WorldWideScience

Sample records for radioactive chemical elements

  1. Some Chemical Group Separations of Radioactive Trace Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K

    1962-06-15

    As a pretreatment for gamma spectrometric analysis methods have been developed for the chemical separation of traces of P, Sc, Ge, As, Se, Br, Zr, Nb, Ru, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, I, Hf, Ta, Re, Os, Au and Hg into 9 different groups. By combining the present methods with already existing chemical group separation methods for traces of Na, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Mo, In, Fe, Cs, Ba, L.a, the rare earths, W and Ir, a complete separation scheme comprising 15 groups of elements has been worked out. The chemical 15-group separation method has been advantageously used in gamma spectrometric routine analysis of biological materials.

  2. Some Chemical Group Separations of Radioactive Trace Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsahl, K.

    1962-06-01

    As a pretreatment for gamma spectrometric analysis methods have been developed for the chemical separation of traces of P, Sc, Ge, As, Se, Br, Zr, Nb, Ru, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, I, Hf, Ta, Re, Os, Au and Hg into 9 different groups. By combining the present methods with already existing chemical group separation methods for traces of Na, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Mo, In, Fe, Cs, Ba, L.a, the rare earths, W and Ir, a complete separation scheme comprising 15 groups of elements has been worked out. The chemical 15-group separation method has been advantageously used in gamma spectrometric routine analysis of biological materials

  3. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations of the interaction between radioactive elements and imidazolium based ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, A. V. Sai; Abishek, B.; Anantharaj, R.

    2018-04-01

    The fundamental natures of the molecular level interaction and charge transfer between specific radioactive elements and ionic liquids of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([BMIM]+[NTf2]-), 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([BMIM]+[ES]-) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]+[BF4]-) were investigated utilising HF theory and B3LYP hybrid DFT. The ambiguity in reaction mechanism of the interacting species dictates to employ Effective Core Potential (ECP) basis sets such as UGBS, SDD, and SDDAll to account for the relativistic effects of deep core electrons in the system involving potential, heavy and hazardous radioactive elements present in nuclear waste. The SCF energy convergence of each system validates the characterisation of the molecular orbitals as a linear combination of atomic orbitals utilising fixed MO coefficients and the optimized geometry of each system is visualised based on which Mulliken partial charge analysis is carried out to account for the polarising behaviour of the radioactive element and charge transfer between the IL phase by comparison with the bare IL species.

  4. Study of the physico-chemical behavior of transuranian elements in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitorge, P.; Billon, A.; Dautel, C.; Michau, O.; Quevrin, M.; Delorme, P.; Berthoud, T.; Mauchien, P.

    1986-01-01

    Transuranian chemistry is being studied in the geochemical context of the geological disposal of radioactive waste. The transuranians considered are plutonium, neptunium and americium. The first part, devoted to the chemistry of these elements in aqueous solutions, consists of a critical compilation of literature data with a view to resulting in producing the E h -pH diagrams of transuranians in a complexing environment. The study of the retention by constituents of artificial clay barriers (bentonite and attapulgite) is the subject of the second part. The third part concerns the development of a measurement technique for transuranian elements at trace levels by the thermal lensing method

  5. Transportation of radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thubert, Francis; Rentien, Guy; Jacquet, Michel

    1981-01-01

    The production and marketing of artificial radioactive elements engaged in by the 'Office des Rayonnements Ionisants' requires the use of specially designed packagings and assorted means of transport. The authors begin by describing the different kinds of products involved and the forms of packagings needed, and go on to discuss the various means of transport used, underlining the fact that, in terms of number and gravity, the incidents that have occurred to date have indeed been few and far between [fr

  6. Elements to diminish radioactive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes I, M.E.; Ramirez G, F.P.

    1998-01-01

    In this work it is presented an application of the cause-effect diagram method or Ichikawa method identifying the elements that allow to diminish accidents when the radioactive materials are transported. It is considered the transport of hazardous materials which include radioactive materials in the period: December 1996 until March 1997. Among the identified elements by this method it is possible to mention: the road type, the radioactive source protection, the grade driver responsibility and the preparation that the OEP has in the radioactive material management. It is showed the differences found between the country inner roads and the Mexico City area. (Author)

  7. Radioactivity in Chemical Fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankovic, M.; Nikolic, J.; Pantelic, G.; Rajacic, M.; Sarap, N.; Todorovic, D.

    2013-01-01

    The fertilizers are essential in agriculture as they supply nutrients to the farming fields. One of the sources of radioactivity other than those of natural origin is mainly due to extensive use of fertilizers. The concentrations of natural radionuclides, 40K, 226Ra, 238U and 235U in different chemical fertilizers, which are part of the regular control of imported goods from the border crossing were analyzed using gamma spectrometry with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector, relative efficiency 20 %, in order to assess the implications of the extended use of chemical fertilizers. Measurements were performed at Vinca Institute, Radiation and Environmental Protection Department. The obtained results show remarkable wide variations in the radioactivity contents of different samples. The mean (ranges) of specific activities for gamma activity of those fertilizer samples for 40K, 226Ra, 238U and 235U are 4857 (23 - 12 324) Bq/kg, 87 (4-393) Bq/kg, 220 (26-1145) Bq/kg and 15 (1.6-53) Bq/kg, respectively. The radium equivalent activity (Ra eq ) as well as the external absorbed gamma dose rate (D) for all samples was also calculated.(author)

  8. Radioactive elements in Pennsylvania waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The first recognition of radioactive elements in natural waters dates back many years, but interest has accelerated in recent years with the advent of concern about the health effects of radioactivity. At the present time, extensive monitoring of public water supplies for radioactive substances is mandated by federal and state law, and monitoring near nuclear facilities is required by federal regulations, so that a great deal of information is accumulating on the amount and distribution of radioactivity in natural waters. These results reveal that small amounts of radioactive elements are universally present in natural waters, and that the concentration vary over an appreciable range as a result of natural processes and human activities. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the origin, behavior, abundance and hazard of the main radioactive species in Pennsylvania surface and ground waters. This treatment is intended to provide background to the interested reader in comprehending questions such as the hazard of radon in homes with private wells and pollution related to the nuclear power cycle

  9. Chemical decontamination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.I.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. There is also a variety of alternatives for treatment and conditioning of the wastes prior disposal. The importance of treatment of radioactive waste for protection of human and environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has gained in this field. Generally, the methods used for treatment of radioactive wastes can be classified into three type's biological, physical and chemical treatment this physical treatment it gives good result than biological treatment. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. In chemical treatment there are different procedures, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electro dialysis but solvent extraction is best one because high purity can be optioned on the other hand the disadvantage that it is expensive. Beside the solvent extraction technique one can be used is ion exchange which gives reasonable result, but requires pretreatment that to avoid in closing of column by colloidal and large species. Electro dialysis technique gives quite result but less than solvent extraction and ion exchange technique the advantage is a cheep.(Author)

  10. Radioactive sources in chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive sources including all radioactive materials exceeding exemption levels have to be registered in national databases according to international standards based on the recommendations ICRP 60 and a proper licensing should take place as described for example in the 96/29/EURATOM. In spite of that, unregistered sources could be found, usually due to the fact that the owner is not aware of radiation characteristics of sources. The material inventories of chemical laboratories are typical and most frequent example where radioactive sources could be found. Five different types of sources could be identified. The most frequent type are chemicals, namely thorium and uranium compounds. They are used not due to their radioactivity but due to their chemical properties. As for all other sources a stringent control is necessary in order to assure their safe use. Around hundred of stored radioactive chemical items were found during inspections of such laboratories performed by the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration or qualified experts in a period December 2006 - July 2007. Users of such chemicals are usually not aware that thorium and uranium chemicals are radioactive and, as unsealed sources, they could be easily spilled out and produce contamination of persons, surfaces, equipment etc. The external exposure as well as the internal exposure including exposure due to inhalation could be present. No knowledge about special precautions is usually present in laboratories and leads to underestimating of a potential risk and unintentional exposure of the laboratory personnel, students etc. Due to the long decay times in decay series of Th -232, U-238 and U- 235 the materials are also radioactive today. Even more, in case of thorium chemicals the radioactivity increased substantially from the time of their production. The implementation of safety measures has been under way and includes a survey of the qualified experts, establishment of organizational structure in a

  11. Chemical experiments with superheavy elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türler, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Unnoticed by many chemists, the Periodic Table of the Elements has been extended significantly in the last couple of years and the 7th period has very recently been completed with eka-Rn (element 118) currently being the heaviest element whose synthesis has been reported. These 'superheavy' elements (also called transactinides with atomic number > or = 104 (Rf)) have been artificially synthesized in fusion reactions at accelerators in minute quantities of a few single atoms. In addition, all isotopes of the transactinide elements are radioactive and decay with rather short half-lives. Nevertheless, it has been possible in some cases to investigate experimentally chemical properties of transactinide elements and even synthesize simple compounds. The experimental investigation of superheavy elements is especially intriguing, since theoretical calculations predict significant deviations from periodic trends due to the influence of strong relativistic effects. In this contribution first experiments with hassium (Hs, atomic number 108), copernicium (Cn, atomic number 112) and element 114 (eka-Pb) are reviewed.

  12. Plants' essential chemical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    2007-01-01

    Every garden center and hardware store sells fertilizer guaranteed to "feed" plants. In a strict sense, we can't feed plants. Food contains an energy source. Green plants capture solar energy and make their own food through photosynthesis! Photosynthesis and other metabolic processes require chemical elements in appropriate doses for plants to survive...

  13. Chemical treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottier, P.E.

    1968-01-01

    This is the third manual of three commissioned by the IAEA on the three principal techniques used in concentrating radioactive liquid wastes, namely chemical precipitation, evaporation and ion exchange. The present manual deals with chemical precipitation by coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation, commonly called ''chemical treatment'' of low-activity wastes. Topics discussed in the manual are: (i) principles of coagulation on flocculation and sedimentation and associated processes; (ii) process and equipment; (iii) conditioning and disposal of flocculation sludge; (iv) sampling and the equipment required for experiments; and (v) factors governing the selection of processes. 99 refs, 17 figs, 4 tabs

  14. Elements of a radioactive waste management course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fentiman, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    The demand for scientists, engineers, and technicians with expertise in radioactive waste management is growing rapidly. Many universities, government agencies, and private contractors are developing courses in radioactive waste management. Two such courses have been developed at The Ohio State University. In support of that course development, two surveys were conducted. One survey went to all nuclear engineering programs in the US to determine what radioactive waste management courses are currently being taught. The other went to 600 waste management professionals, asking them to list the topics they think should be included in a radioactive waste management course. Four key elements of a course in radioactive waste management were identified. They are (a) technical information, (b) legal and regulatory framework, (c) communicating with the public, and (d) sources of information on waste management. Contents of each of the four elements are discussed, and results of the surveys are presented

  15. STATUS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2003-01-01

    During discussions within the Inorganic Chemistry Division Committee, that dealt with the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements and the official IUPAC position on its presentation, the following question was raised. When the various chemical elements are presented, each with their appropriate atomic weight value, how should the radioactive elements be presented? The Atomic Weights Commission has treated this question in a number of different ways during the past century, almost in a random manner. This report reviews the position that the Commission has taken as a function of time, as a prelude to a discussion in Ottawa about how the Commission should resolve this question for the future

  16. Physical and chemical investigation of water and sediment of the Keban Dam Lake, Turkey. Part 2. Distribution of radioactivity, heavy metals and major elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulahci, F.; Dogru, M.

    2006-01-01

    Thirtynine surface water and 20 deep sediment samples were taken in different locations in Keban Dam Lake (Elazig, Turkey) to identify major sources and assess major elements, heavy metals, 137 Cs, 90 Sr, total alpha- and, total beta-distribution in 2003 and 2004 in four seasons each year. As a preliminary study heavy metal (Zn, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, Cr, and Co), major element (Mg, Ca, Na, K) and radioactivity concentrations of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, total-α and total-β in the surface water and deep sediments were determined. (author)

  17. Radioactive resistance of memory elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loncar, B.; Stankovic, S.; Novakovic, D.; Osmokrovic, P.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the results of semiconductor memories radioactive resistance examination (EPROM and EEPROM) are presented. Performance of semiconductor memories is most important, when working under high risk condition where there is an influence of radiation. This research is particularly interesting for specific applications in military industry and space technology. Therefore, the analysis of the degradation mechanism of these components as well as the possibilities to increase their radiation resistivity have been considered by many authors. The aim of this work is the examination of the reliability of EPROM and EEPROM characteristics under radiation. Total dose results are presented for the JL 27C512D EPROM and ST 24C02 EEPROM. There is evidence that EPROM are more sensitive to y radiation than EEPROM. The results obtained are analyzed theoretically via the interaction of gamma radiation with oxide layer. (authors)

  18. Storage container for radioactive fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The interim storage cask for spent fuel elements or the glass moulds for high-level radioactive waste are made up of heat-resistant, reinforced concrete with chambers and highgrade steel lining. Cooling systems with natural air circulation are connected with the chambers. (HP) [de

  19. Elements of chemical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Nash, Leonard K

    2005-01-01

    This survey of purely thermal data in calculating the position of equilibrium in a chemical reaction highlights the physical content of thermodynamics, as distinct from purely mathematical aspects. 1970 edition.

  20. Concentrations of radioactive elements in lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotev, Randy L.

    1998-01-01

    As an aid to interpreting data obtained remotely on the distribution of radioactive elements on the lunar surface, average concentrations of K, U, and Th as well as Al, Fe, and Ti in different types of lunar rocks and soils are tabulated. The U/Th ratio in representative samples of lunar rocks and regolith is constant at 0.27; K/Th ratios are more variable because K and Th are carried by different mineral phases. In nonmare regoliths at the Apollo sites, the main carriers of radioactive elements are mafic (i.e., 6-8 percent Fe) impact-melt breccias created at the time of basin formation and products derived therefrom.

  1. Radioactive elements and earthworms in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleymanova, A.S.; Abdullayev, A.S.; Ahmadov, G.S.; Naghiyev, J.A.; Samadov, P.A.

    2010-11-01

    Earthworms are one of the indispensable soil animals which treat soil with letting it through their gut and help increasing soil fertility. The effect of radioactive elements and comparative effect of heavy metals to the vital functions of earthworms were determined in laboratory conditions. Experiments were continued for a month, and first of all, each soil type, grey-brown soil from Ramana iodine plant territory of Baku city, brown soil from Aluminum plant territory of Ganja city, aborigine grey-brown soil of Absheron peninsula, treated with Ra and U salts as model variants and brown soil of Ganja city was analyzed by gamma-spectrometer for radionuclide determining at the beginning and at the end of the experiment. Earthworms (Nicodrilus Caliginosus Sav.trapezoides) aboriginal for Absheron peninsula and plant residues were added to the soil. At the end of the month the biomass, survival value, coprolite allocation value, food activity and catalase value in earthworms and in soil were determined. The gamma-spectrometric analysis results gave interesting values in coprolites, soils which had been treated through the earthworms' gut. In comparison with the initial variants in experimental results more percent of radioactivity was gathered in coprolites. By this way earthworms absorbed most of radioactive elements and allocated them as coprogenous substances on the upper layer of soil. During absorbing, some percents of radioactive elements were also gathered in gut cells of the earthworms. Thereby determination of some vital functions of earthworms was expedient. Thus, by the instrumentality of these experiments we can use earthworms for biodiagnosis and for bioremediation of contaminated soils with radionuclides and heavy metals.

  2. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  3. Origin of the chemical elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayler, R J

    1984-05-01

    The subject is discussed in relation to the composition of initially created matter and changes which have occurred during the life history of the universe, with particular reference to our galaxy and nearby galaxies. Headings are: observations of element abundances (stars, gas clouds in our own and nearby galaxies, hot gas in galaxy clusters, the solar system); the originally created matter (Big Bang theory and early nuclear reactions); processes changing observed composition (galactic evolution; nuclear fusion reactions in stellar interiors; chemical composition of a highly evolved massive star); supernovae (production of heavy elements); chemical evolution of the galaxy; production of very heavy elements (s process, r process).

  4. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO 2 as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with 231 Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise

  5. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or

  6. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  7. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-06-20

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  8. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Yamazaki, Sei; Miura, Haruki.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal wastes, which are generated from radioactive material handling facilities and the surfaces of which are contaminated by radioactive materials. That is, it has a feature of applying acid dissolution simultaneously with mechanical grinding. The radioactive metal wastes are contained in a vessel such as a barrel together with abrasives in a sulfuric acid solution and rotated at several tens rotation per minute. By such procedures for the radioactive metal wastes, (1) cruds and passive membranes are mechanically removed, (2) exposed mother metal materials are uniformly brought into contact with sulfuric acid and further (3) the mother metal materials dissolve the cruds and the passive membranes also chemically by a reducing dissolution (so-called local cell effect). According to the method of the present invention, stainless steel metal wastes having cruds and passive membranes can rapidly and efficiently be decontaminated to a radiation level equal with that of ordinary wastes. (I.S.)

  9. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to a decontamination method for radioactive metal waste products derived from equipment that handles radioactive materials whose surfaces have been contaminated; in particular it concerns a decontamination method that reduces the amount of radioactive waste by decontaminating radioactive waste substances to a level of radioactivity in line with normal waste products. In order to apply chemical decontamination to metal waste products whose surfaces are divided into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste; the carbon steel waste is treated using only a primary process in which the waste is immersed in a sulfuric acid solution, while the stainless steel waste must be treated with both the primary process and then electrolytically reduces it for a specific length of time and a secondary process that uses a solution of sulfuric acid mixed with oxidizing metal salts. The method used to categorize metal waste into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste involves determining the presence, or absence, of magnetism. Voltage is applied for a fixed duration; once that has stopped, electrolytic reduction repeats the operative cycle of applying, then stopping voltage until the potential of the radioactive metal waste is retained in the active region. 1 fig. 2 tabs

  10. Hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.F.; Stewart, T.L.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Site was established in 1944 to produce plutonium for defense. During the past four decades, a number of reactors, processing facilities, and waste management facilities have been built at Hanford for plutonium production. Generally, Hanford's 100 Area was dedicated to reactor operation; the 200 Area to fuel reprocessing, plutonium recovery, and waste management; and the 300 Area to fuel fabrication and research and development. Wastes generated from these operations included highly radioactive liquid wastes, which were discharged to single- and double-shell tanks; solid wastes, including both transuranic (TRU) and low-level wastes, which were buried or discharged to caissons; and waste water containing low- to intermediate-level radioactivity, which was discharged to the soil column via near-surface liquid disposal units such as cribs, ponds, and retention basins. Virtually all of the wastes contained hazardous chemical as well as radioactive constituents. This paper will focus on the hazardous chemical components of the radioactive mixed waste generated by plutonium production at Hanford. The processes, chemicals used, methods of disposition, fate in the environment, and actions being taken to clean up this legacy are described by location

  11. Hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.F.; Stewart, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Site was established in 1944 to produce plutonium for defense. During the past four decades, a number of reactors, processing facilities, and waste management facilities were built at Hanford for plutonium production. Generally, Hanford's 100 Area was dedicated to reactor operation; the 200 Areas to fuel reprocessing, plutonium recovery, and waste management; and the 300 Area to fuel fabrication and research and development. Wastes generated from these operations included highly radioactive liquid wastes, which were discharged to single- and double-shell tanks; solid wastes, including both transuranic and low-level wastes, which were buried or discharged to caissons; and waste water containing low- to intermediate-level radioactivity, which was discharged to the soil column via near-surface liquid disposal units such as cribs, ponds, and retention basins. Virtually all of the wastes contained hazardous chemicals as well as radioactive constituents. This paper focuses on the hazardous chemical components of the radioactive mixed waste generated by plutonium production at Hanford. The processes, chemicals used, methods of disposition, fate in the environment, and actions being taken to clean up this legacy are described by location

  12. Elements to diminish radioactive accidents; Elementos para disminuir accidentes radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes I, M.E.; Ramirez G, F.P. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    In this work it is presented an application of the cause-effect diagram method or Ichikawa method identifying the elements that allow to diminish accidents when the radioactive materials are transported. It is considered the transport of hazardous materials which include radioactive materials in the period: December 1996 until March 1997. Among the identified elements by this method it is possible to mention: the road type, the radioactive source protection, the grade driver responsibility and the preparation that the OEP has in the radioactive material management. It is showed the differences found between the country inner roads and the Mexico City area. (Author)

  13. The Calculation Of Total Radioactivity Of Kartini Reactor Fuel Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budisantoso, Edi Trijono; Sardjono, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The total radioactivity of Kartini reactor fuel element has been calculated by using ORIGEN2. In this case, the total radioactivity is the sum of alpha, beta, and gamma radioactivity from activation products nuclides, actinide nuclides and fission products nuclides in the fuel element. The calculation was based on irradiation history of fuel in the reactor core. The fuel element no 3203 has location history at D, E, and F core zone. The result is expressed in graphics form of total radioactivity and photon radiations as function of irradiation time and decay time. It can be concluded that the Kartini reactor fuel element in zone D, E, and F has total radioactivity range from 10 Curie to 3000 Curie. This range is for radioactivity after decaying for 84 days and that after reactor shut down. This radioactivity is happened in the fuel element for every reactor operation and decayed until the fuel burn up reach 39.31 MWh. The total radioactivity emitted photon at the power of 0.02 Watt until 10 Watt

  14. Chemically reducing decontamination method for radioactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Sato, Hitoshi.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of electrolytically reducing radioactive metal wastes, then chemically dissolving the surface thereof with a strong acid decontaminating solution. This method utilizes dissolving characteristics of stainless steels in the strong acid solution. That is, in the electrolytic reduction operation, a portion of the metal wastes is brought into contact with a strong acid decontaminating solution, and voltage and current are applied to the portion and keep it for a long period of time so as to make the potential of the immersed portion of the metal wastes to an active soluble region. Then, the electrolytic reduction operation is stopped, and the metal wastes are entirely immersed in the decontaminating solution to decontaminate by chemical dissolution. As the decontaminating solution, strong acid such as sulfuric acid, nitric acid is used. Since DC current power source capacity required for causing reaction in the active soluble region can be decreased, the decontamination facility can be minimized and simplified, and necessary electric power can be saved even upon decontamination of radioactive metal wastes made of stainless steels and having a great area. Further, chemical dissolution can be conducted without adding an expensive oxidizing agent. (N.H.)

  15. Physical and chemical removal of radioactive oxide layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blesa, M.A.; Baumgartner, E.C.; Maroto, A.J.G.

    1983-01-01

    When a nuclear reactor is operating under steady state conditions, the balance between release of activated crud and pick-up and activation of circulating crud dictates the overall contribution to the growth of radiation fields by the release of crud from the fuel elements. Whole-circuit decontamination procedures which are carried out with the fuel elements in-core must take into account that during such procedure this balance is abruptly changed in the sense of releasing considerable amounts of radioactivity towards out-of-core components. In principle, this disruption of balance operates against the decontamination objectives, usually the lowering of radiation fields throughout the primary circuit. This is applicable to the two processes that involve fuel decontamination: cycling redox techniques and whole-circuit chemical decontaminations. However, data on actual cycling redox procedures performed in Atucha I Nuclear Power Station are presented which demonstrate that under appropriate process conditions such release does not prevent the achieval of reasonable decontamination factors in critical components. The relevance of optimum cleaning rates, redeposition rates, reagent injection strategies, and the ways to achieve these are discussed. In chemical decontamination procedures, it is of importance to assess the relative contribution of fuel elements and out-of-core components to dissolved radioactive crud. In order to do this, the mechanisms of dissolution of crud on steel surfaces and on Zircaloy surfaces are compared for the most usual reagents

  16. Radioactivity in the pelagic fish. II. Group separation of radioactive elements in fish tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K; Tozawa, H; Amano, K; Takase, A

    1955-01-01

    Analytical group separation was performed with various ashed tissues of some fishes exposed to radioactive ash. The radioactivity was particularly large with elements belonging to the 3rd group, both A and B subgroups. The 2nd group showed considerable activity in pyloric ceca and kidney of Skipjacks. The radioactivity of the 1st and 4th groups was detected in some tissues; the 5th group showed slight activity.

  17. Radioactive elements found in plants contaminated by radioactive rain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanidazawa, M; Ishihara, T

    1954-01-01

    Ashes obtained from contaminated trifolium repens, astragalus sinicus, and rumex japonicus were studied. The precipitate obtained by treating the acidic solution of the ash with H/sub 2/S followed by Fe/sup + +/ in the presence of NH/sub 3/ and NH/sub 4/Cl contained Y, Sr, and the rare earth elements.

  18. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    What do we mean by a chemical element? A chemical element is matter, all of whose atoms are alike in having the same positive charge on the nucleus and the same number of extra-nuclear electrons. As we shall see in the following elemental review, the origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having an origin in antiquity, other elements having been discovered within the past few hundred years and still others have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements since these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature

  19. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    What do we mean by a chemical element? A chemical element is matter, all of whose atoms are alike in having the same positive charge on the nucleus and the same number of extra-nuclear electrons. As we shall see in the following elemental review, the origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having an origin in antiquity, other elements having been discovered within the past few hundred years and still others have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements since these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature.

  20. Group theoretical classification of chemical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byakov, V.M.; Kulakov, V.I.; Rumer, Y.B.; Fet, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    The method of classification of chemical elements, based on group symmetry principles, is compared with element properties. Elements are considered to be states of a single quantum system, the atomic structure being ignored. Elements treated as states of the system, break down into successively diminishing subsystems, big and small multiplets. The theory, being a group classification, does not describe in detail any of element properties, but leads to a unified qualitative description of all of them simultaneously

  1. Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden-Wuerttemberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-04-01

    The report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg covers the following issues: legal framework for the nuclear disposal; producer of spent fuels and radioactive wastes in Baden- Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg; low- and medium-level radioactive wastes (non heat generating radioactive wastes); spent fuels and radioactive wastes from waste processing (heat generating radioactive wastes); final disposal.

  2. Origin of the chemical elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayler, R J [Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK). Astronomy Centre

    1984-11-08

    An account is first given of the observed chemical composition of objects in the Universe (Sun, Solar System, stars, gas clouds) and of important variations of composition from object to object. The initial composition is then discussed in terms of the Hot Big Bang cosmological theory, and the different types of nuclear reaction which are believed to have occurred in stars and to have modified this composition are considered. Finally, an account is given of the interpretation of the present observations in terms of the initial chemical composition and of galactic and stellar formation and evolution.

  3. Nuclear toxicology file: cell response to the steady or radioactive chemical elements exposure; Dossier toxicologie nucleaire: reponse cellulaire a l'exposition aux elements chimiques stables ou radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, B.S.; Saintigny, Y. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Sciences du Vivant, UMR 217, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); CEA Fontenay aux Roses, IRCM, UMR 217, 92 (France); Adam, Ch. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN:DEI/SECRE), Lab. de Radioecologie et d' Ecotoxicologie, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2008-09-15

    The cellular response to an exposure in a toxic element is made at different levels. The first level is the agent detoxication by its elimination or its neutralization. The second level is the repair of the damages caused by this agent (for example the DNA repair). The third level is the control of the cellular death programmed to eliminate the irreparably damaged cells.Finally, the hurt cell can inform the nearby cells by producing molecular effectors inducing an abscopal or bystander effect. (N.C.)

  4. The radioactivity of spirulina and its heavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantariandraintsoa, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Spirulina is one of the three classes of algae that have the ability to accumulate contaminants from the environment in which they live. The main aim of this work is to study the radioactive contamination of Spirulina using gamma spectrometry and to determine its content of heavy elements using the technique of X-ray fluorescence analysis. Use of detector and Gamma Vision software, in the laboratory of nuclear analysis of the I nstitut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires -Madagascar (INSTN-Madagascar), allowed us to find some amount of radioactive elements such as potassium, lead, thallium and bismuth. The elements found in the laboratory of X-ray fluorescence analysis, of the same institute, using the conventional method along with the XRF AXIL software are calcium, iron, magnesium, bromine, rubidium and strontium as well as heavy elements zinc and copper. Spirulina is rich in potassium, its activity is 98±56 Bq.Kg -1 and the average concentration of the radioactive element is 16.2 g.Kg -1 . Analysis results leads us to say that it is best to consume spirulina from well secured against pollution (greenhouse) culture and we can say that we need to improve crops in natural environments. [fr

  5. The origin of the chemical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayler, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is discussed in relation to the composition of initially created matter and changes which have occurred during the life history of the universe, with particular reference to our galaxy and nearby galaxies. Headings are: observations of element abundances (stars, gas clouds in our own and nearby galaxies, hot gas in galaxy clusters, the solar system); the originally created matter (Big Bang theory and early nuclear reactions); processes changing observed composition (galactic evolution; nuclear fusion reactions in stellar interiors; chemical composition of a highly evolved massive star); supernovae (production of heavy elements); chemical evolution of the galaxy; production of very heavy elements (s process, r process). (U.K.)

  6. Some problems of risk assessment in cases of environmental radioactive and chemical contamination in regions of the Ural radioactive trail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryshev, I.I.; Isaeva, L.N.; Sazykina, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology of risk assessment if being developed to permit the analysis of possible consequences of radioactive and chemical environment contamination on the territory of the Urals radioactive trail. The assessment of hazards from radioactive contamination of the Techa river (Muslyumovo) has been carried out. A comparison of radioactive and chemical risks for the population of Kasli has been made

  7. Radioactivity and trace element contents of commercial chewing tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dafauti, S.; Pulhani, V.; Dahiya, S.; Hegde, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive elements uranium, thorium and their daughters are present ubiquitously in the environment and are transferred to man through various pathways. Both, U and Th can cause radiological and toxic hazards. The ingestion dose pathway calculations involve analysis of all kinds of food or edible materials. A large population in India and Asian subcontinent are addicted to commercially available chewing tobacco. This practice is reported to have lead to increased consequences of cancer. Trace elements (Fe, Co, Mn, Zn etc.) are essential but may also prove to be toxic if present in excess. Besides these the hazards of heavy elements like Pb and Cd have also increased in the current polluted environment. In this study most of the commercially available brands of gutkha and chewing tobacco were collected. The radioactive elements U and Th were analyzed in them by Radiochemical Neutron Activation Analysis technique. Trace elements Fe, Co, Mn, Zn, and toxic heavy elements Pb, Cd, Ni etc. were analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. The levels of Th and U were in the range 0.02-0.11 mg/g and 0.02-0.08 mg/g respectively. The cancer risk due to U, Th, Pb and Cd were calculated and are found to be low. (author)

  8. Synthesis and investigation of superheavy elements - perspectives with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzenberg, G.

    1997-09-01

    The perspectives for the investigation of heavy and superheavy elements with intense beams of radioactive nuclei available from the new generation of secondary beam facilities in combination with modern experimental developments are the subject of this paper. The nuclear properties of the recently discovered shell nuclei centered at Z=108 and N=164 and predictions on the location of the superheavy region with improved theoretical models will be discussed. (orig.)

  9. Distribution of natural radioactive elements in Western Carpathians granitoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katlovsky, V.

    1979-01-01

    The content of natural radioactive elements was determined using the 1024-channel analyser NTA-512 B with NaI(Tl) scintillators or with a Ge(Li) detector. The following groups of samples were processed: 1. granitoids, pegmatites and weathered rocks in the Small Carpathians; 2. acid magmatites of exotic rocks of the klippen zone; 3. granitoids of the Western Carpathians. The results of the measurements are summed up. (Ha)

  10. Chemical element abundance in K giant atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, N.S.; Shcherbak, A.N.

    1980-01-01

    With the help of modified method of differential curves of growth studied are physical parameters of atmospheres of giant stars of KO111 spectral class of the NGC 752, M25 and UMa cluster. Observations have been made on reflector of Crimea astrophysical observatory of Academy of Sciences of the USSR in the period from February to May, 1978. Spectograms are obtained for the wave length range from 5000-5500 A. It is shown that the change of chemical content in the wide range in heavy element composition does not influence the star atmosphere structUre. It follows from the results of the investigation that the abundance of chemical elements in stars of various scattered clusters, is the same in the range of errors of measurements and is similar to the abundance of chemical elements in the Sun atmosphere

  11. Chemical durability of glasses containing radioactive fission product waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.; Ross, W.A.

    1974-04-01

    Measurements made to determine the chemical durability of glasses for disposal of radioactive waste are discussed. The term glass covers materials varying from true glass with only minute quantities of crystallites, such as insoluble RuO 2 , to quasi glass-ceramics which are mostly crystalline. Chemical durability requirements and Soxhlet extractor leach tests are discussed

  12. Chemical engineering problems of radioactive waste fixation by vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Basic features are reviewed of the chemical engineering problems faced in the vitrification of the high-level radioactive liquid wastes resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. After an outline of glass solution properties and formation kinetics the constituent elements of the vitrification route are examined in turn: waste feed evaporation and denitration, calcination, offgas treatment, and finally melting and product quality. Plant and experimental data for each stage are discussed with comparison between process routes and with reference to the underlying principles. Attention is drawn to the future need for higher trapping efficiencies and for dealing with a wider range of species in offgas treatments as higher burnup fuels are processed after shorter cooling times from reactor. Two areas of present study where deeper insight into underlying process mechanics is needed are, firstly, the association of waste material with glass formers in the wet or sinter stages and secondly their incorporation and mixing reaction in the melt. Fuller understanding here would bring direct benefit to process performance and handling. The problems discussed are not of a nature to jeopardize the vitrification routes but if product quality does come to rely heavily on process control then demonstrable confidence in the behaviour of the central physico-chemical interactions is indispensable. (author)

  13. Use of radioactive tracers in chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, B.; Saiki, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the determination of small quantities of nickel by using radioactive tracers is presented. An analytical application of the displacement reaction between and zinc-ethylenediaminetetraacetate, (Zn-EDTA), labelled with 65 Zn is investigated. This method is based on the extraction of radioactive zinc, displaced by nickel from the zinc chelate, into a dithizone-carbon tetrachloride solution and the subsequent measurement of the activity of an aliquot of the extract. It is shown that the method is very sentitive and nickel can be measured in concentrations as small as 0,1μg/ml or even less, depending on the specific activity of the radioreagent used. The precision and accuracy of the method are determined. An attempt to eliminate the problem of interference by using masking agents or by means of a previous separation of nickel and other interfereing metals, is also made. (Author) [pt

  14. Use of radioactive tracers in chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, B.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the determination of small quantities of nickel using radioactive tracers is presented. An analytical application of the displacement reaction between nickel and zinc ethylenediaminetetraacetate labeled with zinc-65 is pursued. This method is based on the extraction of radioactive zinc displaced by nickel from the zinc chelate into a dithizone-carbon tetracloride solution and the subsequent measurement of the activity of an aliquot of the extract. The method is very sensitive and nickel can be measured in concentrations as small as 0.1μg/ml or even less, depending on the specific activity of the radioreagent used. The precision and the accuracy of the method are determined. The problem of interferences, trying to eliminate them by using masking agents or by means of a previous separation between nickel and other interfering metals, is also investigated [pt

  15. Principles for disposal of radioactive and chemical hazardous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, E. R.

    1991-01-01

    The double hazard of mixed wastes is characterized by several criteria: radioactivity on the one hand, and chemical toxicity, flammability, corrosiveness as well as chemical reactivity on the other hand. Chemotoxic waste normally has a much more complex composition than radioactive waste and appears in much larger quantities. However, the two types of waste have some properties in common when it comes to their long-term impact on health and the environment. In order to minimize the risk associated with mixed waste management, the material assigned for ultimate disposal should be thoroughly detoxified, inertized, or mineralized prior to conditioning and packaging. Good control over the environmental consequence of waste disposal requires that detailed criteria for tolerable contamination should be established, and that compliance with these criteria can be demonstrated. For radioactive waste, there has been an extensive international development of criteria to protect human health. For non-radioactive waste, derived criteria exist only for a limited number of substances

  16. Natural radiation, radioactive waste and chemical risk determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, T.; Mustonen, R.; Edhwall, H.; Hansen, H.; Soerensen, A.; Stranden, E.

    1990-01-01

    Doses from natural radiation to the population in the Nordic countries are summarized, and man-made modifications of the natural radiation environment are discussed. An account is given for the radiological concequences of energy concervation by reduced ventilation. Risks from possible future releases of radioactivity from final depositories of spent nuclear fuel are compared to the risks from present natural radioactivity in the environment. The possibilities for comparison between chemical and radiological risks are discussed. 104 refs., 36 figs., 47 tabs

  17. Store for radioactive waste and burnt-up fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spilker, H.; Rox, R.; Peschl, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The invention concerns a concrete storage block in which there are several vertical storage and cooling ducts for radioactive waste and burnt-up fuel elements. The storage block is assembled from several square concrete blocks. Several vertical ducts are made in these. The square blocks are placed on a concrete baseplate. The aligned ducts of several square blocks placed above each other form storage and cooling ducts for tubular storage containers. An annular gap is left for cooling air between the outside wall of the storage containers and the inside wall of the storage and cooling ducts. (orig./HP) [de

  18. On-stream chemical element monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averitt, O.R.; Dorsch, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus and method for on-stream chemical element monitoring are described wherein a multiplicity of sample streams are flowed continuously through individual analytical cells and fluorescence analyses are performed on the sample streams in sequence, together with a method of controlling the time duration of each analysis as a function of the concomitant radiation exposure of a preselected perforate reference material interposed in the sample-radiation source path

  19. Disposal of flow-level radioactive waste in Belgium: A safety analysis for inorganic chemotoxic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallants, D.; Volckaert, G.; Marivoet, J.; Neerdael, B.

    2000-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste often contains large quantities of inorganic chemical substances. Due attention should therefore be given to the safety implications of both the radiological and chemical substances in the waste. Our study develops the safety assessment methodology for surface disposal with emphasis on the potential effects of inorganic nonradiological elements on human health. Contamination of groundwater was considered as the major exposure pathway. The applied methodology first screens all elements on the basis of five criteria. Conservative screening calculations were used to screen out the elements that do not pose danger to humans, and to select those that could have a negative impact and thus require further analysis. The latter was done by first calculating the elemental mass fluxes out of the repository and into the aquifer followed by the calculation of groundwater concentrations. The results showed that on the basis of the screening calculations, 75% of all elements could be classified as non-hazardous. The detailed calculations showed that the majority of the remaining elements had groundwater concentrations below the drinking water or groundwater standards. The results further showed that for a few elements the maximum groundwater concentration was above the standard, but below the background concentrations. (author)

  20. Measurement of fertilizers induced radioactivity in tobacco plants and elemental analysis using ICAP–AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Pooja; Chauhan, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that tobacco smoke is the leading cause of lung cancer worldwide. The alpha radioactive content present in tobacco smoke and increasing number of lung cancer cases explain the importance of investigation. The use of different fertilizers may cause alteration in the metabolism of plants causing different response towards uptake of different element and radionuclides. In the present study, the estimation of alpha radioactivity induced by use of different fertilizers in tobacco leaves was made using solid state nuclear track detector (LR-115) to identify the relative presence of radionuclides in the plants. The radon exhalation rates from the tobacco plant were carried out to confirm the presence of radium or emission of radon from plant. The elemental analysis of tobacco plant by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometry provides a way to understand the difference occurred in metabolism caused by the use of fertilizers. The alpha track densities were found to vary with nature of fertilizers added to the soil and an increase was also observed with time. The radon mass exhalation rates in various tobacco plants were found to vary with type of fertilizers used. - Highlights: • The study is related to alpha radioactivity measurements in tobacco plants. • The radon mass exhalation rates in various tobacco plants were also measured. • Study is related to analysis of chemical elements in different fertilized tobacco samples

  1. Disposal of mixed radioactive and chemical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghissi, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The treatment of waste by dilution was practiced as long as nature provided sufficient unpolluted air, water, and land. The necessity for treatment, including containment and disposal of wastes is, however, relatively new. Initially, waste products from manufacturing processes were looked upon as a potential resource. The industries of Western Europe, short of raw materials, tried to recover as many chemical compounds as possible from industrial waste. However, the availability of abundant and cheap petroleum during the fifties changes this practice, at least for a short period

  2. Anion-exchange Studies of Radioactive Trace Elements in Sulphuric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K

    1963-01-15

    As part of a chemical group separation procedure used as a pretreatment in gamma spectrometric analysis, a study has been made of the adsorption from sulphuric acid solutions on strongly basic anion exchange resins, prepared in the hydroxide and the sulphate forms, of trace activities of Na, P, K, Ca, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ag, Cd, In, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Hf, Ta, W, Ir, Pa and Np. Besides adsorbing some of the trace elements in the solution, the anion exchange resin in the hydroxide form will neutralize the bulk of the sulphuric acid. This makes possible the subsequent sequential separation of chloride complexes on short anion-exchange columns by a stepwise increasing of the HCl concentration of the solution. On the basis of the results obtained in the present and earlier experiments, a new improved chemical group-separation procedure for mixtures of radioactive trace elements is outlined.

  3. Technical possibilities to support separation of radioactive elements from metallic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerkvall, Johan; Ye, Guozhu; Lindberg, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In the nuclear industry metallic objects can be either surface or bulk contaminated. Surface contaminated objects are often decontaminated by chemical or mechanical means, but are there other possibilities? During melting slags are formed either spontaneously or by adding slag forming compounds. However, one question that frequently arises is: Can all nuclides be separated by adding slag forming compounds? This question is not entirely correct as it is not only the radioactive nuclides that are separated from the metal but all atoms of that element present in the melt, radioactive and stable isotopes alike. Part of the answer lays in thermodynamics. Thermodynamics cannot positively answer the question with yes, as there are also practical and economical aspects to take into account, but if the answer is no there will never be any practical or economical efforts that will override nature. This paper will describe the theoretical baseline for evaluating the possibilities to separate certain elements during the melting process, mainly from steel but other metals will also touched on. The most common elements that have radioactive isotopes of interest is of course cobalt (Co-60, Co-58), but other elements of interest are manganese (Mn-54), strontium (Sr- 90), antimony (Sb-125) and of course heavy elements such as uranium, plutonium and americium. The paper will also describe methods used in the normal metal melting industry to separate elements from the base metal melted. This section will cover practical methods used as well as developed methods that are very seldom used due to time or financial constraints. (authors)

  4. Chemical precipitation processes for the treatment of aqueous radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Chemical precipitation by coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation has been commonly used for many years to treat liquid (aqueous) radioactive waste. This method allows the volume of waste to be substantially reduced for further treatment or conditioning and the bulk of the waste to de discharged. Chemical precipitation is usually applied in combination with other methods as part of a comprehensive waste management scheme. As with any other technology, chemical precipitation is constantly being improved to reduce cost to increase the effectiveness and safety on the entire waste management system. The purpose of this report is to review and update the information provided in Technical Reports Series No. 89, Chemical Treatment of Radioactive Wastes, published in 1968. In this report the chemical methods currently in use for the treatment of low and intermediate level aqueous radioactive wastes are described and illustrated. Comparisons are given of the advantages and limitations of the processes, and it is noted that good decontamination and volume reduction are not the only criteria according to which a particular process should be selected. Emphasis has been placed on the need to carefully characterize each waste stream, to examine fully the effect of segregation and the importance of looking at the entire operation and not just the treatment process when planning a liquid waste treatment facility. This general approach includes local requirements and possibilities, discharge authorization, management of the concentrates, ICRP recommendations and economics. It appears that chemical precipitation process and solid-liquid separation techniques will continue to be widely used in liquid radioactive waste treatment. Current research and development is showing that combining different processes in one treatment plant can provide higher decontamination factors and smaller secondary waste arisings. Some of these processes are already being incorporated into new and

  5. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Akio; Shibuya, Sadao.

    1991-01-01

    When contaminants mainly composed of copper remained on the surface of stainless steel wastes sent from an electrolytic reduction as a first step are chemically decontaminated, metal wastes are discriminated to carbon steel wastes and stainless steel wastes. Then, the carbon steel wastes are applied only with the first step of immersing in a sulfuric acid solution, and stainless steel wastes are applied with a first step of immersing into a sulfuric acid solution for electrolytic reduction for a predetermined period of time and a second step of immersing into a liquid in which an oxidative metal salt is added to sulfuric acid. The decontamination liquid which is used for immersing the stainless steel wastes in the second step and the oxidation force of which is lowered is used as the sulfuric acid solution in the first step for the carbon steel wastes. In view of the above, the decontamination liquid of the second step can be utilized most effectively, enabling to greatly decrease the secondary wastes and to improve decontamination efficiency. (T.M.)

  6. Elemental and radioactive analysis of commercially available seaweed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Netten, C.; Hoption Cann, S.A.; Van Netten, J.P.; Morley, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    Edible seaweed products have been used in many countries, specifically Japan, as a food item. Recently these products have become popular in the food industry because of a number of interesting medicinal properties that have been associated with certain edible marine algae. Very little control exists over the composition of these products, which could be contaminated with a number of agents including heavy metals and certain radioactive isotopes. Fifteen seaweed samples (six local samples from the coast of British Columbia, seven from Japan, one from Norway and one undisclosed) were obtained. All samples were analyzed for multiple elements, using ICP mass spectrometry and for radioactive constituents. It was found that six of eight imported seaweed products had concentrations of mercury orders of magnitude higher than the local products. Lead was found at somewhat higher concentrations in only one local product. Laminaria japonica had the highest level of iodine content followed by Laminaria setchellii from local sources. Only traces of cesium-137 were found in a product from Norway and radium-226 was found in a product from Japan. Arsenic levels were found to be elevated. In order to estimate the effect of these levels on health, one needs to address the bioavailability and the speciation of arsenic in these samples

  7. Elemental and radioactive analysis of commercially available seaweed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Netten, C. [Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, James Mather Building, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Avenue, V6T 1Z3 Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hoption Cann, S.A.; Van Netten, J.P. [Special Development Laboratory, Royal Jubilee Hospital, V8X 1P2 Victoria, BC (Canada); Morley, D.R. [Radiation Protection Branch, Ministry of Health, 4940 Canada Way, V5G 4K6 Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2000-06-08

    Edible seaweed products have been used in many countries, specifically Japan, as a food item. Recently these products have become popular in the food industry because of a number of interesting medicinal properties that have been associated with certain edible marine algae. Very little control exists over the composition of these products, which could be contaminated with a number of agents including heavy metals and certain radioactive isotopes. Fifteen seaweed samples (six local samples from the coast of British Columbia, seven from Japan, one from Norway and one undisclosed) were obtained. All samples were analyzed for multiple elements, using ICP mass spectrometry and for radioactive constituents. It was found that six of eight imported seaweed products had concentrations of mercury orders of magnitude higher than the local products. Lead was found at somewhat higher concentrations in only one local product. Laminaria japonica had the highest level of iodine content followed by Laminaria setchellii from local sources. Only traces of cesium-137 were found in a product from Norway and radium-226 was found in a product from Japan. Arsenic levels were found to be elevated. In order to estimate the effect of these levels on health, one needs to address the bioavailability and the speciation of arsenic in these samples.

  8. Curie's hypotheses concerning radioactivity and the origin of the elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    Pierre Curie gave two hypotheses at first; (1) It can be supposed that the radioactive substances borrow the energy, which they release, from an external radiation, and their radiation would then be a secondary radiation, (2) It can be supposed that the radioactive substances draw from themselves the energy which they release. The second hypothesis has shown the more fertile in explaining the properties of the radioactive substances. Consequently, the first hypothesis became more or less forgotten. It appears, however, the first hypothesis should play an important role in explaining the phenomena concerning the origin of the elements. The Oklo Phenomenon has demonstrated that a nuclear fire had once existed on our planet earth and formation of heavy elements was occurring in nature. The author pointed out that the difference in the isotopic compositions of xenon found in meteorites, lunar samples and in the earth's atmosphere can only be explained as due to the alterations of the isotropic compositions of xenon by combined effect of (a) mass-fractionation, (b) spallation, and (c) stellar temperature neutron-capture reactions. The strange xenon components are not isotopically pure substance. Instead, xenon-HL is a mixture of the 244 Pu fission xenon and the xenon whose isotopic compositions is severely altered by a combined effect of the processes (a), (b) and (c) mentioned above. These results also indicate that C1 carbonaceous chondrites, which is generally as the most primitive sample of the solar system material, began to retain its xenon 5.1 billion years ago, when the plutonium to uranium ratio in the solar system was as high as almost 0.6 (atom/atom), while the C2 carbonaceous chondrite began to retain their xenon about 150 million years later and the ordinary chondrites and achondrite about 500 to 600 million years later. This means that the birth of the solar system began soon after the last supernova exploded about 5.1 billion years ago, and the generally

  9. Atlantic Forest. A natural reservoir of chemical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Franca, E.J.; De Nadai Fernandes, E.A.; Bacchi, M.A.; Elias, C.

    2008-01-01

    The accumulation of chemical elements in biological compartments is one of the strategies of tropical species to adapt to a low-nutrient soil. This study focuses on the Atlantic Forest because of its eco-environmental importance as a natural reservoir of chemical elements. About 20 elements were determined by INAA in leaf, soil, litter and epiphyte compartments. There was no seasonality for chemical element concentrations in leaves, which probably indicated the maintenance of chemical elements in this compartment. Considering the estimated quantities, past deforestation events could have released large amounts of chemical elements to the environment. (author)

  10. Program for responsible and safe disposal of spent fuel elements and radioactive wastes (National disposal program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The contribution covers the following topics: fundamentals of the disposal policy; amount of radioactive wastes and prognosis; disposal of radioactive wastes - spent fuel elements and wastes from waste processing, radioactive wastes with low heat production; legal framework of the nuclear waste disposal in Germany; public participation, cost and financing.

  11. Airborne chemical elements in Spanish moss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shacklette, H.T.; Connor, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides L.), collected from its geographic range in Southern United States, was analyzed for 38 chemical elements in 123 samples. Analyses of Spanish moss samples collected at rural, residential, highway, and industrial locations reflected significant differences in concentrations of metals. Samples from industrial and highway locations are characterized as containing greater-than-average amounts of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, nickel, and vanadium. The high levels of lead found in some samples from highway locations are especially noteworthy. Many samples from sites near the seashore contained greater-than-average amounts of sodium that is thought to have been derived from ocean spray. Samples from rural locations commonly contain low concentrations of the metal usually associated with industrial or urban activity but may contain large amounts of the elements that are ordinary constituents of soil dust. Four of six samples containing detectable amounts of tin were collected within 50 miles of the only tin smelter in the United States; this result suggests that elemental analyses of Spanish moss samples can provide an economical and rapid method of estimating the kind and relative degree of local atmospheric metal pollution.

  12. Changes is radioactive iodine metabolism in acute chemical intoxications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selyutitskij, G.V.; Likhtarev, I.A.; Volkova, N.V.; Zvonova, I.A.; Ostryakova, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the response of the endocrine system (iodine-absorbing and hormone-secreting fUnctions of the thyroid) as studied by the radioactive iodine test may be a reasonably versatile indicator of the response of the thyroid component of the endocrine system to acute intoxication of the organism. Trials of this test using seven chemical substances have confirmed that the radioiodine test is a sufficienty universal method to be used in setting sanitary and hygienic standards for permissible levels of chemical substances

  13. The mobility of radioactive elements in a Uranium exploitation zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragea, M.; Toro, L.

    2002-01-01

    One of the purposes of this study is to gain knowledge on the possibilities of accumulations of the radioelements (2 38U , 2 32T h, 2 26R a) in a given ecosystem, and, particularly, the knowledge of the mechanisms implied in the transfer of these radioelements around the abandoned mining exploitations. The final purpose is the evaluation of the quantity of the radioelements susceptible to reach the man. The research is directed towards a quantitative evaluation of the transport rate of the contaminating element in the soil. There have been studied the surroundings of ore mines in the Boul Massif in Poiana Rusca Mountains in Romania. These exploitations had been closed and abandoned in 1990. From a geological point of view, the region is formed from crystalline schists, banat eruptive and sedimentary rocks. The iron deposit is totally situated in crystalline rocks in Poiana Rusca Mountains. The concentration of magnetite in the deposit is 25% with a relatively uniform dissemination in the ore. Brannerite (UCaThY)(TiFe) 2 O 6 , was also found in the same place. It is an ore should contain UO3 in proportion of up to about 33%. In 1963 there were stood out areas with radioactive minerals with gamma doses in the range of 500-9100 nGy/hour. In the same time, there were also identified a few points in which the concentration of thorium and uranium were significant. The areas with radioactive mineralizations were generally limited and strictly located in the limit of the iron ores deposit. By closing the mining activities huge quantities of waste rock stored in unprotected dump remained abandoned. As a result of the process of ore extraction, the waste rock and a very low percentage of metallic minerals were stored in tailing ponds, with a clay liner necessary to isolate the tailing from the reast of the aquifer

  14. Radioactive elements definition in composition of snake venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhrabova, M.A.; Topchieva, Sh.F.; Abiev, G.A.; Nagiev, Dj.A.

    2010-11-01

    Full text: The given article presents questions concerned to usage of snake venom in medicine and pharmacy for medicinal drugs production, zootoxin base antidotes, thorough treatment of many deseases, especially onkological, also have a widespread in biology as a specific test-material for biological sistem analises. It is experimentally proved that certain amount of snake venom can replace morphine drugs, taking into acount that snake venom solutions make longer prolonged influence than other drugs, vithout causing an accustoming. It is also marked about possibility of usage of snake venom for cancer treatment. Many expeditions had been conducted with the purpose to research snake venom crytals on the territory of Azerbaijan. During these expeditions snakes capturing had been made with the purpose of taking the venom and also soil samples had been taken in order to research the quantity of radioactive elements. Measurements made with the help of electronic microscope C anberra . Revealed uranium activity in spectrum of venom as a result of radiation background, which appears under influence of ionizing radiation on the environment. On the base of analises data it can be ascertained that snake venom can be used for production of medicinal and also other necessary drugs. [ru

  15. Measurement of natural radioactivity and elemental analysis in plant samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Pooja; Chauhan, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactivity is a major source of worldwide human exposure to ionizing radiation, a fraction of which results from such anthropogenic activities that are not subjected to regulatory radiological safety standards. In addition to being the main source of continuous radiation exposure to the human, soil acts as a medium of migration for transfer of radio nuclides to the biological systems and hence, it is the basic indicator of radiological contamination in the environment. Soil to plant is major pathway for accumulation of radionuclide to human being. The specific metabolic character of the plant species may lead to accumulation of radio-nuclides in their organs which may further depend upon the physico-chemical characteristics of the soil. A fraction of these heavy metals in soil can transfer to plant through various metabolic activities occurring in plants. Heavy metal-contaminated soil is one of the widespread global problems. Migration and accumulation of contaminants in the soil-plant system is complex, and assessment models commonly utilize a soil-plant concentration ratio, referred to as a transfer factor (TF), to estimate the transportation of radionuclides through the food chain. This ratio describes the amount of radionuclide expected to enter a plant from soil. (author)

  16. Recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense. On analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations. Brief instruction for the CBRN (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear) sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, Udo; Biederbick, Walter; Derakshani, Nahid

    2010-01-01

    The recommendation for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense is describing the analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations and includes detail information on the sampling, protocol preparation and documentation procedures. The volume includes a separate brief instruction for the CBRN (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear) sampling.

  17. An investigation of trace and radioactive elements in Elgash area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, Babikir Ali

    1997-08-01

    the area is suitable for drinkking as well as a source of important nutritional elements for cultivation. These values contents of soil, plant and water of the area were found to be lie within acceptable ranges, in addition to that the area contains a very low amounts of pollutants such as lead compared to the world-wide range. The sampling sites were surveyed using a portable scintillometer hand-held at one meter above the ground level. Rock samples collected from jebel Glusi and Alttaka, and soil samples from the river were analyzed using gamma ray spectrometry so as to estimate- and for the fiirts time-the radiactivity concentaration which will contribute towards an establishment of a country radiation map. It is found that the activity concentration of 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K studied in soil samples ranged from 13.0-30.7 Bq/Kg, 12.5-59.9 Bq/Kg and 283.0-461.4 Bq/Kg, respectively. The calculated dose rate due to gamma radiation form the ground at one meter height ranged between 23.5 and 37.5 nGy/h with an average value of 37.5 nGy/h which correspond to annual dose equivalent of 229.9 μSv. This shows that the level of radioactivity in the surveyed area lies within the worldwide range of normal background radiation. (Author)

  18. An investigation of trace and radioactive elements in Elgash area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Rahman, Babikir Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1997-08-01

    the area is suitable for drinkking as well as a source of important nutritional elements for cultivation. These values contents of soil, plant and water of the area were found to be lie within acceptable ranges, in addition to that the area contains a very low amounts of pollutants such as lead compared to the world-wide range. The sampling sites were surveyed using a portable scintillometer hand-held at one meter above the ground level. Rock samples collected from jebel Glusi and Alttaka, and soil samples from the river were analyzed using gamma ray spectrometry so as to estimate- and for the fiirts time-the radiactivity concentaration which will contribute towards an establishment of a country radiation map. It is found that the activity concentration of {sup 226} Ra, {sup 228} Ra and {sup 40} K studied in soil samples ranged from 13.0-30.7 Bq/Kg, 12.5-59.9 Bq/Kg and 283.0-461.4 Bq/Kg, respectively. The calculated dose rate due to gamma radiation form the ground at one meter height ranged between 23.5 and 37.5 nGy/h with an average value of 37.5 nGy/h which correspond to annual dose equivalent of 229.9 {mu}Sv. This shows that the level of radioactivity in the surveyed area lies within the worldwide range of normal background radiation. (Author) 74 refs. , 21 tabs. , 34 figs.

  19. Process for improving the separation efficiency in the isolation of radioactive isotopes in elementary or chemically bonded form from liquids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidberger, R.; Kirch, R.; Kock, W.

    1986-01-01

    In the process for the improvement of the separation efficiency in the isolation of radioactive isotopes in elementary or chemically bonded form from liquids or gases by ion exchange and adsorption, non-radioactive isotopes of the element to be isolated are added to the fluid before the isolation, whereas at the same time a large surplus of the non-radioactive isotopes to the radioactive isotopes is achieved by addition of only small quantities of compounds of the non-radioactive isotopes. (orig./RB) [de

  20. Naturally occurring radioactive elements, arsenic and other metals in drinking water from private wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, Britt-Marie; Thunholm, Bo; Oestergren, Inger; Falk, Rolf; Mjoenes, Lars

    2008-04-01

    island of Gotland, where the bedrock is dominated by Silurian limestones, the majority of the water samples showed boron concentrations far exceeding the provisional guide line value 500 μg/l set by WHO. Metals like lead, cadmium, nickel and chromium are only rarely found in harmful concentrations in Swedish drinking-water. A conclusion of the results from this study is that ordinary analyses of physico-chemical and microbiological parameters as well as radon-222, should be complemented with analyses of metals including uranium and arsenic, especially in waters from drilled wells in bedrock. A direct finding from this study is that radium-226 accumulates in some types of common water filters, which are often used to decrease iron and manganese. With arsenic concentrations in the drinking water exceeding the guide line 10 μg/l, actions should be taken to reduce the concentrations below this limit. Recent tests by the National Board of Health and Welfare of Sweden have shown that adsorption and ion exchange can reduce arsenic in drinking water up to 98 %. This project has shown that arsenic accumulates to a large degree in common water filters installed to remove iron and manganese. This study gives an overview of how drinking water, extracted from private wells, is influenced by various elements that occur naturally in our environment. New problem areas such as a radiation dose from lead-210 and polonium-210 have been identified. Information campaigns addressing different target groups, like county councils and municipalities, are necessary to inform well owners about the issues on radon, uranium, arsenic, fluoride and water filters. Additional studies are needed to further increase our knowledge on radioactive elements, arsenic and other possibly harmful elements in drinking water. A further mapping of lead-210 and polonium-210 occurrence in drinking water would allow for better estimates of dose to the public

  1. Studies on the remediation of environment contaminated with radioactive pollutants using the chemical separation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurotaki, Katsumi; Yonehara, Hidenori; Sahoo, S.K. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ishii, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki (Japan). Lab. for Radioecology

    2001-12-01

    Remediation of soil and drinking water contaminated with radioactive nuclides is important for the mitigation of radiation exposure. Then we attempted to construct the remediation system including the dose estimation system using the chemical separation technique to remove pollutants from the environment. The information on air dose rate is important for assessment of risk from the radiation exposure. Then we measured the air dose rate and analysed the relationship between air dose rate and the contamination of soil at the area in Russia (Bryansk district) contaminated by Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. Moreover, we analysed the soil of Bryansk district on the concentration of rare earth elements, thorium and uranium and on the isotope ratio of strontium. On the other hand, we tried to develop the rapid measurement method of radioactivity of Sr-90 which is one of the dangerous radionuclides, because the method of radioactivity measurement in the literature is too time-consuming. It was reported recently that the molecules containing SH group form the covalent bond with gold atoms at the surface of gold plate and that crown ether compounds have strong affinity to strontium. Then we attempted to synthesize the crown ether containing SH group. In addition, we search the inorganic elements accumulated to special organisms of fishes and other animals in sea in order to find out new reagent for trace elements. Transition metal such as Co, Fe, Ni, Ti, V and Zn were detected from the intracellular granules in the bronchial heart of octopus. (author)

  2. Radioactivity and elemental analysis in the Ruseifa municipal landfill, Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jundi, J.; Al-Tarazi, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a low background gamma-ray spectrometer based on a Hyper Pure Germanium detector was used to determine the activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in soil samples from various locations within the Ruseifa municipal landfill in Jordan. The chemical composition of the samples was also determined using a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer. The maximum and minimum annual outdoor effective doses were found to be 103 and 36 μSv a -1 in the old landfill and Abu-Sayaah village, respectively. The annual outdoor effective dose at the recent landfill site was found to be 91 μSv a -1 . The annual effective dose equivalents from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation at the old landfill and the recent landfill were higher than the typical worldwide value of 70 μSv a -1 . Thus, some remediation of the soils on both old and recent landfills should be considered before any development for public activities. This could be achieved by mixing with clean soil from areas which are known to have lower radiation background. The concentration of heavy metals Zn, Cr, and Ba in the three sites included in this study were found to be higher than the background levels in the soil samples of the control area (Abu-Sayaah village). The enrichment factors for the above three elements were calculated and found to be: complex building site: Zn = 2.52 and Ba = 1.33; old landfill site: Cr = 1.88, Zn = 3.64, and Ba = 1.26; and recent landfill site: Cr = 1.57, Zn = 2.19, and Ba = 1.28. There was a strong negative correlation between the concentrations of the metallic elements (Mg, Al, Mn, Fe and Rb) and the concentrations of Zn, Ba, and Cr. Moreover, a strong positive correlation was found between Zn, Ba, and Cr. Thus these elements were enriched in the solid waste

  3. Environmental radioactivity and chemical composition of different types of bee honeys produced at in-house area, egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Environmental radioactivity and chemical composition of bee honey varies with the surrounding environment (major floral and soil contamination), which reflects the nutritional value of honey. 23SU, 232Th, 40K, >37Cs, major elements Na, K, Mg and Cl and trace elements Mn, Fe, Zn, F, I, Cu, Co, Ni and Sr as well as toxic elements Cd and Pb -were all determined in different types of bee honey, which include non-floral honey with artificial feeding (syrup-feed honey) and mono-floral honeys (clover honey or sesame honey or orange honey). These elements were also determined in the bee feeds, which include flowers (clover, sesame and orange) and syrup. The results revealed that of all types of honeys and syrup-feed honey exhibited higher natural radioactivity and higher concentrations ofNa, K, Mg, Cl, oMn, Fe, Co, Cd and Pb than in the other honeys. Orange honey contained the lowest natural radioactivity and element concentrations. Clover honey had the lowest toxic element Cd and Pb concentrations (0.02 and 4.2/xg/g, respectively) while sesame honey contained the highest levels of Cd and F (0.7 and 12.9 /ig/g, respectively). Statistical analysis revealed significant correlation between honey and the feed (R= 0.745 to 0.921). Environmental radioactivity and element concentrations in the honey under study were in the safety baseline levels for human consumption

  4. Chemical and radioactivity study of sea alga distribution along the Syrian coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Mamish, S.; Budeir, Y.

    2001-11-01

    Three types of sea alga distributed along the Syrian coast have been studied from the chemical and radioactivity point of view. Results have shown the metals that red alga contains the highest levels of Ca and Mg while brown alga were found to contain relatively high concentrations of other elements and non metals such as Cl, I and Br. In addition, 137 Cs concentrations in all the analyzed sample were low while the levels of naturally occurring radionuclides such as 210 Po, 210 Pb and radium isotopes were found to be high in red alga which indicates their selectivity to these isotopes. On the other hand, brown alga and especially Cysteseira has shown a clear selectivity for some trace elements such as As, Cr, Cd, Cu and Co, this selectivity may encourage the use of brown alga as biological indicator for trace elements pollution. (author)

  5. Advances in chemical investigations of the heaviest elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Türler Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although somewhat in the shadow of the discoveries of new elements, experimental chemical investigations of the heaviest elements have made tremendous progress in the last decades. Indeed, it was possible to experimentally determine thermochemical properties of heavy transactinide elements such as copernicium or flerovium. But will it be possible to chemically study all currently known elements of the periodic table up to element 118? While it is experimentally feasible to work with single atoms, the short half-lives of even the longest currently known isotopes of elements 115 through 118 call for new experimental approaches.

  6. Electronic Transmutation (ET): Chemically Turning One Element into Another.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Lundell, Katie A; Olson, Jared K; Bowen, Kit H; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2018-03-08

    The concept of electronic transmutation (ET) depicts the processes that by acquiring an extra electron, an element with the atomic number Z begins to have properties that were known to only belong to its neighboring element with the atomic number Z+1. Based on ET, signature compounds and chemical bonds that are composed of certain elements can now be designed and formed by other electronically transmutated elements. This Minireview summarizes the recent developments and applications of ET on both the theoretical and experimental fronts. Examples on the ET of Group 13 elements into Group 14 elements, Group 14 elements into Group 15 elements, and Group 15 elements into Group 16 elements are discussed. Compounds and chemical bonding composed of carbon, silicon, germanium, phosphorous, oxygen and sulfur now have analogues using transmutated boron, aluminum, gallium, silicon, nitrogen, and phosphorous. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Radioactivity in chemical and organic fertilizer used in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbady, A.G.E.; Yousef, A.M.M.; Abbady, A.; El-Taher, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Egypt Chemical factories (ECF); such as Talkha, Sues, Abo Qeyer, Kafer Elzayat, and Assuit factories, produces and markets a range of phosphate based fertilizers, including Simple Super Phosphate (SSP) fertilizer, Triple Super Phosphate (TSP) fertilizer and Urea. Phosphate fertilizers produced by ECF are derived from phosphate ore. In addition to phosphate minerals, these ores can contain significant amounts of a wide range of impurities, including heavy metals and naturally occurring radionuclides. This study was carried out to determine the content of radionuclides in fertilizer products produced by ECF and some organic fertilizer (animal manure) includes cow, sheep and chicken fertilizer. In both samples (Chemical and organic fertilizers), the activity concentrations of Ra 2 26 are higher than those Th 2 32. The radioactivity of 226 R a in chemical fertilizers ranged from 21.6 ± 3.6 to 111.2 ± 8.9 Bq kg-1, phosphate fertilizers TSP contained high contents of 226 R a. The average radioactivity of 226 R a in TSP was 79.3 ± 7.4 Bq kg-1, in SSP 51.2 ± 5 Bq kg-1, and in Urea 35.1± 3.5 Bq kg-1. The activity of 232 T h in the different fertilizers ranged from 1.3 ± 1.1 to 9.9 ± 3.2 Bq kg-1,the highest activity observed in SSP fertilizer. The activity of 40 K was found to be great in the TSP fertilizer, which contained a mean activity 478.1± 21.3 Bq kg-1. With respect to organic fertilizers the average radioactivity of 226 R a, 232 T h and 40 K are 40 ± 1.6 Bq kg-1, 3.1± 1.2 and 427.1± 20 Bq kg-1. The data are discussed and compared with those given in the literatures. This study could be useful as baseline data for radiation exposure to fertilizers, and their impact on human health

  8. Studies of the physico-chemical properties on the transuranian elements in connection with the migration phenomenon in the geosphere. Task 3 Characterization of radioactive waste forms. A series of final reports (1985-89)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitorge, P.; Oliver, J.; Mangin, J.P.; Billon, A.

    1991-01-01

    In the first part, the properties of the transuranium elements (TRU) mainly Pu Np Am have been investigated in terms of complexation by OH and CO3 ligands in aqueous solution. The species which are formed in given physicochemical conditions (ionic strength, concentrations...) are studied with no direct reference to well defined ground waters. Equilibrium constants of complexes and redox potential values are useful in the drawing up of Pourbaix's diagrams. Areas of stability of species in function of Eh pH pCO2 are given for the different elements in a few cases. The second part of this report deals with the study of the transfer of tritiated water cesium and strontium through highly compacted clay (diffusion coefficient). In a third part a code for the computation of ion migration and diffusion in areas close to radwaste storage facilities has been developed. This type of application was found to require a mesh pattern and boundary conditions different from the usual, which justifies the writing of a new code called CONDIMENT. (Convection and Diffusion of elements) 49 figs.; 18 tabs.; 21 refs

  9. Chemical identification and properties of element 112

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yakushev, AB.; Zvára, Ivo; Oganessian, YT.; Belozerov, AV.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Eichler, B.; Hubener, S.; Sokol, EA.; Turler, A.; Yeremin, AV.; Buklanov, GV.; Chelnokov, ML.; Chepigin, VI.; Gorshkov, VA.; Gulyaev, AV.; Lebedev, VY.; Malyshev, ON.; Popeko, AG.; Soverna, S.; Szeglowski, Z.; Timokhin, SN.; Tretyakova, SP.; Vasko, VM.; Itkis, MG.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 8 (2003), s. 433-439 ISSN 0033-8230 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : element 112 * superheavy elements * transactinoids Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 0.940, year: 2003

  10. Transfer of radioactive and chemical pollutants into irrigated rice fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myttenaere, C.; Mousny, J.-M.; Dabin, P.; Bittel, R.

    1975-01-01

    In a general study on the consequences of radioactive and chemical releases in continental waters, flooded rice fields must be considered as a very important ecosystem due to the very large quantities of water used. In order to approach as much as possible to the natural conditions (irrigated rice fields of Northern Italy) ''mini-rice fields'' were built and local practices were respected. The behavior of activation and fission products ( 137 Cs, 60 Co, 65 Zn, 51 Cr...) and heavy metals pollutants (Cd, Cr, Sn) was studied and the transfer from water to soil and plant was followed. Concentration factors were calculated for the different organs of the plant and the impact of rice ingested to the dose delivered to man was evaluated [fr

  11. Isolation of transplutonium elements from high-level radioactive wastes using diphenyl(dibutylcarbamoylmethyl)phosphine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmutova, M.K.; Litvina, M.N.; Pribylova, G.A.; Ivanova, L.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Smirnov, I.V.; Shadrin, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Consequent stages of development of principal technological scheme of extraction separation of transplutonium elements from high-level radioactive wastes of spent fuel reprocessing are presented. Approach to reagent selection from the series of carbamoylmethylphosphine oxides is based. Distribution of transplutonium elements and accompanying elements between model solution of high-level radioactive wastes and solution of reagent in organic solvent is investigated. Methods of separation of transplutonium elements, reextraction of transplutonium elements together with rare earth elements are developed. Principal technological scheme of transplutonium elements separation from nonevaporated raffinates of spent fuel of WWER type reactors and method of separation of transplutonium and rare earth elements in weakly acid reextract with the use of liquid chromatography with free immobile phase are proposed [ru

  12. Evaluation of air pollution due to natural radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, B. A.; Lopez, M. E.

    2014-08-01

    The presence of radioactive materials in the crustal and as consequence present in the surface, originate the natural radioactive contamination in the different solid, liquid and gaseous materials; particularly in the air that we breathe. Among these radioactive materials that contribute to the environmental pollution are the presences of uranium, radio, thorium and their respective disintegration chains, as the gas radon (Rn-222) that spreads in the air; whose presence increases in areas where the seismic activity is notorious or other natural events take place, case of the Lima (Peru) City. In this work we show the measurements realized during two consecutive years in the roof of a building of three floors in the Lima City, with the purpose of establishing the fluctuations of this gassy pollutant in the surrounding air. The measurements were made using nitrocellulose detectors (Lr-115 type 2) applying the nuclear prints technique. The obtained results allowing to have an indicator of the Rn-222 presence in the air during different seasons of the year and also the presence of other possible radioactive pollutants. The use of this technique allows obtaining and studying the prints that generate the alpha particles that are emitted during the Rn-222 disintegration or by means of their descendants or predecessors; also allowing to discriminate between the short-range tracers or lineal type prints and other very different prints obtained during some of the measurements. The results analyzed according to proposed models are presented in this work. (author)

  13. Chemical analysis of rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukahara, Ryoichi; Sakoh, Takefumi; Nagai, Iwao

    1994-01-01

    Recently attention has been paid to ICP-AES or ICP-MS, and the reports on the analysis of rare earth elements by utilizing these methods continue to increase. These reports have become to take about 30% of the reports on rare earth analysis, and this is because these methods are highly sensitive to rare earth elements, and also these methods have spread widely. In ICP-AES and ICP-MS, mostly solution samples are measured, therefore, solids must be made into solution. At the time of quantitatively determining the rare earth elements of low concentration, separation and concentration are necessary. Referring to the literatures reported partially in 1990 and from 1991 to 1993, the progress of ICP-AES and ICP-MS is reported. Rare earth oxides and the alloys containing rare earth elements are easily decomposed with acids, but the decomposition of rocks is difficult, and its method is discussed. The separation of the rare earth elements from others in geochemical samples, cation exchange process is frequently utilized. Also solvent extraction process has been studied. For the separation of rare earth elements mutually, chromatography is used. The spectral interference in spectral analysis was studied. The comparison of these methods with other methods is reported. (K.I)

  14. Applicability of thermodynamic database of radioactive elements developed for the Japanese performance assessment of HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Mikazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Rai, Dhanpat; Ochs, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) published a second progress report (also known as H12 report) on high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in Japan (JNC 1999). This report helped to develop confidence in the selected HLW disposal system and to establish the implementation body in 2000 for the disposal of HLW. JNC developed an in-house thermodynamic database for radioactive elements for performance analysis of the engineered barrier system (EBS) and the geosphere for H12 report. This paper briefly presents the status of the JNC's thermodynamic database and its applicability to perform realistic analyses of the solubilities of radioactive elements, evolution of solubility-limiting solid phases, predictions of the redox state of Pu in the neutral pH range under reducing conditions, and to estimate solubilities of radioactive elements in cementitious conditions. (author)

  15. Study of commercial chemical additives for cementation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota Vieira, V.; Oliveira, C.C. de

    2015-01-01

    In this research it has been studied the effects of chemical additives (admixtures) in the cementation process of radioactive wastes, which are used to improve the properties of waste cementation process, both of the paste and of the solidified product. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market, then it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their effects. The tests were carried out with a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste coming from PWR nuclear reactors. It was cemented using two formulations, A and B, incorporating higher or lower amount of waste, respectively. It was added chemical admixtures from two manufacturers (S and H), which were: accelerators, set retarders and superplasticizers. The experiments were organized by a factorial design 23. The measured parameters were the viscosity, the setting time, the paste and product density and the compressive strength. In this study we performed comparative analyzes of the results of compressive strength at age of 28 and 90 days and between the densities of the samples at the same ages. The compressive strength test at age of 28 days is considered a parameter essential issues related to security handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented product, but presented lower values density products. (authors)

  16. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs

  17. Chemical treatment of radioactive liquid wastes from medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo A, J.

    1995-01-01

    This work is a study about the treatment of the most important radioactive liquid wastes from medical usages, generated in medical institutions with nuclear medicine services. The radionuclides take in account are 32 P, 35 S, 125 I. The treatments developed and improved were specific chemical precipitations for each one of the radionuclides. This work involve to precipitate the radionuclide from the liquid waste, making a chemical compound insoluble in the aqueous phase, for this process the radionuclide stay in the precipitate, lifting the aqueous phase with a very low activity than the begin. The 32 P precipitated in form of Ca 3 32 P O 4 and Ca 2 H 32 P O 4 with a value for Decontamination Factor (DF) at the end of the treatment of 32. The 35 S was precipitated in form of Ba 35 SO 4 with a DF of 26. The 125 I was precipitated in Cu 125 I to obtain a DF of 24. The results of the treatments are between the limits given for the International Atomic Energy Agency and the 10 Code of Federal Regulation 20, for the safety release at the environment. (Author)

  18. Transuranium elements in organic chemical forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu; Yamamoto, Masayoshi

    1987-01-01

    It is very important to achive an understanding what role organic matter plays in the behavior of transuranium elements in the environment. This paper reports the studies on characteristics of fallout Pu and Am in soil closely related to soil organic matter, and interaction of humic acid and Am (III) in aqueous solution. From the results obtained, it was suggested that the humic acids had strong interaction with transuranium elements, but such soluble complexes were removed soon from the solution by coagulation and sorption on soil. (author)

  19. First attempt to chemically identify element 112

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yakushev, AB.; Buklanov, GV.; Chelnokov, ML.; Chepigin, VI.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Gorshkov, VA.; Hubener, S.; Malyshev, ON.; Oganessian, YT.; Popeko, AG.; Sokol, EA.; Timokhin, SN.; Turler, A.; Vasko, VM.; Yeremin, AV.; Zvára, Ivo

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 89, 11/12 (2001), s. 743-745 ISSN 0033-8230 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : superheavy elements * actionoid * transactinoids Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 0.660, year: 2001

  20. Exploring the Everyday Context of Chemical Elements: Discovering the Elements of Car Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a project about the chemical elements made by 15-year-old Spanish high school students of Chemistry. It focuses on context-based teaching combined with the advantages of creating a large mural which subsequently is exposed in the school. The project consisted of researching the chemical elements in the different materials that…

  1. Assembly for transport and storage of radioactive nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, G.

    1978-01-01

    The invention concerns the self-control of coolant deficiencies on the transport of spent fuel elements from nuclear reactors. It guarantees that drying out of the fuel elements is prevented in case of a change of volume of the fluid contained in storage tanks and accumulators and serving as coolant and shielding medium. (TK) [de

  2. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other

  3. Measurements of radon and chemical elements: Popocatepetl volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N.; Lopez, B.; Reyes, A.V.; Armienta, M.A.; Valdes, C.; Mena, M.; Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Popocatepetl volcano is a higher risk volcano located at 60 Km from Mexico City. Radon measurements on soil in two fixed seasons located in the north slope of volcano were carried out. Moreover the radon content, major chemical elements and tracks in water samples of three springs was studied. The radon of soil was determined with solid detectors of nuclear tracks (DSTN). The radon in subterranean water was evaluated through the liquid scintillation method and it was corroborated with an Alpha Guard equipment. The major chemical elements were determined with conventional chemical methods and the track elements were measured using an Icp-Ms equipment. The radon on soil levels were lower, indicating a moderate diffusion of the gas across the slope of the volcano. The radon in subterranean water shown few changes in relation with the active scene of the volcano. The major chemical elements and tracks showed a stable behavior during the sampling period. (Author)

  4. An Alternate Graphical Representation of Periodic table of Chemical Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakr, Mohd

    2009-01-01

    Periodic table of chemical elements symbolizes an elegant graphical representation of symmetry at atomic level and provides an overview on arrangement of electrons. It started merely as tabular representation of chemical elements, later got strengthened with quantum mechanical description of atomic structure and recent studies have revealed that periodic table can be formulated using SO(4,2)* SU(2) group. IUPAC, the governing body in Chemistry, doesn't approve any periodic table as a standard...

  5. Treatment of Gravel Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohsah, M. A.; Kamal, S. M.; Mamoon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental protection primarily means controlling the releases of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes to the environment and involves treatment, storage, cleanup and disposal of these wastes. The present study concerns the cleanup of gravel that has been contaminated with 2 26 R a. Aqueous solutions of different compositions including water and various concentrations of calcium chloride and barium chloride were used to leach the contaminated gravel. The leaching experiments were carried out in glass column. In some leaching experiments, samples of sandy soil were placed below the gravel to test the sorption of the leached 2 26 R a by the soil. The relative efficiencies of the leachant and the extent of sorption of the leached radionuclide were determined both by the liquid scintillation counting and by the thermoluminescent chips. The TLD chips record the dose before and after decontamination of the gravel and before and after contamination of the soil samples when used. The results obtained indicated that acidified barium chloride was relatively the most effective leachant of 2 26 R a contamination. It reduced the dose from the contaminated gravel to almost half. The soil sample used adsorbs the leached radionuclides efficiently, increasing the soil naturally low dose to about six folds

  6. Release of radioactive fission products from BN-600 reactor untight fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, S.L.; Tsikunov, A.G.; Lisitsin, E.C.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental data on the release of radioactive fission products from BN-600 reactor untight fuel elements are given in the report. Various groups of radionuclides: inert gases Xe, Kr, volatile Cs, J, non-volatile Nb, and La are considered. The results of calculation-experimental study of transfer and distribution of radionuclides in the reactor primary circuit, gas system and sodium coolant are considered. It is shown that some complex radioactivity transfer processes can be described by simple mathematical models. (author)

  7. Physico-chemical and radioactive characterization of TiO2 undissolved mud for its valorization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazquez, M.J.; Mantero, J.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vaca, F.; Lozano, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    In order to find a potential valorization of a waste generated in the industrial process devoted to the production of TiO 2 pigments, and as an essential and basic step, this waste must firstly be physically and chemically characterized. Moreover, the content of radioactivity is taken in to account due to it comes from a NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) industry. With this end, microscopic studies were performed by applying scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalysis (SEM-XRMA), while the mineralogical compositions were carried out by means of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The concentrations of its major elements were determined by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), while heavy metals and other trace elements were ascertained through Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results obtained for this waste have revealed several lines of research into potential applications. Firstly, with the refractory properties of mineral phases observed leading to a possible use in the ceramics industry or in thermal isolators. And secondly, attending to the characteristic particle-size spectra can be used as an additive in the manufacture of cement and finally, its high concentration of titanium may be used as a bactericide in brick production.

  8. Organic waste process containing at least one radioactive element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roy, F.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of an organic waste process containing at least one element from the group comprising strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium. It comprises the introduction of the organic waste and gaseous oxygen in a bath of melted salt containing an alkaline carbonate, the bath being maintained at a high temperature between 400 and 1000 0 C and at a pressure of 0.5 to 10 bars, so that the organic waste is burnt and oxidised at least partly, the element selected being retained by the bath of melted salt [fr

  9. Trace elements and radioactivity in aerosol particles, produced in the area of Ptolemais (Greece)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.; Zoumi, K.; Nikolakaki, S.; Kritidis, P.

    1998-01-01

    Most of the Greek lignite power plants have been installed in the area of Ptolemais, and a major part of them during the period 1981-1990. Aerosol filters collected in the first and the last years of the decade have been analysed for trace elements as well as for radioactivity (total beta) content. Analysis was performed by radioisotope excited X-ray fluorescence, and 17 elements were determined. A special interest is focused on lead concentrations, an element whose environmental concentrations are regulated by the Greek law; the results for lead were validated by atomic absorption spectrometry. Trace element and radioactivity levels were found significantly lower than the current limit. Enrichment factors and correlation among the analysed elements were also estimated. (author)

  10. State-of-the-art coordination chemistry of radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharisov, B I; Mendez-Rojas, Miguel A

    2001-01-01

    Modern procedures for the synthesis of coordination and organometallic compounds of actinides and technetium and the properties of these compounds are surveyed. Experimental techniques, including methods for the synthesis of actinide and technetium complexes from elemental metals (oxidative dissolution and direct electrosynthesis), salts and halide, carbonyl and other complexes are generalised. The bibliography includes 283 references.

  11. Using proven, cost-effective chemical stabilization to remediate radioactive and heavy metal contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.; Sogue, A.

    1999-01-01

    Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, L.L.C. (RMRS) has deployed a cost-effective metals stabilization method which can be used to reduce the cost of remediation projects where radioactivity and heavy metals are the contaminants of concern. The Envirobond TM process employs the use of a proprietary chemical process to stabilize metals in many waste forms, and provides an excellent binding system that can easily be compacted to reduce the waste into a shippable brick called Envirobric TM . The advantages of using chemical stabilization are: (1) Low cost, due to the simplicity of the process design and inexpensive reagents. (2) Chemical stabilization is easily deployed in field applications, which limit the amount of shielding and other protective measures. (3) The process does not add volume and bulk to the treated waste; after treatment the materials may be able to remain on-site, or if transportation and disposal is required the cost will be reduced due to lower volumes. (4) No secondary waste. The simplicity of this process creates a safe environment while treating the residues, and the long-term effectiveness of this type of chemical stabilization lowers the risk of future release of hazardous elements associated with the residues. (author)

  12. Combustible radioactive waste treatment by incineration and chemical digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stretz, L.A.; Crippen, M.D.; Allen, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    A review is given of present and planned combustible radioactive waste treatment systems in the US. Advantages and disadvantages of various systems are considered. Design waste streams are discussed in relation to waste composition, radioactive contaminants by amount and type, and special operating problems caused by the waste

  13. Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Labushev, Mikhail M.

    2013-01-01

    The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. B...

  14. Behaviour of radioactive elements in the vegetation of uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitaka, Yukinori

    2001-03-01

    To improve the predictability of radium transfer from soil to plant, the behaviour was compared with other alkaline earth elements. I analyzed the radium transfer ratio as the factor of solubility from soil to water, absorbability by plant from soil, and the allocation to each organ for three grass fields in Ningyo-Toge environmental engineering center. The results indicated that the behaviour of radium is correlated with that of other alkaline earth elements. Moreover negative correlation was found between the absorbability of each element and the concentration of Mg and/or Ca in soluble fraction. From the results, it was suggested that the absorption of radium should be influenced by the regulation of the absorption of these nutrients. Secondly, to clarify the soil- and plant-specific feature of the radium transfer, the radium transfer was investigated for twelve plant species from four vegetation. There was 60 times of difference in radium concentration among plant species. It was observed that there is strong correlation between the transfer factor of radium and that of calcium. The differences in radium concentration of plant were explained by the soil-specific difference in the concentration ratio of radium and the plant-specific difference in calcium concentration. (author)

  15. Solidification technique of radioactive elements. Research using zirconium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Susumu; Ito, Katsuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Proton type zirconium phosphates HZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , NASICON type three-dimensional net work structure, is used for solidification of Cs in the high level radioactive waste. Two kinds of solidification methods such as the dry method and autoclave method are explained. Cs ion entered into 0.6nm space of HZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , and formed ionic bonding, which made the difficult situation to remove. When mixture of HZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 and 23 kinds of M(NO 3 )n (M= Li, Na, K, Pb, Sr, Bi, Y, Mg, Ca, Sc, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd, Ba, La, Ce, Tl, and Pb; n=1,2 or 3) was treated at 400-700degC by dry method, solidification of the subject metals was succeeded. Amount of solidification of Cs by autoclave at 250degC is almost same as the dry method and its leachability resistance increased 40 times than that of dry method after heat treatment in atmosphere at 700degC. (S.Y.)

  16. Chemical form of transuranic elements in underground environment and its effect on adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tomo

    1990-01-01

    Many of the transuranic elements such as Np, Pu and Am contained in high-level radioactive wastes are highly dangerous to humans and have extremely long lives. Therefore, safety evaluation of them is highly important after their disposal into the ground. Particularly important processes include the migration of these transuranic elements in near and far fields. The migration of a nuclide depends largely on its chemical form in the underground environment. The present report first describes various chemical forms of transuranic elements in underground environments and outlines their migration behaviors. Techniques that have recently become available for determining their chemical forms include photo-acoustic spectroscopy, thermal lensing spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence, photo-acoustic detection of light scattering, auto-correlation photon spectroscopy, and laser-induced time-resolved spectrofluorometry. Chemical forms of these elements are then discussed focusing on underground environmental conditions, pH-Eh diagram, deposition/dissolution, formation of complex, formation of colloid, and organic complexes. Migration is discussed in relation to ions, insoluble matters, and colloids. (N.K.)

  17. Geochemistry of radioactive elements in the process of weathering of carbonatites, acidic and alkali rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhmodik, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    Geochemical peculiarities of uranium and thorium behaviour under formation of area crusts of weathering of granitoids, alkali rocks and carbonatites of certain areas of East Siberia are considered. The presented crysts of weathering have been formed under different climatic conditions, they have different age (in the limit of upper Cretaceous period - Neogene up to Quaternary time), chemical and mineral composition. Factors determining and controlling the level of uranium and thorium concentrations in weathering products are disclosed on the basis of facts using the methods of neutron-fragmentary radiography and by-fractional balances. Uranium and thorium distribution in granulometric fractions of crysts of weathering is considered in detail. Data on change in forms of radioactive elements under weathering, effect of fine-dispersed hypergene minerals (kaolinite, montmorillonite, goethite, etc.) on the character of uranium and thorium distribution in eluvial products as well as on sources of migrating uranium in crusts of weathering are presented. Scales of uranium and thorium redistribution under weathering are revealed. Supposition on the source of uranium and throium in sediments is made

  18. Magnesium Potassium Phosphate Compound for Immobilization of Radioactive Waste Containing Actinide and Rare Earth Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey E. Vinokurov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective immobilization of liquid radioactive waste (LRW is key to the successful development of nuclear energy. The possibility of using the magnesium potassium phosphate (MKP compound for LRW immobilization on the example of nitric acid solutions containing actinides and rare earth elements (REE, including high level waste (HLW surrogate solution, is considered in the research work. Under the study of phase composition and structure of the MKP compounds that is obtained by the XRD and SEM methods, it was established that the compounds are composed of crystalline phases—analogues of natural phosphate minerals (struvite, metaankoleite. The hydrolytic stability of the compounds was determined according to the semi-dynamic test GOST R 52126-2003. Low leaching rates of radionuclides from the compound are established, including a differential leaching rate of 239Pu and 241Am—3.5 × 10−7 and 5.3 × 10−7 g/(cm2∙day. As a result of the research work, it was concluded that the MKP compound is promising for LRW immobilization and can become an alternative material combining the advantages of easy implementation of the technology, like cementation and the high physical and chemical stability corresponding to a glass-like compound.

  19. Gold and radioactive elements in the bauxite deposits of Shevaroy hills, Tamil Nadu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, B K; Sengupta, D K

    1982-11-01

    The presence of gold and radioactive elements in the bauxite deposits of Shevaroy Hills has been determined by neutron activation technique. The behaviour of uranium supports the theoretical findings. The higher concentration of gold (<10/sup 3/%) indicates that the deposits are auriferous.

  20. Gold and radioactive elements in the bauxite deposits of Shevaroy hills, Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.K.; Sengupta, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of gold and radioactive elements in the bauxite deposits of Shevaroy Hills has been determined by neutron activation technique. The behaviour of uranium supports the theoretical findings. The higher concentration of gold ( -3 %) indicates that the deposits are auriferous. (author)

  1. Control and repair system for radioactive nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallenberger, J.M.; Hornak, L.P.; Desmarchais, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    Irradiated fuel, especially such containing Pu-239, are put in a shielding container for inspection or repair. This container consists of an inner and outer tube of, for example, stainless steel, between which there is a gap filled with water, mineral oil, or polyethylene. At the upper end of the shielding container a rotating sleeve is positioned, by means of a bearing. It contains, for instance, an access opening and an inspection opening which are shielded by means of plexiglass. The access hole is opened only for repair work. In oder to prevent radiation from escaping to the environment during withdrawal and inspection of the fuel elements a second shielding container or shielding tube may be put over the sleeve. (DG/PB) [de

  2. Features of adsorbed chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in iodine air filters AU-1500 of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Dikiy, N.P.; Ledenyov, O.P.; Lyashko, Yu.V.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of research is to investigate the physical features of spatial distribution of the adsorbed chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the iodine air filters of the type of AU-1500 in the forced-exhaust ventilation at the nuclear power plant. The ?-activation analysis method is applied to accurately characterize the distribution of the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the AU-1500 iodine air filter after its long term operation at the nuclear power plant. The typical spectrum of the detected chemical elements and their isotopes in the AU-1500 iodine air filter, which was exposed by the irradiation of bremsstrahlung gamma-quantum producing by the accelerating electrons in the tantalum target, are obtained. The spatial distributions of the detected chemical element 127 I and some other chemical elements and their isotopes in the layer of absorber, which was made of the cylindrical coal granules of the type of SKT-3, in the AU-1500 iodine air filter are also researched. The possible influences by the standing wave of air pressure in the iodine air filter on the spatial distribution of the chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filter are discussed. The comprehensive analysis of obtained research results on the distribution of the adsorbed chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber of iodine air filter is performed.

  3. Systematic studies of radioactive elements in various rocks in northern Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattananikorn, K; Teeyasoontranont, V; Vilaithong, T; Lerdthusnee, S

    1985-12-31

    An investigation into the concentrations of the main heat producing radioactive elements, uranium, thorium and potassium in various rock samples was carried out by gamma ray spectrometry. The samples included igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks of different ages. They were collected mainly from the northern part of the country. Results of the investigation show relatively high concentrations of radioactive elements in most rock types, compared to the average values commonly cited. However, for granitic rocks the values obtained are, more or less, comparable to those obtained by Amnuaychai Thienprasert and his colleagues, who worked in the same area using different methods of investigation. Apart from that granitic samples of triassic and cretaceous ages also have a similar radioactive elements concentration to those of the Darby pluton in Southeastern Seward Peninsular, Alaska, the Granite Mountain in Wyoming and the Conway Granite of New Hampshire which has been cited as a low-grade uranium-thorium resource. As a consequence of such high radioactive element concentrations, heat generations of most rock samples investigated are much higher than reported average values. The heat generations seem to have some influence on the nature of heat sources of hot springs in northern Thailand, especially at Ban Pong, Nam Ron hot spring Amphoe Mae Chan. Furthermore the radiogenic heat productions also affect to a great extent surface heat flow in the region provided that the radioactive element concentrations do not decrease with depth. Surface heat flow in northern Thailand was recently reported to be very high compared to the average value of the earth. This high heat flow was suspected to be caused by extensional tectonics resulting indirectly from sea-floor spreading in the Andaman Sea during the last 10 million years. However, from this study it can be shown that heat generations could be another factor which has much influence on the value of the surface heat flow.

  4. Study of chemical reactions in the nuclear underground explosion - Incidence on radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picq, Jean Maurice

    1970-01-01

    In order to find out and state the theoretical or semi-empirical laws governing the reaction of radioactivity in contained nuclear explosion, we are studying the chemical reactions during the different stages of the cavity and chimney formation, as well as thermal transfers. At the same time, we are carrying an experimental study on melted rock and gas samples taken from the French underground explosions. The results of which can be found in this paper are derived from our present experiments at the plant (have been obtained from partial studies). During the French underground explosions, we took gaseous samples. The gas analysis, without taking water vapour into consideration, showed that those samples were composed of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide with small quantities of hydrocarbons (chiefly methane - about one per cent). The total amount of gas being quite large and proportional to the burst power, we came to the conclusion that those gases were produced by rock reactions (that rock was granite). We considered the following reagents because they were found in sufficient quantities to alter the balance between the different components: ferrous ions contained in mica, biotite, carbon dioxide from carbonates and water, either free or in a component state, contained in the rock. A comparison between theoretical and experimental results led us to notice among other things: the temperature of rock re-solidification; pressure nearing lithostatic pressure. Since the components of the environment, water not included, is quite homogeneous, the gas volume produced by '1 kiloton' is quite constant. On the other hand, the relative proportion of the gases undergoes a few changes, particularly the ratio CO/CO 2 which normally depends on the quantity of water contained in the environment. This statement is verified by the calculation of thermodynamic equilibriums. In order to calculate the simultaneous chemical equilibrium we have first selected five reactions. We

  5. Process Analysis in Chemical Plant by Means of Radioactive Tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, T.; Hamada, K.; Osada, K. [Showa Denko K.K., Tokyo (Japan)

    1967-06-15

    Following the movement of solids and fluids is important in chemical processes to determine mixing efficiency and residence time. Since it is necessary to follow many complex substances such as raw materials, intermediates and reactants in plant investigations, it is often necessary to ascertain whether the behaviour of the radioisotope tracer and the substance to be traced are identical. The most difficult problem is to determine the best method of labelling, a factor which is a substantial key to the success of an experiment. Usually, there are three labelling techniques: radioisotope labelling, pre-.activation of the material and post-activation of the material. This paper deals with practical examples of the double-tracer technique, a combination of conventional radioisotope labelling and post-activation methods by means of activation analysis. In process analysis by means of tracers, a practical measurement method should also be devised and developed for each experiment. Phosphorus-32 and gold (non-radioactive) were used to measure retention time in a carbon-black plant. The radioisotope was pumped into a feed-stock pipe positioned before the reactor and samples were taken from each process of the plant, including the bag filter, mixer and product tank. After sampling from each step of the process, {sup 32}P in a semi-infinite powder sample was measured in situ by beta counting, and the gold was measured by gamma counting after activating the sample in a reactor. The experiment showed that both tracers had the same residence time, which was shorter than expected. Useful data were also obtained from the dispersion pattern of the material flow for future operation controls, including the time required to change from one grade of product to another. Practical tracer techniques to measure mixing characteristics in high-speed gas flows using {sup 85}Kr have been developed. A study of the measurement method was conducted by calculating the differential values of

  6. Chemical elements dynamic in the fermentation process of ethanol producing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepomuceno, N.; Nadai Fernandes, E.A. de; Bacchi, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides useful information about the dynamics of chemical elements analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and, found in the various segments of the fermentation process of producing ethanol from sugar cane. For this, a mass balance of Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Sc, Sm, and Th, terrigenous elements, as well as Br, K, Rb, and Zn, sugar cane plant elements, has been demonstrated for the fermentation vats in industrial conditions of ethanol production. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  7. Chemical fractionation of radionuclides and stable elements in aquatic plants of the Yenisei River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsunovsky, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    The Yenisei River is contaminated with artificial radionuclides released by one of the Russian nuclear plants. The aquatic plants growing in the radioactively contaminated parts of the river contain artificial radionuclides. The aim of the study was to investigate accumulation of artificial radionuclides and stable elements by submerged plants of the Yenisei River and estimate the strength of their binding to plant biomass by using a new sequential extraction scheme. The aquatic plants sampled were: Potamogeton lucens, Fontinalis antipyretica, and Batrachium kauffmanii. Gamma-spectrometric analysis of the samples of aquatic plants has revealed more than 20 radionuclides. We also investigated the chemical fractionation of radionuclides and stable elements in the biomass and rated radionuclides and stable elements based on their distribution in biomass. The greatest number of radionuclides strongly bound to biomass cell structures was found for Potamogeton lucens and the smallest for Batrachium kauffmanii. For Fontinalis antipyretica, the number of distribution patterns that were similar for both radioactive isotopes and their stable counterparts was greater than for the other studied species. The transuranic elements (239)Np and (241)Am were found in the intracellular fraction of the biomass, and this suggested their active accumulation by the plants.

  8. GLOBAL AND REGIONAL GEOCHEMICAL INDEXES OF PRODUCTION OF CHEMICAL ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay S. Kasimov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a geochemical assessment of the primary involvement of chemical elements in technogenesis in the world and individual countries. In order to compare the intensity of production of various chemical elements in different countries, the authors have introduced a number of new terms and parameters. The new term is “abstract rock” (AR - an elemental equivalent, whose average composition corresponds to the average chemical composition of the upper continental crust. The new parameters are: “conditional technophility of an element” (TY, “specific technophility” (TYN “regional conditional technophility” (TYR, “specific regional technophility” (TN, and “density of regional conditional technophility” (TS. TY equals to the tons of AR per year necessary for the production of the current level of the element. TY of different elements has been estimated for 2008-2010. The highest TY values are associated with C, S, N, Ra, and Au. TY of many micro- and ultramicroelements is of the order of n•1011t. TYN reflects the volume of AR per the world’s capita. TYN changes from the 1960s to 2010 indicates that the Earth’s population is growing much faster than its demand for many chemical elements. TYR, TN, and TS were used for the integrated assessment of technogenesis at the regional scale; they reflect the intensity of the technogenesis process at the level of individual countries and allow comparing countries with different levels of elements production, population, and areas. The TN and TS levels of the leaders in extraction of natural resources are below these values in other countries due to the large territories (Russia, USA, Canada, Australia, Saudi Arabia, Kazakhstan, Argentina, Bolivia, Venezuela, Colombia, Zambia, Mali, Libya, Mongolia, and Sudan, to the large population (Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Nigeria, or to both high spatial and demographic dimensions (India, Brazil, France, Egypt

  9. Element interactions and soil properties affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roivainen, Paeivi; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), uranium (U), and zinc (Zn) are among the elements that have radioactive isotopes in radioactive waste. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for possible adverse effects if these radionuclides are accidentally released into the environment. The present study aimed at investigating factors affecting such transfer in boreal forest. The plant species studied were blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana), rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Regression analyses were carried out to investigate the effects of the chemical composition and physical properties of soil on the soil-to-leaf/needle concentration ratios of Co, Mo, Ni, Pb, U and Zn. Soil potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) concentrations were the most important factors affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of the elements studied. Soil clay and organic matter contents were found to significantly affect plant uptake of Mo, Pb and U. Knowledge of the effects of these factors is helpful for interpretation of the predictions of radioecological models describing soil-to-plant transfer and for improving such models. (orig.)

  10. Element interactions and soil properties affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roivainen, Paeivi; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, Kuopio (Finland)

    2012-03-15

    Cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), uranium (U), and zinc (Zn) are among the elements that have radioactive isotopes in radioactive waste. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for possible adverse effects if these radionuclides are accidentally released into the environment. The present study aimed at investigating factors affecting such transfer in boreal forest. The plant species studied were blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana), rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Regression analyses were carried out to investigate the effects of the chemical composition and physical properties of soil on the soil-to-leaf/needle concentration ratios of Co, Mo, Ni, Pb, U and Zn. Soil potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) concentrations were the most important factors affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of the elements studied. Soil clay and organic matter contents were found to significantly affect plant uptake of Mo, Pb and U. Knowledge of the effects of these factors is helpful for interpretation of the predictions of radioecological models describing soil-to-plant transfer and for improving such models. (orig.)

  11. An Educational Card Game for Learning Families of Chemical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin Franco; Martinez, Jose Maria Oliva; Marquez, Serafin Bernal

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an educational card game designed to help high school students (grade 10, 15-16 years old) "understand," as opposed to memorize, the periodic table. The game may also be used to identify different chemical elements found in daily life objects. As an additional value, students learn the names and symbols of the displayed…

  12. The periodic system of chemical elements: old and new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.

    1987-09-01

    Some historical facts about the construction of a periodic system of chemical elements are reviewed. The Madelung rule is used to generate an unusual format for the periodic table. Following the work of Byakov, Kulakov, Rumer and Fet, such a format is further refined on the basis of a chain of groups starting with SU(2)xS0(4.2)

  13. Content of Chemical Elements in Wood-Destroying Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strapáč I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the content of chemical elements in the dried fruiting bodies of edible wood decaying fungi such as Honey mushrooms (Armillaria mellea, Shiitakes (Lentinus edodes and Oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus. Powdered samples of fungi were mineralized in a microwave digestion. Twenty-one (21 chemical elements were detected in the plasma of the device ICP-MS AGILENT 7500c by accredited methods with the aid of calibration curves. The content of individual elements varied within a considerable range. The highest contents of K, Mn, Cu and Cd were found in the fruiting bodies of Honey mushrooms (Armillaria mellea. Shiitakes (Lentinus edodes had the highest content of B and Mo. Significant differences were found in the content of elements in the Oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus from Slovakia, Hungary and China. The highest content of Al was found in the Oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus from Hungary. The Chinese oysters had a maximum contents of Ca, Mg, Co, Pb, As and U. The Oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus from Lemešany (Slovakia had the highest contents of Na, Zn, Fe, Se, Ag, Hg and Cr. The difference of chemical element content could be influenced by the genotype of the fungus and by the composition of substrate on which mushroom grow up.

  14. Chemical behaviour of transuranic elements in the natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical behaviour of transuranic elements in natural aquifer systems is governed by a variety of geochemical reactions, such as dissolution reaction (solubility), hydrolysis, complexation with inorganics or organics, redox reaction, colloid formation, geochemical interaction with surfaces of various minerals, coprecipitation, mineralisation etc. This paper reviews the present state of knowledge on some of these particular reactions. The emphasis is placed on how the individual reactions can be appraised for the long-term prediction of the geochemical behaviour of transuranic elements in the natural environment. Of the various reactions, the primary thermodynamic processes of dissolution of transuranic compounds in aquatic solution, complexation with important anions present in groundwater and colloid generation are discussed with notable examples. Various laser spectroscopy in use for the chemical speciation are mentioned briefly as for their spectroscopic capability as well as applicability. The present review discussion is primarily directed to a better understanding of the migration behaviour of transuranic elements in natural aquifer systems. (author) 100 refs

  15. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    The origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having their origin in antiquity. Still other elements have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements, because these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature. The names of the elements come from many sources including mythological concepts or characters; places, areas or countries; properties of the element or its compounds, such as color, smell or its inability to combine; and the names of scientists. There are also some miscellaneous names as well as some obscure names for particular elements. The claim of discovery of an element has varied over the centuries. Many claims, e.g., the discovery of certain rare earth elements of the lanthanide series, involved the discovery of a mineral ore from which an element was later extracted. The honor of discovery has often been accorded not to the person who first isolated the element but to the person who discovered the original mineral itself, even when the ore was impure and contained many elements. The reason for this is that in the case of these rare earth elements, the ''earth'' now refers to oxides of a metal not to the metal itself. This fact was not realized at the time of their discovery, until the English chemist Humphry Davy showed that earths were compounds of oxygen and metals in 1808. In the early discoveries, the atomic weight of an element and spectral analysis of the element were not available. Later both of these elemental properties would be required before discovery of the element would be accepted. In general, the requirements for discovery claims have tightened through the years and claims that were previously accepted would no longer meet the minimum constraints now imposed. There are cases where the honor of discovery is not given to the first person to actually discover the element but to the first person to claim the discovery in print. If a

  16. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    The origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having their origin in antiquity. Still other elements have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements, because these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature. The names of the elements come from many sources including mythological concepts or characters; places, areas or countries; properties of the element or its compounds, such as color, smell or its inability to combine; and the names of scientists. There are also some miscellaneous names as well as some obscure names for particular elements. The claim of discovery of an element has varied over the centuries. Many claims, e.g., the discovery of certain rare earth elements of the lanthanide series, involved the discovery of a mineral ore from which an element was later extracted. The honor of discovery has often been accorded not to the person who first isolated the element but to the person who discovered the original mineral itself, even when the ore was impure and contained many elements. The reason for this is that in the case of these rare earth elements, the ''earth'' now refers to oxides of a metal not to the metal itself. This fact was not realized at the time of their discovery, until the English chemist Humphry Davy showed that earths were compounds of oxygen and metals in 1808. In the early discoveries, the atomic weight of an element and spectral analysis of the element were not available. Later both of these elemental properties would be required before discovery of the element would be accepted. In general, the requirements for discovery claims have tightened through the years and claims that were previously accepted would no longer meet the minimum constraints now imposed. There are cases where the honor of discovery is not given to the first person to actually discover the element but to the first person to claim the

  17. Advanced chemical analysis service for elements, radionuclides and phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoni, B.

    1986-01-01

    A review is given on the structure, organisation and performance of the chemical analysis service of the Central Department for Chemical Analysis at the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH. The research and development programs together with the infrastructure of the Centre afford to analyse almost all stable elements of the periodical table in almost any material. The corresponding chemical analysis service has been organized according to a new modular system of analytical steps. According to this, the most complicated and, therefore, most general case of an analytical scheme for element and radionuclide analysis in any type of material can be differentiated into about 14 different steps, the modules. They are more or less independent of the special problem. The laboratory is designed and organized according to these steps. (orig./PW) [de

  18. Bio indicator organisms available to use for determination of radioactive elements in Turkey's seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocbas, F.; Guener, H.

    2006-01-01

    In determination of radioactive concentration and monitoring alive and lifeless environmental samples possess a significant place. Thus, intense study is carried out related to natural and artificial radionuclides sediment. Bio indicator living organisms inhabiting in sea ecosystems; are being evaluated in researches such as determinations of environmental pollution, natural and artificial radioactive elements. Turkey's seas are rich related to diversification of various types. In determining and monitoring radioactivity concentration widespread implementation of some sorts appeal attention and on the other hand inadequate usage of many types is observed. In the present study, providing information about the bio indicator organisms keep living in seas and plays important role in food supply chain and increasing the numbers of the types of organisms used are aimed

  19. Final report on fabrication and study of SYNROC containing radioactive waste elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.; Levins, D.M.; Seatonberry, B.W.; Ryan, R.K.; Hart, K.P.; Stevens, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    Two facilities for the fabrication and testing of Synroc samples containing separate additions of the transuranic actinides americium, plutonium, curium and neptunium, a fission product solution, and two radioisotopes of caesium and strontium were designed, built and operated by the AAEC at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories. Twenty-one 75 g batches of radioactive Synroc were made and representative samples were characterised by alpha track etching, scanning electron microscopy and aqueous leach testing, mostly at 70 deg C. Where comparisons were possible, radioactive fission products behaved as expected from non-radioactive tests. The leaching behaviour of the actinides was complex but as a group they were the least leachable of all the elements studied

  20. Groundwater flow analysis using mixed hybrid finite element method for radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Hiroomi; Shimomura, Masanori; Kawakami, Hiroto; Suzuki, Shunichi

    2011-01-01

    In safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities, ground water flow analysis are used for calculating the radionuclide transport pathway and the infiltration flow rate of groundwater into the disposal facilities. For this type of calculations, the mixed hybrid finite element method has been used and discussed about the accuracy of ones in Europe. This paper puts great emphasis on the infiltration flow rate of groundwater into the disposal facilities, and describes the accuracy of results obtained from mixed hybrid finite element method by comparing of local water mass conservation and the reliability of the element breakdown numbers among the mixed hybrid finite element method, finite volume method and nondegenerated finite element method. (author)

  1. Analysis of determination modalities concerning the exposure and emission limits values of chemical and radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Schneider, T.

    2002-08-01

    This document presents the generic approach adopted by various organizations for the determination of the public exposure limits values to chemical and radioactive substances and for the determination of limits values of chemical products emissions by some installations. (A.L.B.)

  2. Leaching assessment of radioactive and non-radioactive elements from Brazilian phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, N.C.; De Nadai Fernandes, E.A.; Cipriani, M.; Taddei, M.H.T.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphogypsum is a high volume by-product from phosphoric acid industries. Due to presence of certain impurities, mainly naturally-occurring radionuclides, this material has restriction for its use as building material and soil amendment. Then, phosphogypsum currently produced has been stacked near industries. To obtain more detailed information about the physico-chemical availability of heavy metals and radionuclides (Al, Ba, Cr, Fe, Mn, Th, U, Zn, Ra-226, Ra-228, Pb-210) in Brazilian phosphogypsum, three leaching procedures (sequential extraction, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and soil fertility) were applied in samples from two phosphoric acid industries. Results indicated that the major fraction of heavy metals and radionuclides is associated with phosphogypsum lattice structure. (author)

  3. The French national inventory of radioactive waste. Elements of openness and responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussat, A.; Fernique, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Article 13 of the Waste Act of 30 December 1991 calls for the Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs (ANDRA) ''to register the condition and location of all radioactive waste on national territory''. The establishment of a national inventory of radioactive waste and the broad distribution of inventory report to ensure that it becomes a matter of public record constitute a new approach to public information and an effective means of fulfilling the responsibility of the present generation vis-a-vis posterity. The National Waste Register goes beyond the low level radioactive waste disposal facilities to encompass 'all' waste, wherever it may be, including waste in storage at sites where waste is produced. As a result, the Register is multi-faceted, containing information on a variety of elements, from highly radioactive waste to hospital waste collected by ANDRA and to repositories with very low level radioactive material. Information must be provided about all of these widely divergent components. ANDRA has already published two inventories, which demonstrates the durability of its new mission. The Register now contains the inventory of radioactive waste generated by some activities connected with the defence programme. Data collection for the Register involves contacting the generators of waste and working with these entities, whether they are nuclear industry companies, defence organizations, non-nuclear industries, or the 25 Regional Directorates of Industry, Research and Environment, the control institutions or the environmental protection organizations. The yearly exchange of information among all partners involved in radioactive waste management is one of the basic tools of ANDRA, allowing it to be recognized as open and responsible, and to be more credible, fulfilling in this way one of the essential criteria for acceptability. (author). 4 refs

  4. CHEMENGL/CHIMISTE, Chemical and Physical Properties of Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levart, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Description of program or function: Data Base on basic chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of the elements in the Mendeleev Table (118 elements, 4435 nuclides comprising isotopes and isomers). Example: density electric and thermal conductivity, masses of isotopes and isomers, ionisation potential, etc. from H to Ei (Z=118). Both French and English versions are available. In addition, the French version (513 pages) contains other general information about the elements such as mineralogy, industrial applications, toxicity, historical information on discovery of the elements, etc. The latest version contains updates of atomic masses, the names of symbols of transuranium elements have been updated in accordance with the IUPAC recommendations. The values of the abundance of elements in the sun have been corrected according to Grevesse et al. The price of the different elements have been updated, some minor errors have been corrected and the presentation of the cover page has been improved. Several pages have been added to the last chapter of the French version (CHIMISTE), this chapter is not available in the English version (CHEMENGL)

  5. Survey of chemical speciation of trace elements using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Information concerning the chemical state of trace elements in biological systems generally has not been available. Such information for toxic elements and metals in metalloproteins could prove extremely valuable in the elucidation of their metabolism and other biological processes. The shielding of core electrons by binding electrons affect the energy required for creating inner-shell holes. Furthermore, the molecular binding and the symmetry of the local environment of an atom affect the absorption spectrum in the neighborhood of the absorption edge. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) using synchrotron radiation excitation can be used to provide chemical speciation information for trace elements at concentrations as low as 10 ppM. The structure and position of the absorption curve in the region of an edge can yield vital data about the local structure and oxidation state of the trace element in question. Data are most easily interpreted by comparing the observed edge structure and position with those of model compounds of the element covering the entire range of possible oxidation states. Examples of such analyses are reviewed. 14 refs., 1 fig

  6. A method for speciation of trace elements (stable and radioactive) in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.; Bjornstad, H.E.; Pappas, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    Radioactive nuclides and stable trace metals entering natural aquatic systems interact with naturally occurring particles through exchange and sorption processes. The extent of which depends not only on the elements and particles in question, but also on size distribution of particles being most pronounced for colloids having large surface areas to volume ratios. The interaction of radionuclides and trace metals with colloids changes their size and charge characteristics and thereby influences their transport, mobility and bioavailability

  7. Apparatus for the storage of transport- and storage-containers containing radioactive fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vox, A.

    1983-01-01

    The invention concerns an apparatus for the storage of transport and storage containers containing radioactive fuel elements. For each transport or storage container there is a separate silo-type container of steel, concrete, prestressed concrete or suchlike breakproof and fireproof material, to be placed in the open, that can be opened for removal and placing of the transport or storage container respectively. (orig.) [de

  8. Chemical and nuclear properties of lawrencium (element 103) and hahnium (element 105)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical and nuclear properties of Lr and Ha have been studied, using 3-minute 260 Lr and 35-second 262 Ha. The crystal ionic radius of Lr 3+ was determined by comparing its elution position from a cation-exchange resin column with those of lanthanide elements having known ionic radii. Comparisons are made to the ionic radii of the heavy actinides, Am 3+ through Es 3+ , obtained by x-ray diffraction methods, and to Md 3+ and Fm 3+ which were determined in the same manner as Lr 3+ . The hydration enthalpy of -3622 kJ/mol was calculated from the crystal ionic radius using an empirical form of the Born equation. Comparisons to the spacings between the ionic radii of the heaviest members of the lanthanide series show that the 2Z spacing between Lr 3+ and Md 3+ is anomalously small, as the ionic radius of Lr 3+ of 0.0886 nm is significantly smaller than had been expected. The chemical properties of Ha were determined relative to the lighter homologs in group 5, Nb and Ta. Group 4 and group 5 tracer activities, as well as Ha, were absorbed onto glass surfaces as a first step toward the determination of the chemical properties of Ha. Ha was found to adsorb on surfaces, a chemical property unique to the group 5 elements, and as such demonstrates that Ha has the chemical properties of a group 5 element. A solvent extraction procedure was adapted for use as a micro-scale chemical procedure to examine whether or not Ha displays eka-Ta-like chemical under conditions where Ta will be extracted into the organic phase and Nb will not. Under the conditions of this experiment Ha did not extract, and does not show eka-Ta-like chemical properties

  9. Chemical composition and mineral elements of edible insects (at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Chemical Composition and Mineral Elements of two edible insects' larvae and termite soldiers were assayed. Their ash content were between 1.01% and 7.50%. The legless larva (LS) had 28.52% fat, while the solider ant had 7.14% and the Legged larva (LG) had 1.50%. The white ant (SA) had 15.61% protein while ...

  10. Fates of Chemical Elements in Biomass during Its Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Li, Wen-Wei; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-05-10

    Biomass is increasingly perceived as a renewable resource rather than as an organic solid waste today, as it can be converted to various chemicals, biofuels, and solid biochar using modern processes. In the past few years, pyrolysis has attracted growing interest as a promising versatile platform to convert biomass into valuable resources. However, an efficient and selective conversion process is still difficult to be realized due to the complex nature of biomass, which usually makes the products complicated. Furthermore, various contaminants and inorganic elements (e.g., heavy metals, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and chlorine) embodied in biomass may be transferred into pyrolysis products or released into the environment, arousing environmental pollution concerns. Understanding their behaviors in biomass pyrolysis is essential to optimizing the pyrolysis process for efficient resource recovery and less environmental pollution. However, there is no comprehensive review so far about the fates of chemical elements in biomass during its pyrolysis. Here, we provide a critical review about the fates of main chemical elements (C, H, O, N, P, Cl, S, and metals) in biomass during its pyrolysis. We overview the research advances about the emission, transformation, and distribution of elements in biomass pyrolysis, discuss the present challenges for resource-oriented conversion and pollution abatement, highlight the importance and significance of understanding the fate of elements during pyrolysis, and outlook the future development directions for process control. The review provides useful information for developing sustainable biomass pyrolysis processes with an improved efficiency and selectivity as well as minimized environmental impacts, and encourages more research efforts from the scientific communities of chemistry, the environment, and energy.

  11. Stellar alchemy: The origin of the chemical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    What makes the stars shine? This question puzzled human beings for thousands of years. Early in this century, chemists and physicists discovered radioactivity; and the nuclear model of the atom was developed. Once nuclear reactions were produced in the laboratory, it did not take long before their role in stellar energy generation was realized. The theory that nuclear fusion is the source of stellar energy was initially developed in the 1930's and was elaborated in detail in the 1950's. Only within the last ten years, however, have astronomical observations provided direct confirmation of these theoretical ideas. In this paper, I describe the sequences of nuclear reactions that are believed to be responsible for the power generation in stars. The ashes of these reactions are the heavy elements that we find on earth and throughout the universe. The evolution and final fates of stars are examined. The key astronomical observations that provide support for these theoretical ideas are presented

  12. Management of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes with regard to their chemical toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    A preliminary overview is provided of management options for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) with regard to its chemical toxicity. In particular, the following issues are identified and described associated with the management and safe disposal of chemically toxic materials in LILW: the origin and characteristics; the regulatory approaches; the pre-disposal management; the disposal; the safety assessment. Also included are: regulatory framework for chemically toxic low level wastes in the USA; pre-disposal processing options for LILW containing chemically toxic components; example treatment technologies for LILW containing chemically toxic components and safety assessment case studies for Germany, Belgium, France and Sweden

  13. Correlation study of chemical elements in phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braganca, Maura Julia Camara da Silva

    1999-07-01

    Geological phenomena, 1) endogenous (volcanism, magmatic flow, metasomatism); 2) metamorphic (resultant of action of high temperature and pressure) and; 3) exogenous (intemperism, contamination) can modify the chemical composition of rocks soils. Thus, chemical elements with little mobility can be used as indicators of the previous geological situation before the occurrence of these phenomena and can sign the chemical composition of the initial formation. The elements with great mobility can already be used as indicators of the characteristic and intensity of the changes, can point out the influence factors and its space and time conditions. In this work the results of the study of phosphated samples ores coming from two alkaline-carbonatitic chimneys (Araxa and Catalao) and from a meta sedimentary rock (Patos de Minas), located phosphate rock deposit, are presented. The results were obtained using the instrumental neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ICP-AES techniques. A comparison of the three types of samples ores, using chemical, crystallographic and statistical methods, shows that the Araxa and Catalao present some geochemical similarities and they are distinguished of Patos de Minas, despite its geographic proximity. (author)

  14. Piracicaba River Basin: evaluation of chemical elements in deep sediment profile by INAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    França, Elvis J. de; Santos, Robson A.; Santos, Katarine M. Barbosa; Silva, Gleyce K. A. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (DIAMB/CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Div, de Monitoração Ambiental; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Rodrigues, Vanessa S.; Cavalca, Isabel P.O., E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: lis@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Many hydrographic basins have been impacted by anthropogenic sources, the Piracicaba River Basin of the State of São Paulo, is one of that. The total concentrations of chemical elements in deep sediments of basin may be indicate those available in ecosystem. Therefore, in this research concentration of chemical elements on deep sediment profile sampled of Piracicaba River Basin was determined by k0-Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. After collecting the 60 cm depth profile, samples were obtained by sectioning the sediment profile in 5 cm layers, totalizing 12 samples. Analytical portions were transferred to polyethylene vials for neutron irradiation at the Nuclear Research Reactor IEA-R1 from the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN. After waiting for radiation safe levels, irradiated samples were transported to the Radioisotopes Laboratory from the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura CENA/USP. High Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometry using HPGe detectors was applied to measure the induced radioactivity. The chemical element mass fractions and their respective expanded analytical uncertainties (95% confidence level) were determined by k0-INAA using the in-house software Quantu. Geological reference materials were analyzed with samples to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure. Results indicated the presence of enriched surface sediments (0-10 cm depth) for As, Ba, Ca, Co, Cs, Fe, Sb, Sc, Sr, Yb and Zn, despite no alteration was observed for Eu, Ta and Tb. Therefore, the evaluation of deep sediment profile afford the chemical element dynamics for the Piracicaba Basin. (author)

  15. Piracicaba River Basin: evaluation of chemical elements in deep sediment profile by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    França, Elvis J. de; Santos, Robson A.; Santos, Katarine M. Barbosa; Silva, Gleyce K. A.

    2017-01-01

    Many hydrographic basins have been impacted by anthropogenic sources, the Piracicaba River Basin of the State of São Paulo, is one of that. The total concentrations of chemical elements in deep sediments of basin may be indicate those available in ecosystem. Therefore, in this research concentration of chemical elements on deep sediment profile sampled of Piracicaba River Basin was determined by k0-Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. After collecting the 60 cm depth profile, samples were obtained by sectioning the sediment profile in 5 cm layers, totalizing 12 samples. Analytical portions were transferred to polyethylene vials for neutron irradiation at the Nuclear Research Reactor IEA-R1 from the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN. After waiting for radiation safe levels, irradiated samples were transported to the Radioisotopes Laboratory from the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura CENA/USP. High Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometry using HPGe detectors was applied to measure the induced radioactivity. The chemical element mass fractions and their respective expanded analytical uncertainties (95% confidence level) were determined by k0-INAA using the in-house software Quantu. Geological reference materials were analyzed with samples to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure. Results indicated the presence of enriched surface sediments (0-10 cm depth) for As, Ba, Ca, Co, Cs, Fe, Sb, Sc, Sr, Yb and Zn, despite no alteration was observed for Eu, Ta and Tb. Therefore, the evaluation of deep sediment profile afford the chemical element dynamics for the Piracicaba Basin. (author)

  16. Distribution of natural radioactive and trace elements in the soils and sands from the high radiation coastal belt of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, V.V.; Pillai, T.N.V.; Ganguly, A.K.

    1974-01-01

    A brief introduction of the work, already done in connection with the radioactivity present in soils in India, is given. Thorium daughter product activity is estimated in samples collected from monazite area, using gamma spectrometry. The activity is estimated quantitatively and the external dose as well as the genetically significant dose are calculated. Labile components in field soils and beach sands are estimated and the elements are analysed. The experimental procedure adopted is also described. The physico-chemical investigations carried out are explained with reference to the base exchange capacity, loss on ignition, particle size analysis, etc. The results have been presented in the form of tables and they are discussed in detail. (K.B.)

  17. Biological effects of concomitant influence of radioactive and chemical factors. (Experimental research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Remote consequences of concomitant influence of radioactive and chemical hazards substances, modeling the ecological situation at the territory of the Altaj region after the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk test site is studied on the mice. Negative effect of the concomitant impact of radioactive and hazardous chemical substances on the basic morpho-functional systems of animals is revealed; the reproduction function proved to be the most sensitive one. It is noted that the radiation factor constitutes the basis of all violations of bone marrow blood-producing function by concomitant influence

  18. Determination of Heavy Metals and Radioactive Elements in Alluvial Soil using Atomic Absorption and Gamma Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamed, S.S.; Walley EI Dine, N.; Soliman, S.I.; Moussa, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes some methods dealing with measurements of some heavy and radioactive elements (U, Th and K) in Egyptian cultivated soil samples. Samples were collected from Toshka area. Also, soil and plant samples were collected from Kalube and EI - Gabal EI - Asfar to compare the obtained results from both region. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS),Neutron activation analysis (INAA) and Natural radioactivity techniques were followed. FAAS and INAA techniques agreed fairly well for the compared elements Co,Zn and Fe which determined by the two techniques. Also for K which was determined by FAAS and natural radioactivity. It was found that the concentration range in soil samples for Co, Fe, K and Zn lies between 4.18 and 29.2 μg/g, 3.0 and 3.8 mg/g, 3.49 and 13.28 mg/g and 120 and 663 μg/g respectively while in plant samples the concentration of Co was from 3.02 to 4.02 μg/g, Fe from 1.18 to 1.35 mg/g and Zn from 29.63 to 73.02 μg/g

  19. Removal of actinide elements from high level radioactive waste by trialkylphosphine oxide (TRPO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chongli; Yang Dazhu; He Longhai; Xu Jingming; Zhu Yongjun

    1992-03-01

    The modified TRPO process for removing actinide elements from synthetic solution, which was taken from reprocessing of power reactor nuclear fuel, was verified by cascade experiment. Neptunium valence was adjusted in the process for improving neptunium removing efficiency. At 1 mol/L concentration of HNO 3 of feed solution and after a few stages of extraction with 30% t=TRPO kerosene, over 99.9% of Am, Pu, Np and U could be removed from HAW (high level radioactive waste) solution. The stripping of actinides loaded in TRPO are accomplished by high concentration nitric acid, oxalic acid and sodium carbonate instead of amino carboxylic complexing agents used in previous process. The actinides stripped were divided into three groups, which are Am + RE, Np + Pu, and U, and the cross contamination between them is small. Behaviours of F.P. elements are divided into three types which are not extracted, little extracted and extracted elements. The extracted elements are rare earth and Pd, Zr and Mo which are co-extracted with actinides. The separation factor between actinides and other two types of F.P.elements will increase if more scrubbing sections are added in the process. The relative concentration profile of actinide elements and Tc in various stages as well as the distribution of actinides and F.P. elements in the process stream solutions are also presented

  20. Major and trace elements regulation in natural granitic waters: Application to deep radioactive waste disposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michard, G.; Negrel, G.; Toulhoat, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Ouzounian, G.

    1991-01-01

    In order to forecast the evolution of deep groundwaters in the environment of a radioactive waste disposal, one must be able to understand the behaviour of major and trace elements in natural systems. From granitic geothermal and groundwater systems the authors establish that major elements are controlled by mineral precipitation. Regulation levels depend both on equilibration temperature and mobile anion concentration (mainly C1). From empirical laws, the regulation levels with temperature of some trace elements (alkaline and most divalent) elements can be estimated, although a precise explanation for the regulation mechanism is not yet available. They demonstrate that some transition metals are controlled by sulphide precipitation; that uranium is controlled by uraninite solubility; that trivalent and tetravalent metals are present in association with colloidal particles. Maximum regulation levels can be estimated. Such studies can also be useful to forecast the concentration levels of many elements related to nuclear wastes, mainly fission products, uranium, thorium and by analogy artificial actinide elements, as the behaviour of corresponding natural elements can be evaluated

  1. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis of toxic elements in radioactive waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.-L. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Carasco, C., E-mail: cedric.carasco@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Perot, B. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mauerhofer, E.; Kettler, J.; Havenith, A. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R and D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages. In particular, the amount of toxic elements present in radioactive waste packages must be assessed before they can be accepted in repository facilities in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To this aim, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA-Cadarache has started to study the performances of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for elements showing large capture cross sections such as mercury, cadmium, boron, and chromium. This paper reports a comparison between Monte Carlo calculations performed with the MCNPX computer code using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library and experimental gamma rays measured in the REGAIN PGNAA cell with small samples of nickel, lead, cadmium, arsenic, antimony, chromium, magnesium, zinc, boron, and lithium to verify the validity of a numerical model and gamma-ray production data. The measurement of a {approx}20 kg test sample of concrete containing toxic elements has also been performed, in collaboration with Forschungszentrum Juelich, to validate the model in view of future performance studies for dense and large LL-MA waste packages. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison between measurements and MCNP calculation has been performed for a PGNAA system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system aims at controlling the amount of toxic elements in nuclear waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple samples and a concrete cylinder in which impurities have been added are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculations agree within a factor 2 with measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system can be improved with a better neutron flux monitoring and the use of boron-free graphite.

  2. Development of chemical decontamination for low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Seigo; Omata, Kazuo; Obinata, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Yoshihiko; Kanamori, Osamu.

    1995-01-01

    During routine intermittent inspection and maintenance at nuclear power plants, a considerable quantity of low level radioactive waste is generated requiring release from the nuclear site or treating additionally. To decontaminate this waste for safe release from the nuclear power plant, the first step could be washing the waste in Methylene chloride, CH 2 Cl 2 , to remove most of the paint coating. However, CH 2 Cl 2 washing does not completely remove the paint coating from the waste, which in the next step is shot blasted with plastic bead media to loose and remove the remaining paint coating. Following in succession, in the third step, the waste is washed in a chelate solution, after which most waste is decontaminated and suitable to be released for recycling. The residual chelate solution may be decomposed into nontoxic carbon dioxide and water by an electrolysis process and then safely discharged into the environment. (author)

  3. Remote detection and ecological monitoring of the industrial and natural nuclei activity of radioactive elements based on passive microwave radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakova, Liliya K.; Chistyakov, Vyacheslav Y.; Losev, Dmitry V.; Penin, Sergei T.; Tarabrin, Yurij K.; Yakubov, Vladimir P.; Yurjev, Igor A.

    1998-12-01

    The passive remote method of microwave radiometry and its instrumental realization for express diagnostics of radioactive elements in the atmosphere have been discussed. Analysis of the microwave radiation due to ionization and dissociation of atmospheric components interacting with radioactive elements is carried out. The photochemical processes resulting in background microwave radiation power have been discussed. As an example, the results of natural experiment of detecting the atomic hydrogen radiation in the plume of emissions of nuclear cycle processing plants have been presented.

  4. A Model for determination of screening levels for radioactive elements in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, Ana C.; Hiromoto, Goro

    2008-01-01

    Full text: At the present, decision about clean-up of Brazilian sites contaminated with radioactive isotopes is addressed on a case-by-case basis, since there is no general guidance or recommendation to support actions in early phases of the problem identification. For chemicals, CETESB - the governmental organization responsible for preventing and controlling environmental pollution in Sao Paulo State - established quality reference values for prevention and intervention, as the first step to implement a remediation policy based on human health risk assessment. The aim of this study is to develop a methodology for the establishment of target values for radioactive soil contamination, as far as possible consistent and compatible with the approach adopted by CETESB for sites contaminated with chemicals. The following steps have been addressed in this study: conceptual scenario and model development; codification of the equations in an electronic spreadsheet; selection of proper input values; derivation of the intervention levels for selected radionuclides using Monte Carlo methods. The mathematical model developed was mainly based on the equations used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements for soil screening purposes. Results are presented for selected natural and man-made radioactive isotopes. (author)

  5. Chemical elements in invertebrate orders for environmental quality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L.; Franca, Elvis J.; Paiva, Jose D.S.; Hazin, Clovis A.; Fonseca, Felipe Y.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Bacchi, Marcio A.

    2013-01-01

    Among the biomonitors of environmental quality, there is a lack of studies on using invertebrates to evaluate quantitatively chemical elements in ecosystems. This group of animals is quite numerous, widely distributed and adaptable to the most diverse environmental conditions. These features are very useful for the environmental quality assessment, as well as the several occurring insect-plant interactions performing essential functions in ecosystems. The objective of this work is to study the variability of chemical composition of invertebrate orders for using in environmental quality monitoring studies. Instrumental neutron activation analysis - INAA was applied to determine some nutrients and trace elements in invertebrate samples. Sampling by pitfall traps was carried out in riverine ecosystems from the urban area from the Piracicaba Municipality, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Invertebrate and reference material samples were irradiated in the nuclear research reactor IEA-R1, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN. Fragments of a Ni-Cr alloy were irradiated for monitoring the thermal neutron flux. Hymenoptera order was considered the most representative according to the total number of sampled species (about 60%). Significant amounts of Ba, Br, Fe and Sc were found in invertebrates of the order Opiliones. Potassium, rubidium and zinc were highly accumulated in species from Blattodea order, indicating a consistent pattern of accumulation for this invertebrate order. Taking into account the abundance of Hymenoptera order, the chemical composition of its species was significant different at the 95% confidence level for Br and Na in the sampled locals. (author)

  6. Chemical elements in invertebrate orders for environmental quality studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L.; Franca, Elvis J.; Paiva, Jose D.S.; Hazin, Clovis A., E-mail: marcelo_rlm@hotmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: dan-paiva@hotmail.com, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Fonseca, Felipe Y.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Bacchi, Marcio A., E-mail: felipe-yamada@hotmail.com, E-mail: lis@cena.usp.br, E-mail: mabacchi@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Among the biomonitors of environmental quality, there is a lack of studies on using invertebrates to evaluate quantitatively chemical elements in ecosystems. This group of animals is quite numerous, widely distributed and adaptable to the most diverse environmental conditions. These features are very useful for the environmental quality assessment, as well as the several occurring insect-plant interactions performing essential functions in ecosystems. The objective of this work is to study the variability of chemical composition of invertebrate orders for using in environmental quality monitoring studies. Instrumental neutron activation analysis - INAA was applied to determine some nutrients and trace elements in invertebrate samples. Sampling by pitfall traps was carried out in riverine ecosystems from the urban area from the Piracicaba Municipality, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Invertebrate and reference material samples were irradiated in the nuclear research reactor IEA-R1, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN. Fragments of a Ni-Cr alloy were irradiated for monitoring the thermal neutron flux. Hymenoptera order was considered the most representative according to the total number of sampled species (about 60%). Significant amounts of Ba, Br, Fe and Sc were found in invertebrates of the order Opiliones. Potassium, rubidium and zinc were highly accumulated in species from Blattodea order, indicating a consistent pattern of accumulation for this invertebrate order. Taking into account the abundance of Hymenoptera order, the chemical composition of its species was significant different at the 95% confidence level for Br and Na in the sampled locals. (author)

  7. Inconsistency... or why differentiate, where prevention is concerned, between radioactive substances and carcinogenic chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choquet, R.; Vinit, J.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotracers, low-activity unsealed radioactive sources, and certain chemical products belong to the list of substances and agents known to promote cancers in humans. The dangers of radiotracers and carcinogenic chemicals being very similar, or even identical, it is inadmissible that preventive measures have not been equally developed and are not viewed in the same way in our country. It should be noted that the International Labour Bureau has long since included radioactive products in the list of carcinogenic substances and agents and treated preventive measures as a whole by proceeding in this way it would be easier to account for the possible combined effects of ionising radiations and chemical molecules. After a review of some facts about cancer the present situation is examined with regard to statutory measures applied on the one hand to radioelements and on the other to chemicals recognised as carcinogenic by international organisations. Proposals are made to remedy this illogical situation [fr

  8. Fuel element replacement and cooling water radioactivity at the Musashi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, T.; Honda, T.; Horiuchi, N.; Aizawa, O.; Sato, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Musashi reactor (TRIGA-II, 100kW) has been operated without any serious troubles since 1963. In 1985 the old Al-cladded fuel elements were replaced with new stainless cladded ones in order to insure a long and safe operation. By using a semi-automatic equipment the old fuel elements have been transferred into the bulk-shielding experimental pool, which was remodelled for the spent-fuel storage. In order to reduce the exposure during the transfer work, the old fuel elements were cooled in the core tank for 3 months. After the replacement, the radioactivities in the cooling water have been drastically changed. The activity of Na-24 decreased about one decade, and the activities of Cr-51, Mn-54, Mn-56, Co-58 and Co-60 increased about two decades. At this conference we will report on the following points: (1) semi-automatic equipment for the transportation of the Al-cladded spent fuel, (2) structure of spent-fuel storage pool, and (3) radioactivity change in the cooling water. (author)

  9. University program in hazardous chemical and radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    The three main functions of a university program are education, training, and research. At Vanderbilt University, there is a Solid and Hazardous Waste option in the Master of Science in Engineering Program. The two main foci are treatment of wastes and environmental transport and transformation of the wastes. Courses in Hazardous Waste Engineering and Radioactive Waste Disposal present a synoptic view of the field, including legal, economic, and institutional aspects as well as the requisite technical content. The training is accomplished for some of the students through the aegis of an internship program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. In the summer between the two academic years of the program, the study works at a facility where decontamination and/or decommissioning and/or remedial actions are taking place. Progress in understanding the movement, transformation, and fate of hazardous materials in the environment is so rapid that it will not be possible to be current in the field without participating in that discovery. Therefore, their students are studying these processes and contributing to new knowledge. Some recent examples are the study of safety factors implicit in assuming a saturated zone below a hazardous waste landfill when an unsaturated zone exists, application of probabilistic risk assessment to three National Priority List sites in Tennessee, and the explanation of why certain organics precede pH, conductivity and nitrates through a clay liner at a hazardous waste disposal site

  10. The interaction between bitumen matrix and chemical components of radioactive wastes of WWER type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selucky, P.; Sazavsky, P.; Peka, V.; Krupka, M.

    2000-01-01

    The interaction between bitumen matrix and chemical components of WWER type radioactive wastes was studied. So called ''cold'' model bitumen products were prepared and compared with real products using macroDTA method. On the basis of obtained curves, the evaluation of bitumen product fire risks was performed with the aim to minimize risks of bituminization process. (authors)

  11. Method for separating the isotopes of a chemical element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devienne, F.M.

    1977-01-01

    A beam of positive or negative primary ions of at least one compound of a chemical element is accelerated in order to pass through collision boxes placed in series. As a result of inelastic collisions of the ions with the molecules of a neutral target gas within each collision box, a given percentage of primary ions is dissociated into at least two fragments, one of which is a secondary ion in the form of at least two isotopic species. The collision boxes are brought to a potential V 2 so as to trap preferentially one isotopic species which is condensed within each box. 15 claims, 4 figures

  12. Chemical states of molybdenum in radioactive waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Kawanishi, Nobuo; Nagaki, Hiroshi; Naito, Aritsune

    1982-01-01

    In order to confirm an expectation that the chemical state of molybdenum in glass reflects the phase separation tendency of the yellow solid from the melt of borosilicate glass, simulated waste glasses were prepared, and ESCA analysis was performed using a commercially available electron spectrometer (PHI550 E) with an excitation source consisting of Mg Kα-ray. The effects of the concentration of Mo and FE 2 O 3 and the melting atmosphere (oxidizing or reducing) in which the samples were prepared on the chemical state of Mo and the solubility of MoO 3 were examined. From the observation of Mo spectra, it was shown that Mo in waste glass had several valencies, e.g., Mo(3), Mo(4), Mo(5) and Mo(6), while Mo in the yellow solid separated from the melts exhibited hexa-valent state, the peak intensity of higher valencies increased relatively with the increase of MoO 3 concentration, but the chemical state of Mo did not change remarkably around the solubility limit of MoO 3 , the melting atmosphere influenced on the Mo state in the waste glass, the peak intensity of Mo(6) increased relatively with the increasing Fe 2 O 3 concentration, and Mo in devitrified glass exhibited hexa-valent state. (Yoshitake, I.)

  13. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and Guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of hazardous chemical, radioactive, and mixed waste to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how a generator of wastes can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for hazardous chemical, radioactive, and mixed waste. 9 figs

  14. Element analysis and radioactivity measurement within a wood disk by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Ikeue, N.; Tanoi, K.; Tange, T.; Yagi, H.; Nakanishi, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    16 elements and the radioactivity of 210 Pb in a wood disk, across the annual rings have been analyzed to find out a promising tool for dendrochronology (chronology of wood) both for a Japanese wood, Cryptomeria japonica, and for an Indonesian rain forest wood, Alstonia, which does not form annual rings because of the relatively constant climate of the rain forest. As a result, only Mg concentration showed similar, smooth decreasing tendency in both wood species. The smooth change of the Mg concentration across the annual rings along with the growth suggested the possibility of the Mg concentration determination as a promising dendrochronological tool. (author)

  15. Drop Test Using Finite Element Method for Transport Package of Radioactive Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoxiao; Zhao Bing; Zhang Jiangang; Li Gouqiang; Wang Xuexin; Tang Rongyao

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical test for transport package of radioactive material is one of the important tests for demonstrating package structure design. Drop test of package is a kind of destructive test. It is a common method of adopting the pre-analysis to determine drop orientation.Mechanical test of a sealed source package was calculated with finite element method (FEM) software. Based on the analysis of the calculation results, some values were obtained such as the stress, strain, acceleration and the drop orientation which causes the most severe damage, and the calculation results were compared with the results of test. (authors)

  16. Sorbents for effective removal of radioactive antimony during chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishad, Padala Abdul; Bhaskarapillai, Anupkumar; Velmurugan, Sankaralingam

    2014-01-01

    Removal of radioactive antimony is a challenging problem. Often, during decontamination, they get mobilized around the system and redeposit in different areas thus offsetting the reduction in the radiation field obtained by removing other activities such as 60 Co. Thus, there is a clear need for better antimony removing materials/strategies for effective reactor decontamination. In this regard, six commercially available sorbents namely, Tulsion A33 (strong base anion (-OH) resin), Amberlite IRC-718 (chelating resin), Radex ® Sb-1000, nano TiO 2 -special grade (Inorganic type IX), Chitosan (biosorbent) and Aeroxide p25 (nano TiO 2 , Inorganic type IX) were evaluated for their antimony sorption properties. Radex ® and TiO 2 based materials were found to be more effective in removing both Sb(V) and Sb(III). Solution pH was seen to significantly influence the antimony sorption and the effect was more prominent in anion resin, when tested under column conditions. Apart from the commercial sorbents, we have synthesised a robust high performing sorbent (TA-Chitosan beads) in the form of stable beads, using nano-TiO 2 and chitosan. The beads were found to retain the antimony sorption properties of the nano-TiO 2 , while adapting a physical format suitable for large scale operations. The sorbent exhibited almost complete sorption of antimony both in low (ppb level) as well as high concentrations of antimony. The suitability of the beads for use in column mode has been established and its radiation stability was probed in detail. The beads were found to be stable to irradiations as ascertained from the TOC values and unchanged sorption properties. The sorption properties of the CHITA beads in typical decontamination formulation containing mixture of complexing agents have been investigated in detail. (author)

  17. Performance of evaporators in high level radioactive chemical waste service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, C.F.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical processing of nuclear fuels and targets at Savannah River Site resulted in generation of millions of gallons of liquid wastes. The wastes were further processed to reduce volume and allow for extended temporary storage of a more concentrated material. Waste evaporators have been a central point for waste reduction for many years. Currently, the transfer and processing of the concentrated wastes for permanent storage requires dilution and results in generation of significant quantities of additional liquid wastes. A new round of volume reduction is required to fit existing storage capacity and to allow for removal of older vessels from service. Evaporator design, performance and repairs are discussed in this report

  18. Radioactive elements on Mercury's surface from MESSENGER: implications for the planet's formation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, Patrick N; Evans, Larry G; Hauck, Steven A; McCoy, Timothy J; Boynton, William V; Gillis-Davis, Jeffery J; Ebel, Denton S; Goldsten, John O; Hamara, David K; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Solomon, Sean C; Rhodes, Edgar A; Sprague, Ann L; Starr, Richard D; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R

    2011-09-30

    The MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measured the average surface abundances of the radioactive elements potassium (K, 1150 ± 220 parts per million), thorium (Th, 220 ± 60 parts per billion), and uranium (U, 90 ± 20 parts per billion) in Mercury's northern hemisphere. The abundance of the moderately volatile element K, relative to Th and U, is inconsistent with physical models for the formation of Mercury requiring extreme heating of the planet or its precursor materials, and supports formation from volatile-containing material comparable to chondritic meteorites. Abundances of K, Th, and U indicate that internal heat production has declined substantially since Mercury's formation, consistent with widespread volcanism shortly after the end of late heavy bombardment 3.8 billion years ago and limited, isolated volcanic activity since.

  19. Radioactive indium labelling of the figured elements of blood. Method, results, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducassou, D.; Nouel, J.P.

    Following the work of Thakur et al. the authors became interested in red corpuscle, leucocyte and platelet labelling with indium 111 or 113m (8 hydroxyquinolein-indium). For easier labelling of the figured elements of blood the technique described was modified. The chelate is prepared by simple contact at room temperature of indium 111 or 113m chloride and water-soluble 8 hydroxyquinolein sulphate, in the presence of 0.2M TRIS buffer. The figured element chosen suspended in physiological serum is added directly to the solution obtained, the platelets and leucocytes being separated out beforehand by differential centrifugation. While it gives results similar to those of Thabur et al. the method proposed avoids the chloroform extraction of the radioactive chelate and the use of alcohol, liable to impair the platelet regation capacity [fr

  20. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  1. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  2. Behavior of rare earth elements in fractured aquifers: an application to geological disposal criteria for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Gu; Kim, Yong Je; Lee, Kil Yong; Kim, Kun Han

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the geochemistry of potential host rocks is very important in the site evaluation for construction of an underground geologic repository for radioactive waste. Because of similar valence and ionic radii and high similarity in electronic structure with trivalent actinides (such as Am 3+ and Cm 3+ ), the rare earth elements (REEs) have been used to predict the behavior of actinide-series elements in solution (Runde et al., 1992). For Am and Cm, which occur only in the trivalent states in most waste-disposal repository environments, the analogy with the REEs is particularly relevant. In order to discuss the behavior of REEs in geological media and to deduce the behavior of actinides in geological environments based on the REE abundance, and to provide an useful tool in deciding an optimum geological condition for radioactive disposal, we estimated the REE abundance from various kinds of fractured rock type. In fractured granitic aquifer, chondrite-normalized REE pattern show Eu positive anomaly due to fracture-filling calcite precipitation. However, in fractured meta-basaltic and volcanic tuffaceous aquifer, REE pattern do not show the change of Eu anomaly due to fracture-filling calcite precipitation. Eu shows very similar properties such as cohesive energy, ionic radii with coordination number compared to Am. Therefore, if we consider the Eu behavior in fractured rocks and the similar physical/chemical properties of Eu and Am, together, our results strongly suggest that Eu is a very useful analogue for predicting the behavior of Am in geological environment

  3. Chemical and nuclear properties of Rutherfordium (Element 104)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacher, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical-properties of rutherfordium (Rf) and its group 4 homologs were studied by sorption on glass support surfaces coated with cobalt(II)ferrocyanide and by solvent extraction with tributylphosphate (TBP) and triisooctylamine (TIOA). The surface studies showed that the hydrolysis trend in the group 4 elements and the pseudogroup 4 element, lb, decreases in the order Rf>Zr∼Hf>Th. This trend was attributed to relativistic effects which predicted that Rf would be more prone to having a coordination number of 6 than 8 in most aqueous solutions due to a destabilization of the 6d 5/2 shell and a stabilization of the 7p l/2 shell. This hydrolysis trend was confirmed in the TBP/HBr solvent extraction studies which showed that the extraction trend decreased in the order Zr>Hf>Rf?Ti for HBr, showing that Rf and Ti did not extract as well because they hydrolyzed more easily than Zr and Hf. The TIOA/HF solvent extraction studies showed that the extraction trend for the group 4 elements decreased in the order Ti>Zr∼Hf>Rf, in inverse order from the trend of ionic radii Rf>Zr∼Hf>Ti. An attempt was made to produce 263 Rf (a) via the 248 Cm( 22 Ne, α3n) reaction employing thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) solvent extraction chemistry and (b) via the 249 Bk( 18 O,4n) reaction employing the Automated Rapid Chemistry Apparatus (ARCA). In the TTA studies, 16 fissions were observed but were all attributed to 256 Fm. No alpha events were observed in the Rf chemical fraction. A 0.2 nb upper limit production cross section for the 248 Cm( 22 Ne, α3n) 263 Rf reaction was calculated assuming the 500-sec half-life reported previously by Czerwinski et al. [CZE92A

  4. Radioactive particles revealed by electron microscopy. Chemical and physical properties of radioactive particles in aerosol samples emitted during the early stage of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Kouji

    2015-01-01

    Water-insoluble radioactive materials emitted during an early stage of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011 were identified, and their chemical and physical properties were characterized as particulate matters. In this report, studies on radioactive particles collected from filter samples in Tsukuba on March 14–15, 2011 are summarized. Their compositions, chemical states, sizes, shapes, crystallinity, and hygroscopicity were analyzed using microscopic analyses such as electron microscopy and synchrotron with a micro-beam. The results indicate that they include Cs, Fe, and Zn as well as elements from fission products and are water insoluble, spherical-glassy particles with ca. 2 micrometer in size. Understanding of their detailed properties is significant to improve the numerical models during the accident and to understand their occurrences in soil as well as the accident itself. In addition to the water-insoluble radioactive materials, water-soluble radioactive materials, which were likely emitted in different events during the accident, should be investigated to have comprehensive understanding of the accident and its environmental effects. More samples from various environments such as soil will be needed, and more detailed chemical and physical analyses will help to understand their formation process, influences on human health, and long term decrements in ambient conditions. (author)

  5. Chemical treatment of liquid radioactive waste at the Boris Kidric Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazic, S.; Vukovic, Z.; Voko, A.

    1989-01-01

    The results of lab-scale experiments on the chemical treatment of radioactive liquid waste collected at the Boris Kidric Institute are presented. The radioactive waste was treated by cobalt hexacyanoferrate precipitation followed by flocculation with polyelectrolyte flocculating agents. The main parameters investigated were standing time, pH and ratio of reagents. The flocculating agents were tested by filtration test and floccule stability test. Satisfactory decontamination factors by precipitation at pH 10 and good separation of solid and liquid phase by applying Praestol polyelectrolytes were obtained (author)

  6. Chemical elements in Leucaena leucocephala leaves of riparian zones of the municipality of Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    França, Elvis J. de; Fernandes, Elisabete A.N.; Lira, Marcelo G.; Ferreira, Fabiano S.; Cavalca, Isabel P.O.; Rodrigues, Vanessa S.; Camilli, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    The species Leucaena leucocephala can be found in several riparian ecosystems, acting as one of the main invasive and harmful species for the forest restoration of the permanent preservation areas. It has also been studied for the phytoremediation of some chemical elements, due to their potential accumulation of chemical substances. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the accumulation of chemical elements in leaves of Leucaena leucocephala trees by Instrumental Neutronic Activation Analysis - INAA. Samples of leaves were collected in eight samples from riverside areas of the Piracicaba Municipality, São Paulo, Brazil, during the dry and rainy season. After collection, washing with water and drying in a forced circulation oven, the samples were comminuted and encapsulated in polyethylene capsules and subjected to a thermal neutron flux of 10 13 cm -2 s -1 for 8 hours in the Nuclear Research Reactor IEA-R1 of IPEN / CNEN. Thermal neutron flux monitoring was performed by Ni-Cr alloy fragments with known concentrations of the chemical monitors elements. After measurements of radioactivity induced by HPGe detectors, the concentrations of the chemical elements were calculated by the k0 method using the Quantu computer program. Certified reference materials were also analyzed for quality assurance of the analytical procedure. The results indicated high concentrations of La and lanthanoids (Ce, Eu, Sm, Tb and Yb) in leaves of L. leucocephala in both periods analyzed. It was possible to observe a decrease in the concentrations of the chemical elements in the rainy season, probably associated to the washing of the geological material deposited on the leaves of the trees by the rains, except for K, Mo, Rb, Sb and Zn, whose values remained or increased in the leaves collected during the rainy season. Considering the constant leaf production, L. leucocephala can greatly affect the cycling of chemical elements due to its accumulation capacity demonstrated by this

  7. The physical and chemical environment and radionuclide migration in a low level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, J.; Buckley, L.P.

    1988-01-01

    The expected physical and chemical environment within the low-level radioactive waste repository to be sited at Chalk River is being studied to establish the rate of radionuclide migration. Chemical conditions in the repository are being assessed for their effect on buffer performance and the degradiation of the concrete structure. Experimental programs include the effect of changes in solution chemistry on radionuclide distribution between buffer/backfill materials and the aqueous phase; the chemical stability of the buffer materials and the determination of the controlling mechanism for radionuclide transport during infiltration

  8. Improvement of the safety regulations in the management of radioactive waste accumulated in the liquid radioactive waste water basins of the PO 'Majak' (Ozersk), the Siberian Chemical Plant (Seversk) and the Mining-Chemical Plant (Zheleznogorsk)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevski, Y.G.; Kislov, A.I.; Irushkin, V.M.

    2002-01-01

    One of the most important problems of radiation safety in Russia is the decommissioning of the liquid radioactive waste water basins of the PO 'Majak' (Ozersk), Siberian Chemical Plant (Seversk) and Mining-Chemical Plant (Zheleznogorsk). The liquid radioactive waste water basins were constructed in 1950-1960 for the collection and storage of liquid waste from the radiochemical plants. The potential hazards of the liquid in the radioactive waste water basins are: migration of radionuclides into the soil of the liquid radioactive waste water basin floors; wind-induced carry-over of radionuclides from the liquid radioactive waste water basins; hazards (radiation included) to the environment and population arising in case physical barriers and hydraulic structures are damaged; and criticality hazards. The classification of the liquid radioactive waste water basins were developed based on the collection and analyzes of the information on liquid radioactive waste water basin characteristics and the method of multicriterion expert assessment of potential hazards. Three main directions for the improvement of safety regulation in the management of radioactive waste accumulated in the liquid radioactive waste water basins were defined: 1. Common directions for the improvement of safety regulation in the area of rehabilitation of the territories contaminated with radioactive substances. 2. Common directions for the improvement of safety regulation in the area of rehabilitation of the territories, such as the liquid radioactive waste water basins. 3. Special directions for the regulatory activities in the area of operation and decommissioning of the liquid radioactive waste water basins of the PO 'Majak' (Ozersk), Siberian Chemical Plant (Seversk) and Mining-Chemical Plant (Zheleznogorsk). As a result, concrete recommendations on safety regulation for the management of radioactive waste accumulated in the water basins were developed. (author)

  9. Study about the integrated treatment of chemical and radioactive effluents, introducing the zero release concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierzwa, Jose Carlos

    1996-01-01

    An Integrated System to the treatment of Chemical and Radioactive Effluents to the Centro Experimental Aramar is proposed and evaluated, introducing the Effluent Zero Release concept, where factors related to the environmental regulation in vigor in the country, as well as the availability of hydrological resources in the place where CEA have been implanted, are considered. Through a literature analysis of the main effluents treatment techniques available nowadays and after a case of study selection, take into account two industrial installations that will be implanted at CEA, it was defined an arrangement to compose the Integrated System to the Treatment of Chemicals and Radioactive Effluents, focusing the Zero Release concept consolidation. A defined arrangement uses a combination among three treatment processes, it means chemical precipitation, reverse osmosis and evaporation, that were experimentally evaluated. The proposed arrangement was evaluated using synthetic effluents, that were prepared based on data from literature and conception documents of the installation considered in this work. Three kinds of effluents were simulated, one arising from a nuclear reactor laundry, one arising from the water refrigeration system and demineralized water production to the nuclear reactor and the other one arising from a nuclear material production laboratory. Each effluent were individually submitted to the selected treatment processes, to get the best operational conditions for each treatment process. The results got during the laboratory assays show that the proposed Integrated System to the Treatment of Chemicals and Radioactive Effluents is feasible, consolidating the Effluent Zero Release concept, which is the proposition of this work. (author)

  10. Characteristics of soil-to-plant transfer of elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roivainen, P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy generates large amounts of different types of radioactive wastes that can be accidentally released into the environment. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for the dispersion of radionuclides in the biosphere and is usually described by a concentration ratio (CR) between plant and soil concentrations in radioecological models. Our knowledge of the soil-to-plant transfer of many radionuclides is currently limited and concerns mainly agricultural species and temperate environments. The validity of radioecological modelling is affected by the accuracy of the assumptions and parameters used to describe soil-to-plant transfer. This study investigated the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements (cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), uranium (U) and zinc (Zn)) relevant to radioactive waste at two boreal forest sites and assessed the factors affecting the CR values. May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) were selected as representatives of understory species, while rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) represented trees in this study. All the elements studied were found to accumulate in plant roots, indicating that separate CR values for root and aboveground plant parts are needed. The between-species variation in CR values was not clearly higher than the within-species variation, suggesting that the use of generic CR values for understory species and trees is justified. No linear relationship was found between soil and plant concentrations for the elements studied and a non-linear equation was found to be the best for describing the dependence of CR values on soil concentration. Thus, the commonly used assumption of a linear relationship between plant and soil concentrations may lead to underestimation of plant root uptake at low soil concentrations. Plant nutrients potassium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and sulphur were found to

  11. Characteristics of soil-to-plant transfer of elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roivainen, P.

    2011-07-01

    The use of nuclear energy generates large amounts of different types of radioactive wastes that can be accidentally released into the environment. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for the dispersion of radionuclides in the biosphere and is usually described by a concentration ratio (CR) between plant and soil concentrations in radioecological models. Our knowledge of the soil-to-plant transfer of many radionuclides is currently limited and concerns mainly agricultural species and temperate environments. The validity of radioecological modelling is affected by the accuracy of the assumptions and parameters used to describe soil-to-plant transfer. This study investigated the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements (cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), uranium (U) and zinc (Zn)) relevant to radioactive waste at two boreal forest sites and assessed the factors affecting the CR values. May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) were selected as representatives of understory species, while rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) represented trees in this study. All the elements studied were found to accumulate in plant roots, indicating that separate CR values for root and aboveground plant parts are needed. The between-species variation in CR values was not clearly higher than the within-species variation, suggesting that the use of generic CR values for understory species and trees is justified. No linear relationship was found between soil and plant concentrations for the elements studied and a non-linear equation was found to be the best for describing the dependence of CR values on soil concentration. Thus, the commonly used assumption of a linear relationship between plant and soil concentrations may lead to underestimation of plant root uptake at low soil concentrations. Plant nutrients potassium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and sulphur were found to

  12. Exposure assessment of a cyclist to particles and chemical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, C A; Silva, J R; Faria, T; Wolterbeek, T H; Almeida, S M

    2017-05-01

    Cycle paths can be used as a route for active transportation or simply to cycle for physical activity and leisure. However, exposure to air pollutants can be boosted while cycling, in urban environments, due to the proximity to vehicular emissions and elevated breathing rates. The objective of this work was to assess the exposure of a cyclist to particles and to chemical elements by combining real-time aerosol mass concentration reading equipment and biomonitoring techniques. PM 10 and PM 2.5 were measured on three cycle paths located in Lisbon, during weekdays and weekends and during rush hours and off-peak hours resulting in a total of 60 campaigns. Lichens were exposed along cycle paths for 3 months, and their element contents were measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis using the k 0 methodology (k 0 -INAA). Using a bicycle commute route of lower traffic intensity and avoiding rush hours or other times with elevated vehicular congestion facilitate a reduction in exposure to pollutants. The implementation of cycle paths in cities is important to stimulate physical activity and active transportation; however, it is essential to consider ambient air and pollutant sources to create safer infrastructures.

  13. Algorithm for calculating an availability factor for the inhalation of radioactive and chemical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report presents a method of calculating the availability of buried radioactive and nonradioactive materials via an inhalation pathway. Availability is the relationship between the concentration of a substance in the soil and the dose rate to a human receptor. Algorithms presented for calculating availabiliy of elemental inorganic substances are based on atmospheric enrichment factors; those presented for calculating availability of organic substances are based on vapor pressures. The basis, use, and limitations of the developed equations are discussed. 32 references, 5 tables

  14. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for hazardous chemical and mixed radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavruska, J.S.; Borduin, L.C.; Hutchins, D.A.; Koenig, R.A.; Warner, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is currently the only radioactive waste incineration facility in the US permitted to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The CAI was developed in the mid-1970's as a demonstration system for volume reduction of transuranic (TRU) contaminated combustible solid wastes. It has since undergone additions and modifications to accommodate hazardous chemical wastes in response to a need within the Department of Energy (DOE) to treat mixed radioactive/chemical wastes. An overview of these additions which include a liquid feed system, a high intensity liquid injection burner, and an activated carbon adsorption unit is presented here. Also included is a discussion of the procedures required for Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the CAI

  15. Chemical and nuclear properties of Rutherfordium (Element 104)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacher, Christian D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-10-30

    The chemical-properties of rutherfordium (Rf) and its group 4 homologs were studied by sorption on glass support surfaces coated with cobalt(II)ferrocyanide and by solvent extraction with tributylphosphate (TBP) and triisooctylamine (TIOA). The surface studies showed that the hydrolysis trend in the group 4 elements and the pseudogroup 4 element, lb, decreases in the order Rf>Zr≈Hf>Th. This trend was attributed to relativistic effects which predicted that Rf would be more prone to having a coordination number of 6 than 8 in most aqueous solutions due to a destabilization of the 6d5/2 shell and a stabilization of the 7pI/2 shell. This hydrolysis trend was confirmed in the TBP/HBr solvent extraction studies which showed that the extraction trend decreased in the order Zr>Hf>Rf?Ti for HBr, showing that Rf and Ti did not extract as well because they hydrolyzed more easily than Zr and Hf. The TIOA/HF solvent extraction studies showed that the extraction trend for the group 4 elements decreased in the order Ti>Zr≈Hf>Rf, in inverse order from the trend of ionic radii Rf>Zr≈Hf>Ti. An attempt was made to produce 263Rf (a) via the 248Cm(22Ne, α3n) reaction employing thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) solvent extraction chemistry and (b) via the 249Bk(18O,4n) reaction employing the Automated Rapid Chemistry Apparatus (ARCA). In the TTA studies, 16 fissions were observed but were all attributed to 256Fm. No alpha events were observed in the Rf chemical fraction. A 0.2 nb upper limit production cross section for the 248Cm(22Ne, α3n)263Rf reaction was calculated assuming the 500-sec half-life reported previously by Czerwinski et al. [CZE92A].

  16. Lipid spectrum of the newborn rats' blood at the radioactive and chemical effects in the prenatal period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzan, Kh.

    1998-01-01

    The radioactive and chemical factors used in complex or separately during the prenatal period in the experiment induce ambiguous effects on the lipid metabolism in blood plasma and erythrocytes of newborn rats. The chemicals cause more significant changes in the blood plasma lipid metabolism than the radioactive irradiation does. Being used combined the radioactive and chemical factors do not increase each other's effect- their effects have opposite directions. The radiochemical exposure induce more significant shifts in the lipid spectrum in erythrocytic membranes than the separate factors

  17. Upper parameters of toxicity (LDsub(50/30)) of some radioactive and chemical substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionova, L.F.; Kupriyanova, V.M.; Zasedatelev, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicities of radioactive ( 90 Sr, 210 Po) and chemical (lead nitrate, mercuric chloride) substances were compared using equivalent procedures. Ninety six doses of toxic substances in various concentrations were tested on mice to which these substances were administered by intragastric intubation. The material was processed and analyzed by conventional methods used in toxicology. The upper limits of toxicity for the tested substances were determined from their LDsub(50/30) values by various methods of calculation

  18. Finite element modelling of an evacuated canister for removal of molten radioactive glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatchell, B.K.; Deibler, J.E.; Ketner, G.L.

    1994-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has prepared a preliminary design for the West Valley Demonstration Project evacuated canister system. The function of the evacuated canister is to remove radioactive molten glass from a hot cell melter cavity during a planned melter shutdown. The proposed evacuated canister system consists of an L-shaped 4-inch 304L stainless steel (SS) schedule 40 pipe, sealed at one end with an aluminum plug and attached at the other end to a canister. While the canister is being filled, it is positioned and held above the melter at approximately 15 degree from horizontal by two turntable-mounted cranes. ANSYS finite element analyses were conducted to evaluate the heat transfer from the glass to the canister and establish a maximum canister temperature for material strength evaluation. Finite element structural analyses were conducted to identify areas that required reinforcement for high temperature use. Finite element results will be used to locate strain gauges at high stress locations during prototype testing

  19. Physical--chemical studies of transuranium elements. Progress report, April 1, 1977--March 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    Major advances in our continuing program to determine, interpret, and correlate the basic chemical and physical properties of the transuranium elements are summarized for the period April 1, 1977, through March 31, 1978. CfCl 2 , EsCl 2 , EsBr 2 , and EsI 2 were synthesized and characterized spectrophotometrically, as were several mixed-valence lanthanide-actinide halides (e.g., GdCf 4 Cl 11 ) and CmF 4 , CfF 4 , and EsF 3 . All samples not containing einsteinium were also examined by X rays. Studies of the chemical consequences of the radioactive decay series 253 Es alpha decaying to 249 Bk beta decaying to 249 Cf have continued and expanded. Elemental Cm-248 has been prepared on the one-half milligram scale and used to synthesize CmP and CmSb. Single crystals of AmTe 2 and AmSe 2 have been grown from a Te melt and by iodine transport, respectively. Our SQUID magnetometer was tested successfully in a preliminary configuration, and the expected sensitivity of the device was confirmed. A new design for the flux sensing coils was incorporated prior to an apparatus calibration experiment with lead. A porous vitreous carbon material was found to make a useful optically transparent electrode for simultaneous electrochemical and absorption spectroscopic investigations. Cyclic voltammograms of UO 2 2+ were obtained prior to a spectroelectrochemical study of the radiation of UO 2 2+ . The major obstacle in our solution microcalorimetry program was overcome by the realization of a leak-free sample container. Calorimeter performance now warrants experiments with transuranium element samples. The electrochemical reductions of Cf(III) and Es(III) have been studied by polarography and/or cyclic voltammetry. The results suggest that both are reduced to the divalent state before being reduced to the amalgam

  20. Chemical reactivity of precursor materials during synthesis of glasses used for conditioning high-level radioactive waste: Experiments and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, A.

    2012-01-01

    The glass used to store high-level radioactive waste is produced by reaction of a solid waste residue and a glassy precursor (glass frit). The waste residue is first dried and calcined (to lose water and nitrogen respectively), then mixed with the glass frit to enable vitrification at high temperature. In order to obtain a good quality glass of constant composition upon cooling, the chemical reactions between the solid precursors must be complete while in the liquid state, to enable incorporation of the radioactive elements into the glassy matrix. The physical and chemical conditions during glass synthesis (e.g. temperature, relative proportions of frit and calcine, amount of radioactive charge) are typically empirically adjusted to obtain a satisfactory final product. The aim of this work is to provide new insights into the chemical and physical interactions that take place during vitrification and to provide data for a mathematical model that has been developed to simulate the chemical reactions. The consequences of the different chemical reactions that involve solid, liquid and gaseous phases are described (thermal effects, changes in crystal morphology and composition, variations in melt properties and structure). In a first series of experiments, a simplified analogue of the calcine (NaNO 3 -Al 2 O 3 ± MoO 3 /Nd 2 O 3 ) has been studied. In a second series of experiments, the simplified calcines have been reacted with a simplified glass frit (SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) at high temperature. The results show that crystallization of the calcine may take place before interaction with the glass frit, but that the reactivity with the glass at high temperature is a function of the nature and stoichiometry of the crystalline phases which form at low temperature. The results also highlight how the mixing of the starting materials, the physical properties of the frit (viscosity, glass transition temperature) and the Na 2 O/Al 2 O 3 of the calcine but also its

  1. A study of radioactive elements of various rocks in Pattani Province with gamma ray spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaewtubtim, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The radioactivity of the three elements, potassium, uranium and thorium, in rocks of various types in Pattani Province was investigated by using a gamma ray spectrometer. It was found that potassium contents in igneous rocks, sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks were 6.29 %, 2.21% and 1.54 % respectively. Uranium equivalent contents in igneous rock, sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks were found to be 22.51 ppm, 11.25 ppm and 14.13 ppm, while thorium contents in these rocks were 21.78 ppm, 18.88 ppm and 18.15 ppm respectively. The results obtained were similar to those reported by Pungtip Ranglek (1995 for igneous rock at Liwong Pluton site in Thepha, Na Thawi, Chana and Saba Yoi Districts, Songkhla Province, and were about six times higher than those reported by Kittichai Wattananikorn (1994 for igneous rock in the northern part of Thailand.

  2. Radioactive elements behaviour in multiphase intrusive series and petrological significance of radiogeochemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomareva, A.P.; Zlobin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of radioactive elements (RE) during formation of multiphase intrusive series of various ages, types and alkalinity nature, placed in different structural formation zones of West Uzbekistan is discussed (on the basis of 230 quantitative determinations). It is established that maximum RE concentrations in the intrusive series considered are U=3-5, Th=11-17 g/t and correspond to granodiorites, adamellites, granites and granosienites. The typical behaviour for U and Th is the growth of their concentrations in the direction from gabbro- to granodiorites (granosienites) and granites, and then decrease to leucocrat granites (alkaline, biotite or bimica ones). The evolution of magmatic systems occurred not along the line of differentiation of melts, but along the line of their ''washing'' with fluid mainly at the level of magma generation and on their way to upper horizons of Earth crust. High concentrations (several times more than a clark) must occur in cases of additional RE introduction

  3. Comparison of the thermodynamic databases for radioactive elements in application to the calculation of the solubilities in the porewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Reisuke; Shibata, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    To calculate the solubility of radioactive elements which is the important parameter for performance assessment of geological disposal system, the thermodynamic database must be reliable and based on the latest information. In this research, it has been compared in the calculation of the solubilities of the representative radioactive elements in the porewater compositions of the compacted bentonite which were set up in the second progress report (H12) that the thermodynamic database of JNC, OECD/NEA, Nagra/PSI. And the causes of the differences among the results from application of different databases were investigated and discussed. (author)

  4. Natural radioactivity and Rare Earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia, E-mail: nadia_walley5@hotmail.co [Department of physics, Faculty of girls for Art, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt); El-Shershaby, Amal [Department of physics, Faculty of girls for Art, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt); Afifi, Sofia [Nuclear Materials Authority (Egypt); Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman [Department of physics, Faculty of girls for Art, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-05-15

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150 km{sup 2} of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg{sup -1} has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th and from 0 to 7894.6 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), dose rate (D{sub R}) and external hazard (H{sub ex}) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries.

  5. Natural radioactivity and Rare Earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia; El-Shershaby, Amal; Afifi, Sofia; Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman

    2011-01-01

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150 km 2 of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg -1 has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7 BqKg -1 for 238 U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2 BqKg -1 for 232 Th and from 0 to 7894.6 BqKg -1 for 40 K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra eq ), dose rate (D R ) and external hazard (H ex ) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries.

  6. Trace elements and naturally occurring radioactive materials in 'Non-traditional fertilizers' used in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assibey, E. O.

    2013-07-01

    Fertilizers have been implicated for being contaminated with toxic trace elements and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) even though they are an indispensable component of our agriculture. This phenomenon of contamination has been investigated and established world-wide in various forms of fertilizers (i.e., granular or 'traditional' type and liquid/powder or 'non-traditional type'). In Ghana, the crop sub-sector has seen a gradual rise in the importation and use of 'non-traditional fertilizers' which are applied to both the foliar parts and roots of plants. This notwithstanding, research on fertilizers has been largely skewed towards the 'traditional' types, focusing principally on the subjects of yield, effects of application and their quality. This study was, therefore, undertaken to bridge the knowledge gap by investigating the levels of trace elements and NORMs found in the 'non-traditional' fertilizers used in Ghana. The principal objective of the study was to investigate the suitability of the 'non-traditional fertilizers' for agricultural purposes with respect to trace elements and NORMs contamination. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis were employed to determine the trace elements (Cu, Zn, Fe, Na, Al, Br, Ni, Cd, As, Hg, Co, Pb, La, Mn, Si, Ca, Cl, S, K, Ba and V) and NORMs ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) concentrations in thirty-nine (39) fertilizer samples taken from two major agro-input hubs in the country (Kumasi-Kejetia and Accra). Multivariate statistical analyses (cluster analysis, principal component analysis and pearson's correlation) were applied to the data obtained in order to identify possible sources of contamination, investigate sample/ parameter affinities and groupings and for fingerprinting. The toxic trace element concentrations determined in all samples were found to be in the order Fe>Cu>Co>Cd>Cr >Ni>Pb>As>Hg. The study found most of the trace elements determined to be within limits set

  7. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrwas, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  8. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  9. A model for determination of screening level for radioactive elements in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, Ana Claudia

    2007-01-01

    At the present, decision about clean-up of Brazilian sites contaminated with radioactive isotopes is addressed on a case-by-case basis, since there is no general guidance or recommendation to support actions in early phases of the problem identification. For chemicals, CETESB - the governmental organization responsible for preventing and controlling environmental pollution in Sao Paulo State - established background values, prevention and intervention, as the first step to implement a remediation actions based on human health risk assessment. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for the establishment of target values for radioactive soil contamination, as far as possible consistent and compatible with the approach adopted by CETESB for sites contaminated with chemicals. The following steps have been addressed in this study: conceptual scenario and model development; codification of the equations in an electronic spreadsheet; selection of proper range and statistical distribution of the input values; derivation of the intervention levels for selected radionuclides using Monte Carlo methods. The mathematical model developed was mainly based on the equations used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) for soil screening purposes. Intervention and prevention values are presented for adult and 10 years old child, for each 3 exposure scenarios: agricultural, residential and industrial; the following radionuclides were considered: 3 H, 14 C, 32 P, 35 S, 45 Ca, 51 Cr, 90 Sr, 125 I, 131 I, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 232 Th, 238 U, 239 Pu and 241 Am. Quality reference values were determined for 40 K, 137 Cs, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th, Th-nat e U-nat. Results obtained in this study showed a good agreement with those reported by NCRP, considering that the equations and the input data used in both models are not the same ones.(author)

  10. Curie's hypotheses concerning radioactivity and the origin of the elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, P.K.

    1999-09-01

    Pierre Curie gave two hypotheses at first; (1) It can be supposed that the radioactive substances borrow the energy, which they release, from an external radiation, and their radiation would then be a secondary radiation, (2) It can be supposed that the radioactive substances draw from themselves the energy which they release. The second hypothesis has shown the more fertile in explaining the properties of the radioactive substances. Consequently, the first hypothesis became more or less forgotten. It appears, however, the first hypothesis should play an important role in explaining the phenomena concerning the origin of the elements. The Oklo Phenomenon has demonstrated that a nuclear fire had once existed on our planet earth and formation of heavy elements was occurring in nature. The author pointed out that the difference in the isotopic compositions of xenon found in meteorites, lunar samples and in the earth's atmosphere can only be explained as due to the alterations of the isotropic compositions of xenon by combined effect of (a) mass-fractionation, (b) spallation, and (c) stellar temperature neutron-capture reactions. The strange xenon components are not isotopically pure substance. Instead, xenon-HL is a mixture of the {sup 244}Pu fission xenon and the xenon whose isotopic compositions is severely altered by a combined effect of the processes (a), (b) and (c) mentioned above. These results also indicate that C1 carbonaceous chondrites, which is generally as the most primitive sample of the solar system material, began to retain its xenon 5.1 billion years ago, when the plutonium to uranium ratio in the solar system was as high as almost 0.6 (atom/atom), while the C2 carbonaceous chondrite began to retain their xenon about 150 million years later and the ordinary chondrites and achondrite about 500 to 600 million years later. This means that the birth of the solar system began soon after the last supernova exploded about 5.1 billion years ago, and the

  11. The chemical behavior of the transuranic elements and the barrier function in natural aquifer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jewett, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    In a geological repository for long-lived radioactive wastes, such as actinides and certain fission products, most of the stored radionuclides remain immobile in the particular geological formation. If any of these could possibly become mobile, only trace concentrations of a few radionuclides would result. Nevertheless, with an inventory in the repository of many tonnes of transuranic elements, the amounts that could disperse cannot be neglected. A critical assessment of the chemical behavior of these nuclides, especially their migration properties in the aquifer system around the repository site, is mandatory for analysis of the long-term safety. The chemistry requited for this includes many geochemical multicomponent reactions that are so far only partially understood and hich therefore can be quantified only incompletely. A few of these reactions have been discussed in this paper based on present knowledge. If a comprehensive discussion of the subject is impossible because of this ack of information then an attempt to emphasize the importance of the predominant geochemical reactions of the transuranic elements in various aquifer systems should be made

  12. Use of a New Method Involving Labelling with Non-Radioactive Elements and Activation Analysis to Investigate Wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvan, M.; Reven'ska-Kos'tsjuk, B.; Vez'ranovski, E

    1967-01-01

    In view of the considerable difficulties in using the labelled-atom method to investigate the wear of bearings in agricultural machines under operating conditions, and also to investigate the wear of fire-proof materials in steel production (owing to the occurrence of exogenous non-metallic inclusions), the authors turned their attention to labelling these parts with nonradioactive elements, which were then determined by activation analysis. In the work carried out by this method either mixtures of rare-earth oxides or lanthanum oxide alone were used as tracers, because of their useful nuclear properties. The use of rare-earth elements is also justified by the fact that their chemical properties differ from those of the remaining elements in the material investigated, which means that they can be separated from the respective carriers. In investigations of the wear of agricultural machine bearings made from cast-iron modified with rare-earth elements in an amount too low to cause structural changes, the authors used the modifier as a tracer. The wear of polyamide bearings was also investigated. The use of activation analysis is particularly interesting in this case, since certain properties of the polyamide make standard methods of investigation completely impossible. The products of wear were separated from the oil or grease by extraction or combustion. In determinations of non-metallic exogenous inclusions in ball-bearing steel, caused by certain fireproof materials, the wear of these materials was investigated using modem steel production technology. The aim of these investigations was to determine the effect of vacuum extraction and the use of induction mixers on the passage of fire-resistant particles into the steel. A method of determination was developed based on chemical separation of the tracer after activation with an appropriate surplus of non-radioactive carrier, and also a method of separating it before activation with a calcium carrier. The authors

  13. Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden-Wuerttemberg; Bericht ueber die Entsorgung von radioaktiven Abfaellen und abgebrannten Brennelementen aus Baden-Wuerttemberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-04-15

    The report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg covers the following issues: legal framework for the nuclear disposal; producer of spent fuels and radioactive wastes in Baden- Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg; low- and medium-level radioactive wastes (non heat generating radioactive wastes); spent fuels and radioactive wastes from waste processing (heat generating radioactive wastes); final disposal.

  14. Chemical speciation of trace transition elements and iodine in freshwater at Rokkasho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaku, Yuichi; Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2007-01-01

    Analytical methods for physicochemical speciation of radioactive and related materials, such as lanthanide, actinide and transition metals in environmental samples, were developed to elucidate behavior of radioactive materials in the environment. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) was combined with a high-performance liquid chromatographer with a size exclusion (SEC) column or capillary electrophoresis apparatus (CE). Analytical methods using SEC-ICP-MS and CE-ICP-MS were developed for speciation of transition elements and iodine in environmental water samples in fiscal year 2004. The methods were applied to freshwater samples in Rokkasho; the results are reported here. Freshwater samples were collected from two lakes and three rivers surrounding the large-scale spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at Rokkasho. After samples were filtered with a membrane filter with 0.45 μm of pore size, large organic molecules were concentrated 200 times using an ultrafilter with a 10 kDa cutoff size. The concentrated solution was used for molecular size analyses using the SEC-ICP-MS technique. Molecular size chromatograms of all river and lake water samples showed two peaks of UV absorptions and concentrations of all transition elements analyzed: 30 kDa and >700 kDa peaks. Ratios of the transition element concentration in 30 kDa peak to that in both peaks varied greatly depending on the element and season of sample collection. Two valence states of inorganic iodine, I - and IO 3 - , were determined separately using the CE-ICP-MS system with a standard capillary column (150 μm inner φ, 75 cm length) with 30 kV as the extraction voltage. Buffer solution of 5 mM TRIS-HNO 3 (pH 3.0) was used for mobile phase. The method was applied to lake and river water samples collected at Rokkasho. Results indicated that the chemical form of inorganic iodine in all samples was IO 3 - . Additional lake water samples were collected from Lake O-ike-higashi-ko in the Juni

  15. Chemical toxicity and radioactivity of depleted uranium: The evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asic, Adna; Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Besic, Larisa; Mehinovic, Lejla; Hasic, Azra; Kozaric, Mirza; Hukic, Mirsada; Marjanovic, Damir

    2017-07-01

    The main aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the current state of knowledge on chemical toxicity and radioactivity of depleted uranium (DU) and their effect on living systems and cell lines. This was done by presenting a summary of previous investigations conducted on different mammalian body systems and cell cultures in terms of potential changes caused by either chemical toxicity or radioactivity of DU. In addition, the authors aimed to point out the limitations of those studies and possible future directions. The majority of both in vitro and in vivo studies performed using animal models regarding possible effects caused by acute or chronic DU exposure has been reviewed. Furthermore, exposure time and dose, DU particle solubility, and uranium isotopes as factors affecting the extent of DU effects have been discussed. Special attention has been dedicated to chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage and DNA breaks, as well as micronuclei formation and epigenetic changes, as DU has recently been considered a possible causative factor of all these processes. Therefore, this approach might represent a novel area of study of DU-related irradiation effects on health. Since different studies offer contradictory results, the main aim of this review is to summarize and briefly discuss previously obtained results in order to identify the current opinion on DU toxicity and radioactivity effects in relation to exposure type and duration, as well as DU properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Studies on the separation and purification of strontium from the highly radioactive waste flow of fuel element reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerker, A.

    1989-10-01

    The quantity of spent fuel elements is increasing due to the extended peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Of the numerous fission products, strontium has an interesting application potential as a radiation or energy source for utilization in various industrial fields. A necessary condition for its use is its isolation in high radiochemical purity from the highly radioactive waste flow of the Purex process. In the present study, precipitation and coprecipitation reactions, and in particular ion exchange reactions, were chosen from among the various possible chemical and physical separation methods and examined with respect to their suitability for a selective separation of strontium from the other fission products. In selecting separation materials, particularly with respect to radiation resistance, thermal stability and selectivity, polyantimonic acid proved to be the best absorbent (even in a very acid medium) for strontium. Furthermore, the behaviour of the most important radionuclides was studied with respect to the denitration reaction from a 5 molar nitric acid solution. On the basis of the high demands made on the purity of the product, a method was developed by combining lead sulphate carrier precipitation with an ion exchange reaction on polyantimonic acid and is shown in a flow chart. (orig.) [de

  17. Radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes. Impact on man and his environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, F.L.; Suess, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The main objective of the various safety measures in all fields of human activities is to prevent deleterious effects of various agents on human health. Preventive health and safety measures therefore play an important role in achieving the main goal of the World Health Organization (WHO): 'Health for all by the year 2000'. The present WHO programme on environmental health emphasizes the prevention of chemical hazards as one of the most important environmental factors affecting human health. At the same time, protection from physical factors, including radiological protection, is part of this programme. Therefore, WHO compares health detriments from both physical and chemical agents. The paper describes the hazardous waste problems of great concern in industrialized countries. For instance, the Commission of the European Communities countries produce about 2x10 9 tonnes of waste per year, a rate which grows by 2 to 3% annually. This poses serious problems of pollution, particularly where the toxic ingredients do not decay. Special attention will also be given to the safe handling of high-level radioactive waste from the peaceful use of nuclear technology. These wastes have to be stored in safe storage facilities, or be disposed of without causing damage to man and his environment. The international measures to contain and control these wastes are described, including the activities of WHO within the Global Environmental Monitoring System and Regional Sea programmes of the United Nations Environment Programme. Guidelines and methodologies for the management of hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes are being developed through WHO to assist national authorities in this task. The paper pays special attention to a comparative assessment of environmental and public health impacts of toxic chemical and radioactive wastes. (author)

  18. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al 2 O 3 to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition

  19. Management of radioactive liquid waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendixsen, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Highly radioactive liquid wastes (HLLW) are routinely produced during spent nuclear fuel processing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This paper discusses the processes and safe practices for management of the radioactive process waste streams, which processes include collection, concentration, interim storage, calcination to granular solids, and long-term intermediate storage. Over four million gallons of HLLW have been converted to a recoverable granular solid form through waste liquid injection into a high-temperature, fluidized bed wherein the wastes are converted to their respective solid oxides. The development of a glass ceramic solid for the long-term permanent disposal of the high level waste (HLW) solids is also described

  20. Direct conversion of radioactive and chemical waste containing metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (CMODS) is a new process for direct conversion of radioactive, mixed, and chemical wastes to glass. The wastes can be in the chemical forms of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics. GMODS destroys organics and it incorporates heavy metals and radionuclides into a glass. Processable wastes may include miscellaneous spent fuels (SF), SF hulls and hardware, plutonium wastes in different forms, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, ion-exchange resins, failed equipment, and laboratory wastes. Thermodynamic calculations indicate theoretical feasibility. Small-scale laboratory experiments (< 100 g per test) have demonstrated chemical laboratory feasibility for several metals. Additional work is needed to demonstrate engineering feasibility

  1. Effect of chemical structure on the radioactive decay rate of 71Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makariunas, K.; Makariuniene, E.; Dragunas, A.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the chemical structure on the electron capture radioactive decay rate of 71 Ge was observed. 71 Ge nuclei in bivalent sulphide GeS decay faster than in quadrivalent sulphide GeS 2 . The relative change Δlambda/lambda of the decay constant lambda is + (11.4 +- 1.7) X 10 -4 . A possibility to use the experimental values of Δlambda/lambda to determine the chemical changes in the electron density at germanium nuclei in germanium chemical compounds is discussed. Quantitative determination of the changes in the electron density is complicated because of insufficient reliability of the published values of exchange and overlap corrections to the electron capture probabilities. (Auth.)

  2. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  3. Storage, handling and internal transport of radioactive materials (fuel elements excepted) in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The rule applies to storage and handling as well as to transport within the plant and to the exchange of - solid radioactive wastes, - liquid radioactive wastes, except for those covered by the rule KTA 3603, - radioactive components and parts which are planned to be mounted and dismounted until shutdown of the plant, - radioactive-contaminated tools and appliances, - radioactive preparations. The rule is to be applied within the fenced-in sites of stationary nuclear power plants with LWR or HTR including their transport load halls, as fas as these are situated so as to be approachable from the nuclear power station by local transport systems. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Investigations concerning the source term for the emission of fission products and transuranic elements from the highly radioactive waste in the temperature region between 200 and 11000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, F.; Krebs, K.; Merte, B.

    1984-04-01

    Starting point of these investigations was the research report 290 of the former Institute for Reactor Safety, Cologne. The largely incorrect assumptions made in the chemical statement led to high radioactive doses not only for the closer, but also for the further surroundings of a reprocessing plant in case that the cooling system of the fuel element storage or the storage tank for the highly radioactive waste (HAW) should become inoperative for an extended period of time. However, as a result of this temperature region which we used in our experiments, the investigations concerning the source term of the HAW between 1100 and 1200 0 C became interesting again, because a glass melt of about 1100 0 C is used during the PAMELA-process for the vitrification of the HAW. The aqueous HAW-solution is thereby poured onto a hot glass melt. The solution thereby dries up, the HAW-salt is calcined and finally sinks into the glass melt. From today's point of view an investigation concerning the source term of the fission products and transuranic elements from the HAW at 1100 0 C therefore provides information regarding the fission product- and transuranic element volatilization within the melting furnace during the vitrification process. The results may now therefore also be considered a contribution for the layout of the off-gas purification system during the PAMELA-process

  5. Investigation on the loss of trace elements in biological materials in different drying and ashing procedures by using radioactive tracers: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongxian; Qin Junfa; Ji Qianmei; Wu Shimin; Wang Xuepeng; Zhang Yuanxun

    1985-01-01

    By using radioactive tracers it is found that freezing dry is safe for Zn, Mo, Cd and Se in all matrices studied. Oven dry is also safe except for Se in hair. The oxygen plasma ashing does not cause any loss of Zn, Mo and Cd. Different degrees of loss were observed in oven ashing with exception of Zn and Mo in hair and shallot. It is obvious that the loss rate of the trace elements depends on their chemical forms present in the matrices. The retention of the four elements studied on the wall of quartz container can be neglected after oxygen plasma ashing. But Zn, Cd and Mo were retended in various degrees after oven ashing

  6. Determination of natural radioactivity and the concentration of elements in soil and plants at Krau Wildlife Reserve, Temerloh, Pahang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafiz Hadzori

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the natural radioactivity and the concentration of elements in soil and plants at Krau Wildlife Reserve, Pahang. Soil and plant samples collected were air dried and heated in the oven at temperature of 100 degree Celsius. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometer (ICP-MS) was used to determine the natural radioactivity and elemental contents of each sample. Results showed that the concentration of U-238 and Th-232 varied from each sampling site. The concentration of Th-232 is higher than of U-238. For soil and plants samples, the natural radioactivity for both radionuclides were below 72 Bq/ kg. 15 elements present in both soil and plant samples, among other are Al, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ca, Zn, Co, Cd and As. The concentration of each elements differs for every sampling site. The elements with higher concentration are Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Mn. This study showed that monocotyledon taking up more Mg than dicotyledons whereas dicotyledon plants taking up more Al. (author)

  7. General-purpose chemical analyzer for on-line analyses of radioactive solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.; Kronberg, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    An automated analyzer is being developed to perform analytical measurements on radioactive solutions on-line in a hostile environment. This General Purpose Chemical Analyzer (GPCA) samples a process stream, adds reagents, measures solution absorbances or electrode potentials, and automatically calculates the results. The use of modular components, under microprocessor control, permits a single analyzer design to carry out many types of analyses. This paper discusses the more important design criteria for the GPCA, and describes the equipment being tested in a prototype unit

  8. New facility for processing and storage of radioactive and toxic chemical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, F.E. III

    1976-01-01

    A new facility for the processing and storage of radioactive and toxic chemical waste is described. The facility is located in the science and engineering complex of the Santa Barbara campus of the University of California, near the Pacific Ocean. It is designed to provide a safe and secure processing and storage area for hazardous wastes, while meeting the high aesthetic standards and ecological requirements of campus and community regulatory boards. The ventilation system and fire prevention features will be described in detail. During the design phase, a small laboratory was added to provide an area for the radiation protection and industrial hygiene programs. Operational experience with this new facility is discussed

  9. [Distribution of chemical elements in whole blood and plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, G K; Zaĭtseva, L I; Kondakhchan, M A; Konstantinova, E A

    2003-01-01

    The distribution factor (Fd) of 35 elements of plasma and whole blood in 26 healthy men and women was detected by ICP-OES. Usilig this parameter the elements were subdivided in 3 pools. 9 of them have Fd higher than 1.5 ("elements of plasma"-Ag, Ca, Cu, In, Li, Na, Se, Si, Sr); 6 have lower than 0.5 ("elements of blood cells"-Fe, K, Mn, Ni, V, Zn), other 20-about 1 ("blood elements"). Fd of all elements depends on ionic radius. Elements of 2nd sub-groups of all groups of Mendeleev's periodic table ("heavy metals") depend on the similar law: "with growing of ionic radius the concentration of elements in plasma enhances". In alkaline metals Fd depends on the opposite law:" with growing of ionic radius of alkaline metal the quantity of elements in blood cells enhance". Dependence of Fd on the value of atomic mass in periods or in exterior electronic cloud (s-, p-, d-, f-) was not established. The table of distribution of all detected elements in whole blood in relation to 8 macroelements (Ca, Mg, K, Na, S, P, Fe, Zn,) is presented, as a basic diagnostic criteria in metal-ligand homeostasis disturbance.

  10. Production of chemically reactive radioactive ion beams through on-line separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joinet, A.

    2003-10-01

    The ISOL (isotope separation on line) allows the production of secondary radioactive ion beams through spallation or fragmentation or fission reactions that take place in a thick target bombarded by a high intensity primary beam. The challenge is to increase the intensity and purity of the radioactive beam. The optimization of the system target/source requires the right choice of material for the target by taking into account the stability of the material, its reactivity and the ionization method used. The target is an essential part of the system because radioactive elements are generated in it and are released more or less quickly. Tests have been made in order to select the best fitted material for the release of S, Se, Te, Ge and Sn. Materials tested as target filling are: ZrO 2 , Nb, Ti, V,TiO 2 , CeO x , ThO 2 , C, ZrC 4 and VC). Other molecules such as: COSe, COS, SeS, COTe, GeS, SiS, SnS have been studied to ease the extraction of recoil nuclei (Se, S, Te, Ge and Sn) produced inside the target

  11. Radioactive and chemical contamination of the water resources in the former uranium mining and milling sites of Mailuu Suu (Kyrgyzstan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcho Alvarado, J A; Balsiger, B; Röllin, S; Jakob, A; Burger, M

    2014-12-01

    An assessment of the radioactive and chemical contamination of the water resources at the former uranium mines and processing sites of Mailuu-Suu, in Kyrgyzstan, was carried out. A large number of water samples were collected from the drinking water distribution system (DWDS), rivers, shallow aquifers and drainage water from the mine tailings. Radionuclides and trace metal contents in water from the DWDS were low in general, but were extremely high for Fe, Al and Mn. These elements were associated with the particle fractions in the water and strongly correlated with high turbidity levels. Overall, these results suggest that water from the DWDS does not represent a serious radiological hazard to the Mailuu Suu population. However, due to the high turbidities and contents of some elements, this water is not good quality drinking water. Water from artesian and dug wells were characterized by elevated levels of U (up to 10 μg/L) and some trace elements (e.g. As, Se, Cr, V and F) and anions (e.g. Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-)). In two artesian wells, the WHO guideline value of 10 μg/L for As in water was exceeded. As the artesian wells are used as a source of drinking water by a large number of households, special care should be taken in order to stay within the WHO recommended guidelines. Drainage water from the mine tailings was as expected highly contaminated with many chemicals (e.g. As) and radioactive contaminants (e.g. U). The concentrations of U were more than 200 times the WHO guideline value of 30 μg/L for U in drinking water. A large variation in (234)U/(238)U isotopic ratios in water was observed, with values near equilibrium at the mine tailings and far from equilibrium outside this area (reaching ratios of 2.3 in the artesian well). This result highlights the potential use of this ratio as an indicator of the origin of U contamination in Mailuu Suu. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  13. Electronic tongue - an array of non-specific chemical sensors - for analysis of radioactive solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legin, A.; Rudnitskaya, A.; Babain, V.

    2006-01-01

    Multisensor systems, combining chemical sensor arrays with multivariate data processing engines (electronic tongue) rapidly and successfully developing in the last years are capable of simultaneous quantitative analysis of several species, e.g. metals, in complex real solutions. The expansion of the metals (metal ions) and species to be detected in radioactive waste requires permanent enhancement of sensing materials and sensors, with seriously different properties from those known earlier. A prospective direction of R and D of novel sensing materials is exploitation of radiochemical extraction systems and application of extraction substances as active components of new sensors. The sensors based on bidentate phosphorous organic compounds and their combinations with chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide displayed high sensitivity and selectivity to rare-earth metal ions La 3+ , Pr 3+ , Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ . The results indicated good promise for the development of novel analytical tools for detection of multivalent metal cations in different media, particularly in corrosive solutions such as radioactive wastes and solutions derived from spent nuclear fuel. The sensors and sensor arrays made on their basis can play an important role in the development of 'electronic tongue' systems for rapid analytical determinations of different components in complex radioactive solutions

  14. Physical-chemical studies of transuranium elements: Progress report for the period April 1, 1985-March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    New knowledge is being accumulated in the role of the 5f electrons in the bonding in actinide elements and compounds, the relationships of metallic structures to metallic valence and radius, the extent and magnitude of the actinide contraction, the magnetic, thermodynamic, spectroscopic, and crystallographic properties of these materials as related to general theories, the effect of self-irradiation on chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical consequences of radioactive decay in the bulk-phase solid state, and in general, the range of validity of the actinide hypothesis. Separate reports are given on: spectrophotometric studies of Cf(III) ions in lanthanide trihalide hosts, new ternary transplutonium chalcogenide halides, Raman spectrometric studies of lanthanide trihalides as function of T or P, and solution calorimetry of californium halides

  15. Electronic structure and chemical properties of superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pershina, V [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Gmbh (Germany)

    2009-12-31

    Relativistic electronic structure calculations of superheavy elements (Z>=104) are analyzed. Preference is given to those related to experimental research. The role of relativistic effects is discussed.

  16. The application of the German reg. guides ('elements of calculation') for radioactive discharges via exhaust air and waste water on fuel element fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Rudolph, W.

    1978-01-01

    The fuel element fabricating plants at Hanau are handlung uranium, plutonium and thorium. The process essentially of converting these heavy metals into oxide, carbide or metal compounds. Thereby occur radioactive discharges into the exhaust air and the waste water. The most important pathway for exposure from these substances is inhalation, the released radionuclides mostly being α-emitters. Compared to this the external irradiation from immersion in γ, β, and neutron radiation is of less importance. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Redistribution of natural radioactive elements resulting from animal and plant life activity in regions with high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malslov, V.I.; Maslova, K.I.; Alexakhin, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative assessment is made of the influence of plant and animal life on the migration and redistribution of naturally occurring radionuclides in several localized areas with unusually high soil concentrations of 226 Ra, 238 U, or 232 Th. In the taiga and tundra zones examined, the effects of radionuclide accumulation in certain plant species and of the feeding and burrowing habits of small mammals were particularly significant. The observed regularities have predictive applications in assessing the redistribution of radionuclides in regions of high radioactivity

  18. Chemical elements in egg shell of a commercial strain of domestic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the chemical elements of the egg shell of exotic commercial pullets (Lohmann) in their first laying year. A total of 160 eggs from eighty pullets were randomly selected at three-monthly intervals during the production year for the ddermination of chemical elements or the eggshell.

  19. Chemical characteristics and trace element concentration of non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study investigates the details on the aspects of Coal quality such as proximate, ultimate, calorific value and trace element concentration and its impact on human health. Trace elements are present in very low percentage in coal but their concentration increases manifold after coal combustion and utilization.

  20. Behaviors of chemical elements in the atmosphere, Kawasaki, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, K.; Kikawada, Y.; Oi, T.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 19 elements in the samples of atmospheric deposition collected in Kawasaki, Japan, were determined by neutron activation analysis, ICPAES and flame photometry. The amounts of soil dust depositions were larger in springs and those of Sb and Zn depositions were larger in summers than in the other seasons. The values of the enrichment factors were higher for Sb and Zn than for the other elements determined throughout the sampling period. A factor analysis showed that the two elements were characterized as industrial components. Rubber products like tires that contain noncombustibles and rubber accelerators were a possible origin of high concentrations of Sb and Zn in the present samples. (author)

  1. Finite element code FENIA verification and application for 3D modelling of thermal state of radioactive waste deep geological repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butov, R. A.; Drobyshevsky, N. I.; Moiseenko, E. V.; Tokarev, U. N.

    2017-11-01

    The verification of the FENIA finite element code on some problems and an example of its application are presented in the paper. The code is being developing for 3D modelling of thermal, mechanical and hydrodynamical (THM) problems related to the functioning of deep geological repositories. Verification of the code for two analytical problems has been performed. The first one is point heat source with exponential heat decrease, the second one - linear heat source with similar behavior. Analytical solutions have been obtained by the authors. The problems have been chosen because they reflect the processes influencing the thermal state of deep geological repository of radioactive waste. Verification was performed for several meshes with different resolution. Good convergence between analytical and numerical solutions was achieved. The application of the FENIA code is illustrated by 3D modelling of thermal state of a prototypic deep geological repository of radioactive waste. The repository is designed for disposal of radioactive waste in a rock at depth of several hundred meters with no intention of later retrieval. Vitrified radioactive waste is placed in the containers, which are placed in vertical boreholes. The residual decay heat of radioactive waste leads to containers, engineered safety barriers and host rock heating. Maximum temperatures and corresponding times of their establishment have been determined.

  2. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste

  3. Allium -test as a tool for toxicity testing of environmental radioactive-chemical mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudalova, A A; Pyatkova, S V; Geras’kin, S A; Dikareva, N S

    2017-01-01

    Bioassay-based approaches have been propagated to assess toxicity of unknown mixtures of environmental contaminants, but it was rarely applied in cases of chemicals with radionuclides combinations. Two Allium -test studies were performed to assess environmental impact from potential sources of combined radioactive-chemical pollution. Study sites were located at nuclear waste storage facilities in European and in Far-Eastern parts of Russia. As environmental media under impact, waters from monitor wells and nearby water bodies were tested. Concentrations of some chemicals and radionuclides in the samples collected enhanced the permitted limits. Cytogenetic and cytotoxic effects were used as biological endpoints, namely, frequency and spectrum of chromosome aberrations and mitotic abnormalities in anatelophase cells as well as mitotic activity in Allium root tips. Sample points were revealed where waters have an enhanced mutagenic potential. The findings obtained could be used to optimize monitoring system and advance decision making on management and rehabilitation of industrial sites. The Allium -test could be recommended and applied as an effective tool for toxicity testing in case of combined contamination of environmental compartments with radionuclides and chemical compounds. (paper)

  4. Allium-test as a tool for toxicity testing of environmental radioactive-chemical mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudalova, A. A.; Geras'kin, S. A.; Dikareva, N. S.; Pyatkova, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    Bioassay-based approaches have been propagated to assess toxicity of unknown mixtures of environmental contaminants, but it was rarely applied in cases of chemicals with radionuclides combinations. Two Allium-test studies were performed to assess environmental impact from potential sources of combined radioactive-chemical pollution. Study sites were located at nuclear waste storage facilities in European and in Far-Eastern parts of Russia. As environmental media under impact, waters from monitor wells and nearby water bodies were tested. Concentrations of some chemicals and radionuclides in the samples collected enhanced the permitted limits. Cytogenetic and cytotoxic effects were used as biological endpoints, namely, frequency and spectrum of chromosome aberrations and mitotic abnormalities in anatelophase cells as well as mitotic activity in Allium root tips. Sample points were revealed where waters have an enhanced mutagenic potential. The findings obtained could be used to optimize monitoring system and advance decision making on management and rehabilitation of industrial sites. The Allium-test could be recommended and applied as an effective tool for toxicity testing in case of combined contamination of environmental compartments with radionuclides and chemical compounds.

  5. Design of chemical treatment unit for radioactive liquid wastes in Serpong nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimin, Z.; Walman, E.; Santoso, P.; Purnomo, S.; Sugito; Suwardiyono; Wintono

    1996-01-01

    The chemical treatment unit for radioactive liquid wastes arising from nuclear fuel fabrication, radioisotopes production and radiometallurgy facility has been designed. The design of chemical processing unit is based on the characteristics of liquid wastes containing fluors from uranium fluoride conversion process to ammonium uranyl carbonate on the fuel fabrication. The chemical treatment has the following process steps: coagulation-precipitation of fluoride ion by calcium hydroxide coagulant, separation of supernatant solution from sludge, coagulation of remaining fluoride on the supernatant solution by alum, separation of supernatant from sludge, and than precipitation of fluors on the supernatant by polymer resin WWS 116. The processing unit is composed of 3 storage tanks for raw liquid wastes (capacity 1 m 3 per tank), 5 storage tanks for chemicals (capacity 0.5 m 3 per tank), 2 mixing reactors (capacity 0.5 m 3 per reactor), 1 storage tank for supernatant solution (capacity 1 m 3 ), and 1 storage tank for sludge (capacity 1 m 3 )

  6. Cluster analysis to evaluate stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters behavior on uranium mining waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de Souza; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo; Goncalves, Simone, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br [Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Morais, Gustavo Ferrari de; Campelo, Emanuele Lazzaretti Cordova [Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Desenvolvimento de Processos; Dores, Luis Augusto de Carvalho Bresser [Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Gerencia de Descomissionamento

    2011-07-01

    The Ore Treating Unit (UTM, in portuguese) is a deactivated uranium mine. A cluster analysis was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in their effluents. The utilization of the cluster analysis proved itself effective in the assessment, allowing the identification of groups of chemical elements, physical-chemical parameters and their joint analysis (elements and parameters). As a result we may assert, based on data analysis, that there is a strong link between calcium and magnesium and between aluminum and rare-earth oxides on UTM's effluents. Sulphate was also identified as strongly linked to total and dissolved solids, and those to electrical conductivity. There were other associations, but not so strongly linked. Further gathering, to seasonal evaluation, are required in order to confirm those analysis. Additional statistical analysis (factor analysis) must be used to try to identify the origin of the identified groups on this analysis. (author)

  7. Cluster analysis to evaluate stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters behavior on uranium mining waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de Souza; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo; Goncalves, Simone; Kelecom, Alphonse; Morais, Gustavo Ferrari de; Campelo, Emanuele Lazzaretti Cordova; Dores, Luis Augusto de Carvalho Bresser

    2011-01-01

    The Ore Treating Unit (UTM, in portuguese) is a deactivated uranium mine. A cluster analysis was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in their effluents. The utilization of the cluster analysis proved itself effective in the assessment, allowing the identification of groups of chemical elements, physical-chemical parameters and their joint analysis (elements and parameters). As a result we may assert, based on data analysis, that there is a strong link between calcium and magnesium and between aluminum and rare-earth oxides on UTM's effluents. Sulphate was also identified as strongly linked to total and dissolved solids, and those to electrical conductivity. There were other associations, but not so strongly linked. Further gathering, to seasonal evaluation, are required in order to confirm those analysis. Additional statistical analysis (factor analysis) must be used to try to identify the origin of the identified groups on this analysis. (author)

  8. Optimization and validation of a chemical process for uranium, mercury and cesium leaching from cemented radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynier, N.; Lastra, R.; Laviolette, C.; Bouzoubaa, N., E-mail: nicolas.reynier@canada.ca [Natural Resources Canada, CanmetMINING, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Chapman, M. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) is developing a treatment and long-term management strategy for a legacy cemented radioactive waste that contains uranium, mercury, and fission products. Extracting the uranium would be advantageous for decreasing the waste classification and reducing the cost of long-term management. The chemical leachability of 3 key elements (U, Hg, and Cs) from a surrogate cemented waste (SCW) was studied with several lixiviants. The results showed that the most promising approach to leach and recover U, Hg, and Cs is the direct leaching of the SCW with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in strong saline media. Operating parameters such as particle size, temperature, pulp density, leaching time, acid and salt concentrations, number of leaching/washing steps, etc. were optimized to improve key elements solubilization. Sulfuric leaching in saline media of a SCW (U5) containing 1182 ppm of U, 1598 ppm of Hg, and 7.9 ppm of Cs in the optimized conditions allows key elements solubilisation of 98.5 ± 0.4%, 96.6 ± 0.1%, and 93.8 ± 1.1% of U, Hg, and Cs, respectively. This solubilization process was then applied in triplicate to 7 other SCWs prepared with different cements, liquid ratios, and at different aging times and temperatures. Concentrated sulfuric acid is added to the slurry until the pH is about 2, which causes the complete degradation of cement and the formation of CaSO{sub 4}. Sulfuric acid is particularly useful because it produces a leachate that is amenable to conventional ion exchange technology for the separation and recovery of uranium. (author)

  9. Materials characterization of radioactive waste forms using a multi-element detection method based on the instrumental neutron activation analysis. MEDINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havenith, Andreas Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste has to meet the specifications and acceptance criteria defined by national regulatory and management authorities for its intermediate and final storage. In Germany the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) has established waste acceptance requirements for the Konrad repository. Konrad is the disposal for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation and is located near the city of Salzgitter and is currently under construction. It will start operation not before the year 2021. The waste-acceptance-requirements are derived from a site-specific safety assessment. They include specific requirements on waste forms, packaging as well as limitations to activities of individual radionuclides and limitations to masses of non-radioactive harmful substances. The amount of chemically toxic elements in the waste is limited in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To comply with these requirements every waste package has to be characterised in its radiological and chemical composition. This characterisation can be performed on the basis of existing documentation or, if the documentation is insufficient, on further analytical analysis. Segmented or integral gamma-scanning as well as active or passive neutron counting are used worldwide as the standard measurement methods for the radiological characterisation and quality checking of radioactive waste. These techniques determine the isotope specific activity of waste packages, but they do not allow the detection of non-radioactive hazardous substances inside the waste packages. Against this background the Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology Transfer (NET) at RWTH Aachen University and the Institute of Safety Research and Reactor Technology at Forschungszentrum Juelich jointly develop an innovative non-destructive analytical technique called MEDINA - ''Multi-Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation'' for

  10. Chemical mode control in nuclear power plant decommissioning during operation of technologies in individual radioactive waste processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, J.; Dugovic, L.

    1999-01-01

    Sewage treatment of nuclear power plant decommissioning is performed by system of sewage concentration in evaporator with formation of condensed rest, it means radioactive waste concentrate and breeding steam. During sewage treatment plant operation department of chemical mode performs chemical and radiochemical analysis of sewage set for treatment, chemical and radiochemical analysis of breeding steam condensate which is after final cleaning on ionization filter and fulfilling the limiting conditions released to environment; chemical and radiochemical analysis of heating steam condensate which is also after fulfilling the limiting conditions released to environment. Condensed radioactive concentrate is stored in stainless tanks and later converted into easy transportable and chemically stable matrix from the long term storage point of view in republic storage Mochovce. The article also refer to bituminous plant, vitrification plant, swimming pool decontamination plant of long term storage and operation of waste processing plant Bohunice

  11. Chemical analysis of useful trace elements in sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Shunsaku; Fujii, Ayako; Miyai, Yoshitaka; Sakane, Kohji; Ogata, Noboru.

    1983-01-01

    The methods for the analysis of useful trace elements in sea water which have been tried so far are reviewed, and these methods are described briefly from the standpoint of studying the collection of resources. Ag and Au can be determined by concentrating sea water by ion-exchange method, solvent extraction method and electrodeposition method, then the elements are measured quantitatively by activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrochemical analysis. Sr, B and Li, which exist in relatively high concentration in sea water, are determined easily by atomic absorption spectrochemical analysis and absorption spectrometry. U, Mo and V are measured suitably by concentrating the elements by coprecipitation or solvent extraction method, and measuring by fluorescence analysis and arsenazo-3 method for U and through graphite-atomic absorption analysis for Mo and V. It has been revealed that the concentration of Ag and Au in sea water is extremely low, accordingly the recovery study is not conducted recently. On the other hand, the adsorption method using hydrated titanium oxide and amidoxim adsorbents for U, Mo and V, the adsorption method using aluminum adsorbent for Li, and the adsorption method using magnesium oxide and zirconium hydroxide and the solvent extraction method for B are hopeful to recover these elements. (Yoshitake, I.)

  12. Characterization of chemical elements of fruits of Leucaena leucocephala in riverside areas of the Piracicaba River Basin, São Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    França, Elvis J.; Magalhães, Marcelo R.L. de; Ferreira, Fabiano S.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de N.; Fonseca, Felipe Y.; Rodrigues, Vanessa S.; Cavalca, Isabel P.O.; Camilli, Leandro; Silva, Bruno F.

    2017-01-01

    The species Leucaena leucocephala is present in several environments. Its fruit is widely used in cattle feed. However, it is classified as an invasive species, causing problems in the restoration of impacted areas. The Piracicaba River Basin is heavily affected by urbanization and industrialization, which shows the proliferation of this species. Considering the importance of this tree species for Brazil, the present study quantifies chemical elements in fruits of this species by applying Instrumental Neutronic Activation Analysis, method k 0 . Samples were collected in riverside areas of the Piracicaba Municipality, São Paulo, Brazil, at different periods (dry and rainy season). After collection, the samples were shattered and transferred to polyethylene capsules and irradiated with neutrons. Certified reference materials were used to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure, all material was irradiated under a thermal neutron flux of 10 13 cm-2s-1 for 8 hours. Ni-Cr alloy was used for the monitoring of thermal neutron flux. High Resolution Range Spectrometry with HPG detectors was employed for the measurement of the induced radioactivity, allowing the quantification of the chemical elements. Compared with available results of chemical analysis of pods, the chemical elements Ca, K, Ba, Cr and Se presented high concentrations. We also quantified chemical elements of environmental relevance such as As, Hg, Br, Ce, Cs, Eu, Hf, La, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th and Yb, indicating the need for element dynamics studies in the environments occupied by this invasive species

  13. A conceptual chemical solidification/stabilization system to remediate radioactive raffinate sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.J.; Ansted, J.P.; Foldyna, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    Past operations at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Weldon Spring, Missouri, Superfund Site included the manufacture of nitroaromatic-based munitions and the production of uranium and thorium metal from ore concentrates. These operations generated a large quantity of diverse contaminated waste media including raffinate sludge, soil, sediment, and building debris. These various waste media are contaminated with varying amounts of radionuclides nitroaromatics, metals, metalloids, non-metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and asbestos. The volumes and diversity of contaminants and waste media pose significant challenges in identifying applicable remedial technologies, particularly for the excavation and treatment of the water-rich raffinate sludge. This paper presents the results of comprehensive efforts to develop a conceptual chemical solidification/stabilization (CSS) system to treat a variety of waste media. The emphasis of this paper is the treatment of a water-rich refractory raffinate sludge and site contaminated soils both radioactive and nonradioactive. The conceptual system design includes raffinate sludge excavation, dewatering, and CSS processing (reagent selection and formulation, reagent and waste storage and metering, and product mixing). Many innovations were incorporated into the design, producing a system that can process the various waste types. Additionally, the radioactive and hazardous constituents are sufficiently immobilized to allow the secured disposal in a waste cell of the treated product. The conceptual CSS system can also produce a variety of treated product types, ranging from a monolithic form to a compactible soil-like medium. The advantages of this system flexibility are also presented

  14. Rehabilitation of radioactive objects of Kirovo-Chepetsky chemical plant preliminary program of works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnokov, F.V.; Ivanov, O.P.; Pavlenko, V.I.; Semenov, S.G.; Stepanov, V.E.; Volkov, V.G.; Volkovich, A.G.; Zverkov, Yu.A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the specialists of RRC Kurchatov Institute, jointly with MosNPO Radon, launched works on the radiation survey of radiation-contaminated objects and areas on the site of Kirovo-Chetetsky Chemical Plant (KCCP). This survey was launched with the object of subsequent development of the rehabilitation program and concept for buildings and storage sites left from shutdown uranium-processing facilities, as well as for sludge storage facilities and repositories of radioactive waste produced as a result of these facilities operation. Besides, radioactive contamination caused by the preceding operations involving radwaste and equipment contaminated at early stages of uranium hexafluoride (UHF) and tetrafluoride (UTF) processing technology mastering was detected in some spots at KCCP site. The radiation survey was performed in order to assess the amount of rehabilitation works, to identify the most critical objects and areas at KCCP site, and to develop the sequence of measures to be implemented in order to enhance the radiation safety of people living in the Kirov Region. (author)

  15. Radioactive contamination of plants in Japan covered with rainout from H-bomb detonations in March-May 1954 at Bikini Atoll, Marshall Island. Part II. Radioactive elements of contaminated plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatazawa, M

    1955-01-01

    Following a fallout estimated at 0.2 microcurie/l, Trifolium repens, Astragalus sinicus, and Rumex japonicus were harvested and analyzed for radioactivity. Most of the radioactivity (2300 to 4700 counts/min/50 g plant ash) was associated with oxalate precipitate. A small amount of activity in the Zn group is attributed to /sup 65/Zn produced by reaction /sup 64/Zn (n,..gamma..) from Zn employed in the mechanical parts of the bomb. Sr-Ba radioactivity was 0.1 that of the rare earth group. Distribution of the radioactive elements was nearly the same as that found on the No. 5 Fukuryu-Maru.

  16. Materials characterization of radioactive waste forms using a multi-element detection method based on the instrumental neutron activation analysis. MEDINA; Stoffliche Charakterisierung radioaktiver Abfallprodukte durch ein Multi-Element-Analyseverfahren basierend auf der instrumentellen Neutronen-Aktivierungs-Analyse. MEDINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havenith, Andreas Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste has to meet the specifications and acceptance criteria defined by national regulatory and management authorities for its intermediate and final storage. In Germany the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) has established waste acceptance requirements for the Konrad repository. Konrad is the disposal for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation and is located near the city of Salzgitter and is currently under construction. It will start operation not before the year 2021. The waste-acceptance-requirements are derived from a site-specific safety assessment. They include specific requirements on waste forms, packaging as well as limitations to activities of individual radionuclides and limitations to masses of non-radioactive harmful substances. The amount of chemically toxic elements in the waste is limited in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To comply with these requirements every waste package has to be characterised in its radiological and chemical composition. This characterisation can be performed on the basis of existing documentation or, if the documentation is insufficient, on further analytical analysis. Segmented or integral gamma-scanning as well as active or passive neutron counting are used worldwide as the standard measurement methods for the radiological characterisation and quality checking of radioactive waste. These techniques determine the isotope specific activity of waste packages, but they do not allow the detection of non-radioactive hazardous substances inside the waste packages. Against this background the Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology Transfer (NET) at RWTH Aachen University and the Institute of Safety Research and Reactor Technology at Forschungszentrum Juelich jointly develop an innovative non-destructive analytical technique called MEDINA - ''Multi-Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation'' for

  17. Study of chemical additives in the cementation of radioactive waste of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2011-01-01

    Cementation is a very useful process to solidify radioactive wastes. Depending on the waste it can be necessary to use of chemical additives (admixtures) to improve the cementation process and its product. Admixtures are materials, other than cement, aggregate and water, that are added either before or during the mixing to alter some properties, such as workability, curing temperature range, and setting time. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market. In this changeable scenario it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their characteristics. In this research the effects of chemical admixtures in the solidification process has been studied. For the tests it was prepared a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste, cemented by two different formulations, and three chemical admixtures from two manufacturers. The tested admixtures were accelerators, set retarders and super plasticizers. The experiments were organized by a planning factorial 23 to quantify the effects of formulations, of the admixtures, its quantity and manufacturer in properties of the paste and products. The measured parameters were the density, the viscosity and the setting time of the paste, and the product compressive strength. The parameter evaluated in this study was the compressive strength at age of 28 days, is considered essential security issues relating to the handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented products. (author)

  18. Fractionation of chemical elements including the REEs and 226Ra in stream contaminated with coal-mine effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centeno, L.M.; Faure, G.; Lee, G.; Talnagi, J.

    2004-01-01

    Water draining from abandoned open-pit coal mines in southeastern Ohio typically has a low pH and high concentrations of Fe, Al and Mn, as well as of trace metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni, Co, etc.) and of the rare earth elements (REEs). The cations of different elements are sorbed selectively by Fe and Al hydroxide precipitates which form with increasing pH. As a result, the trace elements are separated from each other when the hydroxide precipitates are deposited in the channel of a flowing stream. Therefore, the low-energy environment of a stream contaminated by mine effluent is a favorable site for the chemical fractionation of the REEs and of other groups of elements with similar chemical properties. The interpretation of chemical analyses of water collected along a 30-km-stretch of Rush Creek near the town of New Lexington, Perry County, Ohio, indicates that the abundances of the REEs in the water appear to change downstream when they are normalized to the REE concentrations of the mine effluent. In addition, the Ce/La ratios (and those of all REEs) in the water decrease consistently downstream. The evidence indicates that the REEs which remain in solution are enriched La and Ce because the other REEs are sorbed more efficiently. The solid Fe(OH) 3 precipitates in the channel of Rush Creek upstream of New Lexington also contain radioactive 226 Ra that was sorbed from the water. This isotope of Ra is a decay product of 238 U which occurs in the Middle Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous) coal and in the associated shale of southeastern Ohio. The activity of 226 Ra of the Fe(OH) 3 precipitates increases with rising pH, but then declines farther downstream as the concentration of Ra remaining in the water decreases

  19. Transboundary radioactive and chemical pollution simulation using an atmospheric/marine predicting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telenta, B.; Antic, D.

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric models can be used to simulate the transport of contaminants in typical accidental cases and for realistic meteorological conditions. Some numerical models for weather forecast can be used for near to real simulations of propagation of radioactive nuclides or classical chemical pollutants to the atmosphere. The various meteorological parameters are taken into account and various meteorological conditions, even complex ones, can be analyzed. The models can be used for very well assessment of the airborne pollution from energy sources and industrial installations, for comparative studies and for safety analysis. This report describes an proposal for a project of the transboundary pollution simulation, that can be used for the East Mediterranean Region. The project is based on the numerical models developed in the in simulating of the Chernobyl accident and similar hypothetical cases. The study is based on an atmospheric models developed in Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Insular Coastal Dynamics (ICoD), Foundation for International Studies, Valeta, Malta

  20. New radioactive tracers can help find cause of jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrard, G.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive tracers for the investigation of a condition known as persistent jaundice of the newborn, have been designed, prepared and tested at ANSTO. The tracers are chemical compounds of the radioactive elements gallium-67 and indium-111. They given lower radiation doses than the conventional radioactive tracer, iodine-131, used in these studies

  1. Evolution of cement based materials in a repository for radioactive waste and their chemical barrier function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard; Metz, Volker; Schlieker, Martina; Bohnert, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Germany, the alteration of cement and the mobilization/immobilization of radionuclides were studied in laboratory and in full-scale experiments. Most of these experiments were performed in relevant salt brines. The results on following investigations have been obtained: - Mechanical properties, - Element analyses, - Radioactive element and non-radioactive constituents distributions, - Scanning electron microscopic analyses, - Mineralogical analyses by: -- Thermogravimetric measurements, -- Powder X-ray diffraction analyses, -- Raman spectroscopy, -- XANES/EXAFS analyses. A resume of the results including modeling will be presented and the impact on the radioactive waste disposal safety will be demonstrated.

  2. Precipitation kinetics of radioactive elements and their effect upon redox conditions of the nearfield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Hiroyasu; Grindrod, P.

    1994-01-01

    In considering the release and migration of radioelements from the nearfield a variety of processes operating on different timescales must be incorporated. Source term models often employ standard assumptions such as instantaneous elemental solubility limits, instantaneous linear reversible adsorption, and homogeneous transport processes, etc. These ideas are employed because (1) the resulting mathematical models are simple and therefore conveniently solved; (2) they can be motivated by heuristic arguments concerning the relative timescales associated with chemical and transport processes. Hence these assumptions are imposed a-priori by the models, and subsequent release rates are calculated regardless of the actual leach rates and outflux rates encountered within the performance assessment. In certain circumstances these results may be non-conservative with release rates underestimated by orders of magnitude. Thus there is a need to be precise about when various assumptions are valid, and this necessitates a consideration of the kinetics associated with all open-quotes fastclose quotes processes, normally considered instantaneous. In the absence of complete data for this purpose it is appropriate to make a parametric survey incorporating ranges of possible parameter values. In this paper we present such an analysis for some standard source term situations, focusing primarily upon the process of elemental solubility limitation due to precipitation. This results in quantitative indications as to when the imposition of an instantaneous solubility limit is an acceptable approximation, and when it is non-conservative, and should be avoided. In supporting the imposition of solubility limits by a full analysis of the relevant processes, active on their various timescales, we are reversing the previous logic applied, where kinetic effects are ruled out because they are open-quotes fastclose quotes without any proper consideration of how fast they must be

  3. Investigation of chemical forms of elements in surface waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshal, G.M.; Velyukhanova, T.K.; Koshcheeva, I.Ya.; Dorofeeva, V.A.; Buachidze, N.S.; Kasimova, O.G.; Makharadze, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The main trends in the research of the state of elements in natural waters are examined. The hydrolysis of CU(2), Hg(2), Au(3), Sb(3), Ru(4) over a pH range, specific for natural waters, has been studied by solubility and paper electrophoresis technnques and by filtration through cellulose ionites. The regions of predominating different forms of hydroxo complexes have been found and the thermodynamic constants of hydrolysis equilibria have been calculated. Solubility, filtration through sephadexes and cellulose ionites, paper electrophoresis techniques were used to study the complexation of Cu(2), Hg(2), Au(3), Sb(3), Ru(4) with fulvic acids. Some data have been obtained on the composition, stability and molecular-mass distribution of fulvate complexes of ten elements in different oxidation states. High-molecular anionic fulvate complexes are among main forms of most easily hydrolysed elments in solution. The possibility has been shown of prediction of the ratio of coexisting forms of trace elements in solution by theoretical calculations and experimentally Using fractionation on cellulose ionites and sephadexes

  4. Determination of Physicals, Chemical, Biologicals and Radioactivity Parameters of Sediments and Water Samples of Seropan River of First Period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri Rusmanto; Agus Taftazani

    2007-01-01

    Seropan river water quality as residential water resources can be controlled by physical, chemical, and biological parameters. The water quality with the parameters of temperature, suspended solid (SS), gross β radioactivity, hardwater, COD, BOD, Escherichia Coli have been experimentally conducted. The sediment and water samples have been taken at February and August 2006. Measurement result of Seropan river water quality showed that the temperature was 28°C, maximum SS was 48 mg/L, maximum pH was 6.8 maximum hardwater was 257.49 mg/L, maximum COD was 8 mg/L, maximum BOD was 4.9 mg/L, maximum bacteria E. coli > 2400 mpn/100 mL, maximum water gross β was 0.9071 Bq/L. All the parameters were lower than maximum permissible for water condition that decided by Governor of Yogyakarta Special Province No/214/Kpts/1991 and Public Health Minister of Republic of Indonesia Number 907/Menkes/SK/VlI/2002. Sediment sample can not be evaluated because it was not included yet in the river water quality natural radionuclides gamma transmitter identified in river water samples were Tl-208 and K-40. More element detected in sediment samples, they were, Tl-208, Ac-228, Ra-226, Pb-212, Pb-214, Bi-214, Ac-228, Ac-228 and of K-40. (author)

  5. Elemental analysis of fertilizers using X-ray fluorescence and their impact on alpha radioactivity of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooja Chauhan; Chauhan, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The fertilizers used for plantation contain different elements including some natural radionuclides with their daughter decay products. The radiological impact of the use of fertilizers may be due to internal irradiation of the lung by the alpha particles, short lived radon-thoron progeny and the external irradiation of the body by gamma ray emitted from the radionuclides. The aim of this study was to estimate the enhanced alpha radioactivity in different parts of plants due to fertilizers and to measure the concentration of different elements present in the fertilizers. A control study was carried out on round gourd plants using different fertilizers. Fertilizers were added to the soil just before the plantation of seeds in the pots. For the measurement of alpha track densities in different parts of plants we used α-sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors. The alpha-track density (T cm -2 days -1 ) was measured in leaves of plants at different interval of time. The variation in alpha track densities was also observed in root, stem leaf and grain parts of the plants. In case of the plants grown using some phosphate fertilizers the alpha radioactivity was found to be more compared with others. A positive correlation between alpha track densities and mass exhalation rates of radon from different fertilizers has been observed. The concentration of major elements (Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K) along with other elements present in fertilizer samples was measured by X-ray fluorescence analysis. (author)

  6. Measurements of radon and chemical elements: Popocatepetl volcano; Mediciones de radon y elementos quimicos: Volcan Popocatepetl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N.; Lopez, B.; Reyes, A.V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Armienta, M.A.; Valdes, C.; Mena, M. [IGFUNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M. [UMR 5569 CNRS Hydrosciences, Montpellier (France)

    2002-07-01

    The Popocatepetl volcano is a higher risk volcano located at 60 Km from Mexico City. Radon measurements on soil in two fixed seasons located in the north slope of volcano were carried out. Moreover the radon content, major chemical elements and tracks in water samples of three springs was studied. The radon of soil was determined with solid detectors of nuclear tracks (DSTN). The radon in subterranean water was evaluated through the liquid scintillation method and it was corroborated with an Alpha Guard equipment. The major chemical elements were determined with conventional chemical methods and the track elements were measured using an Icp-Ms equipment. The radon on soil levels were lower, indicating a moderate diffusion of the gas across the slope of the volcano. The radon in subterranean water shown few changes in relation with the active scene of the volcano. The major chemical elements and tracks showed a stable behavior during the sampling period. (Author)

  7. PETROS - Worldwide Databank of Major Element Chemical Analyses of Igneous Rocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PETROS is a worldwide data bank of major element chemical analyses of igneous rocks compiled for research and teaching purposes by Dr. Felix Mutschler and Staff at...

  8. Consideration on thermodynamic data for predicting solubility and chemical species of elements in groundwater. Part 1: Tc, U, Am

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Takeda, Seiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-01-01

    The solubility determines the release of radionuclides from waste form and is used as a source term in radionuclide migration analysis in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Complexations of radionuclides by ligands in groundwater affect the interaction between radionuclides and geologic media, thus affect their migration behavior. Thermodynamic data for Tc, Am and U were reviewed and compiled to be used for predicting the solubility and chemical species in groundwater. Thermodynamic data were reviewed with emphasis on the hydrolysis and carbonate complexation that can dominate the speciation in typical groundwater. Thermodynamic data for other species were selected based on existing database. Thermodynamic data for other important elements are under investigation, thus shown in an appendix for temporary use. (author)

  9. Consideration on thermodynamic data for predicting solubility and chemical species of elements in groundwater. Part 2: Np, Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Tetsuji

    2000-11-01

    The solubility determines the release of a radionuclide from waste form and is used as a source term in radionuclide migration analysis in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Complexations of the radionuclide by ligands in groundwater affect the interaction between radionuclides and geologic media, thus affect their migration behavior. It is essential to estimate the solubility and to predict the chemical species for the radionuclide based on thermodynamic data. The thermodynamic data of aqueous species and compounds were reviewed and compiled for Np and Pu. Thermodynamic data were reviewed with emphasis on the hydrolysis and carbonate complexation that can dominate the speciation in groundwater. Thermodynamic data for other species were selected based on existing databases. Thermodynamic data for other important elements are under investigation, thus shown in an appendix for temporary use. (author)

  10. Naturally occurring radioactive elements, arsenic and other metals in drinking water from private wells; Naturligt radioaktiva aemnen, arsenik och andra metaller i dricksvatten fraan enskilda brunnar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, Britt-Marie; Thunholm, Bo (Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), Uppsala (SE)); Oestergren, Inger; Falk, Rolf; Mjoenes, Lars (Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-04-15

    Approximately 50% of all drinking water is extracted from groundwater. For private supply of drinking water almost 100% emanates from groundwater. For approximately 1.2 of the 9 million Swedish citizens, private wells are the primary water source where 700 000 get their water from wells drilled in the bedrock. Radioactive elements and metals that occur naturally in the bedrock can be found in the well water. The radioactive elements include radon-222 (222Rn), uranium (U), radium-226 (226Ra) as well as polonium-210 (210Po) and lead-210 (210Pb), which are long-lived progeny of radon. In 2001 SGU and SSI initiated a collaboration to investigate the occurrence of radioactive elements and metals in water from private wells. Data sampling and analysis was completed in 2006. The aim of the project was to map the occurrence of radioactive elements in drinking water from private wells and to estimate their respective dose contribution. Another aim was to map metals and other elements in the water, to study temporal variations and possible co-variations between analysed elements. Sampling was conducted in a random fashion throughout the country. However, in regions where bedrock and soils are known to show enhanced concentrations of radioactive elements and arsenic the sampling density was increased. The analyses comprises: total beta activity, total alpha activity, radium-226, radon-222, uranium, aluminium, chloride, calcium, vanadium, chromium, iron, manganese, cobalt, nickel, copper, zink, arsenic, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, barium, lead, thorium, boron, sodium, manganese, potassium, silica, alkalinity, sulfate, fluoride, phosphate, nitrate, pH and electric conductivity. In a few cases chemistry analyses of polonium-210 and lead-210 have been done. It was observed that the south-western part of Sweden, with exception for granite areas in the county of Bohuslaen, has relatively low concentrations of natural radioactive elements in the drinking water. The occurrence of

  11. k{sub 0}-INAA for determining chemical elements in bird feathers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Elvis J., E-mail: ejfranca@usp.b [CENA/USP, Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade of Sao Paulo, P.O. Box 97, 13400-970, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Elisabete A.N.; Fonseca, Felipe Y. [CENA/USP, Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade of Sao Paulo, P.O. Box 97, 13400-970, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Antunes, Alexsander Z. [IF, Instituto Florestal do Estado de Sao Paulo, Rua do Horto 931, Horto Florestal 02377-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bardini Junior, Claudiney; Bacchi, Marcio A.; Rodrigues, Vanessa S.; Cavalca, Isabel P.O. [CENA/USP, Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade of Sao Paulo, P.O. Box 97, 13400-970, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2010-10-11

    The k{sub 0}-method instrumental neutron activation analysis (k{sub 0}-INAA) was employed for determining chemical elements in bird feathers. A collection was obtained taking into account several bird species from wet ecosystems in diverse regions of Brazil. For comparison reason, feathers were actively sampled in a riparian forest from the Marins Stream, Piracicaba, Sao Paulo State, using mist nets specific for capturing birds. Biological certified reference materials were used for assessing the quality of analytical procedure. Quantification of chemical elements was performed using the k{sub 0}-INAA Quantu Software. Sixteen chemical elements, including macro and micronutrients, and trace elements, have been quantified in feathers, in which analytical uncertainties varied from 2% to 40% depending on the chemical element mass fraction. Results indicated high mass fractions of Br (max=7.9 mg kg{sup -1}), Co (max=0.47 mg kg{sup -1}), Cr (max=68 mg kg{sup -1}), Hg (max=2.79 mg kg{sup -1}), Sb (max=0.20 mg kg{sup -1}), Se (max=1.3 mg kg{sup -1}) and Zn (max=192 mg kg{sup -1}) in bird feathers, probably associated with the degree of pollution of the areas evaluated. In order to corroborate the use of k{sub 0}-INAA results in biomonitoring studies using avian community, different factor analysis methods were used to check chemical element source apportionment and locality clustering based on feather chemical composition.

  12. Model Experiments on Chemical Properties of Superheavy Elements in Aqueous Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Szeglowski, Z

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of model experiments on investigation of chemical properties of transactinide elements, ranging from 104 to 116. The possibilities of isolation of the nuclei of these elements from nuclear reaction products, using the ion-exchange method, are also considered.

  13. Chemical elements contamination of snow cover in region of coal production 'Karazhyra'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evlampieva, E.P.; Panin, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Peculiarities of space distribution of chemical elements in hardphase and water-soluble falls of snow cover in region of coal deposit 'Karazhyra' are investigated. The maximal, minimal and background areas of elements accumulation in the snow of this region and distribution of their cumulative rates are determined. The main pollutants of snow cover unto background level are revealed.

  14. Study of chemical additives in the cementation of radioactive waste of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2012-01-01

    In this research it has been studied the effects of chemical admixtures in the cementation process of radioactive wastes. These additives are used to improve the properties of waste cementation process, both of the paste and of the solidified product. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market. Then it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their effects. The tests were carried out with a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste coming from PWR nuclear reactors. It was cemented using two formulations, A and B, incorporating higher or lower amount of waste, respectively. It was added chemical admixtures from two manufacturers (S and H), which were: accelerators, set retarders and superplasticizers. The experiments were organized by a factorial design 23. The measured parameters were: the viscosity, the setting time, the paste and product density and the compressive strength. The parameter evaluated in this study was the compressive strength at age of 28 days, is considered essential security issues relating to the handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented products. (author)

  15. studies on the fixation of chemical and radioactive contaminants by natural and artificial compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourad, G.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    the main objective of the work presented in this is to study the adsorption of U(VI), Cr(VI) and Gd (lll) from aqueous medium using modified sorel's cement as artificial adsorbents. the thesis is classified into three chapters; namely ,introduction ,experimental and results and discussion. the first chapter, i ntroduction , includes chemical and radioactive contaminant, some aspects of the properties and aqueous chemistry of uranium, chromium and gadolinium . the separation of different pollutant and their methods of separation based on the types of adsorbents, and the theoretical background of adsorption isotherms, kinetics and ion diffusion as well as literature survey which is related to the present work are given.the second chapter, e xperimental , contains the different materials employed, their chemical purity, and a detailed description for instruments used are given.the third chapter. r esults and discussion i ncludes the experimental results obtained and their interpretation .this chapter is classified into three main parts; namely, characterization, equilibrium and kinetic investigations

  16. Radioactive elements and ionizing radiation in the environment of the alternative sites for the final disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voutilainen, A.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarises a short review of the origin of earth's natural radioactivity and concentrations of radioactive elements in ground and water. The radiation doses of natural and artificial sources are examined and presented for population of both Finland and the whole world. The report includes data on the radioactivity of indoor and outdoor air, rainwater, surface and groundwater, soil and bedrock in Eurajoki, Kuhmo, Loviisa and Aeaenekoski. The radiation doses from natural sources are also estimated in each municipality separately. Natural radiation is the most significant source of radiation exposure in the world. We eat, drink and breathe radioactive elements. The most radiation dose to man comes from indoor radon. We get cosmic radiation from space and terrestrial gamma radiation from ground. Indoor radon and radon in drilled wells causes the largest variation in radiation doses between municipalities or individuals. The radiation doses in Loviisa and Aeaenekoski are bigger and in Eurajoki and Kuhmo smaller than the average in Finland. The average radiation dose from natural radiation and Chernobyl fallout is 3,5 milli-sievert per year (mSv/a) for a Finn who lives in a detached house and uses household water from waterworks. The corresponding radiation dose in Eurajoki is 3,3, in Kuhmo 2,6, in Loviisa 8,3 and in Aeaenekoski 4,2 mSv/a The average doses for persons who use household water from drilled wells are respectively 5,4 (all Finns), 4,1 (Eurajoki), 3,5 (Kuhmo), 12 (Loviisa) and 5,4 mSv/a (Aeaenekoski). The other sources of radiation, excluding indoor radon and household water, cause together less than 1 mSv per year, although these doses vary in different municipalities, too. (orig.)

  17. Effects of radioactive by-products along the extraction of rare earth elements on aquatic and terrestrial organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findeiss, Matthias

    2016-12-13

    Lanthanides, also called rare earth elements (REE) are key elements in modern technologies and especially in green technologies such as energy generation through wind power. Thus, they are of considerable economic importance with a global production of around 124 000 t REE per year. A detailed environmental assessment with identification of all risks is the foundation to assess the sustainability of mining, processing and separation processes. Rare earth elements usually are found together with actinides such as uranium and thorium. Therefore, actinides and their decay products are simultaneously enriched during the processing of REE. In addition to conventional REE minerals such as monazite or bastnasite, the mineral eudialyte can be used as a REE source. Even though, the total share of REE is low, the most important REE needed for industrial usages are strongly represented in eudialyte. Furthermore, the proportion of radioactive impurities is very low. Eudialyte is currently not used as source mineral, but might play a bigger role on the global market in the future.Little information about the environmental impacts of REE-production is available to the public, in particular with regard to its radioactive by-products. Thorium is the most prominent of these and has therefore been characterized in detail for its ecotoxicity. A first goal of this work was to evaluate the a- emitter thorium and its impact on the environment. To this aim, an intensive literature search was conducted and results were prepared including the long-term effects of thorium dust and gaseous emissions. Therefore and because ecotoxicological testing of gaseous emissions was technically difficult and environmentally less relevant - unlike its immense impact for exposed industrial workers and bystanders - the water effluent und solid waste streams were investigated with aquatic and terrestrial toxicological experiments. The knowledge gained is meant to supplement the missing data for thorium. A

  18. Effects of radioactive by-products along the extraction of rare earth elements on aquatic and terrestrial organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findeiss, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanides, also called rare earth elements (REE) are key elements in modern technologies and especially in green technologies such as energy generation through wind power. Thus, they are of considerable economic importance with a global production of around 124 000 t REE per year. A detailed environmental assessment with identification of all risks is the foundation to assess the sustainability of mining, processing and separation processes. Rare earth elements usually are found together with actinides such as uranium and thorium. Therefore, actinides and their decay products are simultaneously enriched during the processing of REE. In addition to conventional REE minerals such as monazite or bastnasite, the mineral eudialyte can be used as a REE source. Even though, the total share of REE is low, the most important REE needed for industrial usages are strongly represented in eudialyte. Furthermore, the proportion of radioactive impurities is very low. Eudialyte is currently not used as source mineral, but might play a bigger role on the global market in the future.Little information about the environmental impacts of REE-production is available to the public, in particular with regard to its radioactive by-products. Thorium is the most prominent of these and has therefore been characterized in detail for its ecotoxicity. A first goal of this work was to evaluate the a- emitter thorium and its impact on the environment. To this aim, an intensive literature search was conducted and results were prepared including the long-term effects of thorium dust and gaseous emissions. Therefore and because ecotoxicological testing of gaseous emissions was technically difficult and environmentally less relevant - unlike its immense impact for exposed industrial workers and bystanders - the water effluent und solid waste streams were investigated with aquatic and terrestrial toxicological experiments. The knowledge gained is meant to supplement the missing data for thorium. A

  19. Phase distribution of ecologically controlled chemical elements in production of extraction phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazak, V.G.; Agnelov, A.I.; Zajtsev, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Content of 16 ecologically controlled chemical element (among them Cd, Sr, Th, U, V, Y) in solid and liquid phases of extraction phosphorus acid (EPA) production is determined. These elements are recommended to control by Scientific research institute of human ecology and environment to establish their extraction coefficients to phosphogypsum and EPA and optimal variant of production of ecologically sate phosphorus fertilizers. X-ray fluorescent, atomic-absorption and polarographic methods are used for analysis these elements

  20. Influences of in-fuel physical-chemical processes on serviceability of energy reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibilashvili, Yu K; Nekrasova, G A; Sukhanov, G I

    1989-01-01

    In-fuel physico-chemical processes and their effect on stress corrosion cracking of fuel element zirconium cladding are considered in the review. The mechanism of fission product release from the fuel is studied and the negative role of primarily iodine on the cladding corrosion process is demonstrated. Directions for improving the fuel element claddings and fuel to increase the fuel element serviceability are specified.

  1. Influences of in-fuel physical-chemical processes on serviceability of energy reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Nekrasova, G.A.; Sukhanov, G.I.

    1989-01-01

    In-fuel physico-chemical processes and their effect on stress corrosion cracking of fuel element zirconium cladding are considered in the review. The mechanism of fission product release from the fuel is studied and the negative role of primarily iodine on the cladding corrosion process is demonstrated. Directions for improving the fuel element claddings and fuel to increase the fuel element serviceability are specified

  2. Distribution of Natural Radioactivity and some Trace Elements in the Aquatic Ecosystem of Manzala Lake, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A. I. M.; Eweida, E. A.; Hamed, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    The hydrochemical composition of Manzala lake water (average TDS = 2550 ppm) reflects the effects of several factors and recharge sources: drainage water discharge, waste water load, sea water intrusion, bathometry and evaporation rate. The concentrations of nitrate and phosphate acquire considerably high values, which indicate a high degree of pollution and eutrification. The results of the lake water analyses obtained by ICP-MS and ICP- AES, show that the concentrations of Sr, Al, Fe and P are higher than those of V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Rb, Y, Zr, Mo, Ba, La, Ce, Eu, Ti, Pb, U and Zn (μ/L). In general, their concentrations increase toward the southeastern part of the lake according to the following descending order: Sr FePMn > BaV > Rb >Cu > Co > Pb > Mo. The chemical composition of the bottom sediments shows that Al, Mn, Sr, Ba and V (averages = 5.7 mg/g and 1124, 679, 290 and 121 ppm, respectively) have the highest concentrations, while U, Mo, Cs, Sb and Tl (averages = 4, 3, 0.79, 0.20 and 0.19 ppm, respectively) have the lowest concentrations. The concentrations of most determined elements increase toward the southeastern and northwestern parts of the lake. This may indicate the effect of the industrial, agricultural and domestic waste disposal through Bahr El Baqar drain at SE and Mohib drain at NW, in addition to the adsorption effect of clay-rich sediments of the lake. The average specific activities of 226 Ra ( 238 U series), 232 Th and 40 K in bottom sediments of the lake were 13.78, 12.53 and 217.74 Bq/kg, while the mean values of 40 K in surface and bottom waters were 0.96 and 0.95 Bq/L, respectively. The average specific activity of 137 Cs in bottom sediments was 4.39 Bq/kg. The obtained results show that the distribution coefficients (K d s) of most elements for bottom sediments of the lake were in the range of the recommended IAEA values, with the exception of some other values. This may be attributed to the influence of the different polluted waters

  3. Soil-to-plant transfer of elements is not linear: Results for five elements relevant to radioactive waste in five boreal forest species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S.; Roivainen, Paeivi, E-mail: paivi.roivainen@uef.fi; Makkonen, Sari; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2011-12-01

    Element-specific concentration ratios (CRs) assuming that plant uptake of elements is linear are commonly used in radioecological modelling to describe the soil-to-plant transfer of elements. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the linearity assumption in boreal forest plants, for which only limited relevant data are available. The soil-to-plant transfer of three essential (Mo, Ni, Zn) and two non-essential (Pb, U) elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste disposal was studied. Three understory species (blueberry, narrow buckler fern and May lily) and two tree species (Norway spruce and rowan) were included. Examining CRs as a function of soil concentration showed that CR was not constant but decreased with increasing soil concentrations for all elements and plant species. A non-linear equation fitted fairly well with the empirical data; the R{sup 2}-values for this equation were constantly higher than those for the linear fit. The difference between the two fits was most evident at low soil concentrations where the use of constant CRs underestimated transfer from soil to plants. Site-specific factors affected the transfer of Mo and Ni. The results suggested that systematic variation with soil concentrations explains a part of the large variation of empirically determined CRs, and the accuracy of modelling the soil-to-plant transfer might be improved by using non-linear methods. Non-linearity of soil-to-plant transfer has been previously reported for a few different species, elements and environments. The present study systematically tested the linearity assumption for five elements (both essential and non-essential) and in five boreal forest species representing different growth traits and phylogenies. The data supported non-linearity in all cases.

  4. Soil-to-plant transfer of elements is not linear: Results for five elements relevant to radioactive waste in five boreal forest species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S.; Roivainen, Päivi; Makkonen, Sari; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    Element-specific concentration ratios (CRs) assuming that plant uptake of elements is linear are commonly used in radioecological modelling to describe the soil-to-plant transfer of elements. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the linearity assumption in boreal forest plants, for which only limited relevant data are available. The soil-to-plant transfer of three essential (Mo, Ni, Zn) and two non-essential (Pb, U) elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste disposal was studied. Three understory species (blueberry, narrow buckler fern and May lily) and two tree species (Norway spruce and rowan) were included. Examining CRs as a function of soil concentration showed that CR was not constant but decreased with increasing soil concentrations for all elements and plant species. A non-linear equation fitted fairly well with the empirical data; the R 2 -values for this equation were constantly higher than those for the linear fit. The difference between the two fits was most evident at low soil concentrations where the use of constant CRs underestimated transfer from soil to plants. Site-specific factors affected the transfer of Mo and Ni. The results suggested that systematic variation with soil concentrations explains a part of the large variation of empirically determined CRs, and the accuracy of modelling the soil-to-plant transfer might be improved by using non-linear methods. Non-linearity of soil-to-plant transfer has been previously reported for a few different species, elements and environments. The present study systematically tested the linearity assumption for five elements (both essential and non-essential) and in five boreal forest species representing different growth traits and phylogenies. The data supported non-linearity in all cases.

  5. The role fo the Pygmy resonance in the synthesis of heavy elements with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1990-12-01

    It is suggested that the inclusion of the virtual excitation of the soft giant dipole (pygmy) resonance in the calculation of the cross-section for very neutron-rich radioactive beam-induced fusion reactions may enhance the formation probability of the heavy compound nucleus produced at low excitation energy. (author)

  6. EDXRF for determination of chemical elements in the beetle Alphitobius diaperinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Magalhaes, Marcelo L.R. de; Franca, Elvis J. de; Cunha, Franklin M. da; Zacarias, Vyvyane L.

    2015-01-01

    Energy Dispersion X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry has been widely employed for chemical element determination of biological matrices, including insects. The beetle Alphitobius diaperinus is a major problem in poultry production, thereby infesting poultry litter and stored grains. Up to now, little is known about the behavior, physiology and environmental interactions of this insect. In this paper, EDXRF was applied to quantify the main chemical elements in A. diaperinus. For the quality of the analytical protocol, certified reference materials produced by National Institute of Standards and Technology - NIST were analyzed together with the samples. The technique was able to quantify Cl, P, S and Zn in this insect, presenting no significant variation at the 95% confidence level among the repetitions (n = 4). A different pattern of chemical element accumulation in this beetle was noticed compared to other Coleoptera species, in which the concentration of the chemical elements were markedly lower in A. diaperinus, probably associated to the restricted availability of chemical elements in food. Since no result has been found in the literature before, A. diaperinus was firstly chemically characterized in this paper. (author)

  7. EDXRF for determination of chemical elements in the beetle Alphitobius diaperinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Magalhaes, Marcelo L.R. de; Franca, Elvis J. de, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marcelo_rlm@hotmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Cunha, Franklin M. da; Zacarias, Vyvyane L., E-mail: ukento@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: vyvyanebiologicas@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Energy Dispersion X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry has been widely employed for chemical element determination of biological matrices, including insects. The beetle Alphitobius diaperinus is a major problem in poultry production, thereby infesting poultry litter and stored grains. Up to now, little is known about the behavior, physiology and environmental interactions of this insect. In this paper, EDXRF was applied to quantify the main chemical elements in A. diaperinus. For the quality of the analytical protocol, certified reference materials produced by National Institute of Standards and Technology - NIST were analyzed together with the samples. The technique was able to quantify Cl, P, S and Zn in this insect, presenting no significant variation at the 95% confidence level among the repetitions (n = 4). A different pattern of chemical element accumulation in this beetle was noticed compared to other Coleoptera species, in which the concentration of the chemical elements were markedly lower in A. diaperinus, probably associated to the restricted availability of chemical elements in food. Since no result has been found in the literature before, A. diaperinus was firstly chemically characterized in this paper. (author)

  8. Application of insoluble tannin to recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metals elements form radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Shirato, Wataru; Nakamura, Yasuo; Matsumura, Tatsuro; Takeshita, Kenji; Nakano, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd. (MNF) has developed a new adsorbent, TANNIX (tread mark), for the recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metal elements in the liquid waste, in which TANNIX derived from a natural tannin polymer. TANNIX has same advantages that handling is easier than that of standard IX-resin, and that the volume of secondary waste is reduced by burning the used TANNIX. We have replaced its radioactive liquid waste treatment system from the conventional co-precipitation process to adsorption process by using TANNIX. TANNIX was founded to be more effective for the recovery of Pu, TRU, and hexavalent chromium Cr-(VI) as well as Uranium. (author)

  9. Recent studies of nuclear and chemical properties of elements 103, 104 and 105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Information obtained since 1983 on the nuclear and chemical properties of element 103, the last on the actinide series, and elements 104 and 105, at the beginning of the transactinide series, is reviewed. Their chemical properties are compared with their lanthanide and lighter group 4 and 5 homologs and evidence for possible relativistic effects is discussed. The current knowledge of the nuclear properties of these elements and how these affect of the study of chemical properties is discussed. Some of the challenges involved in the study of short-lived isotopes which can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' at an appropriate accelerator and the prognosis for future studies of these and still heavier elements are considered. 40 refs., 4 figs

  10. Chemical analogy in the case of hydrolysis species of F-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotake Moriyama; Hajimu Yamana; Kenso Fujiwara

    2001-01-01

    In spite of much importance, some of the thermodynamic data of actinide elements are still lacking, and the chemical behaviour of these elements is often predicted by considering chemical analogy, that is by taking the known data of the same and similar group elements. It is thus quite important to establish the basis and conditions for applying the chemical analogy. In the present study, some topics are discussed which are related with the chemical analogy for the hydrolysis behaviour of actinide ions. Systematic trends of the thermodynamic data of actinide ions, namely the solubility products and hydrolysis constants, are discussed by considering the results of recent measurements and by considering possible contributions of non-electrostatic interactions of actinide ions in addition to those of ordinary electrostatic ones. (authors)

  11. Regional groundwater chemical characteristics of Aqishan pre-selected site for high level radioactive waste repository and its hydrogeological significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yonghai; Dong Jiannan; Liu Shufen; Zhou Zhichao

    2014-01-01

    Aqishan area located in Xinjiang Uygur Automonous Region is one of the main preselected site of disposal repository for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in our country. Groundwater chemical feature is one of the most important consideration factors in the siting and site evaluation for high-level radioactive waste repository, From 2012 to 2013, the regional field hydrogeochemical investigation was carried out in study area and more than 30 groundwater samples were collected. According to the measurement data, the groundwater chemical features for different subareas are discussed in the paper. Furthermore, the location of discharge area of groundwater in Aqishan area was estimated according to the chemical features of different subareas. (authors)

  12. On the occurrence of metallic character in the periodic table of the chemical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Friedrich; Slocombe, Daniel R; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    The classification of a chemical element as either 'metal' or 'non-metal' continues to form the basis of an instantly recognizable, universal representation of the periodic table (Mendeleeff D. 1905 The principles of chemistry, vol. II, p. 23; Poliakoff M. & Tang S. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 373: , 20140211). Here, we review major, pre-quantum-mechanical innovations (Goldhammer DA. 1913 Dispersion und Absorption des Lichtes; Herzfeld KF. 1927 Phys. Rev. 29: , 701-705) that allow an understanding of the metallic or non-metallic status of the chemical elements under both ambient and extreme conditions. A special emphasis will be placed on recent experimental advances that investigate how the electronic properties of chemical elements vary with temperature and density, and how this invariably relates to a changing status of the chemical elements. Thus, the prototypical non-metals, hydrogen and helium, becomes metallic at high densities; and the acknowledged metals, mercury, rubidium and caesium, transform into their non-metallic forms at low elemental densities. This reflects the fundamental fact that, at temperatures above the absolute zero of temperature, there is therefore no clear dividing line between metals and non-metals. Our conventional demarcation of chemical elements as metals or non-metals within the periodic table is of course governed by our experience of the nature of the elements under ambient conditions. Examination of these other situations helps us to examine the exact divisions of the chemical elements into metals and non-metals (Mendeleeff D. 1905 The principles of chemistry, vol. II, p. 23). © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. ''In situ'' investigations of the radioactive fissionable element infiltration and retention in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncescu, M.; Danis, A.; Sahagia, M.; Negrescu, C.; Bobe, M.; Balanescu, P.; Burcescu, M.; Tautu, N.

    1980-01-01

    ''In situ'' investigations of the natural and forced infiltration and retention of the fissionable elements from a liquid residue in several natural compacted soils and compacted clays are presented. The velocities and flow rates for different stages of the residue infiltration are determined. The retention of the fissionable elements by variation of the fissionable element concentration with the distance from the place of the residue depot is investigated. (author)

  14. Optimization and validation of a chemical process for uranium, mercury and cesium leaching from cemented radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynier, N.; Riveros, P.; Lastra, R.; Laviolette, C.; Bouzoubaa, N.; Chapman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is developing a treatment and long-term management strategy for a legacy cemented radioactive waste that contains uranium, mercury and fission products. Extracting the uranium would be advantageous for decreasing the waste classification and reducing the cost of long-term management. Consequently, there are safety and economic and environmental incentives for the extraction of uranium, mercury and cesium before subjecting the cemented waste to a stabilization process. The mineralogical analysis of the surrogate cemented waste (SCW) indicated that uranium forms calcium uranate, CaUO 4 , occurring as layers of several millimeters or as grains of 20 μm. Hg is found mostly as large (∼50 μm) and small grains (5-8 μm) of HgO. The chemical leachability of three key elements (U, Hg, and Cs) from a SCW was studied with several leaching materials. The results showed that the most promising approach to leach and recover U, Hg, and Cs is the direct leaching of the SCW with H 2 SO 4 in strong saline media. Operating parameters such as particle size, temperature, pulp density, leaching time, acid and salt concentrations, number of leaching/rinsing step, etc. were optimized to improve key elements solubilization. Sulfuric leaching in saline media of a SCW (U5) containing 1182 ppm of U, 1598 ppm of Hg, and 7.9 ppm of Cs in the optimized conditions allows key elements recovery of 98.5 ± 0.4%, 96.6 ± 0.1%, and 93.8 ± 1.1% of U, Hg, and Cs respectively. This solubilization process was then applied in triplicate to seven other SCW prepared with different cement, liquid ratio and at different aging time and temperature. Concentrated sulfuric acid is added to the slurry until the pH is about 2, which causes the complete degradation of cement and the formation of CaSO 4 . At this pH, the acid consumption is moderate and the formation of amorphous silica gel is avoided. Sulfuric acid is particularly useful because it produces a leachate that

  15. Evaluation of finite element codes for demonstrating the performance of radioactive material packages in hypothetical accident drop scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tso, C.F. [Arup (United Kingdom); Hueggenberg, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Behaelter mbH (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Drop testing and analysis are the two methods for demonstrating the performance of packages in hypothetical drop accident scenarios. The exact purpose of the tests and the analyses, and the relative prominence of the two in the license application, may depend on the Competent Authority and will vary between countries. The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a powerful analysis tool. A reliable finite element (FE) code when used correctly and appropriately, will allow a package's behaviour to be simulated reliably. With improvements in computing power, and in sophistication and reliability of FE codes, it is likely that FEM calculations will increasingly be used as evidence of drop test performance when seeking Competent Authority approval. What is lacking at the moment, however, is a standardised method of assessing a FE code in order to determine whether it is sufficiently reliable or pessimistic. To this end, the project Evaluation of Codes for Analysing the Drop Test Performance of Radioactive Material Transport Containers, funded by the European Commission Directorate-General XVII (now Directorate-General for Energy and Transport) and jointly performed by Arup and Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Behaelter mbH, was carried out in 1998. The work consisted of three components: Survey of existing finite element software, with a view to finding codes that may be capable of analysing drop test performance of radioactive material packages, and to produce an inventory of them. Develop a set of benchmark problems to evaluate software used for analysing the drop test performance of packages. Evaluate the finite element codes by testing them against the benchmarks This paper presents a summary of this work.

  16. Evaluation of finite element codes for demonstrating the performance of radioactive material packages in hypothetical accident drop scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso, C.F.; Hueggenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Drop testing and analysis are the two methods for demonstrating the performance of packages in hypothetical drop accident scenarios. The exact purpose of the tests and the analyses, and the relative prominence of the two in the license application, may depend on the Competent Authority and will vary between countries. The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a powerful analysis tool. A reliable finite element (FE) code when used correctly and appropriately, will allow a package's behaviour to be simulated reliably. With improvements in computing power, and in sophistication and reliability of FE codes, it is likely that FEM calculations will increasingly be used as evidence of drop test performance when seeking Competent Authority approval. What is lacking at the moment, however, is a standardised method of assessing a FE code in order to determine whether it is sufficiently reliable or pessimistic. To this end, the project Evaluation of Codes for Analysing the Drop Test Performance of Radioactive Material Transport Containers, funded by the European Commission Directorate-General XVII (now Directorate-General for Energy and Transport) and jointly performed by Arup and Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Behaelter mbH, was carried out in 1998. The work consisted of three components: Survey of existing finite element software, with a view to finding codes that may be capable of analysing drop test performance of radioactive material packages, and to produce an inventory of them. Develop a set of benchmark problems to evaluate software used for analysing the drop test performance of packages. Evaluate the finite element codes by testing them against the benchmarks This paper presents a summary of this work

  17. Cumulative and competitive effects of chemical elements on nuclear glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arena, Helene

    2016-01-01

    This work takes place in the context of the long-term behavior of nuclear glasses under repository conditions. The main objective is to identify, understand and compare the effects of some chemical elements present in the glass composition and/or in the repository media (Zn, Mg, Ni, Co, Fe, Ca, Gd, Ce, K, Cs, Cr and Ag) on the processes involved in glass alteration by water. The cumulative or competitive nature of the effects of these chemical elements was determined. To reach this goal, a 6 oxides simple glass (ISG) has been altered for more than 500 days in a solution containing one or more of the chemical elements of interest. The results indicate that Zn, Mg, Ni, Co and Fe elements increase glass alteration forming secondary phases with the same structure and stoichiometry (tri-octahedral smectites). To form, these silicates consume chemical elements (Si, Al) from the environment and induce a pH decrease until a limiting value of pH. Beyond this pH the precipitation of secondary phases is inhibited and these chemical elements can be integrated into the gel, replacing Ca whose solubility increases at lower pH. As long as they form secondary phases, the effects of these elements are cumulative. Rare earths Gd and Ce also increase glass alteration forming secondary phases but their effects are lower as they contain less silicon. These elements are not integrated in the gel. Chromium increases glass alteration by precipitating with Ca and leading to a less protective gel, depleted in Ca. Silver precipitates as AgCl and has no effect on the alteration of the glass. The chemical elements K, Cs and Ca limit glass alteration by integrating into the gel and slowing down the transport phenomena therein. This integration is competitive: the order of integration (quantity and effectiveness glass alteration limitation) is the following Ca≥≥Cs≥K. Thus, the increase of glass alteration may be proportional to the quantity of elements promoting the precipitation of

  18. Chemical speciation of plutonium in the radioactive waste burial ground at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1978-08-01

    The plutonium chemical species in two types of samples from the Savannah River Plant burial ground for radioactive waste were identified. Samples analyzed were water and sediment from burial ground monitoring well C-17 and soil from an alpha waste burial trench. Soluble plutonium in the monitoring well was less than 12A in diameter, was cationic, and contained about 43% Pu(VI) and 25% Pu(IV). The equilibrium distribution coefficient (K /sub d/) for soluble plutonium from the well water (pH 7) to burial ground soil was about 60. Soil plutonium from the waste trench was not cation-exchanged; 78% of the soil plutonium was associated with metallic oxides in the soil. Approximately 9% of the Pu was contained in the crystalline soil matrix. Thus, about 87% of the plutonium in the soil was in a relatively immobile form. Ion-exchangeable and organic acid forms of plutonium amounted to only about 2.5% each. The bulk of the plutonium now on burial ground soils will be immobile except for movement of soil particles containing plutonium. 6 tables

  19. Modular glovebox connector and associated good practices for control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Mewhinney, C.J.; Newton, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    Design and associated good practices are described for a modular glovebox connector to improve control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials. The connector consists of an anodized aluminum circular port with a mating spacer, gaskets, and retaining rings for joining two parallel ends of commercially available or custom-manufactured glovebox enclosures. Use of the connector allows multiple gloveboxes to be quickly assembled or reconfigured in functional units. Connector dimensions can be scaled to meet operational requirements for access between gloveboxes. Options for construction materials are discussed, along with recommendations for installation of the connector in new or retrofitted systems. Associated good practices include application of surface coatings and caulking, use of disposable glovebags, and proper selection and protection of gasket and glove materials. Use of the connector at an inhalation toxicology research facility has reduced the time and expense required to reconfigure equipment for changing operational requirements, the dispersion of contamination during reconfigurations, and the need for decommissioning and disposal of contaminated enclosures

  20. Utilization of certain chemical and physical properties of smectite for isolation of radioactive waste in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, F.

    1990-01-01

    The use of swelling clays as a buffer and backfill in an underground repository for radioactive waste is part of many design concepts from different countries. The Swedish concept KBS-3, for disposal of spent fuel is an underground repository foresees the use of sodium bentonite. The deposition holes with spent fuel containing copper canisters will be backfilled with a mixture of sand and bentonite and the tunnels and shafts will be surrounded by a buffer of highly compact bentonite. The already constructed and licensed repository for low and medium level waste SFR, in Forsmark has a backfill of smectite rich clay between: the rock and an underground concrete silo for reactor operation waste. The clay barriers have a series of protective functions, both mechanically and chemically. This presentation concentrates on the last mentioned aspect and summarizes the experience of clay as an engineered near field barrier to radionuclide release and transport gained by the safety analyses of KBS-3 and SFR. It is concluded that the use of swelling clays adds considerably to the waste isolation function of the engineered near field barriers. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Ways of adaptation of the plant populations to chemical and radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozolotina, V.; Bezel', V.; Zhuykova, T.; Severu'Khina, O.; Ulyanova, E.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical agents (heavy metals, acids, etc.) and radiation render their influence upon biota being clearly distinct in primary mechanisms of action. However, lively organisms demonstrate one and the same set [arsenal] of response reactions, and thus it is important to reveal the ways of their realization caused by different types of techno-genic impacts. Our work was intended to examine the seed progeny of the dandelion, Taraxacum officinale, from radionuclides-contaminated coeno-populations (grown at the territories influenced by Eastern-Ural radioactive trace, in the Techa-river flood plain) and those situated in the nearest impact zone affected by a large metallurgical plant in the Urals. Plots, differently distanced from the enterprise, showed heavy metal contamination loads 8-33 times higher than the control site did. Radionuclides concentrations ( 90 Sr and 137 Cs) within the contaminated zone exceeded the background values 4-40 times. The study allowed estimation of the seed progeny vitality level for different coeno-populations, comparison of their adaptive potential in regard to heavy metals tolerance and gamma radiation resistance, estimation of abnormal seedlings [sprouts] frequency values. It was shown [found] that under techno-genic pollution the dandelion coeno-populations usually demonstrate wider variations of different characteristics (vitality, mutability, root and leaf growth rates) as compared to those in the background zone. As a general regularity one can regard the phenomenon, that negative effects were not marked to be increased by heavier pollution loads, irrespectively of the agents nature. (author)

  2. Degradation of hazardous chemicals in liquid radioactive wastes from biomedical research using a mixed microbial population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram, J.H.; Radtke, M.; Wey, J.E.; Rogers, R.D.; Rau, E.H.

    1997-10-01

    As the costs associated with treatment of mixed wastes by conventional methods increase, new technologies will be investigated as alternatives. This study examines the potential of using a selected mixed population of microorganisms to treat hazardous chemical compounds in liquid low level radioactive wastes from biomedical research procedures. Microorganisms were isolated from various waste samples and enriched against compounds known to occur in the wastes. Individual isolates were tested for their ability to degrade methanol, ethanol, phenol, toluene, phthalates, acetonitrile, chloroform, and trichloroacetic acid. Following these tests, the organisms were combined in a media with a mixture of the different compounds. Three compounds: methanol, acetonitrile, and pseudocumene, were combined at 500 microliter/liter each. Degradation of each compound was shown to occur (75% or greater) under batch conditions with the mixed population. Actual wastes were tested by adding an aliquot to the media, determining the biomass increase, and monitoring the disappearance of the compounds. The compounds in actual waste were degraded, but at different rates than the batch cultures that did not have waste added. The potential of using bioprocessing methods for treating mixed wastes from biomedical research is discussed

  3. Purposeful synthesis of chemical elements and ecologically pure mobile sources of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivitsky, V. A.; Gareev, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known [1] that the natural geo-transmutation of chemical elements occurs in the atmosphere and earth in the regions of a strong change in geo-, bio-, acoustic-, and electromagnetic fields. The mineral row materials contain the same accompanying chemical combinations which are independent of mineral deposit [2]. This means that the formation of chemical elements occurs in the same physical and chemical conditions. These conditions were simulated on the fundamental cooperative resonance synchronization principle [1]. The experimental facility was constructed on the basis of our model which provided with the calculated final chemical elements. These experimental results indicate new possibilities for, simulating, inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by low energy external fields. The borrowing from the geo-transmutation mechanisms of chemical elements creates the fundamental directions in low energy nuclear reaction researches for construction of new ecologically pure mobile sources of energy independent of oil, gas and coal, new substances, and technologies. References [1] F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova, E-print arXiv Nucl-th/0610002 2006. [2] V.A. Krivzskii, Transmutazija ximicheskix elementov v evolyuzii Semli (in Russian), Moscow 2003

  4. Removal of some Fission Products from Low Level Liquid Radioactive Waste by Chemical Precipitation liquid/Co-precipitation / Phosphate Coagulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borai, E.H.; Attallah, M.F.; Hilal, M.A.; Abo-Aly, M.M.; Shehata, F.A.

    2008-01-01

    In Egypt radioactive waste has been generated from various uses of radioactive materials. Presence of cesium demonstrated a major problem from the removal point of view even by conventional and advanced technologies. Selective chemical precipitation has been oriented for removal of some fission products including 137 Cs from low level liquid radioactive waste (LLLRW). The aim of the present study was focused to investigate the effectiveness of various phosphate compounds that improved the precipitation process and hence the decontamination factor. The results showed that, maximum removal of 137 Cs reaching 46.4 % using di-sodium hydrogen phosphate as a selective coagulant. It was found that significant enhancement of co-precipitation of 137 Cs (62.5 %) was obtained due to presence of Nd 3+ in the LLLRW

  5. Some chemical elements in gamma irradiated adults of the mediterranean fruit fly , Ceratitis Capitata (WIED.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-akhdar, E.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    The chemical analysis of the elemental compositions of both males and females of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.), was conducted on adult flies irradiated in the full grown pupae with 50, 70, 90 and 110 Gray at different ages (newly emerged, 7 and 15 days old). The data revealed the presence of ten elements, three of which are major (Na, K and N), four are moderate (P, Ca, Fe and Mg) and three are minors (Zn, Mn and Cu). Their quantities, however, varied according to adult sex, age and radiation dose. In all cases, the major elements remained major, the moderate elements remained moderate and the minor elements remained minor although the elements of each group differed in their arrangement according to changes in their quantities

  6. Physical, chemical and radioactive characterization of co-products from titanium dioxide industry for valorization in the cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazquez, M.J.; Mantero, J.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vaca, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the raw materials (ilmenite and slag), waste (red gypsum) and several co-products (sulphate monohydrate and sulphate heptahydrated) form the titanium dioxide industry in relation to their elemental composition (major, minor and trace elements), granulometry, mineralogy, microscopic morphology, physical composition and radioactive content in order to apply this knowledge in the valorization of the co-products in the fields such a as construction, civil engineering, etc. In particular, the main properties of cements produced with different proportions of red gypsum were studied, and the obtained improvements, in relation to Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC) were evaluated. It was also demonstrated that the levels of pollutants and the radioactive content in the produced RG cements, remain within the regulated safety limits. (Author). 38 refs.

  7. Soil-leaf transfer of chemical elements for the Atlantic Forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joacir De Franca, E.; De Nadai Fernandes, E.A.; Bacchi, M.A.; Tagliaferro, F.S.

    2007-01-01

    Soil analysis could improve environmental studies since soil is the main source of chemical elements for plants. In this study, soil samples collected at 0-10 cm depth under tree crown projection were analyzed by INAA. Using the chemical composition of the leaf previously determined, the leaf-soil transfer factors of chemical elements could be estimated for the Atlantic Forest. Despite the variability of the intra-species, the transfer factors were specific for some plant species due to their element accumulation in the leaves. Similar Br-Zn combined transfer factors were obtained for the species grouped according to habitats in relation to their position (understory or dominant species) in the forest canopy. (author)

  8. The chemical durability of glasses suitable for the storage of high level radioactive wastes, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, Ryohei; Hara, Shigeo; Kawamoto, Takamichi; Nanbu, Tadahiko; Nakamura, Takao.

    1975-01-01

    To develop the glassy materials suitable for the long-term storage of high level radioactive wastes, the chemical durability of the glasses of borax-alumina-silica system has been investigated. The test was carried out by the following three ways, (1) glass-disk immersion method, (2) continuous leach method and (3) method prescribed in JIS-R3502. In the continuous leach method, glass grains were exposed to circulating water at a constant temperature for a week to obtain the leach factor or leach rate. It was found from the experimental results that, as the silica content increased, the melting temperature of the glasses progressively increased and the chemical durability was considerably improved, and that B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O constituents were preferentially dissolved in water leaving relatively insoluble components such as SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 . The rate at which B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O in glass are leached out is governed by three processes, that is, (1) the boundary reaction on the glass surface, (2) the diffusion process through the hydrated layer, and (3) the disintegration of hydrated layer. The first process probably corresponds to the hydration of boric oxides on the glass surface or to the ion exchange between protons in solution and Na + ions in glass, and the second process seems to correspond to the diffusion of protons through the hydrated layer on the glass surface. Although the ratio of [Na-BO 4 ]/[BO 3 ] in the borax-silica glasses was determined to be 0.5 by means of NMR measurement, Na 2 O/B 2 O 3 ratio in leached solution was less than 0.5, indicating that [BO 3 ] groups in glass were more soluble than [Na-BO 4 ] groups. From the viewpoint of appreciation of safety, the chemical durability of the glasses of borax-aluminasilica system was rather unsatisfactory, but that of the glasses containing silica in quantities was comparable to the soda-lime silicate sheet glasses. (auth.)

  9. Radioactivity and concentration of some trace elements in sponges distributed along the Syrian coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Mamish, S.; Haleem, M. A.; Ammar, I.

    2009-07-01

    natural and artificial radionuclides ( 210 Po, 210 Pb, 40 K, 137 Cs, 234 U, 238 U) and concentration of some trace elements (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) in several types of sponges distributed along the Syrian coast have been studied. The samples were collected from four stations distributed at the Syrian coast (Al-Basset, Lattakia, Banise, Tartous). Concentration factors (CF) for the studied radionuclides and trace elements have been calculated in order to determine the sponges types to be used as biomonitors for the radionuclides and trace elements. (authors)

  10. Determination of natural radioactive elements in Abo Zaabal, Egypt by means of gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, Zeinab; Abd El-Wahab, Magda; El-Faramawy, Nabil

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the radioactivity of different type samples from Abo Zaabaal Lake. ► We evaluated the natural nuclide gamma-ray activities and their annual dose rates. ► We evaluated the concentrations of 226 Ra and its hazard indices. ► We assessed the absorbed dose in human. ► All results are within normal ranges. - Abstract: The natural nuclide gamma-ray activities and their respective annual effective dose rates, produced by 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and 226 Ra, are determined for 10 different natural samples (soil–plant–water) from Abo Zaabaal Lake. This lake is located very close to the Egyptian reactors. The gamma spectra analysis indicates that the photo-gamma lines represent ten radioactive nuclides 234 Th, 239 Pu, 228 Ac, 226 Ra, 212 Pb, 214 Pb, 208 Tl, 212 Bi, 214 Bi and 40 K. These nuclides represent the daughters of the natural radioactive series 238 U and 232 Th with 40 K. The mean activity concentration of 238 U was found to be 6.57, 10.16 and 5.44 Bq kg −1 for (soil–plant–water); 8.46, 8.33 and 6.04 Bq kg −1 of 232 Th, and 136.3, 216.8 and 119.2 Bq kg −1 of 40 K respectively. The mean activity concentrations of 226 Ra were obtained which help to evaluate the radiation hazard indices as radium equivalent, internal and external hazard indices. In addition, to assess the radiation risk to a biosystem, the annual effective dose rate, the absorbed dose in human and the absorbed dose outdoor are also evaluated.

  11. Chemical element concentrations in four lichens on a transect entering Voyageurs National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J.; Wetmore, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    A three factor transect study was conducted to test the hypothesis that chemical elements from air emissions in the vicinity of International Falls, Minnesota could not be detected in lichens along a 24 km transect reaching into Voyageurs National Park. It was hypothesized that element concentrations in lichens would decline exponentially downwind and would reach background values at a distance before the park boundary. Four species (Cladina rangiferina, Evernia mesomorpha, Hypogymnia physodes, and Parmelia sulcata) were sampled at ten sites for 3 years and 17 chemical elements were measured. The most notable result was a curvilinear geographic trend for many elements, which decreased from International Falls and then increased towards the park. This trend was significant for many anthropogenic elements, including S, Hg, Cd, and Cr, and for all four species. This type of distribution pattern has been observed in Hypogymnia physodes in other studies downwind of a steel mill and an oil refinery. Cladina, a ground-dwelling lichen, generally had lower tissue concentrations of the elements than the three epiphytic species. Tissue concentrations over the 3 years of sampling declined an average of 12%. Sufficient evidence exists to conclude that lichen tissue element concentrations in the vicinity of International Falls may be related to local air emissions, and that an exponential decline of element concentrations downwind of the sources does not apply to this situation.

  12. Development and improvement of radioactive methods for tribiological researches on elements of tools, machines and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, B.

    1979-02-01

    Charged particle activation analysis based on the bombardment with 15MeV protons from cyclotron was used to study the friction wearing at the zone of contacts in cutting tools, roller bearings and gear teeth. The radioactivity of resulting isotopes such as Co-56, Co-58, Re-183 serves as a measure of the mass changes on the surface tools. The method is suitable for studying the parameters effecting wearing processes and the role of cutting fluid, and also to envisage the economic factors in production planning

  13. Data base for site specific migration analysis of radioactive elements in repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadermann, J

    1982-01-01

    Migration analysis is of considerable importance in long-term safety aspects of radioactive waste repositories. The present work gives the data base for a selected part of a comprehensive geosphere transport calculation. We restrict ourselves to a critical evaluation of parameters pertinent to the migration analysis of the /sup 245/Cm chain. This includes the important nuclide /sup 237/Np. With these we are able to perform a site specific calculation for repositories planned in deep geologic formations in Switzerland. It is shown that the granitic basement induces strong time delays in nuclide migration. In contrast to that, the overlaying sedimentary layers cause primarily a dilution of the radionuclide concentrations.

  14. The distributions of chemical elements and Caesium-137 in the Northern-Crimean canal ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazorenko, G.

    1998-01-01

    The distributions in 1992-1995 of some chemical elements and 137 Cs concentrations in components of the Northern-Crimean Canal (NCC) ecosystem and agricultural fields of the Kherson District and the Northern Crimea irrigated by the Dnieper River water are presented in the work. Five main sampling were selected between the Kakhovka Reservior (at the beginning of the NCC) and the Karkinitsky Bay along the 150 km of the main Canal. Two additional stations were selected in discharge canals to study of the role of irrigated agricultural fields in the accumulation of 137 Cs and chemical elements from water. (author)

  15. Study of chemically synthesized ZnO nano particles under a bio template using radioactive ion beam

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a project proposal to study nano sized semiconductor ZnO system, useful in biology and medicinal purposes, using radioactive ion beam from ISOLDE. Doping of the nano particles with Cu, Cd and Ga ions (in their variable valancy states) are expected to impart changes in the electrical structure and properties in the said system under study. The morphological changes, chemical environment, micro structure, electrical and optical properties of the nano size particles of ZnO system (developed under a bio template of folic acid) after the interaction with radioactive ion beam will be studied. The provision of perturbed angular correlation (PAC) study with respect to the changes in chemical environment, where ever possible will be attempted.

  16. Radioactive nuclides formed by irradiation of the natural elements with thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekberg, Kim

    1959-05-15

    For each natural element up to Bi this report gives: the 2200 m/sec neutron absorption cross section; the nuclides formed by thermal neutron activation; the saturation activity per gram natural element for a certain flux; half life and 'tenth life' of the activity; {beta}-energy and/or type of decay; mean {gamma} energy per disintegration; energy and abundance of {gamma} quanta.

  17. Radioactive nuclides formed by irradiation of the natural elements with thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekberg, Kim

    1959-05-15

    For each natural element up to Bi this report gives: the 2200 m/sec neutron absorption cross section; the nuclides formed by thermal neutron activation; the saturation activity per gram natural element for a certain flux; half life and 'tenth life' of the activity; {beta}-energy and/or type of decay; mean {gamma} energy per disintegration; energy and abundance of {gamma} quanta.

  18. Study of the migration of radioactive elements in soils ''in-place''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, P.; Grauby, A.

    The problems of medium protection against radioactive contamination hazards have led the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique--Service de Controle des Radiations et de Genie Radioactif to study the behavior of ions in soils. There are many theoretical researches and laboratory studies on the movement of radioelements in soil. But, with the difficulties for obtaining a similar result in field, we have developed a simple direct method of in place soil contamination. However, a principal drawback remains, the necessity to extrapolate from one or two reduced size samples to a large area. This is all the problem of sampling, which is not specific of our method. However, a choice justified by classical data, let us obtain a sufficient number of results and an accuracy which is suitable

  19. Study of the migration of radioactive elements in soils ''in-place''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovard, P.; Grauby, A.

    The problems of medium protection against radioactive contamination hazards have led the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique--Service de Controle des Radiations et de Genie Radioactif to study the behavior of ions in soils. There are many theoretical researches and laboratory studies on the movement of radioelements in soil. But, with the difficulties for obtaining a similar result in field, we have developed a simple direct method of in place soil contamination. However, a principal drawback remains, the necessity to extrapolate from one or two reduced size samples to a large area. This is all the problem of sampling, which is not specific of our method. However, a choice justified by classical data, let us obtain a sufficient number of results and an accuracy which is suitable.

  20. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in Eastern Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbady, Adel G.E.; El-Arabi, A.M.; Abbady, A.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of Igneous and Metamorphic outcrops in the Eastern Desert are presented. Samples were analysed using a low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 μW m -3 (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite ) to 0.91 μW m -3 (metagabbro). The contribution due to U is about 51%, as that from Th is 31% and 18% from K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%, 19% and 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values except in some areas containing granites

  1. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in eastern desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbady, A G.E.; Arabi, A.M.; Abbay, A.

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive heat - production data of igneous and metamorphic rocks cropping out from the eastern desert are presented. Samples were analysed using low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 Μ Wm-3 (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite) to 0.91 (metagabroo) Μ W.m-3. The contribution due to U is about (51%), whereas that of Th (31%) and (18%) by K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%: 19%: 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values expect in some areas contained granite rocks

  2. Data base for a site-specific migration analysis radioactive elements out of a waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadermann, J

    1981-11-01

    Migration analysis is of considerable importance in long-term safety analysis of radioactive waste repositories. In a first step our plans are to calculate transport of radionuclides using data - as far as possible - for an undisturbed hydrogeology. Thereby a reference case is defined. In a later step, possible events and processes can be considered leading to a deviation from the reference case. The present work gives the data base for a selected part of a comprehensive geosphere transport calculation. We restrict ourselves to a critical evaluation of parameters pertinent to the migration analysis of the /sup 245/Cm chain. This includes the important nuclide /sup 237/Np. For the first time we are able to perform a site specific calculation for repositories planned in deep geologic formations in Switzerland. The well-known fact that the data basis is extremely sparse is pointed out once more and concretized in detail.

  3. Recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense. On analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations. Brief instruction for the CBRN (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear) sampling; Empfehlungen fuer die Probenahme zur Gefahrenabwehr im Bevoelkerungsschutz. Zur Analytik von chemischen, biologischen und radioaktiven Kontaminationen. Kurzanleitung fuer die CBRN-Probenahme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Udo; Biederbick, Walter; Derakshani, Nahid (and others)

    2010-07-01

    The recommendation for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense is describing the analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations and includes detail information on the sampling, protocol preparation and documentation procedures. The volume includes a separate brief instruction for the CBRN (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear) sampling.

  4. Concentration and distributions of the natural radioactives elements in tropical and semi-arid soils, Fazenda Bela Vista-Bahia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, A.M.R. de.

    1975-01-01

    U, th and K concentrations were determinated on 239 samples collected from a grid of 3 km 3 in a part of the Bela Vista Farm, Jaguarari County, Bahia. The samples are mainly surface soils and rocks, but includes a few ones from trenches as well. This area consist of metamorphic rocks of granulitic facies, pait of the precambrian migmatitic complex of Bahia, with banded gneisses, pyroxenites and amphibolites. Since the area studied is closer to a cupriferous district, in addition to the radioactive elements determined by gamma-ray spectrometry, the samples were also analysed for copper and nickel content by flame atomic absorption in order to abtain complementary geochemical information. Correlation between elements as well as with local geology studied and its was found that: a) except for uranium, the isoconcentration for all elements were aproximately parallel to the geological structure and geophysical anomaly. b) potassium showed an irregular distribution. c) uranium concentration were in general very low. d) The U/Th ratios were very high. Indicating a probable low geochemical evolution. e) The concentration found for C, Ni and Th were closer to average concentrations of intermediate igneous rocks than those of basic and ultra basic rocks. (C.D.G.) [pt

  5. Fixation of radioactive elements on diethylene-glycol-succinate and its use for the determination of gross activity in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafez, M.B.; Nazmy, A.F.; Eldesoky, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    Studies are given to illustrate surface adsorption of 144 Ce, 90 Sr, 232 Th, 235 U, 239 Pu and 241 Am on diethylene-glycol-succinate, DGS. Adsorption of these elements was studied from aqueous and phosphate solutions. A procedure for the determination of gross activity in urine, based on surface adsorption on DGS is described. Groups of nine solutions, in 30 ml 1N HNO 3 , were spiked with the investigated radioactive elements (approximately 5 pCi). The pH of the solutions was adjusted to a range of 0.5 to 10 using ammonia. Each solution was passed through the column and the fixed activity was removed from the column with 50 ml of 4N HCl, followed by two washes with 10 ml of distilled water. The acid solution was evaporated to dryness for alpha- or beta-counting. The percentage fixation was determined by comparison with a standard source of the same spiked element. Adsorption was found to depend on pH, age of the tracer solution, hydrolysis state of the radioelement and the ionic strength of the solution. The adsorption phenomenon which was particularly well observed could be used as a separation stage in a method for the determination of gross activity in urine. Recoveries of about 85% were obtained. (T.G.)

  6. Simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast in scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Volker; Preissner, Curt A; Hla, Saw-Wai; Wang, Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A method and system for performing simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast analysis in a scanning, tunneling microscope. The method and system also includes nanofabricated coaxial multilayer tips with a nanoscale conducting apex and a programmable in-situ nanomanipulator to fabricate these tips and also to rotate tips controllably.

  7. Development of treatment method for stillage residues of liquid radioactive wastes to remove organic substances and transuranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudenko, L.I.; Dzhuzha, O.V.; Khan, V.E.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the study into the laws that govern the process of treating by oxidation the stillage residues of liquid radioactive wastes to remove organic compounds and transuranium elements with the use of hydrogen peroxide, potassium permanganate and subsequent ultra-filtration. The optimum oxidisation regime has been defined on the basis of this study to ensure that the initial dichromate oxidability of LRW's stillage residues decreases from 6,000-9,500 to 500-1,000 mg O/I, whereas the TUE activity associated with the key isotopes is reduced by 74-87 % for 238,239,240 Pu, by 94-95 % for 241 Am, and by 90-95 % for 244 Cm. The concentration of uranium decreases by 94-99 %. It is proposed to implement this method at the Chernobyl NPP site.

  8. Determination of radioactive trace elements in ashes and fly-ashes from Brazilian coal-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellido, L.F.; de Castro Arezzo, B.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work was to apply a epithermal neutron activation technique to determine the uranium and thorium content in coal ashes and fly ashes from Brazilian coal-fired thermoelectric plants and to evaluate the contribution of these elements and their descendents to the environmental radioactivity. Brazil has adopted as short term policy the use of alcohol and coal as alternative sources of energy. With regard to coal, large deposits of this mineral are found in southern states but the serious problem of its utilization is the risk of environmental contamination which can reach dangerous levels because the industrial plants burn several million tons per year. Uranium and thorium contents, determined experimentally, are extrapolated for annual coal consumption and their amounts and the activity of the radium isotopes descendents released to the atmosphere are calculated. The significance of these values and problems in environmental pollution are discussed

  9. The simultaneous neutron and photon interrogation method for fissile and non-fissile element separation in radioactive waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jallu, F.; Lyoussi, A.; Passard, C.; Payan, E.; Recroix, H.; Nurdin, G.; Buisson, A.; Allano, J.

    2000-01-01

    Measuring α-emitters such as ( 234,235,236,238 U, 238,239,240,242,244 Pu, 237 Np, 241,243 Am, ...), in solid radioactive waste allows us to quantify the α-activity in a drum and then to classify it. The simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation experiment (SIMPHONIE) method dealt with in this paper, combines both active neutron interrogation and induced photofission interrogation techniques simultaneously. Its purpose is to quantify fissile ( 235 U, 239,241 Pu, ...) and non-fissile ( 236,238 U, 238,240 Pu, ...) elements separately in only one measurement. This paper presents the principle of the method, the experimental setup, and the first experimental results obtained using the DGA/ETCA Linac and MiniLinatron pulsed linear electron accelerators located at Arcueil, France. First studies were carried out with U and Pu bare samples

  10. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Boris N.; Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M.; Lazarev, Leonard N.; Dzekun, Evgeniy G.; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.; Herbst, Ronald S.; Law, Jack D.

    2001-01-01

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  11. Mass spectrographic analysis of selected chemical elements by microbial leaching of zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.; Dietze, H.J.; Bullmann, M.; Iske, U.

    1986-01-01

    Spark source mass spectrometry is a useful method for chemical element analysis of geological and biological samples. This sensitive technique (detection limit down to the ppb-range) is used to analyze leaching processes by means of several microorganisms. The problem of microbial leaching of chemical resistent materials was tested under laboratory conditions with regard to possible analytical and technical applications. Leaching of metals with chemolithotrophic and heterotrophic, organic acids producing microorganisms has been investigated with zircon from the Baltic Shield containing 0.7% rare earth elements and 1.67% hafnium. When zircon is leached with strains of thiobacillus ferrooxidans about 80% of the rare earth elements, Hf, Th and U can be recovered. (orig.) [de

  12. Behavior of radon, chemical compounds and stable elements in underground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez R, N.; Segovia, N.; Lopez, M.B.E.; Pena, P.; Armienta, M.A.; Godinez, L.; Seidel, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The radon behavior, chemical compounds, major and trace elements in water samples of four springs and three wells of urban and agricultural zones around the Jocotitlan volcano and El Oro region was determined, both of them located in the medium part of the Mexican neo-volcanic axis. The 222 Rn was measured by the liquid scintillation method, the analysis of major components was realized with conventional chemical techniques, while the trace elements were quantified using an Icp-Ms. The average values of the radon concentrations obtained during one year were constant relatively, in an interval from 0.97 to 4.99 Bq/lt indicating a fast transport from the reload area toward the sampling points. the compounds, major and trace elements showed differences which indicate distinct origins of water from the site studies. (Author)

  13. Prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy and its use for the elemental chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconninck, G.; Demortier, G.; Bodart, F.

    The elemental chemical analysis by nuclear techniques has been widely developed since a quarter of century. In this review the analysis by irradiation of the the sample (solid or liquid) of a majority of chemical elements by means of the charged particles and the detection during this irradiation of the gamma photons characteristic of the element are considered. After a brief account of the physical phenomena peculiar to the prompt detection of photons in comparison with the activation methods where a delayed activity is measured, a brief description of the experimental equipment for this kind of analysis is given. A comprehensive critical survey of the recent applications to the analysis of metals, semiconductors and electric insulating substances is presented. The necessary informations for the choice of the nuclear reaction to use for a specific analysis are contained in a set of tables. (AF)

  14. Initial chemical transport of reducing elements and chemical reactions in oxide cathode base metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roquais, J.M.; Poret, F.; Doze, R. le; Dufour, P.; Steinbrunn, A.

    2002-01-01

    In the present work, the formation of compounds associated to the diffusion of reducing elements (Mg and Al) to the nickel surface of a one-piece oxide cathode has been studied. Those compounds have been evidenced after the annealing steps at high temperature performed on cathode base metal prior to the emitting coating deposition. Therefore, they form the ''initial'' interface between the nickel and the coating, in other words, the interface existing at the beginning of cathode life. Extensive analysis to characterize the nickel base prior to coating deposition has been performed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). TEM and AES analysis have allowed to identify for the first time a spinel compound of MgAl 2 O 4 . The preferential distribution of the different compounds on the nickel surface has been studied by EDX mapping. Experimental profiles of diffusion of the reducing elements in the nickel have been obtained over the entire thickness of the material by GDOES. The mechanism of formation of these compounds together with a related diffusion model are proposed

  15. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes

  16. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    1995-05-01

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

  17. Kinetic study of the precipitation of radioactive elements in the production process of phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Mahmoud, Souha

    2009-01-01

    In this engineering study we determined the activities of gamma emitting radionuclides belonging to the families of 238 U , 232 Th and 40K in phosphate, the acid derivatives and gypsum in Tunisian Chemical Group. The most important activities are those of 238 U and 226 Ra, which are located in the phosphate, gypsum and the precipitates formed in the pipes.

  18. Versatile protein recognition by the encoded display of multiple chemical elements on a constant macrocyclic scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhou; De Luca, Roberto; Cazzamalli, Samuele; Pretto, Francesca; Bajic, Davor; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2018-03-01

    In nature, specific antibodies can be generated as a result of an adaptive selection and expansion of lymphocytes with suitable protein binding properties. We attempted to mimic antibody-antigen recognition by displaying multiple chemical diversity elements on a defined macrocyclic scaffold. Encoding of the displayed combinations was achieved using distinctive DNA tags, resulting in a library size of 35,393,112. Specific binders could be isolated against a variety of proteins, including carbonic anhydrase IX, horseradish peroxidase, tankyrase 1, human serum albumin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, calmodulin, prostate-specific antigen and tumour necrosis factor. Similar to antibodies, the encoded display of multiple chemical elements on a constant scaffold enabled practical applications, such as fluorescence microscopy procedures or the selective in vivo delivery of payloads to tumours. Furthermore, the versatile structure of the scaffold facilitated the generation of protein-specific chemical probes, as illustrated by photo-crosslinking.

  19. Chemical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction in light water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    In contrast to the extensive literature on the mechanical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical features of this phenomenon are so poorly understood that there is still disagreement concerning the chemical agent responsible. Since the earliest work by Rosenbaum, Davies and Pon, laboratory and in-reactor experiments designed to elucidate the mechanism of PCI fuel rod failures have concentrated almost exclusively on iodine. The assumption that this is the reponsible chemical agent is contained in models of PCI which have been constructed for incorporation into fuel performance codes. The evidence implicating iodine is circumstantial, being based primarily upon the volatility and significant fission yield of this element and on the microstructural similarity of the failed Zircaloy specimens exposed to iodine in laboratory stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests to cladding failures by PCI

  20. An investigation of changes in element distribution and chemical states during differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, T.; Ide-Ektessabi, A.; Ishihara, R.; Tanigaki, M.

    2004-01-01

    Metallic elements and their organic compounds have dynamic regulatory functions in cells. In this study, we implemented a new approach to investigate the mechanism of differentiation of embryonic stem cells, by measuring and analyzing the change in distribution and chemical states of intracellular trace elements. We anticipate that trace metal elements and metalloproteins play important roles in the direction of differentiation, both as active centers, and as factors in the death of neural cells in neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study is to analyze the distribution and chemical states of trace elements during the process of differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells, and to understand how these factors relate to the differentiation process. Using the experimental results, some previously unexplained points are considered, namely (1) how the intracellular elements change during the process of neuronal differentiation, and (2) what the optimal conditions of such elements are for neuronal differentiation. The information obtained during this study is relevant to nervous system development and evolution

  1. An investigation of changes in element distribution and chemical states during differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, T.; Ide-Ektessabi, A. E-mail: h51167@sakura.kudpc.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ishihara, R.; Tanigaki, M

    2004-07-01

    Metallic elements and their organic compounds have dynamic regulatory functions in cells. In this study, we implemented a new approach to investigate the mechanism of differentiation of embryonic stem cells, by measuring and analyzing the change in distribution and chemical states of intracellular trace elements. We anticipate that trace metal elements and metalloproteins play important roles in the direction of differentiation, both as active centers, and as factors in the death of neural cells in neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study is to analyze the distribution and chemical states of trace elements during the process of differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells, and to understand how these factors relate to the differentiation process. Using the experimental results, some previously unexplained points are considered, namely (1) how the intracellular elements change during the process of neuronal differentiation, and (2) what the optimal conditions of such elements are for neuronal differentiation. The information obtained during this study is relevant to nervous system development and evolution.

  2. Solidification Technologies for Radioactive and Chemical Liquid Waste Treatment - Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglioni, Andrew J.; Gelis, Artem V.

    2016-01-01

    This project, organized under DOE/NNSA's Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention program, joined Russian and DOE scientists in developing more effective solidification and storage technologies for liquid radioactive waste. Several patent applications were filed by the Russian scientists (Russia only) and in 2012, the technology developed was approved by Russia's Federal State Unitary Enterprise RADON for application throughout Russia in cleaning up and disposing of radioactive waste.

  3. Analysis of determination modalities concerning the exposure and emission limits values of chemical and radioactive substances; Analyse des modalites de fixation des valeurs limites d'exposition et d'emission pour les substances chimiques et radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, C.; Schneider, T

    2002-08-01

    This document presents the generic approach adopted by various organizations for the determination of the public exposure limits values to chemical and radioactive substances and for the determination of limits values of chemical products emissions by some installations. (A.L.B.)

  4. Radiological and related Chemical Health Impact Assessments of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ogunjo Samuel

    concentrations obtained and the relation from United State Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the chemical ... radioactive elements uranium-238 and thorium-232 decay .... Using Equation 2, the elemental concentrations in pipe.

  5. Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, D.K.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    1980-04-23

    The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

  6. Metrological system for y-ray spectrometry measurement of the specific activity and mass fraction of natural radioactive elements in soil and rock samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaikovich, I.M.; Fominykh, V.I.; Kirisyuk, E.M.; Belyachkov, Y.A.

    1994-01-01

    In the last few years a great deal of attention has been devoted to the study of the radiation conditions, which in some regions change markedly as a result of intense human activity. One reason for radioactive contamination of an area is dissemination during extraction and processing of radioactive ores or other minerals of natural radioactive elements with a high content of potassium, uranium (radium), and thorium. Estimation of the level of radioactive contamination is one of the main problems of ecological monitoring, and the quality of the measurements sometimes plays a deciding role in the fate of the object being investigated. This also pertains to, in particular, estimation of radioactive contamination of minerals employed for building homes and factories and other industrial structures. In order to draw unequivocal and well-founded conclusions from measurements of the content of natural radioactive elements in soil and rock samples, collected at the object being investigated, a great deal of attention must be devoted during the organization of the measurements to the metrological system

  7. The uses of synchrotron radiation sources for elemental and chemical microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Back, J.M.; Jones, K.W.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources offer important features for the analysis of a material. Among these features is the ability to determine both the elemental composition of the material and the chemical state of its elements. For microscopic analysis synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes now offer spatial resolutions of 10μm with minimum detection limits in the 1--10 ppM range depending on the nature of the sample and the synchrotron source used. This paper describes the properties of synchrotron radiation and their importance for elemental analysis, existing synchrotron facilities and those under construction that are optimum for SXRF microanalysis, and a number of applications including the high energy excitation of the K lines of heavy elements, microtomography, and XANES and EXAFS spectroscopies. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  8. The uses of synchrotron radiation sources for elemental and chemical microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Back, J.M.; Jones, K.W.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources offer important features for the analysis of a material. Among these features is the ability to determine both the elemental composition of the material and the chemical state of its elements. For microscopic analysis synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes now offer spatial resolutions of 10 ??m with minimum detection limits in the 1-10 ppm range depending on the nature of the sample and the synchrotron source used. This paper describes the properties of synchrotron radiation and their importance for elemental analysis, existing synchrotron facilities and those under construction that are optimum for SXRF microanalysis, and a number of applications including the high energy excitation of the K lines of heavy elements, microtomography, and XANES and EXAFS spectroscopies. ?? 1990.

  9. Use of chemical elements of 1A family by tropical tree species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, Andrius M.J.; Paiva, Jose Daniel S. de; Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L. de; Franca, Elvis J. de; Hazin, Clovis A.; Bacchi, Marcio A.; Fernandes, Elisabete A.N.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the distribution of K, Rb and Cs in leaves of trees of the Atlantic Forest through studies of correlation between the chemical elements. For this, we used the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis for the quantification of the chemical elements. The concentration ranges found were 6700-24000 mg / kg for K, 16 to 72mg / kg for Rb and 0.08 to 0,92mg / kg for Cs. As Rb has chemical similarity to K, is easily absorbed by plants, leading to a high value (0.9) of the Pearson correlation. For the correlation between K and Cs, no significant values were detected except for some species of the Myrtaceae family. However, average correlations (0.6 < r <0.8) between Rb-Cs were obtained for seven plant species of different families. The absence of a specific pattern using of K, Rb and Cs by plants showed great complexity in the distribution of chemical elements in the ecosystem

  10. Quantitative analysis of chemical elements in single cells using nuclear microprobe and nano-probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deves, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    The study of the role of trace elements at cellular level requires the use of state-of-the-art analytical tools that could achieve enough sensitivity and spatial resolution. We developed a new methodology for the accurate quantification of chemical element distribution in single cells based on a combination of ion beam analysis techniques STIM, PIXE and RBS. The quantification procedure relies on the development of a STIM data analysis software (Paparamborde). Validity of this methodology and limits are discussed here. The method allows the quantification of trace elements (μg/g) with a 19.8 % uncertainty in cellular compartments with mass below 0.1 ng. The main limit of the method lies in the poor number of samples that can be analyzed, due to long irradiation times required and limited access to ion beam analysis facilities. This is the reason why we developed a database for cellular chemical composition capitalization (BDC4). BDC4 has been designed in order to use cellular chemical composition as a tracer for biological activities and is expected to provide in the future reference chemical compositions for any cellular type or compartment. Application of the STIM-PIXE-RBS methodology to the study of nuclear toxicology of cobalt compounds is presented here showing that STIM analysis is absolutely needed when organic mass loss appears during PIXE-RBS irradiation. (author)

  11. A method for speciation of trace elements (stable and radioactive) in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.; Bjoernstad, H.E.; Pappas, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of radionuclides and trace metals with colloids changes their size and charge characteristics and thereby influences their transport, mobility and bioavailability. In order to investigate the role of colloids as transport agents for radionuclides or trace elements, a continuous mixing and separation system, using hollow fiber cartridges has been developed. This system allows the association of traces with naturally occurring colloids of a given size distribution to be followed and information on the degree of binding, binding constants and number of sorption sites can be obtained. Based on diffusion rate measurements using the hollow fibres, the molecular weight of species diffusing through membranes can also be estimated. (author)

  12. Problems of criterions of sanitary evaluation of fodder phosphates of an increased content of radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarski, T.P.; Krynski, A.

    1984-01-01

    In samples of 15 fodder phosphates a proper activity of natural radionuclides K-40, Ra-226 and Th-228 was determined. It was found that the content of K-40 in the examined phosphates was from 0 to 113.6 mBq/g (0-3.07 pCi/g), Ra-226 from 5.6 to 2523.4 mBq/g (0.15-68.2 pCi/g) and Th-228 from 11.1 to 100 mBq/g (0.3-2.7 pCi/g). On the basis of the obtained data the quantity of uranium in fodder phosphates and the quantity of Ra-226 transmitted into milk of cows fed on these phosphates was estimated. It was found that the quantity of uranium in phosphates was harmless for animals. It was admitted that the criterion of phosphates evaluation on the basis of quantity of Ra-226 transmitted into milk is not sufficient for drawing conclusion about their sanitary value. For a complex evaluation of fodder phosphates a limit value of radioactive activity of Ra-226 37 mBq/g (1 pCi/g) is proposed. Considering the possibility of air pollution in fodder factories a disuse of phosphates in production in which the activity of Ra-226 increases to 0.37 mBq/g (10 pCi/g) and of Th-228 to 75 mBq/g (2pCi/g) was proposed. The proposed criterion of evaluation concerns all phosphates used in Poland. (author)

  13. EDXRF applied to the chemical element determination of small invertebrate samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Marcelo L.R.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Souza, Thomas Marques de; Franca, Elvis J. de

    2015-01-01

    Energy Dispersion X-Ray Fluorescence - EDXRF is a fast analytical technique of easy operation, however demanding reliable analytical curves due to the intrinsic matrix dependence and interference during the analysis. By using biological materials of diverse matrices, multielemental analytical protocols can be implemented and a group of chemical elements could be determined in diverse biological matrices depending on the chemical element concentration. Particularly for invertebrates, EDXRF presents some advantages associated to the possibility of the analysis of small size samples, in which a collimator can be used that directing the incidence of X-rays to a small surface of the analyzed samples. In this work, EDXRF was applied to determine Cl, Fe, P, S and Zn in invertebrate samples using the collimator of 3 mm and 10 mm. For the assessment of the analytical protocol, the SRM 2976 Trace Elements in Mollusk produced and SRM 8415 Whole Egg Powder by the National Institute of Standards and Technology - NIST were also analyzed. After sampling by using pitfall traps, invertebrate were lyophilized, milled and transferred to polyethylene vials covered by XRF polyethylene. Analyses were performed at atmosphere lower than 30 Pa, varying voltage and electric current according to the chemical element to be analyzed. For comparison, Zn in the invertebrate material was also quantified by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after acid treatment (mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide) of samples have. Compared to the collimator of 10 mm, the SRM 2976 and SRM 8415 results obtained by the 3 mm collimator agreed well at the 95% confidence level since the E n Number were in the range of -1 and 1. Results from GFAAS were in accordance to the EDXRF values for composite samples. Therefore, determination of some chemical elements by EDXRF can be recommended for very small invertebrate samples (lower than 100 mg) with advantage of preserving the samples. (author)

  14. EDXRF applied to the chemical element determination of small invertebrate samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Marcelo L.R.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Souza, Thomas Marques de; Franca, Elvis J. de, E-mail: marcelo_rlm@hotmail.com, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, E-mail: thomasmarques@live.com.pt, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Energy Dispersion X-Ray Fluorescence - EDXRF is a fast analytical technique of easy operation, however demanding reliable analytical curves due to the intrinsic matrix dependence and interference during the analysis. By using biological materials of diverse matrices, multielemental analytical protocols can be implemented and a group of chemical elements could be determined in diverse biological matrices depending on the chemical element concentration. Particularly for invertebrates, EDXRF presents some advantages associated to the possibility of the analysis of small size samples, in which a collimator can be used that directing the incidence of X-rays to a small surface of the analyzed samples. In this work, EDXRF was applied to determine Cl, Fe, P, S and Zn in invertebrate samples using the collimator of 3 mm and 10 mm. For the assessment of the analytical protocol, the SRM 2976 Trace Elements in Mollusk produced and SRM 8415 Whole Egg Powder by the National Institute of Standards and Technology - NIST were also analyzed. After sampling by using pitfall traps, invertebrate were lyophilized, milled and transferred to polyethylene vials covered by XRF polyethylene. Analyses were performed at atmosphere lower than 30 Pa, varying voltage and electric current according to the chemical element to be analyzed. For comparison, Zn in the invertebrate material was also quantified by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after acid treatment (mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide) of samples have. Compared to the collimator of 10 mm, the SRM 2976 and SRM 8415 results obtained by the 3 mm collimator agreed well at the 95% confidence level since the E{sub n} Number were in the range of -1 and 1. Results from GFAAS were in accordance to the EDXRF values for composite samples. Therefore, determination of some chemical elements by EDXRF can be recommended for very small invertebrate samples (lower than 100 mg) with advantage of preserving the samples. (author)

  15. The use of some local plants for removal of radioactive and trace elements from aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Amin, Y.; Al-Akel, B; Al-Naama, T.

    2008-02-01

    The removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions by biosorption plays an important role in water pollution control. In this study, dried leaves of Barbary, Jew's mallow and poplar, branches of poplar trees and creeping club as biomass for removal of toxic elements (Cd, Pb and U) and some radionuclides ( 133 Ba, 137 Cs and 226 Ra) from aqueous solution have been evaluated. The results show that all studied plants can be effectively used for removing U and Ba from aqueous solutions, while Pb was removed using branches of poplar trees. In addition, Cd was removed using Barbary, Jew's mallow and branches of poplar trees. The adsorption of U and Cd by leaves of Barbary reached 3.3 mg g -1 and 3.5 mg g -1 , respectively. Moreover, the leaves of poplar trees were the best plant for biosorping Pb, its maximum capacity reached a value 1.7 mg g -1 . On the other hand, the maximum capacity for studied radionuclide was less than 10-6 mg g -1 . Further more, the effect of many factors such as, plant pretreatment, solution temperature, pH, plant particles size and contact time, on biosorption process were performed and the best conditions of biosorption were recognized. The studied plants were used for removing 226 Ra and some trace elements from real polluted water. The results show that the method is effective.(author)

  16. Some peculiarities of radioactive elements metabolism in body according to the indices of activity of blood and urine in malignant neoplasms of different localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelashvili, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    Background beta-radioactivity of blood and day urine in 115 patients (36 healthy ones and 79 suffering from malignant tumor of different localization) taking into account age was determined. It is shown that changes in background radioactivity of blood and urine both in healthy and oncologic patients are mostly presented in old age. Increase of background radioactivity of blood and urine takes place mainly not due to 40 K, but other beta-active elements - in healthy persons. Activity of blood and day urine in patients with malignant tumors decreases due to other beta-emittor, but not 40 K. Some changes in metabolic processes of beta-active elements of an organism both with the growth increase and when developing malignant tumors are established. 1 tab

  17. Chemical properties of some elements in a molten lithium chloride, potassium chloride eutectic (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, R.

    1961-12-01

    The increasing use of molten media especially in chemical preparations and for certain technological applications, has made it more necessary to have a knowledge of the chemical properties of elements in these solvents. Structural studies on molten solutions show the existence of certain species such as ions and complexes known to exist in aqueous solutions. This fact, together with certain experiments on chemical reactions in molten media has led us to establish a comparison between these media and aqueous solutions. We wish to show that the same fundamental phenomena occur in these media as are found in the chemistry of aqueous solutions and that this makes it possible to predict certain reactions. We have taken as examples the chemical properties of vanadium, uranium and sulphur in a LiCl-KCl eutectic melted at 480 deg. C. The first problem is to identify the various degrees of oxidation of these elements existing in the solvent chosen. We have tried to resolve it by comparing the absorption spectra obtained in aqueous solution and in the molten eutectic. We consider the possibilities of this method in a chapter on absorption spectrophotometry in the LiCl-KCl eutectic. During the study of the chemical properties we stress the various methods of displacing the equilibria: complex formation, variation of the oxidation-reduction properties with complex formation. The complexes of the O 2- ion are considered in particular. The study of the exchange of this particle is facilitated by the use of a classification of some of its complexes which we call the pO 2- scale by analogy with the pH scale; the value pO 2- is defined by the relationship: pO 2- = log O 2- Similarly, the use of apparent potential diagrams pO 2- makes it possible to predict and to interpret reactions involving the simultaneous exchange of electrons and O 2- ions between the various degrees of oxidation of the same element. It is possible, by studying some reactions of this type between two elements

  18. A study of essential elements in ancient Thai fighting swords by chemical and nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janposri, K.

    1980-01-01

    Four ancient Thai fighting swords from the Bangkok National Museum and iron ore from Kao Tab Kwai, Lopburi were studied by neutron activation analysis, metallography and chemical analysis. The results of these scientific studies show that all of these four swords are made of plain carbon steel, containing trace elements which have no effect on the physical and mechanical properties of the steel. The trace elements which were found in the iron ore are quite similar to those found in one of these swords. This means that the iron in one of the swords may have come from ore found at Kao Tab Kwai, Lopburi

  19. Search for chemical separations of the element 106 homologues in HF and HF-HCl media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubert, D.; Monroy-Guzman, F.; Hussonnois, M.; Brillard, L.; Le Naour, C.; Constantinescu, O.

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the chemical properties of element 263 106 in aqueous media, fast, efficient and reproducible chromatographic separations were tested on its assumed homologous: Mo, W and U. Corroborative static and dynamic off-line experiments have shown that after fixation of these three elements on anion-exchange resin in HF medium, selective elution could be achieved by using suitable concentration of HCl - HF and HCl solutions. Separations of short-lived W isotopes, produced through heavy ion irradiation were also performed on-line. (author). 27 refs., 14 figs

  20. A historical approach to teaching the concept of the chemical element

    OpenAIRE

    Cachapuz, António; Paixão, Fátima

    2005-01-01

    A novel teaching strategy is described, which was developed to introduce the key notion of chemical elements to 15-year-old Portuguese chemistry pupils. The strategy started from the analysis of the so-called ‘Lavoisier law ’and explored the relationships between macro and micro level chemistry in an innovative way. The key idea was first to explore the macro level (mass conservation) to help pupils consider the existence of indestructible units (elements, micro level) as a logical necessity ...

  1. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Bradley, C.; Buchholz, B.A.; Aase, S.B.; Tuazon, H.E.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Landsberger, S.

    1995-05-01

    The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration

  2. Development of new extraction agents for separation of rare radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hala, J.; Navratil, O.; Prihoda, J.; Smola, J.

    1977-01-01

    Certain transition elements, such as rhodium and palladium may be recovered from waste solutions produced in spent fuel reprocessing. The extraction of palladium was studied using sulfur compounds of the sulfide and sulfoxide types and the effects were investigated of the individual factors on palladium distribution between the aqueous and the organic phases. The possibility of separating hafnium in the form of extractable complexes was tested on several systems. Studied in more detail were mainly the complexes of hafnium with pyrocatechol violet, xylenol orange, and tributyl phosphate. The extraction of other metals, mainly of scandium, europium and indium was investigated in detail in the system acid aqueous phase - organophosphinic acids solution in benzene. (L.K.)

  3. Determination of naturally radioactive elements in chalk sticks by means of gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Wahab, Magda; Morsy, Zeinab; El-Faramawy, Nabil

    2010-04-01

    The radiation hazards due to ingestion of chalkboard dust were investigated. Sixteen samples from three different origin fabricates were used. The estimation of radiation hazard indices were based on the evaluation of the concentration activities of the natural radionuclides 238U, 232Th and 40K. The radium equivalent activity, external hazard index, internal hazard index and the annual dose equivalent associated with the radionuclides were calculated and compared with international recommended values to assess the radiation hazard. The values of internal and external radiation hazard indices were found to be less than unity. The annual effective dose rate obtained, E eff, and the annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE) are found to be less than the limit of the doses recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the general public. The analytical results show that besides the main calcium content, some toxic elements, S, Mo and Pb and Ni and Pb, in the Egyptian and imported chalk stocks, respectively, existed.

  4. Natural radioactive trace elements and their occurrence in soil and in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valek, B.

    1974-01-01

    A brief survey is presented on the content of 40 K, 238 U, 232 Th, 206 Ra, 87 Rb, 208 Bi in certain soils in Czechoslovakia. Also presented is a survey of the 40 K level in some plants. The level of the trace elements in the soils, expressed in units of 10 -6 μCi/100 g soil, was ascertained as varying from 0.0271 to 0.04 for 206 Ra to up to 240 for 208 Bi. Novel data are also given on the content of 40 K in 13 meadow plants for which the level was ascertained to vary between 4,760 (Deschampsia caespitosa P. Beav.) and 17,126 (Ranunculus acer L.) in units of 10 -6 μCi/100 g ash. (L.O.)

  5. Chemical Studies on the treatment and Conditioning of Radioactive Liquid Waste Using Combined Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Masry, E.H.

    2004-01-01

    Natural inorganic exchanges were used to remove radioactive isotopes cesium, Cobalt and europium using coagulant zinc sulfate as coagulant from low level liquid radioactive waste. the highest percent of removal was obtained in the order asswanlly (85.5%), bentonite (82.2%) and sandstone (65.4%) for the removal of cesium . the same order of removal percent was detected for the removal of cobalt (92.5,91.2,90.6%) and europium (90.6,90.8,90.2%) for asswanlly, bentonite and sandstone respectively

  6. environmental studies for removal of some radioactive elements using zirconium silicate as inorganic ion exchange material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Aryan, Y.F.A.

    2007-01-01

    inorganic ion exchangers have a good potential than the commonly used organic ones for removal and separation of radionuclides from irradiated nuclear fuel solutions. therefore, the main aim of this work is directed to find the optimum conditions for removal of some radionuclides such as Cs + ,Co 2+ ,and Eu 3+ by the prepared zirconium silicate as cation exchanger. the following items will be involved:-1- preparation of zirconium silicate as a cation exchanger. 2- characterization of the prepared exchanger using IR spectra, X-ray diffraction patterns, DTA and TG analyses. 3-chemical stability, capacity and equilibrium measurements will be determined on the materials using at different conditions (heating temperature and reaction temperature). 4- ion exchange isotherms. 5- breakthrough curves for removal of the investigated metal ions on the prepared exchanger under certain conditions

  7. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Matthew; O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Donor, John; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Stassun, Keivan G.; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. However, neutron capture elements are very limited in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we are conducting a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. As part of this effort, we present Ba II, La II, Ce II and Eu II results for a few open clusters without previous abundance measurements using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  8. Three-dimensionality of space in the structure of the periodic table of chemical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veremeichik, T. F.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the dimension of the 3D homogeneous and isotropic Euclidean space, and the electron spin on the self-organization of the electron systems of atoms of chemical elements is considered. It is shown that the finite dimension of space creates the possibility of periodicity in the structure of an electron cloud, while the value of the dimension determines the number of stable systems of electrons at different levels of the periodic table of chemical elements and some characteristics of the systems. The conditions for the stability of systems of electrons and the electron system of an atom as a whole are considered. On the basis of the results obtained, comparison with other hierarchical systems (nanostructures and biological structures) is performed

  9. INAA application in the assessment of chemical element mass fractions in adult and geriatric prostate glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichick, Vladimir; Zaichick, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    The variation with age of the mass fraction of 37 chemical elements in intact nonhyperplastic prostate of 65 healthy 21–87 year old males was investigated by instrumental neutron activation analysis with high resolution spectrometry of short- and long-lived radionuclides. Mean values (M±SΕΜ) for mass fractions (mg kg −1 , dry mass basis) of the chemical elements studied were: Ag—0.055±0.007, Br—33.2±3.3, Ca—2150±118, Cl—13014±703, Co—0.038±0.003, Cr—0.47±0.05, Fe—99.3±6.1, Hg—0.044±0.006, K—11896±356, Mg—1149±68, Mn—1.41±0.07, Na—10886±339, Rb—12.3±0.6, Sb—0.049±0.005, Sc—0.021±0.003, Se—0.65±0.03, and Zn—795±71. The mass fraction of other chemical elements measured in this study were lower than the corresponding detection limits (mg kg −1 , dry mass basis): As<0.1, Au<0.01, Ba<100, Cd<2, Ce<0.1, Cs<0.05, Eu<0.001, Gd<0.02, Hf<0.2, La<0.5, Lu<0.003, Nd<0.1, Sm<0.01, Sr<3, Ta<0.01, Tb<0.03, Th<0.05, U<0.07, Yb<0.03, and Zr<0.3. This work revealed that there is a significant trend for increase with age in mass fractions of Co (p<0.0085), Fe (p<0.037), Hg (p<0.035), Sc (p<0.015), and Zn (p<0.0014) and for a decrease in the mass fraction of Mn (p<0.018) in prostates, obtained from young adult up to about 60 years, with age. In the nonhyperplastic prostates of males in the sixth to ninth decades, the magnitude of mass fractions of all chemical element were maintained at near constant levels. Our finding of correlation between the prostatic chemical element mass fractions indicates that there is a great variation of chemical element relationships with age. - Highlights: • 37 trace elements were determined in prostate of 65 healthy 21–87 year old males by NAA. • Co, Fe, Hg, Sc, and Zn contents significantly increase with age. • Mn content significantly decreases with age. • All elemental contents in the sixth to ninth decades are near constant level. • There is a great disturbance of chemical element

  10. Finite Element Analysis Modeling of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-19

    concentrations. This is the method by which species adsorb to the surface of the substrate. The movement resulting from diffusion is governed by...itself. This can be treacherous, however. The mesh is what the entire finite element method is built upon. If the movement of the backbone has... Brownian Motion Algorithm for Tow Scale Modeling of Chemical Vapor Infiltration. Computational Materials Science, 1871-1878. !178 23. Wang, C. & D

  11. Chemical Abundances of Hydrostatic and Explosive Alpha-elements in Sagittarius Stream Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Sheffield, Allyson A.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2018-05-01

    We analyze chemical abundances of stars in the Sagittarius (Sgr) tidal stream using high-resolution Gemini+GRACES spectra of 42 members of the highest surface-brightness portions of both the trailing and leading arms. Targets were chosen using a 2MASS+WISE color–color selection, combined with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) radial velocities. In this Letter, we analyze [Fe/H] and α-elements produced by both hydrostatic (O, Mg) and explosive (Si, Ca, Ti) nucleosynthetic processes. The average [Fe/H] for our Sgr stream stars is lower than that for stars in the Sgr core, and stars in the trailing and leading arms show systematic differences in [Fe/H]. Both hydrostatic and explosive elements are depleted relative to Milky Way (MW) disk and halo stars, with a larger gap between the MW trend and Sgr stars for the hydrostatic elements. Chemical abundances of Sgr stream stars show similar patterns to those measured in the core of the Sgr dSph. We explore the ratio of hydrostatic to explosive α-elements [α h/ex] (which we refer to as the “HEx ratio”). Our observed HEx ratio trends for Sgr debris are deficient relative to MW stars. Via simple chemical evolution modeling, we show that these HEx ratio patterns are consistent with a Sgr IMF that lacks the most massive stars. This study provides a link between the chemical properties in the intact Sgr core and the significant portion of the Sgr system’s luminosity that is estimated to currently reside in the streams.

  12. Multielement analysis of reagents used in chemical identification of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montalvan Estrada, A.; Brigido Flores, O.; Maslov, O.D.; Dmitriev, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    For more than 40 years, chemical identification of transuranic elements has been used at the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Join Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia, as a secondary method of identification. Chlorination of transuranic elements obtained by nuclear reactions is an important step of the procedure in order to obtain volatile compounds able to pass through a thermo chromatographic process. To access the quality of the reagents TiCl 4 and SOCl 2 multielement analysis was carried out using both X-rays fluorescence and gamma activation. It was followed the simplest procedure for reagents samples pretreatment, so further interferences from other chemical products were avoided. X-rays fluorescence analysis was performed in a spectrometer with Si(Li) detector with a resolution for Fe (K?) of 190 eV. Both Cd-109 and Am-241 were used as isotopic sources of excitation. Gamma activation analysis was carried out using the compact electron accelerator MT-25, where gamma rays are produced in a stopping target. Among the parameters of the MT-25 are the following: energy range-10-25 MeV, gamma-ray flux-10 14 photon/s, power consumption-20 kw. Measurements of the induced activity were performed with the help of a HPGe detector, thin and coaxial Ge(Li) detectors. There were identified two elements in SOCl 2 -Nickel (3*10 -6 g/g) and Antimony (2*10 -7 g/g), while there were identified three elements in TiCl 4 - Zirconium (8*10 -7 g/g), Arsenic (9*10 -7 g/g) and Antimony (5*10 -7 g/g). Only five elements were detected in trace concentrations in the two analyzed reagents, that is for more than 57 elements capable of being detected using gamma activation analysis with the MT-25 only 5 had concentrations above the detection limits of the method. Not being chemical analogs of the synthesized transuranic elements (Z-104 and 106) and not being able to alpha or fission disintegrations there is not expected any interference from them in the chemical

  13. Genetic interpretations of elemental and chemical differences in a soil chronosequence, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Soils developed on fluvial terraces in central California have similar parent materials, climatic settings, vegetation cover and slopes but range in age from 40,000 to 3,000,000 years. The soils have chemical compositions that change systematically with increasing age. Such chemical differentiation is most likely the result of long-term weathering and mineralogical transformations that occurred since deposition of terrace fills and stabilization of the geomorphic surfaces. The changes in composition with time closely mimic other studies on mineral weathering, in which alkali and alkali-earth elements are lost more rapidly than transitional elements. The relative rates of element loss were determined by changes in element ratios over time. Net losses and gains of elements in different size fractions were monitored by their concentrations relative to Zr, the most stable constituent. Both sand and finer size fractions have lost considerable amounts of Ca, Mg, Na and K. Aluminum appears to have been lost from the sand fraction and gained in the fine fraction over a 3-million-year-time-span. Although there is no evidence for losses of Fe and Ti from sands, there is a net influx of Fe and Ti into finer fractions, probably gained from undetectable yet significant weathering of sand grains. Etching of sand grains, clay mineralogy, and microprobe analyses also indicate that the soils have undergone these chemical transformations during their formation. Mineralogical analyses also mimic other studies on mineral weathering, in which the pyroxenes weather more rapidly than hornblende, which weathers more rapidly than sphene or zircon. ?? 1988.

  14. Modeling of physico-chemical characteristics of mortar-waste mixture of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Arbutina, D.

    2015-01-01

    An optimization of mortar (as matrix), improved with bentonite clay, used for immobilization of radionuclides 137 Cs is presented. A relatively simple mathematical model is given, which permits minimization of leach rate and permeability and maximization of compressive strength. An optimal solution, based on experimental data, is given. These results will be used for a future Serbian radioactive waste disposal center. (authors)

  15. Mechanism and degree of chemical elements effect on atmosphere corrosion resistance of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu Din' Vuj

    1991-01-01

    It follows from the proposed regression equations that falourable effect of chemical elements on steel resistance to atmospheric corrosion is determined by their ability to increase interatom bond stability in iron crystal lattice and form corrosion products with high protection properties. Element positive influence on steel corrosion resistance decreases in the following order: S, P, Si, Mn, Cu, Cr, Ni, C in semiurban tropical atmosphere and S, Mn, Sr, Cu, Ni, Cr in coastal atmosphere. In the latter case C increases corrosion in a greater degree as compared to P. Small ammounts of Mo decrease steel resistance in semiurban atmosphere and almost do not influence it in the coastal one. Possible mechanisms of individual element influence on steel corrosion resistance are considered

  16. Pesticides, selected elements, and other chemicals in adult total diet samples October 1979-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartrell, M.J.; Craun, J.C.; Podrebarac, D.S.; Gunderson, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducts Total Diet Studies to determine the dietary intake of selected pesticides, industrial chemicals, and elements (including radionuclides). These studies involve the retail purchase and analysis of foods representative of the diets of infants, toddlers, and adults. The individual food items are separated into a number of food groups, each of which is analyzed as a composite. This report summarizes the results for adult Total Diet samples collected in 20 cities between October 1979 and September 1980. The average concentration, range of concentrations, and calculated average daily intake of each chemical found are presented by food group. The average daily intakes of the chemicals are similar to those found in the several preceding years and are within acceptable limits. The results for samples collected during the same period that represent the diets of infants and toddlers are reported separately

  17. Geochemical mapping of radioactive elements using helicopter-borne gamma-ray spectrometry (Tiouit, Eastern Anti-Atlas, Morocco): Or occurrence and environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftah, Abdelhalim; El Azzab, Driss; Attou, Ahmed; Manar, Ahmed; Rachid, Ahmed; Ramhy, Haytam

    2018-03-01

    The spectrometric prospection is a direct geophysical method based on the analysis of the radioactive elements spectra, due to three principal radioactive elements 40K, 238U and 232Th. In order to measure the content of radioactive elements a geophysical helicopter survey was carried out to a flight altitude of 60 m from the subsoil, covering the geological map of Tiouit 1/50,000 with an extent of 45.5 × 29 km2. In this paper, we propose an application in the environment and or occurrence by the production of maps concentration in K, U and Th to delimit the areas with purely natural radioactive risk by the calculation of the dose rate in mSv, the found values show a variation of 0,3 with 1649 mSv with a median value of 0,831 mSv. Moreover, data processing as the horizontal gradient filter which allowed to amplify the spectrometric signatures, this one coupled to the upward continuation, lead us to a better location of the abrupt changes, which materialize by spectrometric lineaments, reflecting the change of the geochemical properties of the basement.

  18. REDOX state analysis of platinoid elements in simulated high-level radioactive waste glass by synchrotron radiation based EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro, E-mail: okamoto.yoshihiro@jaea.go.jp [Condensed Matter Chemistry Group, Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shiwaku, Hideaki [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5143 (Japan); Nakada, Masami [Nuclear Engineering Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Komamine, Satoshi; Ochi, Eiji [Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited, 4-108 Aza Okitsuke, Oaza Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori 030-3212 (Japan); Akabori, Mitsuo [Nuclear Engineering Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analyses were performed to evaluate REDOX (REDuction and OXidation) state of platinoid elements in simulated high-level nuclear waste glass samples prepared under different conditions of temperature and atmosphere. At first, EXAFS functions were compared with those of standard materials such as RuO{sub 2}. Then structural parameters were obtained from a curve fitting analysis. In addition, a fitting analysis used a linear combination of the two standard EXAFS functions of a given elements metal and oxide was applied to determine ratio of metal/oxide in the simulated glass. The redox state of Ru was successfully evaluated from the linear combination fitting results of EXAFS functions. The ratio of metal increased at more reducing atmosphere and at higher temperatures. Chemical form of rhodium oxide in the simulated glass samples was RhO{sub 2} unlike expected Rh{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It can be estimated rhodium behaves according with ruthenium when the chemical form is oxide.

  19. Assessment of the radiation field from radioactive elements in a wood-ash-treated coniferous forest in southwest Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravila, A.; Holm, E.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of natural and antrophogenic radioactive elements in soil and wood was investigated in a 30-year-old forest stand of Norway spruce. Forest plots treated with a single dose of granulated wood ash in 1989 were compared with untreated control plots. It was observed that the retention of radiocesium and radiostrontium by the forest soil is rather strong in spite of the high annual precipitation (1100 mm a -1 ) and the relatively acidic conditions of the soil. Most of the deposited nuclear weapon fall-out of radiocesium and radiostrontium is still residing in the forest soil. Radiostrontium, but not radiocesium, was found in the intrasoil water collected with lysimeters at soil depths of 20 and 50 cm. Wood xylem radial distributions of radiostrontium indicated a decreased bioavailability with time after deposition of nuclear weapons fall-out, and no major differences could be observed on comparison of wood from ash-treated plots with wood from untreated plots. The activity concentration of radiocesium in tree rings formed prior to 1986 and grown at the ash-treated plot was about two to three times that found in wood from the untreated control plot. (author)

  20. Physical simulation of precipitation of radioactive element oxalates by using the harmless neodymium oxalate for studying the agglomeration phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalleman, Sophie; Bertrand, Murielle; Plasari, Edouard

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic precipitation is usually applied in nuclear industry to process radioactive wastes or to recover actinides from a multicomponent solution.This paper deals with the development of methods adapted to a nuclear environment in order to study the agglomeration phenomena during actinide oxalic precipitation.These methods are previously set up with harmless elements that simulate the actinide behaviour: the lanthanides. A parametric study is carried out to quantify the influence of operating parameters on the agglomeration kernel and to determine a kinetic law for this mechanism. The experimental study is performed in a continuous-MSMPR precipitator at steady-state. The method is based on the resolution of two population balances using the moment approach, one for elementary crystals and the other for agglomerates. Provided that the kinetic rates of nucleation and growth are known, the agglomeration kernel can be obtained from a mathematical treatment of the experimental particle size distributions. Results point out that experimental crystal sizes are consistent with an independent kernel. It appears that the agglomeration kernel is directly proportional to supersaturation, increases with temperature but is limited by ionic strength and shear rate. (authors)

  1. Dynamics of chemical elements in the fermentation process of ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepomuceno, N.; Fernandes, E.A.N.; Bacchi, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Brazil has become the largest producer of biomass ethanol derived from sugar cane. The industrial production is based on the fermentation of sugar cane juice by yeast, inside of large volume vats, in a fed-batch process that recycles yeast cells. To study the dynamics of chemical elements in each operating cycle, five stages of the fermentation process were considered: must, yeast suspension, wine, non-yeast wine and yeast cream. For this, a mass balance of the terrigenous elements, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Na, Sc, Sm, and Th, and the sugar cane plant elements, Br, K, Rb, and Zn, were established in fermentation vats of an industrial scale unit, with sampling undertaken during different climatic conditions (dry and rainy periods). A similar distribution of the sugar cane characteristics elements was found for the stages analysed, while for the terrigenous elements a trend of accumulation in the yeast cream was observed. Preferential absorption of Br, K, Rb, and Zn by yeast cells was indicated by the smaller concentrations observed in yeast suspension than in yeast cream. (author)

  2. Research requirements for a unified approach to modelling chemical effects associated with radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krol, A.A.; Read, D.

    1986-09-01

    This report contains the results of a review of the current modelling, laboratory experiments and field experiments being conducted in the United Kingdom to aid understanding and improve prediction of the effects of chemistry on the disposal of radioactive wastes. The aim has been to summarise present work and derive a structure for future research effort that would support the use of probabilistic risk assessment (pra) methods for the disposal of radioactive wastes. The review was conducted by a combination of letter and personal visits, and preliminary results were reported to a plenary meeting of participants held in April, 1986. Following this meeting, copies of the report were circulated to participants at draft stage, so that the finalised report should be taken to provide as far as possible a consensus of opinion of research requirements. (author)

  3. Delisting efforts for mixed radioactive and chemically hazardous waste at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodpasture, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Presently, there are four hazardous wastes at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant that are candidates for the delisting from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste regulations. These candidates are the sludges from K-1407-B and C ponds, Central Neutralization Facility sludges, mixed sludges from Y-12 and the ash generated by the RCRA/Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. All of these hazardous wastes contain radioactive constituents as well as hazardous constituents. The delisting will be based upon the nonradioactive constituents. Whether the delisting petition is granted or not, the wastes will be handled according to the Department of Energy guidelines for radioactive wastes. The presentation discusses the methodologies for delisting these wastes and the rationale behind the processes

  4. The status of water ecosystems under conditions of their chronic radioactive chemical pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evtushenko, N.Yu.; Shcherbak, V.I.; Klenus, V.G.

    2000-01-01

    There are two stages of consequences of the accident on the Chernobyl NPP for the water ecosystem status of Dnieper basin. The first is characterized by some disturbance of bio status stability, especially the structure-functional status of phytoplankton. At the second stage, due to the stabilization of radioactive pollution and in-reservoir biological processes, the recovery of functioning the phytoplankton association is observed

  5. Distribution and relationships between selected chemical elements in green alga Enteromorpha sp. from the southern Baltic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbikowski, Radoslaw; Szefer, Piotr; Latala, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Mn) and macroelements (K, Na, Ca and Mg) were determined in green alga Enteromorpha sp. from the coastal zone of the southern Baltic including Gulf of Gdansk and Vistula Lagoon in 2000-2003. In order to estimate the degree of accumulation of each element by the green alga, concentration and discrimination factors (CFs) with respect to seawater were calculated. The results of factor analysis (FA) and ANOVA clearly indicate geographical differences between concentrations of chemical elements. Enteromorpha sp. from Vistula Lagoon and the southern Baltic exhibited higher levels of Mn and Ni, and Na and K, respectively. Anthropogenic impact of Cu, Pb and Zn, possibly originated from municipal sewage, was identified in alga samples collected in the Gulf of Gdansk, especially in the vicinity of Gdynia. From comparison our data with those published earlier results that Pb content in Enteromorpha sp. from the Gulf of Gdansk decreased within 1978-2003 reflecting reducing use of leaded petrol in Baltic countries in this period. The alga Enteromorpha sp. can be used for biomonitoring surveys of metal contaminants in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea. - Enteromorpha sp. can be used as efficient biomonitor for chemical elements in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea

  6. Rare Earth and other Chemical Elements Accumulation in Vines of Fogo Island (Cape Verde)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rosa; Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Rocha, Fernando; Dias, Maria Isabel; Franco, Dulce

    2017-04-01

    The Fogo Island is the fourth bigger island of the Cape Verde (central Atlantic Ocean). This archipelago is located 570 kilometres off the coast of West Africa, and is characterized by a semi-arid climate. The volcanic soils of the caldera of this island, with an active volcanism during historical times, have been used for viticulture. The study of uptake of chemical elements by vines - absorption and translocation to grapes - grown in soils developed on alkaline pyroclasts is the main goal of this work. The concentrations of 27 chemical elements in bark, leafs and grapes of two vines, as well as in the corresponding soils ( 50). The bioavailable fraction of Cr and As in these soils may be due to the low percentage of iron oxides (particularly in the form of nanoparticles), which play an important role in the retention of these elements. The factors responsible for the phytoavailability of Sb in soils and its uptake by plants it's still poorly known. Although the Sb concentrations in earth's crust are low, higher concentrations of this element in soils may be related with hydrothermal and volcanic processes. Also, the temperature may influence the accumulation of Sb in plants, with an increase of the Sb uptake by plants at higher temperatures, due to an increased desorption rate of Sb from soil particles. Concerning U, its mobility and dispersion in soils is controlled by its oxidation state, its adsorption capacity in clay minerals or iron oxides, and the ability to form more or less soluble complexes. Although U concentrations in these volcanic soils are low, there is a fraction available for absorption and accumulation by grapes. Concerning the rare earth elements (REE), it should be noted that the light REE are not enriched in any part of the vines studied, and only the heavy REE are enriched in grapes (EF = 20-50); this can be explained by the preferential uptake of the heavy REE, after primary minerals breakdown and the formation of more soluble compounds

  7. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous, Dental, and Non-skeletal Materials in Forensic Anthropology using Elemental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Heather A; Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Forensic anthropologists are generally able to identify skeletal materials (bone and tooth) using gross anatomical features; however, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic to identify. Several chemical analysis techniques have been shown to be reliable laboratory methods that can be used to determine if questionable fragments are osseous, dental, or non-skeletal in nature. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed background of chemical analysis techniques focusing on elemental compositions that have been assessed for use in differentiating osseous, dental, and non-skeletal materials. More recently, chemical analysis studies have also focused on using the elemental composition of osseous/dental materials to evaluate species and provide individual discrimination, but have generally been successful only in small, closed groups, limiting their use forensically. Despite significant advances incorporating a variety of instruments, including handheld devices, further research is necessary to address issues in standardization, error rates, and sample size/diversity. Copyright © 2014 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transport of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The report on the transport of radioactive substances covers the following topics: facts on radioactive materials transport, safety of the transport of radioactive substances, legal regulations and guidelines: a multiform but consistent system, transport of nuclear fuels, safety during the transport of nuclear fuel, future transport of spent fuel elements and high-level radioactive wastes in Germany.

  9. An approach to quantitate and control the mutagenic hazards of environmental chemical and radioactive pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.S.

    1977-01-01

    Human population, both at the occupational and non-occupational levels, is exposed to the environment polluted by man-made chemicals and radiation sources. The parameters required for quantitating mutagenic hazards of any agent are listed and it has been pointed out that though sufficient information of this nature is available in the case of radiations, it is almost impossible to collect similar information for chemical substances due to their number running into astronomical figures. A short-cut approach, therefore, is suggested to quantitate and control the mutagenic hazards of these pollutants. It is to express the mutagenic hazards of a chemical substance in terms of equivalent radiation units. The unit proposed for this purpose is called as Rem-Equivalent Chemical (REC). Total mutagenic burden to the society should take account of exposure from both chemicals and radiations. Advantages and limitation of this approach are discussed. (M.G.B.)

  10. Results of the experiment on chemical identification of Db as a decay product of element 115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, S.N.; Oganesyan, Yu.Ts.; Utenkov, V.K.

    2004-01-01

    For the first time the chemical identification of Db as the terminal isotope of the decay element 115 produced via the 243 Am( 48 Ca, 3n) 288 115 reaction was realized. The experiment was performed on the U400 cyclotron of FLNR, JINR. The 243 Am target was bombarded with a beam dose of 3.4 · 10 18 48 Ca projectiles at an energy of 247 MeV in the center of the target. The reaction products were collected in the surface of a copper catcher block, which was removed with a lathe and then dissolved in concentrated HNO 3 . The group 5 elements were separated by sorption onto Dowex 50X8 cation-exchange resin with subsequent desorption using 1 M HF, which forms anionic fluoride complexes of group 5 elements. The eluant was evaporated onto 0.4 μm thick polyethylene foils which were placed between a pair of semiconductor detectors surrounded by 3 He neutron counters for measurement of α particles, fission fragments and neutrons. Over the course of the experiment, we observed 15 spontaneous fission events with T 1/2 = 32 -7 +11 h which we attribute to 268 Db. The production cross section for the 243 Am + 48 Ca reaction was 4.2 -1.2 + 1 .6 pb. These results agree with the original element 115 synthesis experiment where 268 Db was first observed as the terminal isotope following the five consecutive α decays from the 288 115 parent nucleus at the Dubna gas-filled separator. The data from the present experiment give independent evidence for the synthesis of element 115 as well as element 113 via the 243 Am + 48 Ca reaction

  11. The General Laws of Chemical Elements Composition Dynamics in the Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzh, Vyacheslav D.

    2013-04-01

    The key point of investigation of the specificity of the biosphere elemental composition formation is determination of patterns of redistribution of elemental average concentrations among various phases, like solid - liquid ( the lithosphere - the hydrosphere), which occurs as a result of a global continuous processing of inert matter by living substances. Our task here is to investigate this process in the system "lithosphere - hydrosphere" in view of the integrated involvement of living material in it. This process is most active in biogeochemical barriers, i.e. in places of "the life condensation" and runs under a nonlinear regularity that has been unknown before. It is established that this process results in a general relative increase in concentrations of chemical elements in the solid phase in proportion as their prevalence in the environment is reduced. This process running in various natural systems has practically the same parameter of nonlinearity (v) approximately equal to 0.7. For proto-lithosphere -"living material" - soil v = 0.75. For river - "living material" - ocean v = 0.67. For the contemporary factual awareness level these estimations of nonlinearity indices are practically negligible. Hence, it is for the first time that the existence of a universal constant of nonlinearity of elemental composition evolution in the biosphere has been proved and its quantitative evaluation has been made. REFERENCES 1. Korzh V.D. 1974. Some general laws governing the turnover of substance within the ocean-atmosphere-continent-ocean cycle. // Journal de Recherches Atmospheriques. Vol. 8. P. 653-660. 2. Korzh V.D. 2008. The general laws in the formation of the elemental composition of the Hydrosphere and Biosphere.// J. Ecologica, Vol. XV, P. 13-21. 3. Korzh V.D. 2012. Determination of general laws of elemental composition in Hydrosphere // Water: chemistry & ecology, Journal of water science and its practical application. # 1, P.56-62.

  12. Radioactive tracer technique in process optimization: applications in the chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Process optimization is concerned with the selection of the most appropriate technological design of the process and with controlling its operation to obtain maximum benefit. The role of radioactive tracers in process optimization is discussed and the various circumstances under which such techniques may be beneficially applied are identified. Case studies are presented which illustrate how radioisotopes may be used to monitor plant performance under dynamic conditions to improve production efficiency and to investigate the cause of production limitations. In addition, the use of sealed sources to provide information complementary to the tracer study is described. (author)

  13. Use of radioactive double labelling technique in the chemical analysis of the mediators of cellular immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorg, C.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive double labelling was adapted for the analysis of mediators of cellular immunity. Two identical lymphocyte cultures were simultaneously labelled with [ 3 H]- or [ 14 C] leucine. Each of the cultures was stimulated with antigen or mitogen. The combined supernatants were then subjected to various fractionation procedures. By determining the isotope ratio in each fraction it is possible to identify those products of activated lymphocytes that have been produced either de novo or in increased amounts. The method proved sensitive enough to detect lymphocyte activation products in supernatants of activated lymphocyte cultures from guinea pig, mouse, and man

  14. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces.

  15. A class of chemical pinning centers including two elements foreign to HTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Roy; Sawh, Ravi-Persad

    2003-01-01

    Very small deposits are formed when two foreign elements, A and B, are added to textured (RE)BCO. These deposits increase the J{sub c} of samples and hence the maximum trapped field. Deposit sizes are generally in the range 200-400 nm. Their chemical composition is (A{sub x},B{sub y})(RE)Ba{sub 2}O{sub 6}, where x+y=1 and x=y{+-}0.1. Their structure is double perovskite. The deposits produce two types of pinning, one by refinement (e.g., of the Y211 phase) and the other due to the double perovskite deposits themselves. In those cases tested, the refinement increases J{sub c} by factors exceeding 1.33, and the deposits increase J{sub c} by factors exceeding 2, for a total increase by a factor exceeding 2.66. Element A can be U, W or Mo. Element B can be Pt or Zr. We speculate on possible additional elements in classes A and B.

  16. Adaptive Finite Element Method Assisted by Stochastic Simulation of Chemical Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Cotter, Simon L.; Vejchodský , Tomá š; Erban, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic models of chemical systems are often analyzed by solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation, which is a drift-diffusion partial differential equation for the probability distribution function. Efficient numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation requires adaptive mesh refinements. In this paper, we present a mesh refinement approach which makes use of a stochastic simulation of the underlying chemical system. By observing the stochastic trajectory for a relatively short amount of time, the areas of the state space with nonnegligible probability density are identified. By refining the finite element mesh in these areas, and coarsening elsewhere, a suitable mesh is constructed and used for the computation of the stationary probability density. Numerical examples demonstrate that the presented method is competitive with existing a posteriori methods. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  17. Distribution of some chemical elements between dissolved and particulate phases in the ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, D.W.; Bacon, M.P.; Sachs, P.L.; Fleer, A.P.; Shafer, D.K.; Belastock, R.A.; Hammer, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    The long-range goal of our research is to understand the processes that control the distribution and fate of chemical elements in the ocean, with emphasis on the rates at which the governing processes operate. Such an understanding is essential in predicting the fate of substances such as heavy metals and radionuclides that are released to the environment as a consequence of energy-producing activities. In pursuit of this goal we have, during the present contract period, devoted all of our effort to participation in the Shelf-Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program. Initial results from SEEP-1 are consistent with our hypothesis of enhanced scavenging of reactive chemical substances in upper slope sediments. During the next year we will complete our analytical work for SEEP-1 and carry out quantitative interpretations of our data with mathematical models to assess the importance of boundary uptake in this region of the continental margin. 8 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  18. A mathematical model for chemical reactions with actinide elements in the aqueous nitric acid solution: REACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachimori, Shoichi

    1990-02-01

    A mathematical model of chemical reactions with actinide elements: REACT code, was developed to simulate change of valency states of U, Pu and Np in the aqueous nitric acid solution. Twenty seven rate equations for the redox reactions involving some reductants, disproportionation reactions, and radiolytic growth and decay reaction of nitrous acid were programmed in the code . Eight numerical solution methods such as Porsing method to solve the rate equations were incorporated parallel as options depending on the characteristics of the reaction systems. The present report gives a description of the REACT code, e.g., chemical reactions and their rate equations, numerical solution methods, and some examples of the calculation results. A manual and a source file of the program was attached to the appendix. (author)

  19. Status of chemical elements in Atlantic Forest tree species near an industrial complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.L.L.; Fernandes, E.A.N.; Franca, E.J.; Bacchi, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental quality assessment studies have been conducted with tree species largely distributed in the Atlantic Forest. Leaf and soil samples were collected in the conservation unit Parque Estadual da Serra do Mar (PESM) nearby the industrial complex of Cubatao, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, and analyzed for chemical elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Results were compared to background values obtained in the Parque Estadual Carlos Botelho (PECB). The higher As, Fe, Hg and Zn mass fractions in the tree leaves of PESM indicated anthropogenic influence on this conservation unit. (author)

  20. Determination of the concentration profile of chemical elements in superheater pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldape U, F.; Aspiazu F, J.

    1986-05-01

    This work has for object to determine the profile of concentration of chemical elements at trace level in a superheater pipe of Thermoelectric Plants using the X-ray emission spectroscopy technique induced by protons coming from the Accelerator of the Nuclear Center. In the X-ray detection, a Si Li detector was used. The technique was chosen because it allows a multielemental analysis, of high sensitivity and precision. The results can help to understand the problems that are had in the change of flexibility or of corrosion. This will be from utility to the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE). (Author)

  1. Chemical aspects of the radioactive decay 38S to 38Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leurs, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    The cyclotron-production of 38 S with the reaction 40 Ar(p,3p) 38 S is described. An excitation curve for this nuclear reaction is given and the chemistry used to produce sulfates labeled with 38 S and H 2 38 S is described. The probability distribution of the recoil energy of 38 Cl, produced by beta-decay of 38 S, is given. The probability for rupture of the original bonds due to the radioactive decay process, is estimated for gaseous H 2 38 S and for crystalline sulfates- 38 S. The results are given for the β,γ-decay of 38 S to 38 Cl under different circumstances in inorganic solid sulfates (with and without water of crystallization) and in the mixed crystal K 2 SO 4 .K 2 BeF 4 (1 : 2500). Finally, the reactions of 38 Cl, produced by radioactive decay of 38 S (as H 2 38 S) with gaseous 1,2-dichloroethylene are discussed

  2. The role of chemistry in the history of radioactivity (1897-1939)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical research on radioactivity started in 1898. That year, Pierre and Marie Curie discovered in pitchblende polonium and radium. Rutherford and Soddy showed that radioactivity is an atomic phenomenon accompanied by transmutation of elements and established the basic laws of radioactive changes. The existence of isotopes was postulated after the discovery of many radioactive substances. Major discoveries in nuclear science, i.e. the atomic nucleus, the neutron and artificial radioactivity, were made with radiation sources elaborated bu chemists. Finally, in 1939, radiochemists on the search for transuranium elements, discovered nuclear fission. (authors)

  3. Utilization of plastic detector for pool water radioactivity control of IEA-R1 reactor. Examination of fuel element irradiation behaviour fabricated at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berretta, J.R.; Mesquita, C.H. de; Madi Filho, T.

    1989-01-01

    For the examination of fuel element irradiation behavior that were fabricated at IPEN/CNEN/SP Metalurgical Departament, it was provided a detection system for pool water radioactivity measurements. This system uses a plastic scintillator detector produced at IPEN/CNEN-SP Health Physics Department, with dimensions and shape apropriated for such work. The detection system shows a sensibility of 4.125x10 -2 dps/cm 3 and 20% of efficiency for 131 I radiations. (author) [pt

  4. Guidelines for terms related to chemical speciations and fractionation of elements : definitions, structural aspects, and methodological approaches (IUPAC Recommendations 2000)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Templeton, D.M.; Ariese, F.; Cornelis, R.; Danielsson, L.G.; Muntau, H.; Leeuwen, van H.P.; Lobínski, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents definitions of concepts related to speciation of elements, more particularly speciation analysis and chemical species. Fractionation is distinguished from speciation analysis, and a general outline of fractionation procedures is given. We propose a categorization of species

  5. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactivity is a natural phenomenon. Out of 1700 known isotopes of 104 chemical elements, only about 16 per cent are stable. Seventy-three radioactive isotopes of 39 elements occur naturally in the terrestrial environment. The significance of environmental radioactivity lies in the contribution to the annual exposure of the general population to ionising radiation. This exposure results largely from natural sources of radioactivity and radiation together with applications of radiation in medicine. Minor contributions are from nuclear weapons tests, nuclear power production and the nuclear fuel cycle, and consumer products including luminous clocks and watches, television receivers and smoke detectors. The natural background radiation level varies substantially with altitude and geographic location. Although no satisfactory evidence is available that natural variations in background radiation levels are detrimental to humans, upper limits of risk have been estimated for possible somatic and genetic effects from these levels of radiation. Contributory sources of and variability in the radiation background are reviewed and the relation between effective dose equivalent and associated detriment outlined. The risk from exposure to an average level of background radiation is compared with risks from other human activities

  6. Basic study on behaviors of radioactive and toxic inorganic elements in environment, and environmental assessment for geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Outline of the prize-winning study of the 12th Osaka Nuclear Science Corporation Prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujikawa, Yoko; Kudo, Akira [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1999-01-01

    This study was made aiming to establish geological disposal technology for high-level radioactive wastes generated in nuclear power plant. A basic study for the technology was made using various radioactive materials containing Pu, U, Cs, Se, etc. as a tracer. First, adsorption mechanisms of various nuclides in ground water such as Cs, Co, Se, etc. onto rocks were investigated by indoor experiment. A certain correlation between the apparent adsorption rate of a nuclide onto rocks and diffusion coefficient into micropores in rocks was demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. To estimate the radionuclide migration during more than one thousand years based on the results from indoor experiments is difficult, so that construction of a mathematical model was attempted to make numerical simulation. Thus,it was suggested that the properties of underground barrier are considerably related to the adsorption rates of nuclides and also diffusion coefficients into micropores. In addition, the effects of soil microorganisms and organic compounds on the behaviors of radioactive nuclides in soil ecosphere were investigated by extra-low level analysis of long-life radioactivities. More than 10% of Pu derived from Atomic Bomb at Nagasaki were found to be strongly bound to organic compounds in soils, showing that the element is extremely reactive with organic substances. (M.N.)

  7. Chemical Effects of Nuclear Transformations Vol. I. Proceedings of the Symposium on Chemical Effects Associated with Nuclear Reactions and Radioactive Transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The study of the chemical changes consequent upon the nuclear transformation of an atom that is linked with other atoms in a molecule and surrounded by other similar or dissimilar molecules has intrigued chemists for a number of years. This interest is certainly not static but if anything is increasing. The main theme of this meeting was a discussion of the suggestions and theories that have been advanced to explain the wealth of experimental observations on the behaviour of atoms at energies and in situations not normally accessible in the laboratory. Though the subject has some practical implications in the preparation of radioisotopes, this was not an important consideration at this Symposium. The first Symposium on hot-atom chemistry organized by the Agency was held in Prague in October 1960. Comparison of the past and the present state of the subject shows that a greater variety and sophistication of techniques are now being applied as the simpler approaches used in the past have been shown to be inadequate. Progress has been made in the understanding of the simpler gas system, but in liquids and solids there is still much to clarify. It is also of interest that for the majority of the work reported in these Proceedings a reactor was the radiation source, and in this field much experimental work still remains to be done. The Symposium on Chemical Effects Associated with Nuclear Reactions and Radioactive Transformations was held from 7 to 11 December 1964 in Vienna, and was attended by 136 participants from 29 countries and 4 international organizations. It was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in co-operation with the Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity. The publication of these Proceedings makes the content of the papers and discussion available to a wider audience than was possible at the meeting in Vienna

  8. Statistic analysis of grouping in evaluation of the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in effluent from uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.

    2013-01-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (UTM) is a uranium mine off. The statistical analysis of clustering was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physico-chemical variables in their effluents. The use of cluster analysis proved effective in the evaluation, allowing to identify groups of chemical elements in physico-chemical variables and group analyzes (element and variables ). As a result, we can say, based on the analysis of the data, a strong link between Ca and Mg and between Al and TR 2 O 3 (rare earth oxides) in the UTM effluents. The SO 4 was also identified as strongly linked to total solids and dissolved and these linked to electrical conductivity. Other associations existed, but were not as strongly linked. Additional collections for seasonal evaluation are required so that assessments can be confirmed. Additional statistics analysis (ordination techniques) should be used to help identify the origins of the groups identified in this analysis. (author)

  9. A contribution to the physical and chemical model of long-lived radioactive wastes by clayey materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorgeon, L.

    1994-01-01

    This work deals with the high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes confinement which come from the irradiated fuels reprocessing. These wastes are generally coated in a deep geological structure confinement matrix. The radiation protection of a such storage requires that the coating matrix, the technological barriers which separate the storage and the geological medium and the reception rock does not let the radioactive wastes pass. The materials used in this work for the confinement studies are clayey minerals and the retention mechanisms studies are realized on cesium 135, neptunium 237, americium 241 and uranium 233. The first part of this thesis concerns the clayey minerals retention properties towards ions in aqueous solutions. More particularly the relations between these properties and the chemical structure of these solids are investigated. In the second part are presented the experimental works which have allowed to specify the intrinsic characteristics of the studied minerals. Indeed the knowledge of these parameters is essential to quantitatively explain the results of the radionuclides retention. The adsorption mechanisms are described in a third part. (O.L.). 112 refs., 59 figs., 51 tabs

  10. Chemical stability of seven years aged cement-PET composite waste form containing radioactive borate waste simulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.M., E-mail: hosamsaleh70@yahoo.com [Radioisotope Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki (Egypt); Tawfik, M.E. [Department of Polymers and Pigments, National Research Center, Dokki (Egypt); Bayoumi, T.A. [Radioisotope Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki (Egypt)

    2011-04-15

    Different samples of radioactive borate waste simulate [originating from pressurized water reactors (PWR)] have been prepared and solidified after mixing with cement-water extended polyester composite (CPC). The polymer-cement composite samples were prepared from recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) waste and cement paste (water/cement ratio of 40%). The prepared samples were left to set at room temperature (25 deg. C {+-} 5) under humid conditions. After 28 days curing time the obtained specimens were kept in their molds to age for 7 years under ambient conditions. Cement-polymer composite waste form specimens (CPCW) have been subjected to leach tests for both {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co radionuclides according to the method proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Leaching tests were justified under various factors that may exist within the disposal site (e.g. type of leachant, surrounding temperature, leachant behavior, the leachant volume to CPCW surface area...). The obtained data after 260 days of leaching revealed that after 7 years of aging the candidate cement-polymer composite (CPC) containing radioactive borate waste samples are characterized by adequate chemical stability required for the long-term disposal process.

  11. The variation of organ doses with the particle size and chemical form of an inhaled radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, B.W.; Adams, N.; Reissland, J.A.

    1979-04-01

    In this report, radiation doses to organs are calculated as a function of the particle size of the inhaled radioactive material. Aerosols with an Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) from 0.1 μm to 20 μm are considered and doses accumulated by various organs in periods ranging from 1 day to 70 years are given for 65 radionuclides. A computer program is used which calculates the transformations taking place in each organ per curie of inhaled nuclide from the basic radioactivity and metabolic data. The program also calculates the resulting doses both for the organ in which the transformations occur and from penetrating radiation emitted as a result of transformations in other organs. The effects of particle size and chemical form of the nuclides on the doses received by organs are discussed. Tables of doses accumulated by 10 specific organs and other organs together with effective whole body doses are given for particle sizes 0.1 μm, 1 μm and 10 μm (AMAD). (author)

  12. Determination of chemical elements in Eucalyptus grandis, manured with Ballad's, by neutrons activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateus, Natalina de Fatima; Madi Filho, Tufic

    2007-01-01

    The biosolid is a mud resulting from the biological treatment of wasted liquids. It is considered as a profitable alternative and important to minimize the environmental impact generated by the sewage thrown in to sanitary lands, in forest cultures like the Eucalyptus grandis. The objective of this work was to detect which chemical elements are present in Eucalyptus grandis samples, fertilized with different quantities of biosolid. The eucalyptuses of Estacao Experimental de Ciencias Florestais of Itatinga were planted in March of 1998 and collected with five years old. The used biosolid was produced by Station of Treatment of Sewer of Barueri - SP, classified as kind B. For the determination of the presence and quantity of chemical elements in the eucalyptus samples, an analysis technique by neutronic activation (NAA) was used followed by gamma rays spectroscopy. The samples were irradiated in the Nuclear Reactor IEA-R1 of IPEN-SP, followed by the measure of induced gamma rays activity, using a Detector HPGe. The presence, mainly of Br, Mn, Na and K, was detected in all analyzed samples. (author)

  13. Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshina, Elena V [Troitsk, RU; Zhuikov, Boris L [Troitsk, RU; Srivastava, Suresh C [Setauket, NY; Ermolaev, Stanislav V [Obninsk, RU; Togaeva, Natalia R [Obninsk, RU

    2012-01-17

    The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  14. Remote operation of microwave systems for solids content analysis and chemical dissolution in highly radioactive environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturcken, E.F.; Floyd, T.S.; Manchester, D.P.

    1986-10-01

    Microwave systems provide quick and easy determination of solids content of samples in high-level radioactive cells. In addition, dissolution of samples is much faster when employing microwave techniques. These are great advantages because work in cells,using master-slave manipulators through leaded glass walls, is normally slower by an order of magnitude than direct contact methods. This paper describes the modifiction of a moisture/solids analyzer microwave system and a drying/digestion microwave system for remote operation in radiation environments. The moisture/solids analyzer has operated satisfactorily for over a year in a gamma radiation field of 1000 roentgens per hour and the drying/digestion system is ready for installation in a cell

  15. The radioactive earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant, J.A.; Saunders, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium are the main elements contributing to natural terrestrial radioactivity. The isotopes 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th and 40 K decay with half-lives so long that significant amounts remain in the earth, providing a continuing source of heat. The slow decay of these isotopes also provides the basis for radiometric age dating and isotopic modelling of the evolution of the earth and its crust. There is a complex interplay between their heat production and the processes involved in crust formation. Phenomena such as volcanism, earthquakes, and large-scale hydrothermal activity associated with ore deposition reflect the dissipation of heat energy from the earth, much of which is derived from natural radioactivity. The higher levels of radioactive elements during the early history of the earth resulted in higher heat flow. All three of the radioactive elements are strongly partitioned into the continental crust, but within the crust their distribution is determined by their different chemical properties. The behaviour of U, which has two commonly occurring oxidation states, is more complex than that of Th and K. Uranium deposits are diverse, and are mostly associated with granites, acid volcanics, or detrital sedimentary rocks. The most important U deposits economically are unconformity-type ores of Proterozoic age, in which U is enriched by up to 5 x 10 6 with respect to bulk earth values. In some cases natural radioactivity can be of environmental concern. The most significant risk is posed by accumulations of radon, the gaseous daughter product of U. (author)

  16. The Detailed Chemical Properties of M31 Star Clusters. I. Fe, Alpha and Light Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-12-01

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the α elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, which were obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio >60 echelle spectra of their integrated light (IL). All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution IL abundance analysis of GCs. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The GCs are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc < R M31 < 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H] ~ - 1.6 for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive GC in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The α-element ratios are generally similar to the Milky Way GC and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at least one cluster, which has a different abundance pattern than other clusters at similar metallicity. We find evidence for star-to-star abundance variations in Mg, Na, and Al in the GCs in our sample, and find correlations of Ca, Mg, Na, and possibly Al abundance ratios with cluster luminosity and velocity dispersion, which can potentially be used to constrain GC self-enrichment scenarios. Data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  17. THE DETAILED CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF M31 STAR CLUSTERS. I. Fe, ALPHA AND LIGHT ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: jcolucci@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 105-24, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the α elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, which were obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio >60 echelle spectra of their integrated light (IL). All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution IL abundance analysis of GCs. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The GCs are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc < R {sub M31} < 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H] ∼ – 1.6 for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive GC in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The α-element ratios are generally similar to the Milky Way GC and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at least one cluster, which has a different abundance pattern than other clusters at similar metallicity. We find evidence for star-to-star abundance variations in Mg, Na, and Al in the GCs in our sample, and find correlations of Ca, Mg, Na, and possibly Al abundance ratios with cluster luminosity and velocity dispersion, which can potentially be used to constrain GC self-enrichment scenarios. Data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope.

  18. Clustering of samples and elements based on multi-variable chemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Op de Beeck, J.

    1984-01-01

    Clustering and classification are defined in the context of multivariable chemical analysis data. Classical multi-variate techniques, commonly used to interpret such data, are shown to be based on probabilistic and geometrical principles which are not justified for analytical data, since in that case one assumes or expects a system of more or less systematically related objects (samples) as defined by measurements on more or less systematically interdependent variables (elements). For the specific analytical problem of data set concerning a large number of trace elements determined in a large number of samples, a deterministic cluster analysis can be used to develop the underlying classification structure. Three main steps can be distinguished: diagnostic evaluation and preprocessing of the raw input data; computation of a symmetric matrix with pairwise standardized dissimilarity values between all possible pairs of samples and/or elements; and ultrametric clustering strategy to produce the final classification as a dendrogram. The software packages designed to perform these tasks are discussed and final results are given. Conclusions are formulated concerning the dangers of using multivariate, clustering and classification software packages as a black-box

  19. Results of the Experiment on Chemical Identification of Db as a Decay Product of Element 115

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, S N; Utyonkov, V K; Shishkin, S V; Eremin, A V; Lobanov, Yu V; Tsyganov, Yu S; Chepigin, V I; Sokol, E A; Vostokin, G K; Aksenov, N V; Hussonnois, M; Itkis, M G; Aggeler, H W; Schumann, D; Bruchertseifer, H; Eichler, R; Shaughnessy, D A; Wilk, P A; Kenneally, J M; Stoyer, M A; Wild, J F

    2004-01-01

    For the first time the chemical identification of Db as the terminal isotope of the decay element 115 produced via the $^{243}{\\text{Am}}(^{48}{\\text{Ca}},3n)^{288}115$ reaction was realized. The experiment was performed on the U400 cyclotron of FLNR, JINR. The $^{243}$Am target was bombarded with a beam dose of $3.4\\cdot 10^{18}$ $^{48}$Ca projectiles at an energy of 247 MeV in the center of the target. The reaction products were collected in the surface of a copper catcher block, which was removed with a lathe and then dissolved in concentrated HNO$_3$. The group 5 elements were separated by sorption onto Dowex 50$\\times$8 cation-exchange resin with subsequent desorption using 1M HF, which forms anionic fluoride complexes of group 5 elements. The eluant was evaporated onto 0.4 $\\mu$m thick polyethylene foils which were placed between a pair of semiconductor detectors surrounded by $^3$He neutron counters for measurement of $\\alpha$ particles, fission fragments and neutrons. Over the course of the experiment...

  20. Radioactivity of heavy minerals and geochemistry of trace elements and radon, resulting from the weathering of the ophiolitic complex, Northwest of Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattaa, B.; Al-Hilal, M.; Jubeli, Y.

    1999-06-01

    Geochemical and radiometric survey of stream sediments resulting from the weathering of ophiolitic complex at Al-Basit area were carried out. Several exploration techniques have been used to evaluate the radioactive elements and minerals in the area, and to estimate the significance of the radioactivity of the source rocks of these elements and minerals. determination of radioelements and some trace elements in stream sediments, in addition to gamma-ray spectrometry and radon gas measurement in water of springs and wells were carried out in the study area. The results show that the high values of radioactive elements and radon concentration are related to the occurrence of syenite nepheline and plageogranite, characterized by higher content of these elements compared to mafic and ultramafic rocks. Mineralogical study of the heavy minerals shows that the abundant minerals are pyroxene and amphibole, while less abundant minerals are iron oxides (limonite and hematite), chromite, ilmenite, olivine and magnetite. Rare minerals are zircon, apatite, barite, tourmaline and sphen. The absence of monazite, xenotime and thorite in the collected samples is mainly attributed to the very limited occurrence of their source rocks. However, this results is rather restricted to the collected samples. High concentration of magnetite and ilmenite in some samples was noted, in addition to the presence of mineral called galaxite which was not reported previously. Gold flake was also found in one of the samples. The study of grain morphology suggests that the heavy minerals were transported for short distance from their source rocks. Grain size analyse of heavy minerals reveals that the concentration of economic minerals such as chromite and ilmenite increases with the decrease of the grain size. (author)

  1. A multimedia exposure assessment methodology for evaluating the performance of the design of structures containing chemical and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephanatos, B.N.; Molholt, B.; Walter, K.P.; MacGregor, A.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to develop a multimedia exposure assessment methodology for the evaluation of existing and future design of structures containing chemical and radioactive wastes and to identify critical parameters for design optimization. The designs are evaluated in terms of their compliance with various federal and state regulatory requirements. Evaluation of the performance of a particular design is presented within the scope of a given exposure pathway. An exposure pathway has four key components: (1) a source and mechanism of chemical release, (2) a transport medium; (3) a point of exposure; and (4) a route of exposure. The first step in the analysis is the characterization of the waste source behavior. The rate and concentration of releases from the source are evaluated using appropriate mathematical models. The migration of radionuclides and chemicals is simulated through each environmental medium to the exposure point. The total exposure to the potential receptor is calculated, and an estimate of the health effects of the exposure is made. Simulation of the movement of radionuclides and chemical wastes from the source to the receptor point includes several processes. If the predicted human exposure to contaminants meets the performance criteria, the design has been validated. Otherwise the structure design is improved to meet the performance criteria. A phased modeling approach is recommended at a particular mixed waste site. A relatively simple model is initially used to pinpoint critical fate and transport processes and design parameters. The second phase of the modeling effort involves the use of more complex and resource intensive fate and transport models. This final step in the modeling process provides more accurate estimates of contaminant concentrations at the point of exposure. Thus the human dose is more accurately predicted, providing better design validation

  2. Natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in chemical and organic fertilizers used in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taher, A; Althoyaib, S S

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with identifying and determining the activity levels of natural occuring radionuclides, (226)Ra and (232)Th series, their decay products and (40)K, in chemical and organic fertilizers used in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 30 samples: 20 phosphatic fertilizers (single super-phosphate SSP and triple super-phosphate,TSP) and 10 organic fertilizers (cow, sheep and chicken) collected from markets and farms. The gamma-ray spectrometer consists of NaI(Tl) detector and its electronic circuit was used for measuring γ-ray spectra. The ranges of radioactivity levels of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in chemical fertilizers are 51.5±5.2-106.3±7.5, 5.1±1.6-9.9±3.2. and 462.6±21-607.3±14Bqkg(-1), respectively. The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in natural fertilizers (cow, sheep and chicken) are lower than the activities in chemical fertilizers. The obtained data are compared with available reported data from other countries in literature. The Ra(eq) in chemical fertilizer ranges from 100.37 to 161.43Bqkg(-1) and in organic fertilizer ranges from 34.07 to 102.19Bqkg(-1), which are lower than the limit of 370Bqkg(-1) adopted from NEA-OECD (1979). The average heavy metal (Pb, Cd, Ni, Co and Cr) contents of the fertilizers marketed in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are also determined and within the limits of those used worldwide. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparative study of changes in immunological reactivity during prolonged introduction of radioactive and chemical substances into the organism with drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubik, V.M.; Nevstrueva, M.A.; Kalnitskij, S.A.; Livshits, R.E.; Merkushev, G.N.; Pilshchik, E.M.; Ponomareva, T.V.

    1978-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted into the factors of non-specific protection and specific immunity, allergic and autoallergic reactivities during prolonged exposure of experimental animals to 6 different radioactive and 7 harmful chemical substances. Qualitative and quantitative peculiarities were found in the changes in immunological reactivity during the exposure of the organism to radionuclides and stable chemical compounds. Impairment of immunity plays an essential role in the course and the outcome of effects induced by chronic action of the substances examined. (author)

  4. Effects of chemical elements in the trophic levels of natural salt marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Piotr; Barczak, Tadeusz; Bennewicz, Janina; Jerzak, Leszek; Bogdzińska, Maria; Aleksandrowicz, Oleg; Koim-Puchowska, Beata; Szady-Grad, Małgorzata; Klawe, Jacek J; Woźniak, Alina

    2016-06-01

    The relationships between the bioaccumulation of Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Co, Cd, and Pb, acidity (pH), salinity (Ec), and organic matter content within trophic levels (water-soil-plants-invertebrates) were studied in saline environments in Poland. Environments included sodium manufactures, wastes utilization areas, dumping grounds, and agriculture cultivation, where disturbed Ca, Mg, and Fe exist and the impact of Cd and Pb is high. We found Zn, Cu, Mn, Co, and Cd accumulation in the leaves of plants and in invertebrates. Our aim was to determine the selectivity exhibited by soil for nutrients and heavy metals and to estimate whether it is important in elucidating how these metals are available for plant/animal uptake in addition to their mobility and stability within soils. We examined four ecological plant groups: trees, shrubs, minor green plants, and water macrophytes. Among invertebrates, we sampled breastplates Malacostraca, small arachnids Arachnida, diplopods Diplopoda, small insects Insecta, and snails Gastropoda. A higher level of chemical elements was found in saline polluted areas (sodium manufactures and anthropogenic sites). Soil acidity and salinity determined the bioaccumulation of free radicals in the trophic levels measured. A pH decrease caused Zn and Cd to increase in sodium manufactures and an increase in Ca, Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb in the anthropogenic sites. pH increase also caused Na, Mg, and Fe to increase in sodium manufactures and an increase in Na, Fe, Mn, and Co in the anthropogenic sites. There was a significant correlation between these chemical elements and Ec in soils. We found significant relationships between pH and Ec, which were positive in saline areas of sodium manufactures and negative in the anthropogenic and control sites. These dependencies testify that the measurement of the selectivity of cations and their fluctuation in soils provide essential information on the affinity and binding strength in these environments. The

  5. Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods

  6. Studies by nuclear and physico-chemical methods of tissue's metallic contamination located around biomaterials. Toxicity measurements of several biomaterials residual radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibert, Geoffroy

    2004-01-01

    Implants used as biomaterials fulfill conditions of functionality, compatibility and occasionally bio-activity. There are four main families of biomaterials: metals and metal alloys, polymers, bio-ceramics and natural materials. Because of corrosion and friction in the human body, implants generate debris. These debris develop different problems: toxicity, inflammatory reactions, prosthetic unsealing by osseous dissolution. Nature, size, morphology and amount of debris are the parameters which have an influence on tissue response. We characterize metallic contamination coming from knee prosthesis into surrounding capsular tissue by depth migration, in vivo behaviours, content, size and nature of debris. The PIXE-RBS and STEM-EDXS methods, that we used, are complementary, especially about characterization scale. Debris contamination distributed in the whole articulation is very heterogeneous. Debris migrate on several thousands μm in tissue. Solid metallic particles, μm, are found in the most polluted samples, for both kinds of alloys TA6V and CrCoMo. In the mean volume analysed by PIXE, the in vivo mass ratios [Ti]/[V] and [Co]/[Cr] confirm the chemical stability of TA6V debris and chemical evolution of CrCoMo debris. Complementary measures of TA6V grains, on a nano-metric scale by STEM-EDXS, show a dissolution of coarse grain (μm) in smaller grains (nm). Locally, TA6V grains of a phase are detected and could indicate a preferential dissolution of β phase (grain boundaries) with dropping of Al and V, both toxic and carcinogenic elements. A thin target protocol development correlates PIXE and histological analysis on the same zone. This protocol allows to locate other pathologies in relationship with weaker metal contamination, μg/g, thanks to the great sensitivity of PIXE method. Harmlessness with respect to the residual radioactivity of several natural or synthetic biomaterials is established, using ultra low background noise γ detection system. (author)

  7. Evaluation of chemical stability of vitrification media for radioactive waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkatt, A.; Simmons, J.H.; Macedo, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Test methods and test results concerning the measurement of chemical durability of glass media proposed for nuclear waste fixation are described. In order to develop predictive models and risk calculations, the release rates of individual components are measured. The results are used to determine matrix dissolution rates, possible transport of components through the matrix, and chemical and physical corrosion mechanisms. Measurements on model borosilicate and high silica glass fixation media are reported and discussed in terms of layer formation, approach to steady state, interaction of polyvalent ions with the dealkalised layer, structural disintegration of the layer, and the effects of glass composition and of environmental conditions (temperature, leachant composition and pH, γ dose). The extrapolation of short term laboratory tests to long time storage conditions and the use of such extrapolation in predicting safe upper limits for the release rates of components of the glass are described. (author)

  8. Mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol modified cement mortar with silica fume used as matrix including radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakroury, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discussed the mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol - modified cement mortar with silica fume to assess the safety for disposal of radioactive waste. The modified cement mortars containing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in the presence of 10 % silica fume (SF) .The chemical reaction between polymer and cement - hydrated product were investigated by the Infrared Spectral Technology, Differential Thermal Analysis and X-ray diffraction. The leaching of 137Cs from a waste composite into a surrounding fluid has been studied .The results shown that PVA increases the strength and decreases the porosity. The increase in strength duo to the interaction of PVA with cement , may be forming some new compound that fill the pores or improve the bond between the cement . The pozzolanic reaction of the SF increases the calcium silicate hydrates in the hardening matrix composites. There is distinct change in the refinement of the pore structure in cement composites giving fewer capillary pores and more of the finer gel pores

  9. Effects of crystallization on thermal properties and chemical durability of the glasses containing simulated high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Terai, Ryohei; Hara, Shigeo

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the thermodynamic stability of the glasses containing high level radioactive wastes, the conversion to glass-ceramics by the heat-treatment was carried out with two kinds of glasses, and the change of thermal properties and chemical durability by crystallization was investigated. One of the glasses has a composition of SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -ZnO-TiO 2 system, and another one has a composition which could grow the nephelite crystals from Na 2 O in wastes and Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 added as glass-forming materials. Transition and yield points shifted to higher temperatures by the conversion and the glass-ceramics were found to be more stable than the original glasses. The glass-ceramics of the composition of SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -ZnO-TiO 2 showed poor durability, whereas the chemical durability of the glass-ceramics containing nephelite crystals was considerably improved. In the latter case, improvement of the durability is attributable to that some parts of glass are converted to nephelite crystals and the crystals are more durable than glass under most conditions. (auth.)

  10. Chemical effects of the radioactive decay 7677Kr→7677Br reactions of recoil bromine in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, D. de.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes the chemical reactions of 76 Br and 77 Br recoil species, formed by radioactive decay of 76 Kr and 77 Kr, with various gaseous compounds. Due to differences in decay energy and decay mode the resulting 76 Br and 77 Br isotopes obtain different kinetic energies and carry different charges; 76 Kr decays completely via electron capture and the resulting 76 Br is formed with a multiple positive charge and a kinetic energy of 7.2 eV at the most. 77 Kr decays for only 16% via electron capture, resulting in 77 Brsup(n+) ions with a maximal kinetic energy of 56.9 eV. 84% of the 77 Kr decays via #betta# + particle emission, which leads to 77 Br species, that are mainly negative or uncharged and that possess a maximal kinetic energy of 36.4 eV. The aim of this study was to explore whether these initial differences in charge and kinetic energy are reflected in the products, formed after chemical reactions of 76 Br and 77 Br. (Auth.)

  11. Chemical treatment of radioactive liquid wastes from medical applications; Tratamiento de desechos radiactivos liquidos de aplicaciones medicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo A, J

    1996-12-31

    This work is a study about the treatment of the most important radioactive liquid wastes from medical usages, generated in medical institutions with nuclear medicine services. The radionuclides take in account are {sup 32} P, {sup 35} S, {sup 125} I. The treatments developed and improved were specific chemical precipitations for each one of the radionuclides. This work involve to precipitate the radionuclide from the liquid waste, making a chemical compound insoluble in the aqueous phase, for this process the radionuclide stay in the precipitate, lifting the aqueous phase with a very low activity than the begin. The {sup 32} P precipitated in form of Ca{sub 3} {sup 32} P O{sub 4} and Ca{sub 2} H {sup 32} P O{sub 4} with a value for Decontamination Factor (DF) at the end of the treatment of 32. The {sup 35} S was precipitated in form of Ba{sup 35} SO{sub 4} with a DF of 26. The {sup 125} I was precipitated in Cu {sup 125} I to obtain a DF of 24. The results of the treatments are between the limits given for the International Atomic Energy Agency and the 10 Code of Federal Regulation 20, for the safety release at the environment. (Author).

  12. Recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense. On analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations. 2. ed.; Empfehlungen fuer die Probenahme zur Gefahrenabwehr im Bevoelkerungsschutz. Zur Analytik von chemischen, biologischen und radioaktiven Kontaminationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Udo; Derakshani, Nahid; Drobig, Matthias; Koenig, Mario; Mentfewitz, Joachim; Prast, Hartmut; Uelpenich, Gerhard; Vidmayer, Marc; Wilbert, Stefan; Wolf, Manfred

    2016-07-01

    The recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense (analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations) cover the following topics: Requirements for sampling, description of the materials (chemical, biological and radioactive contaminated materials), decontamination, sample transport and protocol documents.

  13. On the enrichment of low-abundant isotopes of light chemical elements by gas centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisevich, V.D.; Morozov, O.E.; Zaozerskiy, Yu.P.; Shmelev, G.M.; Shipilov, Yu.D.

    2000-01-01

    A brief review of the main areas for the application of the isotopes 15 N and 13 C is made. Separation of the nitrogen isotopes in a single gas centrifuge in the form of pure nitrogen, ammonia, and trifluoride of nitrogen as well as the carbon isotopes in the form of carbon dioxide has been studied by means of numerical simulation. The parameters of the centrifugal machine investigated were close to the parameters of the Iguassu machine. The dependence of the efficiency criterion versus the basic parameters of the separation process has been explored in the computational experiments. Comparisons of the calculated results with the experimental data have shown good agreement. The results obtained have demonstrated the possibility of using gas centrifuge technology to enrich successfully the low-abundant isotopes of light chemical elements

  14. Selected elements and organic chemicals in streambed sediment in the Salem area, Oregon, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Dwight Q.

    2002-09-13

    Analysis of streambed sediments in the Salem, Oregon, area showed anomalously large concentrations of some elements and organic chemicals, indicating contamination from anthropogenic and/or geologic sources. The streambed sediment sample from Clark Creek, an urban basin, had large concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hyrdocarbons (PAHs), organochlorines, cadmium, lead, and zinc. The sample from the East Fork of Pringle Creek, which is a mostly urban basin, had the highest concentrations of DDD, DDE, and DDT compounds. Aldrin was detected in streambed sediment at only one site, the East Fork of Pringle Creek. Ten of the 14 sites sampled had exceedances of the sediment quality guidelines of the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), and 8 sites had exceedances of guidelines from the Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) Program.

  15. Transformation processes influencing physico-chemical forms of radionuclides and trace elements in natural water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.; Riise, G.; Oughton, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    In order to assess short and long term consequences of radionuclides and trace elements introduced to aquatic systems, knowledge on source terms, key factors and key processes influencing the speciation is essential. The mobility, bioavailability and subsequent transfer into food chains depend on the physico-chemical forms on radionuclides and trace metals. In addition, transformation processes and especially the interaction with natural organic matter (NOM) influences the distribution pattern. Furthermore, the prevailing climate conditions, e.g. episodic events and temperature are vital for fluxes and for the kinetics of the transformation processes. In the present work processes in catchments and processes associated with acidification, episodic events, climate conditions (temperature) and mixing zone phenomena influencing the speciation of radionuclides and trace metals are highlighted. These processes should be highly relevant for assessing far field consequences of radionuclides potentially released from disposal sites. (authors). 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. 37-Active rods fuel element for Atucha 1 nuclear power plant. Effects of this change in design over the neutronic behavior, decay power and radioactive inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, Javier E.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the use of 37-rods fuel element on the behavior of the Atucha 1 nuclear power plant homogeneous core with slightly enriched fuel to 0.85 w % were studied through representative parameters such as average discharge burnup, channel powers, reactivity coefficients, kinetic parameters, radioactive inventory and decay power. In general, the values of mentioned parameters are similar to those corresponding to a core with the 36-rods fuel element actually in use, although it must be emphasized a decrease both in linear power and, in minor degree, in the efficiency of shut-off and control rods and a slight increase in the discharge burnup. The fuel management strategy developed for a core with 36-rods elements can be maintained. (author)

  17. Chemical elements in the environment: multi-element geochemical datasets from continental to national scale surveys on four continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caritat, Patrice de; Reimann, Clemens; Smith, David; Wang, Xueqiu

    2017-01-01

    During the last 10-20 years, Geological Surveys around the world have undertaken a major effort towards delivering fully harmonized and tightly quality-controlled low-density multi-element soil geochemical maps and datasets of vast regions including up to whole continents. Concentrations of between 45 and 60 elements commonly have been determined in a variety of different regolith types (e.g., sediment, soil). The multi-element datasets are published as complete geochemical atlases and made available to the general public. Several other geochemical datasets covering smaller areas but generally at a higher spatial density are also available. These datasets may, however, not be found by superficial internet-based searches because the elements are not mentioned individually either in the title or in the keyword lists of the original references. This publication attempts to increase the visibility and discoverability of these fundamental background datasets covering large areas up to whole continents.

  18. Nuclear radioactive techniques applied to materials research

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, João Guilherme; Wahl, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we review materials characterization techniques using radioactive isotopes at the ISOLDE/CERN facility. At ISOLDE intense beams of chemically clean radioactive isotopes are provided by selective ion-sources and high-resolution isotope separators, which are coupled on-line with particle accelerators. There, new experiments are performed by an increasing number of materials researchers, which use nuclear spectroscopic techniques such as Mössbauer, Perturbed Angular Correlations (PAC), beta-NMR and Emission Channeling with short-lived isotopes not available elsewhere. Additionally, diffusion studies and traditionally non-radioactive techniques as Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy, Hall effect and Photoluminescence measurements are performed on radioactive doped samples, providing in this way the element signature upon correlation of the time dependence of the signal with the isotope transmutation half-life. Current developments, applications and perspectives of using radioactive ion beams and tech...

  19. Chemical elemental distribution and soil DNA fingerprints provide the critical evidence in murder case investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Concheri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The scientific contribution to the solution of crime cases, or throughout the consequent forensic trials, is a crucial aspect of the justice system. The possibility to extract meaningful information from trace amounts of samples, and to match and validate evidences with robust and unambiguous statistical tests, are the key points of such process. The present report is the authorized disclosure of an investigation, carried out by Attorney General appointment, on a murder case in northern Italy, which yielded the critical supporting evidence for the judicial trial. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proportional distribution of 54 chemical elements and the bacterial community DNA fingerprints were used as signature markers to prove the similarity of two soil samples. The first soil was collected on the crime scene, along a corn field, while the second was found in trace amounts on the carpet of a car impounded from the main suspect in a distant location. The matching similarity of the two soils was proven by crossing the results of two independent techniques: a elemental analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES approaches, and b amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis by gel electrophoresis (ARDRA. CONCLUSIONS: Besides introducing the novel application of these methods to forensic disciplines, the highly accurate level of resolution observed, opens new possibilities also in the fields of soil typing and tracking, historical analyses, geochemical surveys and global land mapping.

  20. Natural and anthropogenic sources of chemical elements in sediment profiles from the Admiralty Bay, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, A.P.; Figueira, R.C.L.; Silva, C.R.A.; Franca, E.J.; Mahiques, M.M.; Bicego, M.C.; Montone, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The Antarctic Continent and its surrounding Southern Ocean are the least known regions of the world, mainly due to the most unfavorable climatic conditions, in which sampling for environmental studies are quite difficult to be carried out. Admiralty Bay on the King George Island (Antarctica) hosts three research stations, Arctowski, Ferraz and Macchu Picchu, which are operate by Poland, Brazil and Peru, respectively. Therefore, human activities in this region require the use of fossil fuel as an energy source, which is also considered the main source of pollutants in the area. This work investigated the natural and anthropogenic inputs of chemical elements in sediment samples collected close to Ferraz Station, during the 25 th Brazilian Antarctica Expedition in the 2006/2007 austral summer. Total concentrations of As, Zn and Sc were determined in sediment profiles by using the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). The analytical technique employed to determine the major elements such as Fe, Al, Ca, Mn and Ti was X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. For estimating the sedimentation rate, High Resolution Gamma Ray Spectrometry was applied to determine 137 Cs, after 30 days, to achieve secular equilibrium. According to the enrichment factor and the geochronology analysis, the most relevant enrichment was observed for As in the sediment samples, suggesting the increasing of its content due to the Brazilian activities in the Admiralty Bay. Despite some evidences of anthropogenic contribution, the study indicated low level of environmental risk for this region. (author)

  1. Physical--chemical studies of transuranium elements. Progress report, April 1, 1976--March 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Major advances in our continuing program to determine, interpret, and correlate the basic chemical and physical properties of the transuranium elements are summarized for the period April 1, 1976, through March 31, 1977. Implementation of data reduction programs and acquisition of a CRT time-sharing graphics terminal/stand-alone computer have advanced significantly the handling capabilities of single-beam spectral data obtained by our microscope spectrophotometer. EsCl 3 , EsBr 3 , and EsI 3 have been well characterized spectroscopically, and limited X-ray diffraction data have been obtained from EsBr 3 and EsI 3 . The reduction of mixed Es-lanthanide trihalides has produced what might be Es(II). Dimorphism in BkCl 3 , CfCl 3 , and BkBr 3 has been studied spectrophotometrically and the results confirmed by X-ray analysis. Our solution microcalorimeter was improved by reducing the system-generated electrical noise and developing a novel sample container. The operating sensitivity was determined to be within the desired 0.1 percent precision requirement. The necessary hardware was obtained and software development was initiated for the capability to acquire, store, and analyze the heat of solution data automatically. A very sensitive apparatus (SQUID) for the determination of magnetic susceptibility has been constructed and is being evaluated. Our device should greatly facilitate the study of microgram-sized samples of transuranium elements and compounds

  2. Electronic Structure and Chemical Bond of Ti3SiC2 and Adding Al Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; LU Ning; MEI Bingchu

    2006-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and property of Ti3SiC2 and Al-doped was studied by density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method. When Al element is added into Ti3SiC2, there is a less difference of ionic bond, which does not play a leading role to influent the properties. After adding Al, the covalent bond of Al and the near Ti becomes somewhat weaker, but the covalent bond of Al and the Si in the same layer is obviously stronger than that of Si and Si before adding. Therefore, in preparation of Ti3SiC2, adding a proper quantity of Al can promote the formation of Ti3SiC2. The density of state shows that there is a mixed conductor character in both of Ti3SiC2 and adding Al element. Ti3SiC2 is with more tendencies to form a semiconductor. The total density of state near Fermi lever after adding Al is larger than that before adding, so the electric conductivity may increase after adding Al.

  3. Carbon black vs. black carbon and other airborne materials containing elemental carbon: Physical and chemical distinctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Christopher M.; Nascarella, Marc A.; Valberg, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Airborne particles containing elemental carbon (EC) are currently at the forefront of scientific and regulatory scrutiny, including black carbon, carbon black, and engineered carbon-based nanomaterials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, and graphene. Scientists and regulators sometimes group these EC-containing particles together, for example, interchangeably using the terms carbon black and black carbon despite one being a manufactured product with well-controlled properties and the other being an undesired, incomplete-combustion byproduct with diverse properties. In this critical review, we synthesize information on the contrasting properties of EC-containing particles in order to highlight significant differences that can affect hazard potential. We demonstrate why carbon black should not be considered a model particle representative of either combustion soots or engineered carbon-based nanomaterials. Overall, scientific studies need to distinguish these highly different EC-containing particles with care and precision so as to forestall unwarranted extrapolation of properties, hazard potential, and study conclusions from one material to another. -- Highlights: •Major classes of elemental carbon-containing particles have distinct properties. •Despite similar names, carbon black should not be confused with black carbon. •Carbon black is distinguished by a high EC content and well-controlled properties. •Black carbon particles are characterized by their heterogenous properties. •Carbon black is not a model particle representative of engineered nanomaterials. -- This review demonstrates the significant physical and chemical distinctions between elemental carbon-containing particles e.g., carbon black, black carbon, and engineered nanomaterials

  4. Chemical Hand Warmer Packet Ingestion: A Case of Elemental Iron Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Jessica L; Sherrow, Leighanne K; Jayant, Deepak A; Katz, Kenneth D

    2017-09-01

    For individuals who work outdoors in the winter or play winter sports, chemical hand warmers are becoming increasingly more commonplace because of their convenience and effectiveness. A 32-year-old woman with a history of chronic pain and bipolar disorder presented to the emergency department complaining of a "warm sensation" in her mouth and epigastrium after reportedly ingesting the partial contents of a chemical hand warmer packet containing between 5 and 8 g of elemental iron. She had been complaining of abdominal pain for approximately 1 month and was prescribed unknown antibiotics the previous day. The patient denied ingestion of any other product or medication other than what was prescribed. A serum iron level obtained approximately 6 hours after ingestion measured 235 micrograms/dL (reference range 40-180 micrograms/dL). As the patient demonstrated no new abdominal complaints and no evidence of systemic iron toxicity, she was discharged uneventfully after education. However, the potential for significant iron toxicity exists depending on the extent of exposure to this or similar products. Treatment for severe iron toxicity may include fluid resuscitation, whole bowel irrigation, and iron chelation therapy with deferoxamine. Physicians should become aware of the toxicity associated with ingestion of commercially available hand warmers. Consultation with a medical toxicologist is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stand-Off Chemical Detection Using Photoacoustic Sensing Techniques—From Single Element to Phase Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Gupta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Technologies that can detect harmful chemicals, such as explosive devices, harmful gas leaks, airborne chemicals or/and biological agents, are heavily invested in by the government to prevent any possible catastrophic consequences. Some key features of such technology are, but not limited to, effective signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the detected signal and extended distance between the detector and target. In this work, we describe the development of photoacoustic sensing techniques from simple to more complex systems. These techniques include passive and active noise filters, parabolic sound reflectors, a lock-in amplifier, and beam-forming with an array of microphones; using these techniques, we increased detection distance from a few cm in an indoor setting to over 41 feet in an outdoor setting. We also establish a theoretical mathematical model that explains the underlying principle of how SNR can be improved with an increasing number of microphone elements in the phase array. We validate this model with computational simulations as well as experimental results.

  6. Influence of chemical composition of precipitation on migration of radioactive caesium in natural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thørring, H.; Skuterud, L.; Steinnes, E.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the impact of the chemical composition of precipitation on radiocaesium mobility in natural soil. This was done through column studies. Three types of precipitation regimes were studied, representing a natural range found in Norway: Acidic precipitation (southernmost part of the country); precipitation rich in marine cations (highly oceanic coastal areas); and low concentrations of sea salts (slightly continental inland areas). After 50 weeks and a total precipitation supply of ∼10 000 L m −2 per column, results indicate that acidic precipitation increased the mobility of 134 Cs added during the experiment. However, depth distribution of already present Chernobyl fallout 137 Cs was not significantly affected by the chemical composition of precipitation. - Highlights: • Mobility of freshly added Cs-134 was higher in soil receiving acidic precipitation. • Depth penetration of Cs-134 was higher in soil profiles with a thicker humus layer. • Depth distribution of Chernobyl Cs-137 was not affected by precipitation type

  7. Origin of major element chemical trends in DSDP Leg 37 basalts, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, G.R.; Wright, T.L.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the major element chemical variation for basalts from the Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 37 and relate it to stratigraphic position in each of five drilling sites. Least-squares techniques are successfully used to quantify the nature and extent of alteration in these basalts, and to correct the major element analysis back to a magmatic, or alteration-free, composition on the assumption that alteration takes place in two ways: (1) secondary minerals are introduced into veins and vesicles, and (2) CO2 and H2O react with components in the rock to form a simple alteration assemblage. A chemical stratigraphy is defined for these basalts by grouping lavas whose chemistries are related by low-pressure phenocryst-liquid differentiation as identified by least-squares calculation. Major chemical-stratigraphic units are as much as 200 m thick; correlations of these units can be made between the holes at site 332 (about 100 m apart), but not between the other sites. Compositions of parental magmas are calculated by extrapolating low-pressure variations to a constant value of 9% MgO. The differences in these extrapolated compositions reflect high-pressure processes, and suggest that clinopyroxene may be an important phase in either intermediate-level fractionation of basaltic liquids, or as a residual phase during the partial melting which produces these basaltic liquids. Several of the basaltic liquids calculated as parental to the Leg 37 basalts have CaO contents greater than 14% and indicate that the oceanic mantle is richer in CaO and Al2O3 than values used in pyrolite models for the upper mantle. A model for magma generation and eruption beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge embodies the following characteristics: 1. (1) Separate magma batches are generated in the mantle. 2. (2) Each of these may be erupted directly or stored at shallow depth where significant fractionation takes place. Common fractionation processes are inferred to be gravitative

  8. Physico-chemical reactions in the underground movement of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gailledreau, C.

    The physico-chemical state of the radioelements moving underground can influence considerably their migration velocity. In the case of 90 Sr--held on by monmorillonites, apatites, activated aluminum oxide--the occurrence of electronegative colloids, sorbing selectively 90 Sr results in an immediate break-through of this isotope. This phenomenon has been demonstrated in the case of the calcite phosphate reaction. A high pH is generally favorable to 90 Sr sorption (apatite, aluminum oxide). The occurrence of Ca 2+ ions acts very unfavorably on 90 Sr sorption by minerals specifics of this isotope (apatite, aluminum oxide). The same thing occurs with organic matters 137 Cs sorption, attributed to illitic clays, is little sensitive to the nature of the solution. Ruthenium-106 seems to move underground chiefly as a nitrosylruthenium hydroxide complex. This complex would be weakly sorbed on soil colloids by London--Van der Waals forces

  9. Standard practices for dissolving glass containing radioactive and mixed waste for chemical and radiochemical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover techniques suitable for dissolving glass samples that may contain nuclear wastes. These techniques used together or independently will produce solutions that can be analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), radiochemical methods and wet chemical techniques for major components, minor components and radionuclides. 1.2 One of the fusion practices and the microwave practice can be used in hot cells and shielded hoods after modification to meet local operational requirements. 1.3 The user of these practices must follow radiation protection guidelines in place for their specific laboratories. 1.4 Additional information relating to safety is included in the text. 1.5 The dissolution techniques described in these practices can be used for quality control of the feed materials and the product of plants vitrifying nuclear waste materials in glass. 1.6 These pr...

  10. Sources of radioactive waste from light-water reactors and their physical and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Collins, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    The general physical and chemical properties of waste streams in light-water reactors (LWRs) are described. The principal mechanisms for release and the release pathways to the environment are discussed. The calculation of liquid and gaseous source terms using one of the available models is presented. These calculated releases are compared with observed releases from operating LWRs. The computerized mathematical model used is the GALE Code which is the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff's model for calculating source terms for effluents from LWRs (USNRC76a, USNRC76b). Programs currently being conducted at operating reactors by the NRC, Electric Power Research Institute, and various utilities to better define the characteristics of waste streams and the performance of radwaste process equipment are described

  11. Deposition of radioactive corrosion products on the internal surfaces of tube elements in gaseous phase of dissociating system N2O4 reversible 2NO2 reversible 2NO+O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'tsev, V.P.; Dolgov, V.M.; Katanaev, A.O.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of experimental data, obtained as a result of γ-scanning of tube element samples of loop assembling with dissociating coolant contacting with N 2 O 4 gaseous phase is presented. Radioactive depositions are differentiated on fixed and unfixed ones by the method of radiochemical analysis. The data obtained have made it possible to establish the analytical form of radioactive element distribution functions along the piping length. It is noted, that relative quantities of radioactive isotopes, existing in fixed and unfixed depositions vary with temperature. The fraction of soluble forms of corrosion radioactive products in unfixed depositions increases both with the decrease of temperature and after passing of radioactive impurity through the zone of liquid coolant

  12. Health risk from radioactive and chemical environmental contamination: common basis for assessment and safety decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demin, V.

    2004-01-01

    To meet the growing practical need in risk analysis in Russia health risk assessment tools and regulations have been developed in the frame of few federal research programs. RRC Kurchatov Institute is involved in R and D on risk analysis activity in these programs. One of the objectives of this development is to produce a common, unified basis of health risk analysis for different sources of risk. Current specific and different approaches in risk assessment and establishing safety standards developed for chemicals and ionising radiation are analysed. Some recommendations are given to produce the common approach. A specific risk index R has been proposed for safety decision-making (establishing safety standards and other levels of protective actions, comparison of various sources of risk, etc.). The index R is defined as the partial mathematical expectation of lost years of healthy life (LLE) due to exposure during a year to a risk source considered. The more concrete determinations of this index for different risk sources derived from the common definition of R are given. Generic safety standards (GSS) for the public and occupational workers have been suggested in terms of this index. Secondary specific safety standards have been derived from GSS for ionizing radiation and a number of other risk sources including environmental chemical pollutants. Other general and derived levels for decision-making have also been proposed including the e-minimum level. Their possible dependence on the national or regional health-demographic data is shortly considered. Recommendations are given on methods and criteria for comparison of various sources of risk. Some examples of risk comparison are demonstrated in the frame of different comparison tasks. The paper has been prepared on the basis of the research work supported by International Science and Technology Centre, Moscow (project no. 2558). (author)

  13. Chemical Elements in Mulch and Litterfall of Beech Ecosystems and Their Total Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariyana I. Lyubenovа

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The beech communities on the territory of Bulgaria had been objects of regional, local as well as large scale national investigations aiming their classification, determination of their ecological characteristics, conservation status, habitats etc. They are included as objects of the intensive monitoring of forest ecosystems in Bulgaria also. The investigations of chemical content of the litter – fall in these forests were conducted until now. The novelty of the present research is investigation of these elements in the mulch and the ratio between the established quantities calculation. The main goal is the biological turnover special features characterization of the investigated elements which give us a chance to define the investigated ecosystems state and functioning. The indexes as litter – mulch and acropetal coefficients were used for this aim. The content of macroelements as N, Ca and K and microelements as Pb, Zn, Mn and Fe in soils, mulch and in different litter fall fractions have been calculated. The investigation was carried out on three sample plots. During the investigation was established that the soils are characterized with acid reaction, high content of Fe, N and Mn and low content of Ca and K. The concentration of Zn and Pb are high also. The calculated average store of investigated elements in litter – fall is 81.312 kg.ha1 and in the mulch 314 kg.ha1. According to the acropetal coefficient N is accumulated mainly in the acorns, K – in the annual phytomass fractions and Ca – in the perennial fractions. The leaves and the acorns fraction accumulate Mn, and cupolas Fe. The litter – mulch coefficient vary from 1,6 (Mn to 4,2 (Pb. The tendencies of Zn and Ca turnovers acceleration are discovered, while the turnover of more investigated elements is inhibited. The litter – mulch coefficient for Zn and Ca is 0,8 and 1,4 accordingly, i.е. corresponding to the intensive type of turnovers which is not typical for the

  14. Spatial gradient of human health risk from exposure to trace elements and radioactive pollutants in soils at the Puchuncaví-Ventanas industrial complex, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani-Ghabeshi, S; Palomo-Marín, M R; Bernalte, E; Rueda-Holgado, F; Miró-Rodríguez, C; Cereceda-Balic, F; Fadic, X; Vidal, V; Funes, M; Pinilla-Gil, E

    2016-11-01

    The Punchuncaví Valley in central Chile, heavily affected by a range of anthropogenic emissions from a localized industrial complex, has been studied as a model environment for evaluating the spatial gradient of human health risk, which are mainly caused by trace elemental pollutants in soil. Soil elemental profiles in 121 samples from five selected locations representing different degrees of impact from the industrial source were used for human risk estimation. Distance to source dependent cumulative non-carcinogenic hazard indexes above 1 for children (max 4.4 - min 1.5) were found in the study area, ingestion being the most relevant risk pathway. The significance of health risk differences within the study area was confirmed by statistical analysis (ANOVA and HCA) of individual hazard index values at the five sampling locations. As was the dominant factor causing unacceptable carcinogenic risk levels for children (sampling locations which are closer to the industrial complex, whereas the risk was just in the tolerable range (10 -6 - 10 -4 ) for children and adults in the rest of the sampling locations at the study area. Furthermore, we assessed gamma ray radiation external hazard indexes and annual effective dose rate from the natural radioactivity elements ( 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K) levels in the surface soils of the study area. The highest average values for the specific activity of 232 Th (31 Bq kg -1 ), 40 K (615 Bq kg - 1 ), and 226 Ra (25 Bq kg -1 ) are lower than limit recommended by OECD, so no significant radioactive risk was detected within the study area. In addition, no significant variability of radioactive risk was observed among sampling locations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of natural radioactive elements in building materials by gamma spectroscopy, trace dosimetry and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, G.; Desdin, L.F.; Hernandez, A.T.; Gonzalez, D.; Labrada, A.; Tenreiro, J.J.; Capote, G.; Perelyguin, V.P.; Herrera, H.; Tellez, E.

    1993-01-01

    Five types of Cuban concretes and their main components (minerals aggregates and cement) were investigated in order to analyze the content of uranium, thorium, radium, potassium and radon 220,222, using gamma spectroscopy, trace dosimetry and neutron activation analysis. The comparative evaluation of different concretes, aggregates and two types of cements according to natural radioactivity is shown

  16. Evaluation of air pollution due to natural radioactive elements; Evaluacion de contaminacion del aire debido a elementos radiactivos naturales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, B. A.; Lopez, M. E., E-mail: bertin.perez@pucp.edu.pe [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Seccion Fisica, Av. Universitaria 1801, San Miguel, Lima (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The presence of radioactive materials in the crustal and as consequence present in the surface, originate the natural radioactive contamination in the different solid, liquid and gaseous materials; particularly in the air that we breathe. Among these radioactive materials that contribute to the environmental pollution are the presences of uranium, radio, thorium and their respective disintegration chains, as the gas radon (Rn-222) that spreads in the air; whose presence increases in areas where the seismic activity is notorious or other natural events take place, case of the Lima (Peru) City. In this work we show the measurements realized during two consecutive years in the roof of a building of three floors in the Lima City, with the purpose of establishing the fluctuations of this gassy pollutant in the surrounding air. The measurements were made using nitrocellulose detectors (Lr-115 type 2) applying the nuclear prints technique. The obtained results allowing to have an indicator of the Rn-222 presence in the air during different seasons of the year and also the presence of other possible radioactive pollutants. The use of this technique allows obtaining and studying the prints that generate the alpha particles that are emitted during the Rn-222 disintegration or by means of their descendants or predecessors; also allowing to discriminate between the short-range tracers or lineal type prints and other very different prints obtained during some of the measurements. The results analyzed according to proposed models are presented in this work. (author)

  17. Contents of chemical elements in tissues of European badger (Meles meles affected by ovarian tumour – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Bukovjan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher concentrations of chemical elements in animal tissues may be associated with tumours and may explain cancerogenity. In this study, selected chemical elements were measured in the liver, kidneys, muscles and tissues affected by tumour in a dead female European badger (Meles meles with a metastatic ovarian carcinoma. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used for the assessment of concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc. AMA 254 analyser was used for the assessment of mercury concentration. Concentrations of heavy metals such as As, Cr, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, and total Hg amounted to 0.031, 0.16, 7.74, 44.54, 0.67, 0.67, and 0.36 mg·kg-1 in the tumour tissue. This is the first detection of ovarian tumour in a European badger (Meles meles which was systematically examined for the presence of chemical elements.

  18. On the discovery of artificial radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.; Trubert, D.

    1997-01-01

    A review is presented of the elegant Joliot-Curie physical experiments which showed for the first time the possibility of producing artificial radioactive nuclei. An attempt has been made to explain the results of their equally elegant chemical experiments that unequivocally demonstrated the chemical change of elements by nuclear processes. These experiments are discussed in the light of present-day radiochemistry, keeping in mind the scientific and historical context in which they were originally performed. (author)

  19. The effect of storage on Physical, Chemical and Bacteriological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Ten (10) different companies' water samples each of bottled water (B) and ... after storage as with other chemical element except that lead showed ... Although it is true that soil generally ... organic pollutants, heavy metals and radioactive.

  20. Influence of relativistic effect on chemical properties of element 104; Wplyw efektu relatywistycznego na wlasnosci chemiczne pierwiastka 104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilewicz, A.

    1997-12-31

    The influence of relativistic effect upon chemical properties of element 104 is discussed. An original method of measurements of adsorption on the surface of thin film of cobalt ferrocyanate was developed and applied for the studies of 104{sup 4+} hydrolysis. Results of this experiments indicate that in the Group 4 tendency to hydrolysis decreases in the order 104{sup 4+}>Zr{sup 4+}>Hf{sup 4+}. The results were explained on the basis of relativistic effect. Unexpected chemical properties of element 104 in aqueous solutions indicate, that due to relativistic effect element 104 differs distinctly from its congeners - Zr and Hf. In contrary it becomes similar to the lightest element in the Group, Ti, through atomic mass of latter is 213 unit less. (author). 119 refs, 22 figs, 7 tabs.

  1. Chromosome breakage at sites of oncogenes in a population accidentally exposed to radioactive chemical pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyinskikh, N.N.; IIlyinskikh, I.N.; Ilyinskikh, E.N.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the level of aberrations at fragile sites of chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes of the population of an area polluted with radionuclides, following an accident at the Siberian Chemical Plant (SCP). We carried out the micro-nucleus test to screen people with radiation-related cytogenetic effects. Of the 1246 examined inhabitants of the settlement of Samus, 148 showed a significantly increased frequency of micro-nucleated erythrocytes and were selected for the chromosome analysis as a radiation-exposed group. Additional analysis was carried out on 40 patients with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis with stage II-III epithelial dysplasia. Eighty six individuals from a non-polluted area were used as a control group. Chromosomal breaks and exchanges occurred preferentially in chromosomes 3 and 6 among radiation-exposed persons and patients. The regions 3p14-3p25 and 6p23 were damaged most often. There was a tendency towards preferential involvement at q21-q25 of chromosome 6 in patients with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis. Specific damage at certain chromosome sites was observed in the radiation-exposed population as well as in patients with gastric cancer. Most often this damage were located near oncogene loci which could imply that chromosome damage induced by radiation is likely to be a predisposing factor to the expression of oncogenes and malignant transformation of cells in exposed individuals. (author)

  2. Measurement of natural radioactivity in chemical fertilizer and agricultural soil: evidence of high alpha activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Bera, Sukumar; Sengupta, Rosalima; Patra, Kanchan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    People are exposed to ionizing radiation from the radionuclides that are present in different types of natural sources, of which phosphate fertilizer is one of the most important sources. Radionuclides in phosphate fertilizer belonging to 232Th and 238U series as well as radioisotope of potassium (40K) are the major contributors of outdoor terrestrial natural radiation. The study of alpha activity in fertilizers, which is the first ever in West Bengal, has been performed in order to determine the effect of the use of phosphate fertilizers on human health. The data have been compared with the alpha activity of different types of chemical fertilizers. The measurement of alpha activity in surface soil samples collected from the cultivated land was also performed. The sampling sites were randomly selected in the cultivated land in the Midnapore district, which is the largest district in West Bengal. The phosphate fertilizer is widely used for large agricultural production, mainly potatoes. The alpha activities have been measured using solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD), a very sensitive detector for alpha particles. The results show that alpha activity of those fertilizer and soil samples varies from 141 Bq/kg to 2,589 Bq/kg and from 109 Bq/kg to 660 Bq/kg, respectively. These results were used to estimate environmental radiation exposure on human health contributed by the direct application of fertilizers.

  3. Pilot scale study of a chemical treatment process for decontamination of aqueous radioactive waste of pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, F.; Hussain, M.; Ahmad, S.S.; Aslam, M.; Haq, E.U.

    2007-12-01

    Chemical treatment process for the low level liquid radioactive waste generated at PINSTECH was previously optimized on lab-scale making use of coprecipitation of hydrous oxides of iron in basic medium. Ferrous sulfate was used as coagulant. Batch wise application of this procedure on pilot scale has been tested on a 1200 L batch volume of typical PINSTECH liquid waste. Different parameters and unit operations have been evaluated. The required data for the construction of a small size treatment plant envisioned can be used for demonstration/teaching purpose as well as for the decontamination of the waste effluents of the Institute. The lab-scale process parameters were verified valid on pilot scale. It was observed that reagent doses can further be economized with out any deterioration of the Decontamination Factors (DF) achieved or of any other aspect of the process. This simple, cost- effective, DF-efficient and time-smart batch wise process could be coupled with an assortment of other treatment operations thus affording universal application. Observations recorded during this study are presented. (author)

  4. The chemical and microbial degradation of cellulose in the near field of a repository for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askarieh, M.M.; Chambers, A.V.; Daniel, F.B.D.; FitzGerald, P.L.; Holtom, G.J.; Pilkington, N.J.; Rees, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on one aspect of the calculations of risk in performance assessments of the deep disposal of radioactive wastes in the UK, namely the apparent contradiction regarding the representation of microbial activity in performance assessments of the release of gases and of dissolved radionuclides. A discussion is presented of the current understanding of the microbial and chemical degradation of cellulose. The assumptions made in recent performance assessment calculations of the Nirex disposal concept are then stated. For the release of gases, it was assumed that the complete conversion of cellulosic wastes to gases by the action of microbes, was, in principle, permitted. However, concerning migration of radionuclides by the groundwater pathway, all the cellulose was assumed to be converted to complexants that could increase the solubility and decrease the sorption of radionuclides in the near field. This contradiction in the approach of the groundwater and gas pathway assessments stems from the consistent need to provide a cautious approach in the face of uncertainty about the actual evolution of microbial activity in the repository. Therefore, no credit is currently taken for possible beneficial effects of the microbial destruction of complexants, whereas the complete conversion of cellulose to gaseous products is assumed

  5. Development of a SISAK extraction system for chemical studies of element 108, hassium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samadani, F.; Alstad, J.; Bjoernstad, T.; Stavsetra, L.; Omtvedt, J.P. [Oslo Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction system suitable for studies of chemical properties of Hs (element 108), in the form of HsO{sub 4}, was developed using {gamma}-emitting isotopes of its homologue Os. The system is targeted for the fast on-line extraction system SISAK, which operates in a continuous manner and is suitable for liquid-phase studies of transactinide elements. The distribution of OsO{sub 4} between various dilute NaOH solutions and toluene was studied. Both batch and SISAK on-line experiments were performed to develop an appropriate system. From analysis of the extraction curves equilibrium constants for the formation of the presumed complexes, Na[OsO{sub 4}(OH)] and Na{sub 2}[OsO{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}], were obtained: K{sub 1} = (1 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 4} and K{sub 2} = 12 {+-} 8, respectively. The SISAK system includes a liquid-scintillation detection system for {alpha} measurements. Due to quenching effects it is not possible to perform direct measurement of the aqueous phase {alpha}'s. Therefore, a two-stage extraction method that provides an indirect measurement of the activity in the aqueous phase was developed as part of the proposed system for Hs: Acidification of the raffinate from the first stage result in recovery of OsO{sub 4}, which is highly extractable into toluene. The yield of extraction in the second step, from 0.01 M NaOH solution after acidification with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution, was (90 {+-} 3)%. (orig.)

  6. Development of a SISAK extraction system for chemical studies of element 108, hassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samadani, F.; Alstad, J.; Bjoernstad, T.; Stavsetra, L.; Omtvedt, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction system suitable for studies of chemical properties of Hs (element 108), in the form of HsO 4 , was developed using γ-emitting isotopes of its homologue Os. The system is targeted for the fast on-line extraction system SISAK, which operates in a continuous manner and is suitable for liquid-phase studies of transactinide elements. The distribution of OsO 4 between various dilute NaOH solutions and toluene was studied. Both batch and SISAK on-line experiments were performed to develop an appropriate system. From analysis of the extraction curves equilibrium constants for the formation of the presumed complexes, Na[OsO 4 (OH)] and Na 2 [OsO 4 (OH) 2 ], were obtained: K 1 = (1 ± 0.5) x 10 4 and K 2 = 12 ± 8, respectively. The SISAK system includes a liquid-scintillation detection system for α measurements. Due to quenching effects it is not possible to perform direct measurement of the aqueous phase α's. Therefore, a two-stage extraction method that provides an indirect measurement of the activity in the aqueous phase was developed as part of the proposed system for Hs: Acidification of the raffinate from the first stage result in recovery of OsO 4 , which is highly extractable into toluene. The yield of extraction in the second step, from 0.01 M NaOH solution after acidification with H 2 SO 4 solution, was (90 ± 3)%. (orig.)

  7. Limitations on the concentration of radioactive elements substances (natural or enhanced by human activity) in building materials - a proposal for draft Israeli regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, T.; Hareuveny, R.; Margaliot, M.

    1997-01-01

    Natural radioactive elements 40 K 228 U and 232 Th and their decay product such as 226 Ra and its short lived daughters occur in building materials in relatively high concentrations. 40 K and part of the above mentioned radionuclides cause external exposure while the inhalation of 222 Ra and its short lived progeny lead to internal exposure of the respiratory tract to alpha particles. In recent years there is a growing tendency to use new construction materials with naturally or technologically enhanced levels of radioactivity (e.g. phosphogypsum, fly ash, exotic minerals etc). This trend causes a growing health concern.The result of this concern is legislation activity and publication of guidance notes by national authorities and international professional organizations related to the radiological implications of these novel technologies. The Ministry of the Environment in Israel is authorized by Israeli legislation to control the exposure of the public to ionising radiation. The ministry asked in 1996 a professional group in the Radiation Protection Division in the Soreq NRC (the authors of this presentation) to study the radiological implications of the use of building materials with naturally or technologically enhanced concentrations of radioactive substances, and to submit draft regulations setting primary limits on excess exposure of the public to ionizing radiation from building materials, and derived limits related to concentrations of specific radionuclides in these materials.The draft regulations will be presented and the way of their derivation will be reviewed (authors)

  8. Application of INAA for chemical quality control analysis of C-C composite and high purity graphite by determining trace elemental concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, Amol D.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Acharya, R.; Venugopalan, Ramani

    2015-01-01

    Carbon based materials like graphite and C-C composites are used for various scientific and technological applications. Owing to its low neutron capture cross section and good moderating properties, graphite is used as a moderator or reflector in nuclear reactors. For high temperature reactors like CHTR, graphite and C-C composites are proposed as structural materials. Studies are in progress to use C-C composites as prospective candidate instead of graphite due to their excellent mechanical and thermal properties. The advantage of carbon-carbon composite is that the microstructure and the properties can be tailor made. Impurities like rare earth elements and neutron poisons which have high neutron absorption cross section and elements whose activation products of have longer half-lives like 60 Co (5.27 y), 65 Zn (244.3 d) and 59 Fe (44.5 d) are not desired in structural materials. For chemical quality control (CQC) it is necessary to evaluate accurately the impurity concentrations using a suitable non-destructive analytical technique. In the present work, two carbon/carbon composite samples and two high purity graphite samples were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using high-flux reactor neutrons. Samples, sealed in Al foil, were irradiated in tray-rod position of Dhruva reactor, BARC at a neutron flux of ∼ 5 x 10 13 cm -2 s -1 . Radioactive assay was carried out using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry using 40% HPGe detector

  9. Determination of chemical state of Al doping element in ZnO layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, A.; Toth, J.; Lovics, R.; Takats, V.; Hakl, J.; Vad, K.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Transparent and conducting oxides (TCO) thin films are very important from the scientific and technological point of view. The coexistence of electrical conductivity and optical transparency in these materials makes it possible to use them in modern technologies: transparent electrodes for flat panel displays and photovoltaic cells, low emissivity windows, transparent thin films transistors, light emitting diodes. One of the important TCO semiconductors is the impurity-doped zinc-oxide (ZnO) layer, for example aluminium doped zinc-oxide layer (AZO), due to its unique physical and chemical properties. It has wide band gap (3.44 eV) and large exciton binding energy (60 meV). ZnO thin layers have a great interest for potential applications in optical and optoelectronic devices. Furthermore, high quality single crystal ZnO wafers has already been available as a result of new developments in ZnO growth technologies with the capability to scale up wafer size, which is an important factor for increasing efficiency of solar cells. Nonetheless, in order to enable the use of ZnO layers with enhanced electrical properties, higher conductivities can be obtained by doping with donor elements such as aluminium, gallium, indium, boron or fluorine. Investigation of p-type doping possibilities, diffusion processes and thermal stability of these layers are in the focus of interest in the interpretation of their optical and electrical properties, and the prediction of their lifetime. In our SNMS/SIMS-XPS laboratory, experiments on TCO layered structures were carried on. Depth profile and chemical state analyses of ZnO/AlO/ZnO layered structures were performed by Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The samples were produced by atomic layer deposition technique with the following layered structure: between a few hundred atomic layers of ZnO was an AlO atomic layer. The SNMS was used for depth

  10. Hard X-ray Microscopy with Elemental, Chemical and Structural Contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, C.G.; Boye, P.; Feldkamp, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    We review hard X-ray microscopy techniques with a focus on scanning microscopy with synchrotron radiation. Its strength compared to other microscopies is the large penetration depth of hard x rays in matter that allows one to investigate the interior of an object without destructive sample preparation. In combination with tomography, local information from inside of a specimen can be obtained, even from inside special non-ambient sample environments. Different X-ray analytical techniques can be used to produce contrast, such as X-ray absorption, fluorescence, and diffraction, to yield chemical, elemental, and structural information about the sample, respectively. This makes X-ray microscopy attractive to many fields of science, ranging from physics and chemistry to materials, geo-, and environmental science, biomedicine, and nanotechnology. Our scanning microscope based on nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses has a routine spatial resolution of about 100 nm and supports the contrast mechanisms mentioned above. In combination with coherent X-ray diffraction imaging, the spatial resolution can be improved to the 10 nm range. The current state-of-the-art of this technique is illustrated by several examples, and future prospects of the technique are given. (author)

  11. Plant absorption of trace elements in sludge amended soils and correlation with soil chemical speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torri, Silvana, E-mail: torri@agro.uba.ar [Catedra de Fertilidad y Fertilizantes, Facultad de Agronomia, UBA, Avda San Martin 4453, Buenos Aires (C1417 DSE) (Argentina); Lavado, Raul [Catedra de Fertilidad y Fertilizantes, Facultad de Agronomia, UBA, Avda San Martin 4453, Buenos Aires (C1417 DSE) (Argentina)

    2009-07-30

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Lolium perenne L. uptake of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in sludge amended soils and soil availability of these elements assessed by soil sequential extraction. A greenhouse experiment was set with three representative soils of the Pampas Region, Argentina, amended with sewage sludge and sewage sludge enriched with its own incinerated ash. After the stabilization period of 60 days, half of the pots were sampled for soil analysis; the rest of the pots were sown with L. perenne and harvested 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks after sowing, by cutting just above the soil surface. Cadmium and Pb concentrations in aerial tissues of L. perenne were below detection limits, in good agreement with the soil fractionation study. Copper and Zn concentration in the first harvest were significantly higher in the coarse textured soil compared to the fine textured soil, in contrast with soil chemical speciation. In the third harvest, there was a positive correlation between Cu and Zn concentration in aerial biomass and soil fractions usually considered of low availability. We conclude that the most available fractions obtained by soil sequential extraction did not provide the best indicator of Cu and Zn availability to L. perenne.

  12. Plant absorption of trace elements in sludge amended soils and correlation with soil chemical speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torri, Silvana; Lavado, Raul

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Lolium perenne L. uptake of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in sludge amended soils and soil availability of these elements assessed by soil sequential extraction. A greenhouse experiment was set with three representative soils of the Pampas Region, Argentina, amended with sewage sludge and sewage sludge enriched with its own incinerated ash. After the stabilization period of 60 days, half of the pots were sampled for soil analysis; the rest of the pots were sown with L. perenne and harvested 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks after sowing, by cutting just above the soil surface. Cadmium and Pb concentrations in aerial tissues of L. perenne were below detection limits, in good agreement with the soil fractionation study. Copper and Zn concentration in the first harvest were significantly higher in the coarse textured soil compared to the fine textured soil, in contrast with soil chemical speciation. In the third harvest, there was a positive correlation between Cu and Zn concentration in aerial biomass and soil fractions usually considered of low availability. We conclude that the most available fractions obtained by soil sequential extraction did not provide the best indicator of Cu and Zn availability to L. perenne.

  13. Selected elements and organic chemicals in bed sediment and fish tissue of the Tualatin River basin, Oregon, 1992-96

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, Bernadine A.

    1999-01-01

    A variety of elements and organic compounds have entered the environment as a result of human activities. Such substances find their way to aquatic sediments from direct discharges to waterways, atmospheric emissions, and runoff. Some of these chemicals are known to harm fish or wildlife, either by direct toxicity, by reducing viability, or by limiting reproductive success. In aquatic systems, sediments become the eventual sink for most of these chemicals. Analyzing the sediments provides a first step in a chemical inventory that can lead to an assessment of potential biological impacts (Kennicutt and others, 1994).

  14. Experimental results on salt concrete for barrier elements made of salt concrete in a repository for radioactive waste in a salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsch, Alex-W.; Preuss, Juergen; Mauke, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The Bartensleben rock salt mine in Germany was used as a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste from 1971 to 1991 and from 1994 to 1998. The repository with an overall volume of about 6 million m 3 has to be closed. Salt concrete is used for the refill of the voids of the repository. The concrete mixtures contain crushed salt instead of natural aggregates as the void filling material should be as similar to the salt rock as possible. Very high requirements regarding low heat development and little or even no cracking during concrete hardening had to be fulfilled even for the barrier elements made from salt concrete which separate the radioactive waste from the environment. Requirements for the salt concrete were set up with regard to the fluidity of the fresh concrete during the hardening process and its durability. In the view of a comprehensive numerical calculations of the temperature development and thermal stresses in the massive salt concrete elements of the backfill of the voids, experimental results for material properties of the salt concrete are presented: mixture of the salt concrete, thermodynamic properties (adiabatic heat release, thermal dilatation, thermal conductivity and heat capacity), mechanical short term properties, creep (under tension, under compression), autogenous shrinkage

  15. Data base for a site specific migration analysis of radioactive elements from a final repository. Datenbasis fuer eine standortspezifische Ausbreitungsanalyse radioaktiver Elemente aus einem Endlager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadermann, J

    1981-11-01

    Migration analysis is of considerable importance in long-term safety analysis of radioactive waste repositories. In a first step our plans are to calculate transport of radionuclides using data - as far as possible - for an undisturbed hydrogeology. Thereby a reference case is defined. In a later step, possible events and processes can be considered leading to a deviation from the reference case. The present work gives the data base for a selected part of a comprehensive geosphere transport calculation. We restrict ourselves to a critical evaluation of parameters pertinent to the migration analysis of the /sup 245/Cm chain. This includes the important nuclide /sup 237/Np. For the first time we are able to perform a site specific calculation for repositories planned in deep geologic formations in Switzerland. The well known fact that the data basis is extremely sparse is pointed out once more and concretized in detail.

  16. Understanding the Idea of Chemical Elements and Their Periodic Classification in Spanish Students Aged 16-18 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio-Joaquín; Oliva-Martínez, José María; Almoraima Gil, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    The work reported here involved a comparative study regarding the understanding that high school students (16-18 years) have of the concept of chemical elements and their periodic classification. More specifically, the level of knowledge on this topic was compared before and after the completion of baccalaureate studies in a sample of Spanish…

  17. Review of the microbiological, chemical and radiolytic degradation of organic material likely to be present in intermediate level and low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, B.F.; Rosevear, A.; Williams, S.J.

    1990-11-01

    A review has been made of the microbiological, chemical and radiolytic degradation of the solid organic materials likely to be present in intermediate-level and low-level radioactive wastes. Possible interactions between the three routes for degradation are also discussed. Attention is focussed on the generation of water-soluble degradation products which may form complexes with radioelements. The effects of complexation on radioelement solubility and sorption are considered. Recommendations are made for areas of further research. (author)

  18. Study on the distribution of radioactive trace elements in vitamin D-overloaded rats using the multitracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirunuma, Rieko; Enomoto, Shuichi; Ambe, Fumitoshi; Endo, Kazutoyo; Ambe, Shizuko

    1999-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of radioisotopes of beryllium, calcium, scandium, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, zinc, gallium, arsenic, strontium and barium in vitamin D (VD)-overloaded rats were investigated and compared with those in control rats, using the multitracer technique. Each element revealed its characteristic distribution among various organs in control and VD-overloaded rats. For some elements, such as cobalt and chromium, the distribution patterns in them were significantly different. These results are discussed in terms of the metabolism of the elements in rats

  19. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Coupled to Chemical Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    A new chemolithotrophic bacterial metabolism was discovered in anaerobic marine enrichment cultures. Cultures in defined medium with elemental sulfur (S0) and amorphous ferric hydroxide (FeOOH) as sole substrates showed intense formation of sulfate. Furthermore, precipitation of ferrous sulfide and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S0 was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O → SO42- + 3H2S + 2H+. Subsequent chemical reactions between the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO3. Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO2, instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant reduction of MnO2 to Mn2+. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO2, the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO42- and H2S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S0. The observed microbial disproportionation of S0 only proceeds significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S0 disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO2 was high, > 104 cm-3 in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic sulfide oxidation to sulfate in anoxic sediments. PMID:16348835

  20. Radioactive pollution of the Chernobyl cooling pond bottom sediments. I. Water-physical properties, chemical compound and radioactive pollution of pore water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Pirnach

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available First results of complex research of the Chernobyl cooling pond bottom sediments are presented. The general problematic is considered. Information about vertical distribution of bottom sediments water-physical properties, and also ionic compound and radioactive pollution 137Cs and 90Sr of pore water is received. The inventory of bottom sediments pore water activity is calculated. Strong correlations between concentration in pore water 137Cs, K +, NH4 + within the selected sediments columns are found out. Results of researches are intended for the forecast of radioecological situation change in the cooling pond water-soil complex during drying-up.

  1. Black poplar-tree (Populus nigra L.) bark as an alternative indicator of urban air pollution by chemical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlizov, A.N.; Malyuk, I.A.; Tryshyn, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Capabilities of black poplar-tree (Populus nigra L.) bark as a biomonitor of atmospheric air pollution by chemical elements were tested against epiphytic lichens Xanthoria parietina (L.) and Physcia adscendens (Fr.). Concentrations of 40 macro and trace elements were determined using epicadmium and instrumental NAA. The data obtained were processed using non-parametric tests. A good correlation was found between concentrations of majority of elements in bark and lichens. On the accumulation capability bark turned out to be competitive with both lichens examined. The main inorganic components of black poplar-tree bark were revealed. A substrate influence on the concentrations of some elements in epiphytic lichens was established. An optimized procedure of bark pre-irradiation treatment was suggested. (author)

  2. Chemical portioning and speciation of some trace elements in soil and street dust from Khartoum state, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Amel Yousif

    2000-09-01

    In this study, surface soil and street dust samples were collected from Khartoum State, from areas exposed to industrial and traffic emission and from areas expected to be free from elemental emission to serve as control. Samples were digested using wet digestion method to determine the total concentration of Na, K, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb using Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer (Aas), X-Ray fluorescence and flame photometer. Also samples were chemically fractionated using chemical specification method, and the solutions analyzed using Aas to determine the chemical form of the elements. Quality assurance of the data was achieved through the analysis of certified reference material. The range of the total concentration for Na, K, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb are 400-5175, 220-4690, 0.07-315.25, 20-250, 2050.8-46000, 0.5-2305, 4.5-280, 9.5-6200 mg/kg respectively. results obtained agree with expected emission profile as inferred from the emitting source locations. Distribution of elements from emitting source locations and control samples in different chemical fractions was carried out, and the findings reinforced by enrichment factors calculations as well by the results obtained by statistical multi-variate analysis methods such as principle compared with previous literature.(Author)

  3. Determination of strontium in drinking water and consequences of radioactive elements present in drinking water for human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, M.B.; Stojanovic, M.D.; Pantelic, G.K.; Vuletic, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the analysis of strontium and uranium content in drinking water has been done, indirectly, according to the scale which originates from drinking water in water-supply system of the city of Belgrade. Gamaspectrometric analysis showed the presence of free natural radionuclide in low activities. The activity of 90Sr in scale which is 0.72±0.11 Bq/kg was determined by radiochemical. Because of the small quantities of fur in the house heater this activity can be considered as irrelevant, but the accumulation of scale can have intensified influence. In this paper, the analysis of effects of the radioactive isotopes presence (first of all 238U and 235U) in drinking water on human health has been done

  4. Dose and dose commitment calculations from groundwaterborne radio-active elements released from a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, U.

    1983-05-01

    The turnover of radioactive matter entering the biosphere with groundwater has been studied with regard to exposure and doses to critical groups and populations. Two main recipients, a well and a lake, have been considered for the inflow of groundwaterborne nuclides. Mathematical models of a set of coupled ecosystems on regional, intermediate and global levels have been used for calculations of doses. The intermediate system refers to the Baltic Sea. The mathematical treatment of the model is based upon compartment theory with first order kinetics and also includes products in decay chains. The time-dependent exposures have been studied for certain long-lived nuclides of radiological interest in waste from disposed fuel. Dose and dose commitment have been calculated for different episodes for inflow to the biosphere. (author)

  5. The Assessment of Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Generated From The Fuel Reprocessing Plant Using Chemical Coagulation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuncoro Arief, H; M Birmano, Dj

    1998-01-01

    Reprocessing of nuclear spent fuel produced 8 lot of radioactive liquid waste still bearing uranium and transuranium. The assessment of the radioactive liquid waste treatment with FeCI 3 as coagulant has been done. Decontamination factor and separation efficiency can be calculated from known activities of initial and post-treatment wastes. It can be concluded that some factors i.e. pH of treatment process, quantity of coagulant, mixing rate, and mixing time have influenced the treatment product

  6. Reconstruction of centennial-scale fluxes of chemical elements in the Australian coastal environment using seagrass archives

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar; Davis, Grace; Lavery, Paul S.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Martinez-Cortizas, Antonio; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Masqué , Pere; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Kendrick, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    The study of a Posidonia australis sedimentary archive has provided a record of changes in element concentrations (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Co, As, Cu, Ni and S) over the last 3000 years in the Australian marine environment. Human-derived contamination in Oyster Harbor (SW Australia) started ~. 100 years ago (AD ~. 1900) and exponentially increased until present. This appears to be related to European colonization of Australia and the subsequent impact of human activities, namely mining, coal and metal production, and extensive agriculture. Two contamination periods of different magnitude have been identified: Expansion period (EXP, AD ~. 1900-1970) and Establishment period (EST, AD ~. 1970 to present). Enrichments of chemical elements with respect to baseline concentrations (in samples older than ~. 115 cal. years BP) were found for all elements studied in both periods, except for Ni, As and S. The highest enrichment factors were obtained for the EST period (ranging from 1.3-fold increase in Cu to 7.2-fold in Zn concentrations) compared to the EXP period (1.1-fold increase for Cu and Cr to 2.4-fold increase for Pb). Zinc, Pb, Mn and Co concentrations during both periods were 2- to 7-fold higher than baseline levels. This study demonstrates the value of Posidonia mats as long-term archives of element concentrations and trends in coastal ecosystems. We also provide preliminary evidence on the potential for Posidonia meadows to act as significant long-term biogeochemical sinks of chemical elements.

  7. Reconstruction of centennial-scale fluxes of chemical elements in the Australian coastal environment using seagrass archives

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar

    2015-10-02

    The study of a Posidonia australis sedimentary archive has provided a record of changes in element concentrations (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Co, As, Cu, Ni and S) over the last 3000 years in the Australian marine environment. Human-derived contamination in Oyster Harbor (SW Australia) started ~. 100 years ago (AD ~. 1900) and exponentially increased until present. This appears to be related to European colonization of Australia and the subsequent impact of human activities, namely mining, coal and metal production, and extensive agriculture. Two contamination periods of different magnitude have been identified: Expansion period (EXP, AD ~. 1900-1970) and Establishment period (EST, AD ~. 1970 to present). Enrichments of chemical elements with respect to baseline concentrations (in samples older than ~. 115 cal. years BP) were found for all elements studied in both periods, except for Ni, As and S. The highest enrichment factors were obtained for the EST period (ranging from 1.3-fold increase in Cu to 7.2-fold in Zn concentrations) compared to the EXP period (1.1-fold increase for Cu and Cr to 2.4-fold increase for Pb). Zinc, Pb, Mn and Co concentrations during both periods were 2- to 7-fold higher than baseline levels. This study demonstrates the value of Posidonia mats as long-term archives of element concentrations and trends in coastal ecosystems. We also provide preliminary evidence on the potential for Posidonia meadows to act as significant long-term biogeochemical sinks of chemical elements.

  8. Evaluated and estimated solubility of some elements for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste using updated version of thermodynamic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Doi, Reisuke; Yoshida, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) established the thermodynamic database (JAEA-TDB) for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and TRU waste. Twenty-five elements which were important for the performance assessment of geological disposal were selected for the database. JAEA-TDB enhanced reliability of evaluation and estimation of their solubility through selecting the latest and the most reliable thermodynamic data at present. We evaluated and estimated solubility of the 25 elements in the simulated porewaters established in the 'Second Progress Report for Safety Assessment of Geological Disposal of HLW in Japan' using the JAEA-TDB and compared with those using the previous thermodynamic database (JNC-TDB). It was found that most of the evaluated and estimated solubility values were not changed drastically, but the solubility and speciation of dominant aqueous species for some elements using the JAEA-TDB were different from those using the JNC-TDB. We discussed about how to provide reliable solubility values for the performance assessment. (author)

  9. Thermodynamic stability of radioactivity standard solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iroulard, M.G.

    2007-04-01

    The basic requirement when preparing radioactivity standard solutions is to guarantee the concentration of a radionuclide or a radioelement, expressed in the form of activity concentration (Ac = A/m (Bq/g), with A: activity and m: mass of solution). Knowledge of the law of radioactive decay and the half-life of a radionuclide or radioelement makes it possible to determine the activity concentration at any time, and this must be confirmed subsequently by measurement. Furthermore, when radioactivity standard solutions are prepared, it is necessary to establish optimal conditions of thermodynamic stability of the standard solutions. Radioactivity standard solutions are prepared by metrology laboratories from original solutions obtained from a range of suppliers. These radioactivity standard solutions must enable preparation of liquid and/or solid radioactivity standard sources of which measurement by different methods can determine, at a given instant, the activity concentration of the radionuclide or radioelement present in the solution. There are a number of constraints associated with the preparation of such sources. Here only those that relate to the physical and chemical properties of the standard solution are considered, and therefore need to be taken into account when preparing a radioactivity standard solution. These issues are considered in this document in accordance with the following plan: - A first part devoted to the chemical properties of the solutions: - the solubilization media: ultra-pure water and acid media, - the carriers: concentration, oxidation state of the radioactive element and the carrier element. - A second part describing the methodology of the preparation, packaging and storage of standard solutions: - glass ampoules: the structure of glasses, the mechanisms of their dissolution, the sorption phenomenon at the solid-solution interface, - quartz ampoules, - cleaning and packaging: cleaning solutions, internal surface coatings and

  10. Thermodynamic stability of radioactivity standard solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iroulard, M.G

    2007-04-15

    The basic requirement when preparing radioactivity standard solutions is to guarantee the concentration of a radionuclide or a radioelement, expressed in the form of activity concentration (Ac = A/m (Bq/g), with A: activity and m: mass of solution). Knowledge of the law of radioactive decay and the half-life of a radionuclide or radioelement makes it possible to determine the activity concentration at any time, and this must be confirmed subsequently by measurement. Furthermore, when radioactivity standard solutions are prepared, it is necessary to establish optimal conditions of thermodynamic stability of the standard solutions. Radioactivity standard solutions are prepared by metrology laboratories from original solutions obtained from a range of suppliers. These radioactivity standard solutions must enable preparation of liquid and/or solid radioactivity standard sources of which measurement by different methods can determine, at a given instant, the activity concentration of the radionuclide or radioelement present in the solution. There are a number of constraints associated with the preparation of such sources. Here only those that relate to the physical and chemical properties of the standard solution are considered, and therefore need to be taken into account when preparing a radioactivity standard solution. These issues are considered in this document in accordance with the following plan: - A first part devoted to the chemical properties of the solutions: - the solubilization media: ultra-pure water and acid media, - the carriers: concentration, oxidation state of the radioactive element and the carrier element. - A second part describing the methodology of the preparation, packaging and storage of standard solutions: - glass ampoules: the structure of glasses, the mechanisms of their dissolution, the sorption phenomenon at the solid-solution interface, - quartz ampoules, - cleaning and packaging: cleaning solutions, internal surface coatings and

  11. Radioactivity of long-lived nuclides in the primary circuit of the reactor BOR-60 during operation with defective fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryazev, V.M.; Kizin, V.D.; Lisitsyn, E.S.; Polyakov, V.I.; Chechetkin, Y.V.

    1978-06-01

    The summarized results of measurements of the enrichment and distribution of radioactive nuclides from corrosion and of fission products during the four years of operation of BOR-60, including a longer period of operation with detective fuel elements in the core, are presented. It is shown that for operation with approximately 1% leaking fuel rods radiation exposure becomes worse manily because of release and enrichment of cesium isotopes in the coolant. Of the other fission products, the largest contribution to the dose rate in pipework and components is given by 140 Ba / 140 La and 95 Nb. On operation with 0.1 to 0.2% of leaking fuel rods, this contribution is comparable to that of the corrosion products 60 Co and 54 Mn. The radioactivity of corrosion products in the circuit has not increased within the last three years and was about one order of magnitude lower than the theoretical values. The corrosion and fission products are nonuniformly distributed over the circuit. Concentration of 95 Nb and 60 Co in the pipe for 'cold' sodium is larger by a factor of 2 - 5 and of 140 Ba and 54 Mn by a factor of 10-20 than in the pipes for 'hot' sodium. Most of the cobalt was found to deposit in the heat exchanges. The effectiveness of emptying the pipes from coolant in order to reduce the dose sate is assessed. (orig.) [de

  12. Main Achievements 2003-2004 - Interdisciplinary Research - Radiation detection methods for health, earth and environmental sciences - Natural radioactive elements in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Research on natural radioactive elements in the environment has been conducted. The main activities are focused on measurements of isotopes arising from natural radioactive series (especially radon). In 2004, the first two parts of survey within the frame of scientific cooperation between ''Vinca'' Institute and IFJ PAN were completed. Field measurements were carried out in Niska Banja Spa (Serbia and Montenegro). In this region extremely high radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations in soil gas, to above 2 000 kBq/m 3 ., very high values of radon exhalation rates (1,5 Bq/m 2 s) and radon concentration in water samples (> 500 Bq/l) were observed. Indoor radon concentrations in some houses exceeded 10 kBq/m 3 . A special model and computer code were developed for calculating and visualising radon distribution and its migration into houses (PhD thesis). At the Radon Study Field located in IFJ PAN, the influence of different parameters on the radon exhalation process are studied and changes of radon concentration in soil are investigated. The natural radiation level plays an important role in low background gamma spectroscopy. Long-term measurements of the gamma background level are being performed and their changes (e.g., post-Chernobyl or solar activity induced) studied

  13. Development of the chemical stabilization and solidification process for the treatment of radioactive raffinate sludges at the DOE Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, P.M.; Kakaria, V.; Enger, J.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical Solidification and Stabilization (CSS) is the mixing of chemical reagents with waste to solidify and chemically stabilize the contaminated material. The resulting product is resistant to leaching of certain contaminants. CSS treatment using Class C fly ash and Portland cement was chosen as the most feasible method for treatment of the chemically and radioactively contaminated sludge (raffinate) contained in raffinate pits on the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) located outside of St. Louis, Missouri. Due to the uniqueness of the material, substantial bench-scale testing was performed on the raffinate to better understand its properties. Similarly, due to mixed results in the application of CSS treatment to radioactive materials, a pilot-scale testing facility was built to verify bench testing results and to establish and quantify design parameters for the full-scale CSS production facility. This paper discusses the development of the pilot-scale testing facility, the testing plan, and the results of the testing activities. Particular attention has been given to the applicability of the CSS treatment method and to the value of pilot-scale testing

  14. Study on expanding the capability of laboratory and maintaining the accredited status of VILAS 524 at the Institute of Radioactive and Rare Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Kim Dung; Le Hong Minh; Doan Thanh Son; Nguyen Thi Lien; Do Thi Anh Tuyet; Nguyen Thi Men; Do Van Thuan

    2015-01-01

    The study to expand the VILAS activities in the field of uranium and rare earth ores as well as environmental samples on addition of accredited test methods has been implemented in VILAS 524. The maintenance of all routine activities at VILAS 524 laboratory (Center for Analytical Chemistry-Institute for Technology of Radioactive and Rare Elements) to comply with TCVN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 has been carried out regularly after the certificate of VILAS 524 was issued. The annual audit by the experts from BOA (Bureau of Accreditation) has been applied to VILAS 524 in order to control the compliance of VILAS activities with ISO standard and the renew of VILAS certificate up to 2017 was issued. (author)

  15. Elaboration of y-fanjasite catalysts containing radioactive elements such as uranyl ion in order to obtain aromatic solvents and heavy amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nibou, D.

    1990-06-01

    The present work has shown the possibility of ammonia alkylation by n-octanol-l in gaseous phase, in presence of zeolitic catalysts. These catalysts are Y faujasitic types being used in waste water demineralization containing radioactive elements such as uranyl ion. This ion gives to the Y faujasite similar activity and selectivity as those of catalysts containing rare earths or transition metals. Toluene disproportionation has permitted to test beforehand catalysts destined to ammonia alkylation and to compare their mechanism. We have also proved the possibility to produce heavy amines such as tertiary amines which are used as uranium extractant agent. Some zeolites such as ZSM-5, beta, X, A, analcime, HS and Y faujasite type are prepared by hydrothermal synthesis method and characterized by some analysis techniques

  16. Sampling procedure in a willow plantation for chemical elements important for biomass combustion quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Na; Nielsen, Henrik Kofoed; Jørgensen, Uffe

    2015-01-01

    clone ‘Tordis’, and to reveal the relationship between sampling position, shoot diameters, and distribution of elements. Five Tordis willow shoots were cut into 10–50 cm sections from base to top. The ash content and concentration of twelve elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, and Zn......Willow (Salix spp.) is expected to contribute significantly to the woody bioenergy system in the future, so more information on how to sample the quality of the willow biomass is needed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the spatial variation of elements within shoots of a willow......) in each section were determined. The results showed large spatial variation in the distribution of most elements along the length of the willow shoots. Concentrations of elements in 2-year old shoots of the willow clone Tordis were fairly stable within the range of 100–285 cm above ground and resembled...

  17. Radium, thorium, and the light rare earth elements in soils and vegetables grown in an area of high natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsalata, P.; Franca, E.P.; Sachett, I.

    1987-01-01

    A study is in progress in Brazil to assess the soil-to-plant concentration ratios (CR) of the naturally occurring radionuclides 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 232 Th, 230 Th, and 228 Th and the light rare earth elements (REE) La, Ce, and Nd. Thorium serves as an analog for Pu(IV) and La or Nd as analogs for Am and Cm(III). A near-surface deposit of Th (∼30,000 tons) and REE (>100,000 tons) exists at the center of the plateau near the summit of a small hill. No trends have been observed between farm soil concentrations and proximity to the ore body, substantiating earlier conclusions of the relative immobility of these elements from the deposit. New analytical procedures are presented for the sequential determination of isotopic thorium and the light REE in large biological samples. Typical radiochemical yields are 50 to 70% for Th and 80 to 100% for the REE. Preliminary analyses of seven vegetable types indicate that concentrations of Th, La, Nd, Ce, and Sm are quite variable between and among species. Average concentrations in plant tissues generally reflect soil abundances as: Ce > La > Nd > Sm ∼ Th. Mean CRs are 604, 270, 24, 17, 8 and 1 for 228 Ra, 226 Ra, La, Nd, Ce, and Th, respectively. Plant uptake of elements with stable oxidation states of II, III, and IV decreases as Ra(II) > REE(III) > Th(IV), which may reflect the availability of these elements in soil. 33 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  18. Behaviour of metallic and radioactive elements in lagoonal sediments: the example of the Canet-St Nazaire Pond (Mediterranean Coast)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernat, M.; Chassefiere, B.; Cauwet, G.; Faguet, D.; Gadel, F.; Monaco, A.; Ouakad, M.; Thommeret, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and radionuclides (U, Th, Pb, Ra) was studied in water, suspensions and sediments of an euxinic lagoonal environment of the French Mediterranean coast. The dynamic of these elements at the sediment-water interface is considered particularly in relation to the redox conditions, the nature of inorganic and organic supports and the sedimentation rate. (author)

  19. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis applied to the study of chemical element accumulation in organs of Rhinella schneideri (Werner, 1894)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardini Junior, Claudiney; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai, E-mail: lis@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Santos, Katarine M. Barbosa; Silva Neto, Luiz J. da; Santos, Robson A. dos; Silva, Karolayne E.M.; França, Elvis J. de, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (DIAMB/CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Div. de Monitoração Ambiental

    2017-07-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) is a multielementar technique with high sensitivity, and can be applied to study small samples. Therefore, this research proposes using the INAA for quantifying the accumulation of chemical elements in organs of anuran amphibians Rhinella schneideri (Werner, 1894). Male individuals were collected on areas with anthropogenic influence close to water resources on the campus of ESALQ/USP in 2009. The animals were sacrificed in a cold chamber and dissected to separate their kidneys, livers, lungs and skins. After cleaning, the organs were lyophilized and pulverized. Samples weighing from 200 to 500 mg were placed in polyethylene capsules to be irradiated. The INAA technique, based on the bombardment of samples with neutrons for the production of radionuclides, was applied using the Nuclear Research Reactor of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute. Portions of certified reference materials were used to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure. The mass fractions were quantified by the k0 method, and the results indicated differences among the As, Br, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, Sc, Se and Zn concentrations in the analyzed organs. Therefore, it was possible to calculate the bioaccumulation indexes relative to these chemical elements for the species. In addition, it was possible to infer the contamination pathways: As, Br, Co, Cr and Se by ingestion and Co, Fe, Hg, Sc and Zn by contact, which corroborated the usage of R. schneideri anuran as a biomonitor of chemical elements. (author)

  20. Determination of chemical elements in africanized Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae honey samples from the State of Piauí, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geni da Silva Sodré

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Honey is a food used since the most remote times, appreciated for its characteristic flavor, considerable nutritional value and medicinal properties; however, little information exists about the presence of chemical elements in it. The objectives of this work were to determine the chemical elements present in 38 honey samples, collected directly from beekeepers from the State of Piauí, Brazil and to verify whether they presented any contamination. The chemical elements were determined by means of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence. The means of three replicates were: K (109.671 ± 17.487, Ca (14.471 ± 3.8797, Ti (0.112 ± 0.07, Cr (0.196 ± 0.11, Mn (0.493 ± 0.103, Fe (1.722 ± 0.446, Co (0.038, Ni (0.728 ± 0.706, Cu (0.179 ± 0.0471, Zn (0.967 ± 0.653, Se (not detected, Br (not detected, Rb (0.371 ± 0.097, Sr (0.145 ± 0.45, Ba (11.681, Hg (not detected, and Pb (0.863 µg g-1.