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Sample records for radioactive effluent monitoring

  1. Radioactive effluent monitoring at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, O.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Effluent and Radiation Measurements Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has recently upgraded capabilities in the field of monitoring and analysis of radioactive airborne and liquid effluents using the techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry. The techniques and equipment used include remotely-operated, computer-based Ge(Li) spectrometers which obtain data on a real-time basis. Permanent record files are maintained of both the effluent release values and the gamma-ray data from which the release values are calculated. Should values for release levels ever be challenged, the gamma-ray spectral information for any measurement can be recalled and analyzed as needed. Daily effluent release reports are provided to operating personnel which contributes to prompt correction of any operational problems. Monthly, quarterly, and annual reports are compiled which provide inventories of the radionuclides released. A description of the effluent monitoring, reporting and records system developed at INEL for this application will be presented

  2. Radioactive and electron microscope analysis of effluent monitor sample lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Effluent air sampling at nuclear power plant often leads to the question ''How representative is the sample of the effluent stream?'' Samples from radiation monitors are typically obtained at great distances from the sample nozzle because of high background concerns under postulated accidents. Sample line plateout during normal effluent sampling becomes the major concern. A US Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspection raised a concern that monitors were not collecting representative samples per ANSI standard N13.1. A comprehensive 2-yr study at Beaver Valley was performed during normal effluent releases in two phases: 1) weekly charcoal and glass fiber filter samples were analyzed for radioactivity for 6 months, and 2) nuclepore membrane filter samples were analyzed by electron microscope for 4- and 6-h periods. A specially designed test nozzle was directly inserted into an effluent stream for comparison with the radiation monitor samples. Particle behavior characteristics can be determined during effluent releases using a simple test probe. While particle plateout was the major purpose of the study, other particle behavior characteristics were evident and equally as important. Particle travel through long sample lines can also lead to (a) agglomeration or the coagulation of smaller particles to form larger ones, (b) particle splitting or fracturing upon impact with the sample line interior walls, and (c) resuspension of large particles in sample lines

  3. High sensitivity on-line monitor for radioactive effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Toshimi [Tohoku Electric Power Co. Ltd., Sendai (Japan); Ishizuka, Akira; Abe, Eisuke; Inoue, Yasuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki; Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Doi, Akira

    1983-04-01

    A new approach for a highly sensitive effluent monitor is presented. The free flow type monitor, which consists of a straightener, nozzle, monitoring section and ..gamma..-ray detector, is demonstrated to be effective in providing long term stability. The 160 start-and-stop cycles of effluent discharge were repeated in a 120-h testing period. Results showed a background increase was not observed for the free flow type monitor. The background count rate was calibrated to the lowest detection limit to be 2.2 x 10/sup -2/ Bq/ml for a 300 s measurement time.

  4. Monitoring of released radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, M.; Keta, S.; Nagai, S.; Kano, M.; Ishihara, N.; Moriyama, T.; Ogaki, K.; Noda, K.

    2009-01-01

    Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant started its active tests with spent fuel at the end of March 2006. When spent fuels are sheared and dissolved, radioactive gaseous effluent and radioactive liquid effluent such as krypton-85, tritium, etc. are released into the environment. In order to limit the public dose as low as reasonably achievable in an efficient way, RRP removes radioactive material by evaporation, rinsing, filtering, etc., and then releases it through the main stack and the sea discharge pipeline that allow to make dispersion and dilution very efficiently. Also, concerning the radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent to be released into the environment, the target values of annual release have been defined in the Safety Rule based on the estimated annual release evaluated at the safety review of RRP. By monitoring the radioactive material in gaseous exhaust and liquid effluent RRP controls it not to exceed the target values. RRP reprocessed 430 tUpr of spent fuel during Active Test (March 2006 to October 2008). In this report, we report about: The outline of gaseous and liquid effluent monitoring. The amount of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent during the active test. The performance of removal of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents. The impact on the public from radioactive effluents during the active test. (author)

  5. Palisades Nuclear Plant. Radioactive effluents and environmental monitoring sections to second annual operating report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A total of 0.435 Ci of radioactive liquid effluent less tritium was released with 19.63 Ci of tritium. Both liquid and gaseous releases were within permissible limits. There were 8 Ci of solid wastes stored on the site as of 12/31/76. Data clearly shows there was no detectable increase in radioactivity levels in the environmental media that can be attributed to plant effluents. Monitoring reports are presented concerning fish, meteorology, noise, and cooling tower drift

  6. Proposed radioactive liquid effluent monitoring requirements at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannik, G.T.; Carlton, W.H.; Blunt, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    Clear regulatory guidance exists for structuring a radiological air monitoring program, however, there is no parallel guidance for radiological liquid monitoring. For Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, there are no existing applicable federal regulations, DOE orders, or DOE guidance documents that specify at what levels continuous monitoring, continuous sampling, or periodic confirmatory measurements of radioactive liquid effluents must be made. In order to bridge this gap and to technically justify and document liquid effluent monitoring decisions at DOE's Savannah River Site, Westinghouse Savannah River Company has proposed that a graded, dose-based approach be established, in conjunction with limits on facility radionuclide inventories, to determine the monitoring and sampling criteria to be applied at each potential liquid radioactive effluent point. The graded approach would be similar to--and a conservative extension of--the existing, agreed-upon SRS/EPA-IV airborne effluent monitoring approach documented in WSRC's NESHAP Quality Assurance Project Plan. The limits on facility radionuclide inventories are based on--and are a conservative extension of--the 10 CFR 834, 10 CFR 20, and SCR 61-63 annual limits on discharges to sanitary sewers. Used in conjunction with each other, the recommended source category criteria levels and facility radionuclide inventories would allow for the best utilization of resources and provide consistent, technically justifiable determinations of radioactive liquid effluent monitoring requirements

  7. Processing and monitoring liquid, radioactive effluents from the Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehlein, G.; Huppert, K.L.; Winter, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (WAK) serves as a demonstration plant for the processing of highly-irradiated uranous oxide. The high active waste concentrates find interim storage at the WAK until they are solidified at a later stage. In contrast to this, the slightly- and the medium-active liquid wastes are transported to the decontamination facility of the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe, where they are immediately processed. These liquid wastes contain about 1 per thousand of the activity inventary of the fuel elements processed. Monitoring of the radioactive waste water of the WAK is carried out by the Nuclear Research Centre's department radiation protection and safety. (orig.) [de

  8. Effluent monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions data. These data will be reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Effluent Monitoring performs compliance assessments on radioactive airborne sampling and monitoring systems. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is prepared in compliance with interim guidelines and specifications. Topics include: project description; project organization and management; quality assurance objectives; sampling procedures; sample custody; calibration procedures; analytical procedures; monitoring and reporting criteria; data reduction, verification, and reporting; internal quality control; performance and system audits; corrective actions; and quality assurance reports

  9. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  10. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC's program results

  11. Summarization of radioactive effluent monitoring in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station 1994-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Junjie; Chen Yue

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces the radioactive effluent monitoring systems, measurement and quality control methods used in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station from its commercial operation in 1994. The main work and experiences for the management of effluent release are discussed and analyzed. The radwaste data appear declining trend and are far blow the annual limit approved by the national Environmental Protection Bureau since 1995. The normalized release (unit GBq/GWa) of 9 years is as follows: liquid nuclides (except tritium) 11.1, liquid tritium 1.91 x 10 4 , noble gas 2.03 x 10 4 , halogen 0.13, aerosol 7.57 x 10 -3 . For 110m Ag, the average release from 1998 to 2002 has been reduced to 1/7 of the quantity in 1997

  12. Monitoring of low-level radioactive liquid effluent in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Tomoko; Koarashi, Jun; Takeishi, Minoru

    2009-01-01

    The Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP), the first reprocessing plant in Japan, has discharged low-level liquid wastes to the Pacific Ocean since the start of its operation in 1977. We have performed liquid effluent monitoring to realize an appropriate radioactive discharge control. Comparing simple and rapid analytical methods with labor-intensive radiochemical analyses demonstrated that the gross-alpha and gross-beta activities agreed well with the total activities of plutonium isotopes ( 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu) and major beta emitters (e.g., 90 Sr and 137 Cs), respectively. The records of the radioactive liquid discharge from the TRP showed that the normalized discharges of all nuclides, except for 3 H, were three or four orders of magnitude lower than those from the Sellafield and La Hague reprocessing plants. This was probably due to the installation of multistage evaporators in the liquid waste treatment process in 1980. The annual public doses for a hypothetical person were estimated to be less than 0.2 μSv y -1 from the aquatic pathway. Plutonium radioactivity ratios ( 238 Pu/ 239+240 Pu) of liquid effluents were determined to be 1.3-3.7, while those of the seabed sediment samples collected around the discharge point were 0.003-0.059, indicating no remarkable accumulation of plutonium in the regional aquatic environment. Thus, we concluded that there were no significant radiological effects on the public and the aquatic environment during the past 30-year operation of the TRP. (author)

  13. General principles governing sampling and measurement techniques for monitoring radioactive effluents from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1978-01-01

    An explanation is given of the need to monitor the release of radioactive gases and liquid effluents from nuclear facilities, with particular emphasis on the ICRP recommendations and on the interest in this problem shown by the larger international organizations. This is followed by a description of the classes of radionuclides that are normally monitored in this way. The characteristics of monitoring 'in line' and 'by sample taking' are described; the disadvantages of in line monitoring and the problem of sample representativity are discussed. There follows an account of the general principles for measuring gaseous and liquid effluents that are applied in the techniques normally employed at nuclear facilities. Standards relating to the specifications for monitoring instruments are at present being devised by the International Electrotechnical Commission, and there are still major differences in national practices, at least as far as measurement thresholds are concerned. In conclusion, it is shown that harmonization of practices and standardization of equipment would probably help to make international relations in the field more productive. (author)

  14. Treating radioactive effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of radioactive effluent it is known to produce a floc being a suspension of precipitates carrying radioactive species in a mother liquor containing dissolved non-radioactive salts. It is also known and accepted practice to encapsulate the floc in a solid matrix by treatment with bitumen, cement and the like. In the present invention the floc is washed with water prior to encapsulation in the solid matrix whereby to displace the mother liquor containing the dissolved non-radioactive salts. This serves to reduce the final amount of solidified radioactive waste with consequent advantages in the storage and disposal thereof. (author)

  15. Monitoring of the radioactive liquid effluents discharged from IPEN-CNEN/SP. Optimization of the procedures adopted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The main purpose of a radioactive liquid effluents monitoring of a nuclear installation is to determine the amount of radioactivity discharged to the environment, as well as, to verify if this activity is below the authorized discharge limits established by the competent authority. Although this control has been established on a routine basis since the beginning of operation of the nuclear installations available at IPEN, the growing of such facilities in the last years has implied in an increase in the number of samples to be analyzed. The aim of this work is, therefore, to optimize the procedures adopted in the Environmental Monitoring Division of IPEN-CNEN/SP for the activity measurement of the liquid effluents discharged to the environment. Since these effluents are discharged to Pinheiros river, which presents a high dilution factor, a study is also carried out in order to verify if the activity present can be measured by the equipment available. (author)

  16. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-09-01

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

  17. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-01-01

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the efferent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability

  18. Facility effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  19. Risk-Based Radioactive Liquid Effluent Monitoring Requirements at the U. S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannik, G.T.

    2001-01-01

    For Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, clear regulatory guidance exists for structuring radiological air emissions monitoring programs. However, there are no parallel regulations for radiological liquid effluent monitoring programs. In order to bridge this gap and to technically justify liquid effluent monitoring decisions at DOE's Savannah River Site, a graded, risk-basked approach has been established to determine the monitoring and sampling criteria to be applied at each liquid discharge point

  20. Effluent Treatment Facility tritium emissions monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved sampling and analysis protocol was developed and executed to verify atmospheric emissions compliance for the new Savannah River Site (SRS) F/H area Effluent Treatment Facility. Sampling equipment was fabricated, installed, and tested at stack monitoring points for filtrable particulate radionuclides, radioactive iodine, and tritium. The only detectable anthropogenic radionuclides released from Effluent Treatment Facility stacks during monitoring were iodine-129 and tritium oxide. This paper only examines the collection and analysis of tritium oxide

  1. Hybrid monitoring of environmental radioactivity as a perspective approach to rapid control and prediction of environmental contamination due to NPP wastes and effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremeev, I.S.; Eremenko, V.A.; Zhernov, V.S.; Makarov, Yu.A.; Matveev, V.V.; Ryzhov, N.V.; Ryazanov, V.V.; Skatkin, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    Conseptucal model of the system of hybride monitoring of environmental radioactivity due to NPP wastes and effluents is proposed. The model a combination of measuring and simulating monitoring, provides correlation of methods and aims of simulation of environmental contamination spread methods and means of monitoring of its factual distribution in space, methods of separation of technogeneous signals from natural radiation background and provision of the given degree of reliability of results of information processing, in particular periodic coorection, model adaptation according to the factual measurement data

  2. Legal provisions governing gaseous effluents radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.

    1985-01-01

    This contribution explains the main provisions governing radiological monitoring of gaseous effluents from LWR type nuclear power plants. KTA rule 1503.1 defines the measuring methods and tasks to be fulfilled by reactor operators in order to safeguard due monitoring and accounting of radioactive substances in the plants' gaseous effluents. The routine measurements are checked by a supervisory programme by an independent expert. The routine controls include analysis of filter samples, comparative measurement of radioactive noble gases, interlaboratory comparisons, and comparative evaluation of measured values. (DG) [de

  3. Radiological consequences of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the differential radiological impact of the nuclear fuel cycle with and without plutonium recycle is being undertaken jointly by the National Radiological Protection Board and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). A summary is given of the development of the methodology detailed in their first report to the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) (NRPB/CEA, A methodology for evaluating the radiological consequences of radioactive effluents released in normal operations. Luxembourg, CEC Doc. V/3011/75 EN (1979)). The Collective Effective Dose Equivalent Commitment was used in an attempt to assess the total health detriment. The application of the methodology within particular member states of the European Community has been discussed at seminars. Sensitivity analysis can identify the more important parameters for improving the accuracy of the assessment. (UK)

  4. Assessment methodology for radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this environmental assessment is to define and rank the needs for controlling radioactive effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The assessment is based on environmental standards and dose-to-man calculations. The study includes three calculations for each isotope from each facility: maximum individual dose for a 50-year dose commitment from a 1-yr exposure according to the organ affected; population dose for a 50-yr dose commitment from a 1-yr exposure according to the organ affected; and annual dose rate for the maximally exposed individual. The relative contribution of a specific nuclide and source to the total dose provides a method of ranking the nuclides, which in turn identifies the sources that should receive the greatest control in the future. These results will be used in subsequent tasks to assess the environmental impact of the total nuclear fuel cycle

  5. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Dahl, N.R.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  6. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  7. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years

  10. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the B plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesser, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plant assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated every three years

  11. Management of radioactive effluents from research Reactors and PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodke, S.B.; Surender Kumar; Sinha, P.K.; Budhwar, R.K.; Raj, Kanwar

    2006-01-01

    Indian nuclear power programme is mainly based on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). In addition we have research reactors namely Apsara, CIRUS, Dhruva at Trombay. The operation and maintenance activities of these reactors generate radioactive liquid waste. These wastes require effective management so that the release of radioactivity to the environment is well within the authorized limits. India is self reliant in the design, erection, commissioning and operation of effluent management system for nuclear reactors. Segregation at source based on nature of effluents and radioactivity content is the first and foremost step in the over all management of liquid effluents. The effluents from the power reactors contain mainly activation products like 3 H. It also contains fission products like 137 Cs. Containment of these radionuclide along with 60 Co, 90 Sr, 131 I plays an important part in liquid waste management. Treatment processes for decontamination of these radionuclide include chemical treatment, ion exchange, evaporation etc. Effluents after treatment are monitored and discharged to the nearby water body after filtration and dilution. The concentrates from the processes are conditioned in cement matrix and disposed in Near Surface Disposal Facilities (NSDFs) co-located at each site. Some times large quantity of effluents with higher radioactivity concentration may get generated from the abnormal operation such as failure of heat exchangers. These effluents are handled on a campaign basis for which adequate storage capacity is provided. The treatment is given taking into consideration the required decontamination factor (DF), capacities of available treatment process, discharge limits and the availability of the dilution water. Similarly large quantities of effluents may get generated during fuel clad failure incident in reactors. In such situation, as in CIRUS large volume of effluent containing higher radioactivity are generated and are managed by delay

  12. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A Evaporator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1993-03-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1* for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1**. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  14. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FRAZIER, T.P.

    1999-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U. S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. To ensure the long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems, an update to this facility effluent monitoring plan is required whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and is updated, at a minimum, every 3 years

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1995-05-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using specific guidelines. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

  16. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years

  17. Atomics International environmental monitoring and facility effluent annual report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Environmental and facility effluent radioactivity monitoring at Atomics International (AI) is performend by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Unit of the Health, Safety, and Radiation Services Department. Soil, vegetation, and surface water are routinely sampled to a distance of 10 miles from AI sites. Continuous ambient air sampling and thermoluminescent dosimetry are performed on site for monitoring airborne radioactivity and site ambient radiation levels. Radioactivity in effluents discharged to the atmosphere from AI facilities is continuously sampled and monitored to ensure that levels released to unrestricted areas are within appropriate limits, and to identify processes which may require additional engineering safeguards to minimize radioactivity levels in such effluents. In addition, selected nonradioactive constituents in surface water discharged to unrestricted areas are determined. This report summarizes and discusses monitoring results for 1976. The results of a special soil plutonium survey performed during the year are also summarized

  18. A guide for preparing Hanford Site facility effluent monitoring plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    This document provides guidance on the format and content of effluent monitoring plans for facilities at the Hanford Site. The guidance provided in this document is designed to ensure compliance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1988a), 5400.3 (DOE 1989a), 5400.4 (DOE 1989b), 5400.5 (DOE 1990a), 5480.1 (DOE 1982), 5480.11 (DOE 1988b), and 5484.1 (DOE 1981). These require environmental monitoring plans for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants of radioactive or hazardous materials. In support of DOE Orders 5400.5 (Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment) and 5400.1 (General Environmental Protection Program), the DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE 1991) should be used to establish elements of a radiological effluent monitoring program in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. Evaluation of facilities for compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Act of 1977 requirements also is included in the airborne emissions section of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Sampling Analysis Plans for Liquid Effluents, as required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), also are included in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans shall include complete documentation of gaseous and liquid effluent sampling and monitoring systems

  19. Continuous monitoring of gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, A.; Giraut, H.; Prado, M.; Bonino, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The system allows to continuously determine the radioactive materials discharge (iodine, noble gases and aerosols) to the environment. It consists in compelling, by a pump, a known and fixed fraction of the total flow and preserving the aerosols by a filter. The gas -now free from aerosols- traverses an activated carbon filter which keeps the iodine; after being free from aerosols and iodine, the effluent traverses a measurement chambers for noble gases which has a scintillator. (Author) [es

  20. Waste monitoring system for effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, J.M.; Gomez, B.; Trujillo, L.; Malcom, J.E.; Nekimken, H.; Pope, N.; Bibeau, R.

    1995-07-01

    The waste monitoring system in use at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility, TA-55, is a computer-based system that proves real-time information on industrial effluents. Remote computers monitor discharge events and data moves from one system to another via a local area network. This report describes the history, system design, summary, instrumentation list, displays, trending screens, and layout of the waste monitoring system

  1. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements

  2. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, D.J.; Brendel, D.F.; Shields, K.D.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP- 0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years. The primary purpose of the N Reactor Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP), during standby, is to ensure that the radioactive effluents are properly monitored and evaluated for compliance with the applicable DOE orders and regulatory agencies at the federal, state, and local levels. A secondary purpose of the FEMP is to ensure that hazardous wastes are not released, in liquid effluents, to the environment even though the potential to do so is extremely low. The FEMP is to provide a monitoring system that collects representative samples in accordance with industry standards, performs analyses within stringent quality control (QC) requirements, and evaluates the data through the use of comparative analysis with the standards and acceptable environmental models

  3. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 222-S Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.V.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems against applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. The current operation of the 222-S facilities includes the provision of analytical and radiological chemistry services in support of Hanford Site processing plants. The emphasis is on waste management, chemical processing, environmental monitoring effluent programs at B Plant, the Uranium Oxide Plant, Tank Farms, the 242-A Evaporator, the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Facility, the Plutonium Finishing Plant, process development/impact activities, and essential materials. The laboratory also supplies analytical services in support of ongoing waste tank characterization

  4. Solidification of radioactive waste effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergan, L.M.; Cordier, J.-P.

    1981-01-01

    A process and apparatus for solidifying radioactive waste liquid containing dissolved and/or suspended solids is disclosed. The process includes chemically treating for pH adjustment and precipitation of solids, concentrating solids with a thin-film evaporator to provide liquid concentrate containing about 50% solids, and drying the concentrate with a heated mixing apparatus. The heated mixing apparatus includes a heated wall and working means for shearing dried concentrate from internal surfaces and subdividing dry concentrate into dry, powdery particles. The working means includes a rotor and helical means for positively advancing the concentrate and resulting dry particles from inlet to outlet of the mixing apparatus. The dry particles may also be encapsulated in a matrix material. Entrained particles in the vapor stream from the evaporator and mixer are removed in an integral particle separator and the vapor is subsequently condensed and may be recycled upstream of the thin-film evaporator. A section of the mixer may be used for mixing dry particles with the matrix material in a continuous drying and mixing sequence. A section of the mixer also may be used for mixing the treating chemical with the waste liquid

  5. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  6. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapelushnik, I.; Sheinfeld, M.; Avida, R.; Kadmon, Y.; Ellenbogen, M.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements

  8. Effluent monitoring for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanchi, L.

    1977-01-01

    A microprocessor-based instrument operates a continuous surveillance on effluents from a nuclear facility. It receives and evaluates pulses from two NaI detectors and a set of single-channel analyzers. It has self-diagnosing capability so that it takes actions not only when it recognizes excessive radioactivity but also when it ascertains some abnormal behavior. Power failure procedure and automatic restart are provided. Operative constants such as alarm thresholds, times, and number of successive measurements are permanently stored in a read/write battery operated C-MOS memory. The program allows automatic succession of phases in a peculiar way and has a feature for loading an auxiliary program into RAMs

  9. Effluent monitoring for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanchi, L.

    1976-01-01

    A microprocessor-based instrument operates a continuous surveillance on effluents from a nuclear facility. It receives and evaluates pulses from two NaI detectors and a set of single-channel analyzers. It has self-diagnosing capability so that it takes actions not only when it recognizes excessive radioactivity but also when it ascertains some abnormal behavior. Power failure procedure and automatic restart are provided. Operative constants such as alarm thresholds, times, and number of successive measurements are permanently stored in a read/write battery operated C-MOS memory. The program allows automatic succession of phases in a peculiar way and has a feature for loading an auxiliary program into RAMs

  10. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 284-E and 284-W power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Herman, D.R.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  11. CY-1981 effluent monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honkus, R.J.

    1982-05-01

    The effluent monitoring programs at ICPP for calendar year 1981 are summarized. During the year, five significant occurrences or unplanned releases occurred. These are briefly described and tabulated. In none of the instances were the applicable Radiation Concentration Guides (RCG's) exceeded. A graphic summary of the total airborne, liquid and solid releases during CY-1981 is presented. Liquid waste activity was higher than anticipated due to various processing factors throughout the year. Solid waste jumped dramatically in December due to shipment of end-prices from the EBR-II fuel which was processed during the Electrolytic campaign

  12. Treatment of radioactive effluents at the Boris Kidric Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojovic, P.; Drobnik, S.; Popara, D.

    1964-10-01

    The paper describes the origin, composition and activity of radioactive effluents at the Boris Kidric Institute, their collection at the places or origin, transport to the place of disposal and treatment of some smaller quantities. Special attention has been paid to effluents with short-lived isotopes produced in the Laboratory for radioactive isotope production (author)

  13. Legal provisions governing liquid effluents radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, I.; Ruehle, H.

    1985-01-01

    The KTA rule 1504 for radiological monitoring of liquid effluents from nuclear installations is explained. As there are no such rules published to date for establishments handling isotopes, some criteria are discussed which in the future ought to form part of a practical guide for liquid effluents monitoring in isotope handling installations. Monitoring measures described refer to liquid effluents from transfer containers, auxiliary cooling equipment, turbine buildings, main cooling installations, and waste air discharges from closed-circuit cooling systems. (DG) [de

  14. Radioactive surface contamination monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Kei; Minagoshi, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Toru

    1994-01-01

    To reduce radiation exposure and prevent contamination from spreading, each nuclear power plant has established a radiation controlled area. People and articles out of the controlled area are checked for the surface contamination of radioactive materials with surface contamination monitors. Fuji Electric has repeatedly improved these monitors on the basis of user's needs. This paper outlines typical of a surface contamination monitor, a personal surface contamination monitor, an article surface contamination monitor and a laundry monitor, and the whole-body counter of an internal contamination monitor. (author)

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 300 Area Fuels Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Brendel, D.F.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP- 0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring system by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years. The Fuel Fabrication Facility in the Hanford 300 Area supported the production reactors from the 1940's until they were shut down in 1987. Prior to 1987 the Fuel Fabrication Facility released both airborne and liquid radioactive effluents. In January 1987 the emission of airborne radioactive effluents ceased with the shutdown of the fuels facility. The release of liquid radioactive effluents have continued although decreasing significantly from 1987 to 1990

  16. Improved technique for in situ measurement of radioactivity in liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasundar, S.; Jose, M.T.; Ravi, T.; Sundaram, V.M.; Raghunath, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    As a pre-requisite for handling and disposal of radioactive liquid effluents, they should be categorized according to their chemical nature and the type and level of radioactivity. A continuous monitoring of these effluents is necessary to assess the discharged activity and to detect any unusually large increase in the activity level. It may also be required to assess the beta, gamma specific activities in the effluents independently instead of just combined beta-gamma activity as is generally done. (author). 1 ref., 2 tabs

  17. Method for radioactivity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbarger, C. John; Cowder, Leo R.

    1976-10-26

    The disclosure relates to a method for analyzing uranium and/or thorium contents of liquid effluents preferably utilizing a sample containing counting chamber. Basically, 185.7-keV gamma rays following .sup.235 U alpha decay to .sup.231 Th which indicate .sup.235 U content and a 63-keV gamma ray doublet found in the nucleus of .sup.234 Pa, a granddaughter of .sup.238 U, are monitored and the ratio thereof taken to derive uranium content and isotopic enrichment .sup.235 U/.sup.235 U + .sup.238 U) in the liquid effluent. Thorium content is determined by monitoring the intensity of 238-keV gamma rays from the nucleus of .sup.212 Bi in the decay chain of .sup.232 Th.

  18. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.J.

    1995-10-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years

  20. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.J.; Sontage, S.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years

  1. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 2724-W Protective Equipment Decontamination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.J.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1* for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updates as a minimum every three years

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  3. Monitoring of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houriet, J.Ph.

    1982-08-01

    The estimation of risks presented by final disposal of radioactive wastes depends, among other things, on what is known of their radioisotope content. The first aim of this report is to present the current state of possibilities for measuring (monitoring) radionuclides in wastes. The definition of a global monitoring system in the framework of radioactive waste disposal has to be realized, based on the information presented here, in accordance with the results of work to come and on the inventory of wastes to be stored. Designed for direct measurement of unpackaged wastes and for control of wastes ready to be stored, the system would ultimately make it possible to obtain all adaquate information about their radioisotope content with regard to the required disposal safety. The second aim of this report is to outline the definition of such a global system of monitoring. Designed as a workbase and reference source for future work by the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste on the topic of radioactive waste monitoring, this report describes the current situation in this field. It also makes it possible to draw some preliminary conclusions and to make several recommendations. Centered on the possibilities of current and developing techniques, it makes evident that a global monitoring system should be developed. However, it shows that the monitoring of packaged wastes will be difficult, and should be avoided as far as possible, except for control measurements

  4. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-03-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities

  5. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  6. Effluent monitoring: Its purpose and value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoen, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of effluent monitoring is described in terms of the primary objectives, the most important of which is to verify that the facility is functioning as it was designed and that the waste treatment and effluent control systems are performing as planned and expected. The object of a monitoring programme should be periodically re-examined to ensure that the programme serves a contemporary purpose. The value of the effluent monitoring programme is determined by the extent to which users of the monitoring data, i.e. the operator, the regulating authorities and the public, accept the result as indicating that the plant is operating safely, and in an environmentally acceptable manner. The credibility of the monitoring results is therefore the most important factor determining the value of an effluent monitoring programme. (author)

  7. Limits to radioactive effluents and countermeasures in accidental situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowotny, G.; Gonzalez, A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the criteria used by the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, as competent authority, to set limits to radioactive effluents from nuclear installations. It also discusses the selection of action levels for carrying out countermeasures in accidental situations. (author)

  8. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  9. Studies on osmotic concentration of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.C.; Ramachandhran, V.; Misra, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of direct osmosis for concentrating radioactive effluents is examined on the laboratory scale. Studies were carried out using asymmetric cellulose acetate membranes of a range of porosities under varying salinity gradients. A suitable bench scale osmotic concentrator employing tubular membrane systems has been fabricated and tested. An attempt to understand the mechanism of water permeation under osmotic and hydrostatic gradients has been made based on the irreversible thermodynamic approach. The solute separation of sodium chloride and radionuclides under osmosis is in the range of 85 to 95% for various osmotic sink solutions. The osmotic water flux is observed to be lower than the hydraulic water flux under reverse osmosis conditions. While the solute separation increases with an increase in annealing temperature, water flux decreases for both osmosis and reverse osmosis systems for various feed salinities. The effect of concentration polarization is analysed, and the effect of feed and osmotic sink velocity on the performance of the osmotic concentrator has also been studied. (orig.)

  10. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.J.; Sontag, S.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plant is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years. The UO 3 Plant is located in the south-central portion of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The plant consists of two primary processing buildings and several ancillary facilities. The purpose of the UO 3 Plant is to receive uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant, concentrate it, convert the UNH to uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) powder by calcination and package it for offsite shipment. The UO 3 Plant has been placed in a standby mode. There are two liquid discharges, and three gaseous exhaust stacks, and seven building exhausters that are active during standby conditions

  11. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Moeller, M.P.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum three years. A variety of liquid wastes are generated in processing treatment, and disposal operations throughout the Hanford Site. The Tank Farms Project serves a major role in Hanford Site waste management activities as the temporary repository for these wastes. Stored wastes include hazardous components regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and as by-product material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. A total of 177 single- and double-shell tanks (SST and DST) have been constructed in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site. These facilities were constructed to various designs from 1943 to 1986. The Tank Farms Project is comprised of these tanks along with various transfer, receiving, and treatment facilities

  12. Radioactivity monitoring in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrescu, M.; Milu, C.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactivity monitoring in Romania is based on National Regulations for Radiation Protection enforced in 1976, on other environment protection laws enforced in the last years and on the recommendations of IAEA. Accordingly two systems of radioactive monitoring are to date operational in this field: the first one is the self-control of the radioactive emissions in the environment generated by the own nuclear activities (of nuclear units like the Cernavoda NPP, the Institute of Atomic Physics at Magurele-Bucharest, the Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti, the R Plant at Feldioara, Uranium mining units, etc.), while the other is based on two national agencies (the National Network of Environment Radiation Monitoring of the Ministry of Waters, Forests and Environment Protection and the Network of Radiation Hygiene Laboratories of the Health Ministry). The authors review and discuss the radiation protection legislation, the structure and the organizational operations of the national monitoring systems and the co-operation of the national monitoring systems with international authorities or programmes. 3 Figs., 1 tab., 11 refs

  13. The discharge of radioactive effluents from the nuclear power programme into western waters of Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    A brief account is presented of the British nuclear power programme and the types of radioactive effluent that arise from the power stations and from the Windscale reprocessing plant. Routes by which these effluents could affect human populations, and radiation dose limits which have been laid down, are discussed. The discharge of permitted amounts of activity into western coastal waters of Great Britain, and the requirements for monitoring the discharges, are described. (U.K.)

  14. Radioactive clearance discharge of effluent from nuclear and radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinhua; Xu Chunyan

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the basic concepts of radiation safety management system exemption, exclusion and clearance, we expound that the general industrial gaseous and liquid effluent discharges are exempted or excluded, gaseous and liquid effluent discharged from nuclear and radiation facilities are clearance, and non-radioactive. The main purpose of this paper is to clarify the concepts, reach a consensus that the gaseous and liquid effluent discharged from nuclear and radiation facilities are non-radioactive and have no hazard to human health and natural environment. (authors)

  15. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  16. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  17. Monitoring of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The results are described of monitoring radioactivity of atmospheric fallout, surface waters, soils, plant feeds, cereals, and other agricultural produce. The results were obtained over a long time period. Radioactivity was also measured of milk, milk products, vegetables and fruits, meat and hen eggs, flour and bakery products with a view to radionuclide migration in the food chain. The daily intake of 90 Sr and 137 Cs from food was determined from the values obtained and the consumption of the individual types of food. Strontium-90 distribution was studied in the bones and the teeth of the population in Slovakia. With the commissioning of nuclear power plants, emissions and liquid wastes were monitored and their environmental impact assessed. (E.S.)

  18. Regulatory review of releases from HIFAR of radioactive airborne effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westall, D.J.; Macnab, D.I.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) was set up by legislation in 1992 as an independent Commonwealth corporate body reporting to the Minister for Health and Family Services. Its functions include monitoring and reviewing the safety of nuclear plant owned or operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The NSB sets requirements for authorisation of the operation of the HIFAR research reactor, and may impose restrictions and conditions on its operation. The authorisation for the operation of HIFAR includes a requirement for arrangements for the treatment, safe storage and disposal of solid, liquid and gaseous radioactive wastes from the reactor. The objective is to establish conditions which would ensure that radiation exposure to plant personnel and the public from radioactive wastes are within acceptable limits and that releases are maintained as low as reasonably achievable. The NSB has developed expectations based on international best practice, against which to review HIFAR's arrangements for satisfying the requirement and achieving the objective. Arrangements for the release of airborne radioactive effluent from HIFAR were reviewed by the NSB as part of an overall review of the upgrade of safety documentation for HIFAR. The NSB's expectations for the review were drawn from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Basic Safety Standards (Safety Series No 115-I) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Recommendations for Limiting Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (1995). These expectations included a hierarchy of primary dose limits, stack discharge limits and reference levels for HIFAR aimed at ensuring that radiation doses to the public due to airborne effluent are less than the national dose limits and ANSTO's dose constraints, and are as low as reasonably achievable. An approach favoured by the operator is to work directly to a primary dose limit using an airborne dispersion computer program to

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 2724-W Protective Equipment Decontamination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Lavey, G.H.

    1992-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1* for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438**. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  20. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Geiger, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified. in. A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  1. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, W.E.

    2000-03-08

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for K area spent fuel storage basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunacek, G.S.

    1996-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400. 1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document was prepared using the specific guidelines identified in WHC-EP-0438-1, A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the second revision to the original annual report. Long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring system shall be ensured with updates of this report whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  3. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVIS, W.E.

    2000-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years

  4. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FRAZIER, T.P.

    1999-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U. S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. To ensure the long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems, an update to this facility effluent monitoring plan is required whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and is updated, at a minimum, every 3 years

  5. Environmental system applied to radioactive liquid effluent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisti, Marcelo Bessa

    2009-01-01

    The current environmental administration considers the productive activity as an environmental system, defined as a group of processes, interactions, parameters and factors involved in the production. This mastering dissertation evaluated the release of the liquid radioactive effluents at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), under a systemic environmental study. The study evaluated the source term at IPEN in the period from 2004 to 2008, making use of gamma-ray and alpha spectrometry, instrumental neutron activation analysis, liquid phase scintillation and atomic absorption spectrometry. The employed methodologies were verified using samples from the Intercomparison National Program - PNI/IRD and Reference Materials. The facilities that contributed the most in these releases were the Radiopharmaceutical Center (CR) and the Research Reactor Center (CRPq) with an average of 11,4% and 87,4%, respectively, relative to the present radioactive activity. The sewer system releases were within the radioactive protection regulations, showing the effectiveness of IPEN's Radioactive Effluents Monitoring Program. The concentration of the stable elements Ag, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn was determined in the liquid effluent in ali the samples from the storage tanks TR1 and CR in the period from 2004 to 2008 and in some of the samples of other IPEN's facilities in the period from 2004 to 2007. Among the analyzed effluents, two samples were higher than the stable elements discharge standards established in the state of Sao Paulo, one sample was higher than the required value of the element cadmium and the other higher than required value of the element zinco The storage tank TR1 discharge flow was estimated in 10,9 ± 0,9 m3 h -1 . The dilution factor at discharge point E1 was estimated using a radiotracers the isotopes 3 H, 137 CS, 60 Co, 54 Mn and 65 Zn, which are commonly released into IPEN's sewer system. The executed radiotracer study was carried out

  6. Gaseous radioactive effluent restrictions, measurement, and minimization at a PET/cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plascjak, P.S.; Kim, K.K.; Googins, S.W.; Meyer, W.C. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In the US, restrictions on the release of radioactive effluents from PET (positron emission tomography)/cyclotron facilities are typically imposed by State regulatory agencies and may be based on various methodologies and limits published by numerous agencies. This work presents suitable effluent concentration limits for various chemical forms of radioisotopes routinely produced in PET/cyclotron facilities. They were determined by application of metabolic models defined by ICRP 53 and ICRP 26/30 which will result in compliance with effective dose equivalent limits of 100 mrem per year at the release point. The NIH Cyclotron Facility effluent air monitoring system, environmental dosimetry program, and simple, effective systems for radioactive effluent minimization are also described. (orig.)

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan for K Area Spent Fuel. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunacek, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    The scope of this document includes program plans for monitoring and characterizing radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous materials discharged in the K Area effluents. This FEMP includes complete documentation for both airborne and liquid effluent monitoring systems that monitor radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous pollutants that could be discharged to the environment under routine and/or upset conditions. This documentation is provided for each K Area facility that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous materials that could impact public and employee safety and the environment. This FEW describes the airborne and liquid effluent paths and the associated sampling and monitoring systems of the K Area facilities. Sufficient information is provided on the effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against requirements may be performed. Adequate details are supplied such that radioactive and hazardous material source terms may be related to specific effluent streams which are, in turn, related to discharge points and finally compared to the effluent monitoring system capability

  8. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 3720 Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the Environmental Science Laboratory (3720 Facility) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs'' This FEMP has been prepared for the 3720 Facility primarily because it has a major (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The 3720 Facility provides office and laboratory space for PNNL scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of materials characterization and testing and waste management. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials to conduct these activities. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, and dispersible particulate. The facility is in the process of being vacated for shutdown, but is considered a Major Emission Point as of the date of this document approval.

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements

  10. Assessment of Radioactive Liquid Effluents Release at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa Nisti, Marcelo; Godoy dos Santos, Adir Janete

    2008-01-01

    A continuous effluent monitoring program has been established at IPEN's plant in order to allow an environmental impact assessment due to radioactive liquid effluent discharge to sanitary system. Representative samples of radioactive liquid effluents are analyzed by using high resolution gamma spectroscopy and instrumental neutron activation analysis, facing to Brazilian radioprotection regulatory rules. The results are consolidating yearly in the Institute source-term. In this paper, results of the source-term are presented, concerning to years 2004, 2005 and 2006. The total activity discharged was 8.5xl0 8 Bq, 5.7x10 8 Bq and 2.7xl0 8 Bq, respectively. As the release is strongly dependent on the total amount of the effluent and on the dilution factor, special attention is needed in order to obtain the correct value of that last one. The estimated inside plant dilution factor, considering the recent facilities and the reshaping of the sewerage system was 80, 180 and 130, for period of 2004, 2005 and 2006 discharged liquid radioactive effluent

  11. Airborne radioactive effluents: releases and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grissom, M.C.

    1982-10-01

    This bibliography contains 870 citations on airborne radioactive waste included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from January 1981 through August 1982. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  12. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 284-E and 284-W power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, D.R.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP- 0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years. The 284-E and 284-W Power Plants are coal-fired plants used to generate steam. Electricity is not generated at these facilities. The maximum production of steam is approximately 159 t (175 tons)/h at 101 kg (225 lb)/in 2 . Steam generated at these facilities is used in other process facilities (i. e., the B Plant, Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant, 242-A Evaporator) for heating and process operations. The functions or processes associated with these facilities do not have the potential to generate radioactive airborne effluents or radioactive liquid effluents, therefore, radiation monitoring equipment is not used on the discharge of these streams. The functions or processes associated with the production of steam result in the use, storage, management and disposal of hazardous materials

  13. Effluent and sanitary sewer monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanchi, L.; Vasey, M.R.

    1977-03-01

    Two similar instruments that monitor the liquid wastes from the plutonium facility are described. The operation of the two instruments is completely automatic and performs a continuous surveillance in the frame of Nuclear Safeguards. One instrument controls the liquids from the facility and the other checks the sanitary sewer wastes. Both have self-diagnosing capabilities and take automatic actions in case of abnormal occurrences

  14. Effective equivalent dose in the critical group due to release of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, John W.A. dos; Varandas, Luciana R.; Souza, Denise N.; Souza, Cristiano B.F.; Lima, Sandro Leonardo N.; Mattos, Marcos Fernando M.; Moraes, Jose Adenildo T.

    2005-01-01

    To ensure that the emissions of radioactive material by liquid and gaseous pathways are below applicable limits it is necessary to evaluate the effective equivalent dose in the critical group, which is a magnitude that takes into consideration the modeling used and the terms radioactive activity source. The calculation of this dose considers each radionuclide released by the activity of Nuclear plant, liquid and gaseous by, and the sum of the values obtained is controlled so that this dose does not exceed the goals of the regulatory body, the CNEN and the goals established by the Nuclear power plant. To hit these targets various controls are used such as: controls for effluent monitors instrumentation, environmental monitoring programs, effluent release controls and dose calculation in the environment. According to the findings, it is concluded that during the period of operation of the plants, this dose is below of the required limits

  15. Reduction of releases of radioactive effluents from light-water-power-reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Itakura, T.; Kanai, T.

    1977-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Commission established the dose objectives to the population around the light-water-reactors in May, 1975, based on the ''ALAP'' concept. These values are respectively, 5 mrems per year for total body and 15 mrems per year for thyroid of an individual in the critical group in the environs, due to both gaseous and liquid effluents from LWRs in one site. The present paper describes the implications of the dose objective values, control measures which have been adopted to reduce releases of radioactive materials and related technical developments in Japan. The main control measures for reduction of radioactive gaseous effluents are an installation of a charcoal gas holdup system for decay of noble gases and a supply of clean steam for the gland seal of a turbine in BWR, and a storage tank system allowing decay of noble gases in PWR. For liquid effluents are taken measures to re-use them as the primary coolant. Consequently, the amounts of radioactivity released to the environment from any LWR during normal operation have been maintained under the level to meet the above dose objective values. For research reactors, reduction of release of effluents has also been carried out in a similar way to LWRs. In order to establish the techniques applicable for further reduction, studies are being made on the control measures to reduce leakage of radioiodine, an apparatus for removal of krypton, the treatment of laundry waste and measures to remove the crud in the primary coolant. Presentation is also made on the energy-integrated gas monitor for gaseous effluent and systems of measuring γ dose from radioactive cloud descriminating from natural background, which have been developed for effective monitoring thus reduced environmental dose

  16. Mosses in Radioactive Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marovic, G.; Franic, Z.; Sencar, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mosses, lichens and perennial plants, all characterized by slow growth, are able to efficiently accumulate different radionuclides from their environment to a much higher degree than other vegetation. Consequently, they are sensitive bio indicators of radioactive contamination for various ecosystems. Results of systematic, long-term measurements of 137Cs activities in mosses for the period 1986-2007 are summarized. The study was conducted in the Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb, as a part of an extensive monitoring program of the Croatian environment. In the overall observed period the highest activity concentration of 137Cs deposited by fallout has been recorded in 1986, which is the year of Chernobyl accident, causing peak 137Cs activity concentration in moss of 8800 Bqkg -1 in May 1986. Mean value for period 1986 - 1990 was 3423 Bqkg -1 . For comparison, in the same period mean 137Cs activity concentration in grass was 390 Bqkg -1 . In 1990s, ten year after Chernobyl accident, mean 137Cs activity concentration in moss was 1345 Bqkg -1 , with maximum value of 3940 Bqkg -1 (December 1994). In 2000s, mean 137Cs activity concentration in mosses was 172 Bqkg -1 with maximum value of 955 Bqkg -1 (July 2002). Fitting the measured 137Cs activity concentrations to the theoretical curve (1) the ecological half-life of 137Cs in moss was found to be about 978 days, while in grass was found to be about 126 days in the period 1986 - 1990. The ecological half-life of 137Cs in grass after 1991 was found to be about 2503 days. The ecological half-life of 137Cs in moss is about eight times higher than 137Cs ecological half-life observed in grass in the first period after the Chernobyl accident.(author)

  17. Principles for limiting releases of radioactive effluents into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is concerned with the subject of limiting releases of radioactive effluents during normal, controlled operation of nuclear installations. It does not deal with releases from accidents where it is only possible to limit exposures by intervention. In 1978 the IAEA published guidance on the concepts and principles for use by the competent authorities in setting limits for planned releases of radioactive material into the environment (Safety Series No. 45). This publication is a complete revision of Safety Series No. 45 and its Annex

  18. Monitoring programme. Radioactive substances - report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The monitoring of radioactive substances in the vicinity of nuclear sites in the United Kingdom by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution, acts as an independent check on the operator's returns, on the environmental impact of radioactive waste disposal at authorised sites and on radiation doses to critical groups of the public. In 1994 the programme included the analysis of 160 effluent samples, the analysis of low-level solid radioactive waste destined for the British Nuclear Fuels site at Drigg, and the analysis of a total of 290 environmental samples and direct monitoring at over 150 locations. The materials monitored are those that might result in exposure of the public to radiation by non-food pathways and complements monitoring by the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries. Radiation exposures by these pathways which may have been incurred in 1994 are similar to those in previous years and, in all cases, fall substantially below the International Commission on Radiological Protection's recommended principal dose limit of 1mSv per year. (UK)

  19. Management Aspects of Implementing the New Effluent Air Monitoring Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Davis, William E.

    2000-01-01

    The revision to ANSI/HPS N13.1,'Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive substances From the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities,' went into effect in January 1999 - replacing the 1969 version of the standard. There are several significant changes from the old version of the standard. The revised standard provides a new paradigm where representative air samples can be collected by extracting the sample from a single point in air streams where the contaminants are well mixed. The revised standard provides specific performance criteria and requirements for the various air sampling processes - program structure, sample extraction, transport, collection, effluent and sample flow measurement, and quality assurance. A graded approach to sampling is recommended with more stringent requirements for stacks with a greater potential to emit. These significant changes in the standard will impact the air monitoring programs at some sites and facilities. The impacts on the air monitor design, operation, maintenance, and quality control processes are discussed.

  20. Radioactive substances monitoring programme. Report for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Radioactive Substances Act 1993 provides for controls to be exercised over the use and keeping of radioactive materials and the accumulation and disposal of radioactive wastes. The Environment Agency (the Agency) has been responsible for administration and enforcement of the Act in England and Wales since its formation on 1 April 1996. Prior to this date the work was undertaken by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution (HMIP). In support of its regulatory functions HMIP commissioned independent monitoring. This report presents the results from monitoring undertaken in 1995. The 1995 HMIP programme required operators of certain sites to provide samples of their liquid effluents for independent radiochemical analysis. The results provide checks on site operators' returns and insights into their quality assurance (QA) procedures and analytical techniques. The analyses were undertaken by the Laboratory of the Government Chemist (LGC) at its laboratories in Teddington, Middlesex. The programme also included checks on solid low level radioactive waste destined for land disposal at the site operated by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) at Drigg in Cumbria. (author)

  1. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1994-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, which are part of the overall Hanford Site Environmental Protection Plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of the individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans

  2. Radioactivity leakage monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Takuichiro; Noguchi, Noboru.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a device for detecting the leakage ratio of a primary coolant by utilizing the variation in the radioactivity concentration in a reactor container when the coolant is leaked. Constitution: A measurement signal is produced from a radioactivity measuring instrument, and is continuously input to a malfunction discriminator. The discriminator inputs a measurement signal to a concentration variation discriminator when the malfunction is recognized and simultaneously inputs a measurement starting time from the inputting time to a concentration measuring instrument. On the other hand, reactor water radioactivity concentration data obtained by sampling the primary coolant is input to a concentration variation computing device. A comparator obtains the ratio of the measurement signal from the measuring instrument and the computed data signal from the computing device at the same time and hence the leakage rate, indicates the average leakage rate by averaging the leakage rate signals and also indicates the total leakage amount. (Yoshihara, H.)

  3. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUNACEK, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document was prepared using the specific guidelines identified in Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC)-EP-0438-1, ''A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans'', and assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the third revision to the original annual report. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it is updated as necessary

  4. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 200 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    The following facility effluent monitoring plan determinations document the evaluations conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 200 Area facilities (chemical processing, waste management, 222-S Laboratory, and laundry) on the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. These evaluations determined the need for facility effluent monitoring plans for the 200 Area facilities. The facility effluent monitoring plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438 (WHC 1991). The Plutonium/Uranium Extraction Plant and UO 3 facility effluent monitoring plan determinations were prepared by Los Alamos Technical Associates, Richland, Washington. The Plutonium Finishing Plant, Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility, T Plant, Tank Farms, Low Level Burial Grounds, and 222-S Laboratory determinations were prepared by Science Applications International Corporation of Richland, Washington. The B Plant Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan Determination was prepared by ERCE Environmental Services of Richland, Washington

  6. Interpretation of the concepts of ALARA and bat for radioactive effluent releases from nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoqiu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the understanding of the important concepts of both ALARA and BAT associated with the characteristics of effluent releases from the existing nuclear installations and the abatement techniques for effluents, this paper elaborates the principle of controlling radioactive effluent concentration from nuclear installation, that is based on the BAT focusing on the abatement techniques for effluents, introduces the good practice in the projects, and optimize the effluent releases with account taken of external factors such as the site condition. (authors)

  7. Management of effluents and radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Management of effluents and radioactive waste from nuclear power plants, from the viewpoint of radiological protection, basically consists of three main themes: 1) developing and implementing actions that minimize, or where possible, eliminate generation. These actions ranging from simple awareness of people involved with the work on project modifications; 2) maintain a system of accounting and control that allows to know the characteristics of effluents and wastes, charting indicators that reveal the performance and trends of plant, and supplying data proving the compliance of national regulatory body standards; 3) Storing the solid waste generated in a safe manner, ensuring that the physical integrity of the packaged is maintained and that there is no impact to the population and the environment

  8. Packaging of radioactive sludges at the Saclay effluent processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerre, Pierre; Mestre, Emile; Bourdrez, Jean; Leconnetable, Jean

    1964-10-01

    The authors describe technical and technological aspects of the packaging workshop for radioactive sludges produced by processes of co-precipitation of Saclay effluents. This facility is an achievement of studies which aimed at improving working conditions for the plant staff. This workshop implements a process of solidification of filtered sludge by mixing with a hydraulic binding agent. After some generalities on the decontamination process applied to effluents produced by the Saclay research centre, the authors present and describe the adopted process, propose a physical description of the facility: building, chemical engineering equipment (filtration, packaging, and handling). They describe facility operation: introduction of a block into the cell, block filling, output of a packaged container. They briefly discuss the first results of facility exploitation [fr

  9. Processing of miscellaneous radioactive effluents by continous flocculation decantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, D.; Matton, P.; Petteau, J.L.; Roofthooft, R.

    1985-01-01

    In the nuclear power plant of Chooz an installation for flocculation and chemical precipitation has been built to treat miscellaneous radioactive effluents continuously. It is an industrial prototype of 5 m 3 /h resulting of several years of research, first on lab scale in a discontinous system and finally in a continuous pilot plant of small size (500 l/h). The process is based on the adsorption of radioactivity on a floc of copper-ferrocyanide precipitated by ferric chloride. The water is then filtered. After a series of preliminary tests and modifications, it has been possible to develop a technique which satisfies the specified decontamination conditions and to reduce the discharges of radioactivity to the Meuse to only 5 - 10% of the authorized limits. The process aims principally at the treatment of laundry waste, but other effluents such as drains from the rocks, pool water and used decontamination solutions (of the primary pumps) have been treated. A technico-economic evaluation of the process in comparison with evaporation is clearly in favour of the flocculation. 31 figs, 40 tables, 12 refs

  10. Siting considerations for radioactivity in reactor effluents during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, J.M.; Strom, P.O.

    1975-01-01

    In selecting a proper site for a nuclear power station, the consideration of radioactivity released in effluents can be handled in a straightforward manner using the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission's proposed Appendix I to 10 CFR 50, which gives numerical guidelines for design objectives for meeting the criterion ''as low as practicable'' for radioactive material in light-water-cooled nuclear power reactor effluents. By relating the release of radioactive material, the site meteorological conditions, and site boundary distance through appropriate dose models, the suitability of a given site can be determined. ''Rules of thumb'' for comparing anticipated releases to design objectives can be constructed for rapid assessment using the maximum permissible concentration values of 10 CFR 20 as dose factors. These rules of thumb tend to underpredict the allowed releases except in the case of radiocesium in liquids. For gaseous releases, these rules of thumb can be made up in convenient nomogram form for a quick assessment of allowed releases based on local site meteorological conditions. (U.S.)

  11. Nuclear plant refurbishment calls for patience. [Construction of radioactive effluent plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henly, Anna

    1989-08-01

    All nuclear power plants produce a small quantity of liquid effluent from wash hand basins, showers and surface drains on the site. The effluent is termed low-level radioactive waste and under the 'Radioactive Substances Act' can be discharged into estuaries or the sea. Before a controlled discharge can be made the effluent has to be chemically treated and have any radioactive particulate matter removed. The replacing of the radioactive effluent plant at the Berkeley nuclear power station in the United Kingdom is described, with particular reference to the vigorous safety standards and quality assurance programme operated by the Central Electricity Generating Board. (author).

  12. Estimation of radionuclide releases in atmosphere from Cernavoda NPP based on continuous gaseous effluent monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobric, E.; Murgoci, S.; Popescu, I.; Ibadula, R.

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous effluents from Cernavoda NPP is performed to assess the environmental impact of the plant operation. The results of the monitoring program are used to evaluate the population doses in order to ensure that the emissions of radionuclides in air are below regulatory limits and radiation doses are maintained ALARA. It complements, but is independent from the Operational Environmental Monitoring Program for Cernavoda NPP. Gaseous effluent monitors provide continuous indication of the radioactivity content in atmospheric emissions. Except for noble gases, these monitors also collect samples for later detailed analysis in the station Health Physics Laboratory. This paper presents the main equipment and the results of the gaseous effluents monitoring program in order to assess the impact of Cernavoda NPP operation and to predict the future releases as function of radionuclides concentrations in CANDU systems, based on the identified trends.(author)

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 400 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination resulted from an evaluation conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 400 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Two major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 400 Area were evaluated: the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Fuels Manufacturing and examination Facility. The determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of these two facilities, only the Fast Flux Test Facility will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Radioactive effluents from CANDU 6 reactors during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, C.R.; Allsop, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    During routine operation of a CANDU 6 reactor, various gaseous, liquid, and solid radioactive wastes are generated. The layout of the CANDU 6 reactor and the design of its systems ensure that these are minimized, but small quantities of gaseous and liquid wastes are continually discharged at very low concentrations. This report discusses the make-up of these chronically generated gaseous and liquid effluents. From a safety perspective, the doses to individual members of the public resulting from radioactive wastes chronically discharged from CANDU 6 reactors have been negligible. Similarly, doses to the regional and global populations have been negligible, generally less than 0.001% of background. While far below regulatory limits, releases of tritium, noble gases and gross β - -γ have been the most radiologically significant emissions, while radioiodine and particulates have had the greatest potential to deliver public dose. (author). 8 refs., 16 tabs., 3 figs

  15. Monitoring of radioactivity in 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are given on the monitoring of radioactive contamination of air and some food stuffe at world locations throughout Western South America, South Pacific and Africa during 1979. Data are included on the total β and γ activity and radionuclide content in air, milk and other environmental samples ( 131 I, 90 Sr, 137 Cs) [fr

  16. Monitoring of radioactivity in 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented on the monitoring of radioactive contamination of air and some foodstuffs at world (locations throughout Western South America, South Pacific, Africa during 1973. Data are included on the total β and γ activity and content of radionuclides found in fallout in air, milk and other environmental samples ( 131 I, 90 Sr, 137 Cs) [fr

  17. Monitoring of the release of gaseous and aerosol-bound radioactive materials. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    KTA 1503 contains requirements on technical installations and supplementary organizational measures considered necessary in order to monitor the release of gaseous and aerosol-bound radioactive materials. It consists of part 1: Monitoring of the release of radioactive materials together with stack gas during normal operation; part 2: Monitoring of the release of radioactive materials together with stack gas in the event of incidents; part 3: Monitoring of radioactive materials not released together with stack gas. The concept on which this rule is based is to ensure that in the case of incidents during which the result of effluent monitoring remains meaningful, such monitoring can be reliably performed. (orig./HSCH) [de

  18. Radioactive airborne effluent discharged from Tokai reprocessing plant. 1998-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Akira; Miyauchi, Toru; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Momose, Takumaro; Kozawa, Tomoyasu; Yokota, Tomokazu; Ohtomo, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-01

    This report provides the data set of atmospheric discharges from Tokai reprocessing plant in Tokai-mura, Japan over the period from 1998 to 2007. Daily and weekly data are shown for 85 Kr that is continuously monitored and for the other nuclides (alpha emitters, beta emitters, 3 H, 14 C, 129 I and 131 I) whose activities are evaluated based on weekly samplings (Weekly sampling is continuous for 1 week). The data contained in this report are expected to apply for studying the behavior of the radioactive airborne effluent in the environment. (author)

  19. Developments in radioactive scrap monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellian, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past ten years there have been major developments in radiation monitoring systems used for detecting shielded radioactive sources in scrap metal. The extent of the problem and industry's awareness of the problem have both grown significantly during that time. The multimillion dollar expenses associated with decontamination after a source passes into the melt and the potential health hazard to employees and the public have added further impetus to the development of monitoring systems. Early attempts at scrap monitoring could detect some radiation, but testing with real life situations showed them to be virtually incapable of detecting shielded sources of radioactivity in incoming vehicles. More sophisticated detector technology and the development of advanced software made useful by more powerful microprocessors led to successive generations of monitoring systems with order-of-magnitude improvement in detection capability. The next generation includes larger detectors and more complex algorithms offering further improvement in truck and rail car monitoring. Complete solutions require monitoring at additional locations within the site, such as the charge bucket and conveyor lines, and at the scrap processor's site

  20. Control verification radioactive effluent discharges to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, D.E.; Czerniczyniec, M.A.; Amado, V.A.; Curti, A.R.; Lee Gonzáles, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    The National Law of Nuclear Activity No. 24,804 establishes that the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) will be responsible for the function of regulation and control of nuclear activity, grant, suspend and revoke licenses, permits or authorizations and to issue regulatory standards on radiation and nuclear safety. According to the latter the ARN has issued a set of rules that make up the regulatory framework for nuclear activity. This includes the standards that determine the radiological criteria for controlling the release of radioactive effluents which were established to protect members of the public. In the process of licensing a facility, the ARN determines the authorized discharge of gaseous and liquid effluents which must comply with the installation values. These annual values are understood as an operating restriction (OR) and arise from the activity of each relevant radionuclide present in the discharge. For this is taken as a reference the level of optimized discharge considering an appropriate margin of flexibility to ensure public protection without interfering with the operation of the installation. This paper presents the results of the review of the above criteria and methodology for calculating the RO adopted by the RNA present. [es

  1. Technical Orders of 10 August 1976 on the limits and procedures applicable to radioactive effluent discharges from nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Seven technical Orders by the competent Ministers (mainly the Ministers of Health, of Industry and Research, of the Quality of Life) lay down the procedures, conditions and limits applicable to gaseous and liquid radioactive effluent discharges from nuclear installations. These Orders of 10 August were published on 12 September 1976 in the Official French Gazette and were made in implementation of the Decree of 6 November 1974 on gaseous radioactive effluent discharges from nuclear installations and the Decree of 31 December 1974 on liquid radioactive effluent discharges from nuclear installations. Apart from the general rules for setting limits and methods for effluent discharges, they specify the measures for environmental monitoring and for control by the Central Service for Protection against Ionizing Radiations. Certain of them contain the general rules for liquid or gaseous effluent discharges from all nuclear installations, while others lay down the rules proper to light water nuclear power plants. Other types of reactor ie. fast breeders are not yet subject to such regulations. (N.E.A.) [fr

  2. Effluent treatment efficiency and compliance monitoring in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effectiveness of effluent treatment at the Eleme Petrochemical Industry, Port Harcourt, Nigeria was monitored weekly for six weeks to assess their level of compliance with the Directorate of Petroleum Resources (DPR) guidelines and standards for environmental safety. Effluent samples were taken from the untreated ...

  3. Operability test procedure for the TK-900 effluent monitoring station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This procedure will verify that the 221-B liquid effluent monitoring system, installed near the east end of the 6-in. chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. TK-900B was installed near stairwell 3 in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system

  4. Environmental radioactivity monitoring in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltezos, A.; Potiriadis, C.; Aravantinos, A.

    1997-01-01

    Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the national organization responsible for the environmental radioactivity measurements in Greece. In order to monitor the radioactivity, 12 stations were placed all over Greece. Each station is equipped with NaI detector, measuring daily the total gamma dose rates. After the Chernobyl experience many countries have installed dense automatic networks, for measuring environmental radioactivity and serving as an early warning systems. In Greece a small telemetric network of two stations was installed in Athens area as a pilot project. Each station consists of two GM detectors (for low and high dose rate respectively). Data are collected for every ten minutes sampling time. Regration time of one hour is obtained. In case of level one and level two alarm states, the sampling time intervals are ten and one minutes respectively. The measurements are obtained by the above stations using the lines of the telephone network, and stored in the central station. Financial support to upgrade the existing telemetric system was assured by the addition of 25 new telemetric stations which will cover madly the northern part bordering to other states with nuclear power plants.In order to complete the network, we plan to add more stations to measure the gamma dose rates spread all over Greece, and also monitor river water. (authors)

  5. Statistical evaluation of effluent monitoring data for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    2000-01-01

    The 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) consists of a pair of infiltration basins that receive wastewater originating from the 200 West and 200 East Areas of the Hanford Site. TEDF has been in operation since 1995 and is regulated by State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4502 (Ecology 1995) under the authority of Chapter 90.48 Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-216. The permit stipulates monitoring requirements for effluent (or end-of-pipe) discharges and groundwater monitoring for TEDF. Groundwater monitoring began in 1992 prior to TEDF construction. Routine effluent monitoring in accordance with the permit requirements began in late April 1995 when the facility began operations. The State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4502 included a special permit condition (S.6). This condition specified a statistical study of the variability of permitted constituents in the effluent from TEDF during its first year of operation. The study was designed to (1) demonstrate compliance with the waste discharge permit; (2) determine the variability of all constituents in the effluent that have enforcement limits, early warning values, and monitoring requirements (WHC 1995); and (3) determine if concentrations of permitted constituents vary with season. Additional and more frequent sampling was conducted for the effluent variability study. Statistical evaluation results were provided in Chou and Johnson (1996). Parts of the original first year sampling and analysis plan (WHC 1995) were continued with routine monitoring required up to the present time

  6. Limitation of releases of radioactive effluents for nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolksdorf, P.; Buehling, A.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical values relating to the effluents of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany are now available. These values cover a period of several years of operation. The measured emissions of radioactive substances are often very much below the maximum permissible values, based on the dose limits for the environment stipulated in the legal regulations. Extensive technical and administrative measures contribute to the reduction of radioactive effluents. Furthermore, additional possibilities for improvement are mentioned which may lead to a further reduction of radioactive effluents. These are derived from investigations into the release of radioactive substances in nuclear power plants. The licensing procedure in the Federal Republic of Germany in fixing discharge limits is outlined. Proposals are made concerning licence values which may be determined for the radioactive effluents in modern standardized nuclear power plants with light-water reactors. The resulting radiation exposures are quoted for a typical nuclear power plant site. (author)

  7. A unique criterion for the classification of the activity of radioactive effluents according to the activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasovac, T.; Bojovic, P.; Svabic, A.

    1964-10-01

    The present classification of radioactive effluents into categories, i.e. low, medium, high and very high activity, has not been given a definite criterion. Therefore, some categories include specific activities from 2-6 and more potentials. Therefore, it occurs that the category of medium active effluents in one nuclear center is indicated as low active in the second or as highly active in the third. Therefore, a proposal is given in this paper for a unique criterion for the classification of radioactive effluents according to their activities. This proposal is based on the decontamination factors obtained by various methods and the maximum permissible concentrations of radioactive isotopes in water (author)

  8. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) System Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    The liquid effluent sampling program is part of the effort to minimize adverse environmental impact during the cleanup operation at the Hanford Site. Of the 33 Phase I and Phase II liquid effluents, all streams actively discharged to the soil column will be sampled. The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Construction document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  9. Environmental radioactivity monitoring in Republic of Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksic, J.; Radenkovic, M.; Tanaskovic, I.; Vujovic, M.; Vuletic

    2011-01-01

    According to environmental radioactivity monitoring programme continuous measurements of radioactivity in different samples are performed. Measurements are performed in aerosol samples, fallout, soil, surface waters, drinking water, food of animal and plant origin, milk and feeding stuffs. [sr

  10. Development of radioactive seawater monitors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Masanori

    1989-01-01

    Applicability of some adsorptive materials to monitoring of radioactive seawater is generalized. Studied techniques that allow utilization of adsorptive materials in monitoring radioactive seawater are the substitute methods using sampled seawater or indicator plants such as gulfweed and the method using adsorptive materials for continuous monitoring of underwater radioactivity, the method using them for field measurement of under water radioactivity from a boat, and the method using an adsorptive material moored underwater for integration monitoring of underwater radioactivity. Selected adsorptive materials that were judged suitable for monitoring radioactive seawater is the one composed of some kind of adsorptive compound (manganese dioxide or ferrocyan cobalt potassium) fixed to crylic cellulose. This adsorptive material permits selective scavenging radioactive Cs, Mn, Co, Zn, Ce, Fe, Ru, Ra Th, Pu and Am from seawater. (aurhor)

  11. Process and device for conditioning low and medium activity radioactive effluents with hydraulic binders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Magnin, G.; Renault, G.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical processing of borated radioactive effluents is claimed. Tetrahydrated calcium borate crystals are prepared by lime additions, the volume is reduced by evaporation under reduced pressure and the product obtained is mixed with hydraulic binders [fr

  12. Studies for improvement of regulatory control on the radioactive effluent released from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Jae Hak; Park, H. M.; Song, M. C.; Lee, K. H.; Jang, J. K.; Chun, J. K.; Jeong, K. H.

    2005-05-01

    This report contains the second-year results of the research project titled 'Studies for Improvement of Regulatory Control on the Radioactive Effluent Released from Nuclear Facilities' and mainly provides technical and strategic approaches to improve performance of regulatory control on the gaseous effluent released from domestic nuclear facilities. The main result contained here includes overview and technical bases of radioactive gaseous effluent control (Chapter 1), reconsideration of the sensitivity requirements for measurement of radioactivity in gaseous effluent sample (Chapter 2), uncertainty analysis of the calculated radioactivity in gaseous effluent (Chapter 3), and improvement of quantification method of noble gas releases (Chapter 4). In addition, analysis of the impact due to combined sampling of particulate from multiple release points (Chapter 5), comparison of domestic nuclear reactors gaseous effluent data to foreign PWRs (Chapter 6), standardized sampling technique for collection of gaseous tritium (Chapter 7), and application of Xe-133 equivalent concept to gaseous effluent control (Chapter 8) are also provided. As a whole, this report provides a generic approach to improve the performance of regulatory control on the gaseous effluent. Therefore, actual enforcement of the recommendations should be preceded by establishment of a series of action plans reflecting on the site- and facility-specific design and operational features

  13. Study about the integrated treatment of chemical and radioactive effluents, introducing the zero release concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierzwa, Jose Carlos

    1996-01-01

    An Integrated System to the treatment of Chemical and Radioactive Effluents to the Centro Experimental Aramar is proposed and evaluated, introducing the Effluent Zero Release concept, where factors related to the environmental regulation in vigor in the country, as well as the availability of hydrological resources in the place where CEA have been implanted, are considered. Through a literature analysis of the main effluents treatment techniques available nowadays and after a case of study selection, take into account two industrial installations that will be implanted at CEA, it was defined an arrangement to compose the Integrated System to the Treatment of Chemicals and Radioactive Effluents, focusing the Zero Release concept consolidation. A defined arrangement uses a combination among three treatment processes, it means chemical precipitation, reverse osmosis and evaporation, that were experimentally evaluated. The proposed arrangement was evaluated using synthetic effluents, that were prepared based on data from literature and conception documents of the installation considered in this work. Three kinds of effluents were simulated, one arising from a nuclear reactor laundry, one arising from the water refrigeration system and demineralized water production to the nuclear reactor and the other one arising from a nuclear material production laboratory. Each effluent were individually submitted to the selected treatment processes, to get the best operational conditions for each treatment process. The results got during the laboratory assays show that the proposed Integrated System to the Treatment of Chemicals and Radioactive Effluents is feasible, consolidating the Effluent Zero Release concept, which is the proposition of this work. (author)

  14. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring; Umweltradioaktivitaet. Messung und Ueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-11-15

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  15. Radioactive gases monitor system: tritium, radon, noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egey, J.Z.; Matatagui, E.

    2015-01-01

    A system for monitoring the radioactive gases tritium, radon and noble gases is described. We present the description of the sensor and the associated electronics that have been developed to monitor the presence of radioactive gases in air or other gaseous effluents. The system has a high sensitivity and a wide range of operation. The sensor is an ionization chamber, featuring the internal circulation of the gas to monitor and the associated electronics has a resolution better than 10 E-15A (fA). It allows the detection of the individual pulses that are produced during the alpha decay of radon and its daughter elements. The measurement system is made up of a commercial data acquisition system connected to a computer. The acquired data is presented on a graphical display and it is stored for later processing and analysis. We have a system that is of simple construction and versatile. Here we present the experimental results. (authors) [es

  16. Radioactive effluent sources and special system of channels on the RA Reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojovic, P.; Gacinovic, O.; Milosevic, M.

    1964-10-01

    The paper describes the place of origin, composition and activity of radioactive effluents appearing in some reactor systems and special channels for carrying these effluents to disposal basins located outside the reactor building (author)

  17. A risk-based approach to liquid effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, L.C.

    1995-10-01

    DOE Order 5400.1 identifies six objectives of a liquid effluent monitoring program. A strategy is proposed that meets these objective in one of two ways: (1) by showing that effluent concentrations are below concentration limits set by permits or are below concentrations that could cause environmental problems or (2) by showing that concentrations in effluent have not changed from a period when treatment processes were in control and there were no unplanned releases. The intensity of liquid effluent monitoring should be graded to the importance of the source being monitored. This can be accomplished by determining the risk posed by the source. A definition of risk is presented that defines risk in terms of the statistical probability of exceeding a release limit and the time available to recover from an exceedance of a release limit. Three examples are presented that show this approach to grading an effluent monitoring program can be implemented at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and will reduce monitoring requirements.

  18. Optimizing Liquid Effluent Monitoring at a Large Nuclear Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Charissa J.; Johnson, V.G.; Barnett, Brent B.; Olson, Phillip M.

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring data for a centralized effluent treatment and disposal facility at the Hanford Site, a defense nuclear complex undergoing cleanup and decommissioning in southeast Washington State, was evaluated to optimize liquid effluent monitoring efficiency. Wastewater from several facilities is collected and discharged to the ground at a common disposal site. The discharged water infiltrates through 60 m of soil column to the groundwater, which eventually flows into the Columbia River, the second largest river in the contiguous United States. Protection of this important natural resource is the major objective of both cleanup and groundwater and effluent monitoring activities at the Hanford Site. Four years of effluent data were evaluated for this study. More frequent sampling was conducted during the first year of operation to assess temporal variability in analyte concentrations, to determine operational factors contributing to waste stream variability and to assess the probability of exceeding permit limits. Subsequently, the study was updated which included evaluation of the sampling and analysis regime. It was concluded that the probability of exceeding permit limits was one in a million under normal operating conditions, sampling frequency could be reduced, and several analytes could be eliminated, while indicators could be substituted for more expensive analyses. Findings were used by the state regulatory agency to modify monitoring requirements for a new discharge permit. The primary focus of this paper is on the statistical approaches and rationale that led to the successful permit modification and to a more cost-effective effluent monitoring program

  19. A risk-based approach to liquid effluent monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, L.C.

    1995-10-01

    DOE Order 5400.1 identifies six objectives of a liquid effluent monitoring program. A strategy is proposed that meets these objective in one of two ways: (1) by showing that effluent concentrations are below concentration limits set by permits or are below concentrations that could cause environmental problems or (2) by showing that concentrations in effluent have not changed from a period when treatment processes were in control and there were no unplanned releases. The intensity of liquid effluent monitoring should be graded to the importance of the source being monitored. This can be accomplished by determining the risk posed by the source. A definition of risk is presented that defines risk in terms of the statistical probability of exceeding a release limit and the time available to recover from an exceedance of a release limit. Three examples are presented that show this approach to grading an effluent monitoring program can be implemented at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and will reduce monitoring requirements

  20. Estimation of radioactive effluents dispersion from the nuclear power plants in Yugoslavia surrounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehauc, A.

    1997-01-01

    The computational method for atmospheric dispersion of radioactive effluents is applied to the nuclear power plants in Yugoslavia surrounding. On the basis of computation results, ground level concentrations and washout of radioactive nuclides on exposed Yugoslav territories during unfavourable meteorological conditions are estimated. (author)

  1. Monitoring of noble gas radioisotopes in nuclear power plant effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabat, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous radionuclides in the effluents of nuclear facilities is an essential requirement in effluent management programs. Since there is no practical way of removing noble gas radioisotopes from air at release pathways, their accurate monitoring is essential for providing appropriate environmental protection. Emitted γ dose-rate is the limiting factor for concentration-time integral of noble gas in gaseous effluents of reactor facilities. The external exposure to the public from a semi-infinite cloud is directly proportional to both the noble gas isotope concentration and the integrated γ energy per disintegration. Both can be directly measured in gaseous effluent pathways with a suitable detector. The capability of NaI(T1), CaF 2 (Eu) and plastic scintillation detectors to measure the γ-Ci.MeV content of noble gas releases was experimentally evaluated. The combination of CaF 2 (Eu) detector in a pressurized through-flow chamber, with a charge integrating scaler well complied with both γ energy response and detection sensitivity requirements. Noble gas source terms and effluent monitoring criteria are discussed, theoretical and experimental results are presented and a practical, on-line noble gas monitoring system is described

  2. Optimizing liquid effluent monitoring at a large nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Charissa J; Barnett, D Brent; Johnson, Vernon G; Olson, Phil M

    2003-12-01

    Effluent monitoring typically requires a large number of analytes and samples during the initial or startup phase of a facility. Once a baseline is established, the analyte list and sampling frequency may be reduced. Although there is a large body of literature relevant to the initial design, few, if any, published papers exist on updating established effluent monitoring programs. This paper statistically evaluates four years of baseline data to optimize the liquid effluent monitoring efficiency of a centralized waste treatment and disposal facility at a large defense nuclear complex. Specific objectives were to: (1) assess temporal variability in analyte concentrations, (2) determine operational factors contributing to waste stream variability, (3) assess the probability of exceeding permit limits, and (4) streamline the sampling and analysis regime. Results indicated that the probability of exceeding permit limits was one in a million under normal facility operating conditions, sampling frequency could be reduced, and several analytes could be eliminated. Furthermore, indicators such as gross alpha and gross beta measurements could be used in lieu of more expensive specific isotopic analyses (radium, cesium-137, and strontium-90) for routine monitoring. Study results were used by the state regulatory agency to modify monitoring requirements for a new discharge permit, resulting in an annual cost savings of US dollars 223,000. This case study demonstrates that statistical evaluation of effluent contaminant variability coupled with process knowledge can help plant managers and regulators streamline analyte lists and sampling frequencies based on detection history and environmental risk.

  3. Measurement of liquid radioactive materials for monitoring radioactive emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    This draft regulation applies to measuring equipment for liquid radioactive materials for the monitoring of the radioactive discharges from stationary nuclear power plants with LWR and HTR reactors. Demands made on the measuring procedure, methods of concentration determination, balancing, indication of limiting values, and inspections are layed down. The draft regulation deals with: 1) Monitoring liquid radioactive discharges: Water and similar systems; radionuclides and their detection limits, radioactively contaminated water (waste water); secondary cooling water; power house cooling water; primary cooling water; flooding water; 2) Layout of the measuring and sampling equipment and demands made on continuous and discontinuous measuring equipment; demands made on discontinuous α and β measuring equipment; 3) Maintenance and repair work; inspections; repair of defects; 4) Demands made on documentation; reports to authorities; 5) Supplement: List of general and reference regulations. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Consideration of radioecological studies in French regulations on the discharges of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, J.

    1980-01-01

    For each of the lines of approach of the regulations on radioactive effluent discharges utilized in France, the report examines the place of radioecology. Developments in greater depth will be devoted to the preliminary and definitive studies foreseen by the conditions of effluent discharges coming from the base nuclear facilities. The place of radioecology in general international law on pollution across national borders or of the sea will also be examined [fr

  5. Effluent and environmental monitoring of Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgrim, T.; De Waele, C.; Gallagher, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) Environmental Protection Program has been gathering environmental monitoring data at its Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for over 60 years. The comprehensive effluent and environmental monitoring program at CRL consists of more than 600 sampling locations, including the Ottawa River, with approximately 60,000 analyses performed on air and liquid effluent parameters each year. Monitoring for a variety of radiological and non-radiological parameters is regularly conducted on various media, including ambient air, foodstuff (e.g. milk, fish, garden produce, large game, and farm animals), groundwater, Ottawa River water and other surface water on and off-site. The purpose of the monitoring program is to verify that past and current radiological and non-radiological emissions derived from AECL operations and activities, such as process water effluent into the Ottawa River, are below regulatory limits and demonstrate that CRL operations do not negatively affect the quality of water on or leaving the site. In fact, ongoing program reports demonstrate that radiological emissions are well below regulatory limits and have been declining for the past five years, and that non-radiological contaminants do not negatively affect the quality of water on and off the site. Two updated Canadian Standards Association (CSA) standards for Effluent and Environmental monitoring have come into effect and have resulted in some changes to the AECL Program. This presentation will discuss effluent and surface water monitoring results, the observed trends, the changes triggered by the CSA standards, and a path forward for the future. (author)

  6. Estimation of radioactive effluents concentrations in the vicinity of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsov, Lj.

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of mathematical prediction of radioactive effluent concentrations around nuclear power plants. This mathematical model which describes the behaviour of the effluent in the atmosphere here in after is expanded and adapted for radioactive effluent treatment. In this way the mathematical model includes the description of the following effects: the rise of plume caused by its vertical momentum and its heat content, wind velocity profile and vertical growth of the coefficient of diffusion, fallout under gravity, ground deposition, precipitation scavenging, and radioactive decay. The advanced computer program DIFFUS has been applied to evaluate the ground concentration of the nuclides of I, which constitute the greatest risk for population.(author)

  7. Monitoring of radioactivity in the environment 201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, B.; Dyve, J.E.; Tazmini, K.

    2013-01-01

    The Report summarizes the data from Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and The Norwegian Civil Defence monitoring programs for radioactivity in the environment in 2011. A short description of the systems is also presented.(Author)

  8. Impact of treated effluents released from processing of radioactive mineral on the aquatic environment of Periyar river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, Sujata; Haridasan, P.P.; Radhakrishna Pillai, K.; Pillai, P.M.B.; Khan, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    The chemical processing of monazite/ thorium concentrate for the separation of thorium, uranium and rare earths results in the generation of effluents, both acidic and alkaline. Indian Rare Earths Ltd (IREL), Udyogamandal was carrying out processing of monazite for nearly 50 years. Presently (since 2004) Indian Rare Earths Ltd, Udyogamandal is processing earlier stocked thorium hydroxide concentrate retrieved from Silos to produce Thorium Oxalate (along with a small percentage of Rare Earth elements), Nuclear Grade Ammonium Di-Uranate (NGADU), and small quantities of Nuclear Grade Thorium Oxide ('THRUST' Project). The treated effluents after monitoring are discharged to river Periyar. River Periyar is the recipient water body for treated effluents from IREL as well as a host of other chemical industries. Indian Rare Earths Ltd, Udyogamandal had been carrying out chemical processing of monazite for the past 50 years. Recently, from 2004, the plant has shifted from monazite processing to processing of thorium concentrate (THRUST Project). The present paper discusses the characteristics of the effluents generated as per this project, their treatment, monitoring methodology, discharge and impact on the aquatic environment of river Periyar. It has been noted that the impact on the aquatic environment by way of enhancing the natural background radioactivity in the river had been insignificant. (author)

  9. Radioactivity monitoring programme of Krsko nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklavzic, U.; Martincic, R.; Kanduc, M.; Lulic, S.; Kovac, J.; Breznik, B.

    1996-01-01

    As a successor to the preoperational surveillance programme, the regular offsite radioactivity monitoring programme (RMP) of the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) was implemented in 1982, when the power plant formally commenced operating. Observations collected during the first years of its operation were later also the basis for setting up the official 'Regulatory guide on monitoring of nuclear installations', issued not earlier than in 1986. The basic criterion which governed the selection of measuring methods, sampling techniques and locations, was the extent to which the data obtained could serve for the realistic assessment of the committed dose to a member of the population, and later on to members of a representative (critical) group. To be able to differentiate the radioactivity released through the liquid and gaseous effluents of the NPP from other radiation sources (natural radioactivity, global contamination), and especially because of the varying radiotoxicity of different radionuclides, in principle monitoring in the environment, as at the source, had to provide activity data for each individual radionuclide appearing in the effluents. Therefore, as early as 1982 the programme attributed the main weight to high resolution gamma spectrometry, combined with specific radiochemical analytical methods (e.g. 90 Sr/ 89 Sr, 3 H, 14 C, alpha spectrometry of Pu isotopes) which together made feasible determination of individual specific activities of the most significant man-made and natural radionuclides. By weighting the specific activities of the radionuclides identified and measured in the media surveyed by dose factors for intake, the quantity 'B' - the so-called 'radiological burden', was calculated and introduced in the yearly-summary tables. Expressed in relative units, from which the committed dose could be readily calculated, the burden B very lucidly disclosed the relative importance of different artificial pollutants and natural radioactivity present in

  10. Elimination of slightly radioactive liquid effluent by dilution. Its consequences (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, P.; Candillon, C.

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear centres often have to solve problems raised by the elimination of large volumes of slightly radioactive liquid effluent. As things stand at present, the method usually adopted consists in expelling this effluent into the main water system in order to dilute it to a maximum, and thus to lower its radioactive isotope concentration to below the norms imposed by the Public Health Service. This technique requires systematic checking of the water system and its dependences, and demands a thorough knowledge of adsorption and fixation processes. (author) [fr

  11. Process for processing and conditioning radioactive effluents of low and medium activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taponier, Jean; Pierlas, Rene.

    1979-01-01

    Preferably continuous process for processing radioactive effluents of low and medium activity, comprising an effluent pre-treatment: precipitation of radioactive compounds to form a stable suspension that can be concentrated. Then a mix is made of 0.6 to 2 parts of cement by weight for one part by weight of suspension, from 0.5 to 5% by weight, in relation to the cement, of asbestos fibre and, if necessary, added water for the cement to set, this suspension containing from 15 to 75% by weight of dry extract and a suspension agent. The homogeneous mix achieved is poured into a container [fr

  12. The use of PHP in the radioactive effluent treatment in rare earth industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitang, Q.; Ruensheng, W.

    1985-01-01

    Monazite is one of the most important rare earth resources, processing monazite, however, is accompanied by radioactive effluent that needs treatment. A satisfactory treatment should be able not only to insolubilize the radioactive isotopes but also to clarify the suspension quickly and completely. In this study, out of 15 different coagulants, partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHP) of molecular weight 1000 has been chosen as the most efficient one for the clarification of the treated effluent in question. Satisfactory performance has been attained in a continuous clarifier

  13. Treatment of radioactive effluents at the Boris Kidric Institute; Postupak sa radioaktivnim elementima u Institutu Boris Kidric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojovic, P; Drobnik, S; Popara, D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-10-15

    The paper describes the origin, composition and activity of radioactive effluents at the Boris Kidric Institute, their collection at the places or origin, transport to the place of disposal and treatment of some smaller quantities. Special attention has been paid to effluents with short-lived isotopes produced in the Laboratory for radioactive isotope production (author)

  14. Monitoring of radioactivity in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M.; Letessier, P.

    2008-01-01

    Radioactivity is a physical phenomenon whose presence in water is monitored due to its potential capability to induce deleterious effects on human health. In this article the effects that can be caused by radioactivity as well as the way in which regulations establish how to perform a monitorization of water that enables us to ascertain that the radiological quality of water is in agreement with the accepted standard of quality of life are analyzed. Finally the means available to know the content of radioactivity in water together with some clues on how to remove it from water are described. (Author) 5 refs

  15. Radioactive effluents in the Savannah River: Summary report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-09-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site have low-level radiometric studies of the Savannah River to distinguish between the effluent contributions of the Savannah River Site and Plant Vogtle. Since the startup of Plant Vogtle in 1987, researchers have routinely detected neutron-activated isotopes in controlled releases, but all have routinely detected neutron-activated isotopes in controlled releases, but all have been well below the Department of Energy's (DOE) guidelines. The study has found that processing improvement at Plant Vogtle during 1989 have lowered the activities of effluents from Plant Vogtle. These studies will continue on a routine basis because they provide disturbing trends before actual health concerns evolve

  16. Radioactivity monitoring of fallout, water and ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radosavljevic, R.

    1961-01-01

    During 1961, the radioactivity monitoring of the Boris Kidric Institute site covered monitoring of the total β activity of the fallout and water on the site. Activity of the fallout was monitored by measuring the activity of the rain and collected sedimented dust form the atmosphere. Water monitored was the water from Danube and river Mlaka, technical and drinking water. Plants and soil activity were not measured although sample were taken and the total β activity will be measured and analysed later

  17. Automated system of control of radioactive liquid effluents of patients submitted to therapy in hospitals of nuclear medicine (SACEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz C, M.A.; Rivero G, T.; Celis del Angel, L.; Sainz M, E.; Molina, G.

    2006-01-01

    Different hospitals of nuclear medicine require of the technical attendance for the design, construction and instrumentation of an effluents retention system coming from the room dedicated to the medical application of iodine 131, with the one object of giving execution to the normative requirements of radiological protection, settled down in the General Regulation of Radiological Safety (RGSR) emitted by the CNSNS in November, 1988 and in the corresponding official standards. An automatic system of flow measurement, the activity concentration of the effluents to the drainage, the discharges control and the automated report it will allow the execution of the national regulations, also the elimination of unhealthy activities as the taking of samples, analysis of those same and the corresponding paperwork, its will allow that the SACEL is capable of to carry out registrations that are to consult in an automated way. The changes in the demands of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards in relation to the liberation of radioactive material in hospitals by medical treatments, it has created the necessity to develop a system that quantifies and dose the liquid effluents of people under thyroid treatment with iodine-131 to the drainage. The Automated System of Control of radioactive liquids effluents generated in Hospitals of Nuclear Medicine (SACEL) developed in the National Institute of Nuclear Research, it fulfills this regulation, besides improving the work conditions for the medical and technical personnel of the hospital in that are installed, since this system has the advantage of to be totally automated and to require of a minimum of attendance. The SACEL is an electro-hydraulic system of effluents control, based in the alternate operation of two decay deposits of the activity of the material contaminated with iodine-131. The system allows to take a registration of those volumes and liberated dose, besides being able to be monitoring in remote

  18. Graphic overview system for DOE's effluent and environmental monitoring programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burson, Z.G.; Elle, D.R.

    1980-03-01

    The Graphic Overview System is a compilation of photos, maps, overlays, and summary information of environmental programs and related data for each DOE site. The information consists of liquid and airborne effluent release points, on-site storage locations, monitoring locations, aerial survey results, population distributions, wind roses, and other related information. The relationships of different environmental programs are visualized through the use of colored overlays. Trends in monitoring data, effluent releases, and on-site storage data are also provided as a corollary to the graphic display of monitoring and release points. The results provide a working tool with which DOE management (headquarters and field offices) can place in proper perspective key aspects of all environmental programs and related data, and the resulting public impact of each DOE site

  19. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Hary, L.F.; Klein, L.S.

    1983-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. All discharges for 1982 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. 1 figure

  20. Volatile organic monitor for industrial effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Stuart, A.D.; Loyola, V.M.

    1993-07-01

    1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have created the need for instruments capable of monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in public air space in an unattended and low cost manner. The purpose of the study was to develop and demonstrate the capability to do long term automatic and unattended ambient air monitoring using an inexpensive portable analytic system at a commercial manufacturing plant site. A gas chromatograph system personal computer hardware, meteorology tower ampersand instruments, and custom designed hardware and software were developed. Comparison with an EPA approved method was performed. The system was sited at an aircraft engines manufacturing site and operated in a completely unattended mode for 60 days. Two VOCs were monitored every 30 minutes during the 24hr day. Large variation in the concentration from 800ppb to the limits of detection of about 10ppb were observed. Work to increase the capabilities of the system is ongoing

  1. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.

    1995-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting a program to monitor the waste water from PNL-operated research and development facilities on the Hanford Site. The purpose of the program is to collect data to assess administrative controls and to determine whether discharges to the process sewer meet sewer criteria. Samples have been collected on a regular basis from the major PNL facilities on the Hanford Site since March 1994. A broad range of analyses has been performed to determine the primary constituents in the liquid effluent. The sampling program is briefly summarized in the paper. Continuous monitoring of pH, conductivity, and flow also provides data on the liquid effluent streams. In addition to sampling and monitoring, the program is evaluating the dynamics of the waste stream with dye studies and is evaluating the use of newer technologies for potential deployment in future sampling/monitoring efforts. Information collected to date has been valuable in determining sources of constituents that may be higher than the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). This facility treats the waste streams before discharge to the Columbia River

  2. Recommended parameters for effect assessment of radioactive airborne effluents under normal condition of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Fang Dong; Sun Chengzhi; Xiao Naihong

    2003-01-01

    A set of models and default parameters are recommended for effect assessment of radioactive airborne effluents under normal condition of nuclear facilities in order to standardize the environmental effect assessment of nuclear facilities, and to simplify the observation and investigation in early phase. The paper introduces the input data and default parameters used in the model

  3. Radioactivity Monitoring of the Irish Environment 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegan, M.; Dowdall, A.; Hanley, O.; Hayden, E.; Kelleher, K.; Long, S.; Smith, V.; Somerville, S.; Wong, J.; Pollard, D.

    2008-10-01

    This report presents the results of the environmental radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) in 2007. This programme aims to assess the exposure of the Irish population to artificial radioactivity in the envorinment, to review the temporal and geographical distribution of contaminating radionuclides and to maintain systems and procedures which would allow a rapid assessment of environmental contamination to be made in the event of a radiological emergency. In additiopn, some natural radioactivity exposure pathways are included in the programme including radioactivity in surface and ground drinking water. Radioactivity is present in the environment due to natural oprocesses, the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, past nuclear accidents such as that at Chernobyl in the Ukraine and the routine discharge of radionuclides from nuclear installations. Liquid discharges from the British Nuclear Group reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria in the north-west of England continue to be the dominant source of artificial radioactivity in the Irish marine environment. The key elements of the monitoring programme implemented by the RPII in 2007 included; assessment of ambient radioactivity based on measurements of radioactivity in air and of external gamma dose rate at permanent monitoring stations located throughout the country; assessment of levels of radioactivity in drinking water; assessment of levels of radioactivity in foodstuffs based on measurements of total diet, milk and various ingredients; assessment of levels of radioactivity in the Irish marine environment based on sampling and measurement of seawater, sediment, seaweed, fish and shellfish. The RPII monitored airborne radioactivity at twelve stations located throughout the country. One of these stations is equipped with a high volume sampler, which allows background concentrations of caesium-137 to be measured; another is equipped to

  4. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex, calendar year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Klein, L.S.

    1984-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. Routine discharges for 1983 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. There was, however, an unplanned release in December from the X-326 Building Side Purge which exceeded the limits. 1 figure

  5. Ionization chamber for monitoring radioactive gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotrappa, P.; Dempsey, J.

    1992-01-01

    This present invention provides simple, effective and accurate cumulative measurement of radioactive gas over a time period. Measurements of radioactive gas are important for many purposes. Tritium concentrations in potentially exposed workers are measured, for example, with periodic urine specimens. Carbon-14 serves as a useful research tool for monitoring the progress of many chemical and biological reactions and interactions. For example, many microorganisms break down carbon-14 containing compounds in sugar to produce carbon-14 dioxide gas which can be collected and measured to determine various characteristics of the microorganisms. Both tritium and carbon-14 dioxide produce low energy radiation which cannot be easily measured by conventional radioactivity detectors. (author). 4 figs

  6. Ionization chamber for monitoring radioactive gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotrappa, P; Dempsey, J

    1992-09-22

    This present invention provides simple, effective and accurate cumulative measurement of radioactive gas over a time period. Measurements of radioactive gas are important for many purposes. Tritium concentrations in potentially exposed workers are measured, for example, with periodic urine specimens. Carbon-14 serves as a useful research tool for monitoring the progress of many chemical and biological reactions and interactions. For example, many microorganisms break down carbon-14 containing compounds in sugar to produce carbon-14 dioxide gas which can be collected and measured to determine various characteristics of the microorganisms. Both tritium and carbon-14 dioxide produce low energy radiation which cannot be easily measured by conventional radioactivity detectors. (author). 4 figs.

  7. Radioactivity Monitoring of the Irish Environment 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, V.; Dowdall, A; Fegan, M.; Hayden, E.; Kelleher, K.; Long, S.; McEvoy, I.; Somerville, S.; Wong, J.; Pollard, D.

    2007-10-01

    This report presents the results of the environmental radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) in 2006. This programme aims to assess the exposure of the Irish population to artificial radioactivity in the environment, to review the temporal and geographical distribution of contaminating radionuclides and to maintain systems and procedures which would allow a rapid assessment of environmental contamination to be made in the event of a radiological emergency. Radioactivity is present in the environment due to natural processes, the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, past nuclear accidents such as that at Chernobyl in Ukraine and the routine discharge of radionuclides from nuclear installations. Liquid discharges from the British Nuclear Group reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria in the north-west of England, which are licensed by the UK Environment Agency, continue to be the dominant source of artificial radioactivity in the Irish marine environment. The key elements of the monitoring programme implemented by the RPII in 2006 included; assessment of ambient radioactivity based on measurements of radioactivity in air and of external gamma dose rate at permanent monitoring stations located throughout the country; assessment of levels of radioactivity in drinking water; assessment of levels of radioactivity in foodstuffs based on measurements of total diet, milk and various ingredients; assessment of levels of radioactivity in the Irish marine environment based on sampling and measurement of seawater, sediment, seaweed, fish and shellfish. The RPII monitored airborne radioactivity at ten stations located throughout the country. One of these stations is equipped with a high volume sampler, which allows concentrations of caesium-137 to be measured; another is equipped to detect the presence of the gas krypton-85. This gas is released into the environment primarily as a result of the

  8. Introduction of a cation in aqueous solution by electrolytic dissolution of metal. Applications to the decontamination of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauchon, Jean-Paul

    1979-01-01

    This research thesis aims at comparing results obtained in chemical decontamination of radioactive effluents with a metallic cation introduced by metal electro-dissolution or by dose addition. After an overview of methods used for the purification of radioactive effluents and a more precise presentation of chemical co-precipitation, the author reports preliminary tests of the application of chemical co-precipitation to the decontamination of radioactive effluents, reports the analysis of iron, zinc and copper behaviour in aqueous environment by means of thermodynamic diagrams and current-voltage curves. He reports the design and use of two electro-dissolution sets, and the application of copper electrolytic dissolution to the elimination of ruthenium in radioactive effluents. He finally addresses the purification treatment of effluents of nuclear reactors

  9. Fenceline water quality monitoring of effluents from BARC establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prathibha, P.; Kothai, P.; Saradhi, I.V.; Pandit, G.G.; Puranik, V.D.

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater generated from various sources (industrial, residential, rain water runoff etc.,) is either discharged into water bodies or reused/recycled for various purposes. Continuous monitoring of the wastewater is necessary to check whether these effluents are meeting the stringent limits proposed for discharge into water bodies or recycled/reused. Monitoring of these effluents also helps in designing the wastewater treatment system required to meet the standards. In this paper, water quality monitoring carried out during each quarter of the year 2005 for the effluents discharged from different utilities of BARC into Trombay bay is presented. The results indicate that the Bio-chemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) are in the range of 7.9 to 38.9 mg/l and 29.4 to 78.9 mg/l respectively. The nitrates and sulphates are in the range of 0.5 to 7.2 mg/l and 7.8 to 52.3 mg/l respectively. The water quality data of the parameters analyzed are well within the limits stipulated by Central Pollution Control Board. (author)

  10. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are

  11. Radioactivity Monitoring of the Irish Environment 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnity, P.; Currivan, L.; Dowdall, A.; Fegan, M.; Hanley, O.; Kelleher, K.; McKittrick, L.; Somerville, S.; Wong, J.; Pollard, D.

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of the environmental radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) during 2009. The RPII has routinely monitored levels of radioactivity in the environment since 1982 and this is the latest in the RPII's series of environmental monitoring reports. The RPII reviews and updates its environmental programme annually so as to ensure it remains relevant and continues to focus on the most important sources of radioactivity in the environment. The principal aims of the RPII's monitoring programme are; to assess the level of radioactivity to which the Irish population is exposed as a result of radioactivity in the environment; to study trends and establish the geographical distribution of contaminating radionuclides so as to better understand the long term behaviour of artificial radioactivity in the food chain and the environment; to ensure that any increase in radiation levels resulting from an accidental release of radioactivity to the environment is detected and assessed rapidly. During 2009 radioactivity was measured in a wide range of foods and environmental materials including: air, water, milk, seafood, foodstuffs and complete meals. The most significant source of artificial radioactivity in the Irish marine environment is the discharge of low level liquid radioactive waste from the Sellafield Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant on the north east coast of England. In order to assess the exposure arising from the source extensive sampling of fish and shellfish landed at ports along the north east coast of Ireland is undertaken. The most exposed group of individuals to discharges from Sellafield have been identified as commercial oyster and mussel farmers working along the north east coastline and their families. Manmade radioactivity is also present in the terrestrial environment due primarily to residual global fallout arising primarily from atmospheric testing of nuclear

  12. Radioactivity Monitoring of the Irish Environment 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegan, M.; Currivan, L.; Dowdall, A.; Hanley, O.; Hayden, E.; Kelleher, K.; Long, S.; McKittrick, L.; Somerville, S.; Wong, J.; Pollard, D.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of the environmental radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) during 2008. The RPII has routinely monitored levels of radioactivity in the environment since 1982 and this is the latest in the RPII's series of environmental monitoring reports. The RPII reviews and updates its environmental programme annually so as to ensure it remains relevant and continues to focus on the most important sources of radioactivity in the environment. The principal aims of the RPII's monitoring programme are; to assess the level of radioactivity to which the Irish population is exposed as a result of radioactivity in the environment; to study trends and establish the geographical distribution of contaminating radionuclides so as to better understand the long term behaviour of artificial radioactivity in the food chain and the environment; to ensure that any increase in radiation levels resulting from an accidental release of radioactivity to the environment is detected and assessed rapidly. During 2008 radioactivity was measured in a wide range of foods and environmental materials including: air, water, milk, seafood, foodstuffs and complete meals. The most significant source of artificial radioactivity in the Irish marine environment is the discharge of low level liquid radioactive waste from the Sellafield Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant on the north east coast of England. In order to assess the exposure arising from the source extensive sampling of fish and shellfish landed at ports along the north east coast of Ireland is undertaken. The most exposed group of individuals to discharges from Sellafield have been identified as commercial oyster and mussel farmers working along the north east coastline and their families. Manmade radioactivity is also present in the terrestrial environment due primarily to residual global fallout arising primarily from atmospheric testing of nuclear

  13. Treatment of radioactive effluents by concentration in an installation with natural evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormser, G.; Chauvet, P.

    1963-01-01

    This document reports natural evaporation tests performed in Cadarache, notably to adapt the equipment to the treatment of radioactive effluents. After a brief description of the apparatus principle and operation, the authors propose a summary of the first test campaign (test apparatus, results), indicate modifications brought to the apparatus by taking the first results into account, and propose a detailed discussion of results obtained during the second test campaign. They finally discuss the possibility of concentration of effluents by means of natural evaporation [fr

  14. Tests of the use of cation exchange organic resins for the decontamination of radioactive aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdrez, Jean; Girault, Jacques; Wormser, Gerald

    1962-01-01

    The authors report tests performed in laboratory and results obtained during an investigation of the use of synthetic ion exchangers for the decontamination of radioactive effluents of moderate activity level and with a non neglectable salt loading. Resins are used under sodium form and regenerated after each fixing operation. Once decontaminated and free of its disturbing ions, the regenerating agent (NaCl) is used for several operations. The authors present the used resins, the treated effluents, describe the tests, and discuss the obtained results [fr

  15. Realization of sanitary requirements concerning standardization of rare radioactive gas effluents at NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshenko, G.G.; Panchenko, S.V.; Chudajkin, O.G.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is aimed at determination of ways for practical realization of main sanitary requirements concerning environment and population protection under NPP operation. The idea of the requirements is reduced to not increasing permissible limits for radiation doses, minimum irradiation of population and decrease of unjustified irradiation of personnel. The given problem may be fully solved only in case of studying real chacteristics of operating reactors, taking into account statistic nature of effluents of inert radioactive gases (IRG). Methods of developing a system of working and reference standards of IRG effluents at NPPs are suggested. The considered approach may be realized in practice as the All-Union state on branch standards

  16. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Camilleri, A.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1995-12-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) during 1994. All low level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.015 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1.5 % of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council, and 5 % of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. 27 refs., 22 tabs., 6 figs

  17. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E L; Camilleri, A; Loosz, T; Farrar, Y

    1995-12-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) during 1994. All low level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.015 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1.5 % of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council, and 5 % of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. 27 refs., 22 tabs., 6 figs.

  18. Industrial effluent quality, pollution monitoring and environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Maqbool; Bajahlan, Ahmad S; Hammad, Waleed S

    2008-12-01

    Royal Commission Environmental Control Department (RC-ECD) at Yanbu industrial city in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has established a well-defined monitoring program to control the pollution from industrial effluents. The quality of effluent from each facility is monitored round the clock. Different strategic measures have been taken by the RC-ECD to implement the zero discharge policy of RC. Industries are required to pre-treat the effluent to conform pretreatment standards before discharging to central biological treatment plant. Industries are not allowed to discharge any treated or untreated effluent in open channels. After treatment, reclaimed water must have to comply with direct discharge standards before discharge to the sea. Data of industrial wastewater collected from five major industries and central industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWTP) is summarized in this report. During 5-year period, 3,705 samples were collected and analyzed for 43,436 parameters. There were 1,377 violations from pretreatment standards from all the industries. Overall violation percentage was 3.17%. Maximum violations were recorded from one of the petrochemical plants. The results show no significant pollution due to heavy metals. Almost all heavy metals were within RC pretreatment standards. High COD and TOC indicates that major pollution was due to hydrocarbons. Typical compounds identified by GC-MS were branched alkanes, branched alkenes, aliphatic ketones, substituted thiophenes, substituted phenols, aromatics and aromatic alcohols. Quality of treated water was also in compliance with RC direct discharge standards. In order to achieve the zero discharge goal, further studies and measures are in progress.

  19. Treatment of Radioactive Effluents at the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wormser, Gerald [Atomic Energy Commission, Saclay (France)

    1960-07-01

    Investigations have also been made at Saclay to find out if the soil at the Centre could be used to receive SNRC effluents. The Saclay plateau is a sand plateau 75 m thick on a clay base (2). Its upper surface is covered by a heterogeneous layer of clay containing pieces of grindstone of varying sizes. The ion-exchange capacity of this soil is considerable, 25 meq/100 g. Low-activity waste could therefore be discharged into it, especially since the plateau has no lateral water outcrops of any size and underground water does not reappear for a long time. This method of disposal is still only experimental. It was tested with a solution of Sr{sup 90} and tritium having an activity equal to the permitted levels.

  20. Releases of radioactivity from uranium mills and effluent treatment costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, J.P.; Sears, M.B.; Blanco, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Airborne releases of radioactive materials from uranium milling to the environment consist of ore dust, yellowcake dust, tailings dust, and radon gas while the mill is active. After a mill has ceased operations, tailings may be stabilized to minimize or prevent airborne releases of radioactive particulates. However, radon gas will continue to be released in amounts inversely proportional to the degree of stabilization treatment (and expense). Liquid waste disposal is by evaporation and natural seepage to the ground beneath the tailings impoundment area. The release of radioactive materials (and potential radiation exposures) determines the majority of costs associated with minimizing the environmental impact of uranium milling. Radwaste treatments to reduce estimated radiation doses to individuals to 3 to 5% of those received with current milling practices are equivalent to $0.66 per pounds of U 3 O 8 and 0.032 mill per kWhr of electricity. This cost would cover a high efficiency reverse jet bag filter and high energy venturi scrubbers for dusts, neutralization of liquids, and an asphalt-lined tailings basin with a clay core dam to reduce seepage. In addition, this increased cost would cover stabilization of tailings, after mill closure, with a 1-in. asphalt membrane topped by 2 ft of earth and 0.5 ft of crushed rock to provide protection against future leaching and wind erosion. The cost of reducing the radiological hazards associated with uranium milling to this degree would contribute about 0.4% to the current total cost of nuclear power

  1. Development of radioactive surface contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tadao; Hasegawa, Toru; Fukumoto, Keisuke; Ooki, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    In the radiation facilities such as nuclear power plants, surface contamination of the people accessing or articles conveyed in and out of the radiation controlled areas is detected and monitored by installing contamination monitors at the boundary of controlled areas and uncontrolled areas against the expansion of the radioactive materials to out of the facilities. It is required for the surface contamination of articles to be tightened of control criteria as 'Guidelines for discrimination ways of nonradioactive waste (not classified as radioactive waste) generated from nuclear power plants' (hereinafter referred to as 'the Guideline') was established by the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry in August, 2005. It predicts that the control criteria of monitors other than article monitors are also tightened in the future. Fuji electric has been fabricating and delivering surface contamination detecting monitors. Now we are developing the new contamination monitor corresponding to the tightening of the control criteria. 'Large article transfer monitor', 'Clothing monitor' and 'Body surface contamination monitor' are introduced in this article. (author)

  2. Progress in the domain of emissions tracking and environment radioactivity monitoring - Proceedings of the technical days organised by the SFRP Environment Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmet, Dominique; Calvez, Marianne; Rivasseau, Corinne Cea; Monfort, Marguerite; Manificat, Guillaume; Pierrard, Olivier; Couvez, Celine; Masson, Olivier; Bruno, Valerie; Renaud, Philippe; Genova, Zhana; Reynal, Nathalie; Le Coz, Eric; Tchilian, Nathalie; Diana, Jean-Jacques; Beguinel, Philippe; Cortes, Pierre; Puydarrieux, Stephane; Brun, Thierry; Devin, Patrick; Clavel, Benoit; Hemidy, Pierre-Yves; Gontier, Gilles; Delloye, Thierry; Mailliat, Alain; Ferreri, Giovanni; LECLERC, Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    The Environment Section of the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) organized a technical meeting on the progress made in the domain of emissions tracking and environment radioactivity monitoring. This document brings together the abstracts and the presentations (slides) of the different talks given at the meeting: 1 - Environment monitoring at the global, national and local scale: historical overview (Dominique CALMET, CEA); 2 - Evolution of radioactivity monitoring in the environment from 1960 to the present day (Guillaume MANIFICAT, IRSN); 3 - Euratom's legal framework (Zhana GENOVA, CTE); 4 - Main regulatory changes during the last decade (Nathalie REYNAL, ASN); 5 - Progress of standardization works on radioactive effluent emissions control and environment monitoring (Philippe BEGUINEL, BNEN); 6 - From operators' self-monitoring to ASN's inspections: a many components control system (Eric LE COZ, ASN); 7 - Control of effluents and emissions management at CEA Centres (Marianne CALVEZ, CEA); 8 - Liquid and gaseous effluents of ITER experimental facility: description and impacts (Pierre CORTES, IO); 9 - Effluents and emissions management strategy at AREVA NC La Hague facility (Stephane PUYDARRIEUX, AREVA); 10 - Radioactive effluents from nuclear facilities ongoing deconstruction: from dimensioning to real effluents (Benoit CLAVEL, EDF); 11 - Radionuclides decontamination process for liquid effluents using micro-algae at the laboratory scale (Corinne RIVASSEAU, CEA); 12 - Radioactive effluents from nuclear medicine services: management, monitoring and impact measurement methods (Nathalie TCHILIAN, ASN); 13 - Evolution history of effluents management and environment monitoring at the Solvay La Rochelle site (Thierry DELLOYE, SOLVAY); 14 - Different international approaches in effluents management and monitoring: example of French and German gaseous effluents - regulation, analyses, accounting rules (Jean-Jacques DIANA, ASN); 15 - Environment

  3. Environmental and Effluent Monitoring at ANSTO Sites, 2002-2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E L; Ferris,; Markich, S J

    2004-10-01

    This report presents the results of environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) from January 2002 to June 2003. Potential effective dose rates to the general public from airborne discharges from the LHSTC site were less than 0.01 mSv/year, well below the 1 mSv/year dose rate limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the Australian National Occupational Health and Safety Commission. The effective dose rates to hypothetical individuals potentially exposed to radiation in routine liquid effluent discharges from the LHSTC were recently calculated to be less than 0.001 mSv/year. This is much less than dose rates estimated for members of public potentially exposed to airborne emissions. The levels of tritium detected in roundwater and stormwater at the LHSTC were less than the Australian drinking water guidelines. The airborne and liquid effluent emissions from the NMC were below the ARPANSA-approved notification levels and NSW EPA limits, respectively. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and the NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose experienced by members of the Australian public. (authors)

  4. Monitoring programme. Radioactive substances report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    In the United Kingdom, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution commissions independent monitoring of radioactive discharges to the environment. This report presents the results of such monitoring for 1994. It covers nuclear sites, two non-nuclear sites which use large amounts of tritium and several landfill sites which receive low-level radioactive waste for controlled burial. The monitoring programme concentrates on activity levels in environmental materials that might result in exposure of the public to radiation from non-food pathways. The results show that exposures from these pathways in 1994 remain similar to those in previous years and in all cases are estimated to have been substantially lower than the International Commission on Radiological Protection's recommended dose limit of 1mSv per year. (6 figures; 20 tables; 29 references) (UK)

  5. Monitoring of radioactivity in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bologa, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    The necessity of radioactivity monitoring in the marine environment was imposed by the increasing development of nuclear power and its world-wide use in many different segments of economic and social life. Both natural and artificial radioactivity play an important role in marine ecology and human health. In this respect three major facts continue to prevail in Romania. The fallout, the presence of the Danube river and the expectations for future energy production. Spatial and temporal monitoring of marine radioactivity along the Romanian Black Sea shore has been systematically performed in the Romanian Marine Research Institute in close co-operation with the Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology since 1981. Marine emerged and submerged sediments, coastal and offshore sea water, macroalgae, in vertebrates and fish off the Danube mouths and/or along the coast are monitored for natural and artificial radioactivity by means of beta gross measurements and gamma spectrometry. Concentrations of radionuclides as K-40, Cs-134, Cs-137 in abiotic and biotic samples, environmental distributions coefficients and concentrations factors (CF), as well as experimentally-derived CFs in marine biota as radioecological bioindicators are assessed and stored for a national data base. (author) 3 tabs., 18 refs

  6. Radioactive monitoring of the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bologa, A. S.

    1991-01-01

    Radioactivity monitoring of marine environment was required by the development of nuclear power and the worldwide use of ionizing radiations in many different activities. Both natural and artificial radioactivity play an important role in marine ecology and human health. In respect of this, three major facts prevail, namely: the fallout, the proximity of Danube River and the future nuclear power production. Spatial and temporal monitoring of marine radioactivity along the Romanian Black Sea shore has been systematically performed in Romanian Marine Research Institute in close cooperation with Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology since 1981. Marine emerged and submerged sediments, coastal and offshore sea water, macroalgae, invertebrates and fish of Danube mouths and/or along the coast are monitored for natural and artificial radioactivity by means of gross beta measurements and gamma spectrometry. Concentrations of radionuclides such as: K-40, Cs-134 and Cs-137 in abiotic and biotic samples, environmental distribution coefficients and concentration factors (CFs) as well as experimentally derived CFs in marine biota as radioecological bioindicators are assessed and stored in a national data base. (author)

  7. Bulk monitoring and segregation of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddow, H.; Adsley, I.; Pearman, I.; Sweeney, A.; Davies, M., E-mail: helen.beddow@nuvia.co.uk [Nuvia Limited, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Several sites in the UK are contaminated by radioactive legacy wastes. These include; radium luminising sites and more recently the oil, and (potentially) fracking industries; sites contaminated from thorium gas mantle factories; old nuclear research sites; nuclear power sites, and the Sellafield reprocessing site. Nuvia has developed a suite of technologies to map the location of and to recover and process wastes during remedial operations. The main method for delineating contaminated areas in-situ is by use of the Groundhog system, whilst bulk monitoring methods employ the Gamma Excavation Monitor, the High Resolution Assay Monitor, and the Conveyor Active Particle System. (author)

  8. Bulk monitoring and segregation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddow, H.; Adsley, I.; Pearman, I.; Sweeney, A.; Davies, M.

    2014-01-01

    Several sites in the UK are contaminated by radioactive legacy wastes. These include; radium luminising sites and more recently the oil, and (potentially) fracking industries; sites contaminated from thorium gas mantle factories; old nuclear research sites; nuclear power sites, and the Sellafield reprocessing site. Nuvia has developed a suite of technologies to map the location of and to recover and process wastes during remedial operations. The main method for delineating contaminated areas in-situ is by use of the Groundhog system, whilst bulk monitoring methods employ the Gamma Excavation Monitor, the High Resolution Assay Monitor, and the Conveyor Active Particle System. (author)

  9. Development of carrier usage for the treatment of radioactive effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahraman, A [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Istanbul (Turkey)

    1997-02-01

    Low level radioactive liquid wastes are produced in many nuclear applications. Their physico-chemical characteristics may very considerably. Chemical precipitation is a convenient treatment method for the liquid streams of high salinity or solid content containing different radionuclide types. Generally, the concentrations of nuclides in liquid wastes are extremely low. For example, 1000 Bq of {sup 137}Cs makes about 3{center_dot}10{sup -10} g of caesium. Therefore conventional precipitation cannot be applied since the solubility product value is not exceeded. The carriers which are capable to adsorb the nuclides are used to achieve the nuclide removal. Stable isotopes of the nuclide are usually added as the carriers but any reagent which has similar chemical specifications with the nuclide can also be used as the carrier. Precipitation of these non-radioactive carriers ion together with the radionuclide is called co-precipitation. The operational steps of the chemical precipitation process should be established and applied in a treatment facility. Thus, the most suitable carrier for a particular nuclide and its usage conditions are required to be determined. In this study, the carriers for removal of {sup 137}Cs and uranium, their accurate amounts and usage conditions to achieve highest decontamination factors (DF) have been investigated. Residual sludge volumes were evaluated for cementation purposes. The cement composite samples were prepared for each set of experiments and hardening times were measured. 9 refs, 9 figs.

  10. Development of carrier usage for the treatment of radioactive effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahraman, A.

    1997-01-01

    Low level radioactive liquid wastes are produced in many nuclear applications. Their physico-chemical characteristics may very considerably. Chemical precipitation is a convenient treatment method for the liquid streams of high salinity or solid content containing different radionuclide types. Generally, the concentrations of nuclides in liquid wastes are extremely low. For example, 1000 Bq of 137 Cs makes about 3·10 -10 g of caesium. Therefore conventional precipitation cannot be applied since the solubility product value is not exceeded. The carriers which are capable to adsorb the nuclides are used to achieve the nuclide removal. Stable isotopes of the nuclide are usually added as the carriers but any reagent which has similar chemical specifications with the nuclide can also be used as the carrier. Precipitation of these non-radioactive carriers ion together with the radionuclide is called co-precipitation. The operational steps of the chemical precipitation process should be established and applied in a treatment facility. Thus, the most suitable carrier for a particular nuclide and its usage conditions are required to be determined. In this study, the carriers for removal of 137 Cs and uranium, their accurate amounts and usage conditions to achieve highest decontamination factors (DF) have been investigated. Residual sludge volumes were evaluated for cementation purposes. The cement composite samples were prepared for each set of experiments and hardening times were measured. 9 refs, 9 figs

  11. Radioactive liquid effluent management - state of art and the role of membrane processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panicker, S.T.; Prabhakar, S.; Misra, B.M.; Ramani, M.P.S.

    1990-01-01

    This report reviews the conventional methods involving filtration, chemical precipitation, evaporation and ion exchange, employed for the treatment of low level radioactive effluents. The role of membrane processes, particularly reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration has been assessed with a view to increase the effectiveness of the existing methods. After overviewing the practices followed in major countries, a possible scheme has been proposed. (author). 66 refs., 4 tabs., figs

  12. Analysis of adaptability of radioactive liquid effluent discharge under normal condition of inland nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yueping; Zhang Bing; Chen Yang; Zhu Lingqing; Tao Yunliang; Shangguan Zhihong

    2011-01-01

    The discharge of radioactive liquid effluent from inland nuclear power plant under normal operation is an important part to be considered in environmental impact assessment. Requirements of newly revised and upcoming standards GB 6249 and GB 14587 are introduced in this paper. Through an example of an inland NPP siting in the preliminary feasibility study phase, the adaptability to the relevant regulations in the site selection is analyzed. Also, the concerned problems in the design of AP1000 units are addressed. (authors)

  13. The regulation of radioactive effluent release in France (mainly from large nuclear installations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, Jean.

    1978-01-01

    In parallel with the licensing system for construction and operation of classified or so-called large nuclear installations (INB) there are in France regulations for the release of radioactive effuents from such installations. The regulations applicable to installations other than INBs are not specifically of a nuclear nature, while those covering INBs, which are analysed in this study, in particular, cover effluent release in liquid or gaseous form. The licensing and control procedures for such release are analysed in detail. (NEA) [fr

  14. Radiation protection requirements in the limitation of the release of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1978-01-01

    The paper summarizes the requirements of radiation protection, as presented in the new ICRP recommendation, in relation to the limitation of the release of radioactive effluents. The concepts of effective dose equivalent and collective dose equivalent are used in the presentation of the optimization procedures and the dose limitation to individuals. The dose commitment is used for the procedures applied to control future exposures. An appendix describes the basic concepts and quantities used in assessments of human exposures and risks. (author)

  15. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  16. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP

  17. Sampling method of environmental radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This manual provides sampling methods of environmental samples of airborne dust, precipitated dust, precipitated water (rain or snow), fresh water, soil, river sediment or lake sediment, discharged water from a nuclear facility, grains, tea, milk, pasture grass, limnetic organisms, daily diet, index organisms, sea water, marine sediment, marine organisms, and that for tritium and radioiodine determination for radiation monitoring from radioactive fallout or radioactivity release by nuclear facilities. This manual aims at the presentation of standard sampling procedures for environmental radioactivity monitoring regardless of monitoring objectives, and shows preservation method of environmental samples acquired at the samplingpoint for radiation counting for those except human body. Sampling techniques adopted in this manual is decided by the criteria that they are suitable for routine monitoring and any special skillfulness is not necessary. Based on the above-mentioned principle, this manual presents outline and aims of sampling, sampling position or object, sampling quantity, apparatus, equipment or vessel for sampling, sampling location, sampling procedures, pretreatment and preparation procedures of a sample for radiation counting, necessary recording items for sampling and sample transportation procedures. Special attention is described in the chapter of tritium and radioiodine because these radionuclides might be lost by the above-mentioned sample preservation method for radiation counting of less volatile radionuclides than tritium or radioiodine. (Takagi, S.)

  18. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2004-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Emmy L.; Loosz, Tom; Ferris, John M.; Harrison, Jennifer J.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the results of ANSTO's environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) sites, from July 2004 to June 2005. Effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially affected by routine airborne emissions from the LHSTC were less than 0.005 mSv/year. This estimated maximum potential dose is less than 24% of the ANSTO ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv/year, and much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv/year that is recommended by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). The effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially exposed to routine liquid effluent releases from the LHSTC have been realistically estimated as a quarter (or less) of the estimated doses to the critical group for airborne releases. The levels of tritium detected in groundwater and stormwater at the LHSTC were less than those set out in the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. The airborne and liquid effluent emissions from the NMC were below both the ARPANSA-approved notification levels and Sydney Water limits for acceptance of trade wastewater to sewer. Results of environmental monitoring at both ANSTO sites confirm that the facilities continue to be operated well within regulatory limits. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose of ∼1.5 mSv/year experienced by members of the Australian public

  19. Experiences in radioactive gaseous effluent management in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Matsui, H.; Yamamoto, H.; Ikezawa, Y.; Hirayama, K.; Kokubu, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the Japan Research Reactor-II (JRR-2), the main source of 41 Ar generation is the exhaust air from the horizontal experimental holes and the pneumatic tubes. For the horizontal experimental holes, the flow of exhaust air through the holes was decreased by improving the airtightness, and a decay duct of capacity 2.4 m 3 was installed in the middle of the exhaust line. In consequence, the release rate of 41 Ar was reduced by 6-8%. For the pneumatic tubes, a mechanical shutter was installed in the tube. The shutter stops the exhaust air flow, except when the pneumatic tube is used. Prior to the use, the activated air in the tube is led to a decay tank. As a result, the 41 Ar release rate was reduced by 10-20%. By the above means, the yearly exposure at the site boundary was reduced to 0.36 mR from 2.6 mR. In Hot Laboratory for metallurgical examination of spent fuel, the exhaust filtration system consists of filters in the cave, i.e. frame trap, prefilter, HEPA filter, and the main filter system, i.e. prefilter, two-stage HEPA filter and charcoal filter (the charcoal filter is by-passed to lengthen its life when radioiodine is not released). Values of removal efficiency and the dispersion factor for iodine were 80% and 4.4x10 - 3 and for cesium 97% and 3.5x10 - 3 , respectively. The exhaust filtration system in Radioactive Waste Incineration Plant consists of a two-stage ceramic filter installed immediately after the incinerator, air cooler, two-stage HEPA filter and final scrubber. The decontamination factor of the two-stage ceramic filter is 1x10 6 for particulate matter, when measured with radioactive particles from burning of simulated contaminants with 75 mCi of 137 Cs. The decontamination factor of the HEPA filter after the ceramic filter is about 10 3 . The overall decontamination factor for the plant is estimated to be more than 10 6

  20. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2005-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Emmy L.; Loosz, Tom; Ferris, John M.; Harrison, Jennifer J.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the results of ANSTO's environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) sites, from July 2005 to June 2006. Estimated effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially affected by routine airborne emissions from the LHSTC were less than 0.005 mSv/year. The maximum potential dose was 23% of the ANSTO ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv/year, much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv/year that is recommended by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). The effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially exposed to routine liquid effluent releases from the LHSTC have been realistically estimated as a quarter (or less) of the estimated doses to the critical group for airborne releases. The median tritium concentrations detected in groundwater and surface waters at the LHSTC were typically less than 2% of those set out in the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. The airborne emissions from the NMC were below the ARPANSA-approved notification levels. Results of environmental monitoring at both ANSTO sites confirm that the facilities continue to be operated well within regulatory limits. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose of -1.5 mSv/year experienced by members of the Australian public

  1. Construction and calibration of a simple scintillation counter for monitoring radioactive gases in ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, M.S.

    1984-07-01

    A report is given of the practical construction, laboratory calibration and simple-in-situ calibration check of scintillation detectors used for monitoring radioactive inert gases in gaseous effluents. The βγ-ray and γ-ray detectors are identical except for an absorber which is placed over the window of the γ-ray detector after calibration. The construction and calibration of both detectors is therefore identical. (author)

  2. Liquid effluent retention facility final-status groundwater monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.D.; Chou, C.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    The following sections describe the groundwater-monitoring program for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF). The LERF is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The LERF is included in the open-quotes Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit WA890008967close quotes, (referred to herein as the Permit) (Ecology 1994) and is subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring (WAC 173-303-645). This document describes a RCRA/WAC groundwater detection-monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the LERF. This plan describes the LERF monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the LERF. This plan will be used to meet the groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the LERF becomes part of the Permit and through the post-closure care period, until certification of final closure

  3. Study of sample-detector assemblies for application to in-situ measurement of radioactivity in liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendharkar, K.A.; Narayanan Kutty, K.; Krishnamony, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental investigations carried out on four different types of sample-detector assemblies with a view to determining their detection limits and relative merits for application to in-situ measurement of radioactivity in liquid effluents. The four systems studied were: (1) gamma detection using 11 cm x 8 cm NaI (Tl) scintillation detector inserted in the cavity of a specially designed stainless steel chamber of capacity 15 liters, (2) gamma detection using a metal-walled G.M. counter in a similar manner, (3) beta detection using twin thin-walled G.M. counters immersed in liquid, and (4) end window G.M. counter positioned above the liquid surface in a shallow tray. The design features of an in-line monitor employing a 11 cm x 8 cm NaI (Tl) detector used for the routine monitoring of beta gamma activity concentrations in the low level effluents of the Tarapur Fuel Processing Plant are described. (author). 1 tab

  4. Monitoring and management of tritium from the nuclear power plant effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiaoe; Liu, Ting; Yang, Lili; Meng, De; Song, Dahu

    2018-01-01

    It is important to regulate tritium nuclides from the nuclear power plant effluent, the paper briefly analyzes the main source of tritium, and the regulatory requirements associated with tritium in our country and the United States. The monitoring methods of tritium from the nuclear power plant effluent are described, and the purpose to give some advice to our national nuclear power plant about the effluent of tritium monitoring and management.

  5. Radioactivity distribution in phosphate products, by-products, effluents, and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimond, R.J.; Windham, S.T.

    1975-08-01

    Phosphate rock throughout the world contains uranium in concentrations ranging from a few ppM to a few hundred ppM. In the United States, phosphate rock normally contains between 100 to 150 ppM uranium. Mining and processing of these ores redistributes much of the uranium daughters among the various products, by-products, and wastes. These materials are then widely dispersed throughout the environment. This redistribution may lead to increased exposure of the public to these naturally-occurring radionuclides. In determining the magnitude of the population exposure caused by this redistribution and in developing environmental standards and controls to prevent contamination of the biosphere from these naturally-occurring radionuclides it is necessary to determine the concentrations and total quantities of these radionuclides in the products, by-products, effluents and wastes of phosphate mining and manufacturing. Samples of phosphate ores, products, by-products, effluents, and wastes were obtained and analyzed for their radioactivity content. Quantities of radioactivity entering the environment through various products, by-products, effluents, and wastes were estimated

  6. The Use of Aquatic Macrophyte Ecotoxicological Assays in Monitoring Coastal Effluent Discharges in Southern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burridge, T.R.; Karistianos, M.; Bidwell, J

    1999-01-01

    Germination inhibition of zoospores of the aquatic, brown algal macrophyte Ecklonia radiata was employed to assess the toxicity of sewage effluents under short to long term exposure and under modified salinity conditions. The rate of germination inhibition was determined for exposure times between 2 and 48 h in salinity modified and unmodified regimes and under reduced salinity conditions alone. The results indicated that rate of germination inhibition increased with duration of exposure to sewage effluents and to salinity reduction alone, and that response to the effluents may be enhanced under conditions of reduced salinity. Whilst the effect of primary treated effluent was primarily that of toxicity, secondary treated effluent effects appeared to be primarily that of reduced salinity although at a greater rate than would be expected for salinity reduction alone. The assay is suggested to provide a mechanism for monitoring sewage effluent quality and to monitor potential impacts of sewage effluent discharge on kelp communities in southern Australia.

  7. The Use of Aquatic Macrophyte Ecotoxicological Assays in Monitoring Coastal Effluent Discharges in Southern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burridge, T.R.; Karistianos, M.; Bidwell, J.

    1999-01-01

    Germination inhibition of zoospores of the aquatic, brown algal macrophyte Ecklonia radiata was employed to assess the toxicity of sewage effluents under short to long term exposure and under modified salinity conditions. The rate of germination inhibition was determined for exposure times between 2 and 48 h in salinity modified and unmodified regimes and under reduced salinity conditions alone. The results indicated that rate of germination inhibition increased with duration of exposure to sewage effluents and to salinity reduction alone, and that response to the effluents may be enhanced under conditions of reduced salinity. Whilst the effect of primary treated effluent was primarily that of toxicity, secondary treated effluent effects appeared to be primarily that of reduced salinity although at a greater rate than would be expected for salinity reduction alone. The assay is suggested to provide a mechanism for monitoring sewage effluent quality and to monitor potential impacts of sewage effluent discharge on kelp communities in southern Australia

  8. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E L; Loosz, T

    2002-07-01

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2001 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC-controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2001 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2001 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This is well below the ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv per year for off-site doses that ANSTO has set and much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv per year (above natural background and medical doses) and the natural background dose in Australia of 1.5 mSv per year (Webb et al; 1999). It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron.

  9. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E L; Loosz, T; Mokhber-Shahin, L

    1999-07-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the I milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron (authors)

  10. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E L; Loosz, T; Mokhber-Shahin, L [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW, Australia, (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the 1 millisievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron.

  11. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E L; Loosz, T; Mokhber-Shahin, L [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

    2001-07-01

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2000 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2000 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2000 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1 % of the 1 milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron.

  12. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2000 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2000 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2000 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1 % of the 1 milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  13. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2001 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC-controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2001 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2001 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This is well below the ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv per year for off-site doses that ANSTO has set and much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv per year (above natural background and medical doses) and the natural background dose in Australia of 1.5 mSv per year (Webb et al; 1999). It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  14. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E. L.; Loosz, T.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    2000-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the 1 millisievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  15. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the I milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron (authors)

  16. MONITORING OF RADIOACTIVITY AT DNURT CAMPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Dolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research paper aims to determine radioactive contamination on the territory of campus of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan (DNURT. Methodology. The dosimeters measured the radioactive contamination in different places (points of DNURT campus, focusing on public places. The centres of measurements became dormitories, monuments, stops, main entrances of the new and the old buildings, classrooms, basements, a swimming pool, boiler room and others. Findings. The conducted radiation monitoring for the first time in the history of the University discovered the source of radioactive contamination on DNURT territory and campus. The highest radiation background is observed on three points, namely: the pedestal of the monument, the monument to students-soldiers, the main entrance of the new building (columns. This can be explained by granite materials, which the pedestals and the stairs are made of. Originality. The largest contribution to the total value of annual effective dose of human exposure is made by ionizing radiation sources (IRS of building materials (65 - 70%. The radioactivity level of building materials is determined by the content of natural radionuclides that are included in uranium-radium and thorium decay series (18 and 12 radionuclides as well as potassium-40. Radioactivity of building materials is evaluated by the content of dominant radionuclides radium-226, thorium-232 and potassium-40. Their dominant role is explained by the fact that these long-lived high-energy - emitters are the products of decay of radium-226 in uranium series of and radium-224 in thorium series, exposing radioactive gases (radon-222 and radon-220. Radioactive gases are accumulated in the basements of educational buildings; their decay is accompanied by 100% alpha radiation, which is the most dangerous. Practical value. It is necessary to set radioactivity signs near the objects with high

  17. Biological sampling for marine radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Strategies and methodologies for using marine organisms to monitor radioactivity in marine waters are presented. When the criteria for monitoring radioactivity is to determine routes of radionuclide transfer to man, the ''critical pathway'' approach is often applied. Alternatively, where information on ambient radionuclide levels and distributions is sought, the approach of selecting marine organisms as ''bioindicators'' of radioactivity is generally used. Whichever approach is applied, a great deal of knowledge is required about the physiology and ecology of the specific organism chosen. In addition, several criteria for qualifying as a bioindicator species are discussed; e.g., it must be a sedentary species which reflects the ambient radionuclide concentration at a given site, sufficiently long-lived to allow long-term temporal sampling, widely distributed to allow spatial comparisons, able to bioconcentrate the radionuclide to a relatively high degree, while showing a simple correlation between radionuclide content in its tissues with that in the surrounding waters. Useful hints on the appropriate species to use and the best way to collect and prepare organisms for radioanalysis are also given. It is concluded that benthic algae and bivalve molluscs generally offer the greatest potential for use as a ''bioindicator'' species in radionuclide biomonitoring programmes. Where knowledge on contribution to radiological dose is required, specific edible marine species should be the organisms of choice; however, both purposes can be served when the edible species chosen through critical pathway analysis is also an excellent bioaccumulator of the radionuclide of interest. (author)

  18. Radioactive contamination in monitors received for calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Paulo S.; Santos, Gilvan C. dos; Brunelo, Maria Antonieta G.; Paula, Tiago C. de; Pires, Marina A.; Borges, Jose C.

    2013-01-01

    The Calibration Laboratory - LABCAL, from the Research Center for Metrology and Testing - METROBRAS, MRA Comercio de Instrumentos Eletronicos Ltda., began activities in October 2008 and, in August 2009, decided to establish a procedure for monitoring tests, external and internal, of all packages received from customers, containing instruments for calibration. The aim was to investigate possible contamination radioactive on these instruments. On July 2011, this procedure was extended to packagings of personal thermoluminescent dosemeters - TLD, received by the newly created Laboratory Laboratorio de Dosimetria Pessoal - LDP . In the monitoring procedure were used monitors with external probe, type pancake, MRA brand, models GP - 500 and MIR 7028. During the 37 months in which this investigation was conducted, were detected 42 cases of radioactive contamination, with the following characteristics: 1) just one case was personal dosimeter, TLD type; 2) just one case was not from a packing from nuclear medicine service - was from a mining company; 3) contamination occurred on packs and instruments, located and/or widespread; 4) contamination values ranged from slightly above the level of background radiation to about a thousand fold. Although METROBRAS has facilities for decontamination, in most cases, especially those of higher contamination, the procedure followed was to store the contaminated material in a room used for storage of radioactive sources. Periodically, each package and/or instrument was monitored, being released when the radiation level matched the background radiation. Every contamination detected, the client and/or owner of the instrument was informed. The Brazilian National Energy Commission - CNEN, was informed, during your public consultation for reviewing the standard for nuclear medicine services, held in mid-2012, having received from METROBRAS the statistical data available at the time. The high frequency of contamination detected and the high

  19. Occupational monitoring at radioactive waste deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Cunha, Franklin S. [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (COMAP.N/FCN/INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Fábrica de Combustível Nuclear. Coordenação de Meio Ambiente e Proteção Radiológica Ambiental; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: franklincunha@inb.gov.br, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com, E-mail: Ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The Initial Deposit of Low Activity Radioactive Waste - DIRBA is an ancillary facility to the Nuclear Fuel Factory - FCN for the initial storage of low activity radioactive waste generated in the nuclear fuel cycle under the responsibility of the FCN. Currently approximately 460 200-liter drums containing Class 2.3 waste are stored: Waste containing Natural Radionuclides (RBMN-RN). As part of the nuclear licensing of the facility, an area radiological monitoring program was developed with monthly monitoring of 17 exposure points, 3 direct long-distance air sampling points with CAM alpha-7 monitors, monitored in January and 9 points where smears of alpha long half-life emitters were monitored in January. The mean exposure rate between points was 0.5 μSv∙h{sup -1}, with a maximum of 1.27 μSv∙h{sup -1} varying, on average, between 0.98 μSv∙h{sup -1} at point P1 to 0.23 μSv∙h{sup -1} at P11. The monthly average was the same, 0.50 μSv∙h-1, ranging from 0.46 μSv∙h{sup -1} (November) to 0.57 μSv∙h{sup -1} (August). The half-life long-lived alpha sampling were all below the MDA as well as the 9 smears. Regarding the requirements of monitored areas, the deposit must be considered as supervised area, from the point of view of radioprotection. The possibility of tipping the drums or other accidents with spillage of material contained into them caused, in a proactive way, the area to be considered a controlled area. (author)

  20. Toxicity regulation of radioactive liquid waste effluent from CANDU stations - lessons from Ontario's MISA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity testing became an issue for Ontario's CANDU stations, when it was required under Ontario's MISA regulations for the Electricity Generation Sector. In initial tests, radioactive liquid waste (RLW) effluent was intermittently toxic to both rainbow trout and Daphnia. Significant differences in RLW toxicity were apparent among stations and contributing streams. Specific treatment systems were designed for three stations, with the fourth electing to use existing treatment systems. Stations now use a combination of chemical analysis and treatment to regulate RLW toxicity. Studies of Ontario CANDU stations provide a basis for minimizing costs and environmental effects of new nuclear stations. (author)

  1. Radioactivity measurement of the liquid effluents of two university hospital methodology, problems arising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Barthe, N.; Chatti, K.; Ducassou, D.

    2005-01-01

    The authors present methodology used to measure the radioactivity of the effluents at the output of two services of Nuclear medicine located in two Hospital complexes of the Area of Bordeaux. These measures are intended to answer at the requests of circular DGS/DHOS no 2001/323 of the Ministry for Employment and Solidarity. The selected method is more powerful since it is based on the use of a whole of spectrometry to very low background noise. These devices of measurements make it possible to take into account all the isotopes coming from a service of Nuclear medicine. The authors are conscious that of such measurements cannot be considered in all the services of Nuclear medicine. Other technical articles will specify simpler methods allowing a satisfactory management of the radioactive wastes. (author)

  2. A study on the diffusion of gaseous radioactive effluents based on the statistical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Man Gyun; Lee, Goung Jin

    1998-01-01

    A diffusion model of radioactive gaseous effluents is improved to apply for domestic nuclear power plants. Up to now, XOQDOQ computer code package developed by U. S NRC has been used for the assessment of radioactive plume dispersion by normal operation of domestic nuclear power plants. XOQDOQ adopts the straight-line Gaussian plume model which was basically derived for the plane terrain. However, since there are so many mountains in Korea, the several shortcomings of XOQDOQ are improved to consider the complex terrain effects. In this work, wind direction change is considered by modifying the wind rose frequency using meteorological data of the local weather stations. In addition, an effective height correction model, a plume reduction model due to plume penetration into mountain, and a wet deposition model are adopted for more realistic assessments. The proposed methodology is implemented in Yonggwang nuclear power plants, and can be used for other domestic nuclear power plants

  3. Coir pith of the green coconut in the decontamination of radioactive aqueous effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Raquel Almeida; Yamaura, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: quequelll_monteiro@yahoo.com.br; myamaura@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Industrial segments as plant of mining, hospitals and university generate considerable volumes of radioactive wastewater containing uranium. The increasing development of the use of the nuclear energy to lead away to an expansion of the sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, but it leads to security problems and it appears the necessity of control of the removing of uranium and radioactive effluent treatments. Researches evaluate if the technique of the biosorption would promote an alternative process with attractive characteristics of cost-benefit. The residual biomass from agricultural activities has been studied and used as adsorbent of metals and organic composts by low cost, abundance and for being biodegradable. In this work, it is presented the efficiency of the coir pith for the adsorption of ions UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The coir pith is a by-product of the harvest of the coconut, a renewable natural source. The study was accomplished using the batch techniques. The influence from pH 2 to 5, the dose of the coir pith, equilibrium time and the models of kinetic reaction were investigated. It was verified that the adsorption increased with the increase of pH and of the dose. The equilibrium time was of 30 min and the best correspondence with the model of pseudo second-order was observed. The results obtained has been promising, so use as adsorbent of metallic ions represents an economic alternative in relation to the conventional treatment of effluent. (author)

  4. Coir pith of the green coconut in the decontamination of radioactive aqueous effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Raquel Almeida; Yamaura, Mitiko

    2007-01-01

    Industrial segments as plant of mining, hospitals and university generate considerable volumes of radioactive wastewater containing uranium. The increasing development of the use of the nuclear energy to lead away to an expansion of the sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, but it leads to security problems and it appears the necessity of control of the removing of uranium and radioactive effluent treatments. Researches evaluate if the technique of the biosorption would promote an alternative process with attractive characteristics of cost-benefit. The residual biomass from agricultural activities has been studied and used as adsorbent of metals and organic composts by low cost, abundance and for being biodegradable. In this work, it is presented the efficiency of the coir pith for the adsorption of ions UO 2 2+ . The coir pith is a by-product of the harvest of the coconut, a renewable natural source. The study was accomplished using the batch techniques. The influence from pH 2 to 5, the dose of the coir pith, equilibrium time and the models of kinetic reaction were investigated. It was verified that the adsorption increased with the increase of pH and of the dose. The equilibrium time was of 30 min and the best correspondence with the model of pseudo second-order was observed. The results obtained has been promising, so use as adsorbent of metallic ions represents an economic alternative in relation to the conventional treatment of effluent. (author)

  5. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 23. Environmental effluent analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/23, ''Environmental Effluent Analysis,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Drat Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This volume discusses the releases to the environment of radioactive and non-radioactive materials that arise during facility construction and waste handling operations, as well as releases that could occur in the event of an operational accident. The results of the analyses are presented along with a detailed description of the analytical methodologies employed

  6. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous effluents from nuclear-powered merchant ships (NMS-GEFF code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardile, F.P.; Bangart, R.L.; Collins, J.T.

    1978-06-01

    The Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization IMCO) is currently preparing guidelines concerning the safety of nuclear-powered merchant ships. An important aspect of these guidelines is the determination of the releases of radioactive material in effluents from these ships and the control exercised by the ships over these releases. To provide a method for the determination of these releases, the NRC staff has developed a computerized model, the NMS-GEFF Code, which is described in the following chapters. The NMS-GEFF Code calculates releases of radioactive material in gaseous effluents for nuclear-powered merchant ships using pressurized water reactors

  7. Radiation protection and ambient radioactivity monitoring in the area of the Asse mine. Annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Stippler, R.

    1998-01-01

    The number of annual sampling and measurements performed in compliance with the operator's monitoring duties have been the same as last year: 364. All measured radioactivity values were at the level of natural environmental radioactivity. Some samples and measurements reflected the fallout from former atmospheric nuclear weapons tests and the accident at the Chernobyl reactor. Personnel dosimetry was performed according to legal requirements of the Radiation Protection Ordinance, as were measurements for the monitoring of ambient doses, dose rates and radioactivity levels in the air of the mine structures. All measured values were below the maximum permissible personal doses and occupational dose limits. Ambient air measurements in the salt mine as in the preceding years detected low amounts of the nuclides H 3, C 14, Pb 210, and the short-lived daughter products of Rn 222 and Rn 220. The calculated radioactivity concentrations in the vicinity of the mine, derived from averaged annual effluents, to some part were below the average natural concentrations of the nuclides. The effluent-induced radiation dose at the most affected location was far below the limits set by the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig./CB) [de

  8. Method for removing radioactive iodine and radioactive organic iodides from effluent gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A method and composition for removing radioactive and organic iodides from an 131 I-containing off-gas stream is provided. The composition for removal by adsorption is a ceramic material with a surface area of from about 5 m 2 /g to about 250 m 2 /g impregnated with a metallic salt. The method for removing the iodine or iodide is accomplished by passing the off-gas stream over the ceramic material impregnated with the metallic salt. It finds special application in air filters for nuclear power plants

  9. An integrate system for radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, Al.; Bartos, D.; Constantin, F.; Stanga, D.; Giolu, Gh.; Calin, R.; Guta, T.; Stochioiu, A.; Lupu, A.

    2003-01-01

    This is one of the projects included in IFIN-HH nucleus programme 'Nuclear Physics Advanced Researches and Applied Nuclear Techniques'. A new instrument generation for measuring or monitoring the environmental radioactivity is to be developed, based on nowadays components, technology and data processing methods. The additional results should be: - the instrument and related procedures to certify the national standard for neutron dosimetry; - the operational simplicity and higher confidence in the new portable instruments for radioprotection; - the instruments and methods for gas absolute volume activity measuring laboratory; - transportable stand to measure the efficiency of the aerosol filtering systems; - PC based technique to reconstruct the radiometric map of an area supervised by an intelligent gamma probe array. The lecture is a review of the activities to be done. (authors)

  10. Elimination of slightly radioactive liquid effluent by dilution. Its consequences (1960); Elimination par dilution d'effluents liquides faiblement radioactifs. Leurs consequences (1960)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovard, P; Candillon, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    Nuclear centres often have to solve problems raised by the elimination of large volumes of slightly radioactive liquid effluent. As things stand at present, the method usually adopted consists in expelling this effluent into the main water system in order to dilute it to a maximum, and thus to lower its radioactive isotope concentration to below the norms imposed by the Public Health Service. This technique requires systematic checking of the water system and its dependences, and demands a thorough knowledge of adsorption and fixation processes. (author) [French] Les centres nucleaires ont frequemment a resoudre des problemes poses par l'elimination de volumes importants d'effluents liquides faiblement radioactifs. Dans l'etat actuel des choses, la solution la plus utilisee consiste a rejeter ces effluents dans le reseau hydrographique de maniere a les diluer au maximum et abaisser ainsi leurs teneurs en isotopes radioactifs au-dessous des normes imposees par la Sante Publique. Cette technique necessite un controle systematique du reseau et de ses dependances et demande une connaissance approfondie des processus d'adsorption et de fixation. (auteur)

  11. Radioactivity monitoring of Irish dairy produce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The RPII has been carrying out monitoring of milk and dairy produce since 1986. Milk samples are routinely analysed for radiocaesium and strontium-90 as part of the RPII's environmental monitoring programme to determine the doses received to the Irish population from milk consumption. The method the RPII utilises for determining the Sr-90 activity in milk is by measuring the Cerenkov radiation produced by its daughter 90 Y isolated from interfering nuclides such as uranium, thorium, radium and their decay products as well as isotopes of caesium, potassium and strontium by extraction with 10% di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (HDEHP) in toluene. The chemical yield of 90 Y is determined by the acidmetric titration of yttrium nitrate carrier with titriplex III. The levels of Sr-90 and dose to the Irish population from milk consumption have been negligible when compared to other radioactive sources in the Irish environment. Other dairy products are analysed for radiocaesium on a routine basis for commercial customers to ensure the levels of radioactivity in the dairy products fall within EC regulations governing the export/import of dairy produce. The export of milk and milk produce from Ireland is a very important industry, 80% of dairy products produced in Ireland are exported and these exports are worth Euro 2.2 billion annually to the Irish economy. The dairy products are analysed by gamma spectroscopy and include full and skim milk powders, butter, casein, cheese, cream, whey and lactose. The levels of radiocaesium in these products are typically below 5 Bk/kg and fall well within the limit of 370 Bq/kg laid down by the European Community in Council Regulation 737/90. Although the levels of these radionuclides are relatively low the RPII recognises the importance of analysing these samples for radioactivity to inform the public, ensure consumer confidence and, more importantly, to maintain a level of expertise in the RPII in these analytical techniques so that

  12. Radioactivity monitoring of Irish dairy produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, K. (Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland. Radiation Monitoring, Dublin (Ireland))

    2010-03-15

    Full text: The RPII has been carrying out monitoring of milk and dairy produce since 1986. Milk samples are routinely analysed for radiocaesium and strontium-90 as part of the RPII's environmental monitoring programme to determine the doses received to the Irish population from milk consumption. The method the RPII utilises for determining the Sr-90 activity in milk is by measuring the Cerenkov radiation produced by its daughter 90Y isolated from interfering nuclides such as uranium, thorium, radium and their decay products as well as isotopes of caesium, potassium and strontium by extraction with 10% di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (HDEHP) in toluene. The chemical yield of 90Y is determined by the acidmetric titration of yttrium nitrate carrier with titriplex III. The levels of Sr-90 and dose to the Irish population from milk consumption have been negligible when compared to other radioactive sources in the Irish environment. Other dairy products are analysed for radiocaesium on a routine basis for commercial customers to ensure the levels of radioactivity in the dairy products fall within EC regulations governing the export/import of dairy produce. The export of milk and milk produce from Ireland is a very important industry, 80% of dairy products produced in Ireland are exported and these exports are worth Euro 2.2 billion annually to the Irish economy. The dairy products are analysed by gamma spectroscopy and include full and skim milk powders, butter, casein, cheese, cream, whey and lactose. The levels of radiocaesium in these products are typically below 5 Bk/kg and fall well within the limit of 370 Bq/kg laid down by the European Community in Council Regulation 737/90. Although the levels of these radionuclides are relatively low the RPII recognises the importance of analysing these samples for radioactivity to inform the public, ensure consumer confidence and, more importantly, to maintain a level of expertise in the RPII in these analytical techniques so

  13. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo; Park, Won Pyo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2002. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  14. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Z. K.; Oh, S. H. [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 1997. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  15. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo; Park, Won Pyo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2001. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  16. A radioactive noble gas quantitative analysis of gaseous effluents from NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.; Georgiev, K.; Mavrodiev, V.; Kikarin, B.

    1993-01-01

    The radioactive isotopes of argon, krypton and xenon comprise a substantial part of the gaseous emission of a NPP. A quantitative determination of their specific activity in the controlled area and the gaseous effluents requires a special sampling technique, as well as measurement method. The zeolites and the activated charcoals have a differentiated behaviour towards radioisotopes of argon, krypton and xenon. The isotope fractionation is often a problem, especially with argon and xenon. Some additional difficulties arise due to the irreproductibility of temperature and atmospheric moisture. The present paper describes a method for a spectrometric determination of radioactive noble gases after the cryogenic sampling developed at the Radiochemical laboratory of the Sofia University. The quality control of the method, as well as some special difficulties in its performing are discussed. The estimated minimum detectable activity is 5-10 Bq/m 3 for radioactive noble gases with half-life > 1 hour and sampling time for (resp. gamma-spectrometry) 1 hour. (author)

  17. Radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The report presents the available data on radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents discharged by nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community from 1972 to 1976. Discharges are expressed both in absolute terms and relative to the net production of electricity from the fuel. On the basis of the discharges recorded for 1976 the resulting maximum exposure of members of the population is quantified and compared with the dose limits prescribed by Euratom radiological protection standards and with the exposure resulting from natural radioactivity. It is concluded that there is no case in which a discharge could have given rise to an exposure exceeding the relevant prescribed limit. Not only did the possible maximum exposures incurred by individuals leave an appreciable safety margin relative to that limit but, for the vast majority of installations, they were comparable with or were considerably lower than the geographical and temporal variations in exposures resulting from natural radioactivity. Where environmental levels have been detectable the measured results have of course been used but, with few exceptions, the levels have remained less than the very low limits of detection currently possible. In general, where theoretical models are used to evaluate exposure, they are designed to give conservative results and hence it is likely that the true exposures are even less than those calculated

  18. Radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This annual report on Radioactive Discharges and Monitoring the Environment, 1988, summarises the programmes of Sellafield, Drigg, Chapelcross, Springfields and Capenhurst for monitoring the discharges of radioactive materials to the sea and the environment. Critical groups and environmental exposure pathways are identified and collective doses to these groups estimated. The disposal of radioactive wastes at each site is discussed. Certificates of authorisation are presented. A summary of recommended doses of specific radionuclides is given. (Author)

  19. Partial monitoring system Radioactivity of the Environment, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melicherova, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this report the Partial monitoring system 'Radioactivity of the Environment' for the year 2006 is presented. International co-operation of the Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute in the Partial monitoring system 'Radioactivity of the Environment' of the Slovak Republic, international co-operation as well as financial data are reviewed

  20. Decree No 74-1181 of 31 December 1974 concerning liquid radioactive effluent releases from nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Decree prescribes the licensing procedure for the release of liquid wastes from nuclear installations as well as the technical supervision of such operations. It does not apply to the transport of radioactive effluents which is governed by the regulations on the transport of dangerous goods. (NEA) [fr

  1. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans releases 2.0 and 3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guettler, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  2. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) test plans release 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  3. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans release 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  4. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) test plans release 1.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user

  5. Report on radioactive discharges and environmental monitoring at nuclear power stations during 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, M.J.; Thomas, D.W.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents the details for 1991 of radioactive discharges and environmental monitoring at Nuclear Electric sites. In addition to the main section which summarises the discharges and monitoring at the Company's nuclear sites as a whole, appendices are presented covering the data in detail for individual sites. In each case the radiological impact on the general public has been estimated. Discharges generally were not substantially different from those of recent years. All radioactive effluent discharges from power stations were within authorised limits. Radiation doses to members of the public resulting from these discharges, and from direct radiation from the Stations, were in all cases less than the limit of 1 mSv per year which has been recommended by ICRP since 1985. (Author)

  6. Radioactive standards and calibration methods for contamination monitoring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-06-01

    Contamination monitoring in the facilities for handling unsealed radioactive materials is one of the most important procedures for radiation protection as well as radiation dose monitoring. For implementation of the proper contamination monitoring, radiation measuring instruments should not only be suitable to the purpose of monitoring, but also be well calibrated for the objective qualities of measurement. In the calibration of contamination monitoring instruments, quality reference activities need to be used. They are supplied in different such as extended sources, radioactive solutions or radioactive gases. These reference activities must be traceable to the national standards or equivalent standards. On the other hand, the appropriate calibration methods must be applied for each type of contamination monitoring instruments. In this paper, the concepts of calibration for contamination monitoring instruments, reference sources, determination methods of reference quantities and practical calibration methods of contamination monitoring instruments, including the procedures carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and some relevant experimental data. (G.K.)

  7. A multifunction radioactive waste monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edeline, J.C.; Libs, G.

    1991-01-01

    The monitoring of unknown radioactive transuranic wastes mixed with fission products (FP) needs several measuring technics: passive and active neutron methods, gamma rays spectrometry and, sometimes, emission tomography to localize the hot points in the waste packages. The goal is to achieve a whole system from the most up-dated electronics sub-assemblies to provide these characterization measurement at the lowest cost and in the simplest manner. The control of the different measurements is made by only one micro-processor and an unusual way of using the gamma spectrometry A.D.C. and multichannel analyser makes possible to control the neutron analogic electronics: neutron counter high-voltage supplies, amplifiers and discriminators; many of the gamma spectrometry sub-assemblies are also used for the gamma emission tomography. The different measurements are automated and different programs offer the possibility to choice the proper measurement methods for each item. The waste package handling apparatus is not included in the system but the control of such handling might be performed by the micro-computer. We describe the main parts and features of the system [fr

  8. Survey of radioactive effluent releases from byproduct material facilities. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    A survey of over 3,000 NRC byproduct material licensees was conducted in late 1980 to collect data on annual effluent releases of radioactivity. The survey was conducted through a questionnaire, which was sent to NRC licensees who handle radioactive material in unsealed form, i.e., research, medical, and industrial institutions. Principal findings from the survey analysis are as follows: More than 98% of the reported annual releases to air (484 to 490) yield calculated average concentrations at the boundary of the unrestricted area that were at 1% or less than the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) of Appendix B, Table II, Column 1 of 10 CFR 20. The largest reported annual release was estimated to yield a concentration that was approximately 12% of MPC, the 5 other releases ranged from 1 to 10% of MPC. All reported annual releases of liquid waste were within the limits specified by NRC with most facilities reporting annual releases of only a fraction of a curie. Based on the data provided by licensees and analyzed in this report, it appears that in general the environmental impacts from research, medical and industrial institutions and organizations licensed by the NRC to possess and use byproduct materials are minimal and correspond to a small fraction of that from natural background

  9. Introducing radioactivity monitoring systems in the production of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofilic, T.; Marjanovic, T.; Rastovcan-Mioc, A.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, a significant number of cases of radioactive pollution has been recorded in metallurgical processes. However, it is not certain whether the pollution was caused by increased uncontrolled disposal of waste containing radionuclides or whether it was the result of increased radioactivity monitoring and control of metallic scrap. Many metal producers in the world have therefore implemented systematic monitoring of radioactivity in their production processes. Special attention was given to monitoring radioactivity in steel making processes, which is still the most applied construction material with an annual output of over billion tonnes all over the world. Drawing on the experience of the best known steel producers in Europe and world, Croatian steel mills find it necessary and justified to introduce radioactivity monitoring and control systems of radioactive elements in steel scrap, semi-finished and finished products. The aim of this paper is to point out the need to introduce the radioactivity monitoring and control in steel and steel-casting production, and to inform experts in Croatian steel mills and foundries about potential solutions and current systems. At the same time, we wanted to demonstrate how implementation of monitoring equipment can improve quality management and environmental management systems. This would render Croatian products competitive on the European market both in terms of physical and chemical properties and in terms of product quality certificates and radioactivity information. Since we lack our own standards and regulations to control both domestic and imported steel scrap, semi-finished products (crude steel, hot and cold rolled strip) and finished products, we need apply current international recommendations and guidelines, until we design our own monitoring system and adopt relevant legislation on the national level. This paper describes basic types of radioactivity monitoring and control systems, the most

  10. Radioactivity monitoring of the P.P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joksic, J.; Todorovic, D.; Radenkovic, M. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Radiation and Enviro nmental Protecti on Lab., Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-07-01

    The radioactivity monitoring in the 'Nikola Tesla' thermo-electric power plant environment comprised the analysis of soil, waters, flying ash, slag and plants. Soil, plant and water samples were taken in the environment of the 'Tent A', 'Tent B', 'Kolubara' and 'Morava' power plants during the two years period 2003-2004 and analyzed b y standard radiometric methods. Naturally occurring radionuclides 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K, 235 U, 238 U, 210 Pb are determined by gamma spectrometry using H.P. Ge detector, relative efficiency of 23% and energy resolution of 1.8 keV (1332.5 keV). Ceied reference materials: soil matrix with 55 Na, 57 Co, 60 Co, 89 Y, 133 Ba and 137 Cs (MIX-OMHSZ, National Office of Measures) and grass with 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 40 K and 90 Sr (IAEA-373) were used for calibration. The gross alpha and gross beta activity measurements are carried out using low-level background alpha-beta proportional gas counter. Radiochemical analyzes of soil samples have shown the naturally occurring radionuclides: 226 Ra 35-60 Bq/kg, 232 Th 35-49 Bq/kg, 40 K 513-711 Bq/kg, 210 Pb 14-69 Bq/kg, 238 U 25-80 Bq/kg and 235 U 1.1-4.5 Bq/kg. The 137 Cs was found in concentration 10-57 Bq/kg. Radiochemical analyzes of plant samples have shown the naturally occurring radionuclides: 226 Ra 0.7-6.1 Bq/kg, 232 Th 1-4.8 Bq/kg, 40 K 392-1132 Bq/kg, 210 Pb 5.6-97 Bq/kg, 238 U 2.3-7.4 Bq/kg and 235 U 0.2-0.7 Bq/kg. The 137 Cs was found in concentration 0.13-2.8 Bq/kg. The water samples were within the range of recommended values for drinking waters in Serbia and Montenegro. Total alpha activity was below the lowest limit of detection and total beta activities were up to 0.35 Bq/l. The results of measured radionuclides in soil, plant and water samples do not show any significant radioactive environmental pollution. (authors)

  11. Radioactivity monitoring of the P.P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksic, J.; Todorovic, D.; Radenkovic, M.

    2006-01-01

    The radioactivity monitoring in the 'Nikola Tesla' thermo-electric power plant environment comprised the analysis of soil, waters, flying ash, slag and plants. Soil, plant and water samples were taken in the environment of the 'Tent A', 'Tent B', 'Kolubara' and 'Morava' power plants during the two years period 2003-2004 and analyzed b y standard radiometric methods. Naturally occurring radionuclides 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K, 235 U, 238 U, 210 Pb are determined by gamma spectrometry using H.P. Ge detector, relative efficiency of 23% and energy resolution of 1.8 keV (1332.5 keV). Certified reference materials: soil matrix with 55 Na, 57 Co, 60 Co, 89 Y, 133 Ba and 137 Cs (MIX-OMHSZ, National Office of Measures) and grass with 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 40 K and 90 Sr (IAEA-373) were used for calibration. The gross alpha and gross beta activity measurements are carried out using low-level background alpha-beta proportional gas counter. Radiochemical analyzes of soil samples have shown the naturally occurring radionuclides: 226 Ra 35-60 Bq/kg, 232 Th 35-49 Bq/kg, 40 K 513-711 Bq/kg, 210 Pb 14-69 Bq/kg, 238 U 25-80 Bq/kg and 235 U 1.1-4.5 Bq/kg. The 137 Cs was found in concentration 10-57 Bq/kg. Radiochemical analyzes of plant samples have shown the naturally occurring radionuclides: 226 Ra 0.7-6.1 Bq/kg, 232 Th 1-4.8 Bq/kg, 40 K 392-1132 Bq/kg, 210 Pb 5.6-97 Bq/kg, 238 U 2.3-7.4 Bq/kg and 235 U 0.2-0.7 Bq/kg. The 137 Cs was found in concentration 0.13-2.8 Bq/kg. The water samples were within the range of recommended values for drinking waters in Serbia and Montenegro. Total alpha activity was below the lowest limit of detection and total beta activities were up to 0.35 Bq/l. The results of measured radionuclides in soil, plant and water samples do not show any significant radioactive environmental pollution. (authors)

  12. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik; Noh, Hyung Ah [Daejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2002. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  13. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik; Noh, Hyung Ah [Daejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2002. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  14. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik.; Noh, Hyung Ah [Taejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Taejon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Taejon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2000. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Taejon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  15. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Sik; Noh, Hyung Ah [Daejon Radiation Monitoring Station, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2001. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period.

  16. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, J. S.; Kim, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Taejon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Taejon Radiation Monitoring Station in 1998. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Taejon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period

  17. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daejeon area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Jae Sik; Noh, Hyung Ah

    2001-12-01

    Systematic understanding of the distribution of environmental radioactivity and radiation level in Daejeon, including Chungchung area, in normal circumstance, and rapid detection of unusual variation of the radiation level in emergency situation thereby ensure public safety are the objectives of this project to be carried out. This report summarizes and interprets environmental radiation/radioactivity monitoring data obtained at Daejeon Radiation Monitoring Station in 2001. In conclusion, the natural environmental radiation level in Daejeon area has been preserved as usual and no significant artificial enhancement in environmental radioactivity was observed during the course of this survey and monitoring period

  18. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2000. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters. There was no significant difference in environmental radioactivities between 1999 and 2000.

  19. Monitoring dissolved radioactive cesium in Abukuma River in Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Kurosawa, Akihiko; Komai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive materials were released into the atmosphere and deposited over wide areas of farmland, forests, and cities; elevated levels of "1"3"1I, "1"3"4Cs, and "1"3"7Cs have been detected in these areas due to the accident at the Tokyo Power Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused by the April 2011 earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan. Radioactive Cs deposited on farmland and forests gradually leaches into water bodies such as mountain streams and rivers adsorbed onto particles or in a dissolved state. It is important to calrify the level of dissolved and total radioactive Cs in environmental water for forecasting the of discharge of radioactive Cs from forest and watersheds, assessing on the effect of dissolved and total radioactive Cs on not only irrigation water but also rice and other crops, and evaluating the transport of radioactive Cs from rivers to costal areas. Therefore, it is important to monitor their levels in Fukushima Prefecture over time. In this research, we monitored the levels of dissolved and total radioactive Cs in Abukuma River using a conventional evaporative concentration method. By monitoring the river waters since September 2012, it was estimated that the levels of dissolved radioactive Cs were less than 0.128 Bq/L and those of total radioactive Cs were less than 0.274 Bq/L in the main stream and branches of Abukuma River in the low suspended solid condition. (author)

  20. Storage of radioactive material - accidents - precipitation - personnel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijasic, A.; Gacinovic, O.

    1961-12-01

    This volume covers the reports on four routine tasks concerned with safe handling of radioactive material and influence of nuclear facilities on the environment. The tasks performed were as follows: Storage of solid and liquid radioactive material; actions in case of accidents; radiation monitoring of the fallout, water and ground; personnel dosimetry

  1. Radioactivity in the environment. A summary and radiological assessment of the Environment Ageny's monitoring programmes. Report for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the results from the Environment Agency's monitoring of radioactivity in the environment during 1996. Monitoring programmes were carried out in support of the Agency's regulatory functions under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 and as part of the UK Government's obligations under the Euratom Treaty. The programmes included: effluent monitoring; the quality checking of solid waste disposals; environmental monitoring; the monitoring of radioactivity in air and rainwater; the monitoring of radioactivity in drinking water sources. A total of 160 effluent samples were analysed for nearly 900 determinants, two consignments of solid radioactive waste destined for disposal at British Nuclear Fuels' site at Drigg were checked, direct instrumental monitoring was carried out at ISO locations within the vicinity of nuclear sites, and 532 environmental samples were analysed for over 2,000 determinants. Effluent monitoring: The Agency requires operators of certain sites to provide samples of their liquid effluents for independent analysis. The results are compared with reports submitted by site operators. The majority of results showed satisfactory agreement; operators' values were frequently higher than the Agency's measurements indicating that they were not under-reporting. However, some discrepancies were found and are being investigated. Quality checking of solid waste disposals: Consignments of solid low level radioactive waste are seized by inspectors for examination at the Agency's Waste Quality Checking Laboratory. Sophisticated non-destructive and destructive analytical techniques are used at the laboratory to check the radioactive content and description of the wastes. Consignments of waste from the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston and Amersham International at Amersham were examined. In both cases the operators reported higher activity than the Agency's laboratory. The consignments also conformed with the operators' disposal

  2. Radioactivity monitor for high-performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, D.R.; Crozier, A.

    1977-01-01

    The coupling of a homogeneous radioactivity monitor to a liquid chromatograph involves compromises between the sensitivity of the monitor and the resolution and speed of analysis of the chromatograph. The theoretical relationships between these parameters are considered and expressions derived which make it possible to calculate suitable monitor operating conditions for most types of high-performance liquid chromatography

  3. Ambient radioactivity monitoring V: Marine environment, fish and marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedekind, C.; Kanisch, G.

    1996-01-01

    The sea, originally thought to have an almost unlimited capacity of uptake of pollutants due to its water volumes available for dilution, was shown by growing insight into the physical, chemical and ecologic interdependencies to be a sensitive ecosystem. Its limits to cope with growing pollution are increasingly becoming clear, and this is a particular reason to perform radioactivity monitoring of the sea water, as radioactivity is transferred to the marine organisms. Organisms selected for monitoring are fish and crustaceans. (orig.) [de

  4. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from boiling water reactors (BWR-GALE Code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangart, R.L.; Bell, L.G.; Boegli, J.S.; Burke, W.C.; Lee, J.Y.; Minns, J.L.; Stoddart, P.G.; Weller, R.A.; Collins, J.T.

    1978-12-01

    The calculational procedures described in the report reflect current NRC staff practice. The methods described will be used in the evaluation of applications for construction permits and operating licenses docketed after January 1, 1979, until this NUREG is revised as a result of additional staff review. The BWR-GALE (Boiling Water Reactor Gaseous and Liquid Effluents) Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the release of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents from boiling water reactors (BWRs). The calculations are based on data generated from operating reactors, field tests, laboratory tests, and plant-specific design considerations incorporated to reduce the quantity of radioactive materials that may be released to the environment

  5. Analysis and study on generic models for use in assessing the impact of radioactive liquid effluent to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Wenlin; Cao Jianzu; Fang Dong

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of the impact of discharges of radioactive substances into surface water under normal condition of nuclear facilities is an important part of the environmental impact analysis. Generic methods for assessing the impact of radioactive liquid effluent release into surface water provided by IAEA Safety Reports Series 19 are studied in this paper, and also an example calculation that assesses the impact of radioactive surface water discharge of HTR-PM ( High Temperature Air-cooled Reactor demonstration unit) in Anhui is presented in this paper to illustrate that a simplified but conservative assessment can be used for the purpose of screening proposed radioactive discharges. If the results meet the relevant requirements specified by the relevant regulatory authority, the further calculations are not needed. If they fails to meet the requirements, the more field data are to be sampled for calculations by more sophisticated mode or otherwise. (authors)

  6. Monitoring of covering model of the National radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jezikova, M.

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this rigorous report is justification of cover model building at radioactive waste repository in Mochovce as a very important engineering barrier preventing significant release of radioactive substances into the environment and providing protection against ionizing radiation. This rigorous report includes a theoretical part, which describes radioactive waste characterization, radioactive waste management and summary of the preliminary activities prior to the building cover model, particularly involving the selection of appropriate variables and parameters and creation of monitoring plan during the long term monitoring for evaluation of this barrier in order to ensure minimization of any leak of radioactive substances from RAW. The next part includes evaluation of the values of parameters and variables to build cover model of RAW in Mochovce during 2006-2008 (author)

  7. Radioactive source monitoring system based on RFID and GPRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haiyang; Zhou Hongliang; Zhang Hongjian; Zhang Sheng; Zhou Junru; Weng Guojie

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear radiation produced by radioactive source is harmful to the health of human body, and the lost and theft of radioactive source will cause environmental pollution and social panic. In order to solve the abnormal leaks, accidental loss, theft and other problems of the radioactive source, a radioactive source monitoring system based on RFID, GPS, GPRS and GSM technology is put forward. Radiation dose detector and GPS wireless location module are used to obtain the information of radiation dose and location respectively, RFID reader reads the status of a tag fixed on the bottom of the radioactive source. All information is transmitted to the remote monitoring center via GPRS wireless transmission. There will be an audible and visual alarm when radiation dose is out of limits or the state of radioactive source is abnormal, and the monitoring center will send alarming text messages to the managers through GSM Modem at the same time. Thus, the functions of monitoring and alarming are achieved. The system has already been put into operation and is being kept in functional order. It can provide stable statistics as well as accurate alarm, improving the supervision of radioactive source effectively. (authors)

  8. Optimization of the retention of radioactive material from the airborne effluents of reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.; Horn, H.-G.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-protection ordinance of the Federal Republic of Germany does not know the expression 'optimization in radiological protection'. In order to gain experiences with the cost-benefit analysis for the retention of radioactive material from nuclear facilities as proposed in ICRP 26, this method has been applied on the emission of radioactive material with the airborne effluents of reprocessing plants. The reference plant has an annual throughput of 1500 t of spent LWR-fuel. Basing on this plant, two smaller plants (350 t/a, 700 t/a) are also analysed. The cost-benefit-analysis is carried-out for H3, C14, Kr85, J129 and aerosols. For these nuclides as well as for the three plant-sizes, the methods of retention, the estimated annual costs of retention, the emission rates for the different retention measures and the resulting collective-dose commitments are shown. Based on an α-value of 8000 $/man-Sv (20,000 DM/Man-Sv) the cost-benefit analysis shows no optimum for H3 and Kr 85. The optimum C14 as well as iodine retention is a high-efficiency scrubber and an iodine filter, respectively for the dissolver off-gas. For aerosols the cost-benefit analysis shows an optimum for the filtration of the dissolver off-gas by means of HEPA filters. For the other aerosol-sources, condensation, scrubbing and additional droplet separation from the off-gas is optimum. Reasons differing from cost-benefit analysis require HEPA filters for all major aerosol-sources. (author)

  9. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    A report is given on radioactive discharges through authorised outlets and on environmental monitoring for all of British Nuclear Fuels Limited Works and Sites, i.e. the Windscale and Calder Works and the Drigg Storage and Disposal Site; Chapelcross Works; Springfields Works and the Ulnes Walton Disposal Site; and Capenhurst Works. The report includes information on liquid and airborne radioactive effluents and solid radioactive waste at each of the Company's Works and Sites. Assessments are made of maximum radiological exposures to individual members of the public expressed in terms of limits based on ICRP recommendations and in accordance with advice given by the NRPB. The report showed that at no time during 1980 did discharges and disposals of radioactive wastes through authorised outlets at any of the Works exceed those laid down in any of the Authorisations. Environmental monitoring studies also showed that the radiation exposure in 1980 of the most highly exposed groups of the general population was significantly lower than the Annual Limit recommended by the ICRP. (U.K.)

  10. Calibration method based on direct radioactivity measurement for radioactive gas monitoring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Ohi, Yoshihiro; Chida, Tohru; Wu, Youyang.

    1993-01-01

    A calibration method for radioactive gas monitoring instruments was studied. In the method, gaseous radioactivity standards were provided on the basis of the direct radioactivity measurement by the diffusion-in long proportional counter method (DLPC method). The radioactivity concentration of the gas mixture through a monitoring instrument was determined by sampling the known volume of the gas mixture into the proportional counter used for the DLPC method. Since oxygen in the gas mixture decreased the counting efficiency in a proportional counter, the influence on calibration was experimentally estimated. It was not serious and able to be easily corrected. By the present method, the relation between radioactivity concentration and ionization current was determined for a gas-flow ionization chamber with 1.5 l effective volume. It showed good agreement with the results in other works. (author)

  11. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daegu area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H. D.; Lee, S. Y. [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-15

    The objectives of the project are to monitor an abnormal radiation level in Taegu and Kyungpook region, and to enhance our ability to prepare for the radiological emergency situation by establishing the radioactivity monitoring system in Taegu and Kyungpook region. Gross beta activities were measured and gamma radionuclides were analysed for the environmental samples of air-borned dust. precipitation. fallout and drinking water collected in Taegu radioactivity monitoring center. and gamma exposure rates were also measured. To establish the basic data base on the environmental radioactivity, gamma radionuclide analyses were carried out for the samples of soil, drinking water, grain, vegetable, milk, and fish which were obtained from 31 different areas, and the spatial gamma exposure rates from 61 different points were also measured in Taegu and Kyungpook region. In conclusion, it didn't appear any evidence for newly pollution of artificial radioactivity in Taegu and Kyungpook region.

  12. Environmental aspects and public exposure doses of airborne radioactive effluents from a PWR-power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Miaofa; Zhang Jin; Fu Rongchu; Hu Yinxiu

    1989-04-01

    It is estimated that the environmental aspects and public exposure doses of airborne radioactive effluents from a imaginary 0.3 GW PWR-power plant which sited on the site of a large coalfired power plant estimated before. The major contributor to public exposure is found to be the release of 14 C and the critical pathway is food ingestion. A maximum annual individual body effective dose equivalent of 7.112 x 10 -6 Sv · (GW · a) -1 is found at the point of 0.5 km southeast of the source. The collective dose equivalent in the area around the plant within a radius of 100 km is to be 0.5974 man-Sv · a) -1 . Both maximum individual and collective effective dose equivalents of the PWR-power plant are much lower than those of the coal-fired one. If the ash emission ratio of the latter decreases from 24.6% to 1%, public exposure doses of the two plants would be nearly equal

  13. Radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luykx, F.; Fraser, G.

    1983-01-01

    The report covers operational nuclear power stations of capacity greater than 5C MWe and nucler fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community. Radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent discharges from these installations are given for the period 1976 to 1980, expressed both in absolute terms and normalized to net electricity production from the fuel. An assesssment is then made of exposure of members of the public consequent to the 1980 discharges. Where environmental contamination levels were detectable the results have been taken into account in the dose assessment; however, environmental contamination was in general below the limit of detection. In these circumstances the dose estimates rely entirely on theoretical models which frequently incorporate conservative assumptions; hence these estimates are likely to be greater than the doses actually received. The estimated exposures have then been compared with the dose limits set out in the Euratom Directive of 15th July, 1980. It is concluded that the exposure of members of the public always left an appreciable safety margin relative to the limits and indeed lay within the variations in exposure which result from natural background

  14. Morsleben repository for radioactive waste (ERAM). Operational safety, radiation protection and environmental monitoring. Release: December 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The report overviews the monitoring activities of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection at the Morsleben repository for radioactive waste (ERAM), focussing the ERAM inventory of radioactive waste and the measures and results of geomechanical and hydrogeological monitoring, operational radiation protection, the monitoring of discharges of radioactive substances, environmental monitoring, and the dose levels expected from discharges of radioactive substances. (orig.)

  15. Terrestrial radioactivity monitoring programme (TRAMP) report for 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) undertakes a comprehensive independent monitoring programme for radioactivity in terrestrial foodstuffs in England and Wales, this report presents the results from the first full year of operation of this programme and complements the data published annually by the Ministry's Directorate of Fisheries Research in respect of the aquatic environment. This work is undertaken in Wales on behalf of the Secretary of State. The Terrestrial Radioactivity Monitoring Programme (TRAMP) concentrates on samples of agricultural produce (milk, crops, meat) collected from the vicinity of the major nuclear sites in England and Wales and is independent of monitoring undertaken for various purposes by site operators. (author)

  16. Investigation on supervising and monitoring of major radioactive pollution source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yibing; Zhang Zongrang; Men Meng; Zhang Peng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: In order to optimize the supervisory monitoring proposal of the major radioactive enterprises. Methods: The authors have worked out the public doses within the range of 0-1 km as well as 1-2 km through monitoring analysis of the radioactive pollutant enterprises on the samples of its surrounding air, water, soil and organism. Results: Generally the pollutant range of the enterprises runs from 0 to 1.5 km. Conclusion: Unnecessary working hours can be shortened as long as we keep the routine supervisory monitor of pollutant enterprises within the range of 2 km. (authors)

  17. HMIP Monitoring Programme radioactive substances report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    The programme of environmental monitoring of radioactive substances in England and Wales during 1990, was completed satisfactorily under the auspices of Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution. The programme concentrates on monitoring activity levels in environmental materials which might result in radiation exposure of the public from non-food pathways. The programme acts as a check on site operator's returns and provides independent data on the environmental impact of authorised disposals of radioactive wastes and on radiation doses to critical groups of the public. This report presents the data from this continuing monitoring programme. The monitoring was carried out at installations controlled by British Nuclear Fuels PLC, Nuclear Electric the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Amersham International PLC, the Ministry of Defence, at two non-nuclear sites which use tritium, the works of Capper Pass Ltd who carry out lead smelting and at several landfill sites where controlled buried of low-level radioactive wastes is carried out. (Author)

  18. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification using an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.R.; Bennett, C.L.; Fields, D.J.; Hernandez, J.

    1993-10-01

    We are developing an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer for chemical effluent monitoring. The system consists of a 2-D infrared imaging array in the focal plane of a Michelson interferometer. Individual images are coordinated with the positioning of a moving mirror in the Michelson interferometer. A three dimensional data cube with two spatial dimensions and one interferogram dimension is then Fourier transformed to produce a hyperspectral data cube with one spectral dimension and two spatial dimensions. The spectral range of the instrument is determined by the choice of optical components and the spectral range of the focal plane array. Measurements in the near UV, visible, near IR, and mid-IR ranges are possible with the existing instrument. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification measurements will be primarily in the ``fingerprint`` region of the spectrum, ({lambda} = 8 to 12 {mu}m). Initial measurements of effluent using this imaging interferometer in the mid-IR will be presented.

  19. USERDA effluent data collection and reporting program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elle, D.R.; Schoen, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Effluent and environmental monitoring has been conducted at United States Energy Research and Development Administration (formerly United States Atomic Energy Commission) facilities and sites virtually since the inception of atomic energy research and development. In 1971, computer systems were developed that permitted storage of information and data characterizing each effluent and onsite discharge point and relevant information on sources, effluent treatment and control systems, and discharge data, and serve as ERDA's computer-based management information systems for compiling waste discharge control and monitoring data on radioactivity released as airborne or liquid effluents or liquid discharges to onsite retention basins at ERDA facilities. The information systems and associated data outputs have proved to be an effective internal management tool for identifying effluent control problem areas and for surveying an agencywide Radioactive Effluent Reduction Program. The trend data facilitate the detection of gradual changes in the effectiveness of waste treatment systems, and errors or oversights in monitoring and data handling. Other computer outputs are useful for identifying effluent release points that have significantly higher or lower concentrations or quantities in the discharge stream than were measured the previous year. The year-to-year trend reports and the extensive computer edit and error checks have improved the reliability of the reported effluent data. Adoption of a uniform, centralized reporting system has improved the understanding and credibility of effluent data, and has allowed management to evaluate the effectiveness of effluent control practices at ERDA facilities. (author)

  20. Radioactive effluent sources and special system of channels on the RA Reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute; Izvori radioaktivnih efluenata i specijalna kanalizacija u reaktoru RA Instituta Boris Kidric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojovic, P; Gacinovic, O; Milosevic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-10-15

    The paper describes the place of origin, composition and activity of radioactive effluents appearing in some reactor systems and special channels for carrying these effluents to disposal basins located outside the reactor building (author)

  1. Environmental monitoring for radioactivity in Scotland: 1981 to 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A bulletin, prepared by Her Majesty's Industrial Pollution Inspectorate (HMIPI) of the Scottish Development Department (SDD), contains a summary of the environmental monitoring for radioactivity carried out in Scotland as part of the statutory procedure for ensuring the safety of radioactive waste disposals from nuclear facilities. The monitoring results for discharges to both the atmosphere and the sea over the period 1981 to 1985 are presented for BNFL's Chapelcross and Sellafield Works, UKAEA Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment, SSEB Hunterston Power Station and MOD Naval Installations. It is concluded that public radiation exposure in Scotland from environmental radioactivity arising from radioactive waste disposal has been well within the internationally recommended limits.

  2. Environmental radioactive monitoring in Itu, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring of a region near to a radioactive materials deposit in Sao Paulo State, Brazil, are presented. The radioactive materials are uranium and thorium hydroxides from monazite processing. The temporal variation of 226 Ra was determined in the superficial and underground water, showing no increase for the former and a maximum concentration of 0,306 Bq/L for the latter. 21 figs., 17 tabs

  3. Monitoring water for radioactive releases in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, C.R.; Broadway, J.A.; Kahn, B.

    1990-01-01

    The major radiological environmental monitoring programs for water in the United States are described. The applications of these programs for monitoring radioactive fallout, routine discharges from nuclear facilities, and releases due to accidents at such facilities are discussed, and some examples of measurements are presented. The programs monitor rainfall, surface water, and water supplies. Samples are usually collected and analyzed on a monthly or quarterly schedule, but the frequency is increased in response to emergencies. (author)

  4. Infrared thermography applied to monitoring of radioactive waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelmer, P.; Camarano, D.M.; Calado, F.; Phillip, B.; Viana, C.; Andrade, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    The use of thermography in the inspection of drums containing radioactive waste is being stimulated by the absence of physical contact. In Brazil the majority of radioactive wastes are compacted solids packed in metal drums stored temporarily for decades and requires special attention. These drums have only one qualitative indication of the radionuclides present. However, its structural condition is not followed systematically. The aim of this work is presents a methodology by applying thermography for monitoring the structural condition of drums containing radioactive waste in order to detect degraded regions of the drums. (author)

  5. The national scheme for monitoring radioactive fallout in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell, assumed responsibility for the national milk monitoring scheme on Jan. 1, 1979. Milk contamination provides a good guide to radioactivity in the British diet. Brief reference is made to U.K. surveys of radioactive fallout in human food prior to January 1979, and current arrangements for the sampling of milk in the U.K. are explained. The milk is analysed for 90 Sr, 137 Cs and stable calcium. Additional samples are collected to check for 131 I or other short-lived isotopes in the event of atmospheric nuclear tests or accidents involving possible releases of radioactivity. (U.K.)

  6. Monitoring quantity and quality of pangasius pond effluent : report of a monitoring program and recommendations for certification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der P.G.M.; Poelman, M.; Vo Minh Son,; Duong Nhut Long,; Bosma, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    The quantity and quality of pangasius pond effluent was monitored by means of monthly sampling during a study conducted on four striped catfish farms located in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. The study was undertaken to test the practical implications of the standards and guidelines with regard to

  7. Order of 4 august 1989 on licensing the release of gaseous radioactive effluents by the Cattenom nuclear production centre (units 3 and 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This Order fixes the conditions and limits of authorised releases of gaseous radioactive effluents from Units 3 and 4 of the Cattenom nuclear power plant. It specifies these are maximum limits, below which the radioactive releases should be as low as possible [fr

  8. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Daegu area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Dong; Lee, Hae Young; Yang, Chan Sun

    2001-12-01

    The objectives of the project are to monitor an abnormal radiation level in Taegu and Kyungpook region, and to enhance our ability to prepare for the radiological emergency situation by establishing the radioactivity monitoring system in Taegu and Kyungpook region. In this report, we summarized a gamma exposure rates, a gross beta and gamma radionuclide activities for the environmental samples of airborned-dust. precipitation, fallout and tap water collected in Taegu radioactivity monitoring center, and a gamma radionuclide activities for the 28 grocery samples, such as tea, nut and mushroom, rice, chinese cabbage, wormwood and pine needles, soil and drinking water which were obtained from Taegu and Kyungpook region to establish the basic data base for estimating the internal exposure. In conclusion, it didn't appear any evidence for newly pollution of artificial radioactivity in Taegu and Kyungpook region

  9. Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) calibration and assessment of the ATR SPING-3 stack effluent monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppen, L.D.; Rogers, J.W.; Simpson, O.D.

    1983-12-01

    An evaluation, calibration and assessment of the Eberline SPING-3 ATR stack effluent monitor was conducted. This unit which monitors particulate, iodine and noble gas effluents was producing abnormal results following the initial installation and operational testing. The purposes of this work were to find the causes of the abnormal results and correct them if possible; check the calibrations and adjust them if necessary; and to provide a better in-depth understanding of what the unit is monitoring and how well it performs under this application. Results have shown that there were some problems associated with the unit as initially installed and tested. These problems have been identified and suggested alternatives shown, the monitor was found to be applicable to some extent under the current conditions. The calibrations have been checked and adjustments made. More operation testing and evaluation is needed to assess how well this works under a variety of ATR operating conditions. 2 references, 10 figures, 3 tables

  10. The monitoring of radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    35 separately indexed lectures are discussed of this conference. The contents of the individual contributions cover the following areas: 1) Monitoring networks and guidelines; 2) Monitoring equipment and methods; 3) Development of models for radionuclide migration, and 4) Individual determination and analysis of radionuclides relevant to the environment. (PW) [de

  11. Radioactivity Monitoring of the Irish Environment 2003-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, R.W.; Dowdall, A; Fegan, M.F.; Hayden, E.; Kelleher, K.; Long, S.; McEvoy, I.; McKittrick, L.; McMahon, C.A.; Murray, M.; Smith, K.; Sequeira, S.; Wong, J.; Pollard, D.

    2007-05-01

    This report presents the results of the environmental radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) between 2003 and 2005. This programme aims to assess the exposure of the Irish population to anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment, to review the temporal and geographical distribution of contaminating radionuclides and to maintain systems and procedures which would allow a rapid assessment of environmental contamination to be made in the event of a radiological emergency. Radioactivity is present in the environment due to natural processes, the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, past nuclear accidents such as that at Chernobyl and the routine licensed discharge of radionuclides from nuclear installations. Liquid discharges from the British Nuclear Group reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria in the North-West of England continue to be the dominant source of anthropogenic radioactivity in the Irish marine environment. The key elements of the monitoring programme implemented by the RPII during the reporting period include; assessment of ambient radioactivity based on measurements of radioactivity in air and external gamma dose rate at permanent monitoring stations located throughout the country; assessment of levels of radioactivity in drinking water; assessment of levels of radioactivity in foodstuffs based on measurements of total diet, milk and miscellaneous ingredients; assessment of levels of radioactivity in the marine environment based on sampling and measurements of seawater, sediment, seaweed, fish and shellfish. The RPII monitored airborne radioactivity at eleven stations located throughout the country. One station is equipped with a high volume sampler, which allows global fallout concentrations to be measured, and one is equipped to detect the presence of the gas krypton-85. Krypton-85 is released into the environment primarily as a result of the reprocessing of nuclear

  12. Monitoring radioactivity in the environment: context, objectives, challenges and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collet, J.; Jaunet, P.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of environmental radioactivity monitoring are multiples: protection of human health and environment, knowledge of the radiological status of the environment, early detection of radiological events, public information. This monitoring is ensured by several stakeholders (licensees, IRSN, ASN, state and local authorities, associations...) and in all environment compartments (air, water, soil, fauna and flora...). Within a European regulatory context, the Nuclear Transparency and Security Act 2006-686 of 13 June 2006 (TSN Act) reinforces the importance attached to consideration of safety, radiation protection and the environment. Other developments in the scope of environmental radioactivity must be noted: new stakeholders, lower background radiation, deployment of the French National Network of Environmental Radioactivity Monitoring (RNM), evolution of the ICPR thoughts to take better account of environmental protection, post-accident management doctrine, new concerns about environmental behaviour of some radionuclides. In order to maintain a quality policy in the field of environmental radioactivity measurements and to ensure the transparency of information, ASN will make sure that the strategy of environmental radioactivity monitoring will take into account these concerns. (author)

  13. Development of alpha radioactivity monitor using ionized air transport technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Tatsuyuki

    2008-01-01

    A novel alpha radioactivity monitor using ionized air transport technology has been developed for future constitution of 'Clearance Level' for uranium and TRU radioactive waste. We carried out optimum design and realized two kinds of practical alpha activity monitor, combining with radiation detector technology, ionized air physics and computational fluid dynamics. The results will bring paradigm shift on the alpha-ray measurement such as converting 'closely contacting and scanning measurement' to 'remotely measurement in the block', and drastically improve the efficiency of measurement operation. We hope that this technology will be widely endorsed as the practical method for the alpha clearance measurement in future. (author)

  14. Nuclide-specific monitoring of airborne radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aures, R.; Neu, A.

    1996-01-01

    Since the end of the seventies the Landesanstalt fuer Umweltschutz Baden-Wuerttemberg ist operating two radioaerosol monitoring stations at the border in the opposite of foreign nuclear power plants. Since the end of the eighties six similar monitoring stations were built up for measuring activity in breathing air in the common environment in Baden-Wuerttemberg. A special filtersystem allows measuring the activity concentration of up to 99 nuclides. The measuring system was optimized by advanced PC-technology, a multitasking operating system and a special software for users and gamma-spectroscopy. These increased the average availability of all monitoring stations to 96% in 1996. (orig.) [de

  15. Development of monitoring technology for environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Cho, Young Hyun; Lee, M. H.; Choi, K. S.; Hong, K. H.; Sin, H. S.; Kim, M. K.; Pak, J. H.

    2000-05-01

    The accurate and reliable determination techniques of the radioactive isotopes in environmental samples are very important to protect public health from the potential hazards of radiation. Isolation and purification of radiostrontium from environmental aqueous sample was performed by using strontium selectively binding resin (Sr-spec) and strontium selectively permeable liquid membrane. Radioactivity of radiostrontium was measured by liquid scintillation counter coupled with dual counting window and spectrum unfolding method. With combustion apparatus a new determination of Tc-99 in the environmental samples was developed for overcoming demerits of conventional TBP extraction method. An optimized method for determining beta-emitting 2 41Pu in the presence of alpha-emitting nuclides was developed using a liquid scintillation counting system. A method for measuring Rn-222 and Ra-226 in aqueous sample using liquid scintillation counting technique has studied. On-line measurement system coupled with ion chromatography and portable liquid scintillation detector was developed. U and Th measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The mehtod of flow-injection preconcentration for the analysis of U and Th in seawater was developed. A new electrodeposition method for alpha spectrometry was developed

  16. Development of monitoring technology for environmental radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Cho, Young Hyun; Lee, M. H.; Choi, K. S.; Hong, K. H.; Sin, H. S.; Kim, M. K.; Pak, J. H

    2000-05-01

    The accurate and reliable determination techniques of the radioactive isotopes in environmental samples are very important to protect public health from the potential hazards of radiation. Isolation and purification of radiostrontium from environmental aqueous sample was performed by using strontium selectively binding resin (Sr-spec) and strontium selectively permeable liquid membrane. Radioactivity of radiostrontium was measured by liquid scintillation counter coupled with dual counting window and spectrum unfolding method. With combustion apparatus a new determination of Tc-99 in the environmental samples was developed for overcoming demerits of conventional TBP extraction method. An optimized method for determining beta-emitting {sup 2}41Pu in the presence of alpha-emitting nuclides was developed using a liquid scintillation counting system. A method for measuring Rn-222 and Ra-226 in aqueous sample using liquid scintillation counting technique has studied. On-line measurement system coupled with ion chromatography and portable liquid scintillation detector was developed. U and Th measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The mehtod of flow-injection preconcentration for the analysis of U and Th in seawater was developed. A new electrodeposition method for alpha spectrometry was developed.

  17. Natural radioactivity in monitoring waste disposals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meijer, R.J.; Limburg, J.; Venema, L.B.

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring large (underwater) surfaces, with strongly varying composition, requires a sampling density, exceeding the capabilities of standard techniques. These techniques involve sample collection and a number of treatments and measurements in laboratory; both steps are laborious, tedious and

  18. Results of the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility biological monitoring program, July 1987--July 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, W.L.

    1992-07-01

    As required by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) under NPDES Permit SCO000175, biological monitoring was conducted in Upper Three Runs Creek to determine if discharges from the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility have adversely impacted the biotic community of the receiving stream. Data included in this summary report encompass July 1987 through July 1991. As originally designed, the F/H ETF was not expected to remove all of the mercury from the wastewater; therefore, SCDHEC specified that studies be conducted to determine if mercury was bioaccumulating in aquatic biota. Subsequent to approval of the biological monitoring program, an ion exchange column was added to the F/H ETF specifically to remove mercury, which eliminated mercury from the F/H ETF effluent. The results of the biological monitoring program indicate that at the present rate of discharge, the F/H ETF effluent has not adversely affected the receiving stream with respect to any of the parameters that were measured. The effluent is not toxic at the in-stream waste concentration and there is no evidence of mercury bioaccumulation

  19. Operational experience with two tritium-effluent-monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynie, J.S.; Gutierrez, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two new tritium stack monitoring systems were designed and built. The operational experience of a wide-range detector with a useful range of a few μCi/m 3 to 10 8 μCi/m 3 , and a second monitoring system using an improved Kanne chamber and a new electrometer, called a Model 39 Electrometer-Chargemeter are discussed. Both tritium chambers have been designed to have a reduced sensitivity to tritium contamination, a fast response, and an integrating chargemeter with digital readout for easy conversion to microcuries. The calibration of these monitors and advantages of using these chambers over conventional systems are discussed

  20. Effluent controls and environmental monitoring programs for uranium milling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maixner, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Controls will reduce gaseous, particulate, and liquid discharges. Monitoring programs are used to determine effectiveness. The controls and programs discussed are used at Cotter Corporation's Canon City Mill in Colorado. 3 refs

  1. Order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document, took out from the Official Journal, is the law text relative to the order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche. (A.L.B.)

  2. Radioactivity Monitoring of the Irish Environment 2010-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnity, P.; Currivan, L.; Dowdall, A.; Hanley, O.; Kelleher, K.; McKittrick, L.; Pollard, D.; Somerville, S.; Wong, J.; McMahon, C.

    2012-11-01

    This report presents the results of the environmental radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland RPII during 2010 and 2011. The RPII has routinely monitored levels of radioactivity in the Irish environment since 1982 and this is the latest in the RPII's series of environmental monitoring reports. The RPII reviews and updates its environmental programme annually to ensure it remains relevant and continues to focus on the most important sources of radioactivity in the environment. The data presented in this report confirm that while the levels of artificial radioactivity in the Irish environment are detectable, they are low. They do not pose a significant risk to the human health of the Irish population. Trace amounts of radioactive isotopes consistent with the Fukushima nuclear accident were detected in air, rainwater and milk samples during the period March to May 2011. These increases in levels of radioactivity were not of concern from a public health point of view. For the remainder of the reporting period, activity concentrations of radionuclides in airborne particles were low and consistent with measurements made in recent years. Radioactivity levels in milk, mixed diet and a wide range of foodstuffs were low and, for the majority of samples, below the detection limits. All drinking waters tested were found to be in compliance with the total indicative dose defined in national and EU legislation. The doses incurred by the Irish public in 2010 and 2011 as a result of artificial radioactivity in the marine environment are small when compared to dose limits or to natural radiation doses received by the Irish public. The doses to the most exposed individuals, members of the oyster and mussel farmers critical group, were approximately 0.02 per cent and 0.05 per cent of the annual dose limit of 1000 microsieverts for members of the public from practices involving controllable sources of radiation in 2010 and

  3. Internal monitoring system for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanke, J.A.; McConnell, B.C.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with Bechtel National, Inc. as the project management contractor, is responsible for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) interim waste containment facility in Lewiston, New York. The NFSS contains approximately 190,000 m 3 of low-level radioactive waste resulting from the remediation of approximately 600 hectares of the U.S. Army's former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works. The remedial action for the site and vicinity properties was performed as part of DOE's Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program and Surplus Facilities Management Program. The NFSS adapted off-the-shelf instrumentation to show that the design features are functioning, and develops confidence that long-term stability, without constant surveillance, is feasible

  4. Modeling the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive effluents in a nuclear accident situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, Sorin

    2002-01-01

    In case of a nuclear accident, which could lead to release of radioactive contaminants, fastest countermeasures are needed related to sheltering, iodine distribution, evacuation and interdiction of food and water consumption. All these decisions should be based either on estimation of inhaled dose and the dose due to external exposure for public, or on the estimation of radioactive concentration in food (which will depend on the radioactive concentration in air and ground deposition). The dispersion model used, was a Gaussian 'puff' model. The vertical dispersion was considered not dependent on the release high. The used meteorological data are specific for the SCN - Pitesti site, collected every hour for one year. The meteorological data file contains: the wind speed (in m/s), wind direction (degrees clockwise from north), atmospheric stability category, precipitation rate (in mm/h) and the high of the mixing layer (in m). A hypothetical major nuclear accident at TRIGA - SSR of INR - Pitesti, due to a serious damage of the reactor core leading, to a large release of radioactive contaminants was examined. The release was considered as a single phase with of one hour duration. The release factors for the considered isotopic mixture are 100% noble gases (of the reactor core inventory), 40% iodine (of the reactor core inventory) and 40% particulate, i.e., 40% of the fission products of core fission products inventory, released as particles. The accuracy of the model could be increased by implementation of the code on a real-time system, where the acquisition of the parameters done is on-line, namely, the data are introduced as soon as the modification of meteorological and dosimetric conditions are produced. In this case, the parameters used in formulas can be adjusted according with the field situation. Unfortunately the real-time systems need more powerful resources: monitoring stations which can measure and send on-line the data and which can cover a large area

  5. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited monitoring tritiated water in air and water effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, R.V.; Tepley, N.W

    1978-01-01

    Current on-line methods of monitoring effluents for tritium (as tritiated water, HTO) measure concentrations in air above 250 nCi/m 3 (approx. 10 kBq/m 3 ) and in water above 1 uCi/kg (approx. 40 kBq/kg). Some of the problems encountered in such monitoring are the presence of fission and activation products in the effluents and, particularly in water monitoring, the often dirty quality of the sample. In a new design of monitor, HTO is collected directly from air by a flow of liquid scintillator (LS). For water monitoring a flow of air continuously samples the water and transports HTO to the LS. The key features of the new design are that the high detection efficiency of LS is realizable, that the rate of use of LS is only approx. 2 mm 3 /s, that the controlled evaporation and metering of air provides the low flow of HTO needed for mixing with LS, and that accurate metering of a dirty effluent is not needed. The sensitivities for detecing tritium on-line are improved by at least an order of magnitude

  6. An estimation of exposure from gaseous and volatile radioactive effluents released from EWA reactor between 1971 and 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipiak, B.; Nowicki, K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper gives an estimation of radiation doses for individuals due to gaseous radioactive effluents released from EWA reactor between 1971 and 1975. The doses were estimated for three organs, three groups of people: adults, teenagers and children and for three of the most important exposure paths: the external radiation from a passing cloud, inhalation and from milk ingestion. The results of calculations indicate that the radiation doses received by individuals living in the vicinity of EWA reactor were much below the limit doses or those due to the background radiation. (author)

  7. Safety evaluation of liquid radioactive effluents treatment system in a BWR reactor, through the LIQM03 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorrilla R, S.H.

    1978-01-01

    In this work we made a safety evaluation of the liquid radioactive effluents system in a plant using a BWR similar to that now installed in Laguna Verde. For that purpose, the computation program ORIGENwas modified, in order to keep up to date and adapt it to the PDP 10 computer, which is operating at the Computation Department of the Nuclear Center of Mexico, the code LIQM03 was the result of this modification. As usual in this work we dealt with problems which were solved opportunely, now we have at our disposal the code LIQM03 which will be in the future a very useful tool for this kind of evaluations. (author)

  8. Radioactivity monitoring of the Irish marine environment 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Grady, J.; Currivan, L.

    1990-06-01

    This report represents the results of the Board's monitoring of radioactivity levels in the Irish marine environment during 1987. The principal objective of the monitoring programme is to obtain estimates of radiation doses to the Irish public arising from caesium-137 and caesium 134, the main contaminating radionuclides. Estimates are presented of the radiation doses to the Irish public arising from the consumption of fish and shellfish contaminated with radiocaesium

  9. Radiation monitoring in the mining and milling of radioactive ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The present Guide is a revision of IAEA Safety Series No. 43. It explains the recommendations on administrative requirements for the organization of radiation protection in the mining and milling of radioactive ores, and the monitoring requirements, including methods, techniques, instrumentation and strategy. 146 refs, 9 figs, 14 tabs

  10. Thermoexoemission detectors for monitoring radioactive contamination of industrial waste waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obukhov, V.T.; Sobolev, I.A.; Khomchik, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Detectors on base of BeO(Na) monocrystals with thermoemission to be used for monitoring radioactive contamination of industrial waste waters are suggested. The detectors advantages are sensitivity to α and low-ehergy β radiations, high mechanical strength and wide range of measurements. The main disadvantage is the necessity of working in red light

  11. Environmental monitoring for radioactivity in Scotland, 1983 to 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This bulletin, which has been prepared by Her Majesty's Industrial Pollution Inspectorate (HMIPI) of the Scottish Development Department (SDD), contains a summary of the environmental monitoring for radioactivity carried out in Scotland as part of the statutory procedure for ensuring the safety of radioactive waste disposals from nuclear facilities. The results presented cover the period 1983 to 1987. The first section of the bulletin draws together the results of the monitoring and presents the principal conclusions; the second section summarises the procedures underlying the monitoring; and the remaining sections present detailed monitoring results. The principal conclusions of this bulletin are that: public radiation exposure in Scotland from environmental radioactivity arising from radioactive waste disposal has been well within the internationally recommended limits including the ICRP's recommended principal limit of 1 millisievert per year; the levels of radiation exposure have been consistent with the recommendation of the NRPB that procedures leading to exposure of the public should be controlled so that the life-time effective dose equivalent does not exceed 70 millisieverts; any doses received have been small and correspond to negligible levels of risk to individuals; and the effects of waste disposals have been limited in accordance with the national standards of radiological safety, which are designed to protect the population from the harmful effects of radiation. (author)

  12. A field strategy to monitor radioactivity associated with investigation derived wastes returned from deep drilling sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rego, J.H.; Smith, D.K.; Friensehner, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA) is drilling deep (>1500m) monitoring wells that penetrate both unsaturated (vadose) and saturated zones potentially contaminated by sub-surface nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Drill site radiological monitoring returns data on drilling effluents to make informed management decisions concerning fluid management. Because of rapid turn-around required for on-site monitoring, a representative sample will be analyzed simultaneously for α, β and γ emitters by instrumentation deployed on-site. For the purposes of field survey, accurate and precise data is returned, in many cases, with minimal sample treatment. A 30% efficient high purity germanium detector and a discriminating liquid scintillation detector are being evaluated for γ and α/β monitoring respectively. Implementation of these detector systems complements a successful on-site tritium monitoring program. Residual radioactivity associated with underground nuclear tests include tritium, activation products, fission products and actinides. Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is used in α/β liquid scintillation counting and is a function of the time distribution of photon emission. In particular, we hope to measure 241 Am produced from 241 Pu by β decay. Because 241 Pu is depleted in fissile bomb fuels, maximum PSD resolution will be required. The high purity germanium detector employs a multichannel analyzer to count gamma emitting radionuclides; we will designate specific window configurations to selectively monitor diagnostic fission product radionuclides (i.e., 137 Cs)

  13. The management plan of liquid effluent in Korean advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Lim, H. S.; Jeong, D. W.; Jeong, D. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Non-radioactive liquid effluent in Korean Advanced Light Water Reactor is transferred and treated in centralized waste treatment facility after the radioactivity in effluent is checked within power block. The liquid effluent from centralized waste treatment facility will be discharged by way of discharge canal in order to be in the sufficient condition. As a result of investigating the radiation monitoring design in accordance with 20 provisions by Korean Regulatory Authority, each effluent radiation monitoring with 20 provisions by Korean Regulatory Authority, each effluent radiation monitoring design satisfies the regulatory guideline. In relation to sampling and analyses, most systems satisfy the regulatory guideline except for some effluents from turbine building. And, though sampling and analyses are performed after radioactivity is monitored at each system in turbine building, these exceptions in turbine building effluents are expected to cause no significant problems because radioactivity is monitored by direct or indirect methods prior to release from turbine building. Integrated monitoring on liquid effluent from the centralized waste water treatment facility is not necessary because radiation monitoring, sampling and analyses on each system within power block are performed, and operational effectiveness compared with cost according to adding the radiation monitoring equipment is too low. So, whether the radiation monitoring in this effluent is reflected on design or not is planned to be determined through discussion with regulatory authority

  14. Development of improved liquid radioactive effluents treatment technology by precipitation and ion exchange and the related analytical control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M M; Mollah, A S; Alam, M K; Begum, A; Islam, S; Koddus, A [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Savar, Dacca (Bangladesh)

    1997-02-01

    Chemical precipitation method for treatment of LLW and ILW by co-precipitation of caesium with nickel ferrocyanide was employed. High decontamination factors were observed in the pH range of 9 to {approx} 11. The percentage removals of {sup 137}Cs from 37 kBq, 370 kB and 3.4 MBq per litre of simulated effluents were {approx} 90%, 99.7% and 99.8% respectively. Liquid radioactive wastes generated from radioisotope production facilities of AERE, Savar were found to contain {sup 134}Cs and {sup 60}Co with the average activity levels of 13.23 kBq/L and 5.3 kBq/L, respectively. Test runs for removal of {sup 134}Cs from the wastes varied from {approx} 90% to 99%. The radioactive concentrates (sludges) were conditioned by cementation and safely stored in interim storage room. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  15. Development of improved liquid radioactive effluents treatment technology by precipitation and ion exchange and the related analytical control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.M.; Mollah, A.S.; Alam, M.K.; Begum, A.; Islam, S.; Koddus, A.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical precipitation method for treatment of LLW and ILW by co-precipitation of caesium with nickel ferrocyanide was employed. High decontamination factors were observed in the pH range of 9 to ∼ 11. The percentage removals of 137 Cs from 37 kBq, 370 kB and 3.4 MBq per litre of simulated effluents were ∼ 90%, 99.7% and 99.8% respectively. Liquid radioactive wastes generated from radioisotope production facilities of AERE, Savar were found to contain 134 Cs and 60 Co with the average activity levels of 13.23 kBq/L and 5.3 kBq/L, respectively. Test runs for removal of 134 Cs from the wastes varied from ∼ 90% to 99%. The radioactive concentrates (sludges) were conditioned by cementation and safely stored in interim storage room. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig., 9 tabs

  16. Estimation of radioactive effluents concentrations in the vicinity of nuclear power plant; Predviduvanje na koncentraciite na radioaktivni aerozagaduvaci vo okolinata na nuklearni energetski postrojni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsov, Lj [Elektrostopanstvo, Skopje (Yugoslavia)

    1977-07-01

    This paper deals with the problem of mathematical prediction of radioactive effluent concentrations around nuclear power plants. This mathematical model which describes the behaviour of the effluent in the atmosphere here in after is expanded and adapted for radioactive effluent treatment. In this way the mathematical model includes the description of the following effects: the rise of plume caused by its vertical momentum and its heat content, wind velocity profile and vertical growth of the coefficient of diffusion, fallout under gravity, ground deposition, precipitation scavenging, and radioactive decay. The advanced computer program DIFFUS has been applied to evaluate the ground concentration of the nuclides of I, which constitute the greatest risk for population.(author)

  17. Radiation protection instrumentation. Monitoring equipment. Radioactive aerosols in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This international standard applies to portable or installed equipment for continuous monitoring of radioactive aerosols in the environment in normal and emergency conditions. Monitoring involves continuous sampling and, where desirable, automatic start of sampling. The document applies particularly to the following assignments: (i) determination of the volume activity of radionuclides in the form of aerosols, either per time unit, along with its time changes, or in the integral form over a longer time period such as 24 h, and measurement of the volume sampled; (ii) triggering a warning alarm signal if the preset volume activity or time integral of the volume activity of aerosols has been exceeded. The document deals with radioactive aerosol monitor design, testing procedures, and documentation. Appended tables refer to the reference and normal testing conditions, tests in normal testing conditions, tests during changes of the affecting quantities, and tests of the air circuit. (P.A.)

  18. Studies on radioactivity monitoring proceedure for marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Taku; Hirano, Shigeki

    1978-01-01

    Suitability of several species of mollusca and seaweeds as indicator organisms for radioactivity monitoring of marine environment was examined by radioisotope tracer experiments or stable elements analyses from the standpoints of the affinities for radionuclides, the sampling procedures, and the distribution of radioactive and stable elements in the body of these organisms. Extremely high concentration factor of 54 Mn was shown by kidney of scallop suggesting the suitability for the efficient monitoring of the nuclide though the contribution of kidney to the weight of scallop was very small. Higher concentration of 54 Mn in midgut gland rather than kidney was observed in the case of other species of shellfishes but distribution of the nuclide among organs or tissues of the organisms varied during the period of intake and excretion. Ununiform distribution of radioactive and stable elements among the species of seaweeds and in the body of seaweeds observed by the tracer experiments and stable element analyses suggested the necessity of careful selection of the samples for monitoring of these nuclides. From the results of tracer experiments carried out in order to elucidate the relation between existing state of radionuclides in seawater and uptake by marine organisms, it was supposed that the complexed forms with inorganic or organic ligands in seawater were predominant species of radioactive cerium in seawater. (author)

  19. 1994 Environmental monitoring drinking water and nonradiological effluent programs annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.D.; Brock, T.A.; Meachum, T.R.

    1995-10-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., initiated monitoring programs for drinking water in 1988 and for nonradiological parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents in 1985. These programs were initiated for the facilities operated by EG ampersand G Idaho for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. On October 1, 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) replaced EG ampersand G Idaho as the prime contractor at the INEL and assumed responsibility for these programs. Section I discusses the general site characteristics, the analytical laboratories, and sampling methodology general to both programs. Section 2, the Drinking Water Program, tracks the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters required by State and Federal regulations. This section describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at 17 LITCO-operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters detected and the regulatory limits exceeded during calendar year 1994. In addition, groundwater quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for LITCO production wells. Section 3 discusses the nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring results for 27 liquid effluent streams. These streams are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1994 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits

  20. 30 years of environmental radioactivity monitoring in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoc, S.; Alexandrescu, M.; Dovlete, C.; Halasz, A.; Sonoc, N.

    1993-01-01

    A short history of environmental radioactivity monitoring in Romania is presented. Started in 1962 in a few number of sites this activity is performed now by the National Environmental Radioactivity Surveillance Network (NERSN) consisting in 44 local laboratories in each county of the country and a central laboratory, Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory (ERL). The measured values of fallout samples in six points of the network during the period 1962-1992 and the average values of the Cs-137 deposits on Romanian territory from 1977 to 1992 are also presented. The main scientific results of the staff of the central laboratory during the years are mentioned. All these results were possible only due to a persuasive work done during the years by all the staff of the local and central laboratories. (author). 7 figs., 14 refs

  1. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gangneung area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Dong Wan; An, Mi Jeong [Gangnung Regional Radiation Monitoring Station, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    The objectives of the project are to get a systematic data for the distribution of environmental radioactivity levels in Gangnung provinces, and use them as a baseline data for the health of the peoples. To monitor the environmental radiation/radioactivity, gross beta activities and gamma exposure rate in the airborne-dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water were measured in Kangnung province during the period of January 1- December 31, 2001. Waters from drinking water reservoirs, agricultural and marine products were sampled and measured by the HPGe(High Purity Ge)detector for the analysis from some selected areas to make sure of the effect of the fallout due to the atmospheric weapons test. The radioactivity in Kangnung was all about the past data.

  2. The MAFF dry cloth collector programme for monitoring airborne radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.O.; Smith, B.D.; Hunt, G.J.; Thomas, R.E.G.

    1986-01-01

    The history of the MAFF airborne radioactivity monitoring programme and its current operation using dry cloth collectors are described. The detection system has become well established as a sensitive indicator of airborne radioactivity. Details of collector materials, deployment around the major UK nuclear establishments and procedures for radiometric analysis of cloths are given. Typical results for the period 1980-82 show that at most sites only nuclear weapons fallout was detected. The systems's usefulness is exemplified by its response to the release of I-131 from Sellafield in 1981; this release was of negligible radiological significance but was easily detected. The response of dry cloths to various sources of atmospheric radioactivity and factors affecting collection efficiency are discussed. (author)

  3. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gangneung area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hwa; An, Mi Jung [Gangnung Regional Radiation Monitoring Station, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The objectives of the project are to get a systematic data for the distribution of environmental radioactivity levels in Gangnung provinces, and use them as a baseline data for the health of the peoples. To monitor the environmental radiation/radioactivity, gross beta activities and gamma exposure rate in the airborne-dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water were measured in Gangnung province during the period of January 1 - December 31, 2003. Waters from drinking water reservoirs, agricultural and marine products were sampled and measured by the HPGe(High Purity Ge)detector for the analysis from some selected areas to make sure of the effect of the fallout due to the atmospheric weapons test. The radioactivity in Kangnung was all about the past data.

  4. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gangneung area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hwa; An, Mi Jung [Gangnung Regional Radiation Monitoring Station, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The objectives of the project are to get a systematic data for the distribution of environmental radioactivity levels in Gangnung provinces, and use them as a baseline data for the health of the peoples. To monitor the environmental radiation/radioactivity, gross beta activities and gamma exposure rate in the airborne-dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water were measured in Kangnung province during the period of January 1- December 31, 2002. Waters from drinking water reservoirs, agricultural and marine products were sampled and measured by the HPGe(High Purity Ge)detector for the analysis from some selected areas to make sure of the effect of the fallout due to the atmospheric weapons test. The radioactivity in Kangnung was all about the past data.

  5. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1981 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auyong, M.; Griggs, K.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    This report gives methods and results of the 1981 radiation monitoring program at LLL for both radioactive and non-radioactive contamination from gaseous and liquid effluents. Off-site monitoring includes various radionuclides but especially tritium in the ecosystems

  6. Monitoring of natural radioactivity in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikodemova, D; Vladar, M; Gomola, I [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, 83301 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The paper deals with two main natural sources of human exposure, i.e. the outdoor photon dose equivalent rate, H{sub x}, and the indoor volume activity [Bq/m{sup 3}]. The estimation of the radiation load from outdoor photon radiation was based on continuous measurements of dose equivalent rates using: 1)Thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD), types TLD 700 (LiF, Harshaw) in territorial monitoring network, consisting of 66 stations over Slovakia, where integral values are collected for 3 months; 2) Intelligent Environmental Dose Equivalent Proportional Detector, FHZ621B in an International Radiation Information System (IRIS). The system consists of 25 stations (16 working) over the whole Slovakia, situated uniformly at existing hydrometeorological stations. In standard operation a set of average dose equivalent rate, H{sub x}, are transferred every 24 hours into the central database of IRIS. For the measurements of equilibrium equivalent radon concentration (EEC) solid state track detectors type CR-39 (Pershore, UK) were used, exchanged in a period of 6 month during the heating season. Annual values of the effective doses from above natural sources of radiation in Slovakia range from 1.2 mSv to 3.2 mSv/year. This broad range is caused mainly by uncertaintes in calculation procedures of radon effective doses. The effective dose due to exposure radon calculated taking into account, that an annual radon gas concentration of 20 Bq/m{sup 3} is 1 mSv seems to be a very overstinated value. Therefore for protective measures the lower value of the above given range was used. This calculation methods are actually under scrutiny (J.K.). 4 figs., 3 tabs., 7 refs.

  7. Airborne anthropogenic radioactivity measurements from an international radionuclide monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, L.R.; Bohner, J.D.; Williams, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Anthropogenic radioactivity is being measured in near-real time by an international monitoring system designed to verify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Airborne radioactivity measurements are conducted in-situ by stations that are linked to a central data processing and analysis facility. Aerosols are separated by high-volume air sampling with high-efficiency particulate filters. Radio-xenon is separated from other gases through cryogenic methods. Gamma-spectrometry is performed by high purity germanium detectors and the raw spectral data is immediately transmitted to the central facility via Internet, satellite, or modem. These highly sensitive sensors, combined with the automated data processing at the central facility, result in a system capable of measuring environmental radioactivity on the microbecquerel scale where the data is available to scientists within minutes of the field measurement. During the past year, anthropogenic radioactivity has been measured at approximately half of the stations in the current network. Sources of these measured radionuclides include nuclear power plant emissions, Chernobyl resuspension, and isotope production facilities. The ability to thoroughly characterize site-specific radionuclides, which contribute to the radioactivity of the ambient environment, will be necessary to reduce the number of false positive events. This is especially true of anthropogenic radionuclides that could lead to ambiguous analysis. (author)

  8. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Moon Hoe.; Hwang, Sang Gyu [Chuncheon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2002 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of {sup 7}Be and {sup 137}Cs on airborne dust, and {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, {sup 137}Cs etc. concentrations in the 19 foodstuffs(peanut, chestnut, walnut, pine nut acorn, oak mushroom, western mushroom, winter mushroom, oyster mushroom, coffee, green tea, ginseng tea, soils, cereals, vegetable, indicator plant) and 5 tap water sampled in Youngseo area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, and {sup 137}Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA values, except {sup 40}K nuclide. All the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs nuclides in the water are less than the MDA values.

  9. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Moon Hoe.; Hwang, Sang Gyu [Chuncheon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2003 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of {sup 7}Be and {sup 137} Cs on airborne dust, and {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, {sup 137}Cs etc. concentrations in the 22 foodstuffs(peanut, chestnut, walnut, pine nut acorn, oak mushroom, western mushroom, winter mushroom, oyster mushroom, coffee, green tea, ginseng tea, soils, cereals, vegetable, indicator plant) and 10 tap water sampled in Youngseo area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, and {sup 137}Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA values, except {sup 40}K nuclide. All the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs nuclides in the water are less than the MDA values.

  10. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Ki.; Hwang, Sang Kyu [Chuncheon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2000 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of {sup 7}Be and {sup 137}Cs on airborne dust, and {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 226}Ra etc. concentrations in the 23 foodstuffs(potato, sweet potato, bean sprout, onion, pumpkin, spinach, welsh onion, radish leaves, red pepper, garlic, lettuce, apple, persimmon, orange, pear, grape, mackerel, Alaska pollack, hairtail, squid oyster, baby clam, mussed) and 5 tap water sampled in Youngsoe area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, and {sup 137}Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA value, except {sup 40}K nuclide. The concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 226}Ra nuclide in tap water are less(or is slightly higher in one sample) than the MDA value.

  11. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Ki.; Hwang, Sang Kyu [Chuncheon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2001 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of {sup 7}Be and {sup 137}Cs on airborne dust, and {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 226}Ra etc. concentrations in the 23 foodstuffs(potato, sweet potato, bean sprout, onion, pumpkin, spinach, welsh onion, radish leaves, red pepper, garlic, lettuce, apple, persimmon, orange, pear, grape, mackerel, Alaska pollack, hairtail, squid oyster, baby clam, mussel) and 5 tap water sampled in Youngseo area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, and {sup 137}Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA values, except {sup 40}K nuclide. All the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 226}Ra nuclides in the water are less than the MDA values.

  12. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Chuncheon area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Ki.; Hwang, Sang Kyu

    2001-12-01

    Gross beta radioactivities in airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water, and gamma exposure rates have been monitored periodically in 2001 at Chunchon Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station. The concentrations of radioactive nuclide of 7 Be and 137 Cs on airborne dust, and 7 Be, 40 K and 137 Cs on fallout, precipitation have been analyzed monthly. The 7 Be, 40 K, 137 Cs and 226 Ra etc. concentrations in the 23 foodstuffs(potato, sweet potato, bean sprout, onion, pumpkin, spinach, welsh onion, radish leaves, red pepper, garlic, lettuce, apple, persimmon, orange, pear, grape, mackerel, Alaska pollack, hairtail, squid oyster, baby clam, mussel) and 5 tap water sampled in Youngseo area of Kangwon-do have also been measured. No significant changes from the previous years have been found in gross beta radioactivities in environmental samples and gamma exposure rates. The concentrations of 7 Be, 40 K, and 137 Cs nuclide in the foodstuffs sampled in Youngseo area are less(or slightly higher in some cases) than the MDA values, except 40 K nuclide. All the concentrations of 137 Cs and 226 Ra nuclides in the water are less than the MDA values

  13. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gunsan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Ho; Ro, Jeong Suk [Kunsan Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-01-15

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Kunsan have been measured priodically in 2000 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Artificial radionuclide of {sup 137}Cs in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Jeon-buk, vegetables, fishes, shellfishes, drinking water (total 33ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma isotope for all. No significant Changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzig an artificial nuclide concentration in living environmental sample in Jeon-buk are I fee of radiological contaminants.

  14. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gunsan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Ho; Ro, Jeong Suk [Kunsan Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Kunsan have been measured priodically in 2002 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Artificial radionuclide of {sup 137}Cs in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Jeon-buk, vegetables, fishes, shellfishes, drinking water (total 33ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma isotope for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzig an artificial nuclide concentration in living environmental sample in Jeon-buk are fee of radiological contaminants.

  15. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Busan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Han Soeb; Jang, Young A. [Busan Regional Monitoring Station, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Pusan have been measured periodically in 2003 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Gamma nuclides in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Busan foodstuffs, dust, drinking water (total 24ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma nuclide for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzing an gamma nuclide concentration in environmental samples in Pusan are fee of radiological contaminants.

  16. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Busan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Han Soeb; Jang, Young A.

    2003-12-01

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Pusan have been measured periodically in 2003 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Gamma nuclides in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Busan foodstuffs, dust, drinking water (total 24ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma nuclide for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzing an gamma nuclide concentration in environmental samples in Pusan are fee of radiological contaminants

  17. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gunsan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byoung Ho; Ro, Jeong Suk

    2002-12-01

    At Regional Radioactivity Monitoring Station in Kunsan have been measured priodically in 2002 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Artificial radionuclide of 137 Cs in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Jeon-buk, vegetables, fishes, shellfishes, drinking water (total 33ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KINS. We analysis gamma isotope for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzig an artificial nuclide concentration in living environmental sample in Jeon-buk are fee of radiological contaminants

  18. Investigations of the detection of α-radioactivity in samples of effluent water primary circuit and exhaust air of nuclear power plants in the FRG in the years 1973-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoetzl, H.; Rosner, G.; Winkler, R.

    1976-05-01

    Since the middle of 1973 the α-radioactivity of aerosol filters from the stack monitoring system and since the middle of 1974 the α-radioactivity in samples from the primary cycle of the KRB was monitored. Effluent water samples of all nuclear power reactors of the FRG were also examined from the middle of 1973 till 1974. Furthermore, aerosol filters sampled in 1973 and 1974 from various places at the KRB and some aerosol filters from the stack monitoring systems of KWW (1973), KWO (1974) and KKS (1975) were also measured. Essentially, the following procedures of sample preparation for α-spectrometry of the samples in large-area gridded ionization chambers were used: cold ashing of the aerosol samples in 'excited' oxygen; coprecipitation of the alpha emitters from the effluent water samples with iron hydroxide and subsequent cold ashing of the precipitate; evaporation of the samples from the primary cycle on SS plates. The following transuranium nuclides, or some of them, were found in the samples of the primary coolant and in several aerosol filter samples: Pu-239/240, Pu-238 and/or Am-241, Cm-242 and Cm-244. Cm-242 contributes most to the α-radioactivity in fresh samples. In the effluent water samples Cm-242. Pu-239/240 and Pu-238 and/or Am-241 were identified in some cases, in one case also Cm-244. The aim of these investigations is to establish procedures for the measurement and surveillance of α-emitting nuclides in the emissions of power reactors in order to study the contribution of transuranium nuclides to the radiation exposure of the population living in the vicinity of nuclear power stations. (orig.) [de

  19. Automated system of control of radioactive liquid effluents of patients submitted to therapy in hospitals of nuclear medicine (SACEL); Sistema automatizado de control de efluentes liquidos radiactivos de pacientes sometidos a terapia en hospitales de medicina nuclear (SACEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz C, M A; Rivero G, T; Celis del Angel, L; Sainz M, E; Molina, G [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Different hospitals of nuclear medicine require of the technical attendance for the design, construction and instrumentation of an effluents retention system coming from the room dedicated to the medical application of iodine 131, with the one object of giving execution to the normative requirements of radiological protection, settled down in the General Regulation of Radiological Safety (RGSR) emitted by the CNSNS in November, 1988 and in the corresponding official standards. An automatic system of flow measurement, the activity concentration of the effluents to the drainage, the discharges control and the automated report it will allow the execution of the national regulations, also the elimination of unhealthy activities as the taking of samples, analysis of those same and the corresponding paperwork, its will allow that the SACEL is capable of to carry out registrations that are to consult in an automated way. The changes in the demands of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards in relation to the liberation of radioactive material in hospitals by medical treatments, it has created the necessity to develop a system that quantifies and dose the liquid effluents of people under thyroid treatment with iodine-131 to the drainage. The Automated System of Control of radioactive liquids effluents generated in Hospitals of Nuclear Medicine (SACEL) developed in the National Institute of Nuclear Research, it fulfills this regulation, besides improving the work conditions for the medical and technical personnel of the hospital in that are installed, since this system has the advantage of to be totally automated and to require of a minimum of attendance. The SACEL is an electro-hydraulic system of effluents control, based in the alternate operation of two decay deposits of the activity of the material contaminated with iodine-131. The system allows to take a registration of those volumes and liberated dose, besides being able to be monitoring in remote

  20. Disposal of the radioactive effluents at the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique'. Treatment leading to evacuation into a river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhamel; Menoux; Candillon

    1958-01-01

    1) The problems dealing with the treatment of the radioactive effluents at the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' have been studied in order to allow evacuation into a river - after treatment - with respect for the standards regarding radiation protection. 2) At Saclay where there is no possibility of evacuating the effluents, the liquids are directed towards Fontenay-aux-Roses by means of tank wagons. They are removed temporarily into the sewers and will be evacuated later on into the Seine. 3) ln Le Bouchet, the effluents coming from the Factory where urano-thorianite ore is treated will undergo a two stages treatment. The elimination of radium in the first phase facilitates decontamination in the second phase. 4) In Marcoule: a study of synthetic effluents of the Marcoule type is being carried on in order to perfect a selective elimination method of Sr 90 and Cs 137 by coprecipitation. 5) In the general case of the final evacuation into a river, the following problems have been studied: - pre-dilution of treated waters between the storing tanks and the river; - admission in the river; dilution in the river (preliminary study by means of a tracer); - evolution of the activity in the water of the river (adsorption by inert or living elements), contamination of the banks; - locating of the site; - isotopic dilution. 6) Circumstantial study of that last problem. 7) The quantity of a given product in water conditions the isotopic dilution of its radioactive isotopes. When the analysis shows the lack of an element, stable isotopes should be added in order to compensate it. 8) That method led to difficult analysis (specially as far as Sr 90 is concerned), for the percentage of stable isotopes necessary to an important isotopic dilution is very low. 9) The standard regarding the quantity of Sr 90 in drinking water is 8.10 -8 c/m 3 or 4.10 -10 g/m 3 . So a percentage of 40 μg/litre of Sr is enough which is difficult to find out in loaded water, 10) Important elements

  1. Radioactivity Portal Monitor: An actual application and its unconventional detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izraelevitch, F.; Matatagui, E.; Regueiro Veiga, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    A Radioactivity Portal Monitor is an instrument designed to be used at traffic check points to detect the presence of ionizing radiation in goods, vehicles, people, in critical places such as those at border road crossing, airports and seaports, the entrance at nuclear facilities etc. and alert the officer to the presence of radioactive and nuclear material. We have developed and built, and is in operation a Radioactivity Portal Monitor for gamma radiation. The detector and the associated electronics does not follow a conventional design concept and is based on a pressurized ionization chamber with a very large sensitive volume (60 liters) and a very large length (2 meters), and a very low level DC electronics (fAmp). The System is simple, and its operational characteristics are excellent. The reference radiation level is the background radiation, which is continuously measured, and compared with the radiation level measured when a subject (vehicle, person, good) goes trough the Monitor. The system automatically takes a decision, and alert the officer with an alarm signal if the detected radiation level is larger than the reference (dynamical) level. We will describe the designed system and some of its characterization results will be shown (author)

  2. Radioactivity monitoring of the Irish marine environment 1991 and 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, A.; Lyons, S.; McEnri, C.; Ryan, T.; O'Colmain, M.; Cunningham, J.D.

    1994-05-01

    This report presents the results of the Radiological Protection Institute's programme of monitoring of radioactivity in the seas around Ireland during 1991 and 1992. The principal objective of the monitoring programme is to review the risks to human health arising from the Sellafield discharges. Secondary objectives include studies of the distribution of the significant contaminating radionuclides in the marie environment and the identification of trends with a view to assessing possible future effects. Estimates of the radiation doses to the Irish public are also presented in this report. 23 refs. 24 tabs. 9 figs

  3. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E L; Loosz, T; Farrar, Y

    1998-11-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) during 1997. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges from HIFAR were estimated utilising the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective dose to the public was estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around the HIFAR research reactor. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 10% of the HIFAR dose constraint of 0.1 mSv/year 24 tabs., 7 figs.; Glossary; Appendices

  4. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1997-06-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre during 1996. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by thr National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. Details of the environmental sample collection and analytical procedures are given in the appendices. (authors). 29 refs., 26 tabs., 6 figs.

  5. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1997-06-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre during 1996. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by thr National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. Details of the environmental sample collection and analytical procedures are given in the appendices. (authors)

  6. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y

    1998-11-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) during 1997. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges from HIFAR were estimated utilising the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective dose to the public was estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around the HIFAR research reactor. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 10% of the HIFAR dose constraint of 0.1 mSv/year

  7. Environmental monitoring of low-level radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jester, W.A.; Yu, C.

    1985-01-01

    The authors discuss some of the current rationale behind the environmental monitoring of low-level radioactive materials are as follows: Committee 4 of the International commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) defined three broad objectives for environmental monitoring: 1) assessment of the actual or potential exposure of humans to radioactive materials or radiation present in their environment or the estimation of the probable upper limits of such exposure; 2) scientific investigation, sometimes related to the assessment of exposures, sometimes to other objectives; 3) improved public relations. Various regulations have been written requiring environmental monitoring to ensure that the public is not being exposed to excessive amounts of radiation from natural sources or from human activities. An example of the monitoring of natural sources of radiation is a requirement of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations whereby U.S. water supply companies must have drinking water monitored at least once every four years for radionuclides, primarily the naturally occurring radium-226

  8. Radioactivity monitoring in Irish upland lakes 1988 - 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, M.; McGarry, A.T.; Lyons, S.; McEnri, C.; Cunningham, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    In 1988, monitoring of radioactivity in upland lakes was initiated in areas of Ireland which had been subjected to highest deposition following the Chernobyl accident. The monitoring programme was continued in 1989 and extended in 1990 to include 25 lakes in 13 counties. This survey provided a comprehensive national picture of the distribution of Chernobyl contamination in Irish freshwater lakes. In 1991 and 1992, the monitoring programme concentrated on those lakes which had shown highest levels in the 1990 survey. This report details the results of the freshwater lake monitoring programme for the years 1988 - 1992. As assessment of the radiation doses to those consumers who include relatively large amounts of freshwater fish in their diet is also made

  9. Monitoring of geological repositories for high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    Geological repositories for disposal of high level radioactive waste are designed to provide isolation of the waste from human environment for many thousands of years. This report discusses the possible purposes for monitoring geological repositories at the different stages of a repository programme, the use that may be made of the information obtained and the techniques that might be applied. This report focuses on the different objectives that monitoring might have at various stages of a programme, from the initiation of work on a candidate site, to the period after repository closure. Each objective may require somewhat different types of information, or may use the same information in different ways. Having evaluated monitoring requirements, the report concludes with a brief evaluation of available monitoring techniques

  10. HMIP monitoring programme: radioactive substances report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Discharges of radioactive wastes to the environment can only be made under authorisation from government bodies. The main potential sources of environmental contamination in England are nuclear sites (power stations, fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants), some industrial premises such as metal smelters, and landfill sites. As well as the environmental monitoring programmes undertaken by the operators of such sites various government bodies also undertake monitoring. In January 1988 Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution (HMIP) initiated a programme to monitor exposure of the public from non-food pathways such as could occur from occupation of beaches, river banks etc. Radiation levels and radiochemical and gamma spectra of samples collected at specified locations near nuclear sites and industrial premises have been monitored every quarter since then. The results for 1990 are presented and discussed. (UK)

  11. Effluent treatment plant and decontamination centre, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, has a number of plants and laboratories, which generate Radioactive Liquid Waste and Protective Wears. Two facilities have been established in late 1960s to cater to this requirement. The Centre, on the average generates about 50,000 m"3 of active liquid effluents of varying specific activities. The Effluent Treatment Plant was setup to receive and process radioactive liquids generated by various facilities of BARC in Trombay. It also serves a single-point discharge facility to enable monitoring of radioactive effluents discharged from the Trombay site. About 120-150 Te of protective wears and inactive apparel are generated annually from various radioactive facilities and laboratories of BARC. In addition, contaminated fuel assembly components are generated by DHRUVA and formerly by CIRUS. These components require decontamination before its recycle to the fuel assembly process. The Decontamination Centre, setup in late 1960s, is mandated to carry out the above mentioned decontamination activities

  12. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DB Barnett

    2000-01-01

    Seven years of groundwater monitoring at the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) have shown that the uppermost aquifer beneath the facility is unaffected by TEDF effluent. Effluent discharges have been well below permitted and expected volumes. Groundwater mounding from TEDF operations predicted by various models has not been observed, and waterlevels in TEDF wells have continued declining with the dissipation of the nearby B Pond System groundwater mound. Analytical results for constituents with enforcement limits indicate that concentrations of all these are below Practical Quantitation Limits, and some have produced no detections. Likewise, other constituents on the permit-required list have produced results that are mostly below sitewide background. Comprehensive geochemical analyses of groundwater from TEDF wells has shown that most constituents are below background levels as calculated by two Hanford Site-wide studies. Additionally, major ion proportions and anomalously low tritium activities suggest that groundwater in the aquifer beneath the TEDF has been sequestered from influences of adjoining portions of the aquifer and any discharge activities. This inference is supported by recent hydrogeologic investigations which indicate an extremely slow rate of groundwater movement beneath the TEDF. Detailed evaluation of TEDF-area hydrogeology and groundwater geochemistry indicate that additional points of compliance for groundwater monitoring would be ineffective for this facility, and would produce ambiguous results. Therefore, the current groundwater monitoring well network is retained for continued monitoring. A quarterly frequency of sampling and analysis is continued for all three TEDF wells. The constituents list is refined to include only those parameters key to discerning subtle changes in groundwater chemistry, those useful in detecting general groundwater quality changes from upgradient sources, or those retained for comparison with end

  13. Order of 21 October 1988 withdrawing the licence for the release of liquid radioactive effluents by the Cattenom nuclear production centre (units 1 and 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Court of Justice of the European Communities decided on 22 September 1988 that the Commission of the European Communities had to be notified and give its opinion before the competent authorities of Member States authorised the release of radioactive effluents from a nuclear installation. In compliance with that judgment, this Order repeals an Order of 21 February 1986 licensing such release (NEA) [fr

  14. Decree No 74-945 of 6 November 1974 concerning gaseous radioactive effluent releases from large nuclear installations and nuclear installations located on the same site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Decree prescribes the licensing for the release of gaseous wastes from nuclear installations as well as the technical supervision of such operations. It does not apply to the transport of radioactive effluents which is governed by the regulations on the transport of dangerous goods. (NEA) [fr

  15. Implementation of a model of atmospheric dispersion and dose calculation in the release of radioactive effluents in the Nuclear Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz L, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    In the present thesis, the software DERA (Dispersion of Radioactive Effluents into the Atmosphere) was developed in order to calculate the equivalent dose, external and internal, associated with the release of radioactive effluents into the atmosphere from a nuclear facility. The software describes such emissions in normal operation, and not considering the exceptional situations such as accidents. Several tools were integrated for describing the dispersion of radioactive effluents using site meteorological information (average speed and wind direction and the stability profile). Starting with the calculation of the concentration of the effluent as a function of position, DERA estimates equivalent doses using a set of EPA s and ICRP s coefficients. The software contains a module that integrates a database with these coefficients for a set of 825 different radioisotopes and uses the Gaussian method to calculate the effluents dispersion. This work analyzes how adequate is the Gaussian model to describe emissions type -puff-. Chapter 4 concludes, on the basis of a comparison of the recommended correlations of emissions type -puff-, that under certain conditions (in particular with intermittent emissions) it is possible to perform an adequate description using the Gaussian model. The dispersion coefficients (σ y and σ z ), that using the Gaussian model, were obtained from different correlations given in the literature. Also in Chapter 5 is presented the construction of a particular correlation using Lagrange polynomials, which takes information from the Pasquill-Gifford-Turner curves (PGT). This work also contains a state of the art about the coefficients that relate the concentration with the equivalent dose. This topic is discussed in Chapter 6, including a brief description of the biological-compartmental models developed by the ICRP. The software s development was performed using the programming language Python 2.7, for the Windows operating system (the XP

  16. TLD system for the monitoring of the environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochioiu, Ana; Sahagia, Maria; Tudor, Ion

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a high sensitivity TLD system, designed for the survey of the environmental radioactivity. It is based on the use of TL detectors type LiF:Mg, Cu, P, commercially known as GR-200A. The dosimeter designed in our Institute, contains 3 detectors, and the measurement value is calculated as the arithmetic mean. A very sensitive, TL Reader, READER ANALYSER RA'94 was chosen and an optimal thermal cycle was designed, such as to enhance the measurement performances. For each placement, a set of 3 dosemeters is used, and survey intervals from 1 to 100 days, depending on the radioactivity level and reporting requirements, are selected. The technical characteristics of the system were determined by exposing the dosimeters in reference X and gamma radiation fields, such as required by the IEC standard 61066:iun.2006 'Thermoluminescence dosimetry systems for personal and environmental monitoring'. The main technical parameters are of highest quality and recommend it for use in the survey of the environmental radioactivity, at the level of ambient dose equivalent rate, due to normal natural radioactivity, in open areas. The paper describes the method of characterisation and measurement results, as well as their relevance. (author)

  17. New Monitoring System to Detect a Radioactive Material in Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudergui, Karim; Kondrasovs, Vladimir; Coulon, Romain; Corre, Gwenole; Normand, Stephane

    2013-06-01

    Illegal radioactive material transportation detection, by terrorist for example, is problematic in urban public transportation. Academics and industrials systems include Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) to detect radioactive matters transported in vehicles or carried by pedestrians. However, today's RPMs are not able to efficiently detect a radioactive material in movement. Due to count statistic and gamma background, false alarms may be triggered or at the contrary a radioactive material not detected. The statistical false alarm rate has to be as low as possible in order to limit useless intervention especially in urban mass transportation. The real-time approach depicted in this paper consists in using a time correlated detection technique in association with a sensor network. It is based on several low-cost and large area plastic scintillators and a digital signal processing designed for signal reconstruction from the sensor network. The number of sensors used in the network can be adapted to fit with applications requirements or cost. The reconstructed signal is improved by comparing other approaches. This allows us to increase the device speed that has to be scanned while decreasing the risk of false alarm. In the framework of a project called SECUR-ED Secured Urban Transportation - European Demonstration, this prototype system will be used during an experiment in the Milan urban mass transportation. (authors)

  18. Design of automatic control and measurement software for radioactive aerosol continuity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yong; Li Aiwu

    1997-01-01

    The radioactive aerosol continuity measurement is very important for the development of nuclear industry, and it is the major method to measure and find out the leakage of radioactive material. Radioactive aerosol continuity monitor is the advanced method for the radioactive aerosol continuity measurement. With the development of nuclear industry and nuclear power station, it is necessary to design and automatic continuity measurement device. Because of this reason, the authors developed the first unit of radioactive aerosol continuity monitor and adopted the ministry appraisal. The design idea and method of automatic control and measurement for radioactive aerosol continuity monitor are discussed

  19. Environmental monitoring and deep ocean disposal of packaged radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.T.; Preston, A.

    1980-01-01

    The aims and objectives of environmental monitoring as laid down, for example by the ICRP and the IAEA include the assessment of actual or potential radiation exposure of man and the requirements of scientific investigations. The fulfillment of these aims is discussed in the context of the disposal of packaged radioactive waste in the deep Atlantic Ocean within the terms of the London Dumping Convention and within a regional agreement, the consultation/surveillance mechanism of the Nuclear Energy Agency. The paper discusses UK attitudes to such environmental monitoring, concentrates on the first of these ICRP objectives and shows how this is unlikely to be achieved by direct measurement in view of the small quantities of radioactive material involved relative to the scale of the receiving environment, and the timescale on which return to man can be conceived. Whilst meaningful environmental measurement is very unlikely to facilitate direct estimation of public radiation exposure by monitoring, it is still held that the basic objective of environmental monitoring can be met. A means by which this may be achieved is by oceanographic models. These procedures are discussed, illustrating the application of this philosophy in practice. (H.K.)

  20. Study on radioactive release of gaseous and liquid effluents during normal operation of AP1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Quan; Zhou Jing; Liu Yu

    2014-01-01

    The gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of pressurized water reactors plant during normal operation are an important content of environmental impact assessment and play a significant role in the design of nuclear power plant. According to the design characters of AP1OOO radioactive waste management system and the study on the calculation method and the release pathways, the calculation model of the gaseous and liquid radioactive releases during normal operation for AP1OOO are established. Base on the established calculation model and the design parameters of AP1000, the expected value of gaseous and liquid radioactive releases of AP1OOO is calculated. The results of calculation are compared with the limits in GB 6249-2011 and explain the adder that is included tu account for anticipated operational occurrences, providing a reference for environmental impact assessment of pressurized water reactor. (authors)

  1. Magnox Swarf Storage Silo Liquor Effluent Management -Sellafield Site, Cumbria, UK - Legacy radioactive waste storage - 59271

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Clere, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Sellafield Magnox Swarf Storage Silo (MSSS) was constructed to provide an underwater storage facility for irradiated magnox cladding metal Swarf, as well as miscellaneous beta-gamma waste from several sources. Liquid effluent arisings from hazard reduction activities at this facility represent the toughest effluent treatment challenge within the company's Legacy Ponds and Silos portfolio. The key requirement for hazard reduction has generated many substantial challenges as the facility is readied for decommissioning. This has demanded the production of carefully thought out strategies for managing, and overcoming, the key difficulties to be encountered as hazard reduction progresses. The complexity associated with preparing for waste retrievals from the Magnox Swarf Storage Silo, has also generated the demand for a mix of creativity and perseverance to meet the challenges and make progress. Challenging the status quo and willingness to accept change is not easy and the road to overall hazard reduction for the high hazard MSSS facility will demand the skills and investment of individuals, teams, and entire facility work-forces. The first steps on this road have been taken with the successful introduction of liquor management operations, however much more is yet to be achieved. Clear communication, investing in stakeholder management, perseverance in the face of difficulty and a structured yet flexible programme delivery approach, will ensure the continued success of tackling the complex challenges of treating liquid effluent from a legacy fuel storage silo at the Sellafield Site. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of groundwater monitoring results at the Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.

    1998-09-01

    The Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) has operated since June 1995. Groundwater monitoring has been conducted quarterly in the three wells surrounding the facility since 1992, with contributing data from nearby B Pond System wells. Cumulative hydrologic and geochemical information from the TEDF well network and other surrounding wells indicate no discernable effects of TEDF operations on the uppermost aquifer in the vicinity of the TEDF. The lateral consistency and impermeable nature of the Ringold Formation lower mud unit, and the contrasts in hydraulic conductivity between this unit and the vadose zone sediments of the Hanford formation suggest that TEDF effluent is spreading laterally with negligible mounding or downward movement into the uppermost aquifer. Hydrographs of TEDF wells show that TEDF operations have had no detectable effects on hydraulic heads in the uppermost aquifer, but show a continuing decay of the hydraulic mound generated by past operations at the B Pond System. Comparison of groundwater geochemistry from TEDF wells and other, nearby RCRA wells suggests that groundwater beneath TEDF is unique; different from both effluent entering TEDF and groundwater in the B Pond area. Tritium concentrations, major ionic proportions, and lower-than-background concentrations of other species suggest that groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the TEDF bears characteristics of water in the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report recommends retaining the current groundwater well network at the TEDF, but with a reduction of sampling/analysis frequency and some modifications to the list of constituents sought

  3. Examination of the new index creatures for environmental radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Saito, T.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the environmental radioactivity monitoring is to watch over the radiation hazard to the human body, fallout resting from the nuclear test and the environmental pollution around the nuclear facilities and so forth. The measurement of the environmental radioactivity is done using samples like the atmosphere, land water, land soil, bottom soil of the sea and lake, drainage, food, marine samples, index creatures, etc. The index creatures in the land are pine needle, cryptomeria leaf, mugwort and so on. However, in recent years, they are decreasing at the city. Therefore, Kin-mokusei and Pothos are examined using the microwave heating distillation system developed by Radioisotope Research Center of Osaka University, it was proved that they had possibility of the new index creature. (author)

  4. Monitoring technologies for ocean disposal of radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, M. B.; Solomon, K. A.; Bishop, C. B.; Tyce, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using carefully selected subseabed locations to permanently isolate high level radioactive wastes at ocean depths greater than 4000 meters is discussed. Disposal at several candidate subseabed areas is being studied because of the long term geologic stability of the sediments, remoteness from human activity, and lack of useful natural resources. While the deep sea environment is remote, it also poses some significant challenges for the technology required to survey and monitor these sites, to identify and pinpoint container leakage should it occur, and to provide the environmental information and data base essential to determining the probable impacts of any such occurrence. Objectives and technical approaches to aid in the selective development of advanced technologies for the future monitoring of nuclear low level and high level waste disposal in the deep seabed are presented. Detailed recommendations for measurement and sampling technology development needed for deep seabed nuclear waste monitoring are also presented.

  5. Environmental monitoring and deep ocean disposal of packaged radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.T.; Preston, A.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in the context of the dumping of packaged radioactive waste in the deep ocean is discussed in detail. The principles and objectives laid down by the IAEA and the ICRP are reviewed. Monitoring and its relationships to radiation exposure, research, control measures and public information are described. Finally, the actual practice in the UK of environmental monitoring is detailed for the measurable case of liquid wastes in coastal waters and also for package waste in deep oceans which has to be calculated. It is concluded that better mathematical models are needed to predict the dose to man and that more research into oceanographic and biological transfer processes should be carried out. (UK)

  6. Radiological effluent and onsite area monitoring report for the Nevada Test Site (January 1986-December 1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program at the Nevada Test Site as conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE) onsite radiological safety contractor from January 1986 through December 1986. It presents results and evaluations of radioactivity measurements in air and water, and of direct gamma radiation exposure rates. It establishes relevant correlations between the data recorded and DOE concentration guides (CG's). External gamma exposure levels and radioactivity in air and water on the Nevada Test Site were low compared to DOE guidelines. The highest average gross beta concentration in air was 0.005% of the DOE concentration guide (CG). The highest average Pu-239 concentration was 7.7% of the standard. The highest average tritium concentration was 0.39% of the standard. Kr-85 concentrations increased slightly from CY-1985 to CY-1986. Xe-133 remained nondetectable with some exceptions. The highest average gross beta concentration in potable water remained within the applicable standard for drinking water. The highest average Pu-239 concentration from contaminated waters was 0.0005% of the concentration guide. The highest average tritium concentration in noncontaminated water was 6% of the level for drinking water required by the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulation. The amounts of tritium-bearing effluent released to contaminated waste ponds was calculated and reported to DOE Headquarters. Gamma radiation measurements were roughly the same in CY-1986 relative to the previous year. All surveillance results from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) indicate that no detectable releases of radioactive materials occurred in that network in 1986. 29 refs., 14 figs., 23 tabs

  7. A new stack effluent monitoring system at the Risoe Hot Cell plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetter-Jensen, L.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Lauridsen, B.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes a new stack effluent monitoring system that has been installed at the Hot Cell facility. It is an integrating iodine/particulate system consisting of a γ-shielded flow house in which a continous air sample from the ventilation channel ia sucked through coal and glass filter papers. Activity is accumulated on the filter papers and a thin plastic scintillator detects the β-radiation from the trapped iodine or particulate activity. The stack effluent monitoring system has a two-step regulating function as applied to the ventilation system, first switching it to a recirculating mode, and finally to building-seal after given releases of 131 I. The collection efficiency for iodine in form of elementary iodine (I 2 ) and methyliodide (CH 3 I) has been determined experimentally. The unwanted response from a noble gas release has also been determined from experiments. The noble gas response was determined from puff releases of the nuclide 41 Ar in the concrete cells. It is concluded that the iodine/particulate system is extremely sensitive and that it can easily detect iodine or particulate releases as low as a few MBq. A gamma monitor placed in connection with the iodine/particulate system detects Xe/Kr-releases as low as a few tens of MBq per second. (author)

  8. On-line liquid-effluent monitoring of sewage at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, M.; Cate, J.L.; Rueppel, D.W.; Huntzinger, C.J.; Gonzalez, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic on line sewage effluent monitoring system has been developed. A representative fraction of the total waste stream leaving the site is monitored for pH, radiation, and metals as it passes through a detection assembly. This assembly consists of an industrial pH probe, NaI radiation detectors, and an x-ray fluorescence metal detector. A microprocessor collects, reduces and analyzes the data to determine if the levels are acceptable by established environmental limits. Currently, if preset levels are exceeded, a sample of the suspect sewage is automatically collected for further analysis, and an alarm is sent to a station where personnel can be alerted to respond on a 24-hour basis. Since at least four hours pass before LLNL effluent reaches the treatment plant, sufficient time is available to alert emergency personnel, evaluate the situation, and if necessary arrange for diversion of the material to emergency holding basins at the treatment plant. Information on the current system is presented, and progress is reported in developing an on-line tritium monitor as an addition to the assembly

  9. EU-wide monitoring survey on emerging polar organic contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Robert; Carvalho, Raquel; António, Diana C; Comero, Sara; Locoro, Giovanni; Tavazzi, Simona; Paracchini, Bruno; Ghiani, Michela; Lettieri, Teresa; Blaha, Ludek; Jarosova, Barbora; Voorspoels, Stefan; Servaes, Kelly; Haglund, Peter; Fick, Jerker; Lindberg, Richard H; Schwesig, David; Gawlik, Bernd M

    2013-11-01

    In the year 2010, effluents from 90 European wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were analyzed for 156 polar organic chemical contaminants. The analyses were complemented by effect-based monitoring approaches aiming at estrogenicity and dioxin-like toxicity analyzed by in vitro reporter gene bioassays, and yeast and diatom culture acute toxicity optical bioassays. Analyses of organic substances were performed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) or liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) or gas chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Target microcontaminants were pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), veterinary (antibiotic) drugs, perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), organophosphate ester flame retardants, pesticides (and some metabolites), industrial chemicals such as benzotriazoles (corrosion inhibitors), iodinated x-ray contrast agents, and gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging agents; in addition biological endpoints were measured. The obtained results show the presence of 125 substances (80% of the target compounds) in European wastewater effluents, in concentrations ranging from low nanograms to milligrams per liter. These results allow for an estimation to be made of a European median level for the chemicals investigated in WWTP effluents. The most relevant compounds in the effluent waters with the highest median concentration levels were the artificial sweeteners acesulfame and sucralose, benzotriazoles (corrosion inhibitors), several organophosphate ester flame retardants and plasticizers (e.g. tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate; TCPP), pharmaceutical compounds such as carbamazepine, tramadol, telmisartan, venlafaxine, irbesartan, fluconazole, oxazepam, fexofenadine, diclofenac, citalopram, codeine, bisoprolol, eprosartan, the antibiotics trimethoprim, ciprofloxacine, sulfamethoxazole, and clindamycine, the insect repellent N,N'-diethyltoluamide (DEET), the pesticides

  10. Environmental monitoring standardization of effluent from nuclear fuel cycle facilities in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Mili

    1993-01-01

    China has established some environmental monitoring standards of effluent from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Up to date 33 standards have been issued; 10 to be issued; 11 in drafting. These standards cover sampling, gross activities measurement, analytical methods and management rules and so on. They involve with almost all nuclear fuel cycle facilities and have formed a complete standards system. By the end of the century, we attempt to draft a series of analytical and determination standards in various environmental various medium, they include 36 radionuclides from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (3 tabs.)

  11. Annual environmental monitoring report, January-December 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    Non-radioactive monitoring program involved: repair of a leaking waste paint and solvent tank, installation of a pretreatment facility for liquid effluents from a plating shop; and construction discharge. Radioactivity was monitored for air with comparisons to the average annual population dose from neutron radiation and tritium in the waste water effluents

  12. Low-level radioactive gas monitor for natural gas operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, F.E.

    1969-11-01

    A portable radioactivity detection system for monitoring the tritium content of natural gas under field conditions has been developed. The sensing device employed is a complex proportional counting assembly operated without the use of massive shielding previously employed with such low-level radiation detectors. The practical limit of detection for the system is a tritium content of 10 -9 microcurie per cc of natural gas. All components of the system are packaged in three waterproof cases weighing slightly less than 30 kg each. Power requirement is 500 watts of 120 volt, 60 Hz current. Operation is fully automatic with a printed record produced at predetermined time intervals

  13. Activities and Issues in Monitoring Scrap Metal Against Radioactive Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.Y., E-mail: sychen@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Over the past few decades, the global scrap metal industry has grown increasingly vigilant regarding radioactive contamination. Accidental melts of radioactive sources in some smelting facilities, in particular, have caused considerable damage and required recovery efforts costing tens of millions of dollars. In response, the industry has developed and deployed countermeasures. Increasingly expensive and sophisticated radiation monitoring devices have been implemented at key scrap entry points - ports and scrapyards. Recognition of the importance of such endeavors has led to a series of activities aimed at establishing organized and coordinated efforts among the interested parties. Recent concerns over the potential use of radioactive sources for radiological devices in terrorist acts have substantially heightened the need for national and international authorities to further control, intercept, and secure the sources that have escaped the regulatory domain. Enhanced collaboration by the government and industry could substantially improve the effectiveness of efforts at control; the 'Spanish Protocol' as developed by the Spanish metal industry and government regulators is a good example of such collaboration. (author)

  14. Use of aquatic bryophytes as bio monitors for radioactive studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damianova, A.; Penev, I.; Drenska, M.

    2006-01-01

    As a widespread water moss Fontinalis antipyretics is frequently used as a biomonitor for trace elements pollution in lakes and running waters. The purpose of this study is to use Fontinalis antipyretics as a tool for monitoring of radioactivity in waters from different rivers (Musalenska Bistriza, Iskar, Maritza, etc.) in Rila Mountain. The radioactivity of aquatic moss, water samples and sediments were measured using HPG detector with the parameters FWHM 2 kev at 6 0Co efficiency 35% with low background. The dose rate measurements (μR/h) show different values according to the place of sampling and reflect the present ecological status of the river ecosystems. The ongoing measurements will allowed the absolute value of 1 37Cs in bryophytes to be determined and eventually some seasonal variations to be observed. A special interest is whether the measured activity is accidental or is as a consequence of a long time accumulation in the bryophytes. In this case they could probably be used for water purification. On that basis the bryophytes could be used for controlling radioactivity of river ecosystems even in high-mountain difficult accessible places replacing the transportation of large volumes of water

  15. Environmental radioactivity monitoring around Jeongeup ARTI in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Jong; Kwon, Ho Je; Kang, Tai Jin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    In Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI), the environmental radioactivity monitoring programme has been enforced since 2007. This study has been done to guarantee the local residence radiation safety by detecting in early stage a possible radiological effect due to the operation of the ARTI facilities. For the radioactivity measurement, fourteen selected samples were gathered not only monthly, quarterly, half-yearly but also in the harvesting season. Measurement and analysis were done on the samples collected in and around the ARTI. The gamma exposure rates measured in and around ARTI was in the range of 0.05{approx}0.3 {mu}Sv/h. The range of gross-beta-radioactivity analyzed for the water samples except waste water was from <3.451 to 288 mBq/L. The range of 3H concentration detected in the rain sample collected in the ARTI site was 0.951{approx}2.34 Bq/L. 90Sr was not detected from all the samples of soil and honey, pine needles. The above results confirmed that there has been no influence due to operation of the ARTI facilities.. The analysis result reveals that there is no radiological influence due to operation of the ARTI facilities. Also, it is judged that the samples analyzed for the first time in 2009 have to be continuously evaluated afterward

  16. A Low Level Radioactivity Monitor for Aqueous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, E.J.M.

    1968-04-01

    A system is described for continuous monitoring of very low levels of radioactivity in waste water containing typically 3.5 g/l dissolved solids. Spray evaporation of the water enables the dissolved solids to be recovered in the form of an aerosol and collected on a filter tape where the radioactivity is measured by a radiation detector. The advantage of this method compared with a direct measurement is that the attenuating effect of the water is removed and thus greater sensitivity is obtained. Compensation for background and any contamination is achieved by feeding distilled water to the aerosol generator every alternate sampling period and recording the count difference between two successive sampling periods . A printed record of the totalised count difference is obtained once per hour during the integration time of one month. For β radioactivity the minimum values of specific activity measurable extend from 1 x 10 -6 Ci/m 3 to 6 x 10 -8 Ci/m depending on the B end-point energy in the range 167 KeV to 2.26 MeV. The estimated minimum measurable specific activity is 6 x 10 -8 Ci/m 3

  17. Radioactivity monitoring of the Irish marine environment 1993 to 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, D.; Long, S.; Hayden, E.; Smith, V.; Ryan, T.P.; Dowdall, A.; McGarry, A.; Cunningham, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the results of the marine radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland during the period 1993 to 1995. The principal objective of this programme is to assess the exposure to the Irish population arising from radioactive contamination in the Irish marine environment and to estimate the risks to human health arising from such exposure. In addition, the programme aims to assess the distribution of the significant contaminating radionuclides in the marine environment and to identify tends with a view to assessing possible future effects. The results show that by 1995 the mean concentration of caesium-137 in fish landed at north-east ports had fallen to 1.6 Bq/kg, from a figure of 68 Bq/kg in 1979-82 and 3.0 Bq/kg in 1993. A similar decline is evident for seawater, sediment and seaweed. In addition, the Irish Sea data show the progressive dilution of artificial radioactivity with increasing distance from Sellafield

  18. A Low Level Radioactivity Monitor for Aqueous Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, E J.M.

    1968-04-15

    A system is described for continuous monitoring of very low levels of radioactivity in waste water containing typically 3.5 g/l dissolved solids. Spray evaporation of the water enables the dissolved solids to be recovered in the form of an aerosol and collected on a filter tape where the radioactivity is measured by a radiation detector. The advantage of this method compared with a direct measurement is that the attenuating effect of the water is removed and thus greater sensitivity is obtained. Compensation for background and any contamination is achieved by feeding distilled water to the aerosol generator every alternate sampling period and recording the count difference between two successive sampling periods . A printed record of the totalised count difference is obtained once per hour during the integration time of one month. For {beta} radioactivity the minimum values of specific activity measurable extend from 1 x 10{sup -6} Ci/m{sup 3} to 6 x 10{sup -8} Ci/m depending on the B end-point energy in the range 167 KeV to 2.26 MeV. The estimated minimum measurable specific activity is 6 x 10{sup -8} Ci/m{sup 3}.

  19. Design, calculation and testing on mock-up of B(U) f type LR 56 packaging for radioactive liquid effluent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaud; Leconnetable; Daspet; Tombini; Tanguy

    1986-06-01

    Transport of radioactive acid liquid effluents are effected on tank truck inside nuclear center of the CEA. The cylindrical packaging type B(U) f has a capacity of 4,000l, a maximum permissible activity of 110 T Bq (3x10 4 Ci) and comprises a central element for liquid effluent containment to prevent contamination of environment and peripheral elements for mechanical, biological and thermal protection. This packaging is fixed on a trailer associated with a control box. Design and equipment of the packaging are studied for a maximum safety and in accordance with regulations [fr

  20. Synthesis of the IRSN report of the management of effluents in operating nuclear plants, and of associated radioactive and chemical rejections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    This report discusses the various improvements proposed by the IRSN to EDF for a better management of effluents and rejections in nuclear plants. These improvements should bear on a better understanding of the production, of the behaviour and of the treatment of radioactive compounds and of associated chemical compounds. They should also bear on the design of the installations and their inspection, operation practices, the use of local good practices, the organisation, the control of rejections, the control of underground waters of nuclear sites, experience feedback, the documentation on effluents and rejections

  1. Monitoring device for radioactive leakage from steam system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tateo; Sato, Kohei

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability for the monitor of radio-active leakage by accumulating small quantity of radioactivities each lower than the detectable level and increasing their dose rate. Constitution: Even if the steam system radiation monitor in the nuclear power plant is disposed for the detection of in-leak radioactivity, radioactive leakage can be monitored at high reliability by increasing the small quantity of radioactivities in the drains to a detectable sensitivity range of the monitor upon detection. In view of the above, in the present invention, radioactive material catching medium is incorporated to a radio-activity monitor spool piece for accumulating small quantity of radioactivities. Specifically as the catching medium, an ion exchange resin is used for the leakage of ionic radioactive material, while an ion exchange resin increased with the mixing ratio of a cationic resin or hollow thread membrane filter is used for crud-like radioactive material leakage. These catching media are incorporated into the spool piece, thereby enabling to catch even small quantity of radioactive leakage lower than the detectable sensitivity of the radiation monitor, if should occur, in the spool piece and enabling radioactive detection for the accumulated dose rate. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Tests of the use of cation exchange organic resins for the decontamination of radioactive aqueous effluents; Essais d'emploi des resines organiques echangeuses de cations pour la decontamination des effluents aqueux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdrez, Jean; Girault, Jacques; Wormser, Gerald

    1962-12-14

    The authors report tests performed in laboratory and results obtained during an investigation of the use of synthetic ion exchangers for the decontamination of radioactive effluents of moderate activity level and with a non neglectable salt loading. Resins are used under sodium form and regenerated after each fixing operation. Once decontaminated and free of its disturbing ions, the regenerating agent (NaCl) is used for several operations. The authors present the used resins, the treated effluents, describe the tests, and discuss the obtained results [French] Dans ce rapport nous faisons le point des essais et resultats obtenus au laboratoire au cours d'une etude concernant l'utilisation des echangeurs d'ions synthetiques pour la decontamination des effluents radioactifs de niveau d'activite moyenne et de charge en sels non negligeable. Les resines sont employees sous forme sodique et regenerees apres chaque operation de fixation. Le regenerant decontamine et debarrasse de ses ions genants est utilise pour plusieurs operations d'elution. Les seuls residus a stocker proviennent d'une part eventuellement d'un pretraitement de l'effluent, d'autre part, dans tous les cas des precipites consecutifs a la purification de l'eluant dont le traitement chimique est plus aise et donne lieu a des boues beaucoup moins volumineuses qu'une coprecipitation effectuee sur la totalite de l'effluent. (auteurs)

  3. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Busan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H. S.; Lee, J. [Busan Regional Monitoring Station, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    At Pusan Regional Monitoring Station in Busan have been measured periodically in 2000 gross beta activities in the airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water and gamma exposure rates. Gamma nuclides in airborne dust, fallout and precipitation have also been monitored at the station. As a part of environmental radiation/radioactivity distribution survey around Pusan, vegetables, fishes, shellfish, drinking water (total 23ea) samples were taken from sampling sites which were selected by KlNS. We analysis gamma nuclide for all. No significant changes from the previous survey have been found in both beta activities and gamma exposure rates. As the results of analyzing an gamma nuclide concentration in environmental samples in Pusan are fee of radiological contaminants.

  4. Assessment of derived emission limits for radioactive effluents resulted from the decommissioning activities of the VVR-S nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuca, C.; Stochioiu, A.; Sahagia, M.; Gurau, D.; Dragusin, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents complex studies on establishment of derived emission limits for potential radionuclides emitted as gaseous and liquid effluents, during the decommissioning activities (2nd and 3rd phases) of a nuclear research reactor, cooled and moderated with distilled water, type VVR-S, owned by the IFIN-HH. In the present paper there are described: the analysis methods and equipment used, the methodologies for calculating doses and the Derived Emission Limits (DEL), the experimentally measured activities of the representative radionuclides found in gaseous and liquid effluents resulted from decommissioning activities, as well as the effective derived limits of liquid and gaseous effluents, applying the calculation methodologies, specific to critical categories of exposed subjects. A constraint effective dose limit for a person from the critical group of 50 μSv/year was considered in calculations. From the comparison of the two series of values, measured released activities and DELs, there has been concluded that for the gaseous effluents they comply with the DELs, while in the case of liquid effluents they are higher and consequently they must be treated as liquid radioactive wastes. - Highlights: • The DELs for gaseous and liquid effluents in decommissioning were studied. • The impact on the environment and critical group was assessed. • Gamma-ray spectrometry was used to determine the radionuclide composition. • Based on the dosimetry models, the values of conservative DELs were calculated. • The DELs are compliant for gases, not for liquids; require the treatment as rad-waste

  5. USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WESTCOTT, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary

  6. USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WESTCOTT, J.L.; JOCHEN; PREVETTE

    2007-01-01

    Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State are being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary

  7. Impact assessment for the aquatic biota arising from discharges of radioactive liquid effluents into the marine environment - Angra dos Reis nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauria, D.C.; Peres, S.S.; Martins, S.F.

    2011-01-01

    The Piraquara de Fora Bay receives the liquid effluents from the two Brazilian nuclear power plants (NPPs): Angra I that has been operating since 1985 and Angra II that started operating in 2000. The monitoring data set obtained by IRD/CNEN for marine samples over a period of 25 years (from 1985 to 2010) were statistically evaluated. Despite the high presence of non detect observations, suitable statistical tests were applied to compare 60 Co levels in sediments between two periods of time and from different sampling locations. The natural dose and the dose derived from the NPPs routine radioactive releases on the marine biota were assessed by the Erica tool. The highest value of dose rate due to the naturally occurrence radionuclides was estimated to be around 0.6 μGy h -1 for phytoplankton, mainly due to internal dose contribution of 238 U, while fishes received the highest dose (value around 0.4 μGy h -1 ) due to the radionuclide discharges of the NPPs. Accordingly, the dose rates to the studied species (fish, crustacean, macroalgae, zooplankton and phytoplankton) were clearly below the Erica screening level of 10 μGy h -1 , indicating no significant radiological impact of NPPs on these species. (author)

  8. Application of inorganic ion exchangers for low and medium activity radioactive effluent decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, J.F.; Eymard, S.; Gambade, R.; La Rosa, G.

    1986-01-01

    This study proposes an alternative pretreatment or treatment for low and medium activity liquid wastes, allowing to improve the quality of containment and decrease the cost of storage. Inorganic ion exchangers are used to remove alpha emitters and long lived fission products and concentrate them in a small volume; these exchangers can be converted into a stable matrix by thermal treatment. This treatment, at least for some liquid wastes, don't exclude a complementary decontamination by chemical precipitation. Sludges, arising from precipitation, exempt from alpha emitters and long lived fission products can be stored in a shallow land burial. This study includes two parts: - Measurements of distribution coefficients for the main nuclides in order to choose, for each liquid wastes, the most suitable ion exchanger. - Estimation of performances of selected inorganic ion exchangers, from tests of percolation of genuine effluents

  9. Guide for effluent radiological measurements at DOE installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, J.P.; Corbit, C.D.

    1983-07-01

    Effluent monitoring and reporting programs are maintained at all US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities that may: (1) discharge significant concentrations of radioactivity in relation to applicable standards, or (2) discharge quantities of radioactivity that have potential health and safety or other environmental significance. This Guide is intended to provide supplemental guidance to DOE Orders on methods, procedures, and performance criteria to bring more comparable rationale to DOE facility effluent measurement programs and promote compliance with applicable standards and provide the DOE Office of Operational Safety (OOS) and Operations Offices with an additional tool for evaluating effluent measurement programs at DOE facilities

  10. Design of position monitor module in radioactive material transport monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adi Abimanyu; Dwi Yuliansari N

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of safety and security of radioactive substances from the sender to the receiver is to be secured so as not to harm humans. In general, monitoring is done through conversation by telephone to determine the location and rate of exposure of radioactive substances. Through the development of science and technology makes it possible to develop a system of monitoring the transport of radioactive substances in real time by combining radiation monitor module, position monitors module and sending information nir-cable. Position monitor module developed using GPS-receiver and a micro controller ATMega8 based serial interrupts communication. Testing is done by testing communication between micro controller and GPS and also testing reading position by GPS receiver. From the test results concluded that the developed modules is good in serial communication is based on serial interrupts, good position measurement to be used outdoors and is not good enough for measurements indoors because the GPS receiver used is not using an outdoor antenna. (author)

  11. Treatment of radioactive liquid effluents by reverse osmosis membranes: From lab-scale to pilot-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combernoux, Nicolas; Schrive, Luc; Labed, Véronique; Wyart, Yvan; Carretier, Emilie; Moulin, Philippe

    2017-10-15

    The recent use of the reverse osmosis (RO) process at the damaged Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant generated a growing interest in the application of this process for decontamination purposes. This study focused on the development of a robust RO process for decontamination of two kinds of liquid effluents: a contaminated groundwater after a nuclear disaster and a contaminated seawater during a nuclear accident. The SW30 HR membrane was selected among other in this study due to higher retentions (96% for Cs and 98% for Sr) in a true groundwater. Significant fouling and scaling phenomenon, attributed to calcium and strontium precipitation, were evidenced in this work: this underscored the importance of the lab scale experiment in the process. Validation of the separation performances on trace radionuclides concentration was performed with similar retention around 96% between surrogates Cs (inactive) and 137 Cs (radioactive). The scale up to a 2.6 m 2 spiral wound membrane led to equivalent retentions (around 96% for Cs and 99% for Sr) but lower flux values: this underlined that the hydrodynamic parameters (flowrate/cross-flow velocity) should be optimized. This methodology was also applied on the reconstituted seawater effluent: retentions were slightly lower than for the groundwater and the same hydrodynamic effects were observed on the pilot scale. Then, ageing of the membrane through irradiation experiments were performed. Results showed that the membrane active layer composition influenced the membrane resistance towards γ irradiation: the SW30 HR membrane performances (retention and permeability) were better than the Osmonics SE at 1 MGy. Finally, to supplement the scale up approach, the irradiation of a spiral wound membrane revealed a limited effect on the permeability and retention. This indicated that irradiation conditions need to be controlled for a further development of the process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effluent and water treatment at AERE Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    The treatment of liquid wastes at Harwell is based on two main principles: separation of surface water, domestic sewage, trade wastes and radioactive effluents at source, and a system of holding tanks which are sampled so that the appropriate treatment can be given to any batch. All discharges are subject to independent monitoring by the authorising departments and the Thames Water Inspectors. (author)

  13. IRSN's expertise about nuclear medicine hospital effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This brief note aims at presenting the radioactivity follow up of hospital effluents performed by the French Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). This follow up concerns the radioactive compounds and radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine, and principally technetium 99 and iodine 131. The IRSN has developed a network of remote measurement systems for the monitoring of sewers and waste water cleaning facilities. Data are compiled in a data base for analysis and subsequent expertise. (J.S.)

  14. Sellafield (release of radioactivity)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J; Goodlad, A; Morris, M

    1986-02-06

    A government statement is reported, about the release of plutonium nitrate at the Sellafield site of British Nuclear Fuels plc on 5 February 1986. Matters raised included: details of accident; personnel monitoring; whether radioactive material was released from the site; need for public acceptance of BNFL activities; whether plant should be closed; need to reduce level of radioactive effluent; number of incidents at the plant.

  15. Monitoring System for the Inspection of Vehicle Loads for Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamarchri, G.; Chaudhury, P.; Jain, A.; Kale, M. S.; Pradeepkumar, K. S.; Sharma, D. N.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2004-01-01

    From the nuclear facilities, inactive scrap may have to be sent periodically for disposal. The scrap is to be monitored to ensure that it is free from inadvertent mix up of contaminated material, which has got the potential of unwanted exposure to people as well as costly and time consuming clean up operations. Earlier the scrap carrying vehicles were monitored manually using portable radiation survey monitors by health physicists. A PC based monitoring system for the inspection of vehicle loads for radioactivity is developed and is in use which requires minimum manual interaction. The advantage of the system is that it can automatically screen all outgoing vehicles from the establishment. The PC based system consists of two detector boxes, each having three Plastic Scintillation detectors of 50 mm dia x 500 mm long. The processing unit is built around a PC addon card. Using the calibration factor (i.e., nGy/h per cps), the dose rate is computed and 'allow' / 'disallow' visual signal is generated in the PC located in a control room. The graphical user interface provides ON / OFF button for controlling the counting process and counting time interval can be set by the user as desired. All the six counters are synchronized for the process of counting. The acquired counts are displayed on the PC screen in the form of a count rate vs. time graph. At the completion of scanning of a vehicle, the counting is continued to acquire background radiation level till the next vehicle arrives. The processing unit estimates the radiation dose rate from these recorded counts by using already established calibration factor and displays the data on the monitor screen of the computer. If the determined dose rate exceeds the pre determined limit, an audio alarm is initiated and the alarm information is displayed on the monitor of the computer. The system has provision to enter information like vehicle registration number, type of the vehicle, origin of the load, destination etc. These

  16. Recovery of sludge from the treatment of liquid radioactive effluents by co-precipitation with calcium carbonate: laboratory study; Recuperation des boues de traitement des effluents radioactifs liquides par coprecipitation avec le carbonate de calcium: etude de laboratoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patti, F.; Gailledreau, C.; Cohen, P.

    1961-02-24

    As during the treatment by co-precipitation with calcium carbonate of liquid radioactive residues, a partial decontamination can be obtained by simply agitating an already formed radioactive sludge with the effluent to be processed, the authors study whether it would be possible to first perform a co-precipitation with a lower dose of calcium carbonate and then to complete decontamination by agitating with an adequate quantity of sludge stored during preceding operations. The authors report the study of the influence of reactant quantity on the chemical treatment efficiency, of the evolution of the activity of a radioactive residual solution in contact with a precipitate, of the cleaner element, of a precipitate reuse, of the technological and economic aspects, and of another possibility of reduction of the precipitate volume [French] Dans le traitement par coprecipitation avec le carbonate de calcium des residus radioactifs liquides, une decontamination partielle peut etre obtenue en agitant simplement une boue radioactive deja formee avec l'effluent a traiter. En consequence, il pourrait etre possible d'effectuer d'abord une coprecipitation avec une dose plus faible de carbonate de calcium et de completer ensuite la decontamination en agitant le liquide avec une quantite convenable de boue stockee a partir d'operations precedentes. (auteurs)

  17. Removal of radionuclides from radioactive effluents of Purex origin using biomass banana pith as sorbant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Kannan, R.; Das, S.K.; Naik, P.W.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Kansra, V.P.; Balu, K.

    1998-06-01

    Investigations have been carried out on the applicability of dried banana pith (inner stem) for the sorption of various radionuclides viz. U, Pu, 241 Am, 144 Ce, 147 Pm, 152+154 Eu and 137 Cs which are generally present at trace level in Purex process waste effluents. The sorption of trivalent radionuclides as well as tetravalent plutonium was found to be high at pH 2, whereas sorption of uranium was found to be maximum at pH 6. Cesium was not found to be sorbed. 241 Am sorption was investigated in detail as a representative element of trivalent actinides and fission products to study the general trend. Though its sorption was kinetically slow, near-quantitative sorption was observed on prolonged contact. 241 Am sorption was studied in presence of NaNO 3 (up to 1 M) and Nd(III) up to 500 mg/l. Whereas no significant change in distribution ratios (D) was observed in the presence of NaNO 3 , it increased with neodymium concentration in the range tested. This indicates the effectiveness of the biomass as sorbent even in presence of sodium salts. Sorbed metal ions could be recovered by leaching with 2 M nitric acid. The dried biomass samples prepared from different sources were found to be stable for months and gave similar results on testing. The biomass was tested for its applicability for sorbing radionuclides present in Purex evaporator condensate and diluted high level waste solution on once through basis. The sorption capacity of banana pith for trivalent actinide-lanthanide is in the range of 60 mg/g banana pith. The results indicate that the biomass can be used effectively for the treatment of Purex Waste effluents for the removal of strontium, tri- and tetravalent actinides and fission products. The biomass was also tested for the sorption of toxic metal ions viz. Sr, Hg, Pb, Cr, Cd, and As from a nitrate solution at pH 2 and 4. D values followed the order Hg>Sr>Cd>Pb at pH 2, with Cr and As showing no uptake. These results indicate the potential of this

  18. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) during 1998. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges from HIFAR were estimated utilising the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective dose to the public was estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around the HIFAR research reactor. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year approved by the Nuclear Safety Bureau. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the LHSTC

  19. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E L; Loosz, T; Farrar, Y; Mokhber-Shahin, L

    1999-07-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) during 1998. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges from HIFAR were estimated utilising the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective dose to the public was estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around the HIFAR research reactor. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year approved by the Nuclear Safety Bureau. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the LHSTC.

  20. Sampling and monitoring of carbon-14 in gaseous effluents from nuclear facilities - a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellman, M.

    1988-12-01

    C-14 compounds produced in the coolant may be released mainly together with off-gas and waste water from the coolant purification and treatment system. In reactors the release of C-14 will occur mainly in gaseous effluents and only a few percent in liquid effluents. Reported releases from BWRs range from 260 to 670 GBq/GW(e) x year and from 90 to 430 GBq/GW(e) x year for PWRs. At BWRs the condenser air ejector contributes the main inplant release pathway, whereas in PWRs the off-gas treatment vents are the main pathway for C-14 release. C-14 sampling methods depend generally on the C-14 being in the form of CO 2 . The off-gas discharges from BWRs are mainly in the form of CO 2 whereas in PWRs a major fraction of the released C-14 is in the form of hydrocarbons or carbon monoxide (generally 80-100%). Sampling systems in PWRs should therefore be equipped with a catalytic oxidizer to convert all C-14 to CO 2 before trapping. The purpose of this study is to provide information on the techniques available for sampling and monitoring C-14

  1. Influence of radioactive effluents from nuclear installations on mortality of the woods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoutjesdijk, J.F.

    1986-11-01

    Referring to a theory of Reichelt that also radioactive materials, effused from nuclear installations and uranium ores, can contribute to mortality of the woods, it is checked, by studying corresponding literature, to what extent this agrees with the facts. According to this study the radionuclides seem to contribute to the internal and external radiation doses of plants. However these doses are so small with respect to natural radiation doses that it is highly unprobable that this effect contributes to damage of the woods. (Auth.)

  2. Suitability study of using a coincidence monitor for room air radioactivity monitoring in a PET center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roellig, D.; Reichelt, C.; Iwatschenko-Borho, M.

    2001-01-01

    The application of radioactive nuclides in medicine may cause as well radioactive exposure of personnel (Medical Technical Assistants). In the present case the exposure of personnel in the area of medical positron-emission tomography (PET) within the Research Center of Rossendorf due to exhalation of the injected activity by the patient shall be investigated. For this purpose it is necessary to measure the activity concentration of the room air. Conventional methods such as collecting samples on special filters are not suitable due to the short half-life time of the used nuclides. Standard type continuous monitors are hardly suitable as well, because the injected activity of the patient and various radioactive sources required for the calibration of the PET-Camera produce an increased gamma background. In order to eliminate these disturbing influences a monitor has been constructed which uses CCM (cobalt coincidence method) developed by the company Thermo Eberline ESM. This method is specially suitable because upon each radioactive decay of PET nuclides positrons are emitted which in turn annihilate via the simultaneous emission of two 511 keV gamma quanta under an angle of 180 . The air to be measured is sucked through a cavity with two scintillation detectors on opposite sides. The coincident pulses produced by annihilating positrons inside the cavity are counted by a suitable electronic. Gamma quanta from outside the cavity can produce a pulse only in one detector and are rejected. Therefore no heavy lead shielding is required. Besides the mechanical construction of the monitor optimization and calibration for different PET-nuclides had to be performed. Special attention was paid to the sampling system. The air intake had to be close to the breathing zone of the MTA. The hose to the monitor had to be as short as possible. The target of the work was to design a model for an industrial monitor. (orig.) [de

  3. Some analytical methods used by the Marcoule Centre for the control of radioactive effluents; Quelques methodes analytiques, utilisees sur le centre de Marcoule pour le controle radioactif des effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidhauer, J.; Messainguiral, L.; Drogue, N.; Meiranesio, A. M.

    1962-07-09

    After three years of operation, the authors propose a review of the various methods used to determine the radioactivity of wastewaters released by the Marcoule Centre Laboratory. They describe the three main steps of this control: firstly, measurements of the global alpha radioactivity and beta radioactivity (principle and measurement method), secondly, dosing of strontium 89 and strontium 90 (principle, used reactants, operation mode for nitric compound precipitation, ferric decontamination, separation of barium 140, oxalic precipitation, precipitate counting, exploitation of counting results), and thirdly, the possible dosing of other fission products present in the effluents: cerium 144, plutonium (by two different methods), natural uranium, caesium 137, zirconium 95, niobium 95, ruthenium 103 and 106, iodine 131. The principle, reactants, operational mode with different precipitations, measurement devices are indicated for each of these radio-elements.

  4. Radioactivity monitoring in Ireland of air, deposition and water 1982-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeira, S.; McRandall, M.; Hayden, E.; Cunningham, J.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Nuclear Energy Board in conjunction with the Meteorological Service undertakes an environmental radioactivity monitoring programme with the objective of determining levels of artificially produced radioactivity in the Irish environment. The levels of radioactivity in airbourne dust, total fallout samples, precipitation and drinking water are presented for 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986 and 1987

  5. An automated, self-verifying system for monitoring uranium in effluent streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reda, R.J.; Pickett, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    In nuclear facilities such as nuclear fuel fabrication plants, a constant vigil is required to ensure that the concentrations of uranium in process or waste streams do not exceed required specifications. The specifications may be dictated by the process owner, a regulatory agency such as the US Nuclear Regulatory Agency or Environmental Protection Agency, or by criticality safety engineering criteria. Traditionally, uranium monitoring in effluent streams has been accomplished by taking periodic samples of the liquid stream and determining the concentration by chemical analysis. Despite its accuracy, chemical sampling is not timely enough for practical use in continuously flowing systems because of the possibility that a significant quantity of uranium may be discharged between sampling intervals. To completely satisfy regulatory standards, the liquid waste stream must be monitored for uranium on a 100% basis. To this end, an automated, radioisotopic liquid-waste monitoring system was developed by GE Nuclear Energy as an integral part of the uranium conversion and waste recovery operations. The system utilizes passive gamma-ray spectroscopy and is thus a robust, on-line, and nondestructive assay for uranium. The system provides uranium concentration data for process monitoring and assures regulatory compliance for criticality safety. A summary of the principles of system operation, calibration, and verification is presented in this paper

  6. Environmental aspects of airbrone radioactive effluent from a coal-fired power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Miaofa; Fu Rongchu; Lu Zhizhao

    1987-01-01

    The authors determined the contents of natural uranium and thorium in coal and tunnel ash samples taken from a large coal-fired power station in the nearby area. The hourly climate data in 1980 are analysed and the atmospheric stability is cataloged by Pasquill-Turner method. Wind direction-atmospheric stability-wind velocity combined probabilities and rain-wind direction probabilities are calculated. The near ground air pollution concentrations, the ground depositions and the distributions of U and Th presented in airborne effluent (fly ash) within an area round the station with a radius of 60 km are also estimated. In the calculations, some factors such as wind velocity in the higher atmosphere, plume rise, still wind and decrease of air pollution concentration by the ground deposition (especially the wet deposition porduced by rain) have been considered. Some corrections necessary for the factors described above are also made. It is shown that the maximum annual average air pollution concentration (U max = 1.95 x 10 -7 mg.m -3 , Th max = 3.45 x 10 -7 mg.m -3 ) appears at the point 1 km away from the source in the fan SE. In the area round the station with a radius shorter than 10 km, the ground deposition is mainly by the wet deposition, but, where the radius longer than 10 km, the dry deposition must be taken into account

  7. Estimation of low level gross alpha activities in the radioactive effluent using liquid scintillation counting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhade, Sonali P.D.; Johnson, Bella E.; Singh, Sanjay; Babu, D.A.R.

    2012-01-01

    A technique has been developed for simultaneous measurement of gross alpha and gross beta activity concentration in low level liquid effluent samples in presence of higher activity concentrations of tritium. For this purpose, alpha beta discriminating Pulse Shape Analysis Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC) technique was used. Main advantages of this technique are easy sample preparation, rapid measurement and higher sensitivity. The calibration methodology for Quantulus1220 LSC based on PSA technique using 241 Am and 90 Sr/ 90 Y as alpha and beta standards respectively was described in detail. LSC technique was validated by measuring alpha and beta activity concentrations in test samples with known amount of 241 Am and 90 Sr/ 90 Y activities spiked in distilled water. The results obtained by LSC technique were compared with conventional planchet counting methods such as ZnS(Ag) and end window GM detectors. The gross alpha and gross beta activity concentrations in spiked samples, obtained by LSC technique were found to be within ±5% of the reference values. (author)

  8. Environmental pollution by radioactive effluents: present situation facing the 21 Century. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, Juan C.

    2005-01-01

    The awareness of the need to preserve the environment in the local, regional and international spheres has produced a large number of control and prevention rules that constitute the Environmental Law. The contamination of the sea has been the last field to be considered by the States. Since few years ago, marine pollution is appraised as an issue that affects all the States, taking account of its interdependency and the need to establish between governments a greater cooperation network. The radioactive contamination, i.e. the pollution produced by the discharge of radioactive wastes into the sea, is one of the types of contamination. Several discharge systems have been designed, so it is necessary to select in each case the most suitable one taking into account the type of wastes and other factors as the economy and the effectiveness of the method and the application of the radiation protection principles. International rules have evolved to solve different issues since the first United Nation Convention on the Law of the Sea in 1945 to the third Conference in 1982 that produced the United Nation Convention on the Law of the Sea and four Resolutions. The Convention and the Resolutions form an inseparable whole that show the evolution of the international cooperation in this field [es

  9. Environmental pollution by radioactive effluents: present situation facing the 21 Century. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, Juan C.

    2005-01-01

    The awareness of the need to preserve the environment in the local, regional and international spheres has produced a large number of control and prevention rules that constitute the Environmental Law. The contamination of the sea has been the last field to be considered by the States. Since few years ago, marine pollution is appraised as an issue that affects all the States, taking account of its interdependency and the need to establish between governments a greater cooperation network. The radioactive contamination, i.e. the pollution produced by the discharge of radioactive wastes into the sea, is one of the types of contamination. Several discharge systems have been designed, so it is necessary to select in each case the most suitable one taking into account the type of wastes and other factors as the economy and the effectiveness of the method and the application of the radiation protection principles. International rules have evolved to solve different issues since the first United Nation Convention on the Law of the Sea in 1945 to the third Conference in 1982 that produced the United Nation Convention on the Law of the Sea and four Resolutions. The Convention and the Resolutions form an inseparable whole that show the evolution of the international cooperation in this field [es

  10. Status of 2009 radioactivity monitoring in French Polynesia. Results of IRSN's monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Radiological monitoring of the French environment is one of IRSN's permanent tasks as part of public policy on nuclear safety and radiological protection. It is helping to guarantee the best possible protection of the population. Exercised in Polynesia since 1962, this monitoring, which takes place on seven islands (Tahiti, Maupiti, Hao, Rangiroa, Hiva Oa, Mangareva and Tubuai) representing the five archipelagoes, consists in regularly collecting samples of various kinds from the different environmental compartments (air, water, soil, food...) with which the population may be in contact. Regarding food, the samples analyzed are representative of the diet of Polynesians living in the five archipelagoes of that territory. They come from the marine environment of the open sea, from the marine lagoon environment and from the terrestrial environment. Almost all samples are measured at the IRSN Laboratory for the Environment Study and Monitoring, based in Vairao, Tahiti Island. The 239 samples collected in 2009 were measured by Hp-Ge low background gamma spectrometry in order to be able to characterize lowest possible radioactivity levels. The levels of activity of Pu isotopes have also been determined for 17 selected samples and tritium activities for 15 water samples. The results for the year 2009 are in the continuity of a regular reduction of the levels of radioactivity since the stop, in 1974, of the French atmospheric tests. This residual radioactivity relates to primarily the 137 Cs. In term of additional dose, this artificial and residual radioactivity is lower than 5 μSv.y -1 (5 micro Sieverts per year). This value corresponds to less than 0, 5 % of exposure due to natural radioactivity in Polynesia (approximately 1000 μSv.y -1 ). (authors)

  11. A database system for the control of radioactive effluents generated by the IPEN-CNEN/SP installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maduar, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    A PC-compatible database system has been developed in order to optimize the control of liquid and gaseous effluents generated by the installations of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The system implements source-term generation, optimizes the discharge control of the effluents and allows several ways for the retrieval of data concerning to the effluents. (author)

  12. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gwangju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Jeong Ju; Na, Jeong Yeun [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    The objectives of this project are to detect radiation abnormalities In its early stage, to survey the regional environmental radiation/radioactivity levels and me variations of the levels, to prepare the capability of managing the radiological emergencies, and finally to extabish the protective and defence systems against the radiological hazards for the general publics. This report presents the levels of the external gamma dose rates, the gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples, such as airborne dust, fallout, precipitation, and tap water, which were continuously monitored at the environmental research institute at CNU during 2001, and also the levels of the {gamma} - activities in food samples and drinking water which were measured to collect the basic data of the regional environmental radioactivity levels around the Kwangju city and Chonnam province. The levels of the {gamma} - and gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples didn't any significant abnormality during 2001 and were similar to the results obtained in the past 5 years. The {gamma} - activities in almost all food samples, except for a few samples, and drinking water samples were measured to be below the MDA values.

  13. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gwangju area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Jeong Ju; Na, Jeong Yeun

    2001-12-01

    The objectives of this project are to detect radiation abnormalities In its early stage, to survey the regional environmental radiation/radioactivity levels and me variations of the levels, to prepare the capability of managing the radiological emergencies, and finally to extabish the protective and defence systems against the radiological hazards for the general publics. This report presents the levels of the external gamma dose rates, the gross β - activities in the natural samples, such as airborne dust, fallout, precipitation, and tap water, which were continuously monitored at the environmental research institute at CNU during 2001, and also the levels of the γ - activities in food samples and drinking water which were measured to collect the basic data of the regional environmental radioactivity levels around the Kwangju city and Chonnam province. The levels of the γ - and gross β - activities in the natural samples didn't any significant abnormality during 2001 and were similar to the results obtained in the past 5 years. The γ - activities in almost all food samples, except for a few samples, and drinking water samples were measured to be below the MDA values

  14. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gwangju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Jeong Ju; Na, Jeong Yeun [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The objectives of this project are to detect radiation abnormalities in its early stage, to survey the regional environmental radiation/radioactivity levels and the variations of the levels, to prepare the capability of managing the radiological emergencies, and finally to extabish the protective and defence systems against the radiological hazards for the general publics. This report presents the levels of the external gamma dose rates, the gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples, such as airborne dust, fallout, precipitation, and tap water, which were continuously monitored at the environmental research institute at CNU in 2000, and also the levels of the {gamma} - activities in food samples and drinking water which were measured to collect the basic data of the regional environmental radioactivity levels around the Kwangju city and Chonnam province. The levels of the {gamma} - and gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples didn't any significant abnormality in 2000 and were similar to the results obtained in the past years. Also levels of the {gamma} - activities of Cs-137 in those samples were below the MDA values. The {gamma} - activities in almost all food samples, except for a few food samples, and drinking water samples were measured to be below the MDA values.

  15. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Gwangju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Jeong Ju; Na, Jeong Yeun [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The objectives of this project are to detect radiation abnormalities in its early stage, to survey the regional environmental radiation/radioactivity levels and the variations of the levels, to prepare the capability of managing the radiological emergencies, and finally to extabish the protective and defence systems against the radiological hazards for the general publics. This report presents the levels of the external gamma dose rates, the gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples, such as airborne dust, fallout, precipitation, and tap water, which were continuously monitored at the environmental research institute at CNU during 2003, and also the levels of the {gamma} - activities in food samples and drinking water which were measured to collect the basic data of the regional environmental radioactivity levels around the Gwangju city and Chonnam province. The levels of the {gamma} - and gross {beta} - activities in the natural samples didn't any significant abnormality during 2003 and were similar to the results obtained in the past 5 years. The {gamma} - activities in almost all food samples, except for a few samples, and drinking water samples were measured to be below the MDA values.

  16. Radioactivity monitoring of the Irish marine environment 1996 and 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, S.; Pollard, D.; Hayden, E.; Smith, V.; Fegan, M.; Ryan, T.P.; Dowdall, A.; Cunningham, J.D.

    1998-07-01

    This report presents the results of the marine radioactivity monitoring programme carried out be the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) during 1996 and 1997. The primary objective of the programme is to assess the exposure to the Irish population resulting from radioactive contamination of the Irish marine environment and to estimate the risks to health from this exposure. Discharges from the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield continue to be the principal source of this contamination. Approximately 300 samples of fish, shellfish, seaweed, seawater and sediment were collected each year. The samples were analysed for a range of contaminating radionuclides at the Institute's radioanalytical laboratory. The results show that the radionuclide of greatest dosimetric significance continues to be caesium-137. Since 1994 the commissioning and operation of new facilities at Sellafield have resulted in an increase in the discharges of technetium-99 to the Irish Sea. This has been reflected in an increase in the activity concentration of this radionuclide at all east coast sampling sites during the reporting period. The main pathway contributing to the exposure of the Irish public is the consumption of seafood. The committed effective dose to heavy consumers of seafood due to artificial radionuclides in 1996 was 1.6 μSv and in 1997 was 1.4 μSv. in 1996 was 1.6 μSv and in 1997 was 1.4 μSv

  17. Environmental monitoring of low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, E.Y.; Starmer, R.J.; Young, M.H.

    1989-12-01

    This branch technical position (BTP) paper on the environmental monitoring program for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility provides general guidance on what is required by Section 61.53 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) of applicants submitting a license application for such a facility. In general, the environmental monitoring program consists of three phases: preoperational, operational, and postoperational. Each phase of the monitoring program should be designed to fulfill the specific objectives defined in the BTP paper. During the preoperational phase, the objectives of the program are to provide site characterization information, to demonstrate site suitability and acceptability, to obtain background or baseline information, and to provide a record for public information. During the operational phase, the emphasis on measurement shifts. Monitoring data are obtained to provide early warning of releases and to document compliance with regulations, the dose limits of 10 CFR Part 61, or applicable standards of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Data are also used to update important pathway parameters to improve predictions of site performance and to provide a record of performance for public information. The postoperational environmental monitoring program emphasizes measurements to demonstrate compliance with the site-closure requirements and continued compliance with the performance objective in regard to the release of radionuclides to the environment. The data are used to support evaluation of long-term effects on the general public and for public information. Guidance is also provided in the BTP paper on the choice of which constituents to measure, setting action levels, relating measurements to appropriate actions in a corrective action plan, and quality assurance

  18. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Seoul area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jai Ki; Chung, Ok Sun; Kim, Hong Suk [Seoul Monitoring Station, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The following results were obtained through the environmental radiation monitoring in 2002 at the Seoul Monitoring Station: gamma exposure rate : 10.8 - 13.3 {mu}R/h, mean gross beta activity in airborne dust : 84.1 {+-} 46.2 mBq/m{sup 3}, mean gross beta activity in fallout dust : 11.9 {+-} 5.6 MBq/km{sup 2} - 30 days, meab gross beta activity in precipitation : 317 {+-} 465 mBq/L, mean gross beta activity in tap water : 71.2 {+-} 23.0 mBq/L. All the monitored variables remained in the corresponding normal ranges, which implies that there were no abnormal situations of environmental radiation in the Seoul-Gyunggi districts in 2002. Radioactivity contents in foodstuffs consumed in Seoul and Gyunggi districts were analyzed for use in assessment of population doses via dietary intakes. Samples include 16 foodstuffs (peanut, walnut, pine seeds, chessnut, acorn, sesame, perilla seeds, oak mushroom, meadow mushroom, velvet foot, oyster mushroom, instant coffee, green tea leaves, ginseng tea, rice and Chinese cabbage). Two indicator samples, pine needle and mug wort, were also included. Relatively higher concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, a man-made nuclide, were found in coffee and oak mushroom(0.554 and 0.480 Bq/kg, respectively). A few hundreds Bq/kg of {sup 40}K were found in most of the foodstuffs with higher concentrations in coffee and green tea leaves(786 and 574 Bq/kg, respectively)

  19. A radioactive aerosols in air monitoring system - 'ASIA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaish, I.; Levinson, S.; Pelled, O.; German, U.; Laichter, Y.; Gonen, E.; Wengrowicz, U.; Tirosh, D.; Barak, D.

    1997-01-01

    A continuous air monitoring system called 'ASIA' (Aerosols Sampler In Air) was developed at the NRCN for monitoring and measuring the concentration of airborne alpha emitting radionuclides such as Radon or natural Uranium. The 'ASIA' is a stationary multi-channel analyzer based system. The air passes through a 2.5 cm diameter filter and the radioactivity accumulated on it is monitored by a Silicon solid state detector. The sampling unit can be separated from the display and control unit to enable environment sampling close to the workers. The ASIA uses modern hardware and software in order to improve noise and background reduction and to allow friendly and flexible use. Remote communication is also available. The spectrum and additional data are displayed on line. The system was checked according to ANSI N42.17B -1989. The linearity and efficiency were evaluated by using various alpha sources. The Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) and Decision Limit (Lc) were calculated according to ANSI N13.30. Long time stability measurements were performed using a natural Uranium source. (authors)

  20. Method of monitoring volume activity of natural radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, V.

    1980-01-01

    The method of monitoring radioactivity of a aerosol trapped, eg., with a filter is based on counting quasi-coincidences of the RaC-RaC' and ThC-ThC' decay. The first electronic unit counts quasi-coincidences at a time interval proportional to the ThC' half-life while the second electronic unit counts quasi-coincidences at a time interval proportional to the RaC' half-life, reduced by the time interval of the first electronic unit. The quasi-coincidences are evaluated of the RaC-RaC' decay independently of the ThC-ThC' quasi-coincidences and the decay products of the trapped radon and thoron gases are thus offset separately. (J.P.)

  1. Data acquisition system and analysis programme for environmental radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaram, S.; Kannan, V.; Hegde, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In every Environmental Survey Laboratory (ESL) many nuclear radiation detecting instruments such as low level Gas Flow Beta Counting Systems, Gross Alpha Counting Systems, Gamma Counting Systems (Single Channel Analyser) are in use to detect the environmental radiation level. These instruments give output in terms of number (total pulse event counts), which is further manually converted into activity concentration per unit weight of the environmental samples. There is considerable difficulty and delay in obtaining the data, since calculations are done manually and also it is very difficult to maintain database of these results for future reference. In order to overcome all this difficulties a Data Acquisition System and Analysing Software Programme has been designed and developed. This paper describes the design and development of the Data Acquisition System using PCL-830 Counter Timer add on card, for networking the environmental radioactivity monitoring equipment's, which is under routine operation at ESL Kalpakkam

  2. Radioactivity monitoring of the Irish marine environment 1985-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.D.; O'Grady, J.; Rush, T.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of the monitoring programme for the two-year period from January 1985 to December 1986. Information on the radioactive contamination of the marine environment is obtained from the analysis of environmental samples taken at a number of locations along the coastline and various sampling stations in the western Irish Sea. These usually include samples of surface seawater, sediment, seaweed, fish and shellfish. Estimates are presented of the individual and collective doses received by the Irish public from the consumption of fish and shellfish during the period 1985-1986. These doses are assessed in terms of the system of dose limitation recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and embodied in the Basic Safety Standards Directive of the European Community

  3. Recent advances in nuclear techniques for environmental radioactivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Tripathi, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    The environmental radioactivity monitoring was first started in the late 1950s following the global fallout from testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. Nuclear analytical techniques are generally classified into two categories: destructive and non-destructive. Destructive techniques are carried out through several analytical methods such as α-spectrometry, liquid Scintillation counting system, solid state nuclear track detector, spectrophotometry, fluorimetry, atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), chromatography techniques, electro-analytical techniques etc. However, nondestructive methods include gamma spectrometry, X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry, neutron activation analysis (NAA) etc. The development of radiochemical methods and measurement techniques using alpha and gamma spectrometry have been described in brief

  4. The development of gate monitor for low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Morio; Watanabe, Michito; Kato, Tatsuo

    1994-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated from nuclear power plants in Japan, have been deposited in the yard of each power plant. At present, it is stored in about 500,000 drum cans (200l each). These drum cans are carried to Mutsu-ogawara Port by special transport ships and then transferred to Rokkasho LLW transport trucks (special vehicles) for storage. The gate monitor is used to automatically measure the dose rate on the vehicles loaded with transport vessels from a remote location, to ensure the safe transportation from Mutsu-ogawara Port the Burying Center. It is a new system which has been developed for effective measurement of dose rate on a number of transport vessels in a short time. This system is the first in the world for measuring dose rate on vehicles. Such a system cannot be found in any country of the world. (author)

  5. Environmental radioactivity in Canada 1988. Radiological monitoring annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The radiological surveillance program of the Department of National Health and Welfare is conducted for the purpose of determining levels of environmental radioactivity in Canada and assessing the resulting population exposures. Following major changes to the CAMECO Port Hope operations to reduce uranium emissions, a study was initiated to measure uranium levels in air in the community. Studies continued on lung cancer and domestic exposure to radon, and current levels of cesium-137 in caribou, a major source of food in northern communities. The movement of tritium on the Ottawa and St. Lawrence rivers was studied following an accidental release into the Ottawa River. Monitoring continued of fallout contamination from Chernobyl in imported foods. All measurements recorded during 1988 were below the limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. (14 refs., 14 figs., 15 tabs.).

  6. Radioactivity monitoring status in French Polynesia in 2008. Results from IRSN's monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Radiological monitoring of the French environment is one of IRSN's permanent tasks as part of public policy on nuclear safety and radiological protection. It is helping to guarantee the best possible protection of the population. The task addresses two objectives: - To monitor the levels of artificial radioactivity in all sectors of the environment and in major foodstuffs; - To estimate the exposure of the Polynesian population to this artificial radioactivity. The IRSN has monitored radioactivity levels in French Polynesia, excluding the Mururoa and Fangataufa nuclear experimentation centres, since 1962. This task is realized by the IRSN's Environmental Study and Monitoring Laboratory located in Tahiti (Vairao) This monitoring was instigated at the time when atmospheric nuclear weapons testing was being performed by the major powers (the United States, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, France and China), causing fallout of artificial radionuclides, over several years, on a planetary scale. In French Polynesia, the IRSN is most particularly interested in fallout resulting from the 41 tests carried out by France in this region of the globe between 1966 and 1974, and in its consequent effects on the population. Today, just as in metropolitan France, the IRSN carries out monitoring as part of its mission to constantly monitor radiological protection factors. The monitoring takes place on seven islands (Tahiti, Maupiti, Hao, Rangiroa, Hiva Oa, Mangareva and Tubuai) representing the five archipelagoes and consists of taking monthly samples of various kinds from the different environmental compartments (air, water, soil, food...) with which the population may be in contact. For more than 40 years, the IRSN takes part in the evaluation of the dosimetric consequences of these atmospheric depositions in French Polynesia. This laboratory is established in Tahiti. The ingestion component of this dosimetric evaluation requires to collect the most representative samples of

  7. Radioactive effluents and present and future radiation exposure to the population from nuclear facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.; Edelhauser, H.; Gans, I.; Wolter, R.

    1977-01-01

    As this time ten light water cooled nuclear power plants are operated outside of nuclear research centers in the Federal Republic of Germany. A review of the releases of radioactivity in gaseous and liquid effluents shows that increasing operational experience and improved technology combined with restrictive licensing policy and comprehensive control systems have resulted in decreasing release rates. Therefore radiation exposure to the population and critical groups calculated from these release rates on a local scale via different exposure pathways have been low until now. Predictions of future radiation exposure are based on the energy program of the Federal Republic of Germany up to 1985 and continuing forecasts for future energy demands, release rates of new reactor types and reprocessing plants being taken into account. In calculations of exposures to the population local models are combined with regional models superimposing contributions from sources in the Federal Republic and neighbouring countries and with a global multi-compartment model. If, with view to a continued development of the present state of science and technology in connection with major reprocessing plants, retention rates from 90-99% are assumed to be obtainable for H 3 and Kr 85, 99,5-99,9% for iodine and approximately 90% for C 14 from reprocessing plants, it can be demonstrated that also the future radiation exposure can be kept below the dose limits established in the Federal Republic of Germany

  8. National infrastructure for detecting, controlling and monitoring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS) has the direct responsibility to assure proper safety for handling, accounting for and controlling of nuclear materials and radioactive sources which based on a solid regulatory infrastructure , its elements contains the following items: preventing, responding, training, exchanging of information. Based on the National Law for AECS's Establishment no. 12/1976, a Ministerial Decree for Radiation Safety no. 6514 dated 8.12.1997, issued by the Prime Minister. This Decree authorizes the Syrian Atomic Energy Commission to regulate all kinds of radiation sources. It fulfills the basic requirements of radiation protection and enforce the rules and regulations. The Radiation and Nuclear Regulatory Office (RNRO) is responsible for preparing all the draft regulations. In 1999 the General Regulations for Radiation Protection was issued by the Director General of the AECS, under Decision no. 112/99 dated 3.2.1999. It is based on an IAEA publication, Safety Series no. 115 (1996), and adopted to meet the national requirements. Syria has nine Boarding Centers seeking to prevent unauthorized movement of nuclear material and radioactive sources in and out side the country. They are related to the Atomic Energy Commission (AECS), and are located at the main entrances of the country. Each is provided with the practical tools and equipment in order to assist Radiation Protection Officers (RPO) in fulfilling their commitments, by promoting greater transparency in legal transfers of radioactive materials and devices. They apply complete procedures for the safe import, export and transit of radioactive sources. The RPOs provide authorizations by issuing an entry approval document, after making sure that each concerned shipments has an authorized license from the Syrian Regulatory Body (RNRO) before permitting shipments to leave, arrive or transit across their territory, enabling law enforcement to track the legal movement of

  9. Concept and approaches used in assessing individual and collective doses from releases of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    To guide on the applications of the principles for limiting radioactive releases contained in Safety Series 77, the Agency is in the process of preparing a number of safety guides. The first one is this present document which deals with the principal aspects of the methods for the assessment of the individual and collective dose. It aims at giving a general guidance to those responsible for establishing programmes for the determination of individual doses as well as collective doses in connection with licensing a site for a nuclear installation. The document is concerned with the principles applied for calculating individual and collective doses from routine releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere and hydrosphere but not releases directly to the geosphere, as in waste management. These areas will be covered by other Agency publications. 75 refs, figs and tabs

  10. Annual report on radioactive discharges from Winfrith and monitoring the environment 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    The 1987 Annual Report on radioactive discharges from Winfrith Atomic Energy Establishment and monitoring of the environment is given. The report covers waste discharges to the sea and the earth atmosphere and the associated environmental monitoring. (UK)

  11. The application of land-based computerized spectrometers for effluent monitoring aboard nuclear powered ships. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamykowski, E.A.

    1975-12-01

    This report assesses the applicability of computer-based, Ge(Li) detector spectroscopy systems as effluent monitors aboard nuclear powered ships. A survey of the principal commercial spectrometers, in light of the expected shipboard use, indicates these systems may be employed for automatic radioisotope analysis in a seagoing environment if adequate protective measures are adopted

  12. A monitoring system of radioactive tracers in hydroponic solution for research on plant physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzui, N.; Kawachi, N.; Ishioka, N.; Fujimaki, S.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of nutrient uptake in plants has received considerable attention in the field of plant science. Here we describe the development of a new monitoring system of radioactive tracers in hydroponic solution, which enables the noninvasive measurement of radioactive tracer uptake by an intact plant. In addition, we incorporated a weighing instrument into this system in order to simultaneously monitor water uptake by the same plant. For an evaluation of this monitoring system, we conducted a tracer experiment with a rice plant and a positron-emitting radioactive tracer, and successfully obtained continuous data for the amounts of radioactive tracer and water taken up by the intact plant over 36 h. (authors)

  13. A monitoring system of radioactive tracers in hydroponic solution for research on plant physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzui, N.; Kawachi, N.; Ishioka, N.; Fujimaki, S. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yamaguchi, M. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    The mechanism of nutrient uptake in plants has received considerable attention in the field of plant science. Here we describe the development of a new monitoring system of radioactive tracers in hydroponic solution, which enables the noninvasive measurement of radioactive tracer uptake by an intact plant. In addition, we incorporated a weighing instrument into this system in order to simultaneously monitor water uptake by the same plant. For an evaluation of this monitoring system, we conducted a tracer experiment with a rice plant and a positron-emitting radioactive tracer, and successfully obtained continuous data for the amounts of radioactive tracer and water taken up by the intact plant over 36 h. (authors)

  14. New approach to airborne monitoring of radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschl, V.; Jurza, P.; Pavlik, B.

    1997-01-01

    The use of remote sensing methods in the monitoring of an environment is increasing. The best results are obtained when various types of exploration methods are available. This paper presents the use of airborne gamma ray methods, which can be included in a wide scope of works related to environmental problems. It may concern uranium mining areas, areas surrounding various nuclear facilities or areas of Chernobyl fallout. Gamma ray spectrometry data can be combined with airborne magnetic, surface gravity and satellite imagery data to obtain maximum information in data output. Airborne geophysics is able to detect and delineate radioactive contamination and to find important geological trends defining the geological structure of the monitored area. Our company PICODAS Prague Ltd. introduces new sophisticated airborne instrumentation as well as up-to-date data processing and data presentation techniques. In the Czech Cretaceous, a long term project, ''The Structurally-tectonic Survey of the South-West Foreland of the Straz Deposit'' has been undertaken, concerning the ecological load on the environment, especially the pollution of the underground water level horizons due to uranium mining in that area. The major interest is the complicated tectonic structure which interferes heavily with the hydrogeological situation of the region. The paper presents the results of airborne surveys and the interpretation of other geophysical data from the surroundings of Straz pod Ralskem and from Karlovy Vary. (author)

  15. Monitoring of persons with injuries with incorporated radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, A.G.; Tauhata, L.

    2017-01-01

    The monitoring of victims with injuries with incorporated radioactive material can be performed with portable detectors in initial evaluations, with unshielded measurements, collimation, often with the ignorance of the radionuclide, and also, in the posterior medical follow-up with whole-body detectors and HPGe, in measurements of body or urine activity in periodic measurements. Dosimetry in these situations is done using appropriate models, which surpass those of orthodox internal dosimetry, the biokinetic model described in the 2006 NCRP, such as the AIDE models, and the one developed by Deepesh for the 241 Am. Using tissue-equivalent material, measurements were made with portable detectors to obtain the values of the total attenuation coefficient for the 241 Am radiation and compared to the NIST tables. Measurements were also made with the fixed detectors for certification of the measurement procedure. The percentage deviations obtained in relation to the theoretical ones were: PRD (55%) and IdentiFINDER2 (72%). First-aid monitoring measurements may present great uncertainties and differences of accuracy, but are important data to guide the medical treatment of the victims of accidents

  16. Monitoring of radioactivity at the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundsen, I.; Lind, B.

    2002-01-01

    In the morning of August 12th 2000, a Russian submarine accident occurred in international waters east of Rybatschi Peninsula in the Barents Sea about 250 km from Norway. The submarine, a Russian Oscar class II attack submarine, sunk to 116 meters depth at the position 69 deg. 36,99N, 37 deg. 34,50E. The submarine 'Kursk' is 154 meters long, equipped with two pressurised water reactors and the submerged displacement is 24000 tons. Each reactor has a thermal effect or 190 megawatt, or less than 10% of a typical nuclear power plant reactor. The submarines in Oscar-II class is one of the largest and most capable in the Russian Northern Fleet. No indications of leakage from the submarine have so far been observed during the monitoring expeditions. Elevated levels of radioactivity have note been detected in any dose-rate readings or at any of the measurements of environmental samples taken close to Kursk. Furthermore, no increased levels were measured on bits and pieces from the submarine or from water sampled inside the submarine. A more comprehensive report covering experience and monitoring results from the two expeditions term and impact assessments of possible future releases from Kursk. (LN)

  17. Application of functionalized calixarenes to the processing of radioactive effluents by supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Clement

    1994-01-01

    In a first part, this research thesis presents the general context of nuclear waste processing (nature of wastes to be processed, characteristics of the used method and products), and proposes an overview of results obtained during previous campaigns which were based on the use of the technique of supported liquid membranes, but with other types of extracting components. The second part focuses on the tracking of complexing and extractive properties of all functionalized calixarenes which had been synthesised by different research teams. Several experiments have been performed to determine the extraction efficiency and selectivity of these organic compounds with respect to the studied radio-elements. The third part reports the detailed study of a specific family of functionalized calixarenes for which two thermodynamic models of membrane transport described in the literature have been applied. Validity limits are discussed with respect to operation conditions. Some results are finally given on the caesium and actinide (neptunium, plutonium) decontamination of synthetic concentrates which simulate actual radioactive wastes [fr

  18. Status of radioactivity monitoring in French Polynesia in 2012. Synthesis of IRSN's monitoring network results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouisset, P.; Bernagout, S.; Leclerc, G.; Rua, J.; Delabbaye, P.; De Vismes, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Exercised in Polynesia since 1962, the radiological monitoring of the French environment, which takes place on seven islands (Tahiti, Maupiti, Hao, Rangiroa, Hiva Oa, Mangareva and Tubuai) representing the five archipelagos, and consists of taking regular samples of various kinds from the different environmental compartments (air, water, soil, food...) with which the population may be in contact. Regarding food, the samples analyzed are representative of the diet of Polynesians living in the five archipelagos of that territory, and from the marine environment of the open sea, from the lagoon environment and from the terrestrial environment. Almost all the samples are measured at the Laboratory for the Study and Monitoring of the Environment (LESE) IRSN, based in Vairao on the island of Tahiti. During the year 2012, were stable and typical of the regular reduction of the levels of radioactivity since the stop, in 1974, of the French atmospheric tests. This residual radioactivity relates primarily to the 137 Cs. In term of additional dose, this artificial and residual radioactivity is lower than 5 μSv.y -1 (5 micro-sieverts per year). This value corresponds to less than 0,5 % of exposure due to natural radioactivity in Polynesia (approximately 1 000 μSv.y -1 ). Enhanced radiological monitoring of the environment set up in the wake of the Fukushima disaster, continued in 2012 in the marine field. The measurements carried out throughout the year confirm the lack of impact of the contamination of Japanese marine area in Polynesian waters. Samples of pelagic fish (tuna, swordfish, dolphin fish, wahoo...) were made in the vicinity of five Polynesian archipelagos: no increase of 137 Cs compared to previous years was observed and 134 Cs was never detected. (authors) [fr

  19. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Seoul area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jai Ki; Kim, Hong Suk [Seoul Monitoring Station, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The following results were obtained through the environmental radiation monitoring in 2003 at the Seoul monitoring station : gamma exposure rate : 10.8 - 13.3 {mu}R/h, mean gross beta activity in airborne dust : 4.31 {+-} 2.01 mBq/m{sup 3} (after 48 hours), mean gross beta activity in fallout dust : 11.5 {+-} 4.3 MBq/km{sup 2} - 30 days, meab gross beta activity in precipitation : 230 {+-} 246 mBq/L, mean gross beta activity in tap water : 69.3 {+-} 15.7 mBq/L. All the monitored variables remained in the corresponding normal ranges, which implies that there were no abnormal situations of environmental radiation in the Seoul district in 2003. Radioactivity contents in foodstuffs consumed in Seoul and northern part of Gyunggi district were analyzed for use in assessment of population doses via dietary intakes. Samples include 16 foodstuffs(peanut, walnut, pine seeds, chessnut, acorn, sesame, perilla seeds, oak mushroom, meadow mushroom, velvet foot, oyster mushroom, instant coffee, green tea leaves, ginseng tea, rice and Chinese cabbage). Two indicator samples, pine needle and mugwort, were also included. Relatively higher concentrations of {sup l37}Cs, a man-made nuclide, were found in coffee and oak mushroom(0.733 and 0.339 Bq/kg{center_dot}fresh, respectively). A few hundreds Bq/kg{center_dot}fresh of {sup 40}K were found in most of the foodstuffs with higher concentrations in coffee and green tea leaves (1300 and 579 Bq/kg{center_dot}fresh, respectively)

  20. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1992. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This Annual Report supplements the Company's Health and Safety Annual Report by providing more detailed information on radioactive discharges, monitoring of the environment and critical group doses. BNFL has published Annual Reports on Radioactive Discharges and Monitoring of the Environment, covering the period from 1977 to the present. For 1990 this report has been sub-divided into two complementary parts. Volume I includes annual data for each of the Company sites on radioactive discharges into the environment and the associated environmental monitoring programmes. Volume II reproduces the Certificates of Authorisation under which the Company operates and the statutory environmental monitoring programmes which relate to them. (author)

  1. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1990. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Annual Report supplements the Company's Health and Safety Annual Report by providing more detailed information on radioactive discharges, monitoring of the environment and critical group doses. BNFL has published Annual Reports on Radioactive Discharges and Monitoring of the Environment, covering the period from 1977 to the present. For 1990 this report has been sub-divided into two complementary parts. Volume I includes annual data for each of the Company sites on radioactive discharges into the environment and the associated environmental monitoring programmes. Volume II reproduces the Certificates of Authorisation under which the Company operates and the statutory environmental monitoring programmes which relate to them. (author)

  2. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1990. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Annual Report supplements the Company's Health and Safety Annual Report by providing more detailed information on radioactive discharges, monitoring of the environment and critical group doses. BNFL has published Annual Reports on Radioactive Discharges and Monitoring of the Environment, covering the period from 1977 to the present. For 1990 this report has been sub-divided into two complementary parts. Volume I includes annual data for each of the Company sites on radioactive discharges into the environment and the associated environmental monitoring programmes. Volume II reproduces the Certificates of Authorisation under which the Company operates and the statutory environmental monitoring programmes which relate to them. (author)

  3. Roshydromet system of environment radioactive contamination monitoring in the Arctic region of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelukanov, V.

    1995-01-01

    159 arctic hydrometerological stations take measurements of gamma radiation. 51 stations monitor the density of atmospheric radioactive fallout and 12 stations monitor the concentration of aerosols. 13 hydrological stations sited in the mouths of main Arctic Ocean rivers take water samples. Regional laboratories carry out isotop analysis of samples. Information on high levels of a radioactivity measured at the monitoring stations, as well as information on abnormal radioactivity from regional laboratories are transmitted to the Information Centers on the monitoring system (Moscow and Obnisk) by cable. 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Preliminary evaluation of the gaseous effluent sampling and monitoring systems at the 291-Z-1 and 296-Z-3 stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwendiman, L.C.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    The 291-Z-1 and 296-Z-3 stack effluent particulate sampling and monitoring systems are being evaluated for compliance with Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company's Interim Criteria for such systems. This evaluation is part of a study by Battelle-Northwest of gaseous effluent sampling systems in ARHCO facilities. This letter report presents a preliminary evaluation of the mentioned facilities and the indicated improvements needed to meet the Interim Criteria so that conceptual design work for improved systems can be initiated. There is currently underway a detailed study at the two stacks including a series of sampling experiments, the findings of which will not be included in this report. The gaseous effluent sampling system at the 291-Z-1 and 296-Z-3 stacks are very dissimilar and will be treated in separate sections of this report. The discussions for each sampling system will include a brief description and a preliminary evaluation of the systems

  5. 15. Experts' meeting on monitoring environmental radioactivity. Data - models - information. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The proceedings of the 15. Experts' meeting on monitoring environmental radioactivity include contributions o the following topics: environmental monitoring in Germany; developments in emergency protection and environmental monitoring; implementation of model and information systems; measuring programs during events and exercises; public information during local and global events; fast and (new) analytical methods; measures of the quality management systems; European and international environmental monitoring harmonization.

  6. Applicability of monitored natural attenuation at radioactively contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-01-15

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States with the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support a sustainable nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, including managing the legacy of past practices and accidents. Hence, the IAEA has initiated a comprehensive programme of work covering all aspects of environmental remediation including: - Technical and non-technical factors influencing decision making in environmental remediation; - Site characterization techniques and strategies; - Assessment of remediation technologies; - Assessment of technical options for cleanup of contaminated media; - Post-restoration compliance monitoring; - Assessment of the costs of remediation measures. It has been observed that many measures to remove or contain contamination are inefficient below certain concentrations, in general costly, and of a limited lifetime compared with the half-lives of the radionuclides concerned. Dispersed low level contamination poses a particular challenge to those charged with its remediation. Economic considerations in many Member States also result in constraints being placed on resources available to deal with such contamination. Experience has also shown that many techniques are not efficient below certain concentration thresholds or may entail impacts on certain environmental compartments in addition to those due to the contamination itself. This includes doses received by workers on the remediation project. As a result, the concept of relying on geological media to retain contaminants and/or to 'flatten out' concentration/dose peaks is increasingly being discussed in a remediation context. Technical Reports Series No. 424 (Remediation of Sites with Dispersed Radioactive Contamination) examined a variety of technological options for remediating dispersed contamination and concluded that the approaches can be broadly

  7. Applicability of monitored natural attenuation at radioactively contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States with the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support a sustainable nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, including managing the legacy of past practices and accidents. Hence, the IAEA has initiated a comprehensive programme of work covering all aspects of environmental remediation including: - Technical and non-technical factors influencing decision making in environmental remediation; - Site characterization techniques and strategies; - Assessment of remediation technologies; - Assessment of technical options for cleanup of contaminated media; - Post-restoration compliance monitoring; - Assessment of the costs of remediation measures. It has been observed that many measures to remove or contain contamination are inefficient below certain concentrations, in general costly, and of a limited lifetime compared with the half-lives of the radionuclides concerned. Dispersed low level contamination poses a particular challenge to those charged with its remediation. Economic considerations in many Member States also result in constraints being placed on resources available to deal with such contamination. Experience has also shown that many techniques are not efficient below certain concentration thresholds or may entail impacts on certain environmental compartments in addition to those due to the contamination itself. This includes doses received by workers on the remediation project. As a result, the concept of relying on geological media to retain contaminants and/or to 'flatten out' concentration/dose peaks is increasingly being discussed in a remediation context. Technical Reports Series No. 424 (Remediation of Sites with Dispersed Radioactive Contamination) examined a variety of technological options for remediating dispersed contamination and concluded that the approaches can be broadly

  8. Experience during the monitoring of inactive scrap for the detection of inadvertent presence of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Ranjit; Anoj Kumar; Vikas; Singh, Rajvir; Patra, R.P.; Vikas Kumar; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes about the experience gained during the radiation monitoring of inactive scrap generated at various nuclear facilities. This type surveillance is carried out to prevent the spread of radioactivity in public domain and also as requirement by regulatory authorities. The inspection and certification of scrap material from nuclear facilities is a regulatory requirement to ensure that no radioactive material reaches public domain. This paper describes the methodology and experience in detection of radioactivity at inactive Scrap monitoring facility. Inactive scraps (metallic and non metallic) generated from various nuclear facilities of BARC, Trombay is dispatched to Trombay Village Store (TVS) for temporary storage before auction to the public. The monitoring at the facility includes visual inspection and radiation measurement before loading the scrap in the truck. An online PC based monitoring system and portable monitoring instruments in the range (nSv/h-µSv/h) are used to carry out radiation monitoring of inactive scrap loaded in a vehicle. Radioactive source of high activity with potential for serious environmental hazard has not been detected, but few cases of presence of radioactive/contaminated material (MS plate/equipments with low level of 137 Cs contamination) have been detected and identified using portable gamma spectrometer. Implementation of strict regulatory measures and radiation monitoring at nuclear facilities can minimize the probability of radioactive material reaching the public domain. The methodology followed for monitoring of inactive scrap is found to be effective even for detection of presence of radioactivity in scrap if any. (author)

  9. Handbook of radioactivity measurements procedures. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    This report is concerned with the measurement of radioactivity in general, but specifically it deals with radioactive materials that have become available in the last three decades, from nuclear reactors and particle accelerators, for applications in medicine, scientific research, and industry. It is also concerned with low-level radioactivity measurements for the monitoring of radioactivity in environmental media, such as air and water, in connection with the control of radioactive effluents associated with the production of nuclear power or the use of radionuclides. Included in appendices are nuclear decay data for selected radionuclides and statistics of radioactive decay. An extensive bibliography is also included

  10. Real-time alpha monitoring of a radioactive liquid waste stream at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D.; Whitley, C.R.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This poster display concerns the development, installation, and testing of a real-time radioactive liquid waste monitor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The detector system was designed for the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility so that influent to the plant could be monitored in real time. By knowing the activity of the influent, plant operators can better monitor treatment, better segregate waste (potentially), and monitor the regulatory compliance of users of the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System. The detector system uses long-range alpha detection technology, which is a nonintrusive method of characterization that determines alpha activity on the liquid surface by measuring the ionization of ambient air. Extensive testing has been performed to ensure long-term use with a minimal amount of maintenance. The final design was a simple cost-effective alpha monitor that could be modified for monitoring influent waste streams at various points in the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System.

  11. Radioactive contamination in monitors received for calibration; Contaminacao em monitores de radiacao recebidos para calibracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Paulo S.; Santos, Gilvan C. dos; Brunelo, Maria Antonieta G.; Paula, Tiago C. de; Pires, Marina A.; Borges, Jose C. [MRA Comercio de Instrumentos Eletronicos Ltda., Jardinopolis, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ensaios e Pesquisas em Metrologia (METROBRAS)

    2013-10-01

    The Calibration Laboratory - LABCAL, from the Research Center for Metrology and Testing - METROBRAS, MRA Comercio de Instrumentos Eletronicos Ltda., began activities in October 2008 and, in August 2009, decided to establish a procedure for monitoring tests, external and internal, of all packages received from customers, containing instruments for calibration. The aim was to investigate possible contamination radioactive on these instruments. On July 2011, this procedure was extended to packagings of personal thermoluminescent dosemeters - TLD, received by the newly created Laboratory Laboratorio de Dosimetria Pessoal - LDP . In the monitoring procedure were used monitors with external probe, type pancake, MRA brand, models GP - 500 and MIR 7028. During the 37 months in which this investigation was conducted, were detected 42 cases of radioactive contamination, with the following characteristics: 1) just one case was personal dosimeter, TLD type; 2) just one case was not from a packing from nuclear medicine service - was from a mining company; 3) contamination occurred on packs and instruments, located and/or widespread; 4) contamination values ranged from slightly above the level of background radiation to about a thousand fold. Although METROBRAS has facilities for decontamination, in most cases, especially those of higher contamination, the procedure followed was to store the contaminated material in a room used for storage of radioactive sources. Periodically, each package and/or instrument was monitored, being released when the radiation level matched the background radiation. Every contamination detected, the client and/or owner of the instrument was informed. The Brazilian National Energy Commission - CNEN, was informed, during your public consultation for reviewing the standard for nuclear medicine services, held in mid-2012, having received from METROBRAS the statistical data available at the time. The high frequency of contamination detected and the high

  12. Monitoring for radioactive materials releasing to environment in M310 reformatived nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Zhenyu; Yang Guangli; Xu Guang

    2012-01-01

    Airborne radioactive materials of nuclear power plant (NPP) releases to the environment from the stack of NPP. Radioactive liquid waste releases of the ocean, the fluvial and the lake through the liquid waste letdyke of NPP. Further more, a few radioactive waste may be taken out of the NPP by vehicle or personnel. For the purpose of strict management and control above-mentioned waste, we use detect equipment monitoring radioactive waste of NPP. Management and control for the releasing of radioactive material to the environment in M310 reformatived NPP is strict and safety. (authors)

  13. Automated system for the safe management of the radioactive wastes and liquid effluents in a Radiopharmaceutical an labelled compounds production center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador B, Z.H.; Guerra V, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of Isotopes of the Republic of Cuba is a radioactive installation of first category that executes the administration of their radioactive waste under authorization of the National Regulatory Authority. The principles of the design and operation of the 'SADR' system for the safe administration of the radioactive waste and liquid effluents are presented. The Visual Basic 6 platform for the programming of the SADR is used and through of their schematic representation, the control flows and of data of the 7 modules that conform it are shown. For each module the functions are described and it presents an image of the corresponding interface. With the SADR its can be carried out the one registration and the upgrade of the inventory of radioactive waste, the planning of those disqualification operations, the annual consolidation of the volumes of waste generated and disqualified, the evaluation of specific and general indicators and the one tendencies analysis. The handling of the system through the intranet allows the enter of data from the operations place with the radioactive wastes. The results of the operation of the SADR show the utility of this work to elevate the efficiency of the administration of the radioactive wastes. (Author)

  14. Radioactivity monitoring of the Irish marine environment 1998 and 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, T.P.; Long, S.; Dowdall, A.; Hayden, E.; Smith, V.; Fegan, M.; Sequeira, S.; Pollard, D.; Cunningham, J.D.

    2000-09-01

    The safety of the food chain and the protection of the environment are prime concerns of the Irish public. This report presents the results of the marine radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) during 1998 and 1999. The primary objective of the programme is to assess the exposure of the Irish population resulting from radioactive contamination of the Irish marine environment and to estimate the risks to health from this exposure. Discharged radioactive waste from the British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield continues to be the dominant source of this contamination. In particular, the remobilisation from sediments of historic discharges makes an important contribution to the levels of radioactivity in the seawater of the western Irish Sea. Approximately 300 samples of fish, shellfish, seaweed, seawater and sediment were collected in 1998 and again in 1999. Both the Marine Institute and the Department of the Marine and Natural Resources assisted the Institute with this sampling. The samples were analysed for a range of contaminating radionuclides at the Institute's radio-analytical laboratory. The results show that the radionuclide of greatest dosimetric significance continues to be caesium-137. The activity concentration of this radionuclide in the Irish marine environment has remained relatively stable since the mid 1990s but at a lower level than that observed during the previous two decades. Along the Irish coastline the highest activity concentrations observed are in the north-east. Since 1994 the commissioning and operation of new facilities at Sellafield have resulted in an increase in the discharges of technetium-99 to the Irish Sea. This has been reflected in an increase in the activity concentrations of this radionuclide at all east coast sampling sites between 1994 and 1999. However, the low radiotoxicity of technetium-99 means that it is generally of lesser

  15. Radioactivity monitoring of the Irish marine environment 1998 and 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, T.; Long, S.; Dowdall, A.

    2000-09-01

    The safety of the food chain and the protection of the environment are prime concerns of the Irish public. This report presents the results of the marine radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) during 1998 and 1999. The primary objective of the programme is to assess the exposure of the Irish population resulting from radioactive contamination of the Irish marine environment and to estimate the risks to health from this exposure. Discharged radioactive waste from the British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield continues to be the dominant source of this contamination. In particular, the remobilization from sediments of historic discharges makes an important contribution to the levels of radioactivity in the seawater of the western Irish Sea. Approximately 300 samples of fish, shellfish, seaweed, seawater and sediment were collected in 1998 and again in 1999. Both the Marine Institute and the Department of the Marine and Natural Resources assisted the Institute with this sampling. The samples were analysed for a range of contaminating radionuclides at the Institute's radio-analytical laboratory. The results show that the radionuclide of greatest dosimetric significance continues to be caesium-137. The activity concentration of this radionuclide in the Irish marine environment has remained relatively stable since the mid 1990s but at a lower level than that observed during the previous two decades. Along the Irish coastline the highest activity concentrations observed are in the north-east. Since 1994 the commissioning and operation of new facilities at Sellafield have resulted in an increase in the discharges of technetium-99 to the Irish Sea. This has been reflected in an increase in the activity concentrations of this radionuclide at all east coast sampling sites between 1994 and 1999. However, the low radiotoxicity of technetium-99 means that it is generally of lesser

  16. Radioactive contamination of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl exposed to Hanford effluents: Annual summaries, 1945--1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanf, R.W.; Dirkes, R.L.; Duncan, J.P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) is to estimate the potential radiation doses received by people living within the sphere of influence of the Hanford Site. A potential critical pathway for human radiation exposure is through the consumption of waterfowl that frequent onsite waste-water ponds or through eating of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl that reside in/on the Columbia River and its tributaries downstream of the reactors. This document summarizes information on fish, shellfish, and waterfowl radiation contamination for samples collected by Hanford monitoring personnel and offsite agencies for the period 1945 to 1972. Specific information includes the types of organisms sampled, the kinds of tissues and organs analyzed, the sampling locations, and the radionuclides reported. Some tissue concentrations are also included. We anticipate that these yearly summaries will be helpful to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating aquatic pathway information for locations impacted by Hanford operations and will be useful for planning the direction of future HEDR studies.

  17. Radioactive contamination of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl exposed to Hanford effluents: Annual summaries, 1945--1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanf, R.W.; Dirkes, R.L.; Duncan, J.P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) is to estimate the potential radiation doses received by people living within the sphere of influence of the Hanford Site. A potential critical pathway for human radiation exposure is through the consumption of waterfowl that frequent onsite waste-water ponds or through eating of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl that reside in/on the Columbia River and its tributaries downstream of the reactors. This document summarizes information on fish, shellfish, and waterfowl radiation contamination for samples collected by Hanford monitoring personnel and offsite agencies for the period 1945 to 1972. Specific information includes the types of organisms sampled, the kinds of tissues and organs analyzed, the sampling locations, and the radionuclides reported. Some tissue concentrations are also included. We anticipate that these yearly summaries will be helpful to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating aquatic pathway information for locations impacted by Hanford operations and will be useful for planning the direction of future HEDR studies

  18. Experiences in monitoring airborne radioactive contamination in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezawa, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Yabe, A.

    1980-01-01

    The following results were obtained at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) from experience in air monitoring at the hot cells for handling highly radioactive materials, the glove box containing plutonium and the cell for producing 99 Mo. (1) The ratios of activities of airborne dust to those of whole dust were of the order of 10 -2 for the semi-volatile form of 125 Sb, and 10 -3 to 10 -4 for the particulate form of 137 Cs, 144 Ce and 144 Pr, when irradiated fuels were cut in the hot cells. (2) The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of airborne particle size distributions varied from O.4 to 15 μm with changing geometric standard deviation (sigmasub(g)) 1.7 to 7, depending on types of metallurgical treatment of fuels and on kinds of work in the cells. (3) A resuspension factor (the ratio of the concentration of airborne contamination to the surface contamination) was found to be 4x10 -8 to approximately 2x10 -7 cm -1 for plutonium oxide deposited on the floor surface. (4) The collection efficiency of the charcoal-loaded filter paper for airborne radioiodine, consisting of 60% inorganic and 40% organic iodide, was over 95% under conditions of relative humidity 40 to approximately 80% and face velocity 50 cm/sec, during the production of 99 Mo. (H.K.)

  19. Order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche; Arrete du 10 janvier 2003 autorisant l'Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs a poursuivre les rejets d'effluents gazeux et liquides pour l'exploitation du centre de stockage de dechets radioactifs de la Manche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This document, took out from the Official Journal, is the law text relative to the order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche. (A.L.B.)

  20. Experience during the monitoring of inactive scrap for the detection of inadvertent presence of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Ranjit; Kumar, Anoj; Vikas; Patra, R.P.; Kumar, Vikas; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    The inspection and certification of scrap material from nuclear facilities is a regulatory requirement to ensure that radioactive material will not reach public domain. Around the world, cases involving radioactive contamination of metallic components have occurred due to radioactive sources/contaminated metal scrap reaching the public domain. Radiological monitoring of inactive scrap material is essential as it may get into various usages in public domain where controls cannot be implemented. The method of detection is measurement of gamma dose rates due to any loose/fixed radioactive contamination in the scrap or presence of any radioactive material/source. In addition prevention of any inadvertent/malicious act leading to radioactive material reaching the public domain through scrap being essential, this monitoring gains further importance. This paper describes the methodology and experience in detection of presence of radioactivity at inactive Scrap monitoring facility. Even though radioactive sources of high strength with potential for serious environmental hazard have not been detected, few cases of contaminated material (MS plate/equipments etc with extremely low level of 137 Cs and Uranium contamination) have been detected and identified using portable gamma spectrometer. If proper monitoring is not carried out the dispersal of radioactivity to the environment can be a matter of concern due to metal scrap reaching recycling industry resulting in huge cost of decontamination and waste disposal. These events may also have negative impact on the export from the country resulting in economic losses. The impact of such events can be ruled out by effective scrap monitoring techniques which ensure that even small quantity of radioactivity escaping into public domain can be prevented. The methodology followed for monitoring of inactive scrap is found to be effective even for detection of presence of very low level of radioactivity

  1. 2011 report on radioactivity monitoring in French Polynesia. Summary of results from the IRSN monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouisset, P.; Bernagout, S.; Leclerc, G.; Rua, J.; Delabbaye, P.; Cagnat, X.; Jonhson, I.; Taputu, G.; Paeamara, H.; Tamarii, R.; Temarohirani, T.; Flores, T.

    2013-01-01

    Radiological monitoring of the French environment is one of IRSN's permanent tasks as part of public policy on nuclear safety and radiological protection. It helps to guarantee the best possible protection for the population. Carried out in Polynesia since 1962, this monitoring focuses on seven islands (Tahiti, Maupiti, Hao, Rangiroa, Hiva Oa, Mangareva and Tubuai) which are representative of the five archipelagoes. It consists in taking monthly samples of various kinds from the different environmental compartments (air, water, soil, food, etc.) with which the population may be in contact. Regarding food, the samples analyzed are representative of the diet of Polynesians living in the five archipelagoes of the region and are taken from the marine environment of the open sea, the lagoon environment and the terrestrial environment. Almost all samples are measured at the IRSN Laboratory for the Study and Monitoring of the Environment, based in Vairao on the island of Tahiti, plus a few samples at the IRSN Orsay Laboratory. The year 2011 was marked by the Fukushima nuclear accident, which occurred on March 11. Within this context, IRSN stepped up its monitoring activities in French Polynesia and was able to confirm the absence of radiological impact in New Caledonia and Polynesia. As the results of these analyses were published in the previous annual report (report DEI/SESURE 2011-40), this report does not include all the data and results relating to the accident, but provides a summary for the year 2011. As in recent years, levels of radioactivity, which fell steadily as of 1974 when French atmospheric nuclear weapons testing came to an end, were stable and very low in 2011. The residual radioactivity is mainly due to 137 Cs. In terms of additional dose, this artificial and residual radioactivity is lower than 5 μSv.yr -1 (5 micro-sieverts per year). This corresponds to less than 0.5% of exposure due to natural radioactivity in Polynesia (approximately 1000

  2. Processing radioactive effluents with ion-exchanging resins: study of result extrapolation; Traitement des effluents radioactifs par resines echangeuses d'ions: etude de l'extrapolation des resultats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wormser, G.

    1960-05-03

    As a previous study showed the ion-exchanging resins could be used in Saclay for the treatment of radioactive effluents, the author reports a study which aimed at investigating to which extent thus obtained results could be extrapolated to the case of higher industrial columns. The author reports experiments which aimed at determining extrapolation modes which could be used for columns of organic resin used for radioactive effluent decontamination. He notably studied whether the Hiester and Vermeulen extrapolation law could be applied. Experiments are performed at constant percolation flow rate, at varying flow rate, and at constant flow rate [French] Plusieurs etudes ont ete faites dans le but d'examiner les possibilites d'emploi des resines echangeuses d'ions pour le traitement des effluents radioactifs. Dans un rapport preliminaire, nous avons montre dans quelles limites un tel procede pouvait etre utilise au Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay. Les essais ont ete effectues sur des petites colonnes de resine au laboratoire; il est apparu ensuite necessaire de prevoir dans quelle mesure les resultats ainsi obtenus peuvent etre extrapoles a des colonnes industrielles, de plus grande hauteur. Les experiences dont les resultats sont exposes dans ce rapport, ont pour but de determiner les modes d'extrapolation qui pourraient etre employes pour des colonnes de resine organique utilisees pour la decontamination d'effluents radioactifs. Nous avons en particulier recherche si la loi d'extrapolation de Hiester et Vermeulen qui donne de bons resultats dans le cas de fixation d'ions radioactifs en presence d'un ion macrocomposant sur des terres, pouvait etre appliquee. Les experiences, en nombre limite, ont montre que la loi d'extrapolation de Hiester et Vermeulen pouvait s'appliquer dans le cas de l'effluent considere quand les debits de percolation sont tres faibles; quand ils sont plus forts, les volumes de liquide percoles, a fixation egale, sont proportionnels aux

  3. Radiological safety system based on real-time tritium-in-air monitoring indoor and in effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidica, Nicolae; Sofalca, Nicolae; Balteanu, Ovidiu-Ioan; Stefan, Ioana-Iuliana

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe an improved real-time tritium monitoring system designed for Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant of National Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopes Separation, Rm. Valcea, Romania. The system consists of three fixed tritium-in-air monitors which measure continuously tritium-in-air concentration (in both species: vapour and gas) in working areas and gaseous effluents. Portable tritium monitors with ionization chamber, and tritium-in-air collector combined with liquid scintillation counter method are also used to supplement fixed instrument measurements. The main functions of tritium monitoring system are: to measure tritium-in air concentration in working areas and gaseous effluents; to alarm the personnel if tritium concentration thresholds are exceeded; to integrate tritium activity released to the environment during a week and to cut off normal ventilation when the activity threshold is exceeded and start the air cleaning system. Now, several especial functions have been added, so that by using appropriate conversion factors, the tritium monitoring system is able to estimate the effective dose rate before starting an activity into the monitored area, during this activity, or soon as the activity was finished. Another new function has been added by coupling tritium-in-air monitoring system with control access system. This is very useful for quick estimation of tritium doses. For routine dosimetric survey, one the internal dose for individuals by measuring tritium in urine is estimated. With all these features our tritium monitoring system is really a safety system for personnel and for environment. (authors)

  4. Radioactivity monitoring of the Irish marine environment 2000 and 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, T.P.; McMahon, C.A.; Dowdall, A.

    2003-04-01

    This report presents the results of the marine radioactivity monitoring programme carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) during 2000 and 2001. The primary objective of the programme is to assess the exposure of the Irish population resulting from radioactive contamination of the Irish marine environment and to estimate the risks to health from this exposure. Discharged radioactive waste from the British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria in the North West of England continues to be the dominant source of this contamination. In particular, the remobilisation from sediments of historic discharges makes an important contribution to the levels of radioactivity in the seawater of the western Irish Sea. Approximately 300 samples of fish, shellfish, seaweed, seawater and sediment were collected in 2000 and again in 2001. Both the Marine Institute and the Department of Communications, Marine and Natural Resources assisted the Institute with this sampling. The samples were analysed for a range of radionuclides at the Institute's radio-analytical laboratory. The results show that the artificial radionuclide of greatest dosimetric significance continues to be caesium-137. The activity concentration of this radionuclide in the Irish marine environment has remained relatively stable since the mid 1990s but at a lower level than that observed during the previous two decades. Along the Irish coastline the highest activity concentrations observed are in the north-east. Since 1994 the commissioning and operation of new facilities at Sellafield have resulted in an increase in the discharges of technetium-99 to the Irish Sea. This has been reflected in an increase in the activity concentrations of this radionuclide at all east coast sampling sites. However, the low radiotoxicity of technetium-99 means that it is generally of lesser radiological significance than caesium-137. The main pathway contributing to the

  5. Environmental monitoring report, Sandia Laboratories 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, W.L.; Simmons, T.N.

    1976-04-01

    Water and vegetation are monitored to determine Sandia Laboratories impact on the surrounding environment. Nonradioactive pollutants released are reported. Radioactive effluents are also reported and their person-rem contribution to the population is calculated

  6. A radioactive waste transportation package monitoring system for normal transport and accident emergency response conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.S.; Cashwell, J.W.; Apple, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses spent fuel and high level waste transportation history and prospects, discusses accident histories of radioactive material transport, discusses emergency responder needs and provides a general description of the Transportation Intelligent Monitoring System (TRANSIMS) design. The key objectives of the monitoring system are twofold: (1) to facilitate effective emergency response to accidents involving a radioactive waste transportation package, while minimizing risk to the public and emergency first-response personnel, and (2) to allow remote monitoring of transportation vehicle and payload conditions to enable research into radioactive material transportation for normal and accident conditions. (J.P.N.)

  7. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1991. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Annual Report supplements and updates British Nuclear Fuel plc's Health and Safety and the Environment Annual Report by providing more detailed information on radioactive discharges, monitoring of the environment and critical groups doses. BNFL has published Annual Reports on Radioactive Discharges and Monitoring of the Environment since 1977. This year the report is again sub-divided into two complementary volumes. Volume I includes, for each of the Company's sites, annual data on radioactive discharges into the environment and the associated environmental monitoring programmes. Critical groups doses for each site are presented in summary tables at the beginning of each chapter. (author)

  8. Environmental radioactive monitoring, evaluation and protection in luminous workshops of a factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Hanbin; Xiang Ming; Tan Jianzu

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent technique is often used to display instrumental indicator in the dark environment. Luminous workshops of a factory smear and depict the glassware by means of fluorescent power with adulterated radioactive matter. Because of adulterated radioactive matters such as 226 Ra, 40 K emit alpha-ray,beta-ray and gamma-ray, while they decay spontaneously, and high dose or cumulative radiation can damage human body in different degrees. Therefore, any radioactive damage to human body caused by over-safety dose should be prevented strictly during the working. To ensure health and safety of working staff in luminous workshop and the public, it is necessary to regularly have radioactive monitoring and evaluation to luminous workshop and its surrounding environment. Through the environment radioactive monitoring, the authors analyze its environmental radioactive level,and try to find out the possible problems so as to propose some protective measures for personal health. (authors)

  9. Design and development of food radioactivity contamination monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Vaijapurkar, S.G.; Bohra, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Radioactivity has been part and parcel of living being since the existence of the earth. It is available everywhere in our environment and being responsible for evolution of life on earth at some extent. However, the radioactivity in excess of the natural radioactive can have harmful effects on living being. The radiation exposure can be of external or internal origin or of both. The main route of internal radiation exposure is through the contaminated food chains. The concentration of natural radioactivity in food varies in range of 40-600 Bq/kg. 40 K being the single major radionuclide of food with typical radioactivity; 50 Bq/kg in milk, 420 Bq/kg in milk powder, 165 Bq/kg in potatoes, and 125 Bq/kg in beef is also the main contributor of natural radiation doses to human being. Measurement of radioactivity in food items and drinks is thus very important in controlling the internal exposure to human being especially in case of nuclear disaster. Though, the methods and techniques for food radioactivity measurement already existing, the need of portable instrument is warranted to measure the radioactivity in food items in raw form. Measurement of radioactivity may help in quick and mass screening of food items in case of nuclear emergencies. Any enhanced level of radioactivity in food items especially in case of nuclear emergency need to be evaluated for controlling its spread and restriction of consumption by the public. This way, it may help in managing internal radioactivity contamination to human being

  10. Natural radioactivity monitoring in selected areas of the planet Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobst, L.

    2015-01-01

    Mankind lives with the natural radioactivity throughout its development. The effects of radiation may affect to some extent the evolutionary development of life on the Earth. It is therefore important to find out what values can achieve this natural radioactivity at different places of the world. In this presentation some results of dose rate measurement during transcontinental flyers are discussed.

  11. Design, development and calibration of a radioactive gas (85Kr) detector for continuous environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janardhanan, S.; Swaminathan, N.; John, Jacob; Kutty, K.N.; Wattamwar, S.B.; Gopalan, C.S.; Menezes, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    Design, development and calibration of a scintillation type detector for environmental monitoring of low levels of 85 Kr activity in off-line effluents or plant areas in presence of gamma background are reported. Calibration of the system was done using NBS 85 Kr standard. (author)

  12. Design, development and calibration of a radioactive gas (/sup 85/Kr) detector for continuous environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardhanan, S.; Swaminathan, N.; John, J.; Kutty, K.N.; Wattamwar, S.B. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Health Physics Div.); Gopalan, C.S.; Menezes, C.M. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Electronics Div.)

    Design, development and calibration of a scintillation type detector for environmental monitoring of low levels of /sup 85/Kr activity in off-line effluents or plant areas in presence of gamma background are reported. Calibration of the system was done using NBS /sup 85/Kr standard.

  13. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 5. Assessment of the radiological impact to the public resulting from discharges of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centner, B.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the assessment of the radiological impact to the public resulting from discharges of radioactive effluents (liquid and gaseous) in connection with the implementation of the Belgian scenario for the management of PWR waste. Both individual and collective doses have been estimated for a critical group of the population living around the nuclear power plants concerned. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management wastes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  14. Methods of surveying and monitoring marine radioactivity. Report of an ad hoc panel of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    An effective control of the radioactive pollution of the sea depends partly on the availability of adequate technical methods for surveying and monitoring the sea and marine products with regard to the presence of radioactive substances. The purpose of this manual is to offer such methods.

  15. Storage of radioactive material - accidents - precipitation - personnel monitoring; Stokiranje radioaktivnih materijala - akcidenti - padavine - kontrola osoblja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matijasic, A; Gacinovic, O [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Radioloska zastita, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    This volume covers the reports on four routine tasks concerned with safe handling of radioactive material and influence of nuclear facilities on the environment. The tasks performed were as follows: Storage of solid and liquid radioactive material; actions in case of accidents; radiation monitoring of the fallout, water and ground; personnel dosimetry.

  16. High-resolution Mass Spectrometry of Skin Mucus for Monitoring Physiological Impacts in Fish Exposed to Wastewater Effluent at a Great Lakes AOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-resolution mass spectrometry is advantageous for monitoring physiological impacts and contaminant biotransformation products in fish exposed to complex wastewater effluent. We evaluated this technique using skin mucus from male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales promela...

  17. High‐resolution mass spectrometry of skin mucus for monitoring physiological impacts and contaminant biotransformation products in fathead minnows exposed to wastewater effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    High‐resolution mass spectrometry is advantageous for monitoring physiological impacts and contaminant biotransformation products in fish exposed to complex wastewater effluent. We evaluated this technique using skin mucus from male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales pr...

  18. Comparison of monitoring technologies for CO2 storage and radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jihun; Koh, Yongkwon; Choi, Jongwon; Lee, Jongyoul

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring techniques used in radioactive waste disposal have fundamentals of geology, hydrogeology, geochemistry etc, which could be applied to CO 2 sequestration. Large and diverse tools are available to monitoring methods for radioactive waste and CO 2 storage. They have fundamentals on geophysical and geochemical principles. Many techniques are well established while others are both novel and at an early stage of development. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective and acceptable method for radioactive waste disposal and CO 2 storage. In study, we discuss the monitoring techniques and the role of these techniques in providing insight in the risks of radioactive waste disposal and CO 2 sequestration

  19. Monitoring of radioactivity in the UK environment: an annotated bibliography of current programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotter, A.J.R.; Hunt, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the UK, many organisations carry out regular radioactivity monitoring programmes, and summaries of these programmes have been published in 1983 and 1988. The number of organisations carrying out radioactivity monitoring has increased rapidly in recent years, particularly in the local authority sector. The present report updates the previous summarises in the form of an annotated bibliography, giving synopses of all regular UK programmes whose results are published in report form. (author)

  20. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment, 1996. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL)'s 1996 report on radioactive discharges from its various sites and monitoring of the surrounding environments are described. For each of the Sellafield, Drigg, Chapelcross, Springfields and Capenhurst sites, details are given on normal operations, radioactive discharges in gaseous, liquid or solid forms, environmental monitoring routines and collective dose and critical group estimates. The second, linked, volume of this report covers certificates of authorisation issued to the company. (UK)

  1. Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Treated non-hazardous and non-radioactive liquid wastes are collected and then disposed of through the systems at the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). More...

  2. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1993. V. 2: Certificates of authorisation and environmental monitoring programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels plc's Certificates of Authorisation, under which it operates, are reproduced in the second volume of the 1993 Annual Report on Radioactive Discharges and Monitoring of the Environment. The report also includes environmental monitoring programmes relating to discharge authorisation for each of the Sellafield, Drigg, Chapelcross, Springfields and Capenhurst sites. (UK)

  3. Development of plastic scintillator based food radioactivity contamination monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parihar, A.; Sahani, R.M.; Mahala, V.K.; Vaijapurkar, S.G.

    2016-01-01

    Radioactivity is naturally present in soil, water and food stuffs. Food can be contaminated after discharge of radioactivity into the environment from industries that concentrate natural radionuclide and from civil or military nuclear operations. The contamination can be in three ways; by direct deposition, through the food chain and induced radioactivity due to exposure of high neutron flux. The health effects on human depend on the type of radionuclide and the length of time people are exposed to it. The studies of fission product behaviour in the food chain have revealed radionuclide Strontium-90, Caesium 137 and Iodine-131 are of major concern. Plastic scintillator is already developed indigenously at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur. Efforts has been made to develop a portable field instrument using plastic scintillator for assessment of beta ( 90 Sr) and gamma ( 137 Cs and 131 I) radioactivity in food

  4. Monitoring and assessment of radiation exposure from routine radioactive discharges, and its relevance to the question of disease clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Over the period of more than 30 years in which nuclear facilities have been operating, monitoring of the environment around such facilities has produced a wealth of information about the levels of radioactivity in the environment and about how radioactivity, introduced into the environment from effluent discharges, behaves in natural systems. Techniques for estimating radiation exposure to people from environmental measurements, or from theoretical models relating discharges to radiation exposure, have also been developed and validated where possible. The existence of localised excesses of leukaemia near the reprocessing plants at Sellafield and Dounreay, which cannot be explained on the basis of radiation exposure using these established methodologies, could be taken to imply that the methodologies are defective. However the radiation risk estimates have been shown to be robust to many of the suggested deficiencies and there are other, more qualitative, indications that discharges may not be a causative factor. It is argued that a broader search for possible causative factors may be more productive in resolving the conundrum. (author)

  5. Monitoring of radioactivity in drinking water; Control de la radiactividad en las aguas de consumo humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M.; Letessier, P.

    2008-07-01

    Radioactivity is a physical phenomenon whose presence in water is monitored due to its potential capability to induce deleterious effects on human health. In this article the effects that can be caused by radioactivity as well as the way in which regulations establish how to perform a monitorization of water that enables us to ascertain that the radiological quality of water is in agreement with the accepted standard of quality of life are analyzed. Finally the means available to know the content of radioactivity in water together with some clues on how to remove it from water are described. (Author) 5 refs.

  6. Evaluation of environmental radioactivity monitoring data around the Kartini Reactor area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazid, M; Sutrisno; Sukarman-Aminjoyo; Zaenal-Abidin

    1996-01-01

    Evaluation of environmental radioactivity monitoring data around the Kartini Reactor area has been done. The aim of this investigation is for tracing the possibility of radioactivity released in the environment during the operation of Kartini reactor. The data was evaluated were monthly monitored data taken from 1986 to 1994 period. The method of analysis was done by comparing the environmental radioactivity data before and after reactor commissioning, off side the reactor up to a radius of 5.000 meters and more than 5.000 meters from Kartini reactor and also compared to the maximum permissible radioactivity according to the current regulation. This evaluation showed that there was no indication of radioactivity release to the environment during this period of reactor operation

  7. Clinical Validation of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Imipenem in Spent Effluent in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Aiping; Li, Zhe; Yu, Junxian; Li, Ren; Cheng, Sheng; Duan, Meili; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this pilot study was to investigate whether the therapeutic drug monitoring of imipenem could be performed with spent effluent instead of blood sampling collected from critically ill patients under continuous renal replacement therapy. A prospective open-label study was conducted in a real clinical setting. Both blood and effluent samples were collected pairwise before imipenem administration and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 h after imipenem administration. Plasma and effluent imipenem concentrations were determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of blood and effluent samples were calculated. Eighty-three paired plasma and effluent samples were obtained from 10 patients. The Pearson correlation coefficient of the imipenem concentrations in plasma and effluent was 0.950 (Pimipenem concentration ratio was 1.044 (95% confidence interval, 0.975 to 1.114) with Bland-Altman analysis. No statistically significant difference was found in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters tested in paired plasma and effluent samples with Wilcoxon test. Spent effluent of continuous renal replacement therapy could be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of imipenem instead of blood sampling in critically ill patients.

  8. Implementation vigenere algorithm using microcontroller for sending SMS in monitoring radioactive substances transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adi Abimanyu; Nurhidayat; Jumari

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of safety and security of radioactive substances from the sender to the receiver is to be secured for not to harm humans. In general, monitoring the transport of radioactive materials is done by communication with a telephone conversation to determine the location and rate of exposure radioactive substances. From the aspect of safety, communication through telephone conversations easily interpreted by others, in addition the possibility of human-error is quite high. SMS service is known for its ease in terms of use so that SMS can be used as a substitute for communication through telephone conversations to monitor the rate of radiation exposure and the position of radioactive substances in the transport of radioactive substances. The system monitors the transport of radioactive materials developed by implement vigenere algorithms using a microcontroller for sending SMS (Short Message Service) to communicate. Tests was conducted to testing encryption and description and computation time required. From the test results obtained they have been successfully implemented vigenere algorithm to encrypt and decrypt the messages on the transport of radioactive monitoring system and the computational time required to encrypt and decrypt the data is 13.05 ms for 36 characters and 13.61 for 37 characters. So for every single character require computing time 0.56 ms. (author)

  9. Tritium monitoring in groundwater and evaluation of model predictions for the Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R.; Freshley, M.D.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1997-08-01

    The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) disposal site, also known as the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS), receives treated effluent containing tritium, which is allowed to infiltrate through the soil column to the water table. Tritium was first detected in groundwater monitoring wells around the facility in July 1996. The SALDS groundwater monitoring plan requires revision of a predictive groundwater model and reevaluation of the monitoring well network one year from the first detection of tritium in groundwater. This document is written primarily to satisfy these requirements and to report on analytical results for tritium in the SALDS groundwater monitoring network through April 1997. The document also recommends an approach to continued groundwater monitoring for tritium at the SALDS. Comparison of numerical groundwater models applied over the last several years indicate that earlier predictions, which show tritium from the SALDS approaching the Columbia River, were too simplified or overly robust in source assumptions. The most recent modeling indicates that concentrations of tritium above 500 pCi/L will extend, at most, no further than ∼1.5 km from the facility, using the most reasonable projections of ETF operation. This extent encompasses only the wells in the current SALDS tritium-tracking network

  10. Europe-wide survey of estrogenicity in wastewater treatment plant effluents: the need for the effect-based monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarošová, Barbora; Erseková, Anita; Hilscherová, Klára; Loos, Robert; Gawlik, Bernd M; Giesy, John P; Bláha, Ludek

    2014-09-01

    A pan-European monitoring campaign of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents was conducted to obtain a concise picture on a broad range of pollutants including estrogenic compounds. Snapshot samples from 75 WWTP effluents were collected and analysed for concentrations of 150 polar organic and 20 inorganic compounds as well as estrogenicity using the MVLN reporter gene assay. The effect-based assessment determined estrogenicity in 27 of 75 samples tested with the concentrations ranging from 0.53 to 17.9 ng/L of 17-beta-estradiol equivalents (EEQ). Approximately one third of municipal WWTP effluents contained EEQ greater than 0.5 ng/L EEQ, which confirmed the importance of cities as the major contamination source. Beside municipal WWTPs, some treated industrial wastewaters also exhibited detectable EEQ, indicating the importance to investigate phytoestrogens released from plant processing factories. No steroid estrogens were detected in any of the samples by instrumental methods above their limits of quantification of 10 ng/L, and none of the other analysed classes of chemicals showed correlation with detected EEQs. The study demonstrates the need of effect-based monitoring to assess certain classes of contaminants such as estrogens, which are known to occur at low concentrations being of serious toxicological concern for aquatic biota.

  11. Evaluation of indigenously developed plastic scintillator sheet detector for surface radioactive contamination monitoring application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahani, R.M.; Chaudhary, H.S.; Mahala, V.K.; Senwar, K.R.; Meena, J.P.

    2018-01-01

    Radioactive contamination may be caused by release of radioactivity in the environment due to accident at nuclear plant/reactor or spillage of loose radioactive materials in a laboratory. The protection of workers from potentially hazardous radiations emitted by the contaminants is a matter of prime concern. The detection of such radiations requires a monitoring system capable of measuring the level of radioactivity at the contaminated site. Plastic scintillators are widely used for large area radiation monitoring due to the ease of preparation in different shape and sizes. These detectors are sensitive to beta and gamma radiation therefore can be used for monitoring of beta and gamma contamination. In this paper, performance results of indigenously developed plastic scintillator sheet of area 800 cm 2 are reported

  12. 30 years of monitoring environmental radioactivity in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The individual sections of the report describe the development of monitoring functions and of the contamination of the atmosphere and the biosphere by radioactive substances. After environmental radioactivity due to the fallout of nuclear explosions reached a peak level in 1963, its contribution to radiation exposure today is insignificant in comparison with natural radioactivity. Moreover, monitoring by authorities of the emissions and the environmental impact of nuclear installations has been extended during the past 20 years in such a way that the existing network of measuring stations takes full account of the increased number of nuclear installations. The monitoring results show that nuclear installations do not make any considerable contribution to environmental radioactivity. (orig./PW) [de

  13. Monitoring of radioactivity in foodstuffs: experience gained and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamoon, A.M.; Abdulfattah, A.F.; Abulfaraj, W.H.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Al-Johani, M.; Abubakar, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Chernobyl reactor accident released large amounts of radioactivity that was carried by winds across international boundaries. Soils and surface waters as well as vegetation and grazing animals in neighbouring countries to the Soviet Union were subject to radioactive contamination in various degrees. Saudi Arabia imports much of its foodstuffs from European countries and about 75% of the imported foodstuffs come through western ports of the country. Hence the Government of Saudi Arabia took appropriate measures to ensure safety of imported foodstuffs. King Abdulaziz University (KAU) was directed by the government at about mid-June 1986, to carry out radioactivity inspections of food items reaching Jeddah, Yanbu and Jizan seaports as well as food arrivals at King Abdulaziz International Airport at Jeddah. Parallel responsibilities were assigned to other universities and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, for radioactivity inspections of imported foodstuffs reaching ports or inlets in their respective areas. In applying the measures and controls enacted by the government against importation of radioactively contaminated foodstuffs, much management experience was acquired and some of it is rather unique to Saudi Arabia

  14. Terrestrial radioactivity monitoring programme (TRAMP) report for 1994. Radioactivity in food and agricultural products in England and Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries monitoring programmes for radioactivity in the terrestrial environment of the United Kingdom during 1994 are described. The results of the analyses performed with a commentary are presented. Two complimentary programmes, TRAMP and FARM, are used to ensure that radiation doses received by the public from the consumption of foodstuffs are controlled ion accordance with national and international guidelines. TRAMP concentrates on the monitoring of agricultural produce from the vicinity of the 23 licensed nuclear sites in England and Wales. The focus of FARM is the safety of the general food supply through natural food monitoring; a representative selection of industrial and landfill sites which provide potential sources of radionuclide contamination of the food chain is also monitored. In addition, monitoring programmes are undertaken for airborne grass and soil contamination in the neighbourhood of 18 nuclear sites. The overall conclusion drawn from the results presented is that public exposure to anthropogenic radioactivity due to the consumption of milk and foodstuffs grown around licensed nuclear sites in 1994 was well within acceptable limits. (67 references; 97 tables). (UK)

  15. Radiation protection instrumentation. Monitoring equipment. Atmospheric radioactive iodine in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This international standard applies to portable or installed equipment for the monitoring of radioactive iodine (such as I-131 or I-125) in air in the environment of nuclear installations during normal operation, during design basis events, and in emergency situations. The monitoring involves continuous sample trapping and, where adequate, automatic start of sampling. The document deals with radioactive iodine monitor design, testing procedures, and documentation. Appended tables refer to the reference and normal testing conditions, tests in normal testing conditions, tests during changes of the affecting quantities, and tests of changes in the air circuit. (P.A.)

  16. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1991. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Annual Report supplements British Nuclear Fuel plc's Health and Safety Annual Report by providing more detailed information on radioactive discharges, monitoring of the environmental and critical group doses. BNFL has published Annual Reports on Radioactive Discharges and Monitoring of the Environment, covering the period from 1977 to the present. For 1991 this report has been sub-divided into two complementary parts. Volume II reproduces the Certificates of Authorisation under which the Company operates and the statutory environmental monitoring programmes which relate to them. (author)

  17. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1992. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This Annual Report supplements British Nuclear Fuel plc's Health and Safety Annual Report by providing more detailed information on radioactive discharges, monitoring of the environmental and critical group doses. BNFL has published Annual Reports on Radioactive Discharges and Monitoring of the Environment, covering the period from 1977 to the present. For 1991 this report has been sub-divided into two complementary parts. Volume II reproduces the Certificates of Authorisation under which the Company operates and the statutory environmental monitoring programmes which relate to them. (author)

  18. Annual report on radioactive discharges and monitoring of the environment 1992. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This Annual Report supplements and updates the Company's Environment Annual Report by providing more detailed information on radioactive discharges, monitoring of the environment and critical group doses. BNFL has published Annual Reports on Radioactive Discharges and Monitoring of the Environment since 1977. This year the report is again sub-divided into two complementary volumes. Volume I consists of site papers, one for each of the Company's sites and includes annual data on radioactive discharges into the environment and the associated environmental monitoring programmes. Critical group doses for each site are presented in summary tables at the beginning of each Site paper. Volume II reproduces the Certificates of Authorisation regulating the Company's discharges and the statutory environmental monitoring programmes which relate to them. (Author)

  19. Effluent standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisler, G C [Pennsylvania State University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    At the conference there was a considerable interest in research reactor standards and effluent standards in particular. On the program, this is demonstrated by the panel discussion on effluents, the paper on argon 41 measured by Sims, and the summary paper by Ringle, et al. on the activities of ANS research reactor standards committee (ANS-15). As a result, a meeting was organized to discuss the proposed ANS standard on research reactor effluents (15.9). This was held on Tuesday evening, was attended by members of the ANS-15 committee who were present at the conference, participants in the panel discussion on the subject, and others interested. Out of this meeting came a number of excellent suggestions for changes which will increase the utility of the standard, and a strong recommendation that the effluent standard (15.9) be combined with the effluent monitoring standard. It is expected that these suggestions and recommendations will be incorporated and a revised draft issued for comment early this summer. (author)

  20. The monitoring of radioactive contamination and radiation exposure in the environment in Germany- tasks, techniques, realizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, A.

    1998-01-01

    A brief historical account of the development of the monitoring of radioactivity in the environment in Germany is given. The aims of monitoring and the tasks, classified according to the possible sources of release, are presented and the methods required are described. The monitoring systems, set up on the basis of different legal principles, are presented and the technical realization of these including their current state of development, is described. Finally, an account is given of the coordination of the national monitoring systems which is at present in progress, as well as of the integration of these monitoring systems into international monitoring and information networks. (author)