

  5. Dynamics of radioactive waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogaru, Daniela; Virtopeanu, Cornelia; Ivan, Alexandrina

    2008-01-01

    In Romania there are in operation three facilities licensed for collection, treatment and storage of radioactive waste resulted from industry, research, medicine, and agriculture, named institutional radioactive waste. The repository, which is of near surface type, is designed for disposing institutional radioactive waste. The institutional radioactive wastes generated are allowed to be disposed into repository according to the waste acceptance criteria, defined for the disposal facility. The radioactive wastes which are not allowed for disposal are stored on the site of each facility which is special authorised for this. The paper describes the dynamics of generation of institutional waste in Romania, both for radioactive waste which are allowed to be disposed into repository and for radioactive waste which are not allowed to be disposed of. (authors)

  6. Sintesi stereoselettiva di piridilammine

    OpenAIRE

    Chelucci, Giorgio Adolfo; Baldino, Salvatore; Pinna, Gérard Aimé; Soccolini, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Ammino piridine chirali hanno dimostrato la loro validità come leganti per la formazione di complessi metallici utilizzati nella catalisi asimmetrica. Tra i possibili approcci alla sintesi di questi composti noi abbiamo investigato la riduzione diastereoselettiva di N-sostituite (p-totil e tert-butil) piridil chetimmine con una serie di agenti riducenti (NaBH4, L-Selectride, DIBAL, 9-BBN) in diverse condizioni di reazione.

  7. Forest decline, natural and technically generated radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teufel, D.

    1983-06-01

    The question investigated is whether the radioactive rare gases emanating from nuclear plants are causative or participate in the triggering of forest disease. For one thing, a chemical reaction could be responsible for such an effect exerted by these artificial radioactive effluents. However, a calculation shows the concentration of radionuclides, respectively, in this case, their decomposition products, to be by many orders of magnitude smaller than other constituents in air; so a chemical reaction of this kind may be excluded. For the other part, rare gases might contribute to forest damage by their radioactive decomposition and late physical, chemical, and biological effects. In this connection, a detailed analysis is made of the comparability of natural radioactivity with radioactivity generated by nuclear plants. A possible contribution towards the total stress situation of forests (chemical air pollution, natural radioactivity, artificially produced radioactive rare gases, weather conditions and conditions arising from forest management and the like) would amount to a proportion smaller than 1/1000 considering natural radioactivity as a possible stress factor only. (orig.) [de

  8. Generating cryptographic keys by radioactive decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grupen, Claus; Maurer, Ingo; Schmidt, Dieter; Smolik, Ludek

    2001-01-01

    We are presenting a new method for the generation of statistically genuine random bitstream with very high frequency which can be employed for cryptographic purposes. The method uses the feature of statistically unpredictable radioactive decays as the source of randomness. The measured quantity is the time distance between the responses of a small ionisation chamber due to the recording of ionising decay products. This time measurement is converted into states representing 0o r 1. The data generated in our experiment successfully passed FIPS PUB 140-1 and die hard statistical tests. For the simulation of systematic effects Monte Carlo techniques were used

  9. Modelling gas generation in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agg, P.J.

    1993-02-01

    In a repository containing low- and intermediate-level waste, gas generation will occur principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. This Paper describes a mathematical model design to address gas generation by these mechanisms. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing both aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. Gas concentrations have been measured over a period of three years in large-scale drum experiments designed to simulate repository conditions. Model predictions are confirmed against the experimental measurements, and a prediction is then made of gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of one million years in a radioactive waste repository. (author)

  10. Modelling gas generation in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agg, P.J.

    1992-07-01

    In a repository containing low- and intermediate-level waste, gas generation will occur principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. This paper describes a mathematical model designed to address gas generation by these mechanisms. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing both aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. Gas concentrations have been measured over a period of three years in large-scale drum experiments designed to simulate repository conditions. Model predictions are confirmed against the experimental measurements, and a prediction is then made of gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of one million years in a radioactive waste repository. (Author)

  11. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The objective of this study was to predict tensile stress levels in thin-walled titanium alloy and thick-walled carbon steel containers designed for the ocean disposal of heat-generating radioactive wastes. Results showed that tensile stresses would be produced in both designs by the expansion of the lead filter, for a temperature rise of 200 0 C. Tensile stress could be reduced if the waste heat output at disposal was reduced. Initial stresses for the titanium-alloy containers could be relieved by heat treatment. (UK)

  12. Geological disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    A number of options for the disposal of vitrified heat-generating radioactive waste are being studied to ensure that safe methods are available when the time comes for disposal operations to commence. This study has considered the feasibility of three designs for containers which would isolate the waste from the environment for a minimum period of 500 to 1000 years. The study was sub-divided into the following major sections: manufacturing feasibility; stress analysis; integrity in accidents; cost benefit review. The candidate container designs were taken from the results of a previous study by Ove Arup and Partners (1985) and were developed as the study progressed. Their major features can be summarised as follows: (A) a thin-walled corrosion-resistant metal shell filled with lead or cement grout. (B) an unfilled thick-walled carbon steel shell. (C) an unfilled carbon steel shell planted externally with corrosion-resistant metal. Reference repository conditions in clay, granite and salt, reference disposal operations and metals corrosion data have been taken from various European Community radioactive waste management research and engineering projects. The study concludes that design Types A and B are feasible in manufacturing terms but design Type C is not. It is recommended that model containers should be produced to demonstrate the proposed methods of manufacture and that they should be tested to validate the analytical techniques used. (author)

  13. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The feasibility of safe ocean disposal options for heat-generating radioactive waste relies on the existence of suitable disposal sites. This review considers the status of the development of site selection criteria and the results of the study area investigations carried out under various national and international research programmes. In particular, the usefulness of the results obtained is related to the data needed for environmental and emplacement modelling. Preliminary investigations have identified fifteen potential deep ocean study areas in the North Atlantic. From these Great Meteor East (GME), Southern Nares Abyssal Plan (SNAP) and Kings Trough Flank (KTF) were selected for further investigation. The review includes appraisals of regional geology, geophysical studies, sedimentology, geotechnical studies, geochemical studies and oceanography. (author)

  14. Radioactivity transport following steam generator tube rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopenfeld, J.

    1985-03-01

    A review of the capabilities of the CITADEL computer code as well as plant experience to project radioactivity releases following a steam generator tube rupture in PWR's shows that certain experimental data are needed for reliable off-site dose predictions. This article defines five parameters which are the key for such predictions and discusses the functional dependence of these parameters on various operational variables. The above parameters can be used in conjunction with CITADEL or they can be inserted in the appropriate equations which then conveniently can be programmed as a subroutine in thermal-hydraulic system codes. A joint Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Program aimed at obtaining the five parameters empirically is described

  15. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The detailed radiological assessment of any proposed operations for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in deep ocean sediments would require data describing expected embedment depths and spacing of the waste. In this study a theoretical model which predicts penetrator trajectories from launch through to rest in the sediment has been produced and has been used to generate data for environmental models. The trajectory model has been used to study the effects of small imperfections and launch parameters on the motion of a reference penetrator through water and sediment. The model predicts that the horizontal displacements of the penetrators' final resting places in the sediment from their launch positions at the ocean surface could be limited to less than 15m by twisting their tail fins uniformly by just one degree to induce spinning. The reference penetrator is predicted to achieve satisfactory embedment depth for all the cases considered including allowance for the effect of curved penetration paths in the seabed. However, the ability of the model to represent highly non-linear sediment penetration paths is demonstrated. Distribution histograms of seabed impact points relative to specific release points are presented. The area of seabed required is calculated. (author)

  16. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    A study of container designs for heat generating radioactive waste disposal in the deep ocean sediments is presented. The purpose of the container would be to isolate the waste from the environment for a period of 500 to 1000 years. The container designs proposed are based on the use of either corrosion allowance or corrosion resistant metals. Appropriate overpack wall thicknesses are suggested for each design using the results of corrosion studies and experiments but these are necessarily preliminary and data relevant to corrosion in deep ocean sediments remain sparse. It is concluded that the most promising design concept involves a thin titanium alloy overpack in which all internal void spaces are filled with lead or cement grout. In situ temperatures for the sediment adjacent to the emplaced 50 year cooled waste containers are calculated to reach about 260 deg C. The behaviour of the sediments at such a high temperature is not well understood and the possibility of 100 years interim storage is recommended for consideration to allow further cooling. Further corrosion data and sediment thermal studies would be required to fully confirm the engineering feasibility of these designs. (author)

  17. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This report is based on an emplacement techniques review prepared for the Department of the Environment in February 1983, which appeared as Chapter III of the Nuclear Energy Agency, Seabed Working Group's Status Report. The original document (DOE/RW/83.032) has been amended to take account of the results of field trials carried out in March 1983 and to better reflect current UK Government policy on ocean disposal of HGW. In particular Figure 7 has been redrawn using more realistic drag factors for the calculation of the terminal velocity in water. This report reviews the work conducted by the SWG member countries into the different techniques of emplacing heat generating radioactive waste into the deep ocean sediments. It covers the waste handling from the port facilities to final emplacement in the seabed and verification of the integrity of the canister isolation system. The two techniques which are currently being considered in detail are drilled emplacement and the free fall penetrator. The feasibility study work in progress for both techniques as well as the mathematical and physical modelling work for embedment depth and hole closure behind the penetrator are reviewed. (author)

  18. Geological disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    A study has been made of the requirements and design features for containers to isolate vitrified heat generating radioactive waste from the environment for a period of 500 to 1000 years. The requirements for handling, storing and transporting containers have been identified following a study of disposal operations, and the pressures and temperatures which may possibly be experienced in clay, granite and salt formations have been estimated. A range of possible container designs have been proposed to satisfy the requirements of each of the disposal environments. Alternative design concepts in corrosion resistant or corrosion allowance material have been suggested. Potentially suitable container shell materials have been selected following a review of corrosion studies and although metals have not been specified in detail, titanium alloys and low carbon steels are thought to be appropriate for corrosion resistant and corrosion allowance designs respectively. Performance requirements for container filler materials have been identified and candidate materials assessed. A preliminary container stress analysis has shown the importance of thermal modelling and that if lead is used as a filler it dominates the stress response of the container. Possible methods of manufacturing disposal containers have been assessed and found to be generally feasible. (author)

  19. Review Dendrimer : Definisi, Sintesis, Aplikasi Dan Prospektif

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmi, Dwinna

    2013-01-01

    Dendrimer merupakan makrostruktur monodisperse dengan banyak cabang yang homogen dan degree of branching (DB) 100%. Dua cara sintesis dendrimer yaitu convergent dan divergent dilakukan. Convergent dilakukan dengan reaksi kovalen antara dua dan lebih monomer. Divergent dimulai dengan pembentukan inti dilanjutkan dengan pembentukan cabang yang merupakan group fungsional yang aktif. Sejauh ini dendrimer sudah banyak diterapkan pada bidang farmasi yaitu drug delivery dan non farmasi pada proses i...

  20. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, D.G.

    1993-03-30

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  1. Synthesis of lithium silicates generators of tritium by a modified method of combustion; Sintesis de silicatos de litio generadores de tritio por un metodo modificado de combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz G, D

    2003-07-01

    The ceramics of lithium have been proposed as generating materials of tritium through the following reaction: {sup 6} Li + {sup 1} n {yields} {sup 4} He + {sup 3} H . In previous works carried out by Pfeiffer and collaborators, the lithium silicates generators of tritium were prepared using the following methods: reactions of solid state, precipitation and sol-gel synthesis. Although those methods have advantages, it is required of heating at high temperatures (900 C during four hours) to be able to obtain the crystalline compounds. Those products found in these works were diverse crystallization forms of the lithium silicates and of SiO{sub 2}, such as, Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}0{sub 5}, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, and quartz (SiO{sub 2}). The combustion method uses exothermic reactions to take place ceramic compounds. The precursor solutions are mixtures of the nitrate of metal oxidizer and the fuels (urea, glycine, carbohydrazide). However the reported method in the literature, it is not useful to prepare lithium silicates, for what was modified using non oxidizers compounds. The lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and the silicic acid (H{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) they were the compounds non oxidizers used, and the urea (CH{sub 4}N{sub 2}O) it was the one fuel. They were carried out two series of experiments; inside the series 1 of experiments are varied the molar ratio of lithium hydroxide and urea (LiOH : H{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} = 1, 2 and 3, LiOH : CH{sub 4}N{sub 2}O = 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) and the prepared mixtures were taken to one muffle previously preheated to a temperature of 450 C during 5 minutes. In the series 2 of experiments was studied the effect of the temperature and of the washed with distilled water in the prepared samples with the following molar ratios: LiOH : H{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} : CH{sub 4}N{sub 2}O = 1:1:3, 2:1:3, 3:1:3 and 3:1:6, those which were heated to temperatures from 450 C up to 750 C and were washed. The obtained samples were characterized by X

  2. Radioactive waste generated from JAERI partitioning-transmutation cycle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinichi, Nakayama; Yasuji, Morita; Kenji, Nishihara [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Production of lower-level radioactive wastes, as well as the reduction in radioactivity of HLW, is an important performance indicator in assessing the viability of a partitioning-transmutation system. We have begun to identify the chemical compositions and to quantify the amounts of radioactive wastes that may be generated by JAERI processes. Long-lived radionuclides such as {sup 14}C and {sup 59}Ni and spallation products of Pb-Bi coolants are added to the existing inventory of these nuclides that are generated in the current fuel cycle. Spent salts of KCl-LiCl, which is not generated from the current fuel cycle, will be introduced as a waste. (author)

  3. Radioactive Wastes Generated From JAERI Partitioning-Transmutation Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Morita, Yasuji; Nishihara, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Production of lower-level radioactive wastes, as well as the reduction in radioactivity of HLW, is an important performance indicator in assessing the viability of a partitioning-transmutation system. We have begun to identify the chemical compositions and to quantify the amounts of radioactive wastes that may be generated by JAERI's processes. Long-lived radionuclides such as 14 C and 59 Ni and spallation products of Pb-Bi coolants are added to the existing inventory of these nuclides that are generated in the current fuel cycle. Spent salts of KCl-LiCl, which is not generated from the current fuel cycle, will be introduced as a waste. (authors)

  4. Management of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alter, U.

    1990-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany only one company is responsible for the management of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generations. This is the Company for Nuclear Service (GNS mbH). It was the intention of the competent authorities of the FRG to intensify state control during conditioning, intermediate storage and transport of low- and medium level radioactive waste. A guideline provides that the responsibility of the waste producers and of those concerned with conditioning, storage and transport of radioactive waste is assigned in the individual case and that the qualitative and quantitative registration of all waste streams will be ensured. An overview of the radioactive waste management within the last two years in the FRG is presented. (orig./DG)

  5. Radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation suitable for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennecke, P.; Schumacher, J.; Warnecke, E.

    1987-01-01

    It is planned to dispose of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation in the Konrad repository. Preliminary waste acceptance requirements are derived taking the results of site-specific safety assessments as a basis. These requirements must be fulfilled by the waste packages on delivery. The waste amounts which are currently stored and those anticipated up to the year 2000 are discussed. The disposability of these waste packages in the Konrad repository was evaluated. This examination reveals that basically almost all radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation can be accepted. (orig.) [de

  6. Generation and release of radioactive gases in LLW disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, M.S. [Harvard School Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Simonson, S.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The atmospheric release of radioactive gases from a generic engineered LLW disposal facility and its radiological impacts were examined. To quantify the generation of radioactive gases, detailed characterization of source inventory for carbon-14, tritium, iodine-129, krypton-85, and radon-222, was performed in terms of their activity concentrations; their distribution within different waste classes, waste forms and containers; and their subsequent availability for release in volatile or gaseous form. The generation of gases was investigated for the processes of microbial activity, radiolysis, and corrosion of waste containers and metallic components in wastes. The release of radionuclides within these gases to the atmosphere was analyzed under the influence of atmospheric pressure changes.

  7. Generation projection of solid and liquid radioactive wastes and spent radioactive sources in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia A, E.; Hernandez F, I. Y.; Fernandez R, E.; Monroy G, F.; Lizcano C, D.

    2014-10-01

    This work is focused to project the volumes of radioactive aqueous liquid wastes and spent radioactive sources that will be generated in our country in next 15 years, solids compaction and radioactive organic liquids in 10 years starting from the 2014; with the purpose of knowing the technological needs that will be required for their administration. The methodology involves six aspects to develop: the definition of general objectives, to specify the temporary horizon of projection, data collection, selection of the prospecting model and the model application. This approach was applied to the inventory of aqueous liquid wastes, as well as radioactive compaction organic and solids generated in Mexico by non energy applications from the 2001 to 2014, and of the year 1997 at 2014 for spent sources. The applied projection models were: Double exponential smoothing associating the tendency, Simple Smoothing and Lineal Regression. For this study was elected the first forecast model and its application suggests that: the volume of the compaction solid wastes, aqueous liquids and spent radioactive sources will increase respectively in 152%, 49.8% and 55.7%, while the radioactive organic liquid wastes will diminish in 13.15%. (Author)

  8. Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S.; Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature

  9. Radioactive wastes: a problem of morality between generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, D.

    1984-01-01

    Nowhere are the intergenerational moral issues posed more explicitly that in debates over nuclear power and the disposal of radioactive wastes. A survey of some of the ethical issues covers energy supply and risk and the problem of determining a cost-benefit of resources use and conservation that maximizes supply and minimizes risk. The author identifies three arguments against energy policy based on cost-benefit analysis: 1 reliability, 2 fairness, and 3 the lack of subjective value. All three suggest the need to determine not only what our obligations to future generations are, but also the underlying basis of these obligations in our system of values. The radioactive waste issue has an urgency, for options are opening and closing. 13 references

  10. An overview of the transportation of radioactive waste at Ontario Power Generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Material Transportation Department (RMT) ensures regulatory compliance in radioactive material shipping within Ontario Power Generation (OPG). OPG provides a radioactive shipping program, high quality carrier service, stringent packaging maintenance, and quality assurance oversight to the corporation's nuclear facilities and its customers. This paper will speak to the transport of radioactive waste in Ontario Power Generation. It will also mention non-waste shipments and the quality assurance programme used at Ontario Power Generation to ensure a high quality transportation system. (author)

  11. Environmental impact statement on management of commercially generated radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shupe, M.W.; Kreiter, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes the generic environmental impact statement on the management of generated high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes. The contents of the statement are summarized. The alternatives considered include: geologic disposal; chemical resynthesis; very deep hole disposal; rock melting concept; island disposal; subseabed disposal; icesheet disposal; reverse well disposal; transmutation treatment; and space disposal concepts. The types and quantities of wastes considered are from 3 different fuel cycles for the LWR reactor: once through; uranium-only recycle; and uranium and platinum recycle

  12. Synthesis and irradiation of titanium molybdates used as matrices of the {sup 99} Mo/ {sup 99m} Tc generators; Sintesis e irradiacion de molibdatos de titanio utilizados como matrices de los generadores de {sup 99} Mo/ {sup 99m} Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz V, H. [Facultad de Quimica, UAEM 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Monroy G, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The {sup 99m} Tc is the radioisotope but used in nuclear medicine. Commercially it takes place starting from generators of {sup 99} Mo/{sup 99m} Tc, composed by a chromatography column padded of aluminium oxide of aluminum, where it is deposited the {sup 99} Mo, product of the fission of the {sup 235} U adsorbed and eluted, by means of a saline solution, in form of {sup 99m} TcO{sub 4}{sup -}. The production of {sup 99} Mo as a result of the fission, imposes radiochemical separations that generate significant quantities of radioactive waste of medium activity, and inflict elaborated radiochemical manipulation. Due to this, its have been carried out intense investigations to substitute the {sup 99} Mo fission product, by chemical compounds that produce {sup 99} Mo via the reaction {sup 98} Mo(n, {gamma}){sup 99} Mo. Presently work intends the use of gels of titanium molybdates like matrices of these generators. Titanium molybdates were synthesized starting from solutions TiCl{sub 3} and ammonium molybdates and it was studied the effect of the final pH of the gels, the concentration of the Ti{sup +3} and the influence of the laundry of these on the acting of generators. The best efficiencies and chemical purity, radiochemical and radionuclides of the gels like matrices of generators {sup 99} Mo/{sup 99m} Tc were gotten with the washed gel, elaborated with the solution of TiCI{sub 3} 0.35M, and to a final pH of 5.9 (Author)

  13. Radioactive Waste Generation in Pyro-SFR Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Fanxing; Park, Byung Heung; Ko, Won Il

    2011-01-01

    Which nuclear fuel cycle option to deploy is of great importance in the sustainability of nuclear power. SFR fuel cycle employing pyroprocessing (named as Pyro- SFR Cycle) is one promising fuel cycle option in the near future. Radioactive waste generation is a key criterion in nuclear fuel cycle system analysis, which considerably affects the future development of nuclear power. High population with small territory is one special characteristic of ROK, which makes the waste management pretty important. In this study, particularly the amount of waste generation with regard to the promising advanced fuel cycle option was evaluated, because the difficulty of deploying an underground repository for HLW disposal requires a longer time especially in ROK

  14. Basic approach to the disposal of low level radioactive waste generated from nuclear reactors containing comparatively high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Yoshinori

    1998-01-01

    Low level radioactive wastes (LLW) generated from nuclear reactors are classified into three categories: LLW containing comparatively high radioactivity; low level radioactive waste; very low level radioactive waste. Spent control rods, part of ion exchange resin and parts of core internals are examples of LLW containing comparatively high radioactivity. The Advisory Committee of Atomic Energy Commission published the report 'Basic Approach to the Disposal of LLW from Nuclear Reactors Containing Comparatively High Radioactivity' in October 1998. The main points of the proposed concept of disposal are as follows: dispose of underground deep enough not be disturb common land use (e.g. 50 to 100 m deep); dispose of underground where radionuclides migrate very slowly; dispose of with artificial engineered barrier which has the same function as the concrete pit; control human activities such as land use of disposal site for a few hundreds years. (author)

  15. Gas generation phenomena in radioactive waste transportation packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of radiation from radioactive materials with the waste matrix can lead to the deterioration of the waste form resulting in the possible of gaseous species. Depending on the type and characteristics of the radiation source, the generation of hydrogen may predominate. Since the interaction of alpha particles with the waste form results in significant energy transfer, other gases such as carbon oxides, methane, nitrogen oxides, oxygen, water, and helium are possible. The type of gases produced from the waste forms is determined by the mechanisms involved in the waste degradation. For transuranic wastes, the identified degradation mechanisms are reported to be caused by radiolysis, thermal decomposition or dewatering, chemical corrosion, and bacterial action. While all these mechanisms may be responsible for the building of gases during the storage of wastes, radiolysis and thermal decomposition appear to be main contributors during waste transport operations. (authors)

  16. SINTESIS SILIKA AEROGEL DENGAN BAHAN DASAR ABU BAGASSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazriati Nazriati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available SYNTHESIS OF SILICA AEROGEL FROM BAGASSE ASH. Synthesis of silica aerogel from bagasse ash was done by alkaline extraction followed by sol-gel. Bagasse ash was extracted with NaOH at its boiling temperature for one hour with continue stirring, to produce sodium silicate. Subsequently, sodium silicate was pass through ionic exchanger resin, to produces silicic acid (SA. Silicic acid solution was then added with TMCS and HMDS as surface modifier agent. In order to form gel pH must be adjusted to final pH of 8-9 by addition of NH4OH solution. The resulting gel then was aged and dried at ambient pressure and at a certain time and temperature. Characterization of products was done by measuring its pore volume, surface area, and hydrophobisity (contact angle. TMCS serves as water expeller from the pores and subsequently surface was modified by HMDS and TMCS. HMDS content will linearly increase surface area, pore volume, and the contact angle of the resulting silica aerogel. Characteristics of silica aerogel was generated by varying the composition of the SA:TMCS:HMDS resulting has a surface area of 50-488 m2/g, pore volume from 0.2 to 0.9 m3 /g, the contact angle of 48-119 and pore diameter ranging from 5.7-22.56 nm. Based on the resulting pore diameter, the synthesized of silica aerogel categorized as mesoporous.      Abstrak   Sintesis silika aerogel dari bahan dasar abu bagasse dilakukan dengan ekstraksi basa dan diikuti dengan sol-gel. Abu bagasse diekstrak dengan NaOH pada suhu didihnya sambil diaduk selama satu jam, menghasilkan sodium silikat. Selanjutnya, sodium silikat dilewatkan resin penukar ion, menghasilkan asam silicic (SA. Larutan asam silicic kemudian ditambahkan trimethy­l­chlorosilane (TMCS dan hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS sebagai agen pemodifikasi permukaan. Untuk terjadinya gel pH diatur hingga mencapai 8-9 dengan penambahan larutan NH4OH. Gel yang dihasilkan kemudian di-aging dan dikeringkan pada tekanan ambien pada suhu dan

  17. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and Guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of hazardous chemical, radioactive, and mixed waste to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how a generator of wastes can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for hazardous chemical, radioactive, and mixed waste. 9 figs

  18. Physical limits on steam generation by radioactive decay heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1991-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the possibilities that flood water contacting the hot radioactive waste and rock at Yucca Mountain could produce enough steam to lift the top of the mountain off the repository

  19. Gas Generation in Radioactive Wastes - MAGGAS Predictive Life Cycle Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streatfield, R.E.; Hebditch, D.J.; Swift, B.T.; Hoch, A.R.; Constable, M.

    2006-01-01

    Gases may form from radioactive waste in quantities posing different potential hazards throughout the waste package life cycle. The latter includes surface storage, transport, placing in an operating repository, storage in the repository prior to backfill, closure and the post-closure stage. Potentially hazardous situations involving gas include fire, flood, dropped packages, blocked package vents and disruption to a sealed repository. The MAGGAS (Magnox Gas generation) model was developed to assess gas formation for safety assessments during all stages of the waste package life cycle. This is a requirement of the U.K. regulatory authorities and Nirex and progress in this context is discussed. The processes represented in the model include: Corrosion, microbial degradation, radiolysis, solid-state diffusion, chemico-physical degradation and pressurisation. The calculation was split into three time periods. First the 'aerobic phase' is used to model the periods of surface storage, transport and repository operations including storage in the repository prior to backfill. The second and third periods were designated 'anaerobic phase 1' and 'anaerobic phase 2' and used to model the waste packages in the post-closure phase of the repository. The various significant gas production processes are modeled in each phase. MAGGAS (currently Version 8) is mounted on an Excel spreadsheet for ease of use and speed, has 22 worksheets and is operated routinely for assessing waste packages (e.g. for ventilation of stores and pressurisation of containers). Ten operational and decommissioning generic nuclear power station waste streams were defined as initial inputs, which included ion exchange materials, sludges and concentrates, fuel element debris, graphite debris, activated components, contaminated items, desiccants and catalysts. (authors)

  20. Methodology of site generation for evaluation of the behaviour of radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Rivas, C.; Eguilior Diez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The present report summarizes the purpose of methodology for the site generation in the evaluation of high-level radioactive waste storage for long-term. This work is developed into the project Safety analysis long-term of high-level radioactive waste. This project is carried on for CIEMAT and ENRESA

  1. Management of radioactive waste generated from nuclear power reactors in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong-Mook Kim

    2000-01-01

    Fundamental objectives and efforts to safely manage radioactive wastes generating from the expanding nuclear power industry in the Republic of Korea are described. Management, treatment and storage of radioactive wastes arising in different form are addressed. A long tern plan to reduce the volume of solid waste is outlined. (author)

  2. Users manual. Pursuit program of use licenses of radioactive material or generator equipment of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becerril M, V.M.; Villarreal, J.E.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the program 'Databases for the pursuit of licenses of use of radioactive material', it consists on the application of a computer system carried out in dbase IV that it allows the control of the all the information related with those licenses for use, possession and storage of radioactive material or generator equipment of ionizing radiations. (Author)

  3. Radioactive waste generation in the nuclear reactors in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The successful use of nuclear fission as major source of energy for this century is based upon the technological capabilities acquired to face the issue of radioactive waste and spent fuel. The management of radioactive waste is complex and implies solving the following major problems: - isolation of the radioisotopes from the complex of effluents released in the environment; - processing the separated radioisotopes for subsequent storing and final disposal; - transport of processed and conditioned wastes towards disposal repository; - selecting the sites for storage and final disposal. During reactor operation liquid and gaseous effluents are released to the environment as well as radioactive materials. All these may have an dangerous impact upon the environment when the international regulations, i.e. the ALARA principle are not strictly observed. The maximal values for the radioactive release are established by national regulations which are concordant with the IAEA principles. The amount of radioactive materials released depends of the reactor type and the measures adopted to reduce these releases. The average values of these releases during the normal operation of the reactor constitute the 'source term'. Its calculation implies several factors such as: the reactor type; the radionuclide concentration in the primary cooling systems; the transport mechanisms and leaks resulting in liquid and gaseous radionuclide emissions; the efficiency of the barriers and engineered safety systems built to reduce the amounts of radionuclide in the effluents. The concentration of radionuclides in the primary cooling circuit depends on the reactor power level, fuel burnup, fuel sheath type, tightness of the fuel cans, impurity concentration, chemical additives in the fluid of the primary cooling system, the total volume of this fluid, as well as its purification system. The methods applied to facilitate the calculation of the source term are described. In 1998 the spent fuel

  4. The concept of responsibility to future generations for the management and storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vial, E.

    2004-01-01

    Recognition of the concept of responsibility to future generations seems, to imply the need to assume responsibility today for radioactive waste legacy of the past as well as for the waste that is currently being generated. However, this view of things, or more precisely this interpretation, is clouded by the lack of a clear definition of the concept of responsibility towards future generations. The concept has been used mainly in connection with long-lived radioactive wastes, which pose the greatest management problem as it so so far exceeds any human scale of reference. Consideration for future generations has to be a factor in the management of all types of radioactive waste, be it short, medium or long-lived waste or very low, low, intermediate or highly radioactive waste. As a general rule the concept of responsibility has made focus on long lived waste, whatever its level of radioactivity. The current alternatives for the management of radioactive waste may be: interim storage, final disposal, incineration, transmutation, to lower the radioactivity of the wastes. These different alternatives are discussed because they are not all genuine solutions and need to be deepened. (N.C.)

  5. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste

  6. Sintesi, modifica e caratterizzazione di polimeri da fonti rinnovabili

    OpenAIRE

    Cruciani, Letizia

    2013-01-01

    Gli argomenti trattati all’interno di questa tesi di dottorato riguardano la sintesi e la modifica di polimeri ottenuti a partire da fonti rinnovabili. L’acido polilattico (PLA) è stato modificato per ottenere film estensibili per uso alimentare. La scelta del materiale si è basata sull’analisi del suo ciclo di vita e perché è riconosciuto come sicuro per l’utilizzo nel campo alimentare. Le formulazioni testate, a base di PLA, sono state preparate con l’aggiunta di una serie di additivi u...

  7. Characteristics of radioactive waste streams generated in HTGR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, K.H.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of a study concerned with identification and characterization of radioactive waste streams from an HTGR fuel reprocessing plant. Approximate quantities of individual waste streams as well as pertinent characteristics of selected streams have been estimated. Most of the waste streams are unique to HTGR fuel reprocessing. However, waste streams from the solvent extraction system and from the plant facilities do not differ greatly from the corresponding LWR fuel reprocessing wastes

  8. Synthesis and characterization of zirconium molybdates of {sup 99} Mo/{sup 99m} Tc generators; Sintesis y caracterizacion de molibdatos de zirconio de generadores {sup 99} Mo/{sup 99m} Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras R, A.; Monroy G, F.; Diaz A, L.V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The zirconium molybdates are gels which are used as cation exchangers in the production of {sup 99} Mo/{sup 99m} Tc generators. The synthesis method and the characterization of these gels by thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction is presented with the purpose of finding which the factors are that influence in the efficiency of the {sup 99m} Tc production. The results show that the quantity of molecular water contained in gel, is possibly the cause of variations of the efficiencies of the {sup 99} Mo/{sup 99m} Tc generator. (Author)

  9. Method to determine the radioactivity of radioactive waste packages. Basic procedure of the method used to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants: 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    This document describes the procedures adopted in order to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants in Japan. The standards applied have been approved by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan after deliberations by the Subcommittee on the Radioactivity Verification Method for Waste Packages, the Nuclear Cycle Technical Committee, and the Standards Committee. The method for determining the radioactivity of the low-level radioactive waste packages was based on procedures approved by the Nuclear Safety Commission in 1992. The scaling factor method and other methods of determining radioactivity were then developed on the basis of various investigations conducted, drawing on extensive accumulated knowledge. Moreover, the international standards applied as common guidelines for the scaling factor method were developed by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear Energy, Subcommittee SC 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology. Since the application of accumulated knowledge to future radioactive waste disposal is considered to be rational and justified, such body of knowledge has been documented in a standardized form. The background to this standardization effort, the reasoning behind the determination method as applied to the measurement of radioactivity, as well as other related information, are given in the Annexes hereto. This document includes the following Annexes. Annex 1: (reference) Recorded items related to the determination of the scaling factor. Annex 2 (reference): Principles applied to the determining the radioactivity of waste packages. (author)

  10. Incineration of hazardous and low-level radioactive waste by a small generator. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwight, C.C.

    1984-10-01

    The results from Arizona State University's study of the feasibility of a small generator incinerating low-level radioactive waste in a pathological incinerator are reported. The research included various aspects of environmental impact, public relations, cost versus benefit, and licensing procedures. Three years of work resulted in a license amendment authorizing the University to incinerate certain hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. 13 references, 6 figures, 16 tables

  11. Particle size of radioactive aerosols generated during machine operation in high-energy proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Yuichi; Kanda, Yukio; Kondo, Kenjiro; Endo, Akira

    2000-01-01

    In high-energy accelerators, non-radioactive aerosols are abundantly generated due to high radiation doses during machine operation. Under such a condition, radioactive atoms, which are produced through various nuclear reactions in the air of accelerator tunnels, form radioactive aerosols. These aerosols might be inhaled by workers who enter the tunnel just after the beam stop. Their particle size is very important information for estimation of internal exposure doses. In this work, focusing on typical radionuclides such as 7 Be and 24 Na, their particle size distributions are studied. An aluminum chamber was placed in the EP2 beam line of the 12-GeV proton synchrotron at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). Aerosol-free air was introduced to the chamber, and aerosols formed in the chamber were sampled during machine operation. A screen-type diffusion battery was employed in the aerosol-size analysis. Assuming that the aerosols have log-normal size distributions, their size distributions were obtained from the radioactivity concentrations at the entrance and exit of the diffusion battery. Radioactivity of the aerosols was measured with Ge detector system, and concentrations of non-radioactive aerosols were obtained using condensation particle counter (CPC). The aerosol size (radius) for 7 Be and 24 Na was found to be 0.01-0.04 μm, and was always larger than that for non-radioactive aerosols. The concentration of non-radioactive aerosols was found to be 10 6 - 10 7 particles/cm 3 . The size for radioactive aerosols was much smaller than ordinary atmospheric aerosols. Internal doses due to inhalation of the radioactive aerosols were estimated, based on the respiratory tract model of ICRP Pub. 66. (author)

  12. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  13. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  14. Public comments on the draft generic environmental impact statement for management of commercially generated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreiter, M.R.; Unruh, C.M.; McCallum, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has the responsibility for developing the technology required for managing commercial radioactive wastes in an environmentally acceptable manner. As part of this responsibility, DOE has prepared a draft environmental impact statement on the management of commercially generated radioactive waste. The draft was issued for public comment in April of 1979; five public hearings were held. The draft GEIS is intended to provide environmental input for the selection of an appropriate program strategy for the permanent isolation of commercially generated high-level and transuranic wastes. The scope of such a strategy includes research and development into alternative treatment processes and emplacement media, site investigations into candidate media, and the examination of advanced waste management technologies. The draft statement describes the commercial radioactive wastes that would have to be managed for very long periods of time from an assumed nuclear generation scenario of 10,000 GWe-yr of power over a 65-year period ending in 2040

  15. User's manual for applicants proposing on-site burial of self-generated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolbert, M.E.M.; Loretan, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes, for medical and research institutions as well as industrial generators of low-level radioactive waste, the NRC or state submittal requirements for authorizing the on-site burial of self-generated radioactive waste. An important part of completing the license application for operation justifying this alternative for waste disposal over other alternatives. Reasons that might be considered acceptable might include the need to dispose of large volumes of low activity waste that would otherwise take up valuable space in commercial sites; the ability to demonstrate that this method of disposal will result in reduced exposures to the public; the ability to show that the prohibitive costs of other methods of disposal would be detrimental to the progress of significant research which generates radioactive waste. 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Considerations for reduction of gas generation in a low-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Son, Jung Kwon; Lee, Myung Chan; Song, Myung Jae

    1997-01-01

    In a low-level radioactive waste repository, H 2 , CO 2 , and CH 4 will be generated principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. A prediction is made for gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of ten thousand years in a radioactive waste repository. The results suggest that H 2 is the principal gas generated within the radioactive waste cavern. The generation rates of CO 2 and CH 4 are likely to be insignificant by comparison with H 2 . Therefore, an effective way to decrease gas generation in a radioactive waste repository seems to be to reduce metal content since the generation rate of H 2 is most sensitive to the concentration of steel

  17. Radiation after-effects in daughter generations of barley grown under conditions of enhanced radioactive background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, O.N.; Shershunova, V.I.; Taskaev, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    Stimulation of growth and development was observed in the first daughter generation of barley plants grown under conditions simulating an enhanced radioactive background. The stimulatory effect was partially reproduced in the second generation, and signs of depression of initial growth of plants were found in the third generation. A great number of alterations and their regular occurrence allow to refer them to lingering modifications originating under the effect of a radiation factor on vegetating plants

  18. SINTESIS MEMBRAN NATA ALOE VERA-ETILENDIAMIN DAN KARAKTERISASINYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EB Susatyo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Serat yang terkandung di dalam nata Aloe vera adalah selulosa sehingga dapat digunakan dalam sintesis membran. Telah dilakukan penelitian tentang sintesis membran nata Aloe vera-etilendiamin (nata-en menggunakan sistem vakum cair. Proses preparasi membran berlangsung melalui tiga tahap, yaitu preparasi nata Aloe vera, aktivasi menggunakan asam sulfat, dan modifikasi dengan menggunakan etilendiamin. Tujuan penelitian adalah untuk mempelajari teknik dalam sintesis membran nata-en kemudian melakukan karakterisasi untuk mengetahui karakter strukturnya. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan perilaku yang berbeda dalam hal sifat mekanik dan strukturnya. Membran nata murni memiliki sifat mekanik yang kuat, nata teraktivasi cenderung rapuh, sedangkan nata-en bersifat liat. Spektra infra merah dari ketiga tipe membran (nata murni, nata teraktivasi, dan nata-en secara umum tidak mengalami perubahan yang signifikan, hanya terjadi pergeseran panjang gelombang dari masing-masing membran. Berdasarkan spektra infra merah dapat diketahui bahwa masing-masing membran mempunyai gugus hidroksil, tetapi serapannya semakin melebar untuk setiap membran. Gugus alkil dan karboksil juga masih tampak, namun pada membran nata teraktivasi serapannya berkurang, sedangkan pada membran nata-en muncul puncak baru yang menunjukkan adanya gugus amin. Hal ini membuktikan bahwa telah terjadi ikatan antara nata dengan etilendiamin. Fibers contained in nata Aloe vera is cellulose that can be used in the synthesis of membrane. The research has done on the synthesis of nata Aloe vera-ethylenediamine (nata-en membrane by using liquid vacuum system. Membrane preparation process consisted of three stages, they are nata Aloe vera preparation, activation using sulfuric acid, and membrane modification by using ethylenediamine. The purpose of research is to study the technique of nata-en membrane synthesis then to perform the characterization to determine the character of their structure.The results

  19. Management of radioactive waste generated in nuclear medicine; Gestion de los residuos radiactivos generados en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz Perez, P.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear medicine is a clinical specialty in which radioactive material is used in non-encapsulated form, for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Nuclear medicine involves administering to a patient a radioactive substance, usually liquid, both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This process generates solid radioactive waste (syringes, vials, gloves) and liquid (mainly the patient's urine). (Author)

  20. Generation, transport and conduct of radioactive wastes of low and intermediate level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.; Jimenez, J.

    2005-01-01

    The technological development of the last decades produced an increment in the application of the radiations in different human activities. The effect of it has been it the production of radioactive wastes of all the levels. In Mexico, some of the stages of the administration of the waste of low and intermediate level have not been completely resolved, as the case of the treatment and the final storage. In this work aspects of the generation, the transport and the administration of radioactive waste of low and intermediate level produced in the non energy applications from the radioactive materials to national level, indicating the generated average quantities, transported and tried annually by the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). The main generators of wastes in Mexico, classified according to the activity in which the radioactive materials are used its are listed. Some of the main processes of treatment of radioactive wastes broadly applied in the world and those that are used at the moment in our country are also presented. (Author)

  1. Radioactive Waste Management Produced from the Generator Tc-99m Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaedi Muhammad; Rimin Sumantri; Affan Ahmad; Tuyono

    2012-01-01

    Generator Tc-99m product is used in hospitals will result in radioactive waste both solid waste in the form of a column compacted Tc-99m Generator, bottles vials and bottles of saline fluid path series: burning of solid waste in the form of paper straw, hand gloves, and cardboard (vial packing boxes and wrapping Generator) and liquid waste form leaching results lead pot and enclosure. So that these wastes pose no radiological consequences for both humans and the environment, it must be properly managed in accordance with the provisions. In order to realize these expectations should be made so that the radioactive waste management system can be handled effectively, optimal, economical, safe and secure and in accordance with applicable regulations. Management system is in it include: procedures for handling radioactive waste, solid waste compacted, burning of solid waste management, liquid waste handling, shipment of radioactive waste and determination of the amount of radiation doses received by workers who handle radioactive waste. (author)

  2. Systematic analysis method for radioactive wastes generated from nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameo, Yutaka; Ishimori, Ken-ichiro; Haraga, Tomoko; Shimada, Asako; Katayama, Atsushi; Nakashima, Mikio; Takahashi, Kuniaki

    2011-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for the simple and rapid determination of radioactive nuclides, which are selected as important nuclides for the safety assessment of the disposal of wastes generated from research facilities. We advanced the development of a high-efficiency nondestructive measurement technique for γ-ray-emitting nuclides, simple and rapid methods for the pretreatment of hard-to-dissolve samples and subsequent radiochemical separation, and rapid determination methods for long-lived nuclides. In order to establish a system to analyze the important nuclides in various kinds of sample, actual radioactive wastes such as concentrated liquid waste, activated concrete, and metal pipes were analyzed by the present method. The results showed that the present method was well suited for a rapid and simple determination of low-level radioactive wastes generated from research facilities. (author)

  3. Radioactive solid waste management study of generated in the source production laboratory for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Nayane K.O.; Carvalho, Vitória S.; Marques, José R.O.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Baptista, Tatyana S.; Vicente, Roberto; Rostelato, M.E.C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Souza, Daiane C.B.

    2017-01-01

    A management system for radioactive solid wastes generated during seed production in the Laboratório de Produção de Fontes para Radioterapia (LPFRT) was developed. For this, the volume and the mass of each item of solid wastes generated in Glove box were estimated. It is possible to estimate, per week, how much reject will enter the warehouse, what space it will occupy and also its weight. In the final step of the characterization, the decay calculation is applied to define the time the reject will be stored for later disposal in the collection system. After the characterization process, it is noticed that the rate of volume and radioactivity decreases as the retention time of the rejects increases due to the release of the materials, and also, there is the decay of the radioactivity present in the reservoir. It is also observed that the rate of entry and exit of the wastes is proportional

  4. Maintenance of shutdown system in the reactor core to minimize the radioactive waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, P.; Fernandes, V.B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper recommends a modification on the actual strategy of going from Cold-Shutdown to Critical, that will save about 6000 liter of boric acid and 30,000 liters of demineralized water for each reactor criticalization. This strategy will reduce the radioactive waste disposal volume to only about 5% of what would be generated following the actual strategy. (author) [pt

  5. Inter-generational Decision Making for Radioactive Waste Disposal, Policy and Science: Regulatory Protection Forever?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnier, E.P.; Wallo, A.

    2006-01-01

    Assumptions about this generation's duty to future generations underlie decisions on regulatory requirements for disposal of radioactive waste. Regulatory provisions related to time of compliance, dose criteria, and institutional controls, for example, continue to be topics of discussion as regulations are revised or compared. Subjective and difficult ethical issues are either explicit or implicit in these discussions. The information and criteria used must be relevant and help make good decisions that, ideally, increase the overall welfare of future generations. To what extent can or should science usefully inform such decision-making? Both the National Academies of Science and the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) have reported on this topic, albeit from different viewpoints. This paper explains and expands upon the rationale used for setting compliance time periods such as the Department of Energy's requirement for a 1,000 year time of compliance with dose limits for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It evaluates radioactive waste disposal against principles of equity recommended by NAPA. Radioactive waste disposal standards require evaluation of impacts much farther into the future than has been common for other endeavors with very long term effects. While performance assessment analyses provide much useful information, their inherent uncertainties over long time periods preclude the projection of reality. Thus, the usefulness of extremely long projections in supporting good decisions that promote the welfare of future generations is limited. Such decisions are fundamentally a question of resource allocation, equity, and fairness. (authors)

  6. An aerosole generator for production of radioactive aerosoles by evaporating uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, W.M.

    1975-01-01

    In the Institut for Biology of the Austrian Research Center at Seibersdorf an experiment is running to study the behaviour of radioactive aerosoles in the organism of miniature swines after inhalation. In the work under discussion the aerosole generator of the equipment used for this inhalation experiments is described by means of which the aerosole-air mixtures are produced. The main part of this generator is a gas burner for evaporating irradiated UO 2 -pellets. (orig.) [de

  7. Development of disposal technologies for radioactive waste generated from radioisotope users and research institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akihiro; Yoshimori, Michiro

    2001-01-01

    In order to safely dispose of a radioactive waste, which is generated from radioisotope users and research institutes, investigation of characteristics of the waste and conceptual design of disposal facility were carried out. As a result of investigating JAERI that the waste has mainly been stored, it became clear that radioactivities of 19 nuclides are important from the viewpoint of the safety of the disposal. And the result of the conceptual design of disposal facilities on the assumption of 3 kinds of sites, the differences on the safety could not be recognized in either case, though the installation depth to construct the facilities influenced the economical efficiency. (author)

  8. Volume reduction of radioactive concrete waste generated from KRR-2 and UCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. Y.; Choi, W. K.; Park, J. W.; Lee, K. W.

    2009-01-01

    As a part of a technical development for the volume reduction and stabilization of contaminated concrete wastes generated by dismantling a research reactor and uranium conversion plant, we have developed the volume reduction technology and immobilization of fine powder applicable to an activated heavy weight concrete generated by dismantling KRR-2 and a uranium contaminated light weight concrete produced from a UCP decommissioning. During a decommissioning of nuclear plants and facilities, large quantities of contaminated concrete wastes are generated. The decommissioning of the retired TRIGA MARK II and III research reactors and a uranium conversion plant has been under way. In Korea, two decommissioning projects such as the decommissioning of the retired research reactors (KRR-1 and 2) and a uranium conversion plant (UCP) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been carried out. By dismantling KRR-2, more than 260 tons of radioactive concrete wastes are generated among the total 2,000 tons of concrete wastes and more than 60 tons of concrete wastes contaminated with uranium compounds are generated in UCP decommissioning up to now. The volume reduction and recycling of the wastes is essential to reduce the waste management cost with expecting that an approximate disposal cost for low level radioactive waste will be more than 5,000 US dollars per 200 liter waste drum in Korea. It is well known that most of the radioactivity exist in cement mortar and paste composed of concrete. In this context, the volume reduction of concrete waste is based on the separation of radioactive concrete into a clean recyclable aggregates and a radioactive fine cement powder, which can be readily performed by heating to weaken the adherence force between the cement matrix and the aggregates followed by mechanical crushing and milling processes. In this study, we have investigated the characteristics of separation of aggregates and the distribution of radioactivity into

  9. Physics and Technology for the Next Generation of Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities: EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Catherall, R; Giles, T; Stora, T; Wenander, F K

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1935, nuclear scientists have developed tools to study nuclei far from stability. A major breakthrough came in the eighties when the first high energy radioactive beams were produced at Berkeley, leading to the discovery of neutron halos. The field of nuclear structure received a new impetus, and the major accelerator facilities worldwide rivalled in ingenuity to produce more intense, purer and higher resolution rare isotope beams, leading to our much improved knowledge and understanding of the general evolution of nuclear properties throughout the nuclear chart. However, today, further progress is hampered by the weak beam intensities of current installations which correlate with the difficulty to reach the confines of nuclear binding where new phenomena are predicted, and where the r-process path for nuclear synthesis is expected to be located. The advancement of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science calls for the development of so-called next-generation facil...

  10. Evaluation of site-generated radioactive waste treatment and disposal methods for the Yucca Mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, C.V.; Jardine, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This study identifies the sources of radioactive wastes that may be generated at the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, NV, estimates the waste quantities and characteristics, compares technologies available for waste treatment and disposal, and develops recommended concepts for site-generated waste treatment and disposal. The scope of this study is limited to operations during the emplacement phase, in which 70,000 MTU of high-level waste will be received and emplaced at the proposed repository. The evaluations consider all radioactive wastes generated during normal operations in surface and underground facilities. Wastes generated as a result of accidents are not addressed; accidents that could result in large quantities of radioactive waste are expected to occur very infrequently and temporary, portable systems could be used for any necessary cleanup. The results of this study can be used to develop more definitive plans for managing the site-generated wastes and as a basis for the design of associated facilities at the proposed repository

  11. Radioactivity and decay heat generation in precambrian magmatic rocks (with the South Pamirs as an example)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrmurzaev, A.S.; Alibekov, G.I.; Bekieva, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of the heat generation share in the results of the long-living radioactive elements (RAE) decay in the Earth surface layers is accomplished on the basis of the data on the uranium and thorium concentration in the precambrian magmatic rocks of the South Pamirs. It was supposed by the calculations, that the value of the heat flux, generated by the rocks, is determined mainly by the RAE content in the Earth upper layer crust itself of 10-15 km. It is shown that the radioheat generation share is within the range of 5-10% from the measured values of the geothermal flows [ru

  12. Gas generation in deep radioactive waste repositories: a review of processes, controls and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    Gas generation within radioactive waste repositories may produce two general problems: 1) breaching of engineered and natural barriers due to high gas pressures; 2) enhanced radiological risk due to reduced groundwater travel times and/or greater aqueous or gaseous activities reaching the biosphere. As a result of these concerns, HMIP must be aware of the current status of relevant research, together with any associated deficiencies. This report addresses the current status of published research on near-field gas generation from worldwide sources and documents the important gas generating processes, the factors controlling them and models available to simulate them. In the absence of suitable models, outline technical specifications for corrosion and microbial degradation gas generation models are defined and the deficiencies in the current understanding of gas generation are highlighted; a conceptual research programme to correct these deficiencies is presented. (author)

  13. Radioactivity in coal, ashes and selected wastewaters from Canadian coal-fired steam electric generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    Coal is known to contain naturally occurring radioactive elements and there has been speculation that as a results, coal-fuelled power generation stations may be significant emitters of these substances. In this report, the subject of radioactivity is introduced. The kinds of radioactive substances which occur naturally in coal formations, the nature of their emissions and the existing information on their behaviour and their effects on environmental organisms are also reviewed. The results of an examination of levels of alpha, beta and gamma radiaton levels, and the substances which produce them in coals, fly ashes, bottom ashes and related wastewaters at six Canadian coal-fuelled power stations are presented. Difficulties in studies of this nature and the potential effects of these releases on organisms in the adjacent aquatic environment are discussed. Existing and potential technologies for the removal of these substances from wastewaters are examined. In general the releases in wastewaters from the six stations were found to be lower than those known to cause short-term or acute biological effects. The potential for long-term effects from such low-level releases could not be accurately assessed because of the paucity of information. A number of recommendations for: improvements in further studies of this nature; the further examination of the fate of naturally occurring radionuclides in the environment; and the determination of the long-term effects of low levels of naturally occurring radioactive substances on aquatic organisms, are made

  14. Scripting Fonetico nuove risorse per leggere il greco antico mediante la sintesi vocale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gianferrari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Lo scripting fonetico da lingua italiana produce finalmente una sintesi vocale del greco antico senz’altro soddisfacente per gli usi didattici della Scuola secondaria, per l’accesso alle banche dati che raccolgono l’intero patrimonio letterario della lingua antica e per l’editoria digitale costruita secondo i parametri dell’accessibilità.

  15. Generation projection of solid and liquid radioactive wastes and spent radioactive sources in Mexico; Proyeccion de generacion de desechos radiactivos solidos, liquidos y fuentes radiactivas gastadas en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia A, E.; Hernandez F, I. Y.; Fernandez R, E. [Universidad Politecnica del Valle de Toluca, Km 5.7 Carretera Almoloya de Juarez, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Monroy G, F.; Lizcano C, D., E-mail: fabiola.monroy@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    This work is focused to project the volumes of radioactive aqueous liquid wastes and spent radioactive sources that will be generated in our country in next 15 years, solids compaction and radioactive organic liquids in 10 years starting from the 2014; with the purpose of knowing the technological needs that will be required for their administration. The methodology involves six aspects to develop: the definition of general objectives, to specify the temporary horizon of projection, data collection, selection of the prospecting model and the model application. This approach was applied to the inventory of aqueous liquid wastes, as well as radioactive compaction organic and solids generated in Mexico by non energy applications from the 2001 to 2014, and of the year 1997 at 2014 for spent sources. The applied projection models were: Double exponential smoothing associating the tendency, Simple Smoothing and Lineal Regression. For this study was elected the first forecast model and its application suggests that: the volume of the compaction solid wastes, aqueous liquids and spent radioactive sources will increase respectively in 152%, 49.8% and 55.7%, while the radioactive organic liquid wastes will diminish in 13.15%. (Author)

  16. Biodegradation of the alkaline cellulose degradation products generated during radioactive waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Simon P; Radford, Jessica; Laws, Andrew P; Sweeney, Francis; Elmekawy, Ahmed; Gillie, Lisa J; Humphreys, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    The anoxic, alkaline hydrolysis of cellulosic materials generates a range of cellulose degradation products (CDP) including α and β forms of isosaccharinic acid (ISA) and is expected to occur in radioactive waste disposal sites receiving intermediate level radioactive wastes. The generation of ISA's is of particular relevance to the disposal of these wastes since they are able to form complexes with radioelements such as Pu enhancing their migration. This study demonstrates that microbial communities present in near-surface anoxic sediments are able to degrade CDP including both forms of ISA via iron reduction, sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, without any prior exposure to these substrates. No significant difference (n = 6, p = 0.118) in α and β ISA degradation rates were seen under either iron reducing, sulphate reducing or methanogenic conditions, giving an overall mean degradation rate of 4.7 × 10(-2) hr(-1) (SE ± 2.9 × 10(-3)). These results suggest that a radioactive waste disposal site is likely to be colonised by organisms able to degrade CDP and associated ISA's during the construction and operational phase of the facility.

  17. Biodegradation of the alkaline cellulose degradation products generated during radioactive waste disposal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P Rout

    Full Text Available The anoxic, alkaline hydrolysis of cellulosic materials generates a range of cellulose degradation products (CDP including α and β forms of isosaccharinic acid (ISA and is expected to occur in radioactive waste disposal sites receiving intermediate level radioactive wastes. The generation of ISA's is of particular relevance to the disposal of these wastes since they are able to form complexes with radioelements such as Pu enhancing their migration. This study demonstrates that microbial communities present in near-surface anoxic sediments are able to degrade CDP including both forms of ISA via iron reduction, sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, without any prior exposure to these substrates. No significant difference (n = 6, p = 0.118 in α and β ISA degradation rates were seen under either iron reducing, sulphate reducing or methanogenic conditions, giving an overall mean degradation rate of 4.7 × 10(-2 hr(-1 (SE ± 2.9 × 10(-3. These results suggest that a radioactive waste disposal site is likely to be colonised by organisms able to degrade CDP and associated ISA's during the construction and operational phase of the facility.

  18. Implementation of stage 3 decommissioning and optimization of radioactive waste generation, Triton facility, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The CEA centre of Fontenay-aux-Roses was created in 1946, when the French nuclear energy programme started. Two generations of facilities have been built and operated. The first generation remained operational for 15 years and was dismantled in the late 1950s. It was replaced by a new generation of facilities, as part of the French electronuclear programme, and these included the Triton and Nereide research reactors (hereafter called the Triton facility). In accordance with the CEA strategy and taking into account its urban location, in 1998 the CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses centre decided to launch an extensive cleanup programme to be implemented from 2010 onwards. This included the Stage 3 decommissioning of the Triton facility. In the frame of this decommissioning project, a decommissioning strategy was developed making it possible to optimize the volume of radioactive waste generated

  19. Characterization of long-lived radioactive dust clouds generated in uranium mill operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of long-lived radioactive dust clouds generated in several mechanical and physico-chemical operations in a uranium mill have been investigated. The study consisted of the determination of dust size distribution, and of the radionuclides contained in the particles of each dimension class ranging from <0.1 to 26 μm in diameter. Experiments were conducted using several cascade impactors operating at different sample flow rates. Two different types of cascade impactors were used. Radionuclide identification was done using α-spectrometry and γ-spectrometry. Long-lived and short-lived radionuclides were identified in dust samples. The characteristics of the dust clouds depended on the mill operation. The following operations were studied: crushing (vibrating grizzly, jaw crusher, cone crusher); screening; ore transportation; grinding; acid leaching; counter-current decantation; yellowcake precipitation and drying; and yellowcake packaging. In addition, other dust and radioactivity measurements have been carried out

  20. Radioactivity release vs probability for a steam generator tube rupture accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buslik, A.J.; Hall, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A calculation of the probability of obtaining various radioactivity releases from a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) is presented. The only radioactive isotopes considered are Iodine-131 and Xe-133. The particular accident path considered consists of a double-ended guillotine SGTR followed by loss of offsite power (LOSP). If there is no loss of offsite power, and no system fault other than the SGTR, it is judged that the consequences will be minimal, since the amount of iodine released through the condenser air ejector is expected to be quite small; this is a consequence of the fact that the concentration of iodine in the vapor released from the condenser air ejector is very small compared to that dissolved in the condensate water. In addition, in some plants the condenser air ejector flow is automatically diverted to containment or a high-activity alarm. The analysis presented here is for a typical Westinghouse PWR such as described in RESAR-3S

  1. Situation of the radioactive waste management and the employee radiation exposure in commercial power generation reactor facilities in fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    (1) Situation of the radioactive waste management in commercial power generating reactor facilities: The owners of power generation reactor facilities are obligated not to exceed the target dose around the sites by law in the radioactive waste management. The release of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes and the storage of radioactive solid wastes in respective reactor facilities in fiscal 1980 are presented in tables (for the former, the data since 1971 are also given). The release control values were satisfied in all the facilities. (2) Situation of employe radiation exposure in commercial power generating reactor facilities: The owners of power generation reactor facilities are obligated not to exceed the permissible exposure doses by law. The Employe exposure doses in respective reactor facilities in fiscal 1980 are given in tables. All exposure doses were below the permissible levels. (J.P.N.)

  2. Targets for ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is based on the use of the well-known on-line isotope separator (ISOL) technique in which radioactive nuclei are produced by fusion type reactions in selectively chosen target materials by high-energy proton, deuteron, or He ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of radioactive ion beams (RIBs), selection of the most appropriate target material for production of the species of interest is, perhaps, the most difficult. In this report, we briefly review present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect maximum diffusion release rates of the short-lived species that can be realized at the temperature limits of specific target materials. We also describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the HRIBF as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications

  3. Radiolytic gas generation from cement-based waste hosts for DOE low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    Using cement-based immobilization binders with simulated radioactive waste containing sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and fluoride anions, the gamma- and alpha-radiolytic gas generation factors (G/sub t/, molecules/100 eV) and gas compositions were measured on specimens of cured grouts. These tests studied the effects of; (1) waste composition; (2) the sample surface-to-volume ratio; (3) the waste slurry particle size; and (4) the water content of the waste host formula. The radiolysis test vessels were designed to minimize the ''dead'' volume and to simulate the configuration of waste packages

  4. Specifying the Concept of Future Generations for Addressing Issues Related to High-Level Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermisch, Celine

    2016-12-01

    The nuclear community frequently refers to the concept of "future generations" when discussing the management of high-level radioactive waste. However, this notion is generally not defined. In this context, we have to assume a wide definition of the concept of future generations, conceived as people who will live after the contemporary people are dead. This definition embraces thus each generation following ours, without any restriction in time. The aim of this paper is to show that, in the debate about nuclear waste, this broad notion should be further specified and to clarify the related implications for nuclear waste management policies. Therefore, we provide an ethical analysis of different management strategies for high-level waste in the light of two principles, protection of future generations-based on safety and security-and respect for their choice. This analysis shows that high-level waste management options have different ethical impacts across future generations, depending on whether the memory of the waste and its location is lost, or not. We suggest taking this distinction into account by introducing the notions of "close future generations" and "remote future generations", which has important implications on nuclear waste management policies insofar as it stresses that a retrievable disposal has fewer benefits than usually assumed.

  5. A positive (negative) surface ionization source concept for radioactive ion beam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Mills, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    A novel, versatile, new concept, spherical-geometry, positive (negative) surface-ionization source has been designed and fabricated which will have the capability of generating both positive- and negative-ion beams without mechanical changes to the source. The source utilizes a highly permeable, high-work-function Ir ionizer (φ ≅ 5.29 eV) for ionizing highly electropositive atoms/molecules; while for negative-surface ionization, the work function is lowered by continually feeding a highly electropositive vapor through the ionizer matrix. The use of this technique to effect low work function surfaces for negative ion beam generation has the potential of overcoming the chronic poisoning effects experienced with LaB 6 while enhancing the probability for negative ion formation of atomic and molecular species with low to intermediate electron affinities. The flexibility of operation in either mode makes it especially attractive for radioactive ion beam (RIB) applications and, therefore, the source will be used as a complementary replacement for the high-temperature electron impact ionization sources presently in the use at the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility (HRIBF). The design features and operational principles of the source are described in this report. (orig.)

  6. Radiolytic generation of chloro-organic compounds in transuranic and low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Armstrong, S.C.; Krause, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    The radiolytic degradation of chloro-plastics is being investigated to evaluate the formation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in radioactive waste. These chlorinated VOCs, when their subsequent migration in the geosphere is considered, are potential sources of ground-water contamination. This contamination is an important consideration for transuranic waste repositories being proposed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant project and the several additional low-level radioactive waste sites being considered throughout the United States. The production of chlorinated volatile organic compounds due to the interaction of ionizing radiation with chloro-plastic materials has been well-established in both this work and past studies. This occurs as a result of gamma, beta, and alpha particle interactions with the plastic material. The assemblage of organic compounds generated depends on the type of plastic material, the type of ionizing radiation, the gaseous environment present and the irradiation temperature. In the authors' experiments, gas generation data were obtained by mounting representative plastics near (3 mm) an alpha particle source (Am-241 foil). This assembly was placed in an irradiation vessel which contained air, nitrogen, or a hydrogen/carbon dioxide mixture, at near-atmospheric pressures, to simulate the range of atmospheres likely to be encountered in the subsurface. The gas phase in the vessels are periodically sampled for net gas production. The gas phase concentrations are monitored over time to determine trends and calculate the radiolytic yield for the various gaseous products

  7. Study of particle size distribution and formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols generated in high-energy neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, S; Iida, T; Furuichi, S; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y

    2003-01-01

    The size distributions of sup 3 sup 8 Cl, sup 3 sup 9 Cl, sup 8 sup 2 Br and sup 8 sup 4 Br aerosols generated by irradiations of argon and krypton gases containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols with 45 MeV and 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured in order to study the formation mechanism of radioactive particles in high energy radiation fields. The effects of the size distribution of the radioactive aerosols on the size of the added DOP aerosols, the energy of the neutrons and the kinds of nuclides were studied. The observed size distributions of the radioactive particles were explained by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reactions to the DOP aerosols. (author)

  8. Declaration and authorization forms for the fabrication, distribution or use of radioactive sources or electric generators of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document gathers all the forms to be completed when declaring or when asking for an authorization for the fabrication, retailing or use of radioactive sources or electric equipment generating ionizing radiation. These forms can concern all domains (use of sealed radioactive sources, possession and use of a particle accelerator or of radionuclides, import or export of radionuclides or of products containing radionuclides), or the use of such materials or equipment in the medical sector, or the fabrication and use in industry or research, or in user's guides for radioactive sources

  9. SINTESIS DAN MODIFIKASI LAPIS TIPIS KITOSAN-TRIPOLIFOSFAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Alauhdin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Dalam bidang medis, kitosan telah banyak digunakan yakni pada sistem penghantaran dan pelepasan obat. Pelepasan obat dengan kitosan memiliki keterbatasan karena kitosan cepat sekali menyerap air dan memiliki derajat swelling yang tinggi sehingga menyebabkan pelepasan obat terjadi dengan cepat. Diharapkan dengan memodifikasi struktur kitosan secara kimia dapat meningkatan kelarutannya dalam pelarut-pelarut organik. Telah dilakukan sintesis dan modifikasi lapis tipis kitosan. Modifikasi dilakukan melalui pembentukan ikatan silang kitosan dengan tripolifosfat (TPP pada kondisi asam untuk menghasilkan kitosan-TPP. Ikatan silang yang terbentuk diamati dengan FTIR. Sementara itu, pengaruh hasil pengikatan silang diamati dengan membandingkan rasio swelling kitosan-TPP pada kondisi pH yang berbeda-beda. Rasio swelling lapis tipis cenderung konstan setelah terjadi pengikatan silang kitosan dengan tripolifosfat. Reaksi tripolifosfat dengan kitosan melalui pembentukan ikatan silang menjadikan lapis tipis semakin rapat sehingga molekul air sulit untuk berdifusi masuk ke dalam struktur kitosan-tripolifosfat. Hasil ini menunjukkan bahwa pengikatan silang mampu mengurangi kelarutan dan meningkatkan sifat mekanik kitosan. Rasio swelling lapis tipis berkurang dengan adanya pengikatan silang. Hal ini mengindikasikan bahwa pengikatan silang oleh TPP dapat mengurangi hidrofilitas lapis tipis karena gugus amino yang reaktif telah bereaksi dengan ion tripolifosfat. In the medical field, chitosan has been widely used in the delivery systems and drug release. Drug release with chitosan has limitations because chitosan absorbs water very quickly and have a high degree of swelling that causes the release of the drug occurs rapidly. It is expected that by modifying the chemical structure of chitosan could improve its solubility in organic solvents. The synthesis and modification of chitosan thin film have been done. It was performed through the formation of crosslinked

  10. Gas generation from low-level radioactive waste: Concerns for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siskind, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) has urged the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to reexamine the topic of hydrogen gas generation from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in closed spaces to ensure that the slow buildup of hydrogen from water-bearing wastes in sealed containers does not become a problem for long-term safe disposal. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has prepared a report, summarized in this paper, for the NRC to respond to these concerns. The paper discusses the range of values for G(H 2 ) reported for materials of relevance to LLW disposal; most of these values are in the range of 0.1 to 0.6. Most studies of radiolytic hydrogen generation indicate a leveling off of pressurization, probably because of chemical kinetics involving, in many cases, the radiolysis of water within the waste. Even if no leveling off occurs, realistic gas leakage rates (indicating poor closure by gaskets on drums and liners) will result in adequate relief of pressure for radiolytic gas generation from the majority of commercial sector LLW packages. Biodegradative gas generation, however, could pose a pressurization hazard even at realistic gas leakage rates. Recommendations include passive vents on LLW containers (as already specified for high integrity containers) and upper limits to the G values and/or the specific activity of the LLW

  11. Radioactive release data from Canadian nuclear generating stations 1872-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    All nuclear generating stations emit small quantities of radioactive effluent both into the atmosphere and in the form of liquid effluent, into the adjoining water body, be it river, lake or sea. The purpose of this document is to report on the magnitude of these emissions for each nuclear generating station in Canada and to indicate how these emissions compare with the relevant limitations imposed by the Atomic Energy Control Board as part of its regulatory and licensing program. This report incorporates histograms indicating the annual releases of tritium in air, noble gases, iodine-131, airborne particulates, tritium in water and waterborne gross beta activity for each nuclear generating station. In addition, for Pickering NGS 'A', annual released of carbon-14 are depicted for the years 1986 and 1987. In each case the emission data are compared to the Derived Emission Limit (DEL) in order that the data may be placed in perspective. At present, only Pickering NGS 'A' is required to monitor and report carbon-14 emissions. Environmental monitoring for C-14 is conducted around the Bruce site to determine the environmental impact of its emission and whether effluent monitoring will be necessary in future years. Three nuclear generating stations have been permanently taken out of service during the last few years (Gentilly NGS-1, Douglas Point NGS and NPD NGS). Some small emissions from these sites do still occur, however, due to decontamination and decommissioning operations. (11 tabs., 26 figs.)

  12. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

  13. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives

  14. Experience and modeling of radioactivity transport following steam generator tube rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopenfeld, J.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the capabilities of the CITADEL computer code as well as plant experience to project radioactivity releases following a steam generator tube rupture in pressurized-water reactors shows that certain experimental data are needed for reliable offsite dose predictions. This article defines five parameters that are the key for such predictions and discusses the functional dependence of these parameters on various operational variables. The above parameters can be used in conjuction with CITADEL or they can be inserted in the appropriate equations, which then can be programmed conveniently as a subroutine in thermal-hydraulic system codes. A joint Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Electric Power Research Institute, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission program aimed at obtaining the five parameters empirically is described

  15. Radioactive emission data from Canadian nuclear generating stations 1986 to 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    All nuclear generating station (NGSs) release small quantities of radioactivity in a controlled manner into both the atmosphere (as gaseous effluents) and adjoining water bodies (as liquid effluents). The purpose of this document is to report on the magnitude of these emissions for each operating NGS in Canada and to indicate how these emissions compare with the relevant limitations imposed by the AECB as part of its regulatory and licensing program. The data show that the levels of emissions of gaseous and liquid effluents from all currently operating NGSs are well below the values mandated by the AECB. In fact, since 1987 no emissions have exceeded 1% of those values. 3 tabs., 46 figs

  16. Geospatial analyses and system architectures for the next generation of radioactive materials risk assessment and routing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganter, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper suggests that inexorable changes in the society are presenting both challenges and a rich selection of technologies for responding to these challenges. The citizen is more demanding of environmental and personal protection, and of information. Simultaneously, the commercial and government information technologies markets are providing new technologies like commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software, common datasets, ''open'' GIS, recordable CD-ROM, and the World Wide Web. Thus one has the raw ingredients for creating new techniques and tools for spatial analysis, and these tools can support participative study and decision-making. By carrying out a strategy of thorough and demonstrably correct science, design, and development, can move forward into a new generation of participative risk assessment and routing for radioactive and hazardous materials

  17. National profile on commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.A.; Mrochek, J.E.; Jolley, R.L.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Francis, A.A.; Wright, T.

    1992-12-01

    This report details the findings and conclusions drawn from a survey undertaken as part of a joint US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and US Environmental Protection Agency-sponsored project entitled ''National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste.'' The overall objective of the work was to compile a national profile on the volumes, characteristics, and treatability of commercially generated low-level mixed waste for 1990 by five major facility categories-academic, industrial, medical, and NRC-/Agreement State-licensed goverment facilities and nuclear utilities. Included in this report are descriptions of the methodology used to collect and collate the data, the procedures used to estimate the mixed waste generation rate for commercial facilities in the United States in 1990, and the identification of available treatment technologies to meet applicable EPA treatment standards (40 CFR Part 268) and, if possible, to render the hazardous component of specific mixed waste streams nonhazardous. The report also contains information on existing and potential commercial waste treatment facilities that may provide treatment for specific waste streams identified in the national survey. The report does not include any aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOES) management of mixed waste and generally does not address wastes from remedial action activities

  18. National profile on commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.A.; Mrochek, J.E.; Jolley, R.L.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Francis, A.A.; Wright, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This report details the findings and conclusions drawn from a survey undertaken as part of a joint US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and US Environmental Protection Agency-sponsored project entitled ``National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste.`` The overall objective of the work was to compile a national profile on the volumes, characteristics, and treatability of commercially generated low-level mixed waste for 1990 by five major facility categories-academic, industrial, medical, and NRC-/Agreement State-licensed goverment facilities and nuclear utilities. Included in this report are descriptions of the methodology used to collect and collate the data, the procedures used to estimate the mixed waste generation rate for commercial facilities in the United States in 1990, and the identification of available treatment technologies to meet applicable EPA treatment standards (40 CFR Part 268) and, if possible, to render the hazardous component of specific mixed waste streams nonhazardous. The report also contains information on existing and potential commercial waste treatment facilities that may provide treatment for specific waste streams identified in the national survey. The report does not include any aspect of the Department of Energy`s (DOES) management of mixed waste and generally does not address wastes from remedial action activities.

  19. Radioactive waste assessment using 'minimum waste generation' scenario - summary report March 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.A.; Goodill, D.R.; Tymons, B.J.

    1984-11-01

    This report describes an assessment of radioactive waste management arisings from a defined nuclear power generation - Scheme 1. Scheme 1 assumes a minimum waste generation scenario with raw waste arisings from 3 main groups; (i) existing and committed commercial reactors; (ii) fuel reprocessing plants, (iii) research, industry and medicine. No decommissioning wastes are considered except for arisings from the final fuel cores from decommissioned reactors. The study uses the SIMULATION2 code which models waste material flows through the system. With a knowledge of the accumulations and average production rates of the raw wastes and their isotopic compositions (or total activities), the rates at which conditioned wastes become available for transportation and disposal are calculated, with specific activity levels. The data bases for the inventory calculations and the assumptions concerning future operation of nuclear facilities were those current in 1983. Both the inventory data and plans for the future of existing nuclear installations have been updated since these calculations were completed. Therefore the results from this assessment do not represent the most up-to-date information available. The report does, however, illustrate the methodology of assessment and indicates the type of information that can be generated. (author)

  20. Radioactive waste assessment using 'moderate growth in nuclear electricity generation' scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.A.; Goodill, D.R.; Tymons, B.J.

    1985-05-01

    This report describes an assessment of radioactive waste management arisings from a defined nuclear power generation scenario -Scheme 3. Scheme 3 assumes a moderate growth in nuclear generation scenario with raw waste arisings from 3 main groups: (i) existing and committed commercial reactors; (ii) fuel reprocessing plants; (iii) research, industry and medicine. No decommissioning wastes are considered except for arisings from the final fuel cores from decommissioned reactors. The study uses the SIMULATION2 code which models waste material flows through the system. With a knowledge of the accumulations and average production rates of the raw wastes and their isotopic compositions (or total activities), the rates at which conditioned wastes become available for transportation and disposal are calculated, with specific activity levels. The data bases for the inventory calculations and the assumptions concerning future operation of nuclear facilities were those current in 1983. Both the inventory data and plans for the future of existing nuclear installations have been updated since these calculations were completed. Therefore the results from this assessment do not represent the most up-to-date information available. The report does, however, illustrate the methodology of assessment, and indicates the type of information that can be generated. (author)

  1. Underground disposal techniques of radioactive wastes and wind power generation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The 25th business report on foreign survey of electric power civil engineering technology. On the 25th foreign survey held by the Society of Electric Power Civil Engineering, Technology, disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLRWs) in Switzerland and Sweden, and wind power generation in Spain and Denmark were focused. As a result, it was found that opalinas clay and calcite under survey and investigation of host rock candidates for disposal of HLRWs are stable rock stratum with extremely low water permeability and without groundwater stream. At present, basic research and concrete disposing method are under advancement through actual scale tests. To obtain peoples' understanding on necessity, safety, cost-sharing, and so on of this business, it is essential to easily and precisely technical contents with high level generation specialty. And, on wind power generation, it is necessary to install wind wheels at a position enough to become maximum in wind energy usable from wind observation data and to maintain the wheel mechanically and electrically. Here were described outlines on the survey with its members and schedules. (G.K.)

  2. Safety measures to address the year 2000 issue at medical facilities which use radiation generators and radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    In resolution GC(42)/RES/11 on 'Measures to Address the Year 2000 (Y2K) Issue', adopted on 25 September 1998, the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - inter alia - urged Member States 'to share information with the Secretariat regarding diagnostic and corrective actions being planned or implemented by operating and regulatory organizations at their ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make those facilities Year 2000 ready', encouraged the Secretariat 'within existing resources to act as a clearing-house and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions being taken at ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make these facilities Year 2000 ready', urged the Secretariat 'to handle the information provided by Member States carefully' and requested the Director General to report to it at its next (1999) regular session on the implementation of that resolution. The IAEA Secretariat convened a group of consultants who met in Vienna from 14 to 18 December 1998 and produced this report. The consultants decided that the report should cover not just 'medical facilities which use radioactive materials' but also medical facilities which, while perhaps not using radioactive materials, use ionizing radiation produced by radiation generators such as accelerators. The reports issued together are: Achieving Year 2000 Readiness: Basic Processes; Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Medical Facilities Which Use Radiation Generators and Radioactive Materials; and Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Radioactive Waste Management Facilities. This report addresses means of dealing with the Y2K problem at medical facilities which use radiation generators and radioactive materials

  3. The state of radioactive waste management and of personnel radiation exposure in nuclear power generating facilities in fiscal 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    (1) The state of radioactive waste management in nuclear power generating facilities: In the nuclear power stations, the released quantities of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes are all below the control objective levels. For the respective nuclear power stations, the released quantities of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes in fiscal 1983 and the objective levels are given in table. And, the quantities of solid wastes taken into storage and the cumulative amounts are given. For reference, the results each year since fiscal 1974 are shown. (2) The state of personnel radiation exposure in nuclear power generating facilities: In the nuclear power stations, the personnel radiation exposures are all below the permissible levels. The dose distribution etc. in the respective nuclear power stations are given in table. For reference, the results each year since fiscal 1974 are shown. (Mori, K.)

  4. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This EIS reflects the public review of and comments offered on the draft statement. Included are descriptions of the characteristics of nuclear waste, the alternative disposal methods under consideration, and potential environmental impacts and costs of implementing these methods. Because of the programmatic nature of this document and the preliminary nature of certain design elements assumed in assessing the environmental consequences of the various alternatives, this study has been based on generic, rather than specific, systems. At such time as specific facilities are identified for particular sites, statements addressing site-specific aspects will be prepared for public review and comment.

  5. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 1 of 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This EIS reflects the public review of and comments offered on the draft statement. Included are descriptions of the characteristics of nuclear waste, the alternative disposal methods under consideration, and potential environmental impacts and costs of implementing these methods. Because of the programmatic nature of this document and the preliminary nature of certain design elements assumed in assessing the environmental consequences of the various alternatives, this study has been based on generic, rather than specific, systems. At such time as specific facilities are identified for particular sites, statements addressing site-specific aspects will be prepared for public review and comment

  6. Quantitative analysis of the radioactive wastes to be generated in the Brazilian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Jose Mauro Esteves dos

    1979-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle radioactive waste requiring special treatment (processing, transportation and disposal) is produced. For the implementation of a waste management program, parameters such as volume, specific activity, thermal power, gamma power, (alpha,η) and spontaneous fission neutron production rates are required. In this work, we have calculated: a) The specific activity, thermal power, gamma power and neutron production rate for the irradiated fuel of Angra II; b) The volumes of radioactive waste that will be produced in the nuclear fuel cycle in Brazil; c) The specific activity, thermal power, gamma power and neutron production rate for the high-level waste that will be produced during fuel reprocessing. In the short-term it is concluded that the major problems that will require solution will be the disposal of the low-level waste (volume V L ) and the interim storage of the irradiated fuel elements (volume V F ) generated in the nuclear power plants. For the years 1990 and 2010 these volumes are: (1990) V L = 16149 m 3 ; V F = 1287 m 3 and (2010) V L = 690506 m 3 , V F = 55051 m 3 . In the medium-term the problem of the interim storage of the high-level waste (volume V H ) must be solved. The volumes of this waste we have calculated for the years 2000 and 2010 are: (2000) V H = 50 m 3 and (2010) V H = 1265 m 3 . Long term evaluation of high-level waste disposal must be analysed to aid in initial studies of this problem. Several parameters of this waste have been calculated as a function of time after reprocessing. (author)

  7. Management of Discharge of Low Level Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated in Medical, Educational, Research and Industrial Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    Although published information on management technologies suitable for radioactive effluents is readily available, smaller facilities such as hospitals, universities and research laboratories in some countries can benefit from more detailed guidance on identifying optimal arrangements for effectively managing their radioactive liquid effluents. A wide range of circumstances exist globally, given that the generation of radioactive liquid effluents may be regular or irregular, and the liquid effluents may be suitable for direct discharge to the environment, or may require a period of decay storage prior to discharge. Countries typically fit into one of the four following categories with respect to the status of their arrangements for the management of radioactive liquid effluents: (1) The country does not have sufficient technical, regulatory and organizational infrastructure to effectively manage its radioactive liquid effluents; (2) The country's technical infrastructure for effectively managing its radioactive liquid effluents is almost sufficient, but it is not supported by an acceptable level of regulatory and organizational capacity (e.g. legal infrastructure, administrative infrastructure); (3) The country has sufficient technical, regulatory and organizational capacity, but it is known that the application of the requirements for proper management of radioactive liquid effluents is, in many cases, not being carried out to the standard indicated by official reports; (4) The country has well developed and established regulatory and organizational capacity, which is complemented by an acceptable level of relevant technical infrastructure such that the radioactive liquid effluents can be properly managed. Facilities, as well as countries, in the first three categories will find information in this publication to assist their further development. Even countries that already have the necessary infrastructure to properly manage their liquid radioactive effluents may

  8. Management of Discharge of Low Level Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated in Medical, Educational, Research and Industrial Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    Although published information on management technologies suitable for radioactive effluents is readily available, smaller facilities such as hospitals, universities and research laboratories in some countries can benefit from more detailed guidance on identifying optimal arrangements for effectively managing their radioactive liquid effluents. A wide range of circumstances exist globally, given that the generation of radioactive liquid effluents may be regular or irregular, and the liquid effluents may be suitable for direct discharge to the environment, or may require a period of decay storage prior to discharge. Countries typically fit into one of the four following categories with respect to the status of their arrangements for the management of radioactive liquid effluents: (1) The country does not have sufficient technical, regulatory and organizational infrastructure to effectively manage its radioactive liquid effluents; (2) The country's technical infrastructure for effectively managing its radioactive liquid effluents is almost sufficient, but it is not supported by an acceptable level of regulatory and organizational capacity (e.g. legal infrastructure, administrative infrastructure); (3) The country has sufficient technical, regulatory and organizational capacity, but it is known that the application of the requirements for proper management of radioactive liquid effluents is, in many cases, not being carried out to the standard indicated by official reports; (4) The country has well developed and established regulatory and organizational capacity, which is complemented by an acceptable level of relevant technical infrastructure such that the radioactive liquid effluents can be properly managed. Facilities, as well as countries, in the first three categories will find information in this publication to assist their further development. Even countries that already have the necessary infrastructure to properly manage their liquid radioactive effluents may

  9. Fabrication of targets for transmutation of americium : synthesis of inertial matrix by sol-gel method. Procedure study on the infiltration of a radioactive solutions; Fabricacion de blancos para la transmutacion de americio: sintesis de matrices inertes por el metodo sol-gel. Estudio del procedimiento de infiltracion de disoluciones radiactivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Carretero, A [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Transmutation and incineration are innovative options in the management and disposal of fission products and actinides. nevertheless, the fabrication of targets for transmutation and incineration of actinides and fission products require a reconsideration of conventional processes (mechanical blending) and the development of new procedures compatible with the high activity of these materials. This work presents th R and D of a new fabrication method called INRAM (Infiltration of Radioactive Materials) based on the infiltration of an actinide solution in a porous non radiotoxic material in the form of a pellet (up to 12% An), or beads (up to 40% An) produced by sol-gel. The first method have been used for the fabrication of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) targets containing 11% Am, which have been irradiated in HFR-Petten (358.4 full power days). Post-test burn-up calculations showed that at the end of the irradiation the initial Am-241 concentration was reduced to 4%. The fraction of the initial americum atoms that have been fissioned is 28%. The main advantage of the INRAM method is that matrices with low or zero activity can be fabricated and formed into the required shape in an unshielded facility. This method offers other advantages over conventional ones, such as the active wastes are reduced, is easy to automate, adoptable to telemanipulation and dust free, which facilitate operator intervention and minimise radiation exposure to the personal. In addition, the infiltrant needs only be present in liquid form, i. e. it could be transferred directly from the reprocessing plant for fabrication into targets without conversion into-solid form. In order to optimise the infiltration process in depth investigations of all important process parameters, e. g. infiltration kinetics and metal (pu, Am) concentration in the feed solution, and also on extensive study or powder metallurgy parameters for the preparation of high quality fuel pellets with a high density, have been

  10. Transfer of radioactive waste disposal knowledge to future generations: A stiff challenge for universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabet, B.B.; Elorza, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In general, effective knowledge management strategies rely on the capacity to perform a full range of allied functions, among which education and research are the key components. However, in most countries and notably in Europe, universities which have to conduct leading-edge research and to supply society with future skilled staffs on radioactive waste disposal, suffer from both the shortage of the institutional national support and the decline of interest among students. This paper gives an overview of the academic educational challenges in geological disposal of radioactive waste. Prior to presenting possible solutions to overcome difficulties encountered in this field, the causes of the present failure that seriously threaten the future provision of human resources are identified and analysed. Some of the main findings are: The poor image of nuclear issues in general and the lack of public confidence in the management and disposal of radioactive waste in particular; The smallness of the radwaste community and the narrowness of the job market at the national level; The organisational structure of most universities that inhibits partnerships with non-academic institutions and impedes collaborative activities; The reticence of most governments to invest public funds in the academic education on radwaste disposal. These particular motives added to the common problems shared by the whole nuclear sector such as the lack of educational programmes, the ageing of teachers, and the decline in academic R and D activities, bring about the need for collaborative actions. The paper gives an example of possible solutions through the development of a European academic initiative. In response to the rising alarm about the future shortage of expertise, EURATOM has launched the ENEN II (European Commission 6th FP project No. FP6-036414 for years 2007-2008) project. The goal of this project is to consolidate the European nuclear education, training and knowledge

  11. Criteria for selection of target materials and design of high-efficiency-release targets for radioactive ion beam generation

    CERN Document Server

    Alton, G D; Liu, Y

    1999-01-01

    In this report, we define criteria for choosing target materials and for designing, mechanically stable, short-diffusion-length, highly permeable targets for generation of high-intensity radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for use at nuclear physics and astrophysics research facilities based on the ISOL principle. In addition, lists of refractory target materials are provided and examples are given of a number of successful targets, based on these criteria, that have been fabricated and tested for use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF).

  12. Radiation monitors of new generation - New methodology of detection of nuclear and radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, L.; Stavrov, A.

    2001-01-01

    (customs) officers, who as a rule are not experts in the field of radiation control and radiation protection. Therefore, an urgent task for the present is to develop simple, reliable and inexpensive instruments that would allow several of the mentioned tasks to be simultaneously fulfilled. For the last years instruments of a new generation such as the PM1703 and the PM1710 that combine functions of different class devices have been developed. The main distinguishing and favorable features and advantages of these devices are as follows: These devices having small weight and dimensions permit not only effective detection of radioactive sources, but also their location; Special algorithm gives an opportunity to find sources not only with decreasing background as compared to the natural background value due to its shielding (e.g. by scrap), but also with increasing background due to other source (location of one source in the field of the other one); The devices have a non-volatile memory for the history accumulation and storage: time and date of the device switch on/off, source detection cases, etc. The history of operation may be transmitted to the PC for its further storage and processing; The devices have two LCD display modes: in the count rate units (the sources being detected and located in this mode) and in the dose rate units, which allows the evaluation of a danger of the detected and located source to a person. The above-mentioned features of the described devices give an opportunity to develop a new methodology of detection of sources: Owing to small weight and dimensions and a low power consumption the user may hold these devices in a pocket (on a belt) during the entire working shift without switching them off; The user may fulfil his usual professional duties not related to the radiation control and even may not be concerned about the device and its operation - the device functions in the automatic mode and all the information about its operation is accumulated

  13. Long-lived radioactive waste and nuclear plant decommissioning a legacy to future generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAulay, I.R.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive waste is an inevitable by-product of all uses of radioactive substances. This is the case of natural radioactivity as well as for artificially produced radioactive isotopes, and it is easy to overlook the significance of the waste problem in the case of technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. Several options are available for the disposal of radioactive waste and the paper considers these in detail from the point of view of the possible future impact of radiation doses to individuals or populations. Particular consideration is given to the use of deep disposal at stable geological sites as a means of dealing with large amounts of radioactive waste. It should not be forgotten that some of what we term waste today need not necessarily always be so. Indeed, there is a good case to make for the recycling of low activity materials rather than the uneconomic expedient of burying them. The paper will consider the possible recycling of valuable materials following suitable reprocessing and dilution and mention the dose implications of examples of such re-utilisation of radioactive materials

  14. CAN WE CONSIDER WASTES GENERATED DURING RADIOIMMUNOASSAYS AS A RADIOACTIVE WASTE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shapilov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presents issues of the radiation protection provision for the management of radioactive waste produced by the radioimmunological analysis with the use of 125I marker, calculated and experimental data on radioactive waste specific activities are analyzed.

  15. Determination of the radioactive aerosols transport coefficients generated in open pit uranium mining areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo Py Junior, D. de.

    1978-01-01

    The classical atmospheric transport model is applied to uranium mining operations. Among the transport parameters there is one concerned with radioactive decay, but it does not include the radioactive decay series which is the specific case for uranium. Therefore, an extension of the transport theory is developed and tested, giving results greater than the ones obtained with the classical model, as expected. (author)

  16. Long-lived radioactive waste and nuclear plant decommissioning a legacy to future generations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAulay, I R [Trinity Coll., Dublin (Ireland). Physical Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Radioactive waste is an inevitable by-product of all uses of radioactive substances. This is the case of natural radioactivity as well as for artificially produced radioactive isotopes, and it is easy to overlook the significance of the waste problem in the case of technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. Several options are available for the disposal of radioactive waste and the paper considers these in detail from the point of view of the possible future impact of radiation doses to individuals or populations. Particular consideration is given to the use of deep disposal at stable geological sites as a means of dealing with large amounts of radioactive waste. It should not be forgotten that some of what we term waste today need not necessarily always be so. Indeed, there is a good case to make for the recycling of low activity materials rather than the uneconomic expedient of burying them. The paper will consider the possible recycling of valuable materials following suitable reprocessing and dilution and mention the dose implications of examples of such re-utilisation of radioactive materials.

  17. Synthesis of gels with basis of titanium tungstates as matrixes of radioactive generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galico C, L.

    2005-01-01

    The heteropolyanions, compounds formed by the union of molybdates or tungstates polyanions with atoms of metals like zirconium, titanium, cerium, thorium, tin, etc., have been used as generator matrixes of 99m Tc or 188 Re. Particularly they have been studied and produced successfully in our laboratory, generators of 99 Mo/ 99 m Tc at basis of gels zirconium molybdates and titanium molybdates. Considering that the molybdenum and tungsten, as well as the technetium and the rhenium, its belong to the same groups of transition metals, it is feasible that gels can be synthesized at basis of titanium tungstates, continuing a methodology similar to that of the gels titanium molybdates or zirconium molybdates, to produce generators 188 W/ 188 Re. The 188 Re possess nuclear characteristics that make it attractive for therapeutic applications, since, it emits β - particles of a great energy (2.12 MeV); joined to the possibility of being able to unite to different ligands (bifunctional agents) and biomolecules (antibodies or fragments of proteins), as it makes the 99m Tc, useful in radioimmunotherapy. Commercially the 188 Re generators use a chromatographic column loaded with alumina where the 188 Re, it is adsorbed and eluted the 188 ReO 4 - by means of a saline solution The alumina adsorbs around 0.2% of the 188 Re, situation that forces to use 188 Re of a high specific activity. The use of the gels technology, allows to work with medium or low specific activities of 188 Re, opening the possibility of their production in countries whose nuclear capacity is medium or low. In particular, the synthesized gels with basis of titanium offer the possibility of being synthesized with non active material, for later on to be irradiated and directly produce the generator, since, the titanium 51 Ti, unique radioisotope produced by the titanium, has a half life of 5.79 min. This synthesis method avoids the manipulation of radioactive material during the synthesis of the gels, process

  18. Radioactive battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaton, R.L.; Silver, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive battery is described that is comprised of a container housing an electrolyte, two electrodes immersed in the electrolyte and insoluble radioactive material disposed adjacent one electrode. Insoluble radioactive material of different intensity of radioactivity may be disposed adjacent the second electrode. If hydrobromic acid is used as the electrolyte, Br 2 will be generated by the radioactivity and is reduced at the cathode: Br 2 + 2e = 2 Br - . At the anode Br - is oxidized: 2Br - = Br 2 + 2e. (U.S.)

  19. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation

  20. An assessment of radioactivity level in 51Cr-contaminated dry solid waste generated from a research facility for verification of clearance levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamatsu, Tomohiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Hanafusa, Tadashi; Ono, Toshiro

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from research laboratories and other facilities is regulated by the Law Concerning Prevention from Radiation Hazards due to Radioisotopes etc. (Prevention Law). However, the Prevention Law does not provide the level of clearance or the procedures to follow for compliance monitoring. To assess radioactivity amounts for making decisions about clearance levels, the radioactivity levels in dry solid semi-combustible wastes generated from biomedical research, such as 51 Cr-release assays, were measured and evaluated. Radioactivity of semi-combustible waste was 1.42-6.32% of the initial level. In comparison, records for the past 8 years in the Shikata Laboratory, Department of Radiation Research, Okayama University Advanced Science Research Center, indicated 7% to 90% of the initial radioactivity remained in the waste and was differed widely among researchers. This study determined an accurate radioactivity level in dry solid waste, which could lead to savings in disposal costs. (author)

  1. Calculation of external exposure during transport and disposal of radioactive waste arisen from dismantling of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornacek, M.; Necas, V.

    2014-01-01

    The dismantling of large components (reactor pressure vessel, reactor internals, steam generator) represents complex of processes involving preparation, dismantling, waste treatment and conditioning, transport and final disposal. To optimise all of these activities in accordance with the ALARA principle the prediction of the exposure of workers is an essential prerequisite. The paper deals with the calculation of external exposure of workers during transport and final disposal of heat exchange tubes of steam generator used in Slovak nuclear power plant V1 in Jaslovske Bohunice. The type of waste packages, the calculation models of truck and National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mochovce are presented. The detailed methodology of radioactive waste disposal is showed and the degree of influence of time decay (0, 5 and 10 years) on the radiological conditions during transport and disposal is studied. All of the results do not exceed the limits given in Slovak and international regulatory documents. (authors)

  2. Transportation risk assessment of radioactive wastes generated by the N-Reactor stabilization program at the Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, T.

    1994-12-01

    The potential radiological and nonradiological risks associated with specific radioactive waste shipping campaigns at the Hanford Site are estimated. The shipping campaigns analyzed are associated with the transportation of wastes from the N-Reactor site at the 200-W Area, both within the Hanford Reservation, for disposal. The analysis is based on waste that would be generated from the N-Reactor stabilization program

  3. Radioactive contamination and health risk assessment due to burning of coal in thermal energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radon being a ubiquitous air pollutant has global impact and its monitoring in the environment at work places is essential from health and hygiene point of view. In thermal power plants, a lot of coal is burnt which contains radionuclides which are released into the environment and are hazardous. Radon is the main culprit in the local radioactive contamination of the environment due to burning of coal in thermal energy generation. It has been reported by several researchers (Nikl and Vegvari 1992, Bodizs et al. 1992) that the concentrations of the isotopes U 238 and Ra 226 become 3-5 times more than those in the coal itself in the coal slag and fly ash obtained by burning the coal in coal fired power plants. Several researchers have reported radon levels in thermal power plants (Bodizs et al. 1992, Rawat et al. 1991, Nikl and Vevgari 1992, Papastefanou and Charalanbous 1979, Kant et al. 2001). Keeping in view the environmental pollution caused due to the burning of coal in thermal power stations, there is an upsurge in the establishment of nuclear and gas turbine power stations in recent times. An increased share of gas and nuclear in power generation could lead to lower emissions. Also, considerable emphasis is being laid on developing non-polluting and renewable energy sources like water, air, solar energy and others. In this study, measurement of radon and its progeny levels was carried out over long integrated times in thermal power plant in Haryana by using LR-115, Type- II (Kodak Pathe, France), plastic track detectors commonly known as solid state nuclear track detectors (SS NTDs). Alpha particles emitted from radon cause radiation damage tracks, which were subsequently revealed by chemical etching in NaOH. These alpha tracks registered were counted by optical microscope at suitable magnification and converted into radon concentration. The findings indicate that it is very important to carry out these studies and the results of the full study will

  4. A computer code for calculation of radioactive nuclide generation and depletion, decay heat and γ ray spectrum. FPGS90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Katakura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo

    1995-11-01

    In a nuclear reactor radioactive nuclides are generated and depleted with burning up of nuclear fuel. The radioactive nuclides, emitting γ ray and β ray, play role of radioactive source of decay heat in a reactor and radiation exposure. In safety evaluation of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle, it is needed to estimate the number of nuclides generated in nuclear fuel under various burn-up condition of many kinds of nuclear fuel used in a nuclear reactor. FPGS90 is a code calculating the number of nuclides, decay heat and spectrum of emitted γ ray from fission products produced in a nuclear fuel under the various kinds of burn-up condition. The nuclear data library used in FPGS90 code is the library 'JNDC Nuclear Data Library of Fission Products - second version -', which is compiled by working group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee for evaluating decay heat in a reactor. The code has a function of processing a so-called evaluated nuclear data file such as ENDF/B, JENDL, ENSDF and so on. It also has a function of making figures of calculated results. Using FPGS90 code it is possible to do all works from making library, calculating nuclide generation and decay heat through making figures of the calculated results. (author)

  5. A computer code for calculation of radioactive nuclide generation and depletion, decay heat and {gamma} ray spectrum. FPGS90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Katakura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-11-01

    In a nuclear reactor radioactive nuclides are generated and depleted with burning up of nuclear fuel. The radioactive nuclides, emitting {gamma} ray and {beta} ray, play role of radioactive source of decay heat in a reactor and radiation exposure. In safety evaluation of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle, it is needed to estimate the number of nuclides generated in nuclear fuel under various burn-up condition of many kinds of nuclear fuel used in a nuclear reactor. FPGS90 is a code calculating the number of nuclides, decay heat and spectrum of emitted {gamma} ray from fission products produced in a nuclear fuel under the various kinds of burn-up condition. The nuclear data library used in FPGS90 code is the library `JNDC Nuclear Data Library of Fission Products - second version -`, which is compiled by working group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee for evaluating decay heat in a reactor. The code has a function of processing a so-called evaluated nuclear data file such as ENDF/B, JENDL, ENSDF and so on. It also has a function of making figures of calculated results. Using FPGS90 code it is possible to do all works from making library, calculating nuclide generation and decay heat through making figures of the calculated results. (author).

  6. Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, D.E.; Hamp, S.

    2002-01-01

    Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities

  7. Institutional innovation to generate the public acceptance of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, R.

    1991-01-01

    Contrasting experiences of public acceptance of radioactive waste disposal are compared for the United Kingdom, France, Sweden and Canada. The disparity between scientifically assessed and publicly perceived levels of risk is noted. The author argues that the form of decision-making process is more important to public acceptance of radioactive waste disposal than the technology of disposal. Public risk perception can be altered by procedures employed in planning, negotiation and consultation. Precisely what constitutes acceptable risk does vary from country to country, and differences in institutional responses and innovation are particularly highlighted. (UK)

  8. Generating acceptability of PNRI environmental radioactivity monitoring studies at the former ammunition dump area in Clark special economic zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Teofilo Y.

    2002-11-01

    stakeholders that CSEZ is free of radioactive contamination. The APP principally utilized scientific testing in order to verify the physical presence and extent of radioactive contamination as well as the social marketing approach to generate social acceptability of the scientific findings among the various stakeholders of the base

  9. Generating acceptability of PNRI environmental radioactivity monitoring studies at the former ammunition dump area in Clark special economic zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Teofilo Y

    2002-11-01

    stakeholders that CSEZ is free of radioactive contamination. The APP principally utilized scientific testing in order to verify the physical presence and extent of radioactive contamination as well as the social marketing approach to generate social acceptability of the scientific findings among the various stakeholders of the base.

  10. A combined thermal dissociation and electron impact ionization source for radioactive ion beam generation (abstract)a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Williams, C.

    1996-01-01

    The probability for simultaneously dissociating and efficiently ionizing the individual atomic constituents of molecular feed materials with conventional, hot-cathode, electron-impact ion sources is low and consequently, the ion beams from these sources often appear as mixtures of several molecular sideband beams. This fragmentation process leads to dilution of the intensity of the species of interest for radioactive ion beam (RIB) applications where beam intensity is at a premium. We have conceived an ion source that combines the excellent molecular dissociation properties of a thermal dissociator and the high ionization efficiency characteristics of an electron impact ionization source that will, in principle, overcome this handicap. The source concept will be evaluated as a potential candidate for use for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The design features and principles of operation of the source are described in this article. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Memory for future generations. To preserve and to transmit the memory of radioactive wastes. Press file - September 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-09-01

    This publication by the ANDRA describes the approach adopted to develop, to preserve and to transmit the memory about radioactive wastes. This approach comprises three components: messages (texts, archives, drawings...), physical supports (paper, disk, markers), and relays (institutions, companies, etc.). The publication describes how these components are already used or implemented for the different radioactive waste storage centres managed by the ANDRA. It also outlines that this memory is an issue of international concern. It evokes issues related to linguistics (how future generations will understand our messages?), to the ageing of materials used as physical support, to archaeology because of the evolution of landscapes, and to the evolution of archival systems. Some simple ideas and projects are briefly indicated which can be a support in memory building

  12. Volume reduction/solidification of liquid radioactive waste using bitumen at Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, J.E.; Baker, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Ontario Hydro at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A' has undertaken a program to render the station's liquid radioactive waste suitable for discharge to Lake Huron by removing sufficient radiological and chemical contaminants to satisfy regulatory requirements for emissions. The system will remove radionuclide and chemical contaminants from five different plant waste streams. The contaminants will be immobilized and stored at on-site radioactive waste storage facilities and the purified streams will be discharged. The discharge targets established by Ontario Hydro are set well below the limits established by the Ontario Ministry of Environment (MOE) and are based on the Best Available Technology Economically Achievable Approach (B.A.T.E.A.). ADTECHS Corporation has been selected by Ontario Hydro to provide volume reduction/solidification technology for one of the five waste streams. The system will dry and immobilize the contaminants from a liquid waste stream in emulsified asphalt using thin film evaporation technology

  13. Treatment of Radioactive Waste Generated from the Production of Molybdenum-99 Radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisyah; Herlan Martono

    2007-01-01

    The 99 Mo is produced as the parent radionuclide for 99m Tc radioisotope which is used as medical radiodiagnostic for certain disease. In Indonesia 99 Mo is produced by irradiating target of high enriched U in the reactor. The characteristics of radioactive waste from the production of 99 Mo depend on the U enrichment of the target and the irradiation time. The characteristic of the radioactive waste can be directly determined by laboratory analysis or by ORIGEN 2 code. Producing 99 Mo from high enriched uranium target will produce radioactive waste containing 235 U, 238 U and fission product, while from low enriched uranium target will produce radioactive waste containing large amount of 239 Pu. Plutonium-239 is a long half life actinide that need to be separated from the fission product due to a different treatment is required. The fission product, after it is allowed to decay then needs to be categorized as low or medium level waste, while 239 Pu are categorized as transuranic waste. The disposal of low and medium level waste are stored in near surface disposal, while the disposal of transuranic waste is stored in a geologic formation. (author)

  14. The thermal analysis of low heat generating radioactive wastes in land disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lympany, S.D.

    1984-08-01

    A procedure is developed which allows a simple thermal analysis of a radioactive waste repository. The procedure is used to establish if the thermally induced groundwater flow is important when considering the transport of radionuclides from the repository, and thereby indicates if this flow should be taken into account in a detailed thermal assessment. (author)

  15. Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.; Tebes, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary radiological dose assessment related to equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials in production waste streams. The assessment evaluated the relative dose of these activities and included a sensitivity analysis of certain input parameters. Future studies and potential policy actions are recommended

  16. SINTESIS NANOPARTIKEL PERAK MENGGUNAKAN METODE POLIOL DENGAN AGEN STABILISATOR POLIVINILALKOHOL (PVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOB Apriandanu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak __________________________________________________________________________________________ Nanopartikel perak merupakan produk berbasis nanoteknologi yang sedang berkembang saat ini dan dapat diaplikasikan sebagai katalis dan detektor sensor optik. Faktor yang dapat mempengaruhi ukuran nanopartikel adalah konsentrasi garam dan agen pereduksi. Nanopartikel perak bersifat tidak stabil. Oleh karena itu, perlu adanya penambahan polivinil alkohol sebagai agen stabilisator dalam sintesis nanopartikel perak. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh rasio mol reduktor EG/Ag+ dan % PVA (b/v dalam sintesis nanopartikel perak terhadap karakteristik produk yang dihasilkan. Nanopartikel perak disintesis dengan metode poliol yaitu melarutkan AgNO3 ke dalam etilen glikol sebagai reduktor dan polivinilalkohol (PVA sebagai stabilisator. Karakterisasi dilakukan menggunakan Spek-trofotometer UV-Vis dan TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope. Analisis terhadap spektra UV-Vis menunjukkan bahwa nanopartikel yang relatif stabil pada pengukuran panjang gelombang maksimum 417 hingga 418 nm adalah nanopartikel yang disintesis menggunakan PVA 3%. Karakterisasi dengan TEM menunjukkan nanopartikel perak yang disintesis berdasarkan rasio mol etilen glikol terhadap Ag+ 50:1 memiliki ukuran terkecil dengan kisaran 10,15–27,56 nm dengan struktur kristal face centered cubic (FCC. Semakin tinggi rasio mol EG /Ag+ dalam sintesis nanopartikel perak, semakin tinggi pula peningkatan absorbansinya.   Abstract __________________________________________________________________________________________ Silver nanoparticles are nanotechnology based product which can be applied as a catalyst and optic sensor detector. The factors that can effect on nanoparticle size are salt concentration and reductor agent. Silver nanoparticles are unstable material, so polyvinylalcohol needs to be added  as a stabilizer agent in their synthesis. The aims of this research are to

  17. Radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Yoshio; Shimizu, Makoto.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of radioactivity in the ocean with marine life are various. Activities in this field, especially the measurements of the radioactivity in sea water and marine life are described. The works first started in Japan concerning nuclear weapon tests. Then the port call to Japan by U.S. nuclear-powered naval ships began. On the other hand, nuclear power generation is advancing with its discharge of warm water. The radioactive pollution of sea water, and hence the contamination of marine life are now major problems. Surveys of the sea areas concerned and study of the radioactivity intake by fishes and others are carried out extensively in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  18. The Konrad mine - the planned German repository for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H.P.; Brennecke, P.

    1990-07-01

    This report deals with the planned Konrad repository and describes the current state of affairs. In particular, the technical concept is explained and a survey of the radioactive waste intended for disposal is given. The safety assessments which have been made, including the derivation of preliminary waste acceptance requirements, are described and the principles of the waste package control are outlined. (orig./HP) [de

  19. SINTESIS KOMPOSIT KITOSAN-SILIKA DAN APLIKASINYA SEBAGAI ADSORBEN ZAT WARNA TEKTIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warlan Sugiyo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sintesis kitosan-silika dilakukan terhadap kitosan penambahan silika dengan mengkarakteristik komposit yang dihasilkan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengkaji pengaruh penambahan silika pada larutan kitosan terhadap permeabilitas dan daya adsorpsinya terhadap zat warna tekstil Direct Blue 86. Pembuatan komposit menggunakan dua macam cara, yang pertama menggunakan media kertas saring dan yang kedua tanpa menggunakan kertas saring. Pembuatan komposit dengan menggunakan kertas saring memakai proses perendaman. Pembuatan komposit tanpa menggunakan kertas saring dilakukan dengan metode pencetakan membran. Membran komposit yang dihasilkan dikarakteristik dengan menggunakan foto SEM. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa penambahan silika pada larutan kitosan membuat komposit menjadi porogen sehingga fluks permeat dan permeabilitas air menjadi tinggi. Permeabilitas komposit secara keseluruhan dipengaruhi bagaimana pori-pori komposisi tersusun. Komposit yang terbuat dari kertas saring mempunyai daya adsorpsi yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan komposit yang tanpa kertas saring.

  20. Pengaruh Advance Organizer Berbasis Proyek Terhadap Kemampuan Analisis – Sintesis Siswa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasiwan -

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui pengaruh model pengatur kemajuan (advance organizer berbasis proyek terhadap kemampuan analisis – sintesis siswa pada konsep Energi. Sebelum pembelajaran, diberikan tugas proyek pada siswa untuk merealisasikan bel listrik sederhana, rangkaian arus seri - paralel, dan tuas. Produk proyek digunakan sebagai advance organizer dalam pembelajaran di kelas. Penguatan kognitif dilakukan melalui diskusi kelompok dan pembuatan peta konsep, ekspositori guru di kelas, dan kegiatan eksperimen laboratorium. Data diambil melalui pretest, post test, observasi partisipatif pembelajaran oleh dua orang observer, penilaian produk, peta konsep dan laporan kegiatan eksperimen. Teknik analisis data meliputi uji prasyarat data dan uji hipotesis Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa siswa mengalami peningkatan kemampuan analisis – sintesis dalam aspek menguraikan, mengkategorikan, mengidentifikasi, merumuskan pernyataan, merekonstruksi, menentukan konsep, dan menganalisis konsep dengan rata – rata peningkatan delta skor sebesar 54,46 %, uji t sebesar 6,4, dan skala gain sebesar 0,3. This study was conducted to determine the effect of project-based advance organizer model on student’s analysis - synthesis ability of the energy concept. Students were given an assignment to realize the project on simple electric bell, the series – parallel circuit, and lever, before learning. The products of project were used as an advanced organizer in the learning activity. Cognitive strengthening was done through group discussions and concept mapping, expository learning in the classroom, and laboratory experiments activities. The data were taken through a pretest, post-test, participant observation study by two observers, product assessment, concept maps and report of experiment activities. Results showed that the students’ analysis - synthesis ability increased in the aspect of describing, categorizing, identifying, statement

  1. Selection of efficient options for processing and storage of radioactive waste in countries with small amounts of waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The report is intended to assist decision makers in countries using nuclear energy for non-power applications to organize their waste management practices. It describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technologies for processing and storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for implementation of waste management activities at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of particular technologies for different scales of waste generation. These wastes may arise from production of radionuclides and their application in industry, agriculture, medicine, education and research. The report also considers waste generated at research reactors, research centers and research laboratories using radioisotopes, as well as waste from decommissioning of research reactors and small nuclear facilities such as hot cells, laboratories and irradiation facilities. Management of uranium mining and milling waste and management of spent fuel from research reactors are not considered in this report. Discussed in detail are: the basic legal, regulatory, administrative and technical requirements set up in a national waste management system and review of the factors and components affecting the selection of an appropriate national waste management system. the origins and characteristics of radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. the technical factors that might affect the selection of waste processing and storage technologies, the main waste management steps, information on available technologies, the basis for planning of waste processing and storage and the selection of a particular option for radioactive waste processing and storage in countries with a different scale of nuclear applications

  2. Selection of efficient options for processing and storage of radioactive waste in countries with small amounts of waste generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    The report is intended to assist decision makers in countries using nuclear energy for non-power applications to organize their waste management practices. It describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technologies for processing and storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for implementation of waste management activities at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of particular technologies for different scales of waste generation. These wastes may arise from production of radionuclides and their application in industry, agriculture, medicine, education and research. The report also considers waste generated at research reactors, research centers and research laboratories using radioisotopes, as well as waste from decommissioning of research reactors and small nuclear facilities such as hot cells, laboratories and irradiation facilities. Management of uranium mining and milling waste and management of spent fuel from research reactors are not considered in this report. Discussed in detail are: the basic legal, regulatory, administrative and technical requirements set up in a national waste management system and review of the factors and components affecting the selection of an appropriate national waste management system. the origins and characteristics of radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. the technical factors that might affect the selection of waste processing and storage technologies, the main waste management steps, information on available technologies, the basis for planning of waste processing and storage and the selection of a particular option for radioactive waste processing and storage in countries with a different scale of nuclear applications.

  3. Microbial aspects of gas generation from low level radioactive waste simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidby, D.W.; Billington, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report details the experimental work undertaken to further the understanding of the kinetics of methanogenesis associated with radioactive LLW disposal. A series of treatments were established by inoculating a LLW simulant and investigating the kinetics of methanogenesis in small Wheaton bottles. Treatments were set up to study the effects of waste compaction, the addition of metal to the simulant, the initial aerobic phase, pH and temperature on gas production. A separate experiment was also established to determine whether cellulose in the simulant acted as a biogas precursor. Results are presented from the head space gas analysis and the solid and liquid phase analyses undertaken over a 600 day period. (Author)

  4. Selection of targets and ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    In this report, the authors describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications. A brief review of present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect fast and efficient diffusion release of the short-lived species is also given

  5. Method of producing a solution of radioactive lanthanum-140 from radioactive barium-140 in an isotope generator and installation to carry out the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, K.; Jacobs, G.; Sauerwein, K.

    1979-01-01

    A method of separating radioactive lanthanum-140 from radioactive Ba-140 is proposed. The lanthanum-140 will be washed out of a sulphate precipitate and separated from Ba-140-sulphate by a granular filter mass of CaSO 4 and BaSO 4 . Details of the process are given. (UWI) [de

  6. 01 - The sustainable management of radioactive materials with fourth-generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This publication first explains the reasons for the development of fourth-generation nuclear systems: the issue of resources, the issue of used fuels, technologies for fast breeder fourth-generation reactors, the alternative of HFC-cooled light water reactors, the potential market for fast-breeder reactors, strategies in different countries. Then, the authors address the strategy development for these fourth-generation reactors: requirements, safety, economic competitiveness, resistance to proliferation, flexible management of nuclear resources, development scheme (sodium or gas-based heat transfer), and fuel cycle. They finally discuss the possible transition scenarios towards this new generation

  7. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of hazardous chemical waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). Hazardous chemical waste is a necessary byproduct of LBL's research and technical support activities. This waste must be handled properly if LBL is to operate safely and provide adequate protection to staff and the environment. These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of hazardous chemical waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for hazardous chemical waste

  8. Conditioning of radioactive aluminium generated by the VVR-S Nuclear Reactor Decommissioning Laboratory Inactive Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicu, M.; Ionascu, L.; Turcau, C.; Dragolici, F.; Rotarescu, G.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is a reactive amphoteric metal, readily forming a protective oxide layer on contact with air or water. However, as the oxides are amphoteric, aluminium is not resistant to corrosion in acidic and alkaline conditions, because the protective films dissolve. As a consequence radioactive waste containing bulk aluminium alloys can not be embedded in Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). A potential encapsulating material for the radioactive aluminium is potassium magnesium phosphate (MKP). This paper presents the characterization results obtained from analyzing the potential magnesium phosphate formulations and assesses its potential to reduce the corrosion of aluminium. A series of experiments have been performed. The main conclusions of the paper are as follows. First, the pH values of magnesium phosphate formulation investigated increased gradually over the test duration, with pH measurement ranging from 8.1 - 9.1, indicating lower values compared with the reference composite OPC (pH ∼ 13). The reduction of pH is an important controlling factor for the corrosion of aluminium. Secondly, according to XRD, the hardened magnesium phosphate matrix is polycrystalline and the main reaction product of magnesium phosphate cement formulations was confirmed as MgKPO 4 -6H 2 O, which was found to dominate the crystalline phase composition. Thirdly, the compressive strengths obtained for magnesium phosphate matrices investigated are included in the accepted limits for the embedding matrix with cement (above 5 N/mm 2 ). And fourthly, the corrosion of metallic aluminium in magnesium phosphate matrix is markedly reduced in comparison with the composite OPC

  9. The combined hybrid system: A symbiotic thermal reactor/fast reactor system for power generation and radioactive waste toxicity reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollaway, W.R.

    1991-08-01

    If there is to be a next generation of nuclear power in the United States, then the four fundamental obstacles confronting nuclear power technology must be overcome: safety, cost, waste management, and proliferation resistance. The Combined Hybrid System (CHS) is proposed as a possible solution to the problems preventing a vigorous resurgence of nuclear power. The CHS combines Thermal Reactors (for operability, safety, and cost) and Integral Fast Reactors (for waste treatment and actinide burning) in a symbiotic large scale system. The CHS addresses the safety and cost issues through the use of advanced reactor designs, the waste management issue through the use of actinide burning, and the proliferation resistance issue through the use of an integral fuel cycle with co-located components. There are nine major components in the Combined Hybrid System linked by nineteen nuclear material mass flow streams. A computer code, CHASM, is used to analyze the mass flow rates CHS, and the reactor support ratio (the ratio of thermal/fast reactors), IFR of the system. The primary advantages of the CHS are its essentially actinide-free high-level radioactive waste, plus improved reactor safety, uranium utilization, and widening of the option base. The primary disadvantages of the CHS are the large capacity of IFRs required (approximately one MW e IFR capacity for every three MW e Thermal Reactor) and the novel radioactive waste streams produced by the CHS. The capability of the IFR to burn pure transuranic fuel, a primary assumption of this study, has yet to be proven. The Combined Hybrid System represents an attractive option for future nuclear power development; that disposal of the essentially actinide-free radioactive waste produced by the CHS provides an excellent alternative to the disposal of intact actinide-bearing Light Water Reactor spent fuel (reducing the toxicity based lifetime of the waste from roughly 360,000 years to about 510 years)

  10. Refinancing of the search for a repository and of the repository for heat generating radioactive waste. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moench, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The final disposal of radioactive waste is a state task that is assigned to the Federal Government pursuant to section 9a (3) sentence 1 of the Atomic Energy Act (AtG). Since the early 1970's, the Federal Government has been actively searching for and exploring final disposal sites for radioactive waste. In a proceeding accompanied by the intensive participation of technical experts and the public, the Gorleben salt dome (Salzstock) has emerged as a presumably suitable disposal site from a mining standpoint (eignungshoeffig) according to the current status of the exploration. The cost of these exploratory measures - and the subsequent construction - will be financed by the waste producers, in particular the utility companies, by means of advance payments on their contributions. Part I of this article will evaluate the selection and exploration of the Gorleben salt dome to date and examine the provisions on the pre-financing burden from the point of view of constitutional law. Constitutional objections can also be raised against the regulation in section 21b (4) AtG that was introduced in 1998, which excludes a refunding of the pre-financing contributions even if the repository is never erected or operated. Part II of this article, which will appear in the next issue, will take up the question of whether a search for an alternative repository site, as the Federal Ministry for the Environment (BMU) envisions in the working draft of an 'Act on the search for and selection of a site for a repository for heat generating radioactive waste' (Gesetz zur Suche und Auswahl eines Standortes fuer ein Endlager fuer waermeentwickelnde radioaktive Abfaelle), is likewise to be refinanced as a contribution by the parties obliged to make advance payments. (orig.)

  11. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement

  12. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

  13. Hydrogen generation during treatment of simulated high-level radioactive waste with formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, J.A.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Hsu, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Integrated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter System (IDMS), operated by the Savannah River Laboratory, is a one-fifth scale pilot facility used in support of the start-up and operation of the Department of Energy's DWPF. Five IDMS runs determined the effect of the presence of noble metals in HLW sludge on the H 2 generation rate during the preparation of melter feed with formic acid. Overall, the results clearly showed that H 2 generation in the DWPF SRAT could, at times, exceed the lower flammable limit of H 2 in air (4 vol%), depending on such factors as offgas generation and air inleakage of the DWPF vessels. Therefore, the installation of a forced air purge system and H 2 monitors were recommended to the DWPF to control the generation of H 2 during melter feed preparation by fuel dilution

  14. Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1996-09-01

    A preliminary radiological dose assessment of equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in production waste streams. The assessment estimated maximum individual dose equivalents for workers and the general public. Sensitivity analyses of certain input parameters also were conducted. On the basis of this assessment, it is concluded that (1) regulations requiring workers to wear respiratory protection during equipment cleaning operations are likely to result in lower worker doses, (2) underground injection and downhole encapsulation of NORM wastes present a negligible risk to the general public, and (3) potential doses to workers and the general public related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment can be controlled by limiting the contamination level of the initial feed. It is recommended that (1) NORM wastes be further characterized to improve studies of potential radiological doses; (2) states be encouraged to permit subsurface disposal of NORM more readily, provided further assessments support this study; results; (3) further assessment of landspreading NORM wastes be conducted; and (4) the political, economic, sociological, and nonradiological issues related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment be studied to fully examine the feasibility of this disposal option

  15. The management of the radioactive waste generated by the EDF nuclear power plants in service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantes, B.; Beguin, St.

    2011-01-01

    From the very beginning of France's nuclear power programme, EDF has developed industrial-scale management of the waste it produces, which has constantly progressed in line with changes in the regulations and the available technology. This management process, improved thanks to feedback and experience, ensures that any risk of exposure, at every stage, from production to final disposal, is controlled. The guidelines adopted by EDF for sustainable management of its waste are as follows: -) reduce the quantity of waste, from the production stage and then through recycling and reprocessing; -) sort waste according to its nature and activity level, so that it can be processed and packaged appropriately and the appropriate long-term management solution implemented; -) package waste as soon as it is produced to prevent any risk of dispersion; -) store waste, pending decay or the availability of an appropriate disposal solution; -) transport and place waste in repositories, keeping it away from Man and the environment by means of engineered or natural barriers for as long as required for the radioactivity to decay to an acceptable level. Regarding short-lived waste produced during operating and maintenance activities at power plants in service, EDF currently implements fully-integrated industrial management solutions which are constantly being optimised in conjunction with its industrial partners. (authors)

  16. A concept of countermeasure against radioactive wastewater generated in disastrous nuclear accident such as Fukushima Daiichi site case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang-Wook; Lee, Keun-Young; Lee, Eil-Hee; Baek, Yeji; So, Ji-Yang; Chung, Dong-Young; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Before the operation of initial wastewater treatment systems supplied by AREVA and Kurion companies, which were installed about 6 months after the accident, the contaminated water was accumulated in reactor and turbine buildings, then was moved and stored in many hurriedly-prepared storage tanks including even mega float barge. The wastewater treatment systems using Cs-adsorption columns and desalination equipment was not properly operated and there were several small and big leakages of contaminated water from the wastewater treatment system and storage tanks, so that tremendous wastewater had been accumulated during those periods. That thereafter led to many secondary problems in management and treatment of the wastewater. Since the disastrous accident at Fukushima, several measures to more enhance safety of nuclear power plants located on coastal area have been asked. As one of them, a countermeasure against generation of tremendous radioactive wastewater in disastrous nuclear accident like the Fukushima Daiichi station was asked to be prepared.

  17. The generation characteristics of solid radioactive wastes in the KEPCO nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, Soon Hwan; Kang, Duck Won; Kim, Hee Keun

    1991-01-01

    Solid radwastes generation trend and characteristics were discussed for nuclear power plants in KEPCO. Each plant has a specific tendency of solid radwastes generation due to the plant characteristics. The total volume of solid radwastes generated from nine power plants was accumulated in 23,012 drums by the end of 1989. The average annual volume per unit was about 670 drums. The solid radwaste mostly consisted of solidified concentrates and contaminated trash. The contaminated trash has been the major portion of the solid radwastes since 1982. The volume of the contaminated trash was dependent on the availability factor and period of overhaul. Therefore, the contaminated trash was considered to be a prime target for the solid radwastes minimization plan

  18. Radionuclide inventory and heat generation analysis in disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanto

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclide inventory and heat generation analysis on spent nuclear fuel were done in order to study the potential radionuclides contributing radiological impact to human being caused by spent fuel disposal. The study was carried out using the Bateman equation of radionuclide decay chains for fission products and actinides. the results showed that Cs-137, Sr-90 and Pu-239 dominated inventory of spent fuel, in which Pu-238 and Pu-240 dominated heat generation during disposal. Accordingly, the above radionuclides could be considered as the reference radionuclides for safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel disposal (author)

  19. Generation, transport and conduct of radioactive wastes of low and intermediate level; Generacion, transporte y gestion de desechos radiactivos de nivel bajo e intermedio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizcano, D.; Jimenez, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: dlc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The technological development of the last decades produced an increment in the application of the radiations in different human activities. The effect of it has been it the production of radioactive wastes of all the levels. In Mexico, some of the stages of the administration of the waste of low and intermediate level have not been completely resolved, as the case of the treatment and the final storage. In this work aspects of the generation, the transport and the administration of radioactive waste of low and intermediate level produced in the non energy applications from the radioactive materials to national level, indicating the generated average quantities, transported and tried annually by the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). The main generators of wastes in Mexico, classified according to the activity in which the radioactive materials are used its are listed. Some of the main processes of treatment of radioactive wastes broadly applied in the world and those that are used at the moment in our country are also presented. (Author)

  20. A study on the generation of radioactive corrosion product at PWR for extended fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Chul Song; Kun Jai Lee

    2001-01-01

    Current nuclear power plant operating practice is to extend the time between refueling from a 12 month operating cycle to an 18-24 month period. This current to longer fuel cycles has complicated the dilemma of finding optimum pH range for the primary coolant chemistry. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in ICRP publication No. 60 recommends optimization of operator radiation exposure (ORE) in nuclear power plants. CRUD formed in the plants is the major source of ORE and its transport mechanism is not understood. To analyze the generation of CRUD at the extended fuel cycle, the COTRAN code, which was developed at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), was used. It predicts that the activity of CRUD decreases as the pH of the coolant increases. For the same period of different fuel cycles, as the operating fuel cycle duration is increased, the generation of the CRUD increases. In this paper, enriched boric acid (40% enriched 10 B concentration) for reactivity control is adopted as the required chemical shim rather than natural boric acid. The effect of the enriched boric acid (EBA) is that the neutron absorption capability of the chemical shim is maintained while decreasing the required boron and lithium concentration in the reactor coolant system. By employing enriched boric acid, the amounts of CRUD generated are reduced, because the high pH-operating period is extended. From the waste generation point of view, more filters or ion exchangers to remove CRUD are required and the amounts of waste are increased at the extended fuel cycle. (author)

  1. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix D-3: Characterization of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from other generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Other Generators category includes all greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) that is not generated or held by nuclear utilities or sealed sources licensees or that is not stored at Department of Energy facilities. To determine the amount of waste within this category, 90 LLW generators were contacted; 13 fit the Other Generators category. Based on information received from the 13 identified Other Generators, the GTCC LLW Management Program was able to (a) characterize the nature of industries in this category, (b) estimate the 1993 inventory of Other Generator waste for high, base, and low cases, and (c) project inventories to the year 2035 for high, base, and low cases. Assumptions were applied to each of the case estimates to account for generators who may not have been identified in this study

  2. A new class of photoactivatable and carbene generating reagents with extremely high specific radioactivity. Synthesis, characterization and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, T.

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of this work was the development of new photocrosslinking and labeling reagents which show favourable photochemical properties and can be synthesized in an extremely high specific radioactivity. A key compound in the synthesis of these reagents was 2-tributyltin-4-(3-trifluormethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)-benzyl alcohol. Esters of this alcohol can be easily radioiodinated at a specific radioactivity of >2000 Ci/mmol under mild conditions. By experiments with a model compound it was shown that 2-iodo-4-(3-trifluormethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)-benzyl esters, upon photolysis, generate highly reactive (singlet) carbenes capable of inserting into CH-bonds. Equally important, there is no indication of loss of iodine under the photolysis conditions applied. Therefore two key requirements for photolabeling reagents are fulfilled. Several photoactivatable radioiodinated phospholipids have been synthesized. Their properties have been evaluated by labeling of the the membranes of intact erythrocytes and influenza viruses. Currently these lipids are used to study the interaction of various proteins (shown are experiments with MARCKS) with membranes. Furthermore a new class of actual label transfer crosslinkers (two thiol specific and one amino specific) have been developed. The range of potentialities of these reagents is currently being investigated. Finally a photoactivatable radioiodinated ceramide analogue suitable as a photoaffinity crosslinker has been developed with the goal of identifying the putative receptor of this second messenger-like lipid. Preliminary studies towards this goal are described. We are convinced that the reagents and methods presented in this work are valuable tools, and that they will find widespread use in future cell-biological and biochemical research. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  3. Universal method for effusive-flow characterization target ion source/vapor transport systems for radioactive ion beam generation (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Bilheux, J.-C.; Liu, Y.; Cole, J. A.; Williams, C.

    2004-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the use of accelerated radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for exploring reactions important in understanding the structure of the nucleus and nuclear astrophysical phenomena has motivated the construction of facilities dedicated to their production and acceleration. Many facilities utilize the isotope-separator-on-line (ISOL) method in which species of interest are generated within a solid or liquid target matrix. Experimentally useful RIBs are often difficult to generate by this technique because of the times required for diffusion from the interior of the target material, and to effusively transport the species of interest to the ion source following diffusion release in relation to its lifetime. Therefore, these delay times must be minimized. We have developed an experimental method that can be used to determine effusive-flow times of arbitrary geometry target/vapor transport systems. The technique utilizes a fast valve to measure effusive-flow times as short as 0.1 ms for any chemically active or inactive species through any target system, independent of size, geometry and materials of construction. In this report, we provide a theoretical basis for effusive flow through arbitrary geometry vapor transport systems, describe a universal experimental apparatus for measuring effusive-flow times, and provide time spectra for noble gases through prototype RIB target/vapor-transport systems

  4. Radioactive aerosols of the object 'Ukryttya' (a review). Part 4.2. Sources and generation of radioactive aerosols during technogenic activities in 1987 - 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogorodnikov, B.I.; Pazukhin, Eh.M.

    2006-01-01

    The sources of radioactive aerosol formation were considered at operation. It is shown that concentrations, radionuclide composition, size distribution, transfer and transformation in environment depended on physical and chemical processes proceeding within reactor breakdown, man-caused activity into premises of the object 'Shelter' and near ChNPP. 34 refs.; 7 figs.; 11 tab

  5. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, F; Shala, F; Xhixha, G; Xhixha, M K; Hodolli, G; Kadiri, S; Bylyku, E; Cfarku, F

    2014-12-01

    The energy production in Kosovo depends primarily on lignite-fired power plants. During coal combustion, huge amounts of fly ash and bottom ash are generated, which may result in enriched natural radionuclides; therefore, these radionuclides need to be investigated to identify the possible processes that may lead to the radiological exposure of workers and the local population. Lignite samples and NORMs of fly ash and bottom ash generated in lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo are analyzed using a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the activity concentration of natural radionuclides. The average activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th in lignite are found to be 36 ± 8 Bq kg(-1), 9 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) and 9 ± 3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Indications on the occurrence and geochemical behavior of uranium in the lignite matrix are suggested. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in fly ash and bottom ash samples are found to be concentrated from 3 to 5 times that of the feeding lignite. The external gamma-ray absorbed dose rate and the activity concentration index are calculated to assess the radiological hazard arising from ash disposal and recycling in the cement industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Computer-based liquid radioactive waste control with plant emergency and generator temperature monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnick, R.J.; Schneider, M.I.; Shaffer, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    At the start of the design of the liquid radwaste control system for a nuclear generating station under construction, several serious problems were detected. The solution incorporated a new approach utilizing a computer and a blend of standard and custom software to replace the existing conventionally instrumented benchboard. The computer-based system, in addition to solving the problems associated with the benchboard design, also provided other enhancements which significantly improved the operability and reliability of the radwaste system. The functionality of the computer-based radwaste control system also enabled additional applications to be added to an expanded multitask version of the radwaste computer: 1) a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirement that all nuclear power plants have an emergency response facility status monitoring system; and 2) the sophisticated temperature monitoring and trending requested by the electric generator manufacturer to continue its warranty commitments. The addition of these tasks to the radwaste computer saved the cost of one or more computers that would be dedicated to these work requirements

  7. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasani, F.; Shala, F.; Xhixha, G.; Xhixha, M.K.; Hodolli, G.; Kadiri, S.; Bylyku, E.; Cfarku, F.

    2014-01-01

    The energy production in Kosovo depends primarily on lignite-fired power plants. During coal combustion, huge amounts of fly ash and bottom ash are generated, which may result in enriched natural radionuclides; therefore, these radionuclides need to be investigated to identify the possible processes that may lead to the radiological exposure of workers and the local population. Lignite samples and NORMs of fly ash and bottom ash generated in lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo are analyzed using a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the activity concentration of natural radionuclides. The average activity concentrations of 40 K, 226 Ra and 232 Th in lignite are found to be 36 ± 8 Bq kg −1 , 9 ± 1 Bq kg −1 and 9 ± 3 Bq kg −1 , respectively. Indications on the occurrence and geochemical behavior of uranium in the lignite matrix are suggested. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in fly ash and bottom ash samples are found to be concentrated from 3 to 5 times that of the feeding lignite. The external gamma-ray absorbed dose rate and the activity concentration index are calculated to assess the radiological hazard arising from ash disposal and recycling in the cement industry. - Highlights: • NORMs in lignite combustion residues from CFPPs are studied. • Th/U indicates either low U uptake from host rocks and/or high leaching from peat. • The concentration factor of NORMs in fly and bottom ash samples are 3–5 times. • No 226 Ra enrichment is observed in fly ash while a depletion in bottom ash. • The reuse of fly ash in cement industry poses no significant radiological issue

  8. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from utilization of radioisotopes and each step of the nuclear fuel cycle and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are presented. On the safe management of radioactive waste management, international safety standards are established such as ''The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management (IAEA)'' and T he Joint Convention on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management . Basic steps of radioactive waste management consist of treatment, conditioning and disposal. Disposal is the final step of radioactive waste management and its safety is confirmed by safety assessment in the licensing process. Safety assessment means evaluation of radiation dose rate caused by radioactive materials contained in disposed radioactive waste. The results of the safety assessment are compared with dose limits. The key issues of radioactive waste disposal are establishment of long term national strategies and regulations for safe management of radioactive waste, siting of repository, continuity of management activities and financial bases for long term, and security of human resources. (Author)

  9. Radioactivity in wastes generated from shale gas exploration and production - North-Eastern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodłowski, Paweł; Macuda, Jan; Nowak, Jakub; Nguyen Dinh, Chau

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, the K-40, U-238, Ra-226, Pb-210, Ra-228 and Th-228 activity concentrations were measured in 64 samples of wastes generated from shale gas exploration in North-Eastern Poland. The measured samples consist of drill cuttings, solid phase of waste drilling muds, fracking fluids, return fracking fluids and waste proppants. The measured activity concentrations in solid samples vary in a wide range from 116 to around 1100 Bq/kg for K-40, from 14 to 393 Bq/kg for U-238, from 15 to 415 Bq/kg for Ra-226, from 12 to 391 Bq/kg for Pb-210, from a few Bq/kg to 516 Bq/kg for Ra-228 and from a few Bq/kg to 515 Bq/kg for Th-228. Excluding the waste proppants, the measured activity concentrations in solid samples oscillate around their worldwide average values in soil. In the case of the waste proppants, the activity concentrations of radionuclides from uranium and thorium decay series are significantly elevated and equal to several hundreds of Bq/kg but it is connected with the mineralogical composition of proppants. The significant enhancement of Ra-226 and Ra-228 activity concentrations after fracking process was observed in the case of return fracking fluids, but the radium isotopes content in these fluids is comparable with that in waste waters from copper and coal mines in Poland. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Concept for an ultimate storage facility for heat-generating radioactive waste in clay stone in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollingerfehr, Wilhelm; Poehler, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    According to the German reference ultimate storage concept heat-generating radioactive waste from the operation of nuclear power stations should be stored permanently maintenance-free and in a non-recoverable manner in a salt formation. Within the framework of investigations into the utilisation of alternative host rocks a concept for an ultimate storage facility in clay stone was developed in an R and D project. For this purpose all important aspects of the design, development, operation and shutdown were taken into account for a model region in northern Germany. It was established that storage in 50 m deep vertical boreholes in a mine at a depth of about 350 m appears to be the most practical solution for an ultimate storage facility in clay stone. Compared to the reference concept in salt an ultimate storage facility in clay stone requires solid support of all mine openings with steel arches or shotcrete. Because of the lower maximum permissible temperature in the backfilling material (bentonite) the area required for the ultimate storage facility is about five times larger. A period of more than 100 years is estimated from survey to shutdown. (orig.)

  11. The Manche (50) Centre of storage of radioactive wastes, located on the Diguleville village. Memory report for future generations (aimed at maintaining a minimum knowledge for next generations and all the succeeding ones until at least 2500)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charton, Patrick; Cahen, Bruno; Chastagner, Francis

    2007-01-01

    This document gathers two succeeding releases (2007 and 2008) of a report written for future generations in order to present and describe them the Manche centre of storage of radioactive wastes. It first presents some elements of context about radioactivity, nuclear reactors, nuclear fuel, the use of radioactivity outside of electric power generation, and the different types of radioactive wastes according to their activity. The second part presents the natural and human context of the storage centre: location, socio-economic context, meteorological and climatological contexts, geological and seismic contexts, hydrological context, hydro-geological context, physical-chemical context of underground waters, maritime context. It also presents the reference radiological situation. The third part addresses various aspects of the radioactive waste storage: origin and volume of stored wastes, radioactive waste parcels (waste packaging, parcel types, radiological inventory of stored parcels, inventory of chemical toxic products, report of the tritium incident of 1976, specific case of alpha activities after 300 hundred years of surveillance), storage works (history, trenches and platforms of first generation, works of second generation, other specific works, works distribution on the site), the covering of the site and the associated works, and the release management system. It describes safety principles for the surveillance phase and reports the safety analysis, presents the different aspects of the surveillance phase (monitoring of the environment, guarding of the centre, maintenance of installations, population information). It analyses the provisional impact of the storage centre on its environment in a normal situation in terms of sustainable development (impact on soils, waters, sea environment, and public health). It gives indications about the various available memory documents, and about the possible and organised evolution of this documentation

  12. Pengaruh Penambahan Aditif Bi2O3 Terhadap Karakteristik Barium Heksaferit Hasil Sintesis dengan Metode Sol-Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Wardiyati Siswoyo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Telah dilakukan sintesis barium heksaferit (BaFe12O19 secara sol-gel menggunakan prekursor barium nitrat [Ba(NO32], besi nitrat [Fe(NO33] dan asam sitrat (C6H8O7 Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendapatkan BaFe12O19 fasa tunggal berukuran nano dengan koersivitas magnetik tinggi. Untuk mencapai tujuan tersebut dilakukan penambahan aditif Bi2O3 dengan berbagai variasi persentase berat terhadap BaFe12O19 dari 0,5% sampai dengan 2%. Karakterisasi BaFe12O19 hasil sintesis dilakukan dengan  menggunakan alat X-ray diffraction (XRD untuk analisis  fasa, Fourier Transmission Infra Red (FTIR untuk mengetahui tipe ikatan yang terjadi, Scanning Electron Microscope dan Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS untuk analisis struktur dan persentase atom, dan Vibrating Sample Magnetometer VSM untuk mengetahui sifat magnetik yaitu koersivitas dan saturasi magnetik. Dari hasil percobaan diperoleh BaFe12O19 fasa tunggal dengan ukuran partikel sekitar 105 nm - 130 nm, saturasi magnetik 57,86 emu/g dan koersivitas magnetik sebesar 0,38 T. 

  13. BANGUNAN TINGGI MULTI FUNGSI SEBAGAI SINTESIS ARSITEKTUR DAN STRUKTUR Studi Analisis Jin Mao Tower Grand Hyatt Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Priatman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available More than two decades, after the emerging of post- modern architecture, the split between construction technology and cultural expression in architecture appeared to become wider and wider. With the exception of a few "high-tech" buildings, the unity of art and applied science (technology in design seems facing challenges. It is interesting to see how fast and unexpectedly the situation has changed. Many factors and people played a role in this reversal, many new buildings demonstrate that utilitarian artifacts do not have to be oppressive to creativity but can evoke new innovation. One of the most significant contributors was JIN MAO TOWER at Shanghai, China. The paper analyses this building as a genuine synthesis of rational intelligence with art poetry that is still possible. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Lebih dari dua dekade setelah timbulnya arsitektur pasca modern, pemisahan antara tekknologi konstruksi dan ekspresi kultural dalam arsitektur menjadi semakin lebar. Dengan perkecualian beberapa gedung "high-tech", kesatuan antara seni dan teknologi dalam tahap desain terlihat menghadapi tantangan tantangan. Tetapi menarik untuk diamati bahwa situasi telah berubah. Banyak faktor dan tokoh tokoh arsitek memegang peranan penting dalam perubahan ini, banyak bangunan bangunan baru mendemontrasikan bahwa artefak fungsionil tidak bearti menindas kreativitas namun dapat membangkitkan inovasi baru. Salah satu kontributor yang sangat penting adalah JIN MAO TOWER di Shanghai-China. Makalah ini membahas bangunan tersebut sebagai sintesis orijinal yang masih memungkinkan antara kecerdasan rasional dengan puisi seni arsitektur. Kata kunci: Sintesis.

  14. Refinancing of the search for a repository and of the repository for heat generating radioactive Waste. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moench, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Part I of this article, which appeared in the preceding issue, described in general terms the background to the search for a disposal site and the result of the exploration to date of the repository, which would appear to be suitable from a mining standpoint according to the present knowledge. According to the rules in effect up to now, the exploration and construction would be financed by advance payments on the contributions of the waste producing companies, in particular the utility companies. The working draft of an 'Act on the search for and selection of a site for a repository for heat generating radioactive waste' (Gesetz zur Suche und Auswahl eines Standortes fuer ein Endlager fuer waermeentwickelnde radioaktive Abfaelle) from autumn 2012 provides for a new version of section 21b Atomic Energy Act, under which the costs for 'carrying out a repository selection procedure pursuant to the Repository Selection Act (Standort-auswahlgesetz)' would be allocated to the future users of the repository who are obliged to make contributions as a 'necessary expense'. Part II evaluates this provision of the working draft on the basis of the financial constitutional law. A comparison of sites is not a measure that could be allocated to the future users of the repository who are obliged to make contributions as a 'necessary expense'. Moreover, there is a lack of responsibility for the financing and of a legally relevant advantage that would be conferred by a cumulative alternative repository search for the later users of the repository who are obliged to provide the pre-financing. The costs can therefore not be allocated to the later users as either a contribution or a special charge, not even by way of an association with mandatory membership (Zwangsverband). They must be borne by the state. Consequently, the allocation stipulated by provision would constitute an impermissible charge under financial constitutional law. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of low-level solid radioactive waste generated by a large hospital and disposed of with ordinary refuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, L.; Pedroli, G.; Monciardini, M.; Bianchi, L.; Novario, R.; Beretta, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the Lombardy region some hospitals have recently been reported to the local authorities because of the presence of radioactivity in hospital refuse sent to the municipal tips for incineration. On various occasions the refuse collectors coming from the hospitals had to return with their refuse as traces of radioactivity were detected at the entrance to the tips equipped with monitoring systems. Hospitals administering radioactive substances for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes produce radioactive waste mainly in solid and liquid form. This waste is principally present in patient excreta and in contaminated materials. Radioactive waste present in patient excreta is normally disposed of through the sewage system provided that the concentration limits and annual activity stipulated by law are respected. The contaminated materials coming from the departments that carry out radioisotopic investigations and therapy with unsealed sources can be collected separately and sent to a tip after a period of storage to permit radioactive decay. However, part of the radioactive waste escapes all checks and inevitably mixes with normal refuse or with special hospital refuse that is not considered radioactive. This occurs in the case of: 1. excreta from patients who are not hospitalised after a radioisotopic investigation and materials contaminated by the excreta; 2. excreta from hospitalised patients which are eliminated outside the nuclear medicine and radiotherapy departments; 3. contaminated materials produced with unsealed sources in hospital departments other than those of nuclear medicine and radiotherapy; The waste indicated in point 1 is probably the main problem in ecological terms as the patients who are not hospitalised eliminate radioactive excreta into domestic sewage systems and can also contaminate materials that are disposed of with normal household refuse. In this case any solution to the problem would seriously affect diagnostic activities carried out in the

  16. The Assessment of Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Generated From The Fuel Reprocessing Plant Using Chemical Coagulation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuncoro Arief, H; M Birmano, Dj

    1998-01-01

    Reprocessing of nuclear spent fuel produced 8 lot of radioactive liquid waste still bearing uranium and transuranium. The assessment of the radioactive liquid waste treatment with FeCI 3 as coagulant has been done. Decontamination factor and separation efficiency can be calculated from known activities of initial and post-treatment wastes. It can be concluded that some factors i.e. pH of treatment process, quantity of coagulant, mixing rate, and mixing time have influenced the treatment product

  17. Approaches to the final storage of radioactive waste in the Federal Republic of Germany. Will responsibility be shifted to future generations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomauske, B.

    2004-01-01

    With respect to the management of high-level radioactive waste in Germany, there is agreement on these premises: - The waste is to be stored permanently in the Federal Republic of Germany. - A repository is to be operational by 2030. - Final storage is to be achieved in geologic formations. Differences of opinion exist about these questions: - Should there be only one repository for all types of radioactive waste, or would a breakdown into waste generating heat and waste generating only negligible amounts of heat in different repositories be useful under aspects of safety and requirement? - Will a new site selection procedure be required in an effort to find a suitable site, and would such a selection procedure be able to meet the deadline of 2030 for an operational repository? - After the end of legal proceedings, should the Konrad repository be revamped for waste generating negligible amounts of heat? The analysis presented shows that an operational repository for waste generating heat can be made available only in connection with continued exploration work at Gorleben and demonstration of the suitability of that site and subsequent construction of the repository. If the search for a repository site were started from scratch, the date of commissioning such a facility would be after 2050. In this way, that approach would miss the purpose of not shifting the waste management issue to future generations. Acting responsibly means to build the Konrad repository speedily after completion of the legal proceedings about a permit and, in this way, avoid the addition of more interim stores for waste generating negligible amounts of heat. Further exploration of Gorleben is the way agreed upon and necessary for the creation of a repository for high-level radioactive waste generating heat by 2030. For this purpose, the 'points of doubt' must be resolved speedily. (orig.) [de

  18. Plasma-Gasification-Melting System (PGM) for Treatment of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (LILRW) Generated by Nuclear Power Plants (NPP's)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegaz, D.

    2004-01-01

    Solid LILRW generated by NPP's is treated by various methods of Volume Reduction and Stabilization / Immobilization before disposal at suitable Storage Sites for Radioactive Waste. PGM Technology thermally treats such solid LILRW achieving maximum volume reduction and efficient stabilization of radionuclides of the waste in a Vitrified (glassy) solid residue, slag. Since such LILRW is made of a large variety of different materials, organic and inorganic, the PGM Process gasifies and pyrolizes the organics while the inorganics are melted and vitrified

  19. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  20. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  1. Requirements for a long-term safety certification for chemotoxic substances stored in a final storage facility for high radioactive and heat-generating radioactive waste in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tholen, M.; Hippler, J.; Herzog, C.

    2007-01-01

    Within the scope of a project funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Technologie, BMWi), a safety certification concept for a future permanent final storage for high radioactive and heat-generating radioactive waste (HAW disposal facility) in rock salt formations is being prepared. For a reference concept, compliance with safety requirements in regard to operational safety as well as radiological and non-radiological protection objectives related to long-term safety, including ground water protection, will be evaluated. This paper deals with the requirements for a long-term safety certification for the purpose of protecting ground water from chemotoxic substances. In particular, longterm safety certifications for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste in a HAW disposal facility in rock salt formations and for the dumping of hazardous waste in underground storage facilities in rock salt formations are first discussed, followed by an evaluation as to whether these methods can be applied to the long-term safety certification for chemotoxic substances. The authors find it advisable to apply the long-term safety certification for underground storage facilities to the long-term safety certification for chemotoxic substances stored in a HAW disposal facility in rock salt formations. In conclusion, a corresponding certification concept is introduced. (orig.)

  2. Sonochemical synthesis of a PdAg/C electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction; Sintesis sonoquimica de un electrocatalizador de PdAg/C para la reaccion de reduccion de oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinez-Garcia, A.; Perez-Robles, J.F. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN. Santiago de Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: jperez@qro.cinvestav.mx; Solorza-Feria, O. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The synthesis and characterization of nanocatalysts for fuel cells has been a primary line of research for the purpose of obtaining less expensive electrocatalysts with better activity. A large variety of methods exist to synthesize useful nanoparticles as electrocatalysts. Each method generates particles with a different surface morphology and, therefore, the catalytic activity usually varies depending on which is used in the synthesis. In this work, PdAg/C electrocatalysts are synthesized with high-intensity ultrasonic irradiation and compared to those obtained using a conventional method such as reduction by NaBH{sub 4}. The study of this technique is of interest because it produces highly dispersed carbon-supported nanoparticles with very clean surfaces. Each electrocatalyst was evaluated for its oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid medium with cyclic voltamperometry (CV) and rotating disc electrode (RDE). The electrocatalyst was characterized with x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The physical characterization reveals that the electrocatalyst is composed of nanometric bimetallic aggregates. An important characteristic of the PdAg/C alloy obtained using ultrasound is better activity than that obtained by reduction with NaBH{sub 4}. [Spanish] La sintesis y caracterizacion de nanocatalizadores para celdas de combustible ha sido una de las principales lineas de investigacion, con el objetivo de obtener electrocatalizadores mas baratos y con una mejor actividad. Existen una gran variedad de metodos para sintetizar nanoparticulas utiles como electrocatalizadores, cada metodo genera particulas con una morfologia superficial diferente por lo que la actividad catalitica suele variar dependiendo de cual se utilice en la sintesis. En este trabajo se sintetizan electrocatalizadores de PdAg/C con irradiacion ultrasonica de alta intensidad y se comparan con las obtenidas con un metodo convencional como es la reduccion por NaBH{sub 4}. Esta

  3. Contribution to the study on and evaluation of radioactive waste generation in connection with the Brazilian Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, J.M.D. de.

    1978-12-01

    A general description is given of the causes of pollution in the nuclear industry. Emphasis was given to the radioactive pollution, especially radioactivity of fission products (FP). Physical mathematical models were established to calculate the FP activities 'in' and 'out' of the reactor and the yearly accumulated activities. To calculate FP activities 'in' reactor, all physical process of formation and destruction of nuclides were considered: nuclear fission; neutron absorption and radioactivity decay. The necessary input data were analysed and criticised. The specific activities of the discharged fuel were calculated and also their evolution outside reactor. The annual accumulation of FP activities were also calculated for the reference case: the Brazilian Nuclear Program for a 50 year horizon. The results were commented and specific discussions and comparison with other similar studies were made. (Author) [pt

  4. Review to give the public clear information on near surface disposal project of low-level radioactive wastes generated from research, industrial and medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shobu, Nobuhiro; Amazawa, Hiroya; Koibuchi, Hiroto; Nakata, Hisakazu; Kato, Masatoshi; Takao, Tomoe; Terashima, Daisuke; Tanaka, Yoshie; Shirasu, Hisanori

    2013-12-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereafter abbreviated as “JAEA”) has promoted near surface disposal project for low-level radioactive wastes generated from research, industrial and medical facilities after receiving project approval from the government in November 2009. JAEA has carried out public information about low-level radioactive wastes disposal project on the web site. When some town meetings are held toward mutual understanding with the public, more detailed and clear explanations for safety management of near surface disposal are needed especially. Therefore, the information provision method to make the public understand should be reviewed. Moreover, a web-based survey should be carried out in order to get a sense of what the public knows, what it values and where it stands on nuclear energy and radiation issues, because the social environment surrounding nuclear energy and radiation issues has drastically changed as a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on March 11, 2011. This review clarified the points to keep in mind about public information on near surface disposal project for low-level radioactive wastes generated from research, industrial and medical facilities, and that public awareness and understanding toward nuclear energy and radiation was changed before and after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  5. SINTESIS BIODISEL DARI MINYAK BIJI KARET DENGAN VARIASI SUHU DAN KONSENTRASI KOH UNTUK TAHAPAN TRANSESTERIFIKASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Dewi Kusumaningtyas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bahan bakar yang paling banyak digunakan adalah bahan bakar diesel atau fatty acid methyl ester (FAME. Biodiesel berasal dari minyak nabati yang dapat diperbaharui, dapat dihasilkan secara periodik, dan mudah diperoleh. Pada penelitian ini digunakan minyak biji karet untuk sintesis FAME. Proses utama dalam pembuatan FAME adalah transesterifikasi. Penelitian ini mengkaji hasil optimum dari variasi konsentrasi katalis KOH dan suhu reaksi pada reaksi transesterifikasi. Preparasi minyak biji karet dengan menggunakan arang aktif granular diikuti dengan degumming. Reaksi esterifikasi dilaksanakan pada kondisi operasi 500 C selama 1 jam, katalis asam sulfat (98% sebesar 0,5% volume minyak, dan metanol sebesar 20% volume minyak. Reaksi transesterifikasi dilaksanakan selama 1 jam, serta perbandingan volume minyak dan metanol sebesar 4:1. Analisis kadar metil ester yang terbentuk, jumlah komponen, dan komposisinya yang terdapat pada senyawa hasil dilakukan dengan menggunakan alat GC. Kondisi operasi terbaik pada transesterifikasi minyak biji karet menjadi metil ester adalah pada katalis KOH 1% dan suhu 60 0C. Berdasarkan uji sifat-sifat fisis, metil ester yang dihasilkan belum semua memenuhi mutu sifat fisis biodiesel yang disyaratkan. The most widely used fuel is diesel fuel or fatty acid methyl ester (FAME. Biodiesel is derived from vegetable oil that can be renewed, can be produced periodically, and easy to obtain. In this research, the rubber seed was used for synthesizing the FAME. The main process in the production of FAME is transesterification. This study examined the optimum result from variations of the concentration of KOH catalyst and the reaction temperature on the transesterification reaction. Preparation of the rubber seed oil using granular activated charcoal was followed by degumming. Esterification reaction was carried out at 50 oC for 1 h with the sulfuric acid catalyst of 0.5% by volume of oil and methanol of 20% by the volume of

  6. Legislative and Regulatory Control for the Safety of Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metals Generated from Mining and Mineral Processing Facilities in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajane, E. P.; Shale, K., E-mail: PEMohajane@nnr.co.za [National Nuclear Regulator, Centurion, Gauteng (South Africa)

    2011-07-15

    In South Africa, enhanced levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are associated with many mining and industrial processes. Significant amounts of waste materials are involved which can result in radiation exposure of the workers and the public particularly through the diversion of materials into the public domain. The following operations have been regulated in South Africa for the past twenty years: operating metallurgical plants utilizing NORM, underground mining operations, scrap recyclers and smelters, and rehabilitation and remediation activities involving the above sites. The radioactively contaminated scrap metal generated from the above mentioned facilities is available for recycling in amounts of thousands of tons. The South African government has, to a certain extent, responded to the above-mentioned challenges by introducing regulatory controls to the affected industries. The existing regulatory controls have, however, not provided absolute answers to all issues associated with the management of scrap. (author)

  7. Radioactive Waste Management and Constructing Memory for Future Generations. Proceedings of the International Conference and Debate, 15-17 September 2014, Verdun, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, Jantine; Botez, Radu; Formentini, Marine

    2015-01-01

    The Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) across Generations initiative was launched by the Nuclear Energy Agency in 2011 to foster international reflection and progress towards this goal and to meet increasing demands by waste management specialists and other interested parties for viable and shared strategies. The RK and M initiative is now in its second phase, which is to last until 2017. Phase I culminated on 15-17 September 2014 with the organisation of an international conference and debate on 'Constructing Memory' held in Verdun, France. The conference was attended by approximately 200 participants from 17 countries and 3 international organisations. Participants included specialists from the radioactive waste management area and beyond, academics in the fields of archaeology, communications, cultural heritage, geography and history, as well as artists, archivists and representatives from local heritage societies and from communities that could host a radioactive waste repository. (authors)

  8. Volume reduction/solidification of liquid radioactive waste using bitumen at Ontario hydro's Bruce nuclear generating station open-quotes Aclose quotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, J.E.; Baker, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Ontario Hydro at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station open-quotes Aclose quotes has undertaken a program to render the station's liquid radioactive waste suitable for discharge to Lake Huron by removing sufficient radiological and chemical contaminants from five different plant waste streams. The contaminants will be immobilized and stored at on-site radioactive waste storage facilities and the purified streams will be discharged. The discharge targets established by Ontario Hydro are set well below the limits established by the Ontario Ministry of Environment (MOE) and are based on the Best Available Technology Economically Achievable Approach (B.A.T.E.A.). ADTECHS Corporation has been selected by Ontario Hydro to provide volume reduction/solidification technology for one of the five waste streams. The system will dry and immobilize the contaminants from a liquid waste stream in emulsified asphalt using thin film evaporation technology

  9. Social transactions with future generations for the management of high level radioactive waste in deep repositories: Reflections on institutional control and retrievability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Schieber, C.; Schneider, T.; Viala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The management of high level radioactive waste and spent fuel is a key issue and one of the most sensitive aspect of radioactive waste management. Recognising that it is the responsibility of our generation to find a way to isolate the waste, deep geological disposals have been envisaged to provide a definitive solution to the problem, in order to avoid 'undue burden on future generations'. However, even if they are buried, the wastes still exist and human intrusion is still possible as well as releases into the environment in the very far future. At the same time, the ongoing reflections on the ethical aspects of disposals show that it is of great worth that we guarantee future generations the same right of control and responsibility that we ourselves enjoy. This paper presents some reflections on the social transactions associated with the management and design of geological repositories. It is focused on the mission of institutional control in the transmission to future generation of a safety patrimony, composed of the know-how and techniques that permit the human community to 'domesticate' and control the risk. As it appears that the efficiency and the confidence in the control system rely mainly on the capability of implementing corrective actions, some considerations on the role, the consequences and the implementation of retrievability are also presented

  10. Improved management of SG BD demineralizer for reduced generation of low-level radioactive spent resin in Korean nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, I.; Cho, D.; Yeon, J.

    2003-01-01

    Most nuclear power plants in Korea have adopted Ethanolamine(ETA) as a secondary pH control agent to increase the pH at the liquid phase, which may reduce the corrosion in steam generator tubes and moisture separator/reheat system. Along with its beneficial effect of SG protection from corrosion and degradation, the replacement of ammonia with ETA causes the increased generation of spent resin and the reduced run time of demineralizer in steam generator blowdown(SG BD) system. The composition ratio of cation- to anion- exchange resin in SG BD mixed bed should be increased in the ETA chemistry environment to meet the ratio of cation to anion in the aqueous solution, which results in the simultaneous exhaustion of cation and anion exchange resins. The utilization rate of mixed bed is greatest at the cation-to-anion ratio of 95:1 on the theoretical equivalent basis in the solution, but practically highest at that of 22:1 due to the possible inhomogeneous distribution of cation and anion exchange resins in SG BD bed. The run time of the bed could be extended by 30% such that, at that much, the purchase cost of new resin is saved and the production rate of spent resin is reduced. The guideline on the replacement of resin in SG BD bed is not necessary to secure the removal of radioactive particles without the leakage of the primary coolant into the secondary side since all the radioactive ions can be eliminated by SG BD bed with the sufficient time. They are retained during more than one month after their ingress into the SG BD bed without leakage. With the reduced replacement, thus, the SG BD spent resin that comprises 65% of low-level radioactive solid waste can be much cut down

  11. Incineration as a low-level radioactive waste disposal alternative for the very low level (approx. 200 mCi/yr) institutional waste generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of increased shipping costs and decreased land availability, serious questions have arisen regarding the continued use of shallow land burial for disposal of institutional radioactive wastes. These factors are of special significance to very low-level waste generators such as Arizona State University whose most recent waste shipment averaged approximately 2 mCi per shipped barrel at an effective cost of over $100 per mCi disposed - a total cost of over $14,000. Recent studies have shown incineration to be an attractive waste disposal alternative both in terms of volume reduction of waste, and in its expected insignificant radiological and environmental impact. Arizona State University has purchased an incinerator and has initiated a program to incinerate radioactive wastes. Licensing restrictions involving stack monitoring for a variety of possibly hazardous effluents and 10CFR20 restrictions affecting incineration of certain isotopes could render the change to incineration completely inefficient unless accompanied by a rigorous program of waste segregation designed to ease licensing restrictions. This paper reviews incinerator technology as it applies to radioactive waste management and presents the analysis performed during the licensing phase, along with some of the difficulties inherent in the development process

  12. Simple and rapid determination methods for low-level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear research facilities. Guidelines for determination of radioactive waste samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameo, Yutaka; Shimada, Asako; Ishimori, Ken-ichiro; Haraga, Tomoko; Katayama, Atsushi; Nakashima, Mikio; Hoshi, Akiko

    2009-10-01

    Analytical methods were developed for simple and rapid determination of U, Th, and several nuclides, which are selected as important nuclides for safety assessment of disposal of wastes generated from research facilities at Nuclear Science Research Institute and Oarai Research and Development Center. The present analytical methods were assumed to apply to solidified products made from miscellaneous wastes by plasma melting in the Advanced Volume Reduction Facilities. In order to establish a system to analyze the important nuclides in the solidified products at low cost and routinely, we have advanced the development of a high-efficiency non-destructive measurement technique for γ-ray emitting nuclides, simple and rapid methods for pretreatment of solidified product samples and subsequent radiochemical separations, and rapid determination methods for long-lived nuclides. In the present paper, we summarized the methods developed as guidelines for determination of radionuclides in the low-level solidified products. (author)

  13. Basic approaches to the limitation of doses and radiological risks from surface disposal of long-lived radioactive waste for future generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhtarev, I.; Kovgan, L.; Berkovskiy, V.

    2001-01-01

    National radiation standards of Ukraine (NRSU-97/D-2000) recently put into force, which consider the basic principles of radiological protection from the sources of potential exposure, introduce four groups of potential exposure sources depending on types and scope of the consequences of occurrence of different critical events. In the third group are those occurrence which are associated with the events that can take place in the future (including the distant future) at the exempted from regulation facilities as a result of natural abnormal processes and catastrophes as well as inadvertent human intrusions. Future generations living at the moment of the event occurrence can become the subject of exposure. These sources must be taken into account at the stage of radioactive waste repositories designing. Taking into account the peculiarity of sources of the third group of potential, that they are associated with those critical events, which can take place in the distant future (in hundreds and thousands of years) and as a consequence may result in the exposure of future generations of people NRSU-97/D2000 sets an additional principle for potential exposure from sources of third group which requires that the future generations are guaranteed to have at least the same level of radiation protection against actions undertaken nowadays as the present generation. This principle is implemented through setting a requirement that harm for human health of future generation must not exceed the harm corresponding to negligible risk which is 5 x 10 -7 year -1 . NRSU-97/D-2000 establishes two reference dose levels A and B (50 and 1 mSv year -1 ) depending on which the acceptability of surface (or near-surface) disposals of long-lived radioactive waste is determined. In presentation the requirements on the critical events occurrence probability, two groups of scenario, which can lead to the critical event, and five reference scenarios of exposure and their parameters are discussed

  14. UKURAN PARTIKEL DAN KONFORMASI KRISTAL ZEOLIT-A HASIL SINTESIS DENGAN PENAMBAHAN TETRAPROPILAMMONIUM HIDROKSIDA (TPAOH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul - Widiastuti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract PARTICLE SIZE AND CRYSTAL CONFORMATION OF SYNTHESIZED ZEOLITE-A WITH TETRAPROPYLAMMONIUM HYDROXIDE (TPAOH ADDITION. The aims of this research is to study the effect of tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAOH concentration in the synthesis of zeolite A to its physical characteristics such as crystallinity, crystal conformation and average crystal size. The zeolite A was synthesized with composition 3.165 Na2O : 1.000 Al2O3 : 1.926 SiO2 : 128 H2O : x TPAOH where x was 0; 0.0385; 0.0577; 0.0770; 0.1540 and 4.1602. The zeolite was crystalized under hydrothermal condition in a stainless steel autoclave at 100°C for 5 hours. The resulting crystal was washed with distilled water until pH 8 and then dried in an oven at 80oC for 24 hours. FT-IR and XRD analysis results show that the synthesized zeolite A at x = 4.1602 has the lowest crystallinity. It is estimated due to the mass of TPAOH was four times higger than the mass of zeolite framework components (Si and Al. SEM and PSD (Particle Size Distribution analysis results show that TPAOH concentration affected the crystal conformation and the average size of zeolite A particles. The formation of chained crystal conformation was caused by the electrostatic interactions between TPA+ and negatively charge of zeolite framework. In addition, the particel size of the synthesized zeolite A at x = 0.1540 was 2.024 µm which was smaller than the particel size of the synthesized zeolite A without TPAOH, which was 3.534 µm. Keywords: average size of particles; crystal conformation; TPAOH; zeolite A Abstrak Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mempelajari pengaruh konsentrasi TPAOH (Tetrapropilamonium hidroksida dalam sintesis zeolit A terhadap sifat fisikanya yang meliputi kekristalan, konformasi kristal dan ukuran rata-rata kristal yang terbentuk. Pada penelitian   ini   zeolit A   disintesis    dengan komposisi 3,165 Na2O : 1 Al2O3 : 1,926 SiO2 :128 H2O: x TPAOH. Konsentrasi TPAOH divariasikan dengan

  15. SINTESIS DAN KARAKTERISASI BIODIESEL DARI MINYAK KEMIRI SUNAN (Reutealis trisperma DENGAN VARIASI KONSENTRASI KATALIS NAOH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holilah -

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sintesis biodiesel dari minyak Kemiri Sunan (Reutealis trisperma (RTO menggunakan NaOH sebagai katalis dengan variasi konsentrasi katalis yaitu 0,5; 1,0; 1,5 dan 2,0 wt% telah diteliti. Minyak kemiri sunan (Reutealis trisperma adalah bahan baku yang menarik untuk produksi biodiesel. Biodiesel disintesis dengan dua tahap reaksi yaitu esterifikasi menggunakan katalis H2SO4 dan transesterifikasi dengan menggunakan katalis NaOH. Dalam penelitian ini, diteliti pengaruh konsentrasi katalis terhadap produk biodisel serta dan karakteristiknya. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa yield biodiesel meningkat seiring dengan meningkatnya konsentrasi katalis dari 0,5-1,0 wt%, selanjutnya dengan meningkatnya konsentrasi katalis dari 1,5-2,0 wt% membuat yield menurun. Yield optimum dicapai pada 84,7%. FAME (fatty  acid  methyl  ester diperoleh dengan konsentrasi katalis 1 wt% pada kondisi reaksi 65°C, waktu reaksi 1 jam dan rasio metanol minyak 1:2 (wt/wt. Karakteristik biodiesel diamati dengan uji standart bahan bakar dan hasilnya dibandingkan dengan standart ASTM D6751-02. Karakteristik biodiesel yang disintesis dengan konsentrasi katalis NaOH 1% adalah angka asam (0,55 mg KOH/g, densitas (0,90 gr/cm3, viskositas pada 40°C (9,2 cSt, angka setana (54,5 dan residu karbon (0,24 wt%/wt. This research was investigated bio diesel synthesis of Reutealis trisperma oil (RTO by using NaOH as a catalist with variation of catalyst concentration as follow 0.5; 1.0; 1.5 and 2,0 wt% . Reutealis trisperma oil is an attractive raw material for  bio diesel production. It was produced by two steps of reactions, they are esterification by using H2SO4 catalyst and transesterification by using NaOH catalyst. This study examined the effect of catalyst concentration on the yield of biodiesel and their selected properties. The result showed, that the bio diesel yield  with catalyst concentration increasing from 0,5-1,0 wt%, increased, while increasing the concentration from 1

  16. Assessments of conditioned radioactive waste arisings from existing and committed nuclear installations and assuming a moderate growth in nuclear electricity generation - June 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairclough, M.P.; Goodill, D.R.; Tymons, B.J.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes an assessment of conditioned radioactive waste arisings from existing and committed nuclear installations, DOE Revised Scheme 1, and from an assumed nuclear power generation scenario, DOE Revised Scheme 3, representing a moderate growth in nuclear generation. Radioactive waste arise from 3 main groups of installations and activities: i. existing and committed commercial reactors; ii. fuel reprocessing plants, iii. research, industrial and medical activities. Stage 2 decommissioning wastes are considered together with WAGR decommissioning and the 1983 Sea Dump Consignment. The study uses the SIMULATION 2 code which models waste material flows through a system of waste treatment and packaging to disposal. With a knowledge of the accumulations and average production rates of untreated wastes and their isotopic compositions (or total activities), the rates at which conditioned wastes become available for transportation and disposal are calculated, with specific activity levels. The data for the inventory calculations have previously been documented. Some recent revisions and assumptions concerning future operation of nuclear facilities are presented in this report. (author)

  17. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  18. Technology for Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated during Uranium and Plutonium Chemical and Metallurgical Manufacturing in FSUE PO Mayak - 13616

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamovich, D. [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Batorshin, G.; Logunov, M.; Musalnikov, A. [FSUE ' PO Mayak' , 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Created technological scheme for treatment of liquid radioactive waste generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing consists of: - Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) purification from radionuclides and its transfer into category of manufacturing waste; - Concentration of suspensions containing alpha-nuclides and their further conversion to safe dry state (calcinate) and moving to long controlled storage. The following technologies are implemented in LRW treatment complex: - Settling and filtering technology for treatment of liquid intermediate-level waste (ILW) with volume about 1500m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} Bq/dm{sup 3} - Membrane and sorption technology for processing of low-level waste (LLW) of radioactive drain waters with volume about 150 000 m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} Bq/dm{sup 3}. Settling and filtering technology includes two stages of ILW immobilization accompanied with primary settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following flushing and drying of the pulp generated; secondary deep after settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following solid phase concentration by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration. Besides, the installation capacity on permeate is not less than 3 m{sup 3}/h. Concentrates generated are sent to calcination on microwave drying (MW drying) unit. Membrane and sorption technology includes processing of averaged sewage flux by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration with total capacity of installations on permeate not less than 18 m{sup 3}/h and sorption extraction of uranium from permeate on anionite. According to radionuclide contamination level purified solution refers to general industrial waste. Concentrates generated during suspension filtering are evaporated in rotary film evaporator (RFE) in order to remove excess water, thereafter they are dried on infrared heating

  19. Co-ordination of federal and provincial environmental assessment processes for the Point Lepreau Generating Station Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, C.; Thompson, P.D. [Point Lepreau Generating Station, Point Lepreau Refurbishment Project, Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada); Barnes, J. [Jacques Whitford Environment Ltd., Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Modification of the Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility at Point Lepreau Generating Station is required to accommodate waste generated during and after an 18-month maintenance outage during which the station would be Refurbished. The modification of the facility triggered both federal and provincial environmental assessment requirements, and these assessments were conducted in a 'coordinated' and cooperative fashion. In this project, the coordinated approach worked well, and provided some significant advantages to the proponent, the public and the regulators. However, there are opportunities for further improvement in future projects, and this paper explores the advantages and disadvantages of this 'co-ordinated' approach. As part of this exploration, there is a discussion of administrative and regulatory changes that the province is considering for the environmental assessment process, and a discussion of the need for a formal 'harmonization' agreement. (author)

  20. Co-ordination of federal and provincial environmental assessment processes for the Point Lepreau Generating Station Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, C.; Thompson, P.D.; Barnes, J.

    2006-01-01

    Modification of the Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility at Point Lepreau Generating Station is required to accommodate waste generated during and after an 18-month maintenance outage during which the station would be Refurbished. The modification of the facility triggered both federal and provincial environmental assessment requirements, and these assessments were conducted in a 'coordinated' and cooperative fashion. In this project, the coordinated approach worked well, and provided some significant advantages to the proponent, the public and the regulators. However, there are opportunities for further improvement in future projects, and this paper explores the advantages and disadvantages of this 'co-ordinated' approach. As part of this exploration, there is a discussion of administrative and regulatory changes that the province is considering for the environmental assessment process, and a discussion of the need for a formal 'harmonization' agreement. (author)

  1. Nanoparticulas basadas en complejos de Fe(II) con transicion de espin: sintesis, caracterizacion y aplicaciones en electronica molecular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrabal Capilla, Maria

    Esta tesis doctoral esta organizada en 5 capitulos y esta destinada al estudio de sistemas de Fe (II) que presentan el fenomeno de la transicion de espin a escala nanometrica. El capitulo 1 contiene una introduccion general sobre materiales moleculares multifuncionales, destacando aquellos ejemplos mas importantes. Por otro lado, se explicara el fenomeno de la transicion de espin, tratando aspectos conceptuales, los antecedentes mas importantes y la situacion actual. En el capitulo 2 se describen los diferentes procesos existentes para la obtencion de diferentes tipos de nanoparticulas. Ademas, se presenta la sintesis y caracterizacion de nanoparticulas del polimero de coordinacion unidimensional [Fe(Htrz)2(trz)]BF4, obtenidas mediante el metodo de micelas inversas. Estas nanoparticulas, con una estrecha distribucion de tamanos centrada alrededor de los 11 nm, presentan una transicion de espin muy abrupta, con un ancho ciclo de histeresis termica de unos 40K. En el capitulo 3 se describe el proceso de modificacion del tamano de las nanoparticulas descritas en el capitulo anterior, llevado a cabo variando la proporcion de surfactante/H2O en el medio. Ademas, con el objetivo de modificar las propiedades magneticas de las nanoparticulas obtenidas en el capitulo 2, se lleva a cabo la sintesis de nanoparticulas de polimeros de la misma familia del [Fe(Htrz)2(trz)]BF4. En concreto se sintetizaron 3 nuevos tipos de nanoparticulas basadas en el polimero [Fe(Htrz)1-x(NH2trz)x](ClO4)2, siendo x = 0.05, 0.15 y 0.3, en cada caso. Estas nanoparticulas siguen presentando una estrecha distribucion de tamanos y una transicion de espin muy abrupta y con un ancho ciclo de histeresis. Ademas, se observa que este ciclo se desplaza a temperaturas mas proximas a la temperatura ambiente a medida que se aumenta el porcentaje de 4-amino-1, 2, 4- triazol en la muestra. Pero al mismo tiempo se produce una disminucion de la anchura de este ciclo. Por ultimo, en este capitulo se presenta la

  2. ORNL radioactive waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards

  3. Radioactive waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the more frequent questions that arise when discussing nuclear energy's potential contribution to mitigating climate change concerns that of how to manage radioactive waste. Radioactive waste is produced through nuclear power generation, but also - although to a significantly lesser extent - in a variety of other sectors including medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education. The amount, type and physical form of radioactive waste varies considerably. Some forms of radioactive waste, for example, need only be stored for a relatively short period while their radioactivity naturally decays to safe levels. Others remain radioactive for hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of years. Public concerns surrounding radioactive waste are largely related to long-lived high-level radioactive waste. Countries around the world with existing nuclear programmes are developing longer-term plans for final disposal of such waste, with an international consensus developing that the geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) is the most technically feasible and safe solution. This article provides a brief overview of the different forms of radioactive waste, examines storage and disposal solutions, and briefly explores fuel recycling and stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management decision making

  4. Declaration and authorization forms for the fabrication, distribution or use of radioactive sources or electric generators of ionizing radiation; Formulaires de declaration et d'autorisation de fabrication, de distribution ou d'utilisation de sources radioactives ou de generateurs electriques de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This document gathers all the forms to be completed when declaring or when asking for an authorization for the fabrication, retailing or use of radioactive sources or electric equipment generating ionizing radiation. These forms can concern all domains (use of sealed radioactive sources, possession and use of a particle accelerator or of radionuclides, import or export of radionuclides or of products containing radionuclides), or the use of such materials or equipment in the medical sector, or the fabrication and use in industry or research, or in user's guides for radioactive sources

  5. A database system for the control of radioactive effluents generated by the IPEN-CNEN/SP installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maduar, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    A PC-compatible database system has been developed in order to optimize the control of liquid and gaseous effluents generated by the installations of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The system implements source-term generation, optimizes the discharge control of the effluents and allows several ways for the retrieval of data concerning to the effluents. (author)

  6. Radioactive waste management in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, L.; Reyes L, J.; Jimenez D, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the radioactive waste management in Mexico, particularly the activities that the National Institute of Nuclear Research (NINR) is undertaking in this field. Classification and annual generation of radioactive waste, together with practices and facilities relating to the management of radioactive waste are addressed. The respective national legal framework and policy are outlined. (author)

  7. Environmental assessment for the treatment of Class A low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste generated by the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating low-level radioactive waste management alternatives at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) located on the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC) near West Valley, New York. The WVDP's mission is to vitrify high-level radioactive waste resulting from commercial fuel reprocessing operations that took place at the WNYNSC from 1966 to 1972. During the process of high-level waste vitrification, low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste (MILLW) will result and must be properly managed. It is estimated that the WVDP's LLW storage facilities will be filled to capacity in 1996. In order to provide sufficient safe storage of LLW until disposal options become available and partially fulfill requirements under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the DOE is proposing to use U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed and permitted commercial facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Clive, Utah; and Houston, Texas to treat (volume-reduce) a limited amount of Class A LLW and MLLW generated from the WVDP. Alternatives for ultimate disposal of the West Valley LLW are currently being evaluated in an environmental impact statement. This proposed action is for a limited quantity of waste, over a limited period of time, and for treatment only; this proposal does not include disposal. The proposed action consists of sorting, repacking, and loading waste at the WVDP; transporting the waste for commercial treatment; and returning the residual waste to the WVDP for interim storage. For the purposes of this assessment, environmental impacts were quantified for a five-year operating period (1996 - 2001). Alternatives to the proposed action include no action, construction of additional on-site storage facilities, construction of a treatment facility at the WVDP comparable to commercial treatment, and off-site disposal at a commercial or DOE facility

  8. Radioactivity and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive wastes generated by nuclear activities must be reprocessed using specific treatments before packaging, storage and disposal. This digest paper gives first a classification of radioactive wastes according to their radionuclides content activity and half-life, and the amount of wastes from the different categories generated each year by the different industries. Then, the radiotoxicity of nuclear wastes is evaluated according to the reprocessing treatments used and to their environmental management (surface storage or burial). (J.S.)

  9. On present situation of radioactive waste management and exposure of workers in nuclear reactor facilities for commercial power generation in fiscal 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The article summarizes the contents of some reports including the Report on Radiation Management in 1988 that were submitted by the operators of nuclear reactor facilities for commercial power generation according to the requirements specified in the Law Concerning Regulation on Nuclear Material, Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Reactor. According to these reports, the annual radiation release in all nuclear power generation plants was well below the radiation release limits set up in the report 'On Guidelines for Target Dose in Areas around Light Water Reactor Facilities for Power Generation'. Data submitted also show that there are no significant problems with the management of radioactive solid waste. In all nuclear generation plants, the personal exposure of workers is below the permissible exposure dose specified in law. The Agency of Natural Resources and Energy is planned to further promote the development of advanced techniques for automatization and remote control of light water reactors and to provide effective guidance to electrical contractors for positive radiation management. (N.K.)

  10. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  11. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  12. Study of radioactive aerosols emissions and establishment of a model in a nuclear medicine environment during the use of a technetium generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombardier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the control of radioactive aerosols emissions inside the nuclear medicine facilities. These emissions occur during pulmonary scintigraphy examinations using aerosols marked with 99m Tc. Using a test chamber, we have developed a method permitting to quantify these emissions around the aerosol generator. A method dedicated to emissions measurement coming from the patient during the pulmonary ventilation is also described. The results obtained on one patient are exposed in this thesis. We characterized and modelled the ventilation of a complete nuclear medicine department with a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software. This permitted us to study the dissemination of the radioactive aerosol and to compare it with measures of ambient air activity. The numerical model of this department was then employed to test containment solutions and to help defining the best location for air contaminations sensors. An original method combining staff position information and the simulation of the dissemination for the aerosol released has been used to confirm the exposure levels for several professional groups and enhance the workplace studies. (author)

  13. Session V: Management of Radioactive Waste and Damaged Fuel. Session V-A: Generation and Management of Materials and Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blommaert, W.; Cheng Hui

    2013-01-01

    Mitigation of the Chernobyl accident consequences stressed the attention on the huge volumes and the variety of wastes resulting from the accident (almost all long- lived and alfa containing radioactive waste). The accident and the mitigation of the consequences clearly demonstrated the level of unpreparedness for such accident, the absence of experience in the management of huge amounts of contaminated materials, as well as the lack of storage /disposal capacity. This resulted in a ''not organized storage for not organized waste''. Hence, large amounts of contaminated materials are being stored under conditions that do not fully comply with present international safety requirements. During mitigation and clean-up operations after the Chernobyl accident, disposal facilities were constructed. Some of them are located in areas with high water table and hence (potentially) result in contamination of groundwater. For this reason some of them will require re-disposal, requiring itself a comprehensive safety assessment. On the other hand, the Chernobyl accident resulted, during the early phase of the accident, in the creation of a special governmental ''brainstorming'' commission on the decision making process, with a clear allocation of responsibilities and with full power. Later on, considered options for the management of different ''Chernobyl'' waste types (solid, liquid, fuel,) were provided in the National Policy and Strategy. Attention was drawn to the fact that pre-operational work is a time and cost consuming process. Up to now there is no decision on geological disposal. The development of facilities on the ''Vector site'' in the exclusion zone of Chernobyl is going on. The Vector operation covers retrieval operation of radioactive waste, characterization activities, processing activities, transport and storage/disposal of the radioactive waste in the exclusion zone. National legislation does not take into account the peculiarity of the ''Chernobyl'' waste and

  14. Development of vault model 'VERMIN' for post closure behaviour of repositories for non-heat generating radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The computer model VERMIN has been developed to simulate the post closure time dependent behaviour of the vault section of a Land 3 and a Land 2 type repository. Development was carried out within the constraints of the computer code SYVAC. Output from the new model, in terms of radionuclide fluxes versus time, provides the source term for that code. A number of conceptual designs for different geological conditions were produced and used to develop the model. Unlike SYVAC, the boundary of the vault was considered to be at the interface between the damaged rock zone and the undamaged host rock. VERMIN treats the vault as a series of engineered barriers namely: waste matrix, waste package, backfill material liner and the damaged rock zone. For the Land 3 repository, the vault was considered to be fully saturated and consequently corrosion, leading to eventual package failure, will occur. VERMIN allows for package failure and subsequent leaching and then calculates the migration of nuclides from within the vault out to its boundary. One dimensional advection and two dimensional diffusion/dispersion are modelled allowing for retardation due to sorption radionuclide saturation and radionuclide decay. Radioactive decay chains up to eight members can be modelled by VERMIN. (author)

  15. Handling, treatment, conditioning and storage of biological radioactive wastes. Technical manual for the management of low and intermediate level wastes generated at small nuclear research centres and by radioisotope users in medicine, research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Biological materials that contain radioactive isotopes have many important applications. During the production and use of these materials, waste will inevitably arise which must be managed with particular care due to their potential biological as well as radiological hazards. This report deals with wastes that arise outside the nuclear fuel cycle and is directed primarily to countries without nuclear power programmes. It is intended to provide guidance to Member States in the handling, treatment and conditioning of biological radioactive materials. The objective of radioactive waste management is to handle, pretreat, treat, condition, store, transport and dispose of radioactive waste in a manner that protects human health and the environment without imposing undue burdens on future generations. 31 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Handling, treatment, conditioning and storage of biological radioactive wastes. Technical manual for the management of low and intermediate level wastes generated at small nuclear research centres and by radioisotope users in medicine, research and industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Biological materials that contain radioactive isotopes have many important applications. During the production and use of these materials, waste will inevitably arise which must be managed with particular care due to their potential biological as well as radiological hazards. This report deals with wastes that arise outside the nuclear fuel cycle and is directed primarily to countries without nuclear power programmes. It is intended to provide guidance to Member States in the handling, treatment and conditioning of biological radioactive materials. The objective of radioactive waste management is to handle, pretreat, treat, condition, store, transport and dispose of radioactive waste in a manner that protects human health and the environment without imposing undue burdens on future generations. 31 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs.

  17. Low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power generating stations: Characterization, classification and assessment of activated metals and waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.W.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.

    1993-02-01

    Since the enactment of 10 CFR Part 61, additional difficult-to-measure long-lived radionuclides, not specified in Tables 1 2 of Part 61, have been identified (e.g., 108m Ag, 93 Mo, 36 Cl, 10 Be, 113m Cd, 121m Sn, 126 Sn, 93m Nb) that may be of concern in certain types of waste. These nuclides are primarily associated with activated metal and perhaps other nuclear power low-level waste (LLW) being sent to disposal facilities. The concentration of a radionuclide in waste materials is normally determined by direct measurement or by indirect calculational methods, such as using a scaling factor to relate inferred concentration of a difficult-to-measure radionuclide to another that is easily measured. The total disposal site inventory of certain difficult-to-measure radionuclides (e.g., 14 C, 129 I, and 99 Tc) often control the total quantities of radioactive waste permitted in LLW burial facilities. Overly conservative scaling factors based on lower limits of detection (LLD), often used in the nuclear power industry to estimate these controlling nuclides, could lead to premature closure of a disposal facility. Samples of LLW (Class B and C activated metals [AM] and other waste streams) are being collected from operating nuclear power stations and analyzed for radionuclides covered in 10 CFR Part 61 and the additional difficult-to-measure radionuclides. This analysis will enhance the NRC's understanding of the distribution and projected quantities of radionuclides within AM and LLW streams from commercial nuclear power stations. This research will also provide radiological characterization of AM specimens for others to use in leach-rate and lysimeter experiments to determine nuclide releases and subsequent movement in natural soil environments

  18. Radioactive solid waste management study of generated in the source production laboratory for brachytherapy; Estudo de gerenciamento dos rejeitos radioativos sólidos gerados no laboratório de produção de fontes para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Nayane K.O., E-mail: nayaneketteryn07@gmail.com [Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, Vitória S.; Marques, José R.O.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Baptista, Tatyana S.; Vicente, Roberto; Rostelato, M.E.C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Souza, Daiane C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    A management system for radioactive solid wastes generated during seed production in the Laboratório de Produção de Fontes para Radioterapia (LPFRT) was developed. For this, the volume and the mass of each item of solid wastes generated in Glove box were estimated. It is possible to estimate, per week, how much reject will enter the warehouse, what space it will occupy and also its weight. In the final step of the characterization, the decay calculation is applied to define the time the reject will be stored for later disposal in the collection system. After the characterization process, it is noticed that the rate of volume and radioactivity decreases as the retention time of the rejects increases due to the release of the materials, and also, there is the decay of the radioactivity present in the reservoir. It is also observed that the rate of entry and exit of the wastes is proportional.

  19. Radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkina, L.E.; Mazurek, V.; Myascedov, D.N.; Prokhorov, P.; Kachalov, V.A.; Ziv, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioactive layer in a radioactive source is sealed by the application of a sealing layer on the radioactive layer. The sealing layer can consist of a film of oxide of titanium, tin, zirconium, aluminum, or chromium. Preferably, the sealing layer is pure titanium dioxide. The radioactive layer is embedded in a finish enamel which, in turn, is on a priming enamel which surrounds a substrate

  20. Management of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokosa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Radioactive Wastes is to protect workers and the public from the radiological risk associated with radioactive waste for the present and future. It application of the principles to the management of waste generated in a radioisotope uses in the industry. Any material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or radioactivity levels greater than ‘exempt quantities’ established by the competent regulatory authorities and for which no further use is foreseen or intended. Origin of the Radioactive Waste includes Uranium and Thorium mining and milling, nuclear fuel cycle operations, Operation of Nuclear power station, Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and Institutional uses of isotopes. There are types of radioactive waste: Low-level Waste (LLW) and High-level Waste. The Management Options for Radioactive Waste Depends on Form, Activity, Concentration and half-lives of the radioactive waste, Storage and disposal methods will vary according to the following; the radionuclides present, and their concentration, and radio toxicity. The contamination results basically from: Contact between radioactive materials and any surface especially during handling. And it may occur in the solid, liquid or gas state. Decontamination is any process that will either reduce or completely remove the amount of radionuclides from a contaminated surface

  1. Radioactivity metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, J.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the radioactivity metrology are reviewed. Radioactivity primary references; absolute methods of radioactivity measurements used in the Laboratoire de Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants; relative measurement methods; traceability through international comparisons and interlaboratory tests; production and distribution of secondary standards [fr

  2. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teillac, J.

    1988-01-01

    This study of general interest is an evaluation of the safety of radioactive waste management and consequently the preservation of the environment for the protection of man against ionizing radiations. The following topics were developed: radiation effects on man; radioactive waste inventory; radioactive waste processing, disposal and storage; the present state and future prospects [fr

  3. Radioactive waste removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To cleanup primary coolants for LMFBR type reactors by magnetically generating a high speed rotational flow in the flow of liquid metal, and adsorbing radioactive corrosion products and fission products onto capturing material of a complicated shape. Constitution: Three-phase AC coils for generating a rotational magnetic field are provided to the outside of a container through which liquid sodium is passed to thereby generate a high speed rotational stream in the liquid sodium flowing into the container. A radioactive substance capturing material made of a metal plate such as of nickel and stainless steel in the corrugated shape with shape edges is secured within a flow channel. Magnetic field at a great slope is generated in the flow channel by the capturing material to adsorb radioactive corrosion products and fission products present in the liquid sodium onto the capturing material and removing therefrom. This enables to capture the ferri-magnetic impurities by adsorption. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust

  5. Evaluation of the impact and inter-generation risk transfers related to the release and disposal of radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle: a methodological exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croueail, P.; Schneider, T.; Sugier, A.

    2000-01-01

    Reflections about the consequences of decisions involving the long term raise various theoretical and complex issues related to the validity of the quantitative assessment of what could be future risks, but also to the ethical position we are adopting towards future generations. In this perspective, decision-making in the field of radioactive waste management, with a view to maintaining present and future radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable, implies being able to discriminate among alternative options, i.e., being in a position to evaluate the differences in terms of radiological impacts between the options. Because of the complex and multi-dimensional nature of the distant future consequences of waste management options, their comparison involves expressing these impacts using various aggregated or disaggregated indicators, taking into account the time during which radionuclides remain in the environment and their local, regional, or world-wide dispersion. This paper is an attempt to contribute to the development of such a framework. It is mainly focused on the risk transfer dimension inherent to waste disposal management. Any decision to protect people now against the potential impacts of radioactive releases into the environment leads inevitably to the exposure of current generations and potentially of future generations. In this perspective, one of the key questions related to waste management is to decide on the best compromise between present dilution-dispersion into the environment or concentration in surface or underground disposal sites. The objective of this paper is to illustrate, the relative impact of different waste management options, focusing especially on inter-generational risk transfers. For the sake of the exercise, calculations have been performed for six particular radionuclides and for the current waste management options combining underground disposal and releases as well as for extreme alternative waste management options

  6. Synthesis and characterization of porous calcium phosphate; Sintesis y caracterizacion del fosfato de calcio poroso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados C, F.; Serrano G, J.; Bonifacio M, J. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    The porous calcium phosphate was prepared by the continuous precipitation method using Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} salts. The synthesized material was structurally and superficially characterized using the XRD, BET, IR TGA and SEM techniques. The obtained inorganic material was identified as calcium phosphate that presents a great specific area for what can be efficiently used as adsorbent material for adsorption studies in the radioactive wastes treatment present in aqueous solution. (Author)

  7. Joule-Heated Ceramic-Lined Melter to Vitrify Liquid Radioactive Wastes Containing Am241 Generated From MOX Fuel Fabrication in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E C; Bowan II, B W; Pegg, I; Jardine, L J

    2004-01-01

    The governments of the United Stated of America and the Russian Federation (RF) signed an Agreement September 1, 2000 to dispose of weapons plutonium that has been designated as no longer required for defense purposes. The Agreement declares that each country will disposition 34MT of excess weapons grade plutonium from their stockpiles. The preferred disposition technology is the fabrication of mixed oxide (MOx) fuel for use or burning in pressurized water reactors to destroy the plutonium. Implementation of this Agreement will require the conversion of plutonium metal to oxide and the fabrication of MOx fuel within the Russian Federation. The MOx fuel fabrication and metal to oxide conversion processes will generate solid and liquid radioactive wastes containing trace amounts of plutonium, neptunium, americium, and uranium requiring treatment, storage, and disposal. Unique to the Russian MOx fuel fabrication facility's flow-sheet is a liquid waste stream with high concentrations (∼1 g/l) of 241 Am and non radioactive silver. The silver is used to dissolve PuO 2 feed materials to the MOx fabrication facility. Technical solutions are needed to treat and solidify this liquid waste stream. Alternative treatment technologies for this liquid waste stream are being evaluated by a Russian engineering team. The technologies being evaluated include borosilicate and phosphate vitrification alternatives. The evaluations are being performed at a conceptual design level of detail under a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) contract with the Russian organization TVEL using DOE NA-26 funding. As part of this contract, the RF team is evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of the US borosilicate glass vitrification technology based on a Duratek melter to solidify this waste stream into a form acceptable for storage and geologic disposal. The composition of the glass formed from treating the waste is dictated by the concentration of silver and americium it

  8. Preliminary evaluation of the impact and inter-generation risk transfers related to the release and disposal of radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tort, V.; Lochard, J.; Schneider, T.; Sugier, A.

    1997-12-01

    This report is an attempt to contribute to the complex issue of the decision-making in the field of radioactive waste management. Because of the complex and multidimensional nature of the distant future consequences of waste management options, their analysis implies the taking into considerations of various aggregated indicators which depend on the elapse of time during which the radionuclides remain in the environment and their local, regional or world-wide dispersion. This report is a preliminary work sponsored by IPSN mainly focused on the risk transfer dimension, inherent to waste disposal management. Its objective is to illustrate, using the French nuclear fuel cycle context, the relative impact of some simple waste management options, outlining particularly the issue of inter-generation risk transfer. Even though the selected six radionuclides are the most important, a complete assessment should include all the radionuclides contained in the waste, what is particularly important in case of underground waste disposal were both normal evolution scenarios and intrusion must be considered. The extreme alternatives, i.e. the total disposal or total release of the radionuclides are analyzed but realistic are the intermediate options, which should be thoroughly examined from the technical point of view. The analysis of intermediate management options could give an estimation of the most appropriate solution in an ALARA perspective

  9. Challenges in development of matrices for vitrification of old legacy waste and high-level radioactive waste generated from reprocessing of AHWR and FBR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Majority of radioactivity in entire nuclear fuel cycle is concentrated in HLW. A three step strategy for management of HLW has been adopted in India. This involves immobilization of waste oxides in stable and inert solid matrices, interim retrievable storage of the conditioned waste product under continuous cooling and disposal in deep geological formations. Glass has been accepted as most suitable matrix world-wide for immobilization of HLW, because of its attractive features like ability to accommodate wide range of waste constituents, modest processing temperatures, adequate chemical, thermal and radiation stability. Borosilicate glass matrix developed by BARC in collaboration with CGCRI has been adopted in India for immobilization of HLW. In view of compositional variation of HLW from site to site, tailor make changes in the glass formulations are often necessary to incorporate all the waste constituents and having the product of desirable characteristics. The vitrified waste products made with different glass formulations and simulated waste need to be characterized for chemical durability, thermal stability, homogeneity etc. before finalizing a suitable glass formulation. The present extended abstract summarises the studies carried out for development of glass formulations for vitrification of legacy waste and futuristic waste likely to be generated from AHWR and FBR having wide variations in their compositions. The presently stored HLW at Trombay is characterized by significant concentrations of uranium, sodium and sulphate in addition to fission products, corrosion products and small amount of other actinides

  10. Radioactive Waste in Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Large volumes of hazardous wastes are produced each year, however only a small proportion of them are radioactive. While disposal options for hazardous wastes are generally well established, some types of hazardous waste face issues similar to those for radioactive waste and also require long-term disposal arrangements. The objective of this NEA study is to put the management of radioactive waste into perspective, firstly by contrasting features of radioactive and hazardous wastes, together with their management policies and strategies, and secondly by examining the specific case of the wastes resulting from carbon capture and storage of fossil fuels. The study seeks to give policy makers and interested stakeholders a broad overview of the similarities and differences between radioactive and hazardous wastes and their management strategies. Contents: - Foreword; - Key Points for Policy Makers; - Executive Summary; - Introduction; - Theme 1 - Radioactive and Hazardous Wastes in Perspective; - Theme 2 - The Outlook for Wastes Arising from Coal and from Nuclear Power Generation; - Risk, Perceived Risk and Public Attitudes; - Concluding Discussion and Lessons Learnt; - Strategic Issues for Radioactive Waste; - Strategic Issues for Hazardous Waste; - Case Studies - The Management of Coal Ash, CO 2 and Mercury as Wastes; - Risk and Perceived Risk; - List of Participants; - List of Abbreviations. (authors)

  11. Management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes is perhaps the most controversial and least understood aspect of the use of nuclear materials in generating electrical power, the investigation of biochemical processes through tracer kinetics, and the diagnosis and treatment of disease. In the siting of nuclear power facilities, the disposal of radioactive wastes is invariably posed as the ultimate unanswerable question. In the fall of 1979, biochemical and physiologic research employing radioactive tracers was threatened with a slowdown resulting from temporary closure of sites for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). Radioactive pharmaceuticals used extensively for diagnosis and treatment of human disease have increased dramatically in price, partly as a result of the escalating cost of disposing of radioactive wastes created during production of the labeled pharmaceuticals. These problems have resulted in identification of the disposal of LLW as the most pressing issue in the entire scheme of management of hazardous wastes. How this issue as well as the separate issue of disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) are being addressed at both national and state levels is the subject of this chapter

  12. Radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, H.; Closs, K.D.; Kuhn, K.

    1981-01-01

    The solutions to the technical problem of the disposal of radioactive waste are limited by a) the state of knowledge of reprocessing possibilites, b) public acceptance of the use of those techniques which are known, c) legislative procedures linking licensing of new nuclear power plants to the solution of waste problems, and d) other political constraints. Wastes are generated in the mining and enriching of radioactive elements, and in the operation of nuclear power plants as well as in all fields where radioactive substances may be used. Waste management will depend on the stability and concentration of radioactive materials which must be stored, and a resolution of the tension between numerous small storage sites and a few large ones, which again face problems of public acceptability

  13. Radioactivity and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, R N [Fertilizer Association of India, New Delhi

    1977-12-01

    Power generation from radioisotopes is one of the major applications of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes and is in practice in over twenty countries including India. Other well-known applications of radioactive substances are in medicine, industry, scientific and industrial research programs, and nuclear weapons. The only serious disadvantage with the radioisotopes and their waste products is the constant release of radiation energy which contaminates the environment and endangers the life. An attempt has been made to identify the major sources of radioactivity in the environment and assess its potential impact on the environment. Recent developments in safety measures for prevention of contamination and control of radioactivity and in radioactive wastes management are also discussed.

  14. Classification of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. To simplify their management, a number of schemes have evolved for classifying radioactive waste according to the physical, chemical and radiological properties of significance to those facilities managing this waste. These schemes have led to a variety of terminologies, differing from country to country and even between facilities in the same country. This situation makes it difficult for those concerned to communicate with one another regarding waste management practices. This document revises and updates earlier IAEA references on radioactive waste classification systems given in IAEA Technical Reports Series and Safety Series. Guidance regarding exemption of materials from regulatory control is consistent with IAEA Safety Series and the RADWASS documents published under IAEA Safety Series. 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tab

  15. Transporting radioactive rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, G.

    1990-01-01

    The case is made for exempting geological specimens from the IAEA Regulations for Safer Transport of Radioactive Materials. It is pointed out that many mineral collectors in Devon and Cornwall may be unwittingly infringing these regulations by taking naturally radioactive rocks and specimens containing uranium ores. Even if these collectors are aware that these rocks are radioactive, and many are not, few have the necessary equipment to monitor the activity levels. If the transport regulations were to be enforced alarm could be generated and the regulations devalued in case of an accident. The danger from a spill of rock specimens is negligible compared with an accident involving industrial or medical radioactive substances yet would require similar special treatment. (UK)

  16. New radioactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.; Sandulescu, A.

    1996-01-01

    Some atomic nuclei reorganize their structure by ejection of big protons and neutrons aggregates. The observation of these new radioactivities specifies the theories of the nuclear dynamics. (authors)

  17. Radioactivity Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, R.B.; Browne, E.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioactivity Handbook will be published in 1985. This handbook is intended primarily for applied users of nuclear data. It will contain recommended radiation data for all radioactive isotopes. Pages from the Radioactivity Handbook for A = 221 are shown as examples. These have been produced from the LBL Isotopes Project extended ENDSF data-base. The skeleton schemes have been manually updated from the Table of Isotopes and the tabular data are prepared using UNIX with a phototypesetter. Some of the features of the Radioactivity Handbook are discussed here

  18. Radioactivity. Centenary of radioactivity discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Tubiana, M.; Bimbot, R.

    1997-01-01

    This small booklet was edited for the occasion of the exhibitions of the celebration of the centenary of radioactivity discovery which took place in various locations in France from 1996 to 1998. It recalls some basic knowledge concerning radioactivity and its applications: history of discovery, atoms and isotopes, radiations, measurement of ionizing radiations, natural and artificial radioactivity, isotope dating and labelling, radiotherapy, nuclear power and reactors, fission and fusion, nuclear wastes, dosimetry, effects and radioprotection. (J.S.)

  19. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  20. Disposal facility for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Toru.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To remove heat generated from radioactive wastes thereby prevent the working circumstances from being worsened in a disposal-facility for radioactive wastes. Constitution: The disposal-facility comprises a plurality of holes dug out into the ground inside a tunnel excavated for the storage of radioactive wastes. After placing radioactive wastes into the shafts, re-filling materials are directly filled with a purpose of reducing the dosage. Further, a plurality of heat pipes are inserted into the holes and embedded within the re-filling materials so as to gather heat from the radioactive wastes. The heat pipes are connected to a heat exchanger disposed within the tunnel. As a result, heating of the solidified radioactive wastes itself or the containing vessel to high temperature can be avoided, as well as thermal degradation of the re-filling materials and the worsening in the working circumstance within the tunnel can be overcome. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Simulated Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  2. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  3. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    The widely published claims that the public health effects resulting from routine emissions are between 0.01 and 0.1 serious health effects per gigawattyear, and hence are at least a thousand times smaller than those resulting from air pollution by the burning of coal, cannot be true, for two reasons. The authors of these claims have ignored at least two of the more important isotopes, radon-222 and carbon-14, which are presently released to the environment, and thus contribute greatly to the health impact of nuclear energy. The health effects calculated in the earlier work cover only those which occur during the year in which the energy is generated. This means, figuratively speaking, that the authors have confused an annual installment payment with the full cost. This is unacceptable. The contribution to the health impact of nuclear energy arising from the single isotopic species radon-222 emanating from the mill tailings is estimated to 400 lung cancer deaths/GW(e)y, larger even than the most pessimistic estimates of the health impact of energy from coal through atmospheric pollution. We have no assurance that other long-lived isotopes do not contribute comparable amounts to the health impact of nuclear energy. The discussion of the health impact of radon-222 raises the fundamental moral question--how far into the future our responsibility extends. If such a long-termresponsibility is rejected, then we must at least try to predict the environmental buildup of radioactive pollutants, in order to avoid unacceptable and irreversible levels of radiation dose rate. The potential health consequences from long-lived radioisotopes seem to have been largely ignored so far, and should be explored in detail

  4. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to set out the Government's current strategy for the long term in the management of radioactive wastes. It takes account of the latest developments, and will be subject to review in the light of future developments and studies. The subject is discussed under the headings: what are radioactive wastes; who is responsible; what monitoring takes place; disposal as the objective; low-level wastes; intermediate-level wastes; discharges from Sellafield; heat generating wastes; how will waste management systems and procedures be assessed; how much more waste is there going to be in future; conclusion. (U.K.)

  5. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.

    1982-01-01

    Following a definition of the term 'radioactive waste', including a discussion of possible criteria allowing a delimitation of low-level radioactive against inactive wastes, present techniques of handling high-level, intermediate-level and low-level wastes are described. The factors relevant for the establishment of definitive disposals for high-level wastes are discussed in some detail. Finally, the waste management organization currently operative in Austria is described. (G.G.)

  6. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl reactor accident on April 26, 1986, many individual values for radioactivity in the air, in foodstuffs and in the soil were measured and published. Prof. Dr. Rolf Steiner, Wiesbaden, the author of this paper, evaluated the host of data - mostly official pollution data -, drew conclusions regarding the radioactivity actually released at Chernobyl, and used the data to test the calculation model adotped by the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig./RB) [de

  7. Accidents during transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive materials are a part of modern technology and life. They are used in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and electrical power generation. Tens of millions of packages containing radioactive materials are consigned for transport each year throughout the world. In India, about 80000 packages containing radioactive material are transported every year. The amount of radioactive material in these packages varies from negligible amounts used in consumer products to very large amounts in shipment of irradiator sources and spent nuclear fuel

  8. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste

  9. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  10. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous sources of ionizing radiation can lead to human exposure: natural sources, nuclear explosions, nuclear power generation, use of radiation in medical, industrial and research purposes, and radiation emitting consumer products. Before assessing the radiation dose to a population one requires a precise knowledge of the activity of a number of radionuclides. The basis for the assessment of the dose to a population from a release of radioactivity to the environment, the estimation of the potential clinical heath effects due to the dose received and, ultimately, the implementation of countermeasures to protect the population, is the measurement of radioactive contamination in the environment after the release. It is the purpose of this book to present the facts about the presence of radionuclides in the environment, natural and man made. There is no aspect of radioactivity, which has marked the passing century, not mentioned or discussed in this book. refs

  11. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahissa Campa, Jaime; Pahissa, Marta H. de

    2000-01-01

    Throughout this century, the application of nuclear energy has produced many benefits, in industry, in research, in medicine, and in the generation of electricity. These activities generate wastes in the same way as do other human activities. The primary objective of radioactive waste management is to protect human health and environment now and in the future without imposing undue burden on future generations, through sound, safe and efficient radioactive waste management. This paper briefly describes the different steps of the management of short lived low and intermediate level wastes, and presents and overview of the state of art in countries involved in nuclear energy, describing their organizations, methodologies used in the processing of these wastes and the final disposal concepts. It also presents the Argentine strategy, its technical and legal aspects. Worldwide experience during the past 50 years has shown that short lived low and intermediate level wastes can be successfully isolated from human and environment in near surface disposal facilities. (author)

  12. Radioactive waste storage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state's boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected

  13. Approaches of the state committee on the environment protection to development of ecological requirements for radioactive wastes management generated in the decommissioning of nuclear submarines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechkurov, A. V.; Shusharina, N.M

    1999-07-01

    According to this presentation, handling of radioactive waste from the Russian nuclear submarines (NS) is complex because of a lack of sufficient infrastructure for the management of such wastes. The considerable part of decommissioned NSs is located at the main bases of the North and Pacific Navies and at the territories of the enterprises dealing with building and maintenance of NSs. Existing stationary and floating facilities for radioactive wastes are practically filled up completely and there is no adequate reserve facilities. Norway and the USA render their assistance in increasing the existing capacity of the liquid radioactive waste reprocessing facility of Atomflot, and Japan assists in the creation of a floating facility at Zvezda in the far east. The coastal infrastructure created in the 1960s for radioactive waste processing and long-term storage at the Fleet was not commissioned. The present storage facilities, particularly of trench and open type, are dangerous contamination sources for the environment. Realisation of the full-scaled and complex disposal scheme for reactor compartments of disposed NSs requires the solution of a large number of problems and the fundamental requirements on this work are outlined.

  14. Approaches of the state committee on the environment protection to development of ecological requirements for radioactive wastes management generated in the decommissioning of nuclear submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechkurov, A. V.; Shusharina, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    According to this presentation, handling of radioactive waste from the Russian nuclear submarines (NS) is complex because of a lack of sufficient infrastructure for the management of such wastes. The considerable part of decommissioned NSs is located at the main bases of the North and Pacific Navies and at the territories of the enterprises dealing with building and maintenance of NSs. Existing stationary and floating facilities for radioactive wastes are practically filled up completely and there is no adequate reserve facilities. Norway and the USA render their assistance in increasing the existing capacity of the liquid radioactive waste reprocessing facility of Atomflot, and Japan assists in the creation of a floating facility at Zvezda in the far east. The coastal infrastructure created in the 1960s for radioactive waste processing and long-term storage at the Fleet was not commissioned. The present storage facilities, particularly of trench and open type, are dangerous contamination sources for the environment. Realisation of the full-scaled and complex disposal scheme for reactor compartments of disposed NSs requires the solution of a large number of problems and the fundamental requirements on this work are outlined

  15. Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden-Wuerttemberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-04-01

    The report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg covers the following issues: legal framework for the nuclear disposal; producer of spent fuels and radioactive wastes in Baden- Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg; low- and medium-level radioactive wastes (non heat generating radioactive wastes); spent fuels and radioactive wastes from waste processing (heat generating radioactive wastes); final disposal.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of poly iodine anilines by plasma; Sintesis y caracterizacion de poliyodoanilinas por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez P, M A

    2003-07-01

    The polymers and organic materials present a numberless quantity of applications. However, it has not been but until recent times that it has been found that some of these materials can possess semiconductor properties. This has generated a great interest for the investigation in the area of semiconductor polymers. The poly aniline (Pan) it is one of the main semiconductor polymers because their electric properties change depending on the doping and of the state of oxidation to the one the molecules are subjected. The synthesis of this material has been carried out by means of chemical oxidation or electrochemistry. In this work a study is presented on the formation of poly aniline polymers with halogens chemically united to the aniline ring, poly(m-iodine aniline) (m-PAnI) and poly(m-chloroaniline) (m-PAnCI) for plasma. The plasma is generated by means of discharges of splendor with an r f amplifier to 13.5 MHz to drops pressures (10{sup -2} mbar). The synthesized polymers were obtained in form of thin film in the walls of the reactor and in the substrate introduced in the one. The electric properties of the polymers were evaluated in function of the time of reaction. Also, the conductivity of the polymers was compared synthesized in this work with reported data of synthesized poly aniline and doped with iodine for plasma. The highest values in conductivity are obtained in the poly aniline where the halogens are chemically connected to the ring that if it is doped with iodine. The atomic proportion in the surface of the polymers was analyzed by dispersive energy spectroscopy with which is deduced that the halogens come off of the molecules of the monomers or of the polymer in formation and that the atoms of iodine get lost more easily than those of chlorine. Other techniques that were used to characterize to the poly aniline were scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction. The results are presented in

  17. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Managing radioactive wastes used to be a peripheral activity for the French atomic energy commission (Cea). Over the past 40 years, it has become a full-fledged phase in the fuel cycle of producing electricity from the atom. In 2005, the national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) presented to the government a comprehensive overview of the results drawn from 15 years of research. This landmark report has received recognition beyond France's borders. By broadening this agency's powers, an act of 28 June 2006 acknowledges the progress made and the quality of the results. It also sets an objective for the coming years: work out solutions for managing all forms of radioactive wastes. The possibility of recovering wastes packages from the disposal site must be assured as it was asked by the government in 1998. The next step will be the official demand for the creation of a geological disposal site in 2016

  18. Radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.F.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A problem with ore sorting arrangements is that radiation is difficult to measure accurately while particles are moving at speed past the detector. This is particulary so when dealing with ores such as gold ores which have weak emissions. A method of measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material includes the steps of shielding the radiation detector(s) so that the angle of acceptance of the receptor surface is restricted, and further shielding the shielded portion of the detector with a second material which is less radiation emissive than the material of the first shield. This second shield is between the first shield and the detector

  19. Synthesis by plasma of polymer-metal materials; Sintesis por plasma de materiales polimero-metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez R, G

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this work is the design of an experimental set-up to synthesize polymer- metal composites by plasma with versatility in the conditions of synthesis. The main components are a vacuum system capable to reach up to 10{sup -2} mbar and valves and accessories to control the pressure in the system. In order to generate the electrical discharges and the plasma, an electrical circuit with an inductive connection at 13.56 MHz of frequency was constructed. The electric field partially ionizes the reactor atmosphere where the polymer-metal composites were synthesized. The reactor has two metallic electrodes, one in front of the other, where the particles electrically charged collide against the electrodes producing ablation on them. The polymer-metal composites were synthesized by means of an inductive connection at 13.56 MHz. Aniline, 3-chlorine-ethylene and electrodes of silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) were used in a cylindrical reactor coupled with an external coil to generate glow discharges. The average pressures were 6.15 X 10{sup -1} and 5.2 X 10{sup -1} mbar for the synthesis of Poly aniline (P An) and Poly chloroethylene (PE-CI), respectively. The synthesis was performed during 60 and 180 minutes for P An and PE-CI, respectively. The polymers were formed, as films, with an average thickness of 6.42 {mu}m for P An and, in the case of PE-CI, with an approximately growing rate of 14 {eta}m/W. The power in the syntheses was 30, 50, 70 and 90 W for P An and 50, 100, 120, 140 170, and 200 W for PE-CI. The characterization of the polymer-metal composites was done by energy dispersive spectroscopy to study the composition and the relation of the elements involved in the synthesis. The morphology of the films was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. The infrared analysis (IR) was done to study the chemicals bonds and the structure of these polymers. Another important study in these materials was the behavior of the electrical conductivity ({sigma

  20. Identification and evaluation of radionuclide generation/depletion codes for potential use by the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelmers, A.D.; Shappert, L.B.; Roddy, J.W.; Hermann, O.W.; Parks, C.V.

    1989-02-01

    Design, licensing, and operating activities involved with the transportation, storage, and geologic disposal of high-level radioactive wastes involve calculation of waste nuclide content and characteristics at various time out-of-reactor. Gamma and neutron fields must be known to meet transportation and radiation protection regulations of the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Radioactive decay heat must also be known to demonstrate compliance with other DOT and NRC regulations involving transportation, storage, and geologic disposal operations. NRC licensing of a mined geologic repository---to be constructed and operated by the Department of Energy (DOE)---will require nuclide inventory data over a 10,000-year time period in order to show expected compliance with NRC repository engineered facility radionuclide release rules and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) repository 10,000-year cumulative radionuclide environmental standards. 58 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  1. SINTESIS FOSFOLIPID MENGANDUNG ASAM LEMAK w-3 DARI FOSFOLIPID KEDELAI DAN MINYAK KAYA ASAM LEMAK w-3 DARI HASIL SAMPING PENGALENGAN TUNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teti Estiasih

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of Phospholipid Containing w-3 Fatty Acids from Soy Phospholipidsand Fish Oil Enriched with w-3 Fatty Acids from Tuna Canning Processing Teti Estiasih, Moch. Nur, Jaya Mahar Maligan, Satrio Maulana ABSTRAK Keunggulan fosfolipid dapat ditingkatkan dengan menggabungkan asam lemak w-3, terutama EPA (eicosapentaenoicacid, C20:5w-3 dan DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, C22:6w-3, pada struktur fosfolipid sehingga diperoleh fosfolipidterstruktur. Strukturisasi fosfolipid kedelai komersial dilakukan dengan cara mengganti asam lemak dari fosfolipidkedelai dengan asam lemak w-3 dari minyak kaya asam lemak w-3 dari hasil samping pengalengan tuna. Sintesisfosfolipid terstruktur dilakukan secara asidolisis enzimatis dengan menggunakan lipase dari R. miehei. Faktor yangdikaji pada proses sintesis ini adalah konsentrasi enzim dan lama sintesis. Tingkat inkorporasi EPA dan DHA padastruktur fosfolipid dipengaruhi oleh konsentrasi enzim. Pada konsentrasi enzim yang rendah, peningkatan lama reaksisetelah tingkat inkoporasi optimum tercapai cenderung menyebabkan penurunan tingkat inkorporasi EPA+DHA. Padakonsentrasi enzim yang tinggi, lama reaksi tampaknya tidak mempengaruhi tingkat inkorporasi. Tingkat inkorporasiDHA lebih tinggi dari EPA sehingga fosfolipid terstruktur yang dihasilkan sangat sesuai digunakan untuk produk panganyang memerlukan kadar DHA tinggi. Ada preferensi inkorporasi EPA+DHA pada fosfatidiletanolamin dibandingkanjenis fosfolipid yang lain.Kata kunci: Fosfolipid terstruktur, asam lemak w-3, EPA, DHA, asidolisis enzimatis ABSTRACT The superiority of soy phospholipids could be obtained by incorporation of w-3 fatty acids into phospholipids structure,especially EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid, C20:5w-3 and DHA docosahexaenoic acid, C22:6w-3. Structurization ofcommercial soy phospholipids was conducted by replacement of natural fatty acids in soy phospholipids by w-3 fattyacids from w-3 fatty acids enriched Þ sh oil from tuna canning processing

  2. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. Radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwach, G.

    1986-01-01

    This is an overview of radioactivity monitoring work done in the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf in the wake of the Chernobyl accident. It consists of air, rainwater, food and personnel monitoring. Additional services to the public are: information and development of a database and a computer code for predicting future radionuclide concentration in air, soil, water and food. (G.Q.)

  4. Developments and studies on the (T)HMC processes in a final repository for heat generating radioactive wastes. Synthesis and final report; Entwicklungen und Untersuchungen zu (T)HMC-Prozessen eines Endlagers fuer Waerme entwickelnde radioaktive Abfaelle. Synthese und Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyand, Torben [Bonn Univ. (Germany); Bracke, Guido; Fischer, Heidemarie; Frieling, Gerd; Hansmeier, Christina; Hotzel, Stephan; Kock, Ingo; Seher, Holger

    2014-10-15

    The report on developments and studies on the (T)HMC (thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical) processes in a final repository for heat generating radioactive wastes covers the following topics: description of the projects, applied codes: TOUGH2, FLAC3D, TOUGH2 and FLAC3D, TOUHREACT/PetraSim, MARNIE, PHREEQC, geochemists workbench, SUSA; safety relevant singular processes in the transition phase, uncertainties due to process interactions, coupling of mass transport and geochemical equilibria, further developments and application of numerical simulations in the transition phase.

  5. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory across generations. An International Project of the NEA/RWMC. Foundations and guiding principles for the preservation of records, knowledge and memory across generations: A focus on the post-closure phase of geological repositories. A Collective Statement of the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) across generations is needed to support lengthy and complex decision-making processes across long operational and post-operational lifetimes of radioactive waste repositories. It is a recognised management task that spans unprecedented time-horizons in which technical, scientific, societal and cultural information is interwoven. Experience indicates that RK and M need to be actively managed from the start of the waste management programmes. Several radioactive waste disposal programmes are now approaching implementation. The NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) has created an international project addressing the preservation of RK and M across generations. This collective statement summarises the current understanding of the relevant needs and challenges to be faced. It underscores the willingness of the RWMC member organisations to work together and support national programmes to move forward in this area. Research and development underway on the disposal of long-lived radioactive waste in engineered facilities or repositories located in deep geological formations has confirmed this form of disposal as the ultimate solution for the long-term protection of human beings and the environment, eliminating the need for human intervention and maintenance. While the intention is not to abandon repositories for geological disposal of radioactive waste, either before or after closure, as with many long-term projects, it is a question of minimising the risks of losing records, knowledge and memory (RK and M). The international community of radioactive waste professionals is leading advanced work in this important area. At the end of its first phase of RK and M work, the RWMC observed that the context has changed considerably since the 1980's, when RK and M preservation was thought to serve the sole function of deterring intrusion into a repository. The goal today is to preserve information for future

  6. Synthesis of biocompatible polymers by plasma; Sintesis de polimeros biocompatibles por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin O, E

    2007-07-01

    Cl its produced the smallest contact angles. It has been demonstrated that the high energy of plasma in the polymers favors certain crystalline arrangement due to the reorganization of polymeric chains. In this work the crystallinity was calculated by means of areas under the curve of the amorphous and crystalline signals obtained by X-ray diffraction. The crystallinity in PPy/PEG increases from 8% to 9.5%. In Poly allylamine (PAl) the crystallinity was from 4% to 16%. The crystallinity in these materials increases when the increases synthesis energy. While in PPy the crystallinity diminishes from 16% to 12% when the synthesis energy increases, due to the fragmentation and/or possible ramifications of the pyrrole rings that reduce the formation of orderly regions with the energy increments. This characteristic is important, because they can be ended up forming conduction channels in the polymer that is reflected in the electric conductivity of the material. The electric conductivity is another important factor in this study, since due to the electric impulses generated among materials and cells it can stimulates the cellular growth. The electric response of the polymers was study in function of the relative humidity in the interval of 25-80% and in function of the volume of the solutions of NaCl, NaCl-MgSO{sub 4}, and Krebs-Ringer. In the interval of 25-80% of relative humidity, the increment in the electric conductivity in PPy/PEG went from 10{sup -12} to 10{sup -10} S/cm at 25% and of 10{sup -12} to 10{sup -8} S/cm to 80% of relative humidity. The electric conductivity regarding the humidity in PAl increases from 10{sup -11} of 10{sup -9} S/cm to 25% and of 10{sup -}1{sup 0} to 10{sup -8} S/cm at 80%. In Poly pyrrole (PPy) and doped poly pyrrole with Iodine (PPy/I) one observes that the electric conductivity in the interval 25% to 80% of relative humidity went from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup 11} S/cm in PPy and 10{sup -8} and 10{sup -10} S/cm in PPy/I almost increases two

  7. Radioactive waste in Federal Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennecke, P.; Schumacher, J.; Warnecke, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is responsible for the long-term storage and disposal of radioactive waste according to the Federal Atomic Energy Act. On behalf of the Federal Minister of the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, since 1985, the PTB has been carrying out annual inquiries into the amounts of radioactive waste produced in the Federal Republic of Germany. Within the scope of this inquiry performed for the preceding year, the amounts of unconditioned and conditioned waste are compiled on a producer- and plant-specific basis. On the basis of the inquiry for 1986 and of data presented to the PTB by the waste producers, future amounts of radioactive waste have been estimated up to the year 2000. The result of this forecast is presented. In the Federal Republic of Germany two sites are under consideration for disposal of radioactive waste. In the abandoned Konrad iron mine in Salzgitter-Bleckenstedt it is intended to dispose of such radioactive waste which has a negligible thermal influence upon the host rock. The Gorleben salt dome is being investigated for its suitability for the disposal of all kinds of solid and solidified radioactive wastes, especially of heat-generating waste. Comparing the estimated amount of radioactive wastes with the capacity of both repositories it may be concluded that the Konrad and Gorleben repositories will provide sufficient capacity to ensure the disposal of all kinds of radioactive waste on a long-term basis in the Federal Republic of Germany. 1 fig., 2 tabs

  8. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides information on the origin, characteristics and methods of processing of radioactive wastes, as well as the philosophy and practice of their storage and disposal. Chapters are devoted to the following topics: radioactive wastes, characteristics of radioactive wastes, processing liquid and solid radioactive wastes, processing wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, processing gaseous radioactive wastes, fixation of radioactive concentrates, solidification of high-level radioactive wastes, use of radioactive wastes as raw material, radioactive waste disposal, transport of radioactive wastes and economic problems of radioactive wastes disposal. (C.F.)

  9. Radioactive waste engineering and management

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    This book describes essential and effective management for reliably ensuring public safety from radioactive wastes in Japan. This is the first book to cover many aspects of wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle to research and medical use, allowing readers to understand the characterization, treatment and final disposal of generated wastes, performance assessment, institutional systems, and social issues such as intergenerational ethics. Exercises at the end of each chapter help to understand radioactive waste management in context.

  10. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This eighth chapter presents the radioactive wastes and waste disposal; classification of radioactive wastes; basis requests of the radioactive waste management; conditions for a radioactive waste disposal; registers and inventories; transport of radioactive wastes from a facility to another and the radioactive waste management plan

  11. Radioactive wastes in Oklo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar, M.; Flores R, J.H.; Pena, P.; Lopez, A.

    2006-01-01

    The acceptance of the Nuclear Energy as electric power supply implies to give answer to the population on the two main challenges to conquer in the public opinion: the nuclear accidents and the radioactive wastes. Several of the questions that are made on the radioactive wastes, its are the mobility migration of them, the geologic stability of the place where its are deposited and the possible migration toward the aquifer mantels. Since the half lives of the radioactive waste of a Nuclear Reactor are of several hundred of thousands of years, the technical explanations to the previous questions little convince to the public in general. In this work summary the results of the radioactive waste generated in a natural reactor, denominated Oklo effect that took place in Gabon, Africa, it makes several thousands of millions of years, a lot before the man appeared in the Earth. The identification of at least 17 reactors in Oklo it was carried out thanks to the difference in the concentrations of Uranium 235 and 238 prospective, and to the analysis of the non-mobility of the radioactive waste in the site. It was able by this way to determine that the reactors with sizes of hardly some decimeter and powers of around 100 kilowatts were operating in intermittent and spontaneous form for space of 150,000 years, with operation cycles of around 30 minutes. Recent studies have contributed information valuable on the natural confinement of the radioactive waste of the Oklo reactors in matrixes of minerals of aluminum phosphate that caught and immobilized them for thousands of millions of years. This extracted information from the nature contributes guides and it allows 'to verify' the validity of the current proposals on the immobilization of radioactive wastes of a nuclear reactor. This work presents in clear and accessible form to the public in general on the secure 'design', operation, 'decommissioning' and 'storage' of the radioactive waste of the reactors that the nature put

  12. Radioactivity and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Kuczera, B.

    2001-05-01

    The terms radioactivity and nuclear energy, which have become words causing irritation in the political sphere, actually represent nothing but a large potential for innovative exploitation of natural resources. The contributions to this publication of the Karlsruhe Research Center examine more closely three major aspects of radioactivity and nuclear energy. The first paper highlights steps in the history of the discovery of radioactivity in the natural environment and presents the state of the art in health physics and research into the effects of exposure of the population to natural or artificial radionuclides. Following contributions focus on: Radiochemical methods applied in the medical sciences (diagnostic methods and devices, therapy). Nuclear energy and electricity generation, and the related safety policies, are an important subject. In this context, the approaches and pathways taken in the field of nuclear science and technology are reported and discussed from the angle of nuclear safety science, and current trends are shown in the elaboration of advanced safety standards relating to nuclear power plant operation and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes. Finally, beneficial aspects of nuclear energy in the context of a sustainable energy policy are emphasized. In particular, the credentials of nuclear energy in the process of building an energy economy based on a balanced energy mix which combines economic and ecologic advantages are shown. (orig./CB) [de

  13. Analisis Hasil Sintesis Serbuk TiO2 / ZnO sebagai Lapisan Elektroda untuk Aplikasi Dye-sensitized Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilis Retnaningsih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pada penelitian ini telah dilakukan sintesis antara serbuk partikel nano TiO2 dan serbuk partikel nano ZnO menjadi pasta yang akan diaplikasikan sebagai elektroda pada dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC. Elektroda pada DSSC ini bekerja berdasarkan adsorbsi foton oleh pewarna, elektron yang tereksitasi ditransfer ke TiO2/ZnO yang mempunyai perbandingan berbeda. Dimensi material partikel nano TiO2/ZnO sebagai elektroda sangat penting untuk menghasilkan efisiensi yang lebih tinggi pada DSSC. Sifat ini sangat dipengaruh oleh metoda pabrikasi elektroda TiO2/ZnO dan parameternya. Pada penelitian ini digunakan metoda doctor blade untuk pabrikasi DSSC dan larutan dyes (Z907 sebagai zat pewarna. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh pencampuran serbuk TiO2 dan serbuk ZnO sebagai elektroda. Teknik pembuatan pasta TiO2/ZnO sebagai elektroda sangat penting untuk menghasilkan efisiensi tinggi pada DSSC. Teknik ini sangat terkait dengan material TiO2/ZnO, metoda pabrikasi, dan parameter pengukurannya. Dalam penelitian ini dibahas hasil karakterisasi XRD pada kedua serbuk TiO2 dan ZnO, hasil SEM pada pencampuran kedua material, hasil pengujian IPCE serta hasil pengukuran effisiensi pada pengujian I - V.

  14. Technological development for the synthesis of Captan and Folpet in Mexico; Desarrollo tecnologico para la sintesis de Captan y Folpet en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haro C, Jorge A [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Romero M, Artemisa; James M, Guillermo [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Santos de Flores, Elvira [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1995-02-01

    A technological development is presented for the production of Captan (3a, 4, 7, 7a-tetrahydro-2-[(tri-chlo-romethyl) thio]-1 H-isoindol-1, 3 (2H)-dione) and Folpet (2-(Trichloromethyl)- thio- 1 H-isoindol-1, 3-(2H)-dione), protectan fungicides for stored cereals, starting front national raw materials made in Mexico. These compounds are used for the grain protection stored in warehouse, that count the advantage of being degradables and little toxic. [Spanish] En este trabajo presentamos la adaptacion de la tecnologia a nivel laboratorio, para la sintesis de los fungicidas Captan (3a, 4, 7, 7a- te-trahidro-2-[(triclorometril) tio]-1H-iso-indol-1, 3 (2H)-diona) y Folpet (2-(tricloro-metil)-tio-1 H-isoindol-1, 3- (2H)- diona) a partir de materias primas fabricadas en Mexico. Estos compuestos son empleados para la proteccion de granos almacenados en bodega, que cuentan con la ventaja de ser degradables y poco toxicos.

  15. Radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkhout, F.

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author)

  16. Radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkhout, F

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author).

  17. Radioactive transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive Transformations describes Ernest Rutherford's Nobel Prize-winning investigations into the mysteries of radioactive matter. In this historic work, Rutherford outlines the scientific investigations that led to and coincided with his own research--including the work of Wilhelm Rӧntgen, J. J. Thomson, and Marie Curie--and explains in detail the experiments that provided a glimpse at special relativity, quantum mechanics, and other concepts that would shape modern physics. This new edition features a comprehensive introduction by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek which engagingly explains how Rutherford's early research led to a better understanding of topics as diverse as the workings of the atom's nucleus, the age of our planet, and the fusion in stars.

  18. Radioactive hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of radioactive substances in hospital laboratories is discussed and the attendant hazards and necessary precautions examined. The new legislation under the Health and Safety at Work Act which, it is proposed, will replace existing legal requirements in the field of health and safety at work by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare already established, is considered with particular reference to protection against ionising radiations. (UK)

  19. Radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.; Hyslop, C.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to show how to assess the detriment resulting from the release of radioactive materials to the environment. The minimum information required for the assessments is given for seven radionuclides of interest from the point of view of environmental contamination. The seven radionuclides are tritium, krypton-85, strontium-90, iodine-131, cesium-137, radium-226 and plutonium-239. Information is given on the radiation doses and the radiation effects on man due to these radioisotopes. (AN)

  20. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Melvin, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is part of the Annual Literature Review issue of Water Environment Research. The review attempts to provide a concise summary of important water-related environmental science and engineering literature of the past year, of which 40 separate topics are discussed. On the topic of radioactive wastes, the present paper deals with the following aspects: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; waste processing and decommissioning; environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides; and remedial actions and treatment. 178 refs

  1. La sintesi einsteiniana

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    Geometria e cosmologia ; le leggi fondamentali della meccanica classica ; l'universo di Newton ; le leggi fondamentali dell'ottica ; le leggi fondamentali dell'elettrodinamica ; il principio di relatività speciale di Einstein ; la teoria della relatività generale di Einstein.

  2. Method and equipment of processing radioactive laundry wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takamori; Suzuki, Takeo; Tabata, Masayuki; Takada, Takao; Yamaguchi, Shin-ichi; Noda, Tetsuya.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively process radioactive laundry wastes generated due to water-washing after dry-cleaning of protective clothings which have been put on in nuclear facilities. Method: Dry cleaning soaps and ionic radioactive materials contained in radioactive laundry wastes are selectively adsorbed to decontaminate by adsorbents. Then, the adsorbents having adsorbed dry cleaning soaps and ionic radioactive materials are purified by being removed with these radioactive materials. The purified adsorbents are re-used. (Seki, T.)

  3. Safety disposal studies of radioactive and hazardous wastes using cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, M.M.E.

    2000-01-01

    radioactive waste is generated from the production of nuclear energy and from the use of radioactive materials applications, agriculture and medicine. the important of safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized. conditioning of radioactive waste is the transform of radioactive waste into a suitable form for storage and disposal. common immobilization methods include solidification of low radioactive waste in cement or bitumen.in order to improve cement properties to decrease the release of liquid radioactive waste into the environment and its dispersion to a level where the risks to individuals, population and the environment

  4. Potential of membrane processes in management of radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Surender; Jain, Savita; Raj, Kanwar

    2010-01-01

    Various categories of radioactive liquid waste are generated during operations and maintenance of nuclear installations. The potential of membrane processes for the treatment of low-level radioactive liquids is discussed in this paper

  5. Glasses used for the high level radioactive wastes storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1983-06-01

    High level radioactive wastes generated by the reprocessing of spent fuels is an important concern in the conditioning of radioactive wastes. This paper deals with the status of the knowledge about glasses used for the treatment of these liquids [fr

  6. Croatian radioactive waste management program: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanic, R.; Lebegner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Croatia has a responsibility to develop a radioactive waste management program partly due to co-ownership of Krsko nuclear power plant (Slovenia) and partly because of its own medical and industrial radioactive waste. The total amount of generated radioactive waste in Croatia is stored in temporary storages located at two national research institutes, while radioactive waste from Krsko remains in temporary storage on site. National power utility Hrvatska Elektroprivreda (HEP) and Hazardous Waste Management Agency (APO) coordinate the work regarding decommissioning, spent fuel management and low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) management in Croatia. Since the majority of work has been done in developing the LILRW management program, the paper focuses on this part of radioactive waste management. Issues of site selection, repository design, safety assessment and public acceptance are being discussed. A short description of the national radioactive waste management infrastructure has also been presented. (author)

  7. Engineering product storage under the advanced fuel cycle initiative. Part I: An iterative thermal transport modeling scheme for high-heat-generating radioactive storage forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is developing an integrated nuclear fuel cycle technology under its Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Under the AFCI, waste minimization is stressed. Engineered product storage materials will be required to store concentrated radioactive cesium, strontium, americium, and curium for periods of tens to hundreds of years. The fabrication of such engineered products has some precedence but the concept is largely novel. We thus present a theoretical model used to calculate the maximum radial dimensions of right cylinder storage forms under several scenarios. Maximum dimensions are small, comparable to nuclear fuel pins in some cases, to avoid centerline melting temperatures; this highlights the need for a careful strategy for engineered product storage fabrication and storage

  8. A review of biological studies sponsored by the Department of the Environment to assist feasibility studies of the disposal of heat generating radioactive waste in the deep ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.A.; Gale, G.

    1985-04-01

    The report review recent biological studies on the organisms of the deep sea and takes into account the physical and chemical parameters that influence them. Particular attention is devoted to studies funded by the Department of the Environment to determine the technical feasibility of disposing of high level radioactive wastes in the deep sea. Such quantitative information that exists concerning the input and output of organic material into the abyss is given. This information is related to the diversity, growth, size, and reproductive biology of the abyssal infauna and epifauna and to the organisms within the water column above. Life processes, under the influence of high pressure are discussed and related to the uptake by and release from organisms of radiochemicals. Gaps in our present knowledge of the total ecosystem are identified and recommendations for future studies made. (author)

  9. Storage depot for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szulinski, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson

  10. Treatment of Radioactive Gaseous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Radioactive waste, with widely varying characteristics, is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. The waste needs to be treated and conditioned as necessary to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Although radioactive gaseous radioactive waste does not constitute the main waste flow stream at nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste processing facilities, it represents a major source for potential direct environmental impact. Effective control and management of gaseous waste in both normal and accidental conditions is therefore one of the main issues of nuclear fuel cycle and waste processing facility design and operation. One of the duties of an operator is to take measures to avoid or to optimize the generation and management of radioactive waste to minimize the overall environmental impact. This includes ensuring that gaseous and liquid radioactive releases to the environment are within authorized limits, and that doses to the public and the effects on the environment are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Responsibilities of the regulatory body include the removal of radioactive materials within authorized practices from any further regulatory control — known as clearance — and the control of discharges — releases of gaseous radioactive material that originate from regulated nuclear facilities during normal operation to the environment within authorized limits. These issues, and others, are addressed in IAEA Safety Standards Series Nos RS-G-1.7, WS-G-2.3 and NS-G-3.2. Special systems should be designed and constructed to ensure proper isolation of areas within nuclear facilities that contain gaseous radioactive substances. Such systems consist of two basic subsystems. The first subsystem is for the supply of clean air to the facility, and the second subsystem is for the collection, cleanup and

  11. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshihiko; Maruko, Morihisa; Takamura, Yoshiyuki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively separate radioactive claddings from the slurry of wasted ion exchange resins containing radioactive claddings. Method: Wasted ion exchange resins having radioactive claddings (fine particles of iron oxides or hydroxide adhered with radioactive cobalt) are introduced into a clad separation tank. Sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide is introduced to the separation tank to adjust the pH value to 3 - 6. Then, sodium lauryl sulfate is added for capturing claddings and airs are blown from an air supply nozzle to generate air bubbles. The claddings are detached from the ion exchange resins and adhered to the air bubbles. The air bubbles adhered with the claddings float up to the surface of the liquid wastes and then forced out of the separation tank. (Ikeda, J.)

  12. Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dody, A.; Klein, Ben; David, O.

    2014-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive waste imposes complicated constrains on the regulator to ensure the isolation of radioactive elements from the biosphere. The IAEA (1995) states that T he objective of radioactive waste management is to deal with radioactive waste in a manner that protects human health and the environment now and the future without imposing undue burdens on future generation . The meaning of this statement is that the operator of the waste disposal facilities must prove to the regulator that in routine time and in different scenarios the dose rate to the public will not exceed 0.3 mSv/y in the present and in the future up to 10,000 years

  13. Radioactivity telemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouras, Florent; Legrand, Bernard; Montigaud, Jean-Marie; Grandin, Marc

    1969-05-01

    The authors present an assembly which aims at radio-transmitting from mobile stations information on radioactivity. It comprises 20 mobile stations which can be located within the Cadarache Centre or outside of it within a 10 km radius, and a central station which centralises information. The report proposes a general presentation of these stations, their characteristics and principles of operation. It describes operation sequences, central station functions (call programmer, address and memory management, recording, peripherals) and its energy supply, and mobile station functions. The last part presents the installation, its start-up and exploitation, its threshold devices and its safety device

  14. Report of the international workshop on safety measures to address the year 2000 issue at medical facilities which use radiation generators and radioactive materials. (Supplement to IAEA-TECDOC-1074)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    In resolution GC(42)/RES/11 on 'Measures to Address the Year 2000 (Y2K) Issue', adopted on 25 September 1998, the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - inter alia - urged Member States 'to share information with the Secretariat regarding diagnostic and corrective actions being planned or implemented by operating and regulatory organizations at their ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make those facilities Year 2000 ready', encouraged the Secretariat 'within existing resources to act as a clearing-house and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions being taken at ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make these facilities Year 2000 ready', urged the Secretariat 'to handle the information provided by Member States carefully' and requested the Director General to report to it at its next (1999) regular session on the implementation of that resolution. To foster exchange of information and experience and to develop more specific advice based on this experience, the IAEA, in co-operation with the World Health Organization, conducted an International Workshop on Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Medical Facilities Which Use Radiation Generators and Radioactive Materials, held in Vienna, 28-30 June 1999. Whereas the focus in IAEA-TECDOC-1074 had been on identifying what might go wrong as a result of Y2K problems and on proposing methods to address them, the focus of the International Workshop was on sharing the experience gained in implementing the proposed methods - an approach consistent with the role of the Secretariat as 'a clearing-house and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions'

  15. Prediction of radionuclide inventory for the low-and intermediated-level radioactive waste disposal facility the radioactive waste classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kang Il; Jeong, Noh Gyeom; Moon, Young Pyo; Jeong, Mi Seon; Park, Jin Beak

    2016-01-01

    To meet nuclear regulatory requirements, more than 95% individual radionuclides in the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste inventory have to be identified. In this study, the radionuclide inventory has been estimated by taking the long-term radioactive waste generation, the development plan of disposal facility, and the new radioactive waste classification into account. The state of radioactive waste cumulated from 2014 was analyzed for various radioactive sources and future prospects for predicting the long-term radioactive waste generation. The predicted radionuclide inventory results are expected to contribute to secure the development of waste disposal facility and to deploy the safety case for its long-term safety assessment

  16. Radioactive waste management in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzi, F.P.; Bundala, F.M.; Nyanda, A.M.; Msaki, P.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive waste, like many other hazardous wastes, is of great concern in Tanzania because of its undesirable health effects. The stochastic effects due to prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation produce cancer and hereditary effects. The deterministic effects due to higher doses cause vomiting, skin reddening, leukemia, and death to exposed victims. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the status of radioactive wastes in Tanzania, how they are generated and managed to protect humans and the environment. As Tanzania develops, it is bound to increase the use of ionizing radiation in research and teaching, industry, health and agriculture. Already there are more than 42 Centers which use one form of radioisotopes or another for these purposes: Teletherapy (Co-60), Brach-therapy (Cs-137, Sr-89), Nuclear Medicine (P-32, Tc-99m, 1-131, 1-125, Ga-67, In-111, Tl-206), Nuclear gauge (Am-241, Cs- 137, Sr-90, Kr-85), Industrial radiography (Am-241, C-137, Co-60, lr-92), Research and Teaching (1-125, Am241/Be, Co-60, Cs-137, H-3 etc). According to IAEA definition, these radioactive sources become radioactive waste if they meet the following criteria: if they have outlived their usefulness, if they have been abandoned, if they have been displaced without authorization, and if they contaminate other substances. Besides the origin of radioactive wastes, special emphasis will also be placed on the existing radiation regulations that guide disposal of radioactive waste, and the radioactive infrastructure Tanzania needs for ultimate radioactive waste management. Specific examples of incidences (theft, loss, abandonment and illegal possession) of radioactive waste that could have led to serious deterministic radiation effects to humans will also be presented. (author)

  17. Environmental Radioactivity. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explains several things which consist radioactivity measurements, regular and high background radioactivity, radioactive contaminated soil and radioactivity in fertilizers, rocks, building materials, food, water, environments, sediments, flora and fauna. Besides, the natural radioactive gas concentration of radon and toron in the environment also been discussed specifically in this chapter.

  18. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented on the environmental behavior of radioactive wastes. The management of high-level wastes and waste disposal methods were discussed. Some topics included were ore processing, coagulation, absorption and ion exchange, fixation, ground disposal, flotation, evaporation, transmutation and extraterrestrial disposal. Reports were given of the 226 Ra, 224 Ra and tritium activity in hot springs, 90 Sr concentrations in the groundwater and in White Oak Creek, radionuclide content of algae, grasses and plankton, radionuclides in the Danube River, Hudson River, Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Lake Michigan, Columbia River and other surface waters. Analysis showed that 239 Pu was scavenged from Lake Michigan water by phytoplankton and algae by a concentration factor of up to 10,000. Benthic invertebrates and fish showed higher 239 Pu concentrations than did their pelagic counterparts. Concentration factors are also given for 234 Th, 60 Co, Fe and Mr in marine organisms. Two models for predicting the impact of radioactivity in the food chain on man were mentioned. In an accidental release from a light-water power reactor to the ocean, the most important radionuclides discharged were found to be 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239 Pu and activation products 65 Zr, 59 Fe, and 95 Zr

  19. Radioactive waste management - the Indian scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Kanwar

    2008-01-01

    In India, nuclear power generation programme and application of radioisotopes for health care and various other application is increasing steadily. With resultant increase in generation of radioactive waste, emphasis is on the minimization of generation of radioactive waste by deploying suitable processes and materials, segregation of waste streams at sources, recycle and re-use of useful components of waste and use of volume reduction techniques. The minimization of the radioactive waste is also essential to facilitate judicious use of the scarce land available for disposal, to reduce impact on the environment due to disposal and, finally to optimize the cost of radioactive waste management. This paper presents a bird's eye view of radioactive waste management programme in the country today

  20. Approaches to the final storage of radioactive waste in the Federal Republic of Germany. Will responsibility be shifted to future generations?; Wege zur Endlagerung radioaktiver Abfaelle in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. Wird die Verantwortung auf zukuenftige Generationen verschoben?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomauske, B. [Vattenfall Europe Nuclear Power GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    With respect to the management of high-level radioactive waste in Germany, there is agreement on these premises: - The waste is to be stored permanently in the Federal Republic of Germany. - A repository is to be operational by 2030. - Final storage is to be achieved in geologic formations. Differences of opinion exist about these questions: - Should there be only one repository for all types of radioactive waste, or would a breakdown into waste generating heat and waste generating only negligible amounts of heat in different repositories be useful under aspects of safety and requirement? - Will a new site selection procedure be required in an effort to find a suitable site, and would such a selection procedure be able to meet the deadline of 2030 for an operational repository? - After the end of legal proceedings, should the Konrad repository be revamped for waste generating negligible amounts of heat? The analysis presented shows that an operational repository for waste generating heat can be made available only in connection with continued exploration work at Gorleben and demonstration of the suitability of that site and subsequent construction of the repository. If the search for a repository site were started from scratch, the date of commissioning such a facility would be after 2050. In this way, that approach would miss the purpose of not shifting the waste management issue to future generations. Acting responsibly means to build the Konrad repository speedily after completion of the legal proceedings about a permit and, in this way, avoid the addition of more interim stores for waste generating negligible amounts of heat. Further exploration of Gorleben is the way agreed upon and necessary for the creation of a repository for high-level radioactive waste generating heat by 2030. For this purpose, the 'points of doubt' must be resolved speedily. (orig.) [German] Im Hinblick auf die Entsorgung hochradioaktiver Abfaelle in Deutschland besteht

  1. Indian programme on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattal, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of radioactive waste management is protection of human health, environment and future generation. This article describes, briefly, the Indian programme on management of different radioactive wastes arising in the entire nuclear fuel cycle adhering to this objective. (author)

  2. Plastic solidification of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Noboru

    1981-01-01

    Over 20 years have elapsed after the start of nuclear power development, and the nuclear power generation in Japan now exceeds the level of 10,000 MW. In order to meet the energy demands, the problem of the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in nuclear power stations must be solved. The purpose of the plastic solidification of such wastes is to immobilize the contained radionuclides, same as other solidification methods, to provide the first barrier against their move into the environment. The following matters are described: the nuclear power generation in Japan, the radioactive wastes from LWR plants, the position of plastic solidification, the status of plastic solidification in overseas countries and in Japan, the solidification process for radioactive wastes with polyethylene, and the properties of solidified products, and the leachability of radionuclides in asphalt solids. (J.P.N.)

  3. Chapter 8. The radioactivity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Robert; Debetencourt, Michel; Cregut, Andre; Grauby, Andre; Sousselier, Yves

    1980-01-01

    The object of this work is to examine the interactions between the activities of the nuclear industry (generating, transmission and distribution) and the environment, whilst showing to what extent the facilities are likely to affect it adversely and describing the measures taken to lessen the detrimental effects. The chapter dealing with radioactivity among the 'nuisance sectors' includes the following headings: natural radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation, the operation of a power station (principle, generating steam from nuclear energy, different types of reactors, safety barriers), radioactive effluents and wastes, nuclear controls and the environment, measures taken in the event of an accident occurring in a nuclear power station, the dismantling and decommissioning of power stations [fr

  4. Defense radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindman, T.B. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Defense Programs (DP), U.S. Department of Energy, is responsible for the production of nuclear weapons and materials for national defense. Pursuant to this mission, DP operates a large industrial complex that employs over 60,000 people at various installations across the country. As a byproduct of their activities, these installations generate radioactive, hazardous, or mixed wastes that must be managed in a safe and cost-effective manner in compliance with all applicable Federal and STate environmental requirements. At the Federal level such requirements derive primarily from the Atomic Energy Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). Responsibility for DP activities in connection with the disposal of defense wastes is consolidated within the Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). This paper discusses these activities which consist of five principal elements: the environmental restoration of inactive DP facilities and sites, the processing storage and disposal of wastes associated with ongoing operations at active DP facilities, research and development directed toward the long-term disposal of radioactive, hazardous, mixed wastes, technology development directly supporting regulatory compliance, and the development of policies, procedures, and technologies for assuring the safe transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials

  5. Radioactivity monitoring in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrescu, M.; Milu, C.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactivity monitoring in Romania is based on National Regulations for Radiation Protection enforced in 1976, on other environment protection laws enforced in the last years and on the recommendations of IAEA. Accordingly two systems of radioactive monitoring are to date operational in this field: the first one is the self-control of the radioactive emissions in the environment generated by the own nuclear activities (of nuclear units like the Cernavoda NPP, the Institute of Atomic Physics at Magurele-Bucharest, the Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti, the R Plant at Feldioara, Uranium mining units, etc.), while the other is based on two national agencies (the National Network of Environment Radiation Monitoring of the Ministry of Waters, Forests and Environment Protection and the Network of Radiation Hygiene Laboratories of the Health Ministry). The authors review and discuss the radiation protection legislation, the structure and the organizational operations of the national monitoring systems and the co-operation of the national monitoring systems with international authorities or programmes. 3 Figs., 1 tab., 11 refs

  6. A radioactive controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, Veronica

    2002-01-01

    During 2002, the National Congress of Argentina began discussing the 'Agreement between the Republic of Argentina and Australia on cooperation in the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy'. This document has revived the debate regarding development of a national nuclear industry. The debate was spurred by a commercial contract signed in 2000 by INVAP, an Argentinean company who sold a nuclear reactor to the ANSTO, Australian Nuclear and Technology Organization. More than sixty non-governmental organizations are opposed to the ratification of the agreement, because they interpret that the text leaves the door wide open for the transport and deposit of Australian nuclear waste to Argentina, to be processed in national territory. Article 41 of the Argentinean National Constitution, explicitly prohibits the generation of any income from 'radioactive residues'. Those who support the agreement say that it does not promote the deposit of nuclear waste in Argentina, and argue that environmentalists are hampering efforts of this advanced technological industry to flourish in Argentina. The point of conflict in the agreement lies in article 12, which states that Argentina will continue the process of reactor-driven irradiated fuel outside Argentina. Once the treatment is completed, the fuel conditioned and the resulting waste must return to the country of origin for their storage. The possibility of spent fuel being sent to Argentina lies in the hypothetical case that the French company Cogema, which currently holds treatment responsibility, stops treatment sometime within the next fifteen years, when the fuel must be treated. The non-ratification of the agreement on Argentina part will not imply any sort of impediment in the realization of the reactor, it will only put on hold the possibility that the Australians spent fuels will complete treatment in Argentina. The constitutionality of the agreement lies in the question of waste, but this too is not a simple question. The

  7. Pengaruh Variasi Temperatur Hidrotermal Pada Sintesis Lithium Mangan Oksida (Limn2o4 Spinel Terhadap Efisiensi Adsorpsi Dan Desorpsi Ion Lithium Dari Lumpur Sidoarjo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Kurniawan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan teknologi dalam bidang material menunjukkan perkembangan yang sangat pesat dalam beberapa tahun terakhir.Salah satu material yang sangat dibutuhkan dalam berbagai aplikasi adalah lithium. Lithium sendiri bisa didapatkan dari air laut brines dan geothermal fluid. Salah satunya adalah Lumpur Sidoarjo. Lithium Mangan Oksida Spinel digunakan sebagai material absorben karena murah, tidak beracun dan mudah didapatkan. Pada penelitian ini metode hidrotermal digunakan sebagai metode sintesis pada LiMn2O4 karena dapat dilakukan pada temperatur yang relatif rendah dan menghasilkan partikel yang lebih homogen. Metode hidrotermal dilakukan pada temperatur 160 oC, 180 oC dan 200 oC selama 24 jam. Pengujian XRD dilakukan untuk mengetahui struktur kristal. Pengujian SEM dilakukan untuk mengetahui morfologi material setelah proses hidrotermal. Pengujian BET dilakukan untuk mengetahui surface area. Setelah itu metode acid treatment dilakukan untuk proses adsorpsi dan desorpsi. Adsorpsi dilakukan dengan mencelupkan Lithium Mangan Oksida Spinel yang telah disintesis kedalam Lumpur Sidoarjo.Pengujian ICP dilakukan untuk mengetahui kandungan lithium yang terdapat pada Lumpur Sidoarjo sebelum dan sesudah adsorpsi untuk mengetahui jumlah lithium yang terserap.Pengujian desorpsi dilakukan dengan mencelupkan LiMn2O4 kedalam larutan HCL. Pada uji XRD menunjukkan bahwa LiMn2O4 berstruktur kristal cubic. Dari hasil uji SEM terlihat bahwa tidak banyak perbedaan morfologi pada ketiga variasi.Partikel cenderung membentuk aglomerasi. Pada hasil uji ICP menunjukkan bahwa LiMn2O4 dengan temperatur hidrotermal 160oC memiliki efisiensi adsorpsi paling tinggi dengan 6,775 ppm. Sementara untuk desorpsi yang paling tinggi adalah 200oC sebesar 0.081 ppm

  8. Radioactive waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Chino, Koichi.

    1992-01-01

    In a waste processing device for solidifying, pellets formed by condensing radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant, by using a solidification agent, sodium chloride, sodium hydroxide or sodium nitrate is mixed upon solidification. In particular, since sodium sulfate in a resin regenerating liquid wastes absorbs water in the cement upon cement solidification, and increases the volume by expansion, there is a worry of breaking the cement solidification products. This reaction can be prevented by the addition of sodium chloride and the like. Accordingly, integrity of the solidification products can be maintained for a long period of time. (T.M.)

  9. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  10. Radioactive waste disposal: a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentsen, B.A.

    1974-01-01

    The world's industrial nations are embarking on a major build-up of nuclear electric power generating capacity. Enormous quantities of radioactive waste will be produced in fuel reprocessing operations which must be safeguarded from entering the biosphere for thousands of years. It is an unprecedented problem which has no universally agreed upon solution. (U.S.)

  11. The real performance of radioactive lightning arrester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The study of the performance of radioactive lightning arrester comparing to the performance of conventional one are presented. Measurements of currents between lightning arrester and an energyzed plate with wind simulation were done for radioactive and conventional lightning arresters, separately. The attraction range of radioactive and conventional lightning arresters using atmospheric pulses produced by a generator of 3MV were verified, separately and simultaneously. The influence of ionization produced by radioactive lightning arrester on critical disruptive tension of a spark plate, testing two lightning arresters for differents nominal attraction distances with applications of atmospheric pulses (positive and negative polarity) and tensions of 60 Hz was verified. The radiation emitted by a radioactive lightning had used in a building was retired and handled without special carefullness by a personnel without worthy of credence to evaluate the hazard in handling radioactive lightning arrester was measured. Critical disruptive tensions of radioactive and conventional lightning arrester using a suspensed electrode and external pulse generator of 6MV was measured. The effect of attraction of a radioactive and conventional lightning arresters disposed symmetrically regarding the same suspensed electrode was verified simultaneously. Seven cases on faults of radioactive lightning arrester in external areas are present. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. Random pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ya'nan; Jin Dapeng; Zhao Dixin; Liu Zhen'an; Qiao Qiao; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2007-01-01

    Due to the randomness of radioactive decay and nuclear reaction, the signals from detectors are random in time. But normal pulse generator generates periodical pulses. To measure the performances of nuclear electronic devices under random inputs, a random generator is necessary. Types of random pulse generator are reviewed, 2 digital random pulse generators are introduced. (authors)

  13. Radioactive liquid waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Tetsuya; Kuramitsu, Kiminori; Ishii, Tomoharu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a system for processing radioactive liquid wastes containing laundry liquid wastes, shower drains or radioactive liquid wastes containing chemical oxygen demand (COD) ingredients and oil content generated from a nuclear power plant. Namely, a collecting tank collects radioactive liquid wastes. A filtering device is connected to the exit of the collective tank. A sump tank is connected to the exit of the filtering device. A powdery active carbon supplying device is connected to the collecting tank. A chemical fluid tank is connected to the collecting tank and the filtering device by way of chemical fluid injection lines. Backwarding pipelines connect a filtered water flowing exit of the filtering device and the collecting tank. The chemical solution is stored in the chemical solution tank. Then, radioactive materials in radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant are removed by the filtering device. The water quality standard specified in environmental influence reports can be satisfied. In the filtering device, when the filtering flow rate is reduced, the chemical fluid is supplied from the chemical fluid tank to the filtering device to recover the filtering flow rate. (I.S.)

  14. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  15. Treatment and conditioning of radioactive organic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Liquid organic radioactive wastes are generated from the use of radioisotopes in nuclear research centres and in medical and industrial applications. The volume of these wastes is small by comparison with aqueous radioactive wastes, for example; nevertheless, a strategy for the effective management of these wastes is necessary in order to ensure their safe handling, processing, storage and disposal. A aqueous radioactive wastes may be discharged to the environment after the radioactivity has decayed or been removed. By contrast, organic radioactive wastes require management steps that not only take account of their radioactivity, but also of their chemical content. This is because both the radioactivity and the organic chemical nature can have detrimental effects on health and the environment. Liquid radioactive wastes from these applications typically include vacuum pump oil, lubricating oil and hydraulic fluids, scintillation cocktails from analytical laboratories, solvents from solvent extraction research and uranium refining, and miscellaneous organic solvents. The report describes the factors which should be considered in the development of appropriate strategies for managing this class of wastes from generation to final disposal. Waste sources and characterization, treatment and conditioning processes, packaging, interim storage and the required quality assurance are all discussed. The report is intended to provide guidance to developing Member States which do not have nuclear power generation. A range of processes and procedures is presented, though emphasis is given to simple, easy-to-operate processes requiring less sophisticated and relatively inexpensive equipment. 31 refs, 16 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Requirements for a radioactive waste data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Kobayashi, I.; Kikuchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    With the progress of nuclear fuel cycle in Japan, various types of radioactive waste will generate at each nuclear facility in the cycle. Therefor generated volume and stored quantity of waste will be supposed to increase. From the viewpoints of safety and public acceptance, by using mainframe computer it is necessary that the treatment of historical waste data, the estimation of generated waste volume and stored quantity and the investigation of research and development status of waste processing and disposal are carried out. This paper proposes design and development of the radioactive waste data base which is able to properly and correctly manage and grasp numerical and/or documentary information for generated radioactive waste. So the data base will be expected to use for planning the future management of radioactive waste. (author)

  17. Licenses for possessing and applying radioactive sources, materials, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Commercial and governmental institutions have been licensed by Dutch authorities to possess and apply radioactive sources, materials, etc. A summary is given and the list is subdivided into a number of sections such as radioactive sources, radioactive materials, X-ray equipment and technetium-generators

  18. Characteristics of medically related low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, G.J. Jr.; Teele, B.

    1986-07-01

    This report describes a survey that identified the current sources of medically generated radioactive wastes. Included are recommendations on how to reduce the volume of medically-related material classified as low-level radioactive wastes, to improve handling techniques for long-lived radioisotopes, and for options for the use of radioactive materials in medical studies. 8 refs., 11 tabs

  19. Principles and objective of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated in various nuclear applications, for example, in the use of radionuclides in medicine, industry and research or in the nuclear fuel cycle. It must be managed in a safe way independent of its very different characteristics. Establishing the basic safety philosophy is an important contribution to promoting and developing international consensus in radioactive waste management. The principles of radioactive waste management were developed with supporting text to provide such a safety philosophy. They cover the protection of human health and the environment now and in the future within and beyond national borders, the legal framework, the generation and management of radioactive wastes, and the safety of facilities. Details of the legal framework are provided by defining the roles and responsibilities of the Member State, the regulatory body and the waste generators and operators of radioactive waste management facilities. These principles and the responsibilities in radioactive waste management are contained in two recently published top level documents of the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme which is the IAEA's contribution to foster international consensus in radioactive waste management. As the two documents have to cover all aspects of radioactive waste management they have to be formulated in a generic way. Details will be provided in other, more specific documents of the RADWASS programme as outlined in the RADWASS publication plant. The RADWASS documents are published in the Agency's Safety Series, which provides recommendations to Member Sates. Using material from the top level RADWASS documents a convention on the safety of radioactive waste management is under development to provide internationally binding requirements for radioactive waste management. (author). 12 refs

  20. Environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Outline summary of a report prepared under contract to the DOE: Research Priorities and UK Estuaries: An Overview identifying Research Requirements. Topics considered include the study of radionuclides released into the NE Irish Sea from BNFL, Sellafields, differences in the isotopic composition of stable lead in various sediments, the concentration and distribution of 'hot particles' derived from BNFL in the Irish Sea and adjacent areas, together with attempts to separate hot particles from sediments, and the composition and properties of marine surfaces in relation to uptake and loss of radionuclides, particularly in relation to the common mussel, Mytilus edulis. The problem of the presence of transuranic radionuclides in the bottom sediments of the NE Irish Sea is considered. Profiles of radioactivity are being developed at the shelf-break in order to determine the transfer of radionuclides from the sea surface to the deep sea and to coastal waters; organisms examined include phytoplankton, zooplankton and crustacea (shrimps). Organisms such as Acantharia have been examined to determine transfer of elements and radionuclides to skeletal structures eg Sr, Ba and Si. (U.K.)

  1. Radioactive liquid waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inakuma, Masahiko; Takahara, Nobuaki; Hara, Satomi.

    1996-01-01

    Laundry liquid wastes and shower drains containing radioactive materials generated in a nuclear power plant are removed with radioactive materials by a fiber filtration device and an activated carbon filtration device to satisfy standers of water quality described in the environmental effect investigation report. Spent activated carbon is dehydrated together with the back-wash liquid from the fiber filtration device and the activated carbon filtration device using a Nutsche-type filtration dryer. With such procedures, the scale of the facility is minimized, space for devices, maintenance for equipments and radiation dose rate are reduced. (T.M.)

  2. Radioactive liquid waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Takashi; Baba, Tsutomu; Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Matsuda, Masami; Chino, Koichi; Ikeda, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    As an adsorbent used for removing radioactive nuclides such as cesium and strontium from radioactive liquid wastes generated from a reprocessing plant, a silicon compound having siloxane bonds constituted by silicon and oxygen and having silanol groups constituted by silicon, oxygen and hydrogen, or an inorganic material mainly comprising aluminosilicate constituted with silicon, oxygen and aluminum is used. In the adsorbent of the present invention, since silica main skeletons are partially decomposed in an aqueous alkaline solution to newly form silanol groups having a cation adsorbing property, pretreatment such as pH adjustment is not necessary. (T.M.)

  3. Environmental radioactivity in Canada - 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracey, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiological surveillance program of the Department of National Health and Welfare is conducted for the purpose of determining levels of environmental radioactivity in Canada and assessing the resulting population exposures. Special investigations were carried out during 1982 on metabolism of natural radionuclides and on the accumulation of radon in energy-efficient homes. The pre-operational phase of the monitoring program at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station was completed. Dose commitments have been estimated for the ongoing natural radioactivity, fallout and reactor studies. All measurements made during the year are below the limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection

  4. Radioactive waste mangement in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didyk, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of the Canadian radioactive waste management program are to manage the wastes so that the potential hazards of the material are minimized, and to manage the wastes in a manner which places the minimum possible burden on future generations. The Atomic Energy Control Board regulates all activities in the nuclear field in Canada, including radioactive waste management facility licensing. The Atomic Energy Control Act authorizes the Board to make rules for regulating its proceedings and the performance of its functions. The Atomic Energy Control Regulations define basic regulatory requirements for the licensing of facilities, equipment and materials, including requirements for records and inspection, for security and for health and safety

  5. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive waste management and disposal requirements options available are discussed. The possibility of beneficial utilization of radioactive wastes is covered. Methods of interim storage of transuranium wastes are listed. Methods of shipment of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes are presented. Various methods of radioactive waste disposal are discussed

  6. Transport of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The report on the transport of radioactive substances covers the following topics: facts on radioactive materials transport, safety of the transport of radioactive substances, legal regulations and guidelines: a multiform but consistent system, transport of nuclear fuels, safety during the transport of nuclear fuel, future transport of spent fuel elements and high-level radioactive wastes in Germany.

  7. Nuclear fuel cycle waste recycling technology deverlopment - Radioactive metal waste recycling technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Moon, Jei Kwon; Jung, Chong Hun; Park, Sang Yoon

    1998-08-01

    With relation to recycling of the radioactive metal wastes which are generated during operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the following were described in this report. 1. Analysis of the state of the art on the radioactive metal waste recycling technologies. 2. Economical assessment on the radioactive metal waste recycling. 3. Process development for radioactive metal waste recycling, A. Decontamination technologies for radioactive metal waste recycling. B. Decontamination waste treatment technologies, C. Residual radioactivity evaluation technologies. (author). 238 refs., 60 tabs., 79 figs

  8. PENGEMBANGAN METODE SINTESIS FURFURAL BERBAHAN DASAR CAMPURAN LIMBAH PERTANIAN DALAM RANGKA MEWUJUDKAN PRINSIP GREEN CHEMISTRY (Development Of Synthesis Method Of Furfural From Compost Heap Mixture To Reach Out Green Chemistry Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitarlis Mitarlis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian pengembangan metode sintesis furfural dengan bahan dasar campuran limbah pertanian dilakukan dengan tujuan untuk menentukan waktu pemanasan dan konsentrasi asam optimum serta mewujudkan prinsip green chemistry. Dalam penelitian ini digunakan campuran limbah pertanian ampas tebu, limbah daun nanas dan limbah tanaman jagung dengan perbandingan 1:1:1. Proses sintesis melalui tahap hidrolisis pentosan, dehidrasi, dan siklodehidrasi untuk membentuk furfural dengan menggunakan alat refluks termodifkasi. Identifikasi furfural menggunakan uji warna dengan anilin asetat, uji indeks bias, spektrofotometer UV-Vis, dan IR, serta GC. Analisis pemenuhan prinsip green chemistry menggunakan daftar ceck 12 prinsip green chemstry. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa: Waktu pemanasan dan konsentrasi asam sulfat optimum pada pembuatan furfural dari campuran limbah pertanian adalah 5 jam dan konsentrasi asam sulfat 10% (1,876 M dengan rendemen sebesar 5,58%. Metode sintesis furfural yang dikembangkan dapat memenuhi 11 dari 12 prinsip green chemistry yang telah ditetapkan. ABSTRACT The study of developing furfural synthesis method  from  compost heap mixture had been done to determine  optimum condition for this process and  to reach out the green chemistry principles. In this research, the compost heap mixture is from three kinds of compost heap (bagasse, pineapple leaf, waste of corn plant with same amount (1:1:1. The steps of furfural production process are hydrolysis of pentose by sulfuric acid, dehydration, and cyclodehydration to form furfural. It was produced by using a modification reflux apparatus. Identify of furfural product by  using qualitative analysis color test with aniline acetate, refractive index test, UV-Vis,  IR spectrophotometer, and GC. Green chemistry principles are analyzed by using check list of 12 principles of green chemistry.  Based on this research was obtained that the optimum concentration of sulfuric acid is

  9. Mental Models of Radioactivity and Attitudes towards Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.

    2010-01-01

    Siting of a radioactive waste repository presents a great problem in almost every country that produces such waste. The main problem is not a technical one, but socio-psychological, namely the acceptability of this kind of repository. Previous research on people's perception of the LILW repository construction, their attitudes towards radioactive waste, their willingness to accept it, indicated significant differences in answers of experts and lay persons, mainly regarding evaluation of the consequences of repository construction. Based on the findings of pilot investigations a mental model approach to the radioactivity, radioactive waste and repository was used as a method for development better risk communication strategies with local communities. The mental models were obtained by adjustment of the method developed by Morgan and co-workers where expert model of radioactivity is compared with mental model of lay people obtained through individual opened interviews. Additional information on trust, risk perception, role of main actors in the site selection process and their credibility was gained with the overall questionnaire on the representative sample of Slovenian population. Results of the survey confirm some already known findings, in addition we gained new cognitions and with analyses obtained the relationships and ratios between different factors, which are characteristics both for the general public and for the public, which is involved in the site selection process for a longer period and has been living beside a nuclear power plant for one generation. People have in general negative associations regarding the repository, the perceived risk for nuclear facilities is high, and trust in representatives of governmental institutions is low. Mental models of radioactivity, radioactive waste and the LILW repository are mostly irregular and differ from the experts' models. This is particularly valid for the models of radioactivity and the influences of

  10. Radioactive inputs to the North Sea and the Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction (radioactivity; radioisotopes; discharges from nuclear establishments); data sources (statutory requirements); sources of liquid radioactive waste (figure showing location of principal sources of radioactive discharges; tables listing principal discharges by activity and by nature of radioisotope); Central Electricity Generating Board nuclear power stations; research and industrial establishments; Ministy of Defence establishments; other UK inputs of radioactive waste; total inputs to the North Sea and the Channel (direct inputs; river inputs; adjacent sea areas); conclusions. (U.K.)

  11. Synthesis and characterization of the natural and burned hydrotalcite; Sintesis y caracterizacion de la hidrotalcita natural y calcinada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados C, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The synthesis and the structural and surface properties of the natural and burned hydrotalcite using salts of AlCl{sub 3} and MgCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O its were studied. Its were used those analysis of BET, IR, XRD, TGA and SEM to characterize these materials. The obtained product was identified as the natural or carbonated hydrotalcite of chemical formula Mg{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 16}CO{sub 3}.4H{sub 2}O. The hydrotalcite was roasted at 500 C during 5 h and the was obtained roasted hydrotalcite (HTC) that is a material of high selectivity toward the anions that it can be efficiently used as adsorbent material in studies of adsorption for the treatment of anionic radioactive waste present in watery solution. (Author)

  12. Nuclear energy from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenberg, M.

    1998-01-01

    The global energy demand is increasing. Sound forecasts indicate that by the year 2020 almost eight thousand million people will be living on our planet, and generating their demand for energy will require conversion of about 20 thousand million tonnes of coal equivalents a year. Against this background scenario, a new concept for energy generation elaborated by nuclear scientists at CERN attracts particular interest. The concept describing a new nuclear energy source and technology intends to meet the following principal requirements: create a new energy source that can be exploited in compliance with extremely stringent safety requirements; reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive waste; substantially reduce the size of required radwaste repositories; use easily available natural fuels that will not need isotopic separation; prevent the risk of proliferation of radioactive materials; process and reduce unwanted actinides as are generated by the operation of current breeder reactors; achieve high efficiency both in terms of technology and economics. (orig./CB) [de

  13. Classification of solid wastes as non-radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Tomioka, Hideo; Kamike, Kozo; Komatu, Junji

    1995-01-01

    The radioactive wastes generally include nuclear fuels, materials contaminated with radioactive contaminants or neutron activation to be discarded. The solid wastes arising from the radiation control area in nuclear facilities are used to treat and stored as radioactive solid wastes at the operation of nuclear facilities in Japan. However, these wastes include many non-radioactive wastes. Especially, a large amount of wastes is expected to generate at the decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the near future. It is important to classify these wastes into non-radioactive and radioactive wastes. The exemption or recycling criteria of radioactive solid wastes is under discussion and not decided yet in Japan. Under these circumstances, the Nuclear Safety Committee recently decided the concept on the category of non-radioactive waste for the wastes arising from decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The concept is based on the separation and removal of the radioactively contaminated parts from radioactive solid wastes. The residual parts of these solid wastes will be treated as non-radioactive waste if no significant difference in radioactivity between the similar natural materials and materials removed the radioactive contaminants. The paper describes the procedures of classification of solid wastes as non-radioactive wastes. (author)

  14. Final results of the 'Benchmark on computer simulation of radioactive nuclides production rate and heat generation rate in a spallation target'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janczyszyn, J.; Pohorecki, W.; Domanska, G.; Maiorino, R.J.; David, J.C.; Velarde, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    A benchmark has been organized to assess the computer simulation of nuclide production and heat generation in a spallation lead target. The physical models applied for the calculation of thick lead target activation do not produce satisfactory results for the majority of analysed nuclides, however one can observe better or worse quantitative compliance with the experimental results. Analysis of the quality of calculated results show the best performance for heavy nuclides (A: 170 - 190). For intermediate nuclides (A: 60 - 130) almost all are underestimated while for A: 130 - 170 mainly overestimated. The shape of the activity distribution in the target is well reproduced in calculations by all models but the numerical comparison shows similar performance as for the whole target. The Isabel model yields best results. As for the whole target heating rate, the results from all participants are consistent. Only small differences are observed between results from physical models. As for the heating distribution in the target it looks not quite similar. The quantitative comparison of the distributions yielded by different spallation reaction models shows for the major part of the target no serious differences - generally below 10%. However, in the most outside parts of the target front layers and the part of the target at its end behind the primary protons range, a spread higher than 40 % is obtained

  15. Ultimate disposal of radioactive waste - Long-term safe containment. Also a contribution to giving concrete shape to our reponsibility towards the life of future generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeser, H.W.; Oberpottkamp, U.

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental issue arising in connection with the plan approval procedure for the construction and operation of radwaste repositories is the question whether the documentation submitted in evidence of appropriate precaution being taken according to the state of the art in science and technology to prevent damage to the population and the environment, is to include evidence that the precautions envisaged and their efficiency can be maintained by the operator over a prolonged period of time. The opinion of the authors is that demanding such evidence of long-term safe containment of hazardous waste is in agreement with Art. 20 a GG (German Constitution) and is to be given for the full period of time that is accessible to assessment and computation using the state-of-the-art means and technology, yielding reliable scientific results void of any data of a speculative nature. Computed evidence is to be submitted for this period of time in compliance with the means and principles given in section 45 StrlSchV (Radiation Protection Ordinance). The article thus is a contribution to giving more concrete shape to the responsibility towards future generations. (orig.) [de

  16. Low-level radioactive waste, mixed low-level radioactive waste, and biomedical mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the proceedings of a workshop entitled: Low-Level Radioactive Waste, Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Biomedical Mixed Waste presented by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the University of Florida, October 17-19, 1994. The topics covered during the workshop include technical data and practical information regarding the generation, handling, storage and disposal of low-level radioactive and mixed wastes. A description of low-level radioactive waste activities in the United States and the regional compacts is presented

  17. Radioactive waste computerized management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Communaux, M.; Lantes, B.

    1993-01-01

    Since December 31, 1990, the management of the nuclear wastes for all the power stations has been computerized, using the DRA module of the Power Generation and Transmission Group's data processing master plan. So now EDF has a software package which centralizes all the data, enabling it to declare the characteristics of the nuclear wastes which are to be stored on the sites operated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA). Among other uses, this application makes it possible for EDF, by real time data exchange with ANDRA, to constitute an inventory of validated, shippable packs. It also constitutes a data base for all the wastes produced on the various sites. This application was developed to meet the following requirements: give the producers of radioactive waste a means to fully manage all the characteristics and materials that are necessary to condition their waste correctly; guarantee the traceability and safety of data and automatically assure the transmission of this data in real time between the producers and the ANDRA; give the Central Services of EDF an operation and statistical tool permitting an experienced feed-back based on the complete national production (single, centralized data base); and integrate the application within the products of the processing master plan in order to assure its maintenance and evolution

  18. Natural atmospheric radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1986-01-01

    After having summed up the different old or new units, used in radioactivity and radioprotection, the origins of atmospheric radioactivity are reported. Next the authors deal with the air content in radon, thoron and their radioactive descendants, insisting on the variations of the radon air content and on the radioactive balance between radon and its descendants. Then a few notions concerning the natural radioactive aerosol are developed: electric charge state, granulometric distribution. The possible effects of natural atmospheric radioactivity on man are studied with a distinction between inner irradiation and outer irradiation, an average assessment is shown. Finally the important problem of radon in inhabitations is approached [fr

  19. Processing radioactive wastes using membrane (UF/HF/RO) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years many technologies have been utilized to process low level radioactive waste streams generated by the nuclear industry, including: demineralization, evaporation, reverse osmosis and filtration. In the early 1980's interest was generated in membrane technologies and their application to radioactive wastes. This interest was generated based on the capabilities shown by membrane systems in non-radioactive environments and the promise that reverse osmosis systems showed in early testing with radioactive wastes. Membrane technologies have developed from the early development of reverse osmosis system to also include specifically designed membranes for ultrafiltration and hyperfiltration applications

  20. Assessment of the long-term stability of cementitious barriers of radioactive waste repositories by using digital-image-based microstructure generation and reactive transport modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindez, Juan Manuel; Molinero, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Cement-based grout plays a significant role in the design and performance of nuclear waste repositories: used correctly, it can enhance their safety. However, the high water-to-binder ratios, which are required to meet the desired workability and injection ability at early age, lead to high porosity that may affect the durability of this material and undermine its long-term geochemical performance. In this paper, a new methodology is presented in order to help the process of mix design which best meets the compromise between these two conflicting requirements. It involves the combined use of the computer programs CEMHYD3D for the generation of digital-image-based microstructures and CrunchFlow, for the reactive transport calculations affecting the materials so simulated. This approach is exemplified with two grout types, namely, the so-called Standard mix 5/5, used in the upper parts of the structure, and the 'low-pH' P308B, to be injected at higher depths. The results of the digital reconstruction of the mineralogical composition of the hardened paste are entirely logical, as the microstructures display high degrees of hydration, large porosities and low or nil contents of aluminium compounds. Diffusion of solutes in the pore solution was considered to be the dominant transport process. A single scenario was studied for both mix designs and their performances were compared. The reactive transport model adequately reproduces the process of decalcification of the C-S-H and the precipitation of calcite, which is corroborated by empirical observations. It was found that the evolution of the deterioration process is sensitive to the chemical composition of groundwater, its effects being more severe when grout is set under continuous exposure to poorly mineralized groundwater. Results obtained appear to indicate that a correct conceptualization of the problem was accomplished and support the assumption that, in absence of more reliable empirical data, it might

  1. Apparatus and method for radioactive waste screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Douglas W.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Salomon, Hopi; Williams, Charles Leroy

    2012-09-04

    An apparatus and method relating to screening radioactive waste are disclosed for ensuring that at least one calculated parameter for the measurement data of a sample falls within a range between an upper limit and a lower limit prior to the sample being packaged for disposal. The apparatus includes a radiation detector configured for detecting radioactivity and radionuclide content of the of the sample of radioactive waste and generating measurement data in response thereto, and a collimator including at least one aperture to direct a field of view of the radiation detector. The method includes measuring a radioactive content of a sample, and calculating one or more parameters from the radioactive content of the sample.

  2. Management of small quantities of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The main objective of this publication is to provide practical guidance primarily to developing Member States on the predisposal management of small quantities of radioactive waste arising from hospitals, laboratories, industries, institutions, research reactors and research centres.The publication covers the management of liquid, solid and gaseous radioactive wastes at the users' premises and gives general guidance on procedures at a centralized waste management facility. Predisposal management of radioactive waste includes handling, treatment, conditioning, storage and transportation. This publication provides information and guidance on the following topics: national waste management framework; origin and characteristics of radioactive waste arising from users generating small quantities of waste; radioactive waste management concepts appropriate for small quantities; local waste management; the documentation and approval necessary for the consignment of waste to a centralized waste management facility; centralized waste management; exemption of radionuclides from the regulatory body; transportation; environmental monitoring; quality assurance for the whole predisposal process; regional co-operation aspects

  3. Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrubasik, A.; Stich, W.

    1993-01-01

    The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste

  4. Method of decomposing radioactive organic solvent wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uki, Kazuo; Ichihashi, Toshio; Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tatsuaki

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decompose radioactive organic solvent wastes or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom into organic materials under moderate conditions, as well as greatly decrease the amount of secondary wastes generated. Method: Radioactive organic solvent wastes comprising an organic phosphoric acid ester ingredient and a hydrocarbon ingredient as a diluent therefor, or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom are oxidatively decomposed by hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution of phosphoric acid metal salts finally into organic materials to perform decomposing treatment for the radioactive organic solvent wastes. The decomposing reaction is carried out under relatively moderate conditions and cause less burden to facilities or the likes. Further, since the decomposed liquid after the treatment can be reused for the decomposing reaction as a catalyst solution secondary wastes can significantly be decreased. (Yoshihara, H.)

  5. Radioactive waste management; the realities as against the myths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, I.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear power generation is now an essential requirement for the mankind in the current energy difficulties. The problem of radioactive waste management is arousing the opposition, but it must not inhibit the utilization of nuclear energy. Radioactive waste management concerns the whole course from its occurrence to its final disposal. The purpose of the management is then to protect absolutely the human beings of present and future generations from the danger of radioactivity. Radioactive wastes are varied much in their kinds and natures. While the management technology is nearly all established, the amounts of wastes are increasing. The following matters are described. Definition of radioactive waste management, fundamental strategies of the management, kinds of radioactive wastes, the present situation of radioactive waste management, and problems in the management. (J.P.N.)

  6. Treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Chuji

    1976-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is equipped with such atomic energy facilities as a power test reactor, four research reactors, a hot laboratory, and radioisotope-producing factory. All the radioactive wastes but gas generated from these facilities are treated by the waste treatment facilities established in JAERI. The wastes carried into JAERI through Japan Radioisotope Association are also treated there. Low level water solution is treated with an evaporating apparatus, an ion-exchange apparatus, and a cohesive precipitating apparatus, while medium level solution is treated with an evaporating apparatus, and low level combustible solid is treated with an incinerating apparatus. These treated wastes and sludges are mixed with Portland cement in drum cans to solidify, and stored in a concrete pit. The correct classification and its indication as well as the proper packing for the wastes are earnestly demanded by the treatment facilities. (Kobatake, H.)

  7. Radioactive wastes processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Yoshiyuki; Fukujoji, Seiya.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To exactly recognize the deposition state of mists into conduits thereby effectively conduct cleaning. Constitution: A drier for performing drying treatment of liquid wastes, a steam decontaminating tower for decontaminating the steams generated from the drier and a condenser for condensating the decontaminating steams are connected with each other by means of conduits to constitute a radioactive wastes processing apparatus. A plurality of pressure detectors are disposed to the conduits, the pressure loss within the conduits is determined based on the detector output and the clogged state in the conduits due to the deposition of mists is detected by the magnitude of the pressure loss. If the clogging exceeds a certain level, cleaning water is supplied to clean-up the conduits thereby keep the operation to continue always under sound conditions. (Sekiya, K.)

  8. Incineration of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eid, C.

    1985-01-01

    The incineration process currently seems the most appropriate way to solve the problems encountered by the increasing quantities of low and medium active waste from nuclear power generation waste. Although a large number of incinerators operate in the industry, there is still scope for the improvement of safety, throughput capacity and reduction of secondary waste. This seminar intends to give opportunity to scientists working on the different aspects of incineration to present their most salient results and to discuss the possibilities of making headway in the management of LL/ML radioactive waste. These proceedings include 17 contributions ranging over the subjects: incineration of solid β-γ wastes; incineration of other radwastes; measurement and control of wastes; off-gas filtration and release. (orig./G.J.P.)

  9. Electrolyze radioactive contamination away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility is using electrolysis to clean the surfaces of hazardous materials. In the past, contaminated metals were cleaned with concentrated acids. Although these treatments make the surfaces safer, they produce other radioactive and toxic wastes in turn. Anodic current passes through a piece of stainless steel submersed in a sodium nitrate solution, and steel dissolves at the surfaces. Surface contamination strips away along with the surface layers. The authors are using this electrolysis approach to remove plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium. Unlike acid washing processes, electrolytic decontamination can be accomplished quickly. Little waste is generated regardless of how much material has to be removed from the surface. Material removal is proportional to the applied current, which gives the operator control over the rate and extent of decontamination

  10. The design, manufacture, and testing of a new generation of ISO freight container for certification as an IP-2 package in compliance with the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 1985 edition (as amended 1990)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    Solid low level radioactive waste (LLW) which arises at nuclear power stations and other nuclear facilities in the UK, is routinely transported to British Nuclear Fuels' site at Drigg in Cumbria for disposal. A requirement was identified for the use of a refurbished ISO freight container of the full-height design, to transport drummed LLW to the site of a supercompaction facility prior to disposal at Drigg. This paper describes the reasoned technical justification employed for certifying the refurbished ISO freight container, Design No. 2912B, as an IP-2 package under Paragraph 523 of the IAEA Transport Regulations and the development of a new generation of ISO Freight container, Design No. 2044. It was recognised that the use of a refurbished container was only an interim measure and because of significant changes in the acceptance criteria for disposal, the increased use of high force compaction techniques and the proposed amendments to the IAEA Transport Regulations, Nuclear Electric embarked upon the development of a new generation of ISO freight containers. The new container design (Design No. 2044) incorporates a readily decontaminable stainless steel interior, a comprehensive load restraint system designed for the transport of single and multiple packages, and is lined with a polyurethane foam between the inner and outer skins. It is designed to transport 70 off, 200 litre drums of LLW (stacked in two layers) and other payloads of size not greater than 4 m long x 2 m wide and 20 tonnes in weight. The container was subjected to a range of tests to prove compliance with the ISO standard and the IAEA Transport Regulations. Following the preparation of the required documentation, in particular a Safety Case and comprehensive Operating and Maintenance Instructions, a Certificate of Regulatory Compliance was issued by the appropriate authority certifying the container as an Industrial Package Type 2 (IP-2) suitable for the transport of drummed LLW and other

  11. Radioactivity and geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper recalls a few steps of the introduction of radioactivity in geophysics and astrophysics: contribution of radioelements to energy balance of the Earth, age of the Earth based on radioactive disintegration and the discovery of cosmic radiations

  12. Radioactive Waste Management Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This strategy defines methods and means how collect, transport and bury radioactive waste safely. It includes low level radiation waste and high level radiation waste. In the strategy are foreseen main principles and ways of storage radioactive waste

  13. Radioactivity in consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

    1978-08-01

    Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

  14. Radioactivity of bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  15. Immersed radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-03-01

    This document presents a brief overview of immersed radioactive wastes worldwide: historical aspects, geographical localization, type of wastes (liquid, solid), radiological activity of immersed radioactive wastes in the NE Atlantic Ocean, immersion sites and monitoring

  16. Supercompaction of radioactive waste at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, K.; Sirola, P.

    1996-01-01

    The problem of radioactive waste management is both scientifically and technically complex and also deeply emotional issue. In the last twenty years the first two aspects have been mostly resolved up to the point of safe implementation. In the Republic of Slovenia, certain fundamentalist approaches in politics and the use of radioactive waste problem as a political tool, brought the final radioactive repository siting effort to a stop. Although small amounts of radioactive waste are produced in research institutes, hospitals and industry, major source of radioactive waste in Slovenia is the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko. When Krsko NPP was originally built, plans were made to construct a permanent radioactive waste disposal facility. This facility was supposed to be available to receive waste from the plant long before the on site storage facility was full. However, the permanent disposal facility is not yet available, and it became necessary to retain the wastes produced at the plant in the on-site storage facility for an extended period of time. Temporary radioactive storage capacity at the plant site has limited capacity and having no other options available NPP Krsko is undertaking major efforts to reduce waste volume generated to allow normal operation. This article describes the Radioactive Waste Compaction Campaign performed from November, 1994 through November, 1995 at Krsko NPP, to enhance the efficiency and safety of storage of radioactive waste. The campaign involved the retrieval, segmented gamma-spectrum measurement, dose rate measurement, compaction, re-packaging, and systematic storage of radioactive wastes which had been stored in the NPP radioactive waste storage building since plant commissioning. (author)

  17. Transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuller, C.

    2003-01-01

    In this article author describes the system of transport and processing of radioactive wastes from nuclear power of Slovenske elektrarne, plc. It is realized the assurance of transport of liquid and solid radioactive wastes to processing links from places of their formation, or of preliminary storage and consistent transports of treated radioactive wastes fixed in cement matrix of fibre-concrete container into Rebublic storage of radioactive wastes in Mochovce

  18. Polarized secondary radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaika, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of polarized radioactive nuclei beam production: a) a method nuclear interaction of the non-polarized or polarized charged projectiles with target nuclei; b) a method of polarization of stopped reaction radioactive products in a special polarized ion source with than following acceleration; c) a polarization of radioactive nuclei circulating in a storage ring are considered. Possible life times of the radioactive ions for these methods are determined. General schemes of the polarization method realizations and depolarization problems are discussed

  19. Management of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neerdael, B.; Marivoet, J.; Put, M.; Van Iseghem, P.; Volckaert, G.; Wacquier, W.

    1998-09-01

    The document gives an overview of of different aspects of radioactive waste management in Belgium. The document discusses the radioactive waste inventory in Belgium, the treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste as well as activities related to the characterisation of different waste forms. A separate chapter is dedicated to research and development regarding deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. In the Belgian waste management programme, particular emphasis is on studies for disposal in clay. Main results of these studies are highlighted and discussed

  20. Focus on radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M

    1989-01-01

    Written for children, this book looks at the nature of radioactive materials, how they were discovered, what they are used for and how they affect the environment around us. The emphasis is on the benefits of radioactive materials, particularly in nuclear power stations, in medical diagnostics and radiotherapy, in industry and in agriculture. Nuclear fission and fusion are explained, how radioactive materials are handled and naturally occurring radioactivity are included. (UK).

  1. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1994-01-01

    This booklet is a publication by International Atomic Energy Agency for general awareness of citizens and policy-makers to clarify their concept of nuclear wastes. In a very simple way it tells what is radioactivity, radiations and radioactive wastes. It further hints on various medial and industrial uses of radiations. It discusses about different types of radioactive wastes and radioactive waste management. Status of nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern European countries are also discussed

  2. Radioactive consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Otomaru

    1981-01-01

    Present situation of utilizing the radioactive consumer products and exposure dose were reviewed with published data. Practically, consumer products are divided into three categories, (1) radioactive nuclides intentionally incorporated into radioluminous dye, ionization chambers for smoke detector, eliminator of static electricity, and glow lamp (2) natural radioactive nuclides contained in false teeth, porcelain, glass, and gas mantle (3) natural radioactive nuclides accumulated as industrial waste at the consumption of coal, petroleum, and natural gas or in fertilizer and materials for construction. (Nakanishi, T.)

  3. Aspects of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutoiu, Dan

    2003-01-01

    The origin and types of radioactive waste, the objective and the fundamental principles of radioactive waste management and the classification of radioactive waste are presented. Problems of the radioactive waste management are analyzed. (authors)

  4. Storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Even if the best waste minimization measures are undertaken throughout radioisotope production or usage, significant radioactive wastes arise to make management measures essential. For developing countries with low isotope usage and little or no generation of nuclear materials, it may be possible to handle the generated waste by simply practicing decay storage for several half-lives of the radionuclides involved, followed by discharge or disposal without further processing. For those countries with much larger facilities, longer lived isotopes are produced and used. In this situation, storage is used not only for decay storage but also for in-process retention steps and for the key stage of interim storage of conditioned wastes pending final disposal. The report will serve as a technical manual providing reference material and direct step-by-step know-how to staff in radioisotope user establishments and research centres in the developing Member States without nuclear power generation. Considerations are limited to the simpler storage facilities. The restricted quantities and low activity associated with the relevant wastes will generally permit contact-handling and avoid the need for shielding requirements in the storage facilities or equipment used for handling. A small quantity of wastes from some radioisotope production cells and from reactor cooling water treatment may contain sufficient short lived activity from activated corrosion products to require some separate decay storage before contact-handling is suitable. 16 refs, 12 figs, 8 tabs

  5. Management of radioactive waste from nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Radioactive waste arises from the generation of nuclear energy and from the production of radioactive materials and their applications in industry, agriculture, research and medicine. The importance of safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has been gained in this field. Technical expertise is a prerequisite for safe and cost-effective management of radioactive waste. A training course is considered an effective tool for providing technical expertise in various aspects of waste management. The IAEA, in co-operation with national authorities concerned with radioactive waste management, has organized and conducted a number of radioactive waste management training courses. The results of the courses conducted by the IAEA in 1991-1995 have been evaluated at consultants meetings held in December 1995 and May 1996. This guidance document for use by Member States in arranging national training courses on the management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from nuclear applications has been prepared as the result of that effort. The report outlines the various requirements for the organization, conduct and evaluation of training courses in radioactive waste management and proposes an annotated outline of a reference training course

  6. Radioactive waste management and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaluzny, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The public has demonstrated interest and even concern for radioactive waste. A fully demonstrated industrial solution already exists for 90% of the waste generated by the nuclear industry. Several solutions are currently under development for long-term management of long-lived waste. They could be implemented on an industrial scale within twenty years. The low volumes of this type of waste mean there is plenty of time to adopt a solution. (author). 5 photos

  7. Environmental aspects of commercial radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-01

    Environmental effects (including accidents) associated with facility construction, operation, decommissioning, and transportation in the management of commercially generated radioactive waste were analyzed for plants and systems assuming a light water power reactor scenario that produces about 10,000 GWe-yr through the year 2050. The following alternative fuel cycle modes or cases that generate post-fission wastes requiring management were analyzed: a once-through option, a fuel reprocessing option for uranium and plutonium recycle, and a fuel reprocessing option for uranium-only recycle. Volume 1 comprises five chapters: introduction; summary of findings; approach to assessment of environmental effects from radioactive waste management; environmental effects related to radioactive management in a once-through fuel cycle; and environmental effects of radioactive waste management associated with an LWR fuel reprocessing plant. (LK)

  8. Environmental aspects of commercial radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    Environmental effects (including accidents) associated with facility construction, operation, decommissioning, and transportation in the management of commercially generated radioactive waste were analyzed for plants and systems assuming a light water power reactor scenario that produces about 10,000 GWe-yr through the year 2050. The following alternative fuel cycle modes or cases that generate post-fission wastes requiring management were analyzed: a once-through option, a fuel reprocessing option for uranium and plutonium recycle, and a fuel reprocessing option for uranium-only recycle. Volume 1 comprises five chapters: introduction; summary of findings; approach to assessment of environmental effects from radioactive waste management; environmental effects related to radioactive management in a once-through fuel cycle; and environmental effects of radioactive waste management associated with an LWR fuel reprocessing plant

  9. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the sources and health effects of radioactive wastes. It reveals the techniques to concentrate and immobilize radioactivity and examines the merits of various disposal ideas. The book, which is designed for the lay reader, explains the basic science of atoms,nuclear particles,radioactivity, radiation and health effects

  10. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This ninth chapter presents de CNEN-NE--5.01 norm 'Transport of radioactive material'; the specifications of the radioactive materials for transport; the tests of the packages; the requests for controlling the transport and the responsibilities during the transport of radioactive material

  11. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Illustrated by drawings, this publication briefly describes radioactive exposure modalities (external or internal irradiation), the ways they are measured and assessed (doses, units), the different natural radioactivity origins, the different radioactivity origins related to human activity, the share of each origin in population exposures

  12. Radioactive wastes management development in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, S.A.; Cruz, P.F.; Rivera, J.D.; Jorquera, O.H.

    1994-01-01

    A Facility for immobilizing and conditioning of radioactive wastes generated in Chile, has recently started in operation. It is a Radioactive Wastes Treatment Plant, RWTP, whose owner is Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CCHEN. A Storgement Building of Conditioned Wastes accomplishes the facility for medium and low level activity wastes. The Project has been carried with participation of chilean professionals at CCHEN and Technical Assistance of International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA. Processes developed are volume reduction by compaction; immobilization by cementation and conditioning. Equipment has been selected to process radioactive wastes into a 200 liters drum, in which wastes are definitively conditioned, avoiding exposition and contamination risks. The Plant has capacity to treat low and medium activity radioactive wastes produced in Chile due to Reactor Experimental No. 1 operation, and annex Laboratories in Nuclear Research Centers, as also those produced by users of nuclear techniques in Industries, Hospitals, Research Centers and Universities, in the whole country. With the infrastructure developed in Chile, a centralization of Radioactive Wastes Management activities is achieved. A data base system helps to control and register radioactive wastes arising in Chile. Generation of radioactive wastes in Chile, has found solution for the present production and that of near future

  13. Disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The generation of low-level radioactive waste is a natural consequence of the societal uses of radioactive materials. These uses include the application of radioactive materials to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease and to research into the causes of human disease and their prevention. Currently, low level radioactive wastes are disposed of in one of three shallow land-burial disposal sites located in Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina. With the passage in December 1980 of Public Law 96-573, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, the disposal of low-level wastes generated in each state was identified as a responsibility of the state. To fulfill this responsibility, states were encouraged to form interstate compacts for radioactive waste disposal. At the present time, only 37 states have entered into compact agreements, in spite of the clause in Public Law 96-573 that established January 1, 1986, as a target date for implementation of state responsibility for radioactive wastes. Recent action by Congress has resulted in postponement of the implementation date to January 1, 1993

  14. Methodology development for radioactive waste treatment of CDTN/BR - liquid low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Carlos Antonio de

    1996-01-01

    The radioactive liquid wastes generated in Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) were initially treated by precipitation/filtration and then the resulting wet solid wastes were incorporated in cement. These wastes were composed of different chemicals and different radioactivities and were generated by different sectors. The objective of the waste treatment method was to obtain minimum wet solid waste volume and decontamination and minimum operational cost. The composition of the solid wastes were taken into consideration for compatible cementation process. Approximately 5,400 litres of liquid radioactive wastes were treated by this process during 1992-1995. The volume reduction was 1/24 th and contained 20% solids. (author)

  15. Environmental radioactivity survey data in Cheonju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mo Sung; Goo, Hyun Mi [Cheongju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    We surveyed the en environmental radiation and radioactivity in Chungcheongbuk-do in order to provide baseline data in the year of 2003. Data generated from the project will be the information base for making decisions necessary to ensure the protection of public health. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Cheongju regional monitoring station In the year 2003. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of environmental samples such as soil, drinking water, indicator plant(mugwort, pine-needle), agricultural and forest products, and processed food(tea)

  16. Environmental radioactivity survey data in Cheonju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mo Sung; Goo, Hyun Mi

    2003-12-01

    We surveyed the en environmental radiation and radioactivity in Chungcheongbuk-do in order to provide baseline data in the year of 2003. Data generated from the project will be the information base for making decisions necessary to ensure the protection of public health. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Cheongju regional monitoring station In the year 2003. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of environmental samples such as soil, drinking water, indicator plant(mugwort, pine-needle), agricultural and forest products, and processed food(tea)

  17. Development of an application simulating radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riffault, V.; Locoge, N.; Leblanc, E.; Vermeulen, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an application simulating radioactive gamma sources developed in the 'Ecole des Mines' of Douai (France). It generates raw counting data as an XML file which can then be statistically exploited to illustrate the various concepts of radioactivity (exponential decay law, isotropy of the radiation, attenuation of radiation in matter). The application, with a spread sheet for data analysis and lab procedures, has been released under free license. (authors)

  18. Synthesis and formulation of {sup 99m} Tc-ECD radiopharmaceutical; Sintesis y formulacion del radiofarmaco {sup 99m} Tc-ECD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo G, B E

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty which uses radioactive compounds (radionuclides) for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. {sup 99m} Tc is the more common radionuclide used in many studies in nuclear medicine because its advantages: it has a photopeak of 140 KeV and a half-life of 6 hours; it can be eluted from a Molybdenum 99 generator, so radiopharmaceuticals can be prepared on site. Ethyl cysteine dimer (ECD) labelled with reduced Technetium 99m has been purposed recently as a promising radiopharmaceutical for brain perfusion imaging {sup 99m} Tc-ECD is a lipophilic neutral complex which cross the brain blood barrier and show high brain uptake. The objective of this work was synthesize and to design a freeze dried formulation for the instant preparation of {sup 99m} Tc-ECD complex useful for brain perfusion imaging. We obtained a freeze dried stable formulation for the preparation of {sup 99m} Tc-ECD kit with a radiochemical purity higher than 90 %, which fulfills with the quality control of radiopharmaceuticals. Furthermore, we developed analytic techniques for the determination of the different chemical compounds into the lyophilized kit. (Author).

  19. Treating radioactive effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of radioactive effluent it is known to produce a floc being a suspension of precipitates carrying radioactive species in a mother liquor containing dissolved non-radioactive salts. It is also known and accepted practice to encapsulate the floc in a solid matrix by treatment with bitumen, cement and the like. In the present invention the floc is washed with water prior to encapsulation in the solid matrix whereby to displace the mother liquor containing the dissolved non-radioactive salts. This serves to reduce the final amount of solidified radioactive waste with consequent advantages in the storage and disposal thereof. (author)

  20. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The operational and technical feasibility of the penetrator option for HGW disposal has been reviewed and the areas where research is required to confirm feasibility have been identified. The research requirements have been presented against the Department's ocean disposal programme timescale on a series of bar charts. The bar charts show the need for theoretical and experimental studies of the basic mechanisms governing hole closure and the development of suitable instrumentation to assess the actual behaviour of the remoulded sediment in deep ocean trials. Detailed planning of deep ocean trials in sufficient time to develop strategy, models and instrumentation, identification of site investigation requirements and thermal response studies of sediments are also required. (author)

  1. Chemical decontamination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.I.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. There is also a variety of alternatives for treatment and conditioning of the wastes prior disposal. The importance of treatment of radioactive waste for protection of human and environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has gained in this field. Generally, the methods used for treatment of radioactive wastes can be classified into three type's biological, physical and chemical treatment this physical treatment it gives good result than biological treatment. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. In chemical treatment there are different procedures, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electro dialysis but solvent extraction is best one because high purity can be optioned on the other hand the disadvantage that it is expensive. Beside the solvent extraction technique one can be used is ion exchange which gives reasonable result, but requires pretreatment that to avoid in closing of column by colloidal and large species. Electro dialysis technique gives quite result but less than solvent extraction and ion exchange technique the advantage is a cheep.(Author)

  2. Role and Place of the Joint-Stock Company -ECOMET-S- in the System of Solid Radioactive Waste Treatment Generated at the Nuclear Power Plants of the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbutovski, A.B.; Troshev, A.V.; Cheremisin, P.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the existing situation and ways of solving the problem of solid radioactive waste (SRW) management, resulting from the nuclear power industry are considered. It is shown, that one of the ways to manage SRW is transferring the task to a specialized enterprise. Such an enterprise in Russia is the Joint-Stock Company (JSC) 'ECOMET-S', whose main activity is providing services for processing and disposal of radioactive metal waste. They reduce the volume of SRW, ship it for burial and return metal return to industry for unlimited use. The basic provisions of the system of radioactive metal waste (hereinafter RMW) management developed by JSC 'ECOMET-S' are given. Information referring to technology and enterprise industrial capacity is represented. The results of the JSC 'ECOMET-S' activity for processing and disposal of low-activity radioactive metal waste from the Nuclear Power Plant (hereinafter NPP) of the Russian Federation are shown. (authors)

  3. Radioactive waste handling at the Mochovce NPP, 1998-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasickova, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    The radioactive waste management system at the Mochovce NPP is described. The system addresses technical aspects as well as administrative provisions related to radioactive waste generated within the controlled area, from the waste generation phase to waste sorting, packaging, storage, recording, measurement, and transportation to the Bohunice waste processing facility or transfer to the Mochovce liquid radioactive waste treatment facility. The article also addresses conditions for release from the controlled area to the environment for radioactive waste which can be exempt from the institutional administrative control system or released to the environment on the basis of a valid permission issued by the relevant regulatory authority

  4. The different generation of nuclear reactors from Generation-1 to Generation-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognet, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this work author deals with the history of the development of nuclear reactors from Generation-1 to Generation-4. The fuel cycle and radioactive waste management as well as major accidents are presented, too.

  5. Synthesis of Carbon nano structures by plasma discharge; Sintesis de nanoestructuras de carbono por descarga de plasmaa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez L, M L

    2007-07-01

    Due to the great quantity of applications of the carbon nano structures (NEC) in diverse areas like: synthesis of super-resistant materials, hydrogen storage, nano sensors generation and nano catalysts, it has seen the necessity to generate new processes of synthesis of this materials as well as to already improve those existent. The present work has as objective to optimize the NEC synthesis process by means of the electric arc method which uses alternating current to high frequencies (HF), obtaining relatively clean products; that is to say, it hardly presents amorphous material neither sludges. They stand out the obtaining of carbon nano fibers (NFC) by means of a luminescent-arch discharge, in a gas mixture of He-CH{sub 4} with 34% at. Ni/10.32% at.Y like catalyst; at a frequency of 42 kHz and low power (300 W). This method benefits the amass of the particles in both electrodes due to the high frequencies. The time of duration of the process oscillates between 5 and 20 minutes. The obtained product was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (MEB), transmission electron microscopy (MET) to determine the NEC type obtained and by X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy for determining the purity of the samples. The NFC is relatively free of amorphous coal. The surface and structural analysis indicates that the fibers have a half diameter of 80 nm. It is also made, a study by optical emission spectroscopy of plasma using the Swan band for determining the temperature. (Author)

  6. Labelling of olive oil with radioactive iodine and radioactive technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Dayel, O.A.F.

    1988-03-01

    Investigates labelling of olive oil with 125 iodine and with the radioactive 99mTC. A radio analytical study for 99Mo-99mTC generator is also presented. Iodine monochloride and chlormine-T methods are used for labelling olive oil and oleic acid with radioactive iodine. Diethyl ether, benzene and n-heptane have been used as solvents, with diethyl ether giving best results using iodine monochloride method. Infrared spectroscopic studies show that labelling took place at the double bond. Use of milked 99mTc gave very low yield only. A fairly higher labelling yield was achieved when 20 mg of tin chloride has been added in acetone medium than diethyl ether medium. Thin layer chromatography and paper chromatography technique were used as quality control systems. The labelled oil can be used for diagnostic and study purposes. 140 Ref

  7. Radioactive waste management: Spanish experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive waste generation began in Spain during the 1950's, in association with the first applications of radioactive isotopes in industry, medicine and research. Spain's first nuclear power plant began its operations in 1968. At present, there are in operation some one thousand installations possessing the administrative authorization required to use radioactive isotopes (small producers), nine nuclear groups and a tenth is now entering the dismantling phase. There are also activities and installations pertaining to the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (mining, milling and the manufacturing of fuel elements). Until 1985, the research center Junta de Energia Nuclear (now CIEMAT) rendered radioactive waste removal, and subsequent conditioning and temporary storage services to the small producers. Since the beginning of their operations the nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities have had the capacity to condition and temporarily store their own radioactive wastes. ENRESA (Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S. A.) began its operations in the second half of 1985. It is a state-owned company created by the Government in accordance with a previous parliamentary resolution and commissioned to establish a system for management of such wastes throughout Spain, being in charge also of the dismantling of nuclear power plants and other major installations at the end of their operating lifetimes. Possibly the most outstanding characteristic of ENRESA's evolution over these last seven years has been the need to bring about a compromise between solving the most immediate and pressing day-to-day problems of operation (the first wastes were removed at the beginning of 1986) and establishing the basic organization, resources, technology and installations required for ENRESA to operate efficiently in the long term. (author)

  8. Technical feasibility of a Dutch radioactive waste repository in Boom Clay : Plugs and seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Jun; Vardon, P.J.; Hicks, M.A.; Hart, J; Fokker, PA

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive substances and ionizing radiation are used in medicine, industry, agriculture, re- search, education and electricity production. This generates radioactive waste. In the Neth- erlands, this waste is collected, treated and stored by COVRA (Centrale Organisatie Voor Radioactief Afval).

  9. Radioactivity and deep geothermal energy; Radioaktivitaet und tiefe Geothermie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janczik, Sebastian; Kaltschmitt, Martin [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Umwelttechnik und Energiewirtschaft; Merkel, Broder [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie

    2012-02-15

    Due to recent developments in energy politics renewable energies get more and more importance in Germany. This is especially true for geothermal energy representing a promising option for the environmentally sound and secure generation of heat and electricity. But there are a lot of very emotional discussions due to radioactive residues and wastes produced by a geothermal plant. Thus this paper compares radioactivity resulting from geothermal energy with radioactivity coming from other natural sources. In doing so it becomes obvious that naturally radioactive sources exist in all parts of the ecosphere (i.e. air, water, soil). The paper shows also that the specific activities of radioactive elements from geothermal energy in form of residues and waste emerge from radioactive decay of nuclides and that their radiation is not higher than the radiation of other naturally occurring radioactive elements. (orig.)

  10. Method for burning radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Akinori; Tejima, Takaya.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To completely process less combustible radioactive wastes with no excess loads on discharge gas processing systems and without causing corrosions to furnace walls. Method: Among combustible radioactive wastes, chlorine-containing less combustible wastes such as chlorine-containing rubbers and vinyl chlorides, and highly heat generating wastes not containing chloride such as polyethylene are selectively packed into packages. While on the other hand, packages of less combustible wastes are charged into a water-cooled jacket type incinerator intermittently while controlling the amount and the interval of charging so that the temperature in the furnace will be kept to lower than 850 deg C for burning treatment. Directly after the completion of the burning, the packed highly heat calorie producing wastes are charged and subjected to combustion treatment. (Yoshihara, H.)

  11. Radioactivity and food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references

  12. Radioactive air sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Maiello, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of radioactive air sampling has matured and evolved over decades, it has lacked a single resource that assimilates technical and background information on its many facets. Edited by experts and with contributions from top practitioners and researchers, Radioactive Air Sampling Methods provides authoritative guidance on measuring airborne radioactivity from industrial, research, and nuclear power operations, as well as naturally occuring radioactivity in the environment. Designed for industrial hygienists, air quality experts, and heath physicists, the book delves into the applied research advancing and transforming practice with improvements to measurement equipment, human dose modeling of inhaled radioactivity, and radiation safety regulations. To present a wide picture of the field, it covers the international and national standards that guide the quality of air sampling measurements and equipment. It discusses emergency response issues, including radioactive fallout and the assets used ...

  13. Drainage of radioactive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This Code of Practice covers all the drainage systems which may occur in the radioactive classified area of an establishment, namely surface water, foul, process and radioactive drainage. It also deals with final discharge lines. The Code of Practice concentrates on those aspects of drainage which require particular attention because the systems are in or from radioactive areas and typical illustrations are given in appendices. The Code makes references to sources of information on conventional aspects of drainage design. (author)

  14. Radioactivity and its measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Garfinkel, S B

    1980-01-01

    Begins with a description of the discovery of radioactivity and the historic research of such pioneers as the Curies and Rutherford. After a discussion of the interactions of &agr;, &bgr; and &ggr; rays with matter, the energetics of the different modes of nuclear disintegration are considered in relation to the Einstein mass-energy relationship as applied to radioactive transformations. Radiation detectors and radioactivity measurements are also discussed

  15. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources.

  16. Learning more about radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This digest brochure explains what radioactivity is, where it comes from, how it is measured, what are its effects on the body and the way to protect it against these effects, the uses of radioactivity (In the medical field, In industry, In the food industry, and In the cultural world). It ends with some examples of irradiation levels, of natural radioactivity and with the distribution in France of various sources of exposure. (J.S.)

  17. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Almost all IAEA Member States use radioactive sources in medicine, industry, agriculture and scientific research, and countries remain responsible for the safe handling and storage of all radioactively contaminated waste that result from such activities. In some cases, waste must be specially treated or conditioned before storage and/or disposal. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme with the support of the Nuclear Energy Department aimed at establishing appropriate technologies and procedures for managing radioactive wastes. (IAEA)

  18. Handling of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza Mir, Azucena

    1998-01-01

    Based on characteristics and quantities of different types of radioactive waste produced in the country, achievements in infrastructure and the way to solve problems related with radioactive waste handling and management, are presented in this paper. Objectives of maintaining facilities and capacities for controlling, processing and storing radioactive waste in a conditioned form, are attained, within a great range of legal framework, so defined to contribute with safety to people and environment (au)

  19. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources

  20. FFTF radioactive solid waste handling and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The equipment necessary for the disposal of radioactive solid waste from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is scheduled to be available for operation in late 1982. The plan for disposal of radioactive waste from FFTF will utilize special waste containers, a reusable Solid Waste Cask (SWC) and a Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC). The SWC will be used to transport the waste from the Reactor Containment Building to a concrete and steel DSWC. The DSWC will then be transported to a burial site on the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. Radioactive solid waste generated during the operation of the FFTF consists of activated test assembly hardware, reflectors, in-core shim assemblies and control rods. This radioactive waste must be cleaned (sodium removed) prior to disposal. This paper provides a description of the solid waste disposal process, and the casks and equipment used for handling and transport

  1. Radioactive dumping in the Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J.; Gizewski, P.

    1993-01-01

    Recent revelations concerning the possible environmental hazards posed by the sunken Soviet nuclear submarine Komsomolets and the disposal of radioactive materials in the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans have generated much controversy and debate. Too often, however, the key scientific and policy issues that the dumping raises are treated as two solitudes. In reality, decisions taken by national governments and international agencies in connection with remediation, regulation, and even research must be based on both science and policy. Indeed, a sound approach to the dumping issue must integrate scientific evidence and policy considerations relating to legal, political, social, and economic matters. Radioactive waste disposal is an exceedingly difficult problem. Information detailing the Soviet Navy's past dumping practices, and increasing awareness of the problems that Russia and other states may encounter in the future disposal of radioactive waste, indicate that the global inventory of radioactive wastes requiring storage and disposal is large and growing

  2. Liquid Radioactive Wastes Treatment: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tse Hung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive wastes are generated during nuclear fuel cycle operation, production and application of radioisotope in medicine, industry, research, and agriculture, and as a byproduct of natural resource exploitation, which includes mining and processing of ores, combustion of fossil fuels, or production of natural gas and oil. To ensure the protection of human health and the environment from the hazard of these wastes, a planned integrated radioactive waste management practice should be applied. This work is directed to review recent published researches that are concerned with testing and application of different treatment options as a part of the integrated radioactive waste management practice. The main aim from this work is to highlight the scientific community interest in important problems that affect different treatment processes. This review is divided into the following sections: advances in conventional treatment of aqueous radioactive wastes, advances in conventional treatment of organic liquid wastes, and emerged technological options.

  3. Radioactive wastes: sources, treatment, and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wymer, R.G.; Blomeke, J.O.

    1975-01-01

    Sources, treatment, and disposal of radioactive wastes are analyzed in an attempt to place a consideration of the problem of permanent disposal at the level of established or easily attainable technology. In addition to citing the natural radioactivity present in the biosphere, the radioactive waste generated at each phase of the fuel cycle (mills, fabrication plants, reactors, reprocessing plants) is evaluated. The three treatment processes discussed are preliminary storage to permit decay of the short-lived radioisotopes, solidification of aqueous wastes, and partitioning the long-lived α emitters for separate and long-term storage. Dispersion of radioactive gases to the atmosphere is already being done, and storage in geologically stable structures such as salt mines is under active study. The transmutation of high-level wastes appears feasible in principle, but exceedingly difficult to develop

  4. Identification and characterization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RANDRIAMORA, T.H.

    2007-01-01

    As the goal of the radioactive waste management is to protect human health and the environment, without imposing excessive constraints to the future generations, this work consists with of the identification of the radioactive waste existing in Madagascar, theirs characterizations for their later conditioning and their final storage. In this work, we used a dosimeter GRAETZ X5 C and a portable spectrometer EXPLORANIUM GR 135. These apparatuses have a great advantage at the user level because of their capacity to measure the equivalent dose rate, to identify, search and locate radiocative elements. The establishment of national center for radioactive waste management for the conditioning and the storage of spent sealed sources is the best solution for radioactive waste management in Madagascar. [fr

  5. The ISOLDE Facility: Radioactive beams at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The Isope Separation On-Line (ISOL) technique evolved from chemical techniques used to separate radioactive isotopes off-line from irradiated "targets". The ISOL targets of today, used at e.g. ISOLDE, can be of many different types and in different phases but the isotopes are always delivered at very low energies making the technique ideal for study of ground state properties and collections for other applications such as solid state physics and medical physics. The possibility of accelerating these low energy beams for nuclear structure studies, and in the long term future for neutrino physics, is now being explored at first generation radioactive beam facilities. The upgrade towards HIE-ISOLDE aim to consolidate ISOLDE's position as a world leading radioactive nuclear beam facility and it will be a pre-cursor to a future all European ISOL facility, EURISOL, with order of magnitudes higher radioactive beam intensities and energies. Prerequisite knowledge and references: None

  6. Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden-Wuerttemberg; Bericht ueber die Entsorgung von radioaktiven Abfaellen und abgebrannten Brennelementen aus Baden-Wuerttemberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-04-15

    The report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg covers the following issues: legal framework for the nuclear disposal; producer of spent fuels and radioactive wastes in Baden- Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg; low- and medium-level radioactive wastes (non heat generating radioactive wastes); spent fuels and radioactive wastes from waste processing (heat generating radioactive wastes); final disposal.

  7. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  8. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapelushnik, I.; Sheinfeld, M.; Avida, R.; Kadmon, Y.; Ellenbogen, M.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  9. Controlling radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtinger, W.

    1992-01-01

    The guideline of the Ministry for Environmental Protection for controlling radioactive waste with a negligible development of heat defines in detail what data are relevant to the control of radioactive waste and should be followed up on and included in a system of documentation. By introducing the AVK (product control system for tracing the course of waste disposal) the operators of German nuclear power plants have taken the requirements of this guideline into account. In particular, possibilities for determining the degree of radioactivity of radioactive waste, which the BMU-guidelines call for, were put into practice by means of the programming technology of the product control system's module MOPRO. (orig.) [de

  10. Environmental radioactivity 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Environmental Radioactivity in New Zealand and Rarotonga : annual report 1996 was published in May this year. The 1996 environmental radioactivity monitoring programme included, as usual, measurements in New Zealand and the Cook Islands of atmospheric, deposited and dairy product radioactivity. The environment in the New Zealand and Cook Island regions has now virtually returned to the situation in the 'pre-nuclear' era. The contination of monitoring, although at a reduced level of intensity, is basically to ensure that any change from the present state, due to any source of radioactivity does not go undetected or unquestioned. (author)

  11. Application of quality assurance to radioactive waste disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Nuclear power generation and the use of radioactive materials in medicine, research and industry produce radioactive wastes. In order to assure that wastes are managed safely, the implementation of appropriate management control is necessary. This IAEA publication deals with quality assurance principles for safe disposal. This report may assist managers responsible for safe disposal of radioactive waste in achieving quality in their work; and to regulatory bodies to provide guidance for their licensee waste disposal programmes. 17 refs.

  12. Application of quality assurance to radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Nuclear power generation and the use of radioactive materials in medicine, research and industry produce radioactive wastes. In order to assure that wastes are managed safely, the implementation of appropriate management control is necessary. This IAEA publication deals with quality assurance principles for safe disposal. This report may assist managers responsible for safe disposal of radioactive waste in achieving quality in their work; and to regulatory bodies to provide guidance for their licensee waste disposal programmes. 17 refs

  13. Crucible-Free Synthesis of Silicides and Borides; Synthese de siliciures et de borures sans creuset; Bestigel'nyj sintez silitsidov i boridov; Sintesis de siliciuros y boruros sin crisol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Z.; Sikirica, M. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1963-11-15

    The laboratory method for preparing pure silicides and borides, reducing the corresponding oxides of metals, has been developed. Synthesis of silicides was carried out in the floating zone of molten silicon. The floating zone was obtained by means of electron bombardment. Synthesis of borides is similar but reactions are generally of the solid-solid type. Initial heating of the reaction mixture was also obtained by means of the electron beam but further heating was produced by the ionized gaseous products of the reaction. (author) [French] On a mis au point une methode pour la preparation en laboratoire de siliciures et de borures purs, par reduction des oxydes des metaux correspondants. La synthese des siliciures a pu etre faite dans la ''zone flottante'' du silicium fondu. Cette zone flottante a ete obtenue par bombardement electronique. La synthese des borures est analogue, mais les reactions ont lieu generalement a Tetat solide. Le chauffage initial du melange reactionnel a egalement ete obtenu pai bombardement electronique, mais le chauffage ulterieur etait assure par les electrons diffuses des produits ionises gazeux de la reaction. (author) [Spanish] Los autores idearon un metodo de laboratorio para preparar siliciuros y boruros puros por reduccion de los respectivos oxidos metalicos. La sintesis de los siliciuros se llevo a cabo en la zona flotante del silicio fundido. Esa zona se obtuvo por bombardeo electronico. La sintesis de los boruros se llevo a cabo de manera similar, pero generalmente las reacciones son del tipo solido-solido. El calentamiento inicial de la mezcla se efectuo tambien mediante un haz electronico, pero el calentamiento ulterior es producido por la dispersion electronica en los productos de reaccion ionizados en estado gaseoso. (author) [Russian] Razrabotan laboratornyj metod prigotovleniya chistykh silitsidov i boridov putem vosstanovleniya sootvetstvennykh okislov metalla. Sintez, silitsidov provodili v plavayushchej zone

  14. Classification of radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This document first indicates the origins of radioactive wastes (mainly electronuclear industry), and the composition of spent fuel, and that only fission products and minor actinides are considered as radioactive wastes whereas uranium and plutonium can be used as new fuel after recycling. The classification of radioactive wastes is indicated in terms of radioactivity level and radionuclide half-life: high level (0.2 per cent of the total waste volume but 96 per cent of total waste radioactivity), medium level long life (3 per cent of volume, 4 per cent of radioactivity), low level long life (7 per cent of volume, 0.1 per cent of radioactivity), low and medium level and short life (63 per cent of volume and 0.02 per cent of radioactivity), very low level (27 per cent of volume and less than 0.01 per cent of radioactivity). An overview of radioactive waste processing and storage in France is presented for each category. Current and predicted volumes are indicated for each category. The main challenges are briefly addressed: spent fuel recycling, waste valorisation by fourth-generation reactors. Processing locations in France and in the World are indicated. Some key figures are provided: 2 kg of radioactive waste are produced per inhabitant and per year, and waste management costs represent 5 per cent of the total cost of produced electricity

  15. Management of radioactive waste from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanwar Raj

    2010-01-01

    Reprocessing and recycling of both fissile and fertile components back into appropriate reactor systems is an integral part of three stage nuclear energy programme of India. Different steps involved in processing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are decladding, dissolution and recovery of fissile and fertile materials. Reprocessing of SNF is a complex process involving handling of large quantity of radioactive materials and processing chemicals. There are three reprocessing plants in operation in the country at Trombay, Tarapur and Kalpakkam. Out of these plants, Trombay reprocessing plant is engaged in reprocessing of SNF from research reactors and other two plants are processing of SNF from PHWRs. A facility is being built for reprocessing of thorium based spent fuel at BARC, Trombay based on the experience of pilot plant scale. Like other industrial activities of nuclear fuel cycle, fuel reprocessing facilities too generate various types of radioactive waste streams. These are generated in all the three physical forms namely solid, liquid and gas. These waste streams are primarily categorized on the basis of concentration of radionuclides, their half lives and toxicity. Management of these wastes aims at (a) recovery and recycle of useful materials, (b) concentration and confinement of radioactivity in inert and stable matrices, (c) minimization of final waste volume for disposal, (d) decontamination of effluents following ALARA principle and (e) minimization of radioactive discharge to the environment. The present paper outlines the salient features of management of different types of radioactive waste generated in reprocessing plants handling SNF from research reactors and PHWR

  16. Natural and induced radioactivity in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    One of the first questions often asked about irradiated food is whether it is radioactive. Not many people understand that food and any natural substance contains natural radioactivity which can be measurable. It is therefore important to put the issue on natural radioactivity and possible induced radioactivity in food in perspective. While there is a clear consensus among the scientific community that no radioactivity is induced when food is irradiated by gamma rays from cobalt-60 or cesium-137, electron generated by a machine with energy less than 10 million electron volt (MeV) or X rays produced generated by a machine with energy less than 5 MeV. However, data to this effect were published many years ago and are not easy to find. As food irradiation is gaining wide acceptance in many countries, it was considered timely to compile data on natural and induced radioactivity in food into one document. We are grateful to A. Brynjolfsson, one of the few experts who have the knowledge on this subject as well as wide experience on food irradiation, who collected, compiled and evaluated all data on this subject into one report. This publication provides clear explanations not only why radioactivity cannot be induced in food irradiated by radiation sources mentioned above but to what extent the increase in dose or energy level of radiation sources would induce significantly radioactivity in food. The compilation of such data was prompted by a desire to increase the energy limit and the absorbed dose based on the need to irradiate thicker samples of food and to use sterilizing dose up to 60 kGy. This publication concluded that the increase in radiation background dose from consumption of food irradiated to an average dose up to 60 kGy with gamma rays from cobalt- 60 or cesium-137, with 10 MeV electrons or with 5 MeV X rays is insignificant. In addition, food irradiated with X ray with energy up to 7.5 MeV to a dose of 30 kGy has radioactivity well below natural

  17. Natural and induced radioactivity in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    One of the first questions often asked about irradiated food is whether it is radioactive. Not many people understand that food and any natural substance contains natural radioactivity which can be measurable. It is therefore important to put the issue on natural radioactivity and possible induced radioactivity in food in perspective. While there is a clear consensus among the scientific community that no radioactivity is induced when food is irradiated by gamma rays from cobalt-60 or cesium-137, electron generated by a machine with energy less than 10 million electron volt (MeV) or X rays produced generated by a machine with energy less than 5 MeV. However, data to this effect were published many years ago and are not easy to find. As food irradiation is gaining wide acceptance in many countries, it was considered timely to compile data on natural and induced radioactivity in food into one document. We are grateful to A. Brynjolfsson, one of the few experts who have the knowledge on this subject as well as wide experience on food irradiation, who collected, compiled and evaluated all data on this subject into one report. This publication provides clear explanations not only why radioactivity cannot be induced in food irradiated by radiation sources mentioned above but to what extent the increase in dose or energy level of radiation sources would induce significantly radioactivity in food. The compilation of such data was prompted by a desire to increase the energy limit and the absorbed dose based on the need to irradiate thicker samples of food and to use sterilizing dose up to 60 kGy. This publication concluded that the increase in radiation background dose from consumption of food irradiated to an average dose up to 60 kGy with gamma rays from cobalt- 60 or cesium-137, with 10 MeV electrons or with 5 MeV X rays is insignificant. In addition, food irradiated with X ray with energy up to 7.5 MeV to a dose of 30 kGy has radioactivity well below natural

  18. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  19. Radioactive waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  20. Radioactivity in cigaratte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Tanker, E.; Aksu, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Cigaratte is known to be hazardous to health due to nicotine and tar it contains.This is indicated on cigaratte packets by health warnings.However there is less known hazard of smoking due to intake of radioactive compounds by inhalation. This study dwells upon the radioactive hazard of smoking

  1. Transport of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This address overviews the following aspects: concepts on transport of radioactive materials, quantities used to limit the transport, packages, types of packages, labeling, index transport calculation, tags, labeling, vehicle's requirements and documents required to authorize transportation. These requirements are considered in the regulation of transport of radioactive material that is in drafting step

  2. Induced radioactivity at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A description of some of the problems and some of the advantages associated with the phenomenon of induced radioactivity at accelerator centres such as CERN. The author has worked in this field for several years and has recently written a book 'Induced Radioactivity' published by North-Holland.

  3. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  4. Radioactive waste management policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    The speaker discusses the development of government policy regarding radioactive waste disposal in Canada, indicates overall policy objectives, and surveys the actual situation with respect to radioactive wastes in Canada. He also looks at the public perceptions of the waste management situation and how they relate to the views of governmental decision makers

  5. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  6. K. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is a controversial and emotive subject. This report discusses radioactivity hazards which arise from each stage of the fuel cycle and then relates these hazards to the New Zealand situation. There are three appendices, two of which are detailed considerations of a paper by Dr. B.L.Cohen

  7. Radioactive krypton gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive krypton is separated from a gas mixture comprising nitrogen and traces of carbon dioxide and radioactive krypton by selective adsorption and then cryogenic distillation of the prepurified gas against nitrogen liquid to produce krypton bottoms concentrate liquid, using the nitrogen gas from the distillation for two step purging of the adsorbent. 16 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures

  8. Radiation Synthesis of Stannous Dibromodibutyl; Synthese radiochimique de l'etain dibromopibutyle; Radiatsionno-khimicheskij sintez dibromdibutilolova; Sintesis radioquimica del dffiromodibutilestano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramova, L. V.; Vereshchinskij, I. V.; Kocheshkov, K. A.; Miretskij, V. Yu.; Pozdneev, V. V.; Ryabukhin, Yu. S.; Sheverdina, N. I.

    1963-11-15

    'etain dibromodibutyle en grande quantite. Les auteurs montrent que le processus comporte une periode d'amorcage dont la duree depend du degre de purete du bromure de butyle initial. Ce facteur exerce en outre une influence sensible sur la vitesse, de formation du produit final. On a constate que l'etain qui n'est pas entre dans la reaction peut etre utilise de nouveau pour la production d'etain dibromodibutyle, mais que dans ce cas la periode d'amorcage est totalement inexistante. Les particularites mentionnees creent les conditions necessaires pour la realisation d'un processus continu. Les auteurs proposent un mecanisme reactionnel pour expliquer la regularite du processus dont le rendement radiochimique est eleve. (author) [Spanish] La posibilidad de efectuar la sintesis de compuestos organicos del estafio por irradiacion con los rayos gamma del {sup 60}Co de mezclas de estano y de los respectivos haluros alquilicos fue establecida por primera vez en 1958 por Abramova, Kocheshkovy Sheverdina. Las condiciones en que se realizaron los experimentos, en aparatos de vidrio, sin agitadores, no permitieron determinar las leyes cineticas de la formacion de ese tipo de compuestos organo-metalicos. El presente trabajo sirvio para aclarar la influencia de una serie de factores sobre la velocidad de la sintesis radioquimica de los compuestos organicos del estafio tomando como ejemplo el dibromodibutilestaflo. Con ese objeto, se construyo un aparato especial que facilita la carga periodica de los reactivos y la descarga de los productos de reaccion. Dicho aparato permite estabilizar la temperatura, agitar eficazmente los reactivos y extraer periodicamente muestras para analisis. El elemento esencial es el recipiente de reaccion, de acero inoxidable, de 2-1 de capacidad, provisto de un agitador. El aparato se coloca sobre una fuente gamma de {sup 60}Co. Los experimentos se efectuaron a temperaturas de 80 {+-}5{sup o}C y a presion atmosferica. La intensidad de dosis medida con ayuda de un

  9. Objectives for radioactive waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    The report falls under the headings: introduction; the nature of radioactive wastes; how to manage radioactive wastes; packaging of radioactive wastes (supervised storage; disposal); waste form evaluation and test requirements (supervised storage; disposal); conclusions. (U.K.)

  10. Radioactive Iodine Treatment for Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism Fact Sheet Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism April, 2012 Download PDFs English Zulu ... prepare for RAI or surgery. How does radioactive iodine treatment work? Iodine is important for making thyroid ...

  11. Summary report on the 1985 United Kingdom radioactive waste inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, A.M.; Wear, F.J.; Haselden, H.; Shepherd, J.; Tymons, B.J.

    1986-04-01

    Stocks of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom which have arisen, or are projected to arise, from commercial nuclear power reactors and fuel cycle facilities, research, medical and industrial uses of radioactive nuclides are given in the form of summary tables. Projected future arisings from operation and decommissioning of facilities and notional nuclear power generation programmes to 2030 are also given. (author)

  12. The management of radioactive wastes from small producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Medicine, research and industry generate various type of radioactive wastes which have to be managed by the ANDRA, the French agency for the management of radioactive wastes. This educative booklet explains the missions of the ANDRA with respect to these small producers: collection, selection, conditioning, control and storage of wastes. (J.S.)

  13. Radioactive waste management at EDF plants: General overview and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debes, M.; Bordier, M.

    2001-01-01

    During the last fifteen years a significant decrease in solid radioactive waste generated by nuclear power plants of Electricite de France (EDF) has taken place. Technology used by EDF is described, with emphasis on innovative technologies. Experience and lessons learned are described showing how EDF has responded to meet increasingly stringent regulations for radioactive waste management. (author)

  14. Transport and extraction of radioactive ions stopped in superfluid helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, WX; Dendooven, P; Gloos, K; Takahashi, N; Arutyunov, K; Pekola, JP; Aysto, J

    A new approach to convert a high energy beam to a low energy one, which is essential for the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities, has been proposed and tested at Jyvaskyla, Finland. An open Ra-223 alpha-decay-recoil source has been used to produce radioactive ions in superfluid helium.

  15. Method of concentrating radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes generated from nuclear power facilities are caused to flow into a vessel incorporated with first hydrophobic porous membranes. Then, the radioactive liquid wastes are passed through the first hydrophobic porous membranes under an elevated or reduced pressure to remove fine particles contained in the liquid wastes. The radioactive liquid wastes passed through the first membranes are stored in a temporary store a vessel and steams generated under heating are passed through the second hydrophobic porous membranes and then cooled and concentrated as condensates. In this case, the first and the second hydrophobic porous membranes have a property of passing steams but not water and, for example, are made of tetrafluoroethylen resin type thin membranes. Accordingly, since the fine particles can be removed by the first hydrophobic porous membranes, lowering of the concentration rate due to the deposition of solid contents to the membranes upon concentration can be prevented. (I.S.)

  16. Radioactive Solid Waste Management Site (RSMS), Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear operations generate a variety of primary solid waste comprising of tissue materials, glassware, plastics, protective rubber-wears, used components like filters, piping, structural items, unserviceable equipment, etc. This type of solid waste is generally associated with low and intermediate level of beta and gamma radiation and, in some cases, by low levels of alpha contamination. Radioactive Solid Waste Management Site (RSMS), Trombay is operational with an objective of safe and efficient management of low and intermediate level solid waste generated from various nuclear fuel cycle facilities of BARC, Trombay. The RSMS also manages the spent radioactive sources, utilised in healthcare, industries and research institutes, after completion of their useful life. The radioactive solid waste is first segregated, treated for volume reduction and disposed in engineered disposal module to prevent the migration of radionuclides and isolate them from human environment

  17. Radioactivity and wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, V.H.; Horrill, A.D.; Livens, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    The official assumption is that if levels of radioactivity are safe for humans, they are safe for wildlife too. NCC sponsored a research project by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology to find out what was known in this field. It appears that the assumption is justified to a certain extent in that mammals are identified as the organisms most vulnerable to the damaging effects of radioactivity. Other general principles are put forward: where there are radioactive discharges to the marine environment, coastal muds and saltmarshes can be particularly contaminated; upland habitats, with low nutrient status and subject to high rainfall, are likely to accumulate radioactivity from atmospheric discharges (e.g. Chernobyl, the wildlife effects of which are reported here). The document concludes that no deleterious effects of radioactivity on wild plants and animals have been detected in the UK, but acknowledges that there are still many gaps in our knowledge of the behaviour of radioisotopes in the natural environment. (UK)

  18. Radioactive wastes. Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many documents (journal articles, book chapters, non-conventional documents..) deal with radioactive wastes but very often this topic is covered in a partial way and sometimes the data presented are contradictory. The aim of this article is to precise the definition of radioactive wastes and the proper terms to describe this topic. It describes the main guidelines of the management of radioactive wastes, in particular in France, and presents the problems raised by this activity: 1 - goal and stakes of the management; 2 - definition of a radioactive waste; 3 - radionuclides encountered; 4 - radio-toxicity and radiation risks; 5 - French actors of waste production and management; 6 - French classification and management principles; 7 - wastes origin and characteristics; 8 - status of radioactive wastes in France per categories; 9 - management practices; 10 - packages conditioning and fabrication; 11 - storage of wastes; 12 - the French law from December 30, 1991 and the opportunities of new ways of management; 13 - international situation. (J.S.)

  19. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  20. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matagi, Yoshihiko; Takahara, Akira; Ootsuka, Katsuyuki.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid the reduction in the atmospheric insulation by preventing the generation of CO 2 , H 2 O, etc. upon irradiation of microwave heat. Method: Radioactive wastes are charged into a hopper, supplied on a conveyor, fed each by a predetermined amount to a microwave furnace and heated by microwaves applied from a microwave guide. Simultaneously, inert gases are supplied from a supply line. The Radioactive wastes to be treated are shielded by the inert gases to prevent the combustion of decomposed gases produced from the wastes upon irradiation of microwave heat to thereby prevent the generation of CO 2 , H 2 , etc., as well as the generated decomposed gases are diluted with the inert gases to decrease the dissociation of the decomposed gases to prevent the reduction in the atmospheric insulation. Since the spent inert gases can be recovered for reuse, the amount of gaseous wastes released to the atmosphere can be decreased and the working life of the high performance air filters can be extended. (Sekiya, K.)

  1. Method of storing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Toshio; Hiratake, Susumu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the radiation doses externally irradiated from treated radioactive waste and also reduce the separation of radioactive nuclide due to external environmental factors such as air, water or the like. Method: Radioactive waste adhered with radioactive nuclide to solid material is molten to mix and submerge the radioactive nuclide adhered to the surface of the solid material into molten material. Then, the radioactive nuclide thus mixed is solidified to store the waste in solidified state. (Aizawa, K.)

  2. Software for radioactive wastes database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Eros Viggiano de; Reis, Luiz Carlos Alves

    1996-01-01

    A radioactive waste database was implemented at CDTN in 1991. The objectives are to register and retrieve information about wastes ge in 1991. The objectives are to register and retrieve information about wastes generated and received at the Centre in order to improve the waste management. Since 1995, the database has being reviewed and a software has being developed aiming at processing information in graphical environment (Windows 95 and Windows NT), minimising the possibility of errors and making the users access more friendly. It was also envisaged to ease graphics and reports edition and to make this database available to other CNEN institutes and even to external organizations. (author)

  3. Nuclear astrophysics with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.; Gade, A.

    2010-01-01

    The quest to comprehend how nuclear processes influence astrophysical phenomena is driving experimental and theoretical research programs worldwide. One of the main goals in nuclear astrophysics is to understand how energy is generated in stars, how elements are synthesized in stellar events and what the nature of neutron stars is. New experimental capabilities, the availability of radioactive beams and increased computational power paired with new astronomical observations have advanced the present knowledge. This review summarizes the progress in the field of nuclear astrophysics with a focus on the role of indirect methods and reactions involving beams of rare isotopes.

  4. CEGB's radioactive waste management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passant, F.H.; Maul, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) produces low-level and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the process of operating its eight Magnox and five Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) nuclear power stations. Future wastes will also arise from a programme of Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs) and the decommissioning of existing reactors. The paper gives details of how the UK waste management strategy is put into practice by the CEGB, and how general waste management principles are developed into strategies for particular waste streams. (author)

  5. Summary of industrial impacts from recycled radioactive scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmel, J.-C.; Harrop, J.; MacKinney, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    During operation, decontamination, and dismantlement, nuclear facilities are generating significant quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM). Future decommissioning will generate even more RSM. The petroleum industry also generates RSM in the form of equipment contaminated with naturally occurring radioactivity. Finally, the accidental melting of radioactive sources in steel mills has generated smaller amounts of contaminated metals. Steel mills, smelters, and foundries could recycle these materials, which might then appear in finished products or as feedstocks used by other industries. If introduced in this manner, residual radioactivity can adversely affect the performance of certain products. Such products include computers and other devices that rely on integrated circuits. The most important effect of residual radioactivity on integrated circuits is a phenomenon known as 'single event upsets or soft errors.' Radioactivity can also adversely affect the performance of products such as photographic film and components designed to measure the presence of radioactivity. Radioactivity that raises background count-rates to higher levels could affect the performance of radiation monitoring systems and analytical equipment. Higher background count-rates would lead to reduced sensitivity and lower resolution in spectroscopic systems. The computer, photographic, and radiation measurement industries have taken steps to minimize the impact of residual radioactivity on their products. These steps include monitoring manufacturing processes, specifying material acceptance standards, and screening suppliers. As RSM is recycled, these steps may become more important and more costly. This paper characterizes potentially impacted industries and vulnerability and effects due to the presence of residual radioactivity. Finally, the paper describes practices used to limit the impact of residual radioactivity. (J.P.N.)

  6. Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Adopted: February 2010 Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials Everything we encounter in our daily lives contains some radioactive material, ...

  7. Step-By-Step: Life Cycle Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive waste is an unavoidable by-product when nuclear technologies are used for electricity production and for beneficial practices in medicine, agriculture, research and industry. When the radioactivity of the waste is above a certain threshold, the waste requires special disposal methods. Through extensive research, standards and approaches have been developed for safely and securely preparing for and managing radioactive waste disposal. In the course of its journey from the point of generation to disposal, radioactive waste undergoes a number of predisposal management treatment steps to transform it into a safe, stable and manageable form suitable for transport, storage and disposal

  8. IEN Low-level-radioactive waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.C.S. da; Pina, J.L.S.; Silva, S. da; Silva, J.J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The control, treatment and disposal of the low-level radioactive waste produced in the units of IEN-CNEN, in Brazil are presented, in details. These wastes are generated from a particle accelerator (CV-28 cyclotron), radiochemistry laboratories and a nuclear research reactor (Argonaut type). (Author) [pt

  9. Operation of the radioactive waste treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kil Jeong; Ahn, Seom Jin; Lee, Kang Moo; Lee, Young Hee; Sohn, Jong Sik; Bae, Sang Min; Kang, Kwon Ho; Lim, Kil Sung; Sohn, Young Joon; Kim, Tae Kook; Jeong, Kyung Hwan; Wi, Geum San; Park, Seung Chul; Park, Young Woong; Yoon, Bong Keun.

    1996-12-01

    The radioactive wasted generated at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in 1996 are about 118m 3 of liquid waste and 204 drums of solid waste. Liquid waste were treated by the evaporation process, the bituminization process, and the solar evaporation process. In 1996, 100.5m 3 of liquid waste was treated. (author). 84 tabs., 103 figs

  10. Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J M [Australian Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment, Lucas Heights

    1982-03-01

    The aims and options for the management and disposal of highly radioactive wastes contained in spent fuel from the generation of nuclear power are outlined. The status of developments in reprocessing, waste solidification and geologic burial in major countries is reviewed. Some generic assessments of the potential radiological impacts from geologic repositories are discussed, and a perspective is suggested on risks from radiation.

  11. Management of radioactive waste in FR Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.

    1998-01-01

    In the last forty years, in FR Yugoslavia, as a result of the two research reactors operation and as a result of the radionuclides application in the medicine, industry and agriculture, radioactive waste materials of different levels of specific activity was generated. As a temporary solution, these radioactive waste materials are stored in the two interim storage facilities. Since the one of the storages is completely filled with the radioactive waste materials that are packed in the metal drums and plastic barrels, and the second one has a effective space for radioactive waste materials storing for the approximately next few years, attempts are made in the 'Vinca' institute of nuclear sciences in developing the immobilization process for the low and intermediate level radioactive waste materials and their safe disposal into the appropriate disposal system, that was adopted for such materials. Research work on optimization of the chosen techniques in treatment, conditioning, immobilization and storing the radioactive waste materials is in progress. Investigations are carrying out on materials that are adopted as components of the engineer trench system, in aim to improve their physical-chemical properties, mainly retention the radionuclides release from the disposal facility to environment, as well as their mechanical characteristics. Parallel with the optimization of the composition of the materials that will create the engineer trench system, optimization of the processes and matrix-radioactive waste mixture forms is in progress, and we hope that this work will influence the design of the future Yugoslav storage center, shallow land burial type, for low and intermediate level radioactive waste materials

  12. Actions of a protocol for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Joyce Caroline de Oliveira; Andrade, Idalmar Gomes da Silva; Frazão, Denys Wanderson Pereira; Abreu, Lukas Maxwell Oliveira de; França, Clyslane Alves; Macedo, Paulo de Tarso Silva de

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are all those materials generated in the various uses of radioactive materials, which can not be reused and which have radioactive substances in quantities that can not be treated as ordinary waste. All management of these wastes must be carried out carefully, including actions ranging from its collection to the point where they are generated to their final destination. However, any and all procedures must be carried out in order to comply with the requirements for the protection of workers, individuals, the public and the environment. The final product of the study was a descriptive tutorial on the procedures and actions of a standard radioactive waste management protocol developed from scientific publications on radiation protection. The management of radioactive waste is one of the essential procedures in the radiological protection of man and the environment where the manipulation of radioactive materials occurs. The standard radioactive management protocol includes: collection, segregation of various types of wastes, transport, characterization, treatment, storage and final disposal. The radioactive wastes typology interferes with sequencing and the way in which actions are developed. The standardization of mechanisms in the management of radioactive waste contributes to the radiological safety of all those involved

  13. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the last decade to ensure the safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of comprehensive State and Federal regulations governing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, and the enactment of Federal laws making States responsible for the disposal of such waste generated within their borders

  14. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomek, D.

    1980-01-01

    The prospects of nuclear power development in the USA up to 2000 and the problems of the fuel cycle high-level radioactive waste processing and storage are considered. The problems of liquid and solidified radioactive waste transportation and their disposal in salt deposits and other geologic formations are discussed. It is pointed out that the main part of the high-level radioactive wastes are produced at spent fuel reprocessing plants in the form of complex aqueous mixtures. These mixtures contain the decay products of about 35 isotopes which are the nuclear fuel fission products, about 18 actinides and their daughter products as well as corrosion products of fuel cans and structural materials and chemical reagents added in the process of fuel reprocessing. The high-level radioactive waste management includes the liquid waste cooling which is necessary for the short and middle living isotope decay, separation of some most dangerous components from the waste mixture, waste solidification, their storage and disposal. The conclusion is drawn that the seccessful solution of the high-level radioactive waste management problem will permit to solve the problem of the fuel cycle radioactive waste management as a whole. The salt deposits, shales and clays are the most suitable for radioactive waste disposal [ru

  15. Atmospheric natural radioactivity outdoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1985-01-01

    Following a short account of natural atmospheric radioactivity, radon concentrations are given as well as their variations with time obtained by means of a original apparatus developped in Brest. The radioactive equilibrium of radon and its daughters is then considered, many experiments demonstrating that equilibrium is seldom reached even for 218 Po (RaA). Finally, some characteristics of natural radioactive aerosols are studied: charge, particle size distribution (demonstrating they are fine aerosols since only 30 per cent are made of particles with radii exceeding 0,1 μm) [fr

  16. Predisposal Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of the importance of the safe management of radioactive waste means that, over the years, many well-established and effective techniques have been developed, and the nuclear industry and governments have gained considerable experience in this field. Minimization of waste is a fundamental principle underpinning the design and operation of all nuclear operations, together with waste reuse and recycling. For the remaining radioactive waste that will be produced, it is essential that there is a well defined plan (called a waste treatment path) to ensure the safe management and ultimately the safe disposal of radioactive waste so as to guarantee the sustainable long term deployment of nuclear technologies

  17. Radioactive waste (disposal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, P.

    1985-01-01

    The disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes was discussed. The following aspects were covered: public consultation on the principles for assessing disposal facilities; procedures for dealing with the possible sites which the Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive (NIREX) had originally identified; geological investigations to be carried out by NIREX to search for alternative sites; announcement that proposal for a site at Billingham is not to proceed further; NIREX membership; storage of radioactive wastes; public inquiries; social and environmental aspects; safety aspects; interest groups; public relations; government policies. (U.K.)

  18. Radioactivity; La radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  19. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, P.

    1978-01-01

    This article gives an outline of the present situation, from a Belgian standpoint, in the field of the radioactive wastes processing. It estimates the annual quantity of various radioactive waste produced per 1000 MW(e) PWR installed from the ore mining till reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The methods of treatment concentration, fixation, final storable forms for liquid and solid waste of low activity and for high level activity waste. The storage of radioactive waste and the plutonium-bearing waste treatement are also considered. The estimated quantity of wastes produced for 5450 MW(e) in Belgium and their destination are presented. (A.F.)

  20. Radioactive waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, J.-C.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of confining the radioactive wastes produced from the nuclear industry, after the ore concentration stage, is envisaged. These residues being not released into the environment are to be stored. The management policy consists in classifying them in view of adapting to each type of treatment, the suitable conditioning and storage. This classification is made with taking account of the following data: radioactivity (weak, medium or high) nature and lifetime of this radioactivity (transuranians) physical nature and volume. The principles retained are those of volume reduction and shaping into insoluble solids (vitrification) [fr

  1. Radioactivity of fish II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obo, F; Wakamatsu, C; Hiwatashi, Y; Tamari, T; Yoshitake, N; Tajima, D

    1955-01-01

    Various tissues of fish captured east of Formosa after the Bikini H-Bomb experiment had radioactivities (detected on May 27, 1954) in counts/min/ash from 5 g. fresh tissues: blood 2414, eyeball 49, heart muscle 111, white muscle 11, red muscle (chiai) 123, bone 46, skin 28, pancreas 131, liver 522, stomach muscle 106, stomach contents 52, spermatozoa 47, and spleen 504. High radioactivities in blood and blood synthesizing organs (liver and spleen) were emphasized. The radioactivity in the blood had a half-life of 34 to 35 days and the maximum energy of ..beta..-ray of approximate 0.4 m.e.v.

  2. Radioactive facilities classification criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briso C, H.A.; Riesle W, J.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate classification of radioactive facilities into groups of comparable risk constitutes one of the problems faced by most Regulatory Bodies. Regarding the radiological risk, the main facts to be considered are the radioactive inventory and the processes to which these radionuclides are subjected. Normally, operations are ruled by strict safety procedures. Thus, the total activity of the radionuclides existing in a given facility is the varying feature that defines its risk. In order to rely on a quantitative criterion and, considering that the Annual Limits of Intake are widely accepted references, an index based on these limits, to support decisions related to radioactive facilities, is proposed. (author)

  3. Radioactive waste management perspectives in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Wahida Ahmad Khairuddin; Nik Marzukee Nik Ibrahim; Mat Bakar Mahusin; Mohamad Hakiman Mohamad Yusoff; Muhammad Zahid Azrmi

    2009-01-01

    Waste Technology Development Centre (WasTeC) has been mandated to carry out radioactive waste management activities since 1984. The main objective of WasTeC is to deal with radioactive waste in a manner that protects health and the environment now and in the future, without imposing undue burdens on the future generations. This centre provides services for waste generators within Nuclear Malaysia and also for external waste generators. Services provided include transportation of radioactive waste, decontamination, treatment and storage. This paper will discuss on procedure for applying for services, responsibility of waste generator, responsibility of waste operator, need to comply with waste acceptance criteria and regulations related to management of radioactive waste. (Author)

  4. The state of the art on the radioactive metal waste recycling technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Jin; Moon, Jei Kwon; Jung, Chong Hun; Park, Sang Yoon

    1997-09-01

    As the best strategy to manage the radioactive metal wastes which are generated during operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the following recycling technologies are investigated. 1. decontamination technologies for radioactive metal waste recycling 2. decontamination waste treatment technologies. 3. residual radioactivity evaluation technologies. (author). 260 refs., 26 tabs., 31 figs

  5. Radioactive waste management at nuclear power plant Cernavoda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raducea, D.

    2002-01-01

    Many human activities generate waste, but people are worried about wastes produced in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Their concern is an unjustified fear toward the hazards from radioactive waste, probably because in any country generating electric power by NPPs a lot of attention is paid to relevant parties involved in radioactive waste management. Significant attention is also given to the management of radioactive waste at the Cemavoda NPP. The general approach required for the collection, handling, conditioning and storage of radioactive wastes, while maintaining acceptable levels of safety for workers, members of the public and the environment, is conceptually established. The overall programme provides the necessary facilities to adequately manage solid radioactive waste from Cemavoda NPP Unit 1 and will be capable of expansion when other units are brought into service. (author)

  6. Implementation of a management applied program for solid radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. H.; Kim, T. K.; Kang, I. S.; Cho, H. S.; Son, J. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Solid radioactive wastes are generated from the Post-irradiated Fuel Examination Facility, the Irradiated Material Examination Facility, the Research Reactor, and the laboratories at KAERI. A data collection of a solid radioactive waste treatment process of a research organization became necessary while developing the RAWMIS(Radioactive Waste Management Integration System) which it can generate personal history management for efficient management of a waste, documents, all kinds of statistics. This paper introduces an input and output application program design to do to database with data in the results and a stream process of a treatment that analyzed the waste occurrence present situation and data by treatment process. Data on the actual treatment process that is not limited experiment improve by a document, human traces, saving of material resources and improve with efficiency of tracking about a radioactive waste and a process and give help to radioactive waste material balance and inventory study.

  7. Developments in radioactive scrap monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellian, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past ten years there have been major developments in radiation monitoring systems used for detecting shielded radioactive sources in scrap metal. The extent of the problem and industry's awareness of the problem have both grown significantly during that time. The multimillion dollar expenses associated with decontamination after a source passes into the melt and the potential health hazard to employees and the public have added further impetus to the development of monitoring systems. Early attempts at scrap monitoring could detect some radiation, but testing with real life situations showed them to be virtually incapable of detecting shielded sources of radioactivity in incoming vehicles. More sophisticated detector technology and the development of advanced software made useful by more powerful microprocessors led to successive generations of monitoring systems with order-of-magnitude improvement in detection capability. The next generation includes larger detectors and more complex algorithms offering further improvement in truck and rail car monitoring. Complete solutions require monitoring at additional locations within the site, such as the charge bucket and conveyor lines, and at the scrap processor's site

  8. Can the same principles be used for the management of radioactive and non-radioactive waste?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, Gunnar.

    1989-01-01

    Non-radioactive waste has a much more complex composition than radioactive waste and appears in much larger quantities. The two types of waste have, however, some properties in common when it comes to their longterm impact on health and the environment. The occurrence in both of substances that may exist for generations and may cause cancer provides one example. Both types of waste also always occur together. It is therefore proposed that the same basic principles could be applied for the management of radioactive and non-radioactive waste. By doing so one may increase the efficiency of policy development, research and practical management. This is particurlarly importand for the very costly restoration of old disposal sites which have earlier been poorly managed. (author)

  9. Radioactivity in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornaro, Laura

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this practical work is to familiarize the student with radioactivity measures in environmental samples. For that were chosen samples a salt of natural potassium, a salt of uranium or torio and a sample of drinkable water

  10. Radioactivity content of books

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalit, B.Y.; Shukla, V.K.; Ramachandran, T.V.

    1981-01-01

    The natural and fallout radioactivity was measured in a large number of books produced in various countries after 1955. Results of these measurements showed that the books contained radioactivity due to fallout 137 Cs and 226 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K radioisotopes of primordial origin. Books printed in the U.S.A. had low radioactivity of 40K and 226 Ra origin compared to books printed in the European subcontinent. Books printed during high fallout rate (1962-64) or thereafter did not exhibit any significantly higher 137 Cs levels. The maximum radiation dose to the eyes calculated for the radioactivity content of the books was 0.8 μR/hr and the minimum was 0.07 μR/hr; most of the books were in the range 0.3-0.5 μR/hr. (U.K.)

  11. Law of radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Legal device done in order to standardize and promote the exploration and explotation of radioactive minerals by peruvian and foreign investors. This device include the whole process, since the prospection until the development, after previous auction given by IPEN

  12. Radioactive contamination of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytil, I.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model is discussed describing radioactivity transport between the source and the organism. The model is to be applied in assessing the effect of a nuclear installation on the organism. Fortran and Pascal appear to be the most appropriate computer languages. With respect to internal memory requirements, the program file is estimated to consist of a control program and a number of subprograms. Upon setting the radioactivity transport and the output requirements the control program should recall the necessary subprograms. The program file should allow the complete data file and the solutions of all possible radioactivity transport variants to be inputted. It is envisaged that several subprograms will be available for one type of radioactivity transport, this depending on different accuracy of the transport description. Thus, the requirements for input data will also differ. (Z.M.)

  13. Radioactive labelling of insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thygesen, Th.

    Experiments are described with the internal contamination of insects with phosphorus 32 introduced previously in plants of the brassica type using three different techniques. The intake of radioactivity from the plants to the insects is shown. (L.O.)

  14. Miniature radioactive light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffarella, T.E.; Radda, G.J.; Dooley, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    A miniature radioactive light source for illuminating digital watches is described consisting of a glass tube with improved laser sealing and strength containing tritium gas and a transducer responsive to the gas. (U.K.)

  15. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  16. Radioactive pollution, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants into surface waters as well as the atmosphere is discussed. Man-rem data are compared and expected quantities for disposal by power plants in the Netherlands are tabulated

  17. Radioactive Material Containment Bags

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The audit was requested by Senator Joseph I. Lieberman based on allegations made by a contractor, Defense Apparel Services, about the Navy's actions on three contracts for radioactive material containment bags...

  18. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes)

  19. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    According to the Section 24 of the Finnish Radiation Decree (1512/91), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety shall specify the concentration and activity limits and principles for the determination whether a waste can be defined as a radioactive waste or not. The radiation safety requirements and limits for the disposal of radioactive waste are given in the guide. They must be observed when discharging radioactive waste into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste disposal plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilization of nuclear energy of natural resources. (4 refs., 1 tab.)

  20. Internal radioactive contamination treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobajas, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    In a radiological emergency, the internal radioactive contamination becomes a therapeutic urgency and must be established as fast as possible. Just when a radioactive contamination accident occurs, it is difficult to know exactly the amount of radioactive materials absorbed and to estimate the dose received.. The decision to be taken after the incorporation of the radioactive material depends on the method and on the Radiological Protection Department collaboration. Any treatment achieving a reduction of the doses received or expected will be useful. The International Radiological Protection Commission doesn't recommend the use of the dose limit, to decide about the intervention necessity. However the LIA can be used as the reference point to establish the necessity and reach of the treatment. The object of the present work, is to introduce the general principles to carry out the internal people decontamination, under the last international recommendations. (Author) 4 refs

  1. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  2. Radioactivity of tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashawati, A.; Al-Dalal, Z.; Al-Akel, B.; Al-Masri, M. S.

    2002-04-01

    This report shows the results of studies related to radioactivity in tobacco and its pathways to human being. Tobacco contains high concentrations of natural radioactive materials especially polonium 210 and lead 210, which may reach a value of 27 mBq/g. The amount of polonium 210 in tobacco is related to the concentration of radon (the main source of polonium 210 in the agricultural areas) in addition to the over use of phosphate fertilizers for tobacco plantation. Radioactive materials present in tobacco enter the human body through smoking where 210 Po concentrates in the Alveolar lung; this may cause health risks including lung cancer. In addition, radiation doses due to smoking have been reported and some results of the studies carried out for radioactivity in tobacco at the Syrian Atomic Energy Commission. (author)

  3. Radioactive pollution in rainfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemtland, R.

    1985-01-01

    Routine measurements of radioactivity in rainfall are carried out at the National Institute for Radiation Hygiene, Norway. The report discusses why the method of ion exchange was selected and gives details on how the measurements are performed

  4. Radioactive gas solidification apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Eiji; Yabu, Tomohiko; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Handling of a solidification container from the completion for the solidifying processing to the storage of radioactive gases by a remote control equipment such as a manipulator requires a great cost and is difficult to realize. In a radioactive gas solidification device for injection and solidification in accumulated layers of sputtered metals by glow discharge, radiation shieldings are disposed surrounding the entire container, and cooling water is supplied to a cooling vessel formed between the container and the shielding materials. The shielding materials are divided into upper and lower shielding materials, so that solidification container can be taken out from the shielding materials. As a result, the solidification container after the solidification of radioactive gases can be handled with ease. Further, after-heat can be removed effectively from the ion injection electrode upon solidifying treatment upon storage, to attain a radioactive gas solidifying processing apparatus which is safe, economical and highly reliable. (N.H.)

  5. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Abdul Malik Syed Zain

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the basic subjects covered in the radioactive waste management. The subjects are policy and legislation, pre-treatment, classification, segregation, treatment, conditioning, storage, siting and disposal, and quality assurance

  6. Radioactivity of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terpakova, E.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the gamma-spectrometric determination of natural radioactivity in the different building materials and wares applied in Slovakia was performed. The specific activities for potassium-40, thorium, radium as well as the equivalent specific activities are presented

  7. Radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.C.

    1998-04-01

    A deep gap, reflecting a persisting fear, separates the viewpoints of the experts and that of the public on the issue of the disposal of nuclear WASTES. The history of this field is that of the proliferation with time of spokesmen who pretend to speak in the name of the both humans and non humans involved. Three periods can be distinguished: 1940-1970, an era of contestation and confusion when the experts alone represents the interest of all; 1970-1990, an era of contestation and confusion when spokespersons multiply themselves, generating the controversy and the slowing down of most technological projects; 1990-, an era of negotiation, when viewpoints, both technical and non technical, tend to get closer and, let us be optimistic, leading to the overcome of the crisis. We show that, despite major differences, the options and concepts developed by the different actors are base on two categories of resources, namely Nature and Society, and that the consensus is built up through their 'hydridation'. we show in this part that the perception of nuclear power and, in particular of the underground disposal of nuclear wastes, involves a very deep psychological substrate. Trying to change mentalities in the domain by purely scientific and technical arguments is thus in vain. The practically instinctive fear of radioactivity, far from being due only to lack of information (and education), as often postulated by scientists and engineers, is rooted in archetypical structures. These were, without doubt, reactivated in the 40 s by the traumatizing experience of the atomic bomb. In addition, anthropological-linked considerations allow us to conclude that he underground disposal of wastes is seen as a 'rape' and soiling of Mother Earth. This contributes to explaining, beyond any rationality, the refusal of this technical option by some persons. However, it would naturally be simplistic and counter-productive to limit all controversy in this domain to these psychological aspects

  8. Categorizing operational radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    The primary objective of this publication is to improve communications among waste management professionals and Member States relative to the properties and status of radioactive waste. This is accomplished by providing a standardized approach to operational waste categorization using accepted industry practices and experience. It is a secondary objective to draw a distinction between operational waste categorization and waste disposal classification. The approach set forth herein is applicable to waste generation by mature (major, advanced) nuclear programmes, small-to-medium sized nuclear programmes, and programmes with waste from other nuclear applications. It can be used for planning, developing or revising categorization methodologies. For existing categorization programmes, the approach set forth in this publication may be used as a validation and evaluation tool for assessing communication effectiveness among affected organizations or nations. This publication is intended for use by waste management professionals responsible for creating, implementing or communicating effective categorization, processing and disposal strategies. For the users of this publication, it is important to remember that waste categorization is a communication tool. As such, the operational waste categories are not suitable for regulatory purposes nor for use in health and safety evaluations. Following Section 1 (Introduction) Section 2 of this publication defines categorization and its relationship to existing waste classification and management standards, regulations and practices. It also describes the benefits of a comprehensive categorization programme and fundamental record considerations. Section 3 provides an overview of the categorization process, including primary categories and sub-categories. Sections 4 and 5 outline the specific methodology for categorizing unconditioned and conditioned wastes. Finally, Section 6 provides a brief summary of critical considerations that

  9. Who pays for radioactive rubbish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbotts, J.

    1984-01-01

    A generic defect in federal nuclear power regulation has been the failure to establish institutional arrangements to fund the fuel cycle's economic externalities caused by the generation of radioactive byproducts that must be managed, stored, and guarded. Case histories involving uranium mill tailings, decommissioning, and low-level waste illustrate the economic problems. Long-term costs from the nuclear fuel cycle will be large and inflationary. A fair versus a lassez-faire economic system would have followed a different route. Consumers must either see that regulatory bodies require escrow funds to meet these costs before the industry goes under, or the funding can be left to chance and future generations. 26 references

  10. Thermoelectric generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    The main components of a thermoelectric generator are housed in an evacuated cylindrical vessel. In the middle of it there is the radioactive heat source, e.g. 90 Sr or 238 Pu, enclosed by a gamma radiation shield. This one is surrounded by a heat-insulating screen from getter material or indicidual sheets of titanium. In the bottom of the screen there are arranged several thermocouples on a circle. The thermocouples themselves are contained within casings sealed gas-tight and filled with an inert gas, e.g. argon. By separating the internal space of the generator vessel from the thermocouple casings, made of e.g. n- respectively p-doped lead telluride cylinders, for both the optimal gas state may be obtained. (DG) [de

  11. Radiological assessment of the radioactive wastes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech Nieves, Haydee; Hernandez Saiz, Alejandro

    1996-01-01

    In the work are obtained the dose values resulting from the evaluation of the conditioning operations of wastes in the scenarios of exposure that are mentioned and are compared with the dose restriction suggested for the moment for such tasks. The radioactive wastes that are evaluated in the work are: liquids -both those from the generating institutions and the ones stored in the Managua- located deposit, Radon-226 not-in-use solids and sources 226: the results demonstrate that it is possible to treat in a year the total volume of the liquid and solid radioactive wastes as well as a large number of sources of Radon-226

  12. Hanford's Radioactive Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Radioactive Mixed Waste Disposal Facility, is located in the Hanford Site Low-Level Burial Grounds and is designated as Trench 31 in the 218-W-5 Burial Ground. Trench 31 is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act compliant landfill and will receive wastes generated from both remediation and waste management activities. On December 30, 1994, Westinghouse Hanford Company declared readiness to operate Trench 31, which is the Hanford Site's (and the Department of Energy complex's) first facility for disposal of low-level radioactive mixed wastes

  13. Radioactive metals disposal and recycling impact modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, N.W.; Lunn, R.J.; Belton, V.; Kockar, I.

    2014-01-01

    Screening life cycle assessment models developed to investigate hypothetical disposal and recycling options for the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor heat exchangers were used to generate more complex models addressing the main UK radioactive metals inventory. Both studies show there are significant environmental advantages in the metals recycling promoted by the current low level waste disposal policies, strategies and plans. Financial benefits from current metals treatment options are supported and offer even greater benefits when applied to the UK radioactive metals inventory as a whole. (authors)

  14. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this Norm is to establish, relating to the TRANSPORT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS, safety and radiological protection requirements to ensure an adequate control level of the eventual exposure of persons, properties and environment to the ionizing radiation comprising: specifications on radioactive materials for transport; package type selection; specification of the package design and acceptance test requirements; arrangements relating to the transport itself; administrative requirements and responsibilities. (author)

  15. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book highlights the main issues of public concern related to radioactive waste management and puts them into perspective. It provides an overview of radioactive waste management covering, among other themes, policies, implementation and public communication based on national experiences. Its purpose is to assists in increasing the understanding of radioactive waste management issues by public and national authorities, organizations involved in radioactive waste management and the nuclear industry; it may also serve as a source book for those who communicate with the public. Even in the unlikely event that nuclear power does not further develop around the world, the necessity for dealing with nuclear waste from past usages, from uranium mining and milling, decontamination and decommissioning of existing nuclear facilities and from the uses of radioactive materials in medicine, industry and research would still exist. In many countries, radioactive waste management planning involves making effective institutional arrangements in which responsibilities and liabilities are well established for the technical operation and long term surveillance of disposal systems. Financing mechanisms are part of the arrangements. Continuous quality assurance and quality control, at all levels of radioactive waste management, are essential to ensure the required integrity of the system. As with any other human activity, improvements in technology and economics may be possible and secondary problems avoided. Improvements and confirmation of the efficiency of processes and reduction of uncertainties can only be achieved by continued active research, development and demonstration, which are the goals of many national programmes. International co-operation, also in the form of reviews, can contribute to increasing confidence in the ongoing work. The problem of radioactive wastes is not a unique one; it may be compared with other problems of toxic wastes resulting from many other

  16. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Niello, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    The book summarizes general concepts on radiation, nuclear structure, radioactivity and the interaction of the nuclear radiation with matter. It describes also the basic principles of radio dosimetry. Natural and artificial sources of radiation are reviewed as well as the effects of radiation in man. Medical and industrial applications of ionizing radiation and the pollution produced by the discharge of radioactive materials are outlined. A short review is made of the safety rules and the regulations concerning the protection of the environment [es

  17. Foodstuffs (radioactive contamination)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Donald; Taylor, Teddy; Campbell-Savours, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings are given of the debate in the UK House of Commons on the maximum permitted radioactivity levels for foodstuffs, feeding stuffs and drinking water in the case of abnormal levels of radioactivity or of a nuclear accident. The motion takes note of European Community Document no. 7183/87 and urges the Community to assure a common standard of health protection by adopting a rational set of scientifically based intervention levels for foodstuffs. (UK)

  18. Radiation and environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This book is written based on 25 years authors experience especially in scientifc research of radiation and environmental radioactivity field at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia). Interestingly, from the authors experience in managing the services and consultancies for radiological environmental monitoring, it is also helpful in preparing the ideas for this book. Although this book focuses on Malaysian radiation information environmental radioactivity, but the data collected by the international bodies are also included in this book.

  19. Environmental radioactivity Ispra 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1988-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1987 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  20. Radioactivity in fine papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, H.W.; Singh, B.

    1993-01-01

    The radioactivity of fine papers has been studied through γ-ray spectroscopy with an intrinsic Ge detector. Samples of paper from European and North American sources were found to contain very different amounts of 226 Ra and 232 Th. The processes which introduce radionuclides into paper are discussed. The radioactivity from fine papers makes only a small contribution to an individual's annual radiation dose; nevertheless it is easily detectable and perhaps, avoidable. (Author)