WorldWideScience

Sample records for radical trap treatment

  1. Free radicals trapped in polyethylene matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, S.; Maeda, M.; Hori, Y.; Kashiwabara, H.

    1977-01-01

    Two types of alkyl radicals were found to be trapped in irradiated crystals grown from polyethylene solution. One of them corresponds to the broad sextet pattern of the e.s.r. spectrum and the other corresponds to the sharp sextet pattern. The free radicals attributed to the broad sextet began to disappear at a lower temperature than the temperature at which the free radicals attributed to the sharp sextet disappeared. When butadiene molecules were brought into contact with the specimen, the decay of the free radicals corresponding to the broad sextet was accelerated. When the specimen was subjected to fuming nitric acid treatment, no broad sextet was observed. The mat of the crystals was aligned so that the c-axes of its crystallites were perpendicular to its surface. The broad sextet showed no anisotropy when the angle between the direction of applied magnetic field and that of the c-axis of the crystallite was varied. On the other hand, the sharp component of the spectrum showed apparent anisotropy. It can be concluded that the broad component comes from the free radicals trapped in the lamellar surface and the sharp component is attributed to the free radicals trapped in the inner part of the crystallite. (author)

  2. EPR spin trapping of protein radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, Clare Louise

    2004-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping was originally developed to aid the detection of low-molecular-mass radicals formed in chemical systems. It has subsequently found widespread use in biology and medicine for the direct detection of radical species formed during oxidative stress...... tumbling radicals are often broad and relatively poor in distinctive features, a number of techniques have been developed that allow a wealth of information to be obtained about the nature, site, and reactions of such radicals. This article summarizes recent developments in this area and reviews selected...... examples of radical formation on proteins....

  3. HPLC-ESR techniques for detection of complex trapped radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Tiecheng; Dong Jirong; Lin Nianyun; Xie Leidong; Liu Rengzhong

    1992-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ESR combined examination of radical species is an advanced techniques for separation and identification of complex radical species. At SRCL, Waters 990 HPLC has been used to separate the complex trapped radicals and Varian E-112 ESR spectrometer to record the spectra of single trapped radicals after HPLC separation. The advantages of the combined techniques are described as bellow: HPLC is used to separate the long-lived complex trapped radicals derived from reaction of short-lived radicals with spin trap. ESR spectra from single trapped radicals, obtained following HPLC separation of complex trapped radicals, are recorded one by one and well resolved. The structures of short-lived radicals can be inferred from the ESR spectra of the long-lived trapped radicals

  4. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of irradiated Kampo extracts using ESR spin-trap method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Yui; Kawamura, Shoei; Ukai, Mitsuko; Nakamura, Hideo; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The radical scavenging activity (RSA) of 13 kinds of γ-ray irradiated Kampo extracts were studied by ESR spin-trap method. The RSA against alkoxy radical and hydroxyl radical were measured using new spin trapping reagent CYPMPO. The RSA against these two radicals were evaluated using GSH for alkoxy RSA and L-ascorbic acid for hydroxy RSA as a standard antioxidant reagent. We revealed that a few Kampo extracts showed high RSA against alkoxy radical and also hydroxy radical. This RSA of Kampo extracts was changed by γ-ray irradiation treatment. Using ESR spin-trap method, it is concluded that the effect of radiation treatment on RSA of Kampo extracts were able to detect. (author)

  5. ESR study on free radicals trapped in crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Seguchi, Tadao

    1997-01-01

    Free radicals in crosslinked PTFE which formed by 60 Co γ-rays irradiation at 77 K and at room temperature were studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The crosslinked PTFE specimens with different crosslinking density were prepared by electron beam irradiation in the molten state. The ESR spectra observed in the irradiated crosslinked PTFE are much different from those in non-crosslinked PTFE (virgin); a broad singlet component increases with increasing the crosslinking density, G-value of radicals is much higher in crosslinked PTFE than in non-crosslinked one. Free radicals related to the broad component are trapped in the non-crystalline region of crosslinked PTFE and rather stable at room temperature, whereas radicals trapped in amorphous non-crosslinked PTFE are unstable at room temperature. It is thought that most of free radicals trapped in the crosslinked PTFE are formed in the crosslinked amorphous region. The trapped radicals decays around 383 K (110 o C) due to the molecular motion of α-relaxation. (Author)

  6. Detection of free radicals by radical trapping and 15N NMR spectroscopy in copolymerization of methyl acrylate and styrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelemen, P.; Klumperman, B.

    2003-01-01

    The macroradicals taking part in the copolymn. of Me acrylate and styrene were trapped by reaction with a 15N labeled stable nitroxyl radical at 70 DegC. The nitroxyl radical is formed in situ from a thermally instable alkoxyamine precursor. 15N NMR spectroscopy is applied to detect the trapping

  7. IN VIVO EVIDENCE OF FREE RADICAL FORMATION AFTER ASBESTOS INSTILLATION: AN ESR SPIN TRAPPING INVESTIGATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been postulated that the in vivo toxicity of asbestos results from its catalysis of free radical generation. We examined in vivo radical production using electron spin resonance (ESR) coupled with the spin trap alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (4-POBN); 180 d...

  8. Trichloroethylene Radicals: An EPR/SPIN Trapping Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steel-Goodwin, Linda

    1995-01-01

    .... As part of the process to develop environmental and health effects criteria for base clean-up the initial radicals produced by TCE were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR...

  9. Spin Trapping Radicals from Lipid Oxidation in Liposomes in the Presence of Flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, N.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions of four structurally related flavonoids - quercetin, rutin, morin and catechin with peroxyl radicals using liposome/N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) and liposome -(4-pyridyl-N-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN)-spin trap systems have been studied through spin trapping ESR. Results obtained were different from that of conjugated diene analysis experiments, where lag phases indicated radical scavenging activity of all the flavonoids. No clear lag phase was observed in ESR experiments under same conditions. In the presence of flavonoids decreasing ESR signals of spin adducts in PBN, while no or negligibly smaller spin adducts with POBN system were observed which may be attributed to the possibility that spin traps interacted with free radicals. Experiments with buffer/spin trap systems without liposome revealed that spin adducts were only stable with catechin and destroyed by quercetin, rutin and morin in buffer/spin trap systems. These results further assured that quercetin, rutin and morin not only interacted with peroxyl radicals but also with spin adducts. (author)

  10. Electron spin resonance of spin-trapped radicals of amines and polyamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossoba, M.M.; Rosenthal, Ionel; Riesz, Peter

    1982-01-01

    The reactions of hydroxyl radicals with methylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine, diethylamine, sec-butylamine, ethylene-diamine, 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine, cadaverine, 1,7-diaminoheptane, ornithine, spermidine, spermine, agmatine, and arcaine in aqueous solutions have been investigated by spin-trapping and esr. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by the uv photolysis of H 2 O 2 and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) was used as the spin-trap. The effects of ionizing radiation on the same polyamines in the polycrystalline state were also investigated. The free radicals produced by ν-radiolysis of these solids at room temperature in the absence of air were identified by dissolution in aqueous solutions of MNP. The predominant reaction of OH radicals with amines and polyamines below pH 7 was the abstraction of hydrogen atoms from a carbon that is not adjacent to the protonated amino group. For agmatine and arcaine which contain guanidinium groups abstraction occurred from the α-CH. Dimethylamine was oxidized to the dimethylnitroxyl radical by H 2 O 2 in the dark. ν-Radiolysis of polyamines in the polycrystalline state generated radicals due to H-abstraction from either the α-Ch or from a carbon atom in the middle of the alkyl chain. The deamination radical was obtained from ornithine

  11. Iron-chelating agents never suppress Fenton reaction but participate in quenching spin-trapped radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linxiang; Abe, Yoshihiro; Kanagawa, Kiyotada; Shoji, Tomoko; Mashino, Tadahiko; Mochizuki, Masataka; Tanaka, Miho; Miyata, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical formation by Fenton reaction in the presence of an iron-chelating agent such as EDTA was traced by two different assay methods; an electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), and high Performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence detection with terephthalic acid (TPA), a fluorescent probe for hydroxyl radicals. From the ESR spin-trapping measurement, it was observed that EDTA seemed to suppress hydroxyl radical formation with the increase of its concentration. On the other hand, hydroxyl radical formation by Fenton reaction was not affected by EDTA monitored by HPLC assay. Similar inconsistent effects of other iron-chelating agents such as nitrylotriacetic acid (NTA), diethylenetriamine penta acetic acid (DTPA), oxalate and citrate were also observed. On the addition of EDTA solution to the reaction mixture 10 min after the Fenton reaction started, when hydroxyl radical formation should have almost ceased but the ESR signal of DMPO-OH radicals could be detected, it was observed that the DMPO-OH· signal disappeared rapidly. With the simultaneous addition of Fe(II) solution and EDTA after the Fenton reaction ceased, the DMPO-OH· signal disappeared more rapidly. The results indicated that these chelating agents should enhance the quenching of [DMPO-OH]· radicals by Fe(II), but they did not suppress Fenton reaction by forming chelates with iron ions

  12. Modification of dispersibility of nanodiamond by grafting of polyoxyethylene and by the introduction of ionic groups onto the surface via radical trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, I.; Hashimoto, K.; Fujiki, K.; Yamauchi, T.; Tsubokawa, N.

    2014-01-01

    To improve the dispersibility of polycrystalline nanodiamond (ND) in solvents, the grafting of polymers and introduction of ionic groups onto ND surface via radical trapping by ND surface were investigated. The grafting of polyoxyethylene (POE) onto ND surface by trapping of POE radicals formed by the thermal decomposition of POE macro azo-initiator (Azo-POE) was examined. The polymer radicals formed by the thermal decomposition of Azo-POE were successfully trapped by ND surface to give POE-grafted ND. The effect of temperature on the grafting of POE onto ND was discussed. In addition, the introduction of cationic protonated amidine groups onto ND was achieved by the trapping of radicals bearing protonated amidine groups formed by thermal decomposition of 2,2′-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine)dihydrochloride (AMPA). The anionic carboxylate groups was introduced onto ND surface by the trapping of the radicals bearing carboxyl groups formed by thermal decomposition of 4,4′-azobis(4-cyonovaleric acid) (ACVA) followed by the treatment with NaOH aqueous solution. The dispersibility of ND in water was remarkably improved by the grafting of POE, based on the steric hindrance of polymer chains and by the introduction of ionic groups, based on the ionic repulsion, onto ND surface. - Highlights: • Grafting of PEG onto nanodiamond was achieved by radical trapping. • Introduction of ionic groups onto nanodiamond was achieved by radical trapping. • Nanodiamond was dispersed by PEG grafting based on steric hindrance of PEG chains. • Nanodiamond was dispersed by introduction of ionic groups based on ionic repulsion

  13. Modification of dispersibility of nanodiamond by grafting of polyoxyethylene and by the introduction of ionic groups onto the surface via radical trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, I. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Hashimoto, K. [Department of Material Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-218 (Japan); Fujiki, K. [Department of Environmental Science, Niigata Institute of Technology, 1719, Fujihashi, Kashiwazaki, Niigata 945-1195 (Japan); Yamauchi, T. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Material Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-218 (Japan); Tsubokawa, N., E-mail: ntsuboka@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Material Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-218 (Japan)

    2014-02-14

    To improve the dispersibility of polycrystalline nanodiamond (ND) in solvents, the grafting of polymers and introduction of ionic groups onto ND surface via radical trapping by ND surface were investigated. The grafting of polyoxyethylene (POE) onto ND surface by trapping of POE radicals formed by the thermal decomposition of POE macro azo-initiator (Azo-POE) was examined. The polymer radicals formed by the thermal decomposition of Azo-POE were successfully trapped by ND surface to give POE-grafted ND. The effect of temperature on the grafting of POE onto ND was discussed. In addition, the introduction of cationic protonated amidine groups onto ND was achieved by the trapping of radicals bearing protonated amidine groups formed by thermal decomposition of 2,2′-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine)dihydrochloride (AMPA). The anionic carboxylate groups was introduced onto ND surface by the trapping of the radicals bearing carboxyl groups formed by thermal decomposition of 4,4′-azobis(4-cyonovaleric acid) (ACVA) followed by the treatment with NaOH aqueous solution. The dispersibility of ND in water was remarkably improved by the grafting of POE, based on the steric hindrance of polymer chains and by the introduction of ionic groups, based on the ionic repulsion, onto ND surface. - Highlights: • Grafting of PEG onto nanodiamond was achieved by radical trapping. • Introduction of ionic groups onto nanodiamond was achieved by radical trapping. • Nanodiamond was dispersed by PEG grafting based on steric hindrance of PEG chains. • Nanodiamond was dispersed by introduction of ionic groups based on ionic repulsion.

  14. Investigating free radical generation in HepG2 cells using immuno-spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, Yuya; Summers, Fiona A; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki; Mason, Ronald P

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress can induce the generation of free radicals, which are believed to play an important role in both physiological and pathological processes and a number of diseases such as cancer. Therefore, it is important to identify chemicals which are capable of inducing oxidative stress. In this study, we evaluated the ability of four environmental chemicals, aniline, nitrosobenzene (NB), N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) and N,N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline (DMNA), to induce free radicals and cellular damage in the hepatoma cell line HepG2. Cytotoxicity was assessed using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays and morphological changes were observed using phase contrast microscopy. Free radicals were detected by immuno-spin trapping (IST) in in-cell western experiments or in confocal microscopy experiments to determine the subcellular localization of free radical generation. DMNA induced free radical generation, LDH release and morphological changes in HepG2 cells whereas aniline, NB and DMA did not. Confocal microscopy showed that DMNA induced free radical generation mainly in the cytosol. Preincubation of HepG2 cells with N-acetylcysteine and 2,2'-dipyridyl significantly prevented free radical generation upon subsequent incubation with DMNA, whereas preincubation with apocynin and dimethyl sulfoxide did not. These results suggest that DMNA induces oxidative stress and that reactive oxygen species, metals and free radical generation play a critical role in DMNA-induced cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Detection and characterisation of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping and related methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy (also known as electron spin resonance, ESR, or electron magnetic resonance, EMR, spectroscopy) is often described as the “gold standard” for the detection and characterisation of radicals in chemical, biological and medical systems. The article...... reviews aspects of EPR spectroscopy and discusses how this methodology and related techniques can be used to obtain useful information from biological systems. Consideration is given to the direct detection of radicals, the use of spin traps and the detection of nitric oxide, and the advantages...

  16. Spin trapping of cyanoalkyl radicals in the liquid phase γ radiolysis of nitriles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, S.W.; Kevan, L.

    1976-01-01

    The following radicals have been identified in the liquid phase γ radiolysis of several nitriles by spin trapping with phenyl tert-butyl nitrone: CH 2 CN in acetonitrile, H and CH 3 CHCN(question) in propionitrile, CH(CN) 2 in malononitrile, and H, CN, and CH 2 CH 2 CN in succinonitrile. γ proton splittings are observed for the CH 2 CN and CH(CH) 2 spin adducts. The results are discussed in comparison with solid phase radiolysis data and with alkyl radical spin adduct splittings

  17. Use of a cocktail of spin traps for fingerprinting large range of free radicals in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Valérie; Charlier, Nicolas; Verrax, Julien; Buc-Calderon, Pedro; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that the formation of radical species centered on various atoms is involved in the mechanism leading to the development of several diseases or to the appearance of deleterious effects of toxic molecules. The detection of free radical is possible using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and the spin trapping technique. The classical EPR spin-trapping technique can be considered as a "hypothesis-driven" approach because it requires an a priori assumption regarding the nature of the free radical in order to select the most appropriate spin-trap. We here describe a "data-driven" approach using EPR and a cocktail of spin-traps. The rationale for using this cocktail was that it would cover a wide range of biologically relevant free radicals and have a large range of hydrophilicity and lipophilicity in order to trap free radicals produced in different cellular compartments. As a proof-of-concept, we validated the ability of the system to measure a large variety of free radicals (O-, N-, C-, or S- centered) in well characterized conditions, and we illustrated the ability of the technique to unambiguously detect free radical production in cells exposed to chemicals known to be radical-mediated toxic agents.

  18. Identification of mitochondrial electron transport chain-mediated NADH radical formation by EPR spin-trapping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi; Kotake, Yashige; Humphries, Kenneth M

    2011-12-20

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) is a major source of free radical production. However, due to the highly reactive nature of radical species and their short lifetimes, accurate detection and identification of these molecules in biological systems is challenging. The aim of this investigation was to determine the free radical species produced from the mitochondrial ETC by utilizing EPR spin-trapping techniques and the recently commercialized spin-trap, 5-(2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propoxycyclophosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (CYPMPO). We demonstrate that this spin-trap has the preferential quality of having minimal mitochondrial toxicity at concentrations required for radical detection. In rat heart mitochondria and submitochondrial particles supplied with NADH, the major species detected under physiological pH was a carbon-centered radical adduct, indicated by markedly large hyperfine coupling constant with hydrogen (a(H) > 2.0 mT). In the presence of the ETC inhibitors, the carbon-centered radical formation was increased and exhibited NADH concentration dependency. The same carbon-centered radical could also be produced with the NAD biosynthesis precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide, in the presence of a catalytic amount of NADH. The results support the conclusion that the observed species is a complex I derived NADH radical. The formation of the NADH radical could be blocked by hydroxyl radical scavengers but not SOD. In vitro experiments confirmed that an NADH-radical is readily formed by hydroxyl radical but not superoxide anion, further implicating hydroxyl radical as an upstream mediator of NADH radical production. These findings demonstrate the identification of a novel mitochondrial radical species with potential physiological significance and highlight the diverse mechanisms and sites of production within the ETC.

  19. Spin trapping study on the nature of radicals generated by X radiolysis and peroxidation of linolenic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizova, O.A.; Osipov, A.N.; Zubarev, V.E.; Yakhyaev, A.V.; Vladimirov, Yu.A.; Savov, V.M.; Kagan, V.E.

    1983-01-01

    The radicals of linolenic acid and their spin adducts (SA) with PBN formed during X radiolysis of linolenic acid and in lipid peroxidation with ferrous ions were investigated and identified. It was found that in the absence of oxygen in pure linolenic acid at 77 K X irradiation produces alkyl and carboxyl radicals. In the presence of the spin trap alkyl radical spin adducts were formed. Irradiation of linolenic acid in the presence of oxygen at 77 K also resulted in the formation of alkyl radicals. These radicals were transformed into peroxy radicals in the interaction of alkyl radical with oxygen upon heating to 117 K. In the presence of spin trap X irradiation of linolenic acid and heating of the sample up to 300 K gave rise to EPR spectra of SA alkyl and unidentified radicals. Lipid peroxidation of linolenic acid induced by ferrous ions in the presence of spin trap also formed radicals and SA of linolenic acid. The spectral parameters of SA generated with ferrous ions in lipid peroxidation and of those generated during X radiolysis do not differ. The similarity of spectral parameters of SA in these two cases suggests a similarity in the structure of linolenic acid radicals. (author)

  20. Evidence for formation of hydroxyl radicals during reperfusion after global cerebral ischaemia in rats using salicylate trapping and microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, T; Balchen, T

    1994-01-01

    Systemic administration of salicylate (SA) to rats (100 mg kg-1 i.p. ) was used as an in vivo trap of hydroxyl radicals (.OH). In the brain SA reacts with hydroxyl radicals to form the stable adducts 2, 3- and 2,5 dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBAs) which can thus be taken as an index of .OH formation...

  1. α-Tocopherol impact on oxy-radical induced free radical decomposition of DMSO: Spin trapping EPR and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Cwielag-Piasecka, Irmina; Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: α-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of ·CH 3 to ·OCH 3 . Display Omitted Highlights: → α-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of DMSO to ·CH 3 . → α-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of ·CH 3 to ·OCH 3 . → α-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of PBN. → The structures of observed spin adducts were theoretically confirmed. - Abstract: EPR spin trapping and theoretical methods such as density functional theory (DFT) as well as combined DFT and quadratic configuration interaction approach (DFT/QCISD) were used to identify the radicals produced in the reaction of oxy-radicals and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence and absence of α-tocopherol. Additionally, the mixtures of α-tocopherol with linolenic acid and glyceryl trilinoleate as well as bioglycerols (glycerol fractions from biodiesel production) were tested. α-Tocopherol inhibited oxidation of the main decomposition product of DMSO, ·CH 3 to ·OCH 3 but did not prevent the transformation process of N-t-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) into 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). Theoretical investigations confirmed the structures of proposed spin adducts and allowed to correlate the EPR parameters observed in the experiment with the spin adducts electronic structure.

  2. {alpha}-Tocopherol impact on oxy-radical induced free radical decomposition of DMSO: Spin trapping EPR and theoretical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerzykiewicz, Maria, E-mail: Mariaj@wchuwr.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University, 14 F. Joliot-Curie St., 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Cwielag-Piasecka, Irmina; Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierski, Adam [Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University, 14 F. Joliot-Curie St., 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2011-05-26

    Graphical abstract: {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3}. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of DMSO to {center_dot}CH{sub 3}. {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3}. {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of PBN. {yields} The structures of observed spin adducts were theoretically confirmed. - Abstract: EPR spin trapping and theoretical methods such as density functional theory (DFT) as well as combined DFT and quadratic configuration interaction approach (DFT/QCISD) were used to identify the radicals produced in the reaction of oxy-radicals and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence and absence of {alpha}-tocopherol. Additionally, the mixtures of {alpha}-tocopherol with linolenic acid and glyceryl trilinoleate as well as bioglycerols (glycerol fractions from biodiesel production) were tested. {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibited oxidation of the main decomposition product of DMSO, {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3} but did not prevent the transformation process of N-t-butyl-{alpha}-phenylnitrone (PBN) into 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). Theoretical investigations confirmed the structures of proposed spin adducts and allowed to correlate the EPR parameters observed in the experiment with the spin adducts electronic structure.

  3. Demonstration using EPR spin-trapping of an oxygen-dependent, carbon-centered free radical generated by soybean lipoxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.F.; Smith, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    Purified prostaglandin synthase produces a carbon-centered, oxygen-dependent free radical which they have shown forms a spin-trapped adduct with 4-POBN and has characteristic hyperfine spin coupling constants (hfsc). As production of this radical is cyclooxygenase-dependent, additional studies on radical production were done using soybean lipoxygenase. The latter generates a lipid substrate-derived free radical trapped by the EPR spin trap 4-POBN [α-(4-pyridyl 1-oxide)N-tert-butyl nitrone]. With linoleate as substrate, the hfsc are a/sub N/ = 15.5 G, a/sub β//sup H/ = 2.7 G. This signal is inhibited by ETYA, various antioxidants and heat inactivation of the enzyme. Additional hfsc are not seen when the enzyme is incubated in an 17 O 2 atmosphere, but the signal is inhibited by anaerobeosis. Substitution of 13 C 18 carbon free fatty acids from Chlorella pyrenoisdosa for linoleate produces 2 new lines for each of the original 6 observed with 12 C substrate; the new spectrum has hfsc of a/sub N/ = 16.0 G, a/sub β//sup H/ = 2.4 G, a/sub β/ 13 C = 4.2 G. This demonstrates that the radical is carbon centered and oxygen-dependent and appears not to be the same radical formed by enzymic hydrogen abstraction from the lipid substrate. This radical and the prostaglandin synthase-dependent radical appear to be nearly identical

  4. Unusual spin-trap chemistry for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, David A.; Desrosiers, Marc F.

    The reaction of the potent carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) with hydroxyl radical generated via radiolysis was studied using EPR techniques. Attempts to spin trap NDMA radical intermediates with 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) produced only unusual DBNBS radicals. One of these radicals was shown to be generated by both reaction of DBNBS with nitric oxide, and direct oxidation of DBNBS with an inorganic oxidant ( .Br -2). Another DBNBS radical was identified as a sulfite spin adduct resulting from the degradation of DBNBS by a NDMA reactive intermediate. In the absence of DBNBS, hydroxyl radical reaction with NDMA gave the dimethylnitroxide radical. Unexpectedly, addition of DBNBS to a solution containing dimethylnitroxide produced an EPR spectrum nearly identical to that of NDMA solutions with DBNBS added before radiolysis. A proposed mechanism accounting for these observations is presented.

  5. Oxygen radicals in experimental shock: effects of spin-trapping nitrones in ameliorating shock pathophysiology (see comments)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, G.P. (Institute of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Florence, Careggi Hospital, (Italy))

    1992-04-01

    Circulatory shock is accepted as a consequence of an acute oxygen radical overgeneration. Spin-trapping nitrones inactivate free radicals by forming relatively stable adducts. Three spin-trapping nitrones (N-tert-phenyl-butyl-nitrone; alpha-4-pyridyl-oxide-N-tert-butyl-nitrone; 5-5,dimethyl,1,pyrroline-N-oxide) were tested regarding their role in the pathophysiology and evolution of circulatory shock in rats. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial of spin-trapping nitrones in rats experiencing three different models of circulatory shock was designed. In the first group, endotoxic, traumatic, and mesenteric artery occlusion shock (all 100% lethal in control experiments) was prevented by the ip administration of N-tert-phenyl-butyl-nitrone (150 mg/kg); alpha-4-pyridyl-oxide-N-tert-butyl-nitrone (100 mg/kg); or 5-5,dimethyl,1,pyrroline-N-oxide (100 mg/kg). However, the evolution of shock was unaffected by the same compounds when all three nitrones had been previously inactivated by exposure to light and air. In the second group, microcirculatory derangements that were provoked by endotoxin and were observed in the mesocecum of rats were completely prevented by pretreatment with either peritoneal administration of each of the three nitrones or by their topical application to the microscopic field. While the rats survived after systemic treatment, those rats receiving topical nitrones died from endotoxic shock. In the third group, cell-membrane stiffness (a sign of peroxidative damage) was measured by spin-probes and electron-spin resonance in mitochondrial and microsomal membranes. Cell membranes obtained from shocked rats were more rigid than those membranes of controls. However, the membranes obtained from rats that were submitted to trauma or endotoxin after pretreatment with N-tert-phenyl-butyl-nitrone had normal stiffness.

  6. Free radical generation induced by ultrasound in red wine and model wine: An EPR spin-trapping study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Quing An; Shen, Yuan; Fan, Xue-Hui; García-Martín, Juan Francisco; Wang, Xi; Song, Yun

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V. Direct evidence for the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl radicals by ultrasound in red wine and air-saturated model wine is presented in this paper. Free radicals are thought to be the key intermediates in the ultrasound processing of wine, but their nature has not been established yet. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrrolin N-oxide (DMPO) was used for the detection of hydroxyl free radicals and 1-hydroxylethyl free radic...

  7. Electron spin resonance of spin-trapped radicals of amines and polyamines. Hydroxyl radical reactions in aqueous solutions and. gamma. radiolysis in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mossoba, M.M.; Rosenthal, I.; Riesz, P. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1982-06-15

    The reactions of hydroxyl radicals with methylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine, diethylamine, sec-butylamine, ethylene-diamine, 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine, cadaverine, 1,7-diaminoheptane, ornithine, spermidine, spermine, agmatine, and arcaine in aqueous solutions have been investigated by spin-trapping and esr. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by the uv photolysis of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) was used as the spin-trap. The effects of ionizing radiation on the same polyamines in the polycrystalline state were also investigated. The free radicals produced by ..gamma..-radiolysis of these solids at room temperature in the absence of air were identified by dissolution in aqueous solutions of MNP. The predominant reaction of OH radicals with amines and polyamines below pH 7 was the abstraction of hydrogen atoms from a carbon that is not adjacent to the protonated amino group. For agmatine and arcaine which contain guanidinium groups abstraction occurred from the ..cap alpha..-CH. Dimethylamine was oxidized to the dimethylnitroxyl radical by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in the dark. ..gamma..-Radiolysis of polyamines in the polycrystalline state generated radicals due to H-abstraction from either the ..cap alpha..-Ch or from a carbon atom in the middle of the alkyl chain. The deamination radical was obtained from ornithine.

  8. Oxidation of spin-traps by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) radical in aqueous solutions: first ESR evidence of formation of new nitroxide radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, T; Miura, Y; Ueda, J

    1996-01-01

    The reactivities of the chlorine dioxide (ClO2), which is a stable free radical towards some water-soluble spin-traps were investigated in aqueous solutions by an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The ClO2 radical was generated from the redox reaction of Ti3+ with potassium chlorate (KClO3) in aqueous solutions. When one of the spin-traps, 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), was included in the Ti3+-KClO3 reaction system, ESR spectrum due to the ClO2 radical completely disappeared and a new ESR spectrum [aN(1) = 0.72 mT, aH(2) = 0.41 mT], which is different from that of DMPO-ClO2 adduct, was observed. The ESR parameters of this new ESR signal was identical to those of 5,5-dimethylpyrrolidone-(2)-oxyl-(1) (DMPOX), suggesting the radical species giving the new ESR spectrum is assignable to DMPOX. The similar ESR spectrum consisting of a triplet [aN(1) = 0.69 mT] was observed when the derivative of DMPO, 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (M4PO) was included in the Ti3+-KClO3 reaction system. This radical species is attributed to the oxidation product of M4PO, 3,3,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidone-(2)-oxyl-(1) (M4POX). When another nitrone spin-trap, alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (POBN) was used as a spin-trap, the ESR signal intensity due to the ClO2 radical decreased and a new ESR signal consisting of a triplet [aN(1) = 0.76 mT] was observed. The similar ESR spectrum was observed when N-t-butyl-alpha- nitrone (PBN) was used as a spin-trap. This ESR parameter [a(N)(1) = 0.85 mT] was identical to the oxidation product of PBN, PBNX. Thus, the new ESR signal observed from POBN may be assigned to the oxidation product of POBN, POBNX. These results suggest that the ClO2, radical does not form the stable spin adducts with nitrone spin-traps, but oxidizes these spin-traps to give the corresponding nitroxyl radicals. On the other hand, nitroso spin-traps, 5,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzenesulfonate (DBNBS), and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) did not trap

  9. Determination of the free radical concentration ratio in the copolymerization of methyl acrylate and styrene. Application of radical trapping and 15N NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelemen, P.; Klumperman, B.

    2004-01-01

    15N-labeled nitroxides are employed to trap propagating radicals in the copolymn. of styrene and Me acrylate. The resulting polymeric alkoxyamines are analyzed by 15N NMR.The assignment of the obsd. bands to the two possible end groups of the propagating copolymer chain is achieved by comparison of

  10. Use of rapid-scan EPR to improve detection sensitivity for spin-trapped radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Deborah G; Rosen, Gerald M; Tseitlin, Mark; Symmes, Breanna; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2013-07-16

    The short lifetime of superoxide and the low rates of formation expected in vivo make detection by standard continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) challenging. The new rapid-scan EPR method offers improved sensitivity for these types of samples. In rapid-scan EPR, the magnetic field is scanned through resonance in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times, and data are processed to obtain the absorption spectrum. To validate the application of rapid-scan EPR to spin trapping, superoxide was generated by the reaction of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with rates of 0.1-6.0 μM/min and trapped with 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (BMPO). Spin trapping with BMPO to form the BMPO-OOH adduct converts the very short-lived superoxide radical into a more stable spin adduct. There is good agreement between the hyperfine splitting parameters obtained for BMPO-OOH by CW and rapid-scan EPR. For the same signal acquisition time, the signal/noise ratio is >40 times higher for rapid-scan than for CW EPR. Rapid-scan EPR can detect superoxide produced by Enterococcus faecalis at rates that are too low for detection by CW EPR. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reaction between peroxynitrite and boronates: EPR spin-trapping, HPLC analyses, and quantum mechanical study of the free radical pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Adam; Zielonka, Jacek; Lopez, Marcos; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Joseph, Joy; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recently we showed that peroxynitrite (ONOO−) reacts directly and rapidly with aromatic and aliphatic boronic acids (k ≈ 106 M−1s−1). Product analyses and substrate consumption data indicated that ONOO− reacts stoichiometrically with boronates, yielding the corresponding phenols as the major product (~85–90%), and the remaining products (10–15%) were proposed to originate from free radical intermediates (phenyl and phenoxyl radicals). Here we investigated in detail the minor, free radical pathway of boronate reaction with ONOO−. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique was used to characterize the free radical intermediates formed from the reaction between boronates and ONOO−. Using 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) and 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps, phenyl radicals were trapped and detected. Although phenoxyl radicals were not detected, the positive effects of molecular oxygen, and inhibitory effects of hydrogen atom donors (acetonitrile, and 2-propanol) and general radical scavengers (GSH, NADH, ascorbic acid and tyrosine) on the formation of phenoxyl radical-derived nitrated product, suggest that phenoxyl radical was formed as the secondary species. We propose that the initial step of the reaction involves the addition of ONOO− to the boron atom in boronates. The anionic intermediate undergoes both heterolytic (major pathway) and homolytic (minor pathway) cleavage of the peroxy (O-O) bond to form phenol and nitrite as a major product (via a non-radical mechanism), or a radical pair PhB(OH)2O•−…•NO2 as a minor product. It is conceivable that phenyl radicals are formed by the fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion. According to the DFT quantum mechanical calculations, the energy barrier for the dissociation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion to form phenyl radicals is only a few kcal/mol, suggesting rapid and spontaneous fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion

  12. Unusual spin-trap chemistry for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wink, D A [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States); Desrosiers, M F [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of the potent carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) with hydroxyl radical generated via radiolysis was studied using EPR techniques. Attempts to spin trap NDMA radical intermediates with 3.5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) produced only unusual DBNBS radicals. One of these radicals was shown to be generated by both reaction of DBNBS with nitric oxide, and direct oxidation of DBNBS with an inorganic oxidant (BR{sub 2}{sup -}). Another DBNBS radical was identified as a sulfite spin adduct resulting from the degradation of DBNBS by a NDMA reactive inter-mediate. In the absence of DBNBS, hydroxyl radical reaction with NDMA gave the dimethylnitroxide produced an EPR spectrum nearly identical to that of NDMA solutions with DBNBS added before radiolysis. A proposed mechanism accounting for these observations is presented. (author).

  13. Unusual spin-trap chemistry for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wink, D.A.; Desrosiers, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of the potent carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) with hydroxyl radical generated via radiolysis was studied using EPR techniques. Attempts to spin trap NDMA radical intermediates with 3.5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) produced only unusual DBNBS radicals. One of these radicals was shown to be generated by both reaction of DBNBS with nitric oxide, and direct oxidation of DBNBS with an inorganic oxidant (BR 2 - ). Another DBNBS radical was identified as a sulfite spin adduct resulting from the degradation of DBNBS by a NDMA reactive inter-mediate. In the absence of DBNBS, hydroxyl radical reaction with NDMA gave the dimethylnitroxide produced an EPR spectrum nearly identical to that of NDMA solutions with DBNBS added before radiolysis. A proposed mechanism accounting for these observations is presented. (author)

  14. An EPR spin-probe and spin-trap study of the free radicals produced by plant plasma membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORAN BACIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant plasma membranes are known to produce superoxide radicals, while the production of hydroxyl radical is thought to occur only in the cell wall. In this work it was demonstrated using combined spin-trap and spin-probe EPR spectroscopic techniques, that plant plasma membranes do produce superoxide and hydroxyl radicals but by kinetically different mechanisms. The results show that superoxide and hydroxyl radicals can be detected by DMPO spin-trap and that the mechanisms and location of their production can be differentiated using the reduction of spin-probes Tempone and 7-DS. It was shown that the mechanism of production of oxygen reactive species is NADH dependent and diphenylene iodonium inhibited. The kinetics of the reduction of Tempone, combined with scavengers or the absence of NADH indicates that hydroxyl radicals are produced by a mechanism independent of that of superoxide production. It was shown that a combination of the spin-probe and spin-trap technique can be used in free radical studies of biological systems, with a number of advantages inherent to them.

  15. [Combined treatment of endometriosis: radical yet gentle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Wedel, Thilo; Maass, Nicolai

    2018-02-01

    Endometriosis is the second most common benign female genital disease after uterine myoma. This review discusses the management of individual patients. This should take into account the severity of the disease and whether the patient desires to have children. Particular emphasis is laid on the anatomical intersections which, when injured, can lead to persistent damage of the anterior, middle or posterior compartment and are not infrequently the cause of urological and urogynaecological follow-up measures. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include chronic pelvic pain, subfertility, dysmenorrhoea, deep dyspareunia, cyclical bowel or bladder symptoms (e. g. dyschezia, bloating, constipation, rectal bleeding, diarrhoea and haematuria), abnormal menstrual bleeding, chronic fatigue and low back pain. Approx. 50 % of all female teenagers and up to 32 % of all women of reproductive age who have been operated for chronic pelvic pain or dysmenorrhoea suffer from endometriosis. The time interval between the first unspecific symptoms and the medical diagnosis of endometriosis is about 7 years. This is caused not only by the non-specific nature of the symptoms but also by the frequent lack of awareness on the part of the cooperating disciplines with which the patients have first contact. As the pathogenesis of endometriosis is not clearly understood, causal treatment is still impossible. Treatment options include expectant management, analgesia, hormonal medical therapy, surgical intervention and the combination of medical treatment before and/or after surgery. The treatment should be as radical as necessary and as minimal as possible. The recurrence rate among treated patients lies between 5 % and > 60 % and is very much dependent on integrated management and surgical skills. Consequently, to optimise the individual patient's treatment, a high degree of interdisciplinary cooperation in diagnosis and treatment is crucial and should be reserved to appropriate

  16. Free radical generation induced by ultrasound in red wine and model wine: An EPR spin-trapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-An; Shen, Yuan; Fan, Xue-Hui; Martín, Juan Francisco García; Wang, Xi; Song, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Direct evidence for the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl radicals by ultrasound in red wine and air-saturated model wine is presented in this paper. Free radicals are thought to be the key intermediates in the ultrasound processing of wine, but their nature has not been established yet. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrrolin N-oxide (DMPO) was used for the detection of hydroxyl free radicals and 1-hydroxylethyl free radicals. Spin adducts of hydroxyl free radicals were detected in DMPO aqueous solution after sonication while 1-hydroxylethyl free radical adducts were observed in ultrasound-processed red wine and model wine. The latter radical arose from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical generated by ultrasound in water, thus providing the first direct evidence of the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl free radical in red wine exposed to ultrasound. Finally, the effects of ultrasound frequency, ultrasound power, temperature and ultrasound exposure time were assessed on the intensity of 1-hydroxylethyl radical spin adducts in model wine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. EPR investigation of zinc/iodine exchange between propargyl iodides and diethylzinc: detection of propargyl radical by spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Julien; Jammi, Suribabu; Vibert, François; Marque, Sylvain R A; Siri, Didier; Feray, Laurence; Bertrand, Michèle

    2012-10-19

    The production of propargyl radicals in the reaction of dialkylzincs with propargyl iodides in nondegassed medium was investigated by EPR using tri-tert-butylnitrosobenzene (TTBNB) as a spin trap. The radical mechanism and the nature of the observed species were confirmed by the trapping of propargyl radicals generated by an alternative pathway: i.e., upon irradiation of propargyl iodides in the presence of hexa-n-butyldistannane. In dialkylzinc-mediated experiments a high concentration of adduct was instantaneously observed, whereas no spontaneous production of spin adduct was detected in a blank experiment performed with the propargylic iodide and TTBNB in the absence of diethylzinc. Under irradiation in the presence of distannane, two different species were observed at the very beginning of the irradiation; the nitroxide resulting from the trapping of propargyl radical at the propargyl carbon remained the only species detected after irradiating for several minutes. The absence of adducts resulting from the trapping of allenyl canonical forms was supported by DFT calculations and by the preparation of an authentic sample.

  18. ESR and spin-trapping study of room-temperature radicals in γ-irradiated polycrystalline pyrimidine nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Kuwabara, M.; Yoshii, G.

    1983-01-01

    Free radicals produced in γ-irradiated polycrystalline 5'-dCMP (free acid and 2Na), 3'-CMP (free acid and Li), and 5'-UMP (2Na) were studied by ESR and spin-trapping. The results were compared with those of previous single-crystal studies. Furthermore, attempts to identify free radicals in γ-irradiated 5'-dUMP (2Na), 5'-CMP (free acid and 2Na), and 3'-UMP (Na), which have not been the subject of single-crystal studies to date, were made. After γ-irradiation at room temperature to a dose of 100 kGy, the polycrystalline samples were dissolved in aqueous solutions of t-nitrosobutane in the presence or absence of oxygen. The presence or absence of oxygen was helpful in analyzing the presence of more than one radical species. Thus two types of radicals could be established for all samples. Radical -C 5 H-C 6 H 2 -, formed by H addition to the double bond of the base, was observed in the presence of oxygen, and radical -C/sub 5'/H 2 , formed by the transformation of the radical due to loss of an H atom at the C/sub 5'/ position of the sugar moiety, was observed in the absence of oxygen. In some cases, radicals located at the C/sub 1'/, C/sub 4'/, and C/sub 5'/ of the sugar moiety were tentatively identified. For the ESR spectrum associated with radical at C/sub 1'/ the possibility of another explanation was also discussed in relation to the spectrum due to radical at C 5 of the base. Radical -C 5 H 2 -C 6 H-, formed by H addition to the double bond of the base, was not identified

  19. Spin trapping combined with quantitative mass spectrometry defines free radical redistribution within the oxidized hemoglobin:haptoglobin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallelian, Florence; Garcia-Rubio, Ines; Puglia, Michele; Kahraman, Abdullah; Deuel, Jeremy W; Engelsberger, Wolfgang R; Mason, Ronald P; Buehler, Paul W; Schaer, Dominik J

    2015-08-01

    Extracellular or free hemoglobin (Hb) accumulates during hemolysis, tissue damage, and inflammation. Heme-triggered oxidative reactions can lead to diverse structural modifications of lipids and proteins, which contribute to the propagation of tissue damage. One important target of Hb׳s peroxidase reactivity is its own globin structure. Amino acid oxidation and crosslinking events destabilize the protein and ultimately cause accumulation of proinflammatory and cytotoxic Hb degradation products. The Hb scavenger haptoglobin (Hp) attenuates oxidation-induced Hb degradation. In this study we show that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), Hb and the Hb:Hp complex share comparable peroxidative reactivity and free radical generation. While oxidation of both free Hb and Hb:Hp complex generates a common tyrosine-based free radical, the spin-trapping reaction with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) yields dissimilar paramagnetic products in Hb and Hb:Hp, suggesting that radicals are differently redistributed within the complex before reacting with the spin trap. With LC-MS(2) mass spectrometry we assigned multiple known and novel DMPO adduct sites. Quantification of these adducts suggested that the Hb:Hp complex formation causes extensive delocalization of accessible free radicals with drastic reduction of the major tryptophan and cysteine modifications in the β-globin chain of the Hb:Hp complex, including decreased βCys93 DMPO adduction. In contrast, the quantitative changes in DMPO adduct formation on Hb:Hp complex formation were less pronounced in the Hb α-globin chain. In contrast to earlier speculations, we found no evidence that free Hb radicals are delocalized to the Hp chain of the complex. The observation that Hb:Hp complex formation alters free radical distribution in Hb may help to better understand the structural basis for Hp as an antioxidant protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Studies of short-lived radicals in the. gamma. -irradiated aqueous solution of uridine-5'-monophosphate by the spin-trapping method and the liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kominami, S [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Rokushika, S; Hatano, H

    1976-12-01

    An aerated aqueous solution of uridine-5'-monophosphate was ..gamma..-irradiated with 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane as a spin-trapping reagent. Liquid chromatography was applied to separate the stable nitroxide radicals in the irradiated solution. The radicals were detected by U.V. and e.s.r. spectrometry. The e.s.r. detection showed four peaks in the chromatogram. The orcinol method for detection of the residual sugar moieties was applied before and after reduction of the base to determine the existence of the 5,6-double bond for the molecules in each fraction. From the combined results of the e.s.r. and orcinol methods, the short-lived radicals which were trapped by 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane were identified as radicals of N-1 and C-6 positions of the base moiety and t-butyl radicals which was the radiolytic product of the trapping reagent.

  1. Low-temperature matrix effects on orientational motion of Methyl radical trapped in gas solids: Angular tunneling vs. libration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Yurij A.; Zelenetckii, Ilia A.; Benetis, Nikolas P.

    2018-05-01

    EPR investigation of the lineshape of matrix -isolated methyl radical, CH3, spectra recorded in solid N2O and CO2 was carried out. Reversible temperature-dependent line width anisotropy was observed in both matrices. This effect is a fingerprint of the extra-slow radical rotation about the in-plane C2 axes. The rotation was found to be anisotropic and closely correlated to the orientational dynamics of the matrix molecules. It was suggested that a recently discovered "hoping precession" effect of matrix molecules in solid CO2 is a common feature of matrices of the linear molecules CO, N2O, and CO2. A new low-temperature matrix effect, referred to as "libration trap", was proposed which accounts for the changing CH3 reorientational motion about the radical C3-axis from rotation to libration. Temperature dependence of the intensity of the EPR satellites produced by these nonrotating-but librating methyls was presented. This allowed for a rough estimation of the rotation hindering potential due to correlation mismatch between the radical and the nearest matrix molecules' librations.

  2. Free radical generation by non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma in alcohol-water mixtures: an EPR-spin trapping study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Ishikawa, Kenji; Zhao, Qing-Li; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Krishna, Murali C.; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Matsuya, Yuji; Hori, Masaru; Noguchi, Kyo; Kondo, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    Free radical species in aqueous solution—various alcohol-water reaction mixtures—by exposure to non-equilibrium cold atmospheric pressure Ar plasma (CAP), were monitored using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping techniques with 3, 5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate as a water soluble nitroso spin trap. The major radical species were formed by H-abstraction from alcohol molecules due to ·OH radicals. In the ethanol-water mixture ·CH2CH2OH produced by H abstraction from CH3 group of the ethanol and ·CH3 radicals were detected. The latter was due to the decomposition of unstable CH3·CHOH to form the ·CH3 radicals and the stable formaldehyde by C-C bond fission. These intermediates are similar to those observed by reaction with ·OH radicals generation in the H2O2-UV photolysis of the reaction mixtures. The evidence of ·CH3 radical formation in the pyrolytic decomposition of the reaction mixtures by exposure to ultrasound or in methane irradiated with microwave plasma have been reported previously. However, the pyrolytic ·CH3 radicals were not found in both plasma and H2O2-UV photolysis condition. These results suggests that free radicals produced by Ar-CAP are most likely due to the reaction between abundant ·OH radicals and alcohol molecules.

  3. Electron beam treatment with radical scavengers/enhancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehringer, P.

    1994-08-01

    E-beam treatment of low level contaminated groundwater is best apt to demonstrate the role of scavengers and enhancers, respectively because groundwater already contains some scavengers as natural solutes. The action of ionizing radiation to water is known to result in the formation of ions, molecular and free radical species. For low level contaminations of groundwater (pollutant concentration aqu - and H are of interest for pollutant decomposition. The pollutants have to compete for the free radical species with the natural solutes. 10 figures are discussed. (author)

  4. N-tert-butylmethanimine N-oxide is an efficient spin-trapping probe for EPR analysis of glutathione thiyl radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Melanie J.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Stoyanovsky, Detcho A.

    2016-01-01

    The electron spin resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique allows detection of radical species with nanosecond half-lives. This technique is based on the high rates of addition of radicals to nitrones or nitroso compounds (spin traps; STs). The paramagnetic nitroxides (spin-adducts) formed as a result of reactions between STs and radical species are relatively stable compounds whose EPR spectra represent “structural fingerprints” of the parent radical species. Herein we report a novel protocol for the synthesis of N-tert-butylmethanimine N-oxide (EBN), which is the simplest nitrone containing an α-H and a tertiary α′-C atom. We present EPR spin-trapping proof that: (i) EBN is an efficient probe for the analysis of glutathione thiyl radical (GS•); (ii) β-cyclodextrins increase the kinetic stability of the spin-adduct EBN/•SG; and (iii) in aqueous solutions, EBN does not react with superoxide anion radical (O2−•) to form EBN/•OOH to any significant extent. The data presented complement previous studies within the context of synthetic accessibility to EBN and efficient spin-trapping analysis of GS•. PMID:27941944

  5. GMP and AMP as methyl radical traps in the reaction with pentaamminemethylcobalt(III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Pauli

    2004-01-01

    as the PBN/13??H3 adduct (PBN = phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone). When the purine nucleotide was used in large excess, the efficiency of the trapping by the C8 atom was determined by integration of the 13C NMR signals to be 20-25% for GMP and 15-20% for AMP, respectively, at 37??C. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All...

  6. Reactions of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions exposed to non-thermal plasma: limitations of spin trapping of the plasma induced species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Stehling, Nicola; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-10-01

    Low temperature (‘cold’) atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained much attention in recent years due to their biomedical effects achieved through the interactions of plasma-induced species with the biological substrate. Monitoring of the radical species in an aqueous biological milieu is usually performed via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using various nitrone spin traps, which form persistent radical adducts with the short-lived radicals. However, the stability of these nitroxide radical adducts in the plasma-specific environment is not well known. In this work, chemical transformations of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions using a model nitroxide 4-oxo-TEMPO were studied using EPR and LC-MS. The kinetics of the nitroxide decay when the solution was exposed to plasma were assessed, and the reactive pathways proposed. The use of different scavengers enabled identification of the types of reactive species which cause the decay, indicating the predominant nitroxide group reduction in oxygen-free plasmas. The 2H adduct of the PBN spin trap (PBN-D) was shown to decay similarly to the model molecule 4-oxo-TEMPO. The decay of the spin adducts in plasma-treated solutions must be considered to avoid rendering the spin trapping results unreliable. In particular, the selectivity of the decay indicated the limitations of the PTIO/PTI nitroxide system in the detection of nitric oxide.

  7. A new face of phenalenyl-based radicals in the transition metal-free C-H arylation of heteroarenes at room temperature: trapping the radical initiator via C-C σ-bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Jasimuddin; P, Sreejyothi; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Jose, Anex; Raj, Manthan; Mandal, Swadhin K

    2017-11-01

    The radical-mediated transition metal-free approach for the direct C-H bond functionalization of arenes is considered as a cost effective alternative to transition metal-based catalysis. An organic ligand-based radical plays a key role by generating an aryl radical which undergoes a subsequent functionalization process. The design principle of the present study takes advantage of a relatively stable odd alternant hydrocarbon-based phenalenyl (PLY) radical. In this study, the first transition metal-free catalyzed direct C-H arylation of a variety of heteroarenes such as azoles, furan, thiophene and pyridine at room temperature has been reported using a phenalenyl-based radical without employing any photoactivation step. This protocol has been successfully applied to the gram scale synthesis of core moieties of bioactive molecules. The phenalenyl-based radical initiator has been characterized crystallographically by trapping it via the formation of a C-C σ-bond between the phenalenyl radical and solvent-based radical species.

  8. Characterization of free radicals in γ-irradiated polycrystalline uridine 5'-monophosphate: a study combining ESR, spin-trapping and HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, W.; Kuwabara, M.; Sato, F.

    1991-01-01

    Free radicals generated in γ-irradiated polycrystalline uridine 5'-monophosphate (5'-UMP) were studied by ESR, spin-trapping and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Although HPLC ultimately gave four spin-adducts, one component that was originally present disappeared during HPLC. Spin adducts due to two types of C6 radials were identified. One of these was thought to be formed by electron addition and subsequent protonation at the C6 position, and the other was presumed to be produced by electron addition and subsequent protonation at the O 4 position. The spin adducts derived from the C5 and C5' radicals were also identified. The spin adduct that disappeared during HPLC was thought to correspond to the C4'-centred radical. Computer simulation of ESR spectra was carried out to estimate the hyperfine splitting constants. (author)

  9. Potential of EPR spin-trapping to investigate in situ free radicals generation from skin allergens in reconstructed human epidermis: cumene hydroperoxide as proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuresepi, Salen; Vileno, Bertrand; Turek, Philippe; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Giménez-Arnau, Elena

    2018-02-01

    The first step in the development of skin sensitisation to a chemical, and in the elicitation of further allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), is the binding of the allergen to skin proteins after penetrating into the epidermis. The so-formed antigenic adduct is then recognised by the immune system as foreign to the body. Sensitising organic hydroperoxides derived from autoxidation of natural terpenes are believed to form antigens through radical-mediated mechanisms, although this has not yet been established. So far, in vitro investigations on reactive radical intermediates derived from these skin sensitisers have been conducted in solution, yet with experimental conditions being far away from real-life sensitisation. Herein, we report for the first time, the potential use of EPR spin-trapping to study the in situ generation of free radicals derived from cumene hydroperoxide CumOOH in a 3D reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model, thus much closer to what may happen in vivo. Among the undesirable effects associated with dermal exposure to CumOOH, it is described to cause allergic and irritant dermatitis, being reported as a significant sensitiser. We considered exploiting the usage of spin-trap DEPMPO as an extensive view of all sort of radicals derived from CumOOH were observed all at once in solution. We showed that in the Episkin TM RHE model, both by incubating in the assay medium and by topical application, carbon radicals are mainly formed by redox reactions suggesting the key role of CumOOH-derived carbon radicals in the antigen formation process.

  10. Sulfate radical-based water treatment in presence of chloride: formation of chlorate, inter-conversion of sulfate radicals into hydroxyl radicals and influence of bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutze, Holger V; Kerlin, Nils; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2015-04-01

    Sulfate radical (SO4(-)) based oxidation is discussed as a potential water treatment option and is already used in ground water remediation. However, the complex SO4(-) chemistry in various matrices is poorly understood. In that regard, the fast reaction of SO4(-) with Cl(-) is of high importance since Cl(-) belongs to the main constituents in aqueous environments. This reaction yields chlorine atoms (Cl) as primary products. Cl initiate a cascade of subsequent reactions with a pH dependent product pattern. At low pH ( 5 Cl mainly react with water yielding hydroxyl radicals. Thus, at moderate Cl(-) concentrations (mM range) the SO4(-)-based process may be converted into a conventional (hydroxyl radical -based) advanced oxidation process. The conversion of SO4(-) into OH, however, is interrupted in presence of bicarbonate by scavenging of Cl. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidefumi Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH radicals and hydrogen (H atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO, 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO, and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN. The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and

  12. TRAPPING HO2 FREE RADICAL IN SONICATED WATER%空化水中HO2自由基的捕获

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘岩; 王军

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 INTRODUCTION As a new advanced oxidation process (AOP) in water treatment, sonochemistry in water treatment has been paid more attention for one decade[1-7]. The collapsed cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperature and high pressure[8] to generate free radical, e.g. OH, O, HO2 in sonicated water. These kinds of radicals can oxidize the organic substances dissolved in water.

  13. Spin trapping of radicals formed in gamma-irradiated methanol: effect of the irradiation temperature from 77K to 300K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlick, S.; Kevan, L.

    1976-01-01

    The neutral radicals formed in gamma-irradiated methanol were studied by spin trapping with phenyl-t-butylnitrone (PBN) in an attempt to probe the primary neutral radicals formed. In the temperature range from approximately 157 K to 300 K both CH 2 OH and CH 3 O spin adducts are observed and their limiting ratio at high PBN concentrations is CH 2 OH/CH 3 O=1.5 over this temperature range. Below approximately 157 K this ratio increases exponentially with decreasing temperature with an apparent activation energy of 5.8 kJ/mole (1.4 kcal/mole); this is consistent with the finding that only CH 2 OH radicals are formed by gamma radiolysis at 77 K. Several possible models for the primary neutral radicals formed in gamma-irradiated methanol and their subsequent reactions as a function of irradiation temperature are discussed. It is suggested that the primary radical formation mechanisms are similar in the gas and liquid phases and become temperature dependent when molecular motion is arrested in the solid. (Auth.)

  14. Effects of treatment on free radicals in patients with pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fense against Mycobacteria, enhanced ROS generation may promote tissue injury .... time of analysis for electrolytes and free radicals. The sputum of patients .... with high level INH resistance in MTB by using real time technology PCR with 3 ...

  15. Treatment results of radical radiotherapy in uterine cervix cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Bo Kyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Shin, Seong Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kang, Min Kyu; Ahn, Yong Chan [Samsung Medical center, sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the treatment results, prognostic factors, and complication rates after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with uterine cervix cancer who were treated with curative aim. Of 269 cervix cancer patients treated at the department of radiation oncology, Samsung Medical Center from September 1994 to July 1998, the 106 who were treated with radical radiotherapy were analyzed. The median age was 61 years (range 22 to 89). All patients except 4 with carcinoma in situ (CIS) were given external beam radiotherapy (range 30.6 {approx} 50.4 Gy to whole pelvis) and HDR brachytherapy. The common regimens of HDR brachytherapy were a total dose of 24 {approx} 28 Gy with 6 {approx} 7 fractions to point A at two fractions per week. The median overall treatment time was 55 days (range 44 to 104) in patients given both external beam radiotherapy and HDR brachytherapy. Early response of radiotherapy were evaluated by gynecologic examination and follow-up MRI 1 month after radiotherapy. Treatment responses were complete remission in 72 patients, partial response in 33 and no response in 1. The overall survival (OS) rate of all patients was 82%, and 73%, and the disease free survival (DFS) rate was 72%, and 69%, at 3, and 5 years, respectively. The pelvic control rate (PCR) was 79% at both 3 and 5 years. According to the FIGO stage, 3 and 5 year OS were 100% and 50% in CIS/IA, 100% in 100% in IB, 83% and 69% in IIA, 87% and 80% in IIB, and 62% and 62% in III, respectively. The 3 year OS in 4 patients with stage IVA was 100%. Three-year DFS were 80% in CIS/IA, 88% in IB, 100% in IIA, 64% in IIB, 58% in III, and 75% in IVA. Three-year PCR were 100% in CIS/IA, 94% in IB, 100% in IIA, 84% in IIB, 69% in III, and 50% in IVA. By univariate analysis, FIGO stage and treatment response were significant factors for OS. The significant factors for DFS were age, FIGO stage, treatment response and overall treatment time (OTT). For pelvic control rate

  16. HPN-07, a free radical spin trapping agent, protects against functional, cellular and electrophysiological changes in the cochlea induced by acute acoustic trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ning; Du, Xiaoping; Li, Wei; West, Matthew B.; Choi, Chul-Hee; Floyd, Robert; Kopke, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major cause of the structural and functional changes associated with auditory pathologies induced by exposure to acute acoustic trauma AAT). In the present study, we examined the otoprotective effects of 2,4-disulfophenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (HPN-07), a nitrone-based free radical trap, on the physiological and cellular changes in the auditory system of chinchilla following a six-hour exposure to 4 kHz octave band noise at 105 dB SPL. HPN-07 has been shown to suppress oxidative stress in biological models of a variety of disorders. Our results show that administration of HPN-07 beginning four hours after acoustic trauma accelerated and enhanced auditory/cochlear functional recovery, as measured by auditory brainstem responses (ABR), distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE), compound action potentials (CAP), and cochlear microphonics (CM). The normally tight correlation between the endocochlear potential (EP) and evoked potentials of CAP and CM were persistently disrupted after noise trauma in untreated animals but returned to homeostatic conditions in HPN-07 treated animals. Histological analyses revealed several therapeutic advantages associated with HPN-07 treatment following AAT, including reductions in inner and outer hair cell loss; reductions in AAT-induced loss of calretinin-positive afferent nerve fibers in the spiral lamina; and reductions in fibrocyte loss within the spiral ligament. These findings support the conclusion that early intervention with HPN-07 following an AAT efficiently blocks the propagative ototoxic effects of oxidative stress, thereby preserving the homeostatic and functional integrity of the cochlea. PMID:28832600

  17. Identifying the distinct features of geometric structures for hole trapping to generate radicals on rutile TiO₂(110) in photooxidation using density functional theory calculations with hybrid functional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Haifeng; Hu, P

    2015-01-21

    Using density functional theory calculations with HSE 06 functional, we obtained the structures of spin-polarized radicals on rutile TiO2(110), which is crucial to understand the photooxidation at the atomic level, and further calculate the thermodynamic stabilities of these radicals. By analyzing the results, we identify the structural features for hole trapping in the system, and reveal the mutual effects among the geometric structures, the energy levels of trapped hole states and their hole trapping capacities. Furthermore, the results from HSE 06 functional are compared to those from DFT + U and the stability trend of radicals against the number of slabs is tested. The effect of trapped holes on two important steps of the oxygen evolution reaction, i.e. water dissociation and the oxygen removal, is investigated and discussed.

  18. The free radical spin-trap alpha-PBN attenuates periinfarct depolarizations following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats without reducing infarct volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, Torben; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the free radical spin-trap alpha-phenyl-butyl-tert-nitrone (alpha-PBN) in permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats was examined in two series of experiments. In the first, rats were subjected to permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) and treated 1 h after occlusion...... with a single dose of alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg) or saline. Body temperature was measured and controlled for the first 24 h to obtain identical temperature curves in the two groups. Cortical infarct volumes were determined on histological sections 7 days later. alpha-PBN did not significantly reduce infarct volume...

  19. Measuring sunscreen protection against solar-simulated radiation-induced structural radical damage to skin using ESR/spin trapping: development of an ex vivo test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Rachel; Volkov, Arsen; Andrady, Carima; Sayer, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The in vitro star system used for sunscreen UVA-testing is not an absolute measure of skin protection being a ratio of the total integrated UVA/UVB absorption. The in vivo persistent-pigment-darkening method requires human volunteers. We investigated the use of the ESR-detectable DMPO protein radical-adduct in solar-simulator-irradiated skin substitutes for sunscreen testing. Sunscreens SPF rated 20+ with UVA protection, reduced this adduct by 40-65% when applied at 2 mg/cm(2). SPF 15 Organic UVA-UVB (BMDBM-OMC) and TiO(2)-UVB filters and a novel UVA-TiO(2) filter reduced it by 21, 31 and 70% respectively. Conventional broad-spectrum sunscreens do not fully protect against protein radical-damage in skin due to possible visible-light contributions to damage or UVA-filter degradation. Anisotropic spectra of DMPO-trapped oxygen-centred radicals, proposed intermediates of lipid-oxidation, were detected in irradiated sunscreen and DMPO. Sunscreen protection might be improved by the consideration of visible-light protection and the design of filters to minimise radical leakage and lipid-oxidation.

  20. Effects of treatment on free radicals in patients with pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Formation of Malondialdehyde (MDA), a free radical, in Tuberculosis patients does occur when Tubercule bacilli induces ... All patients were screened for presence or absence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in their sputum and. HIV 1 & 2 in .... fever, Diabetes Mellitus, patients with intestinal infec- tions which ...

  1. Free radicals during hypertriglyceridemia treatment by N-3 fatty acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeman, M.; Stopka, Pavel; Vecka, M.; Žák, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2006), s. 292 ISSN 1567-5688 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : free radicals Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.875, year: 2006

  2. Improvement of the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of high-density polyethylene by free radical trapping of rare earth compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Shiya; Zhao, Li; Han, Ligang [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Guo, Zhenghong, E-mail: guozhenghong@nit.zju.edu.cn [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); Fang, Zhengping [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2015-07-20

    Highlights: • Polyethylene filled with ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate was prepared. • A low Yb loading improved thermal stability of PE obviously by radical trapping. • Yb(OTf){sub 3} is expected to be an efficient thermal stabilizer for the polymer. - Abstract: A kind of rare earth compound, ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate (Yb(OTf){sub 3}), was introduced into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) by melt compounding to investigate the effect of Yb(OTf){sub 3} on the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of HDPE. The results of thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the addition of Yb(OTf){sub 3} made the thermal degradation temperatures dramatically increased, the oxidative induction time (OIT) extended, and the enthalpy (ΔH{sub d}) reduced. Very low Yb(OTf){sub 3} loading (0.5 wt%) in HDPE could increase the onset degradation temperature in air from 334 to 407 °C, delay the OIT from 11.0 to 24.3 min, and decrease the ΔH{sub d} from 61.0 to 13.0 J/g remarkably. Electron spin resonance spectra (ESR), thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR), rheological investigation and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) indicated that the free radicals-trapping ability of Yb(OTf){sub 3} was responsible for the improved thermal and thermo-oxidative stability.

  3. ESR of spin-trapped radicals from sugars. Reactions of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solutions and. gamma. -radiolysis in the polycrystalline state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, M; Lion, Y; Riesz, P [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1981-04-01

    For glucose, mannose, and lactose which contain a -CH/sub 2/OH group at the C(5') position, a large secondary doublet (4.8 to 5.6 G) was observed for both solid state and aqueous experiments. However, for fructose, D-deoxyribose and D-ribose, which do not have a -CH/sub 2/OH group at the C(5') position, the large doublet was not found. The small doublet (1.2 to 1.5 G) was obtained from all the sugars for both the solid and the aqueous experiments. The 2.5 to 3.0 G doublet was only observed in the experiments with -irradiated solids, while the 4.3 G doublet was only produced by the reaction of OH radicals. It was inferred that the large (4.8 to 5.6 G) doublet can be assigned to the H-abstraction radical, -CHOH, from the -CH/sub 2/OH group at the C(5') position.

  4. Enantioselective radical addition/trapping reactions with alpha,beta-disubstituted unsaturated imides. Synthesis of anti-propionate aldols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Petrovic, Goran; Zimmerman, Jake

    2005-03-02

    This manuscript describes a highly diastereo- and enantioselective intermolecular radical addition/hydrogen atom transfer to alpha,beta-disubstituted enoates. Additionally, we show that anti-propionate aldol-like products can be easily prepared from alpha-methyl-beta-acyloxyenoates in good yields and high diastereo- and enantioselectivities.

  5. Robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: a different treatment for prostate cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Den Julio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the Health Care System in Brazil, a developing country,and public healthcare policies, robotic surgery is a reality to veryfew citizens. Therefore, robotic assisted radical prostatectomy isfar removed from the daily practice of the vast majority of Brazilianurologists. Scientific evidence of the superiority of robotic assistedradical prostatectomy does not presently justify public investmentsfor widespread development of robotic centers. Maybe over timeand with reductions in costs, robotic technology will become amore established practice, as observed in other countries, and morefeasible for the Brazilian urological community.

  6. MoO3 trapping layers with CF4 plasma treatment in flash memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Chuyan Haur; Chen, Hsiang; Chen, Su-Zhien; Chen, Chian Yu; Lo, Kuang-Yu; Lin, Chun Han

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • MoO 3 -based flash memories have been fabricated. • CF4 plasma treatment could enhance good memory performance. • Material analyses confirm that plasma treatment eliminated defects. • Fluorine atoms might fix the dangling bonds. - Abstract: In this research, we used MoO 3 with CF 4 plasma treatment as charge trapping layer in metal-oxide-high-k -oxide-Si-type memory. We analyzed material properties and electrical characteristics with multiple analyses. The plasma treatment could increase the trapping density, reduce the leakage current, expand band gap, and passivate the defect to enhance the memory performance. The MoO 3 charge trapping layer memory with suitable CF 4 plasma treatment is promising for future nonvolatile memory applications

  7. Photochemical reaction of triplet 9,10-anthraquinone with ethylbenzene in the presence of DPPH as a radical trapping agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moger, G.

    1983-01-01

    DPPH was used as a scavenger of α-phenyl-ethyl radicals produced in the photochemical reaction between triplet anthraquinone (Qsup(T)) and ethylbenzene (RH 2 ) in benzene solutions. The rate constant ratio ksub(2)/ksub(-1) was determined from the measurements of the quantum yield of scavenging against (RH 2 ) and found to be (0.49+-0.015) M at 25 deg C. (author)

  8. Transformations of the radical cations of 1,3-dienes, 1,4-dienes, and cyclopentene as studied by ESR technique in irradiated frozen freon matrices and by spin trapping technique in liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchapin, I.Yu.; Belevskij, V.N.

    1996-01-01

    Transformations of cation-radicals of 1,3- and 1,4-pentadienes, 2,3-dimethylbutadienes and cyclopentene, formed by X-ray irradiation at 77 K, are studied in the freon-11 and 113 matrices. It is shown that cation-radicals of 1,3-pentadienes in the CFCl 3 matrix at 77 K are regrouped in cyclopentene cation-radicals. There is no such a regrouping in the freon-113 matrix. The 1,4-pentadiene radicals have plane structure in the CFCl 3 matrix and are transformed into pentadienyl radicals in the freon-113 matrix. The cation radicals of dimethylbutadiene in the freon-113 matrix are transformed into end allyl radicals. The cation-radicals of cyclopentene in the freon-113 matrix are transformed at 110 K in cyclic allyl radicals. The radicals formation mechanism is in good agreement with the data, obtained during studies on liquid hydrocarbons, X-irradiated at 293 K in the presence of spin trap of 2.4.6-tri-tert-butylnitrosobenzene

  9. Radical treatment of stage Ⅳ pancreatic cancer by the combination of cryosurgery and iodine-125 seed implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Bing Chen; Jia-Liang Li; Li-Hua He; Wei-Qun Liu; Fei Yao; Jian-Ying Zeng; Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the therapeutic effect of radical treatment and palliative treatment in stage Ⅳ pancreatic cancer patients.METHODS:81 patients were enrolled in the study.Radical treatment was performed on 51 patients,while 30 patients were put under palliative treatment.The procedural safety and interval survival for stage Ⅳ pancreatic cancer (IS-Ⅳ) was assessed by almost 2.5 years of follow-ups.The IS-Ⅳ of patients under the two kinds of treatment,and the effects of treatment timing and frequency on IS-Ⅳ,were compared.RESULTS:The IS-Ⅳ of patients who received radical treatment was significantly longer than those who received palliative treatment (P < 0.001).The IS-Ⅳ of patients who received delayed radical or palliative treatment was longer than those who received accordingly timely treatment (P =0.0034 and 0.0415,respectively).Multiple treatments can play an important role in improving the IS-Ⅳ of patients who received radical treatment (P =0.0389),but not for those who received palliative treatment (P =0.99).CONCLUSION:The effect of radical treatment was significantly more obvious than that of palliative treatment,and multiple radical treatments may contribute more to patients than a single radical treatment.

  10. Does penile rehabilitation have a role in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecher, Gideon; Almekaty, Khaled; Kalejaiye, Odunayo; Minhas, Suks

    2017-01-01

    In men undergoing radical treatment for prostate cancer, erectile function is one of the most important health-related quality-of-life outcomes influencing patient choice in treatment. Penile rehabilitation has emerged as a therapeutic measure to prevent erectile dysfunction and expedite return of erectile function after radical prostatectomy. Penile rehabilitation involves a program designed to increase the likelihood of return to baseline-level erectile function, as opposed to treatment, which implies the therapeutic treatment of symptoms, a key component of post-radical prostatectomy management. Several pathological theories form the basis for rehabilitation, and a plethora of treatments are currently in widespread use. However, whilst there is some evidence supporting the concept of penile rehabilitation from animal studies, randomised controlled trials are contradictory in outcomes. Similarly, urological guidelines are conflicted in terms of recommendations. Furthermore, it is clear that in spite of the lack of evidence for the role of penile rehabilitation, many urologists continue to employ some form of rehabilitation in their patients after radical prostatectomy. This is a significant burden to health resources in public-funded health economies, and no effective cost-benefit analysis has been undertaken to support this practice. Thus, further research is warranted to provide both scientific and clinical evidence for this contemporary practice and the development of preventative strategies in treating erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy.

  11. Surgical treatment of metachronous metastases in different organs following radical nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. N. de Jesus

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCCC is a neoplasia resistant to radio and chemotherapy, with surgical treatment being the procedure that is recognized for its curative treatment. This case report demonstrates the success of an aggressive surgical treatment for consecutive and late metachronous metastases following radical nephrectomy. CASE REPORT: Asymptomatic 50-year old man. During a routine examination, an incidental mass was found by renal ultrasonography. He underwent right radical nephrectomy due to RCCC in June 1992. During the follow-up metastases were evidenced in cerebellum on the seventh year, and in left lung and pancreas on the eighth year following the radical nephrectomy, with all of them successfully treated by surgical excision. COMMENTS: The surgical excision of consecutive and late metachronous metastases in different organs arising from RCCC is feasible, being a good therapeutic alternative in selected cases.

  12. Radical vs. Conservative Surgical Treatment of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst: A 10- Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghaemi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatic hydatid cyst is caused by echinococcosis granulosis. It is a major health problem in endemic areas. The modern treatment of hydatid cysts of the liver varies from surgical intervention to percutaneous drainage or medical therapy. A high rate of complications following percutaneous drainage, and ineffectiveness of medical therapy have shown not to be the definitive treatments for the disease. Thus, surgery is still the best choice for the treatment of hydatid cyst of the liver. Surgical treatment methods can be divided into radical and conservative approaches. There is controversy regarding efficacy of the two surgical methods. In this study, we aimed to present a retrospective evaluation of the two surgical methods in patients treated for the hepatic hydatid cyst. Methods: This retrospective study reviewed medical records of 135 patients who underwent surgery for hepatic hydatid cyst from 1997 to 2007. Surgery comprised conservative methods (evacuation of the cyst content and excision of the inner cyst layers and radical methods (total excision of the cyst and removal of its outer layer. Results: One hundred thirty five patients underwent liver surgery. Conservative surgery was performed for 71 (53%, whereas, the remaining 64 patients (47% underwent radical surgery. Postoperative complications were 28% and 19%, respectively. Recurrence of the cyst in the conservative and radical surgery groups was noted to be 12.5 and 1.5%, respectively. The mean length of hospital stay was shorter in the radical surgery group (5 vs. 15 days. Conclusion: Radical surgery may be the preferred treatment for the hepatic hydatid cyst because of its low rate of postoperative complications and recurrence, as well as short hospital stay. Selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on the size, number, and location of the cyst(s, and presence of cystobiliary communications, and the availability of an experienced surgeon.

  13. Treatment of early stage breast cancer by limited surgery and radical irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, A.M.; Cope, O.; Russo, R.; Wang, C.C.; Schulz, M.D.; Wang, C.; Rodkey, G.

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-five female patients with early stage breast cancer, i.e., Stage I and II were treated by limited surgery followed by radical radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between January, 1956 and December, 1974. Patients included those who were medically inoperable or who refused mastectomy. The 5-year survival rate was 83% and 76% for Stage I and II, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival (absolute) was 67% and 42%. Although the number of patients so treated is small, there was no significant difference in survival from the results of the radical mastectomy series at the same institution. No major complications were encountered. Seventeen of eighty-five patients developed minor problems; mostly fibrosis and minimal arm lymphedema stemmming from older orthovoltage equipment and treatment techniques. With the current availability of megavoltage equipment, improvements in techniques and dosimetry, complications should decrease. Combined limited surgery and radical radiation therapy should be considered in those patients where a radical mastectomy is not feasible because of psychological or medical problems. Since this procedure results in a cosmetically acceptable breast, radical radiation in early stage breast cancer seems a reasonable alternative to radical mastectomy

  14. Radical proposal for the treatment of malignant astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, U.; Black, P.; Nair, S.; Yablon, J.S.; Brady, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    The traditional treatment for anaplastic astrocytoma (AAF) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) leads to local relapse. The recurring element is assumed to be previously radioresistant, reorganizing hypoxic cells that require up to three times the traditional photon irradiation dose for inactivation. We are proposing to coagulate the original lesion with high-dose precision brachytherapy, immediately followed by resection to save the patient from secondary effects of the necrotic region. The treatment then continues with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy to the local surrounding brain and concomitant chemotherapy. The approach inverts the traditional regimen. It has the virtue of being precise, avoiding secondary effects of the necrotic tumor, and satisfying accepted radiobiological principles

  15. Systematic Review of Treatment for Trapped Thrombus in Patent Foramen Ovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Won-Woo; Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Myung-Soo; Lee, Jun-Hee; Park, Dae-Gyun; Han, Kyoo-Rok; Oh, Dong-Jin

    2017-09-01

    Trapped thrombus in patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a rare complication of pulmonary embolism that may lead to tragic clinical events. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal treatment for different clinical situations in patients with trapped thrombus in a PFO by conducting a literature review. A PubMed database search was conducted from 1991 through 2015, and 194 patients (185 articles) with trapped thrombus in a PFO were identified. Patient characteristics, paradoxical embolic events, and factors affecting 60-day mortality were analyzed retrospectively. Among all patients, 112 (57.7%) were treated with surgery, 28 with thrombolysis, and 54 with anticoagulation alone. Dyspnea (79.4%), chest pain (33.0%), and syncope (17.5%) were the most common presenting symptoms. Pretreatment embolism was found in 37.6% of cases, and stroke (24.7%) was the most common event. Surgery was associated with fewer post-treatment embolic events than were other treatment options (p=0.044). In the multivariate analysis, initial shock or arrest, and thrombolysis were independent predictors of 60-day mortality. Thrombolysis was related with higher 60-day mortality compared with surgery in patients who had no initial shock or arrest. This systematic review showed that surgery was associated with a lower overall incidence of post-treatment embolic events and a lower 60-day mortality in patients with trapped thrombus in a PFO. In patients without initial shock or arrest, thrombolysis was related with a higher 60-day mortality compared with surgery.

  16. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy in radical treatment of frail patients with deeply invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellin, G.; Mussari, S.; Graffer, U.; Caffo, O.; Valduga, F.; Tomio, L.; Luciani, L. [S. Chiara Hospital, Trento (Italy)

    2004-11-01

    The radical treatment of deeply invasive bladder cancer with full dose radiotherapy and concomitant 5- fluorouracil continuous infusion is feasible even in frail patients, with an acceptable toxicity and a response rate comparable to that obtained using radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin. Many patients can retain a functioning bladder. (author)

  17. Radical-trapping and preventive antioxidant effects of 2-hydroxymelatonin and 4-hydroxymelatonin: Contributions to the melatonin protection against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-González, Adriana; Galano, Annia; Alvarez-Idaboy, J Raúl; Tan, Dun Xian; Reiter, Russel J

    2017-09-01

    Melatonin is well known for its antioxidant capacity, which has been attributed to the combined protective effects of the parent molecule and its metabolites. However, the potential role of 2-hydroxymelatonin (2OHM) and 4-hydroxymelatonin (4OHM) in such protection has not been previously investigated. The calculations were performed using the Density Functional Theory, with the M05-2X and M05 functionals, the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set and the solvation model based on density (SMD). 4OHM shows excellent antioxidant activity via radical-trapping, reacting with peroxyl radicals faster than Trolox and melatonin. 4OHM can be moderately efficient as a preventing antioxidant by inhibiting Cu(II). This effect would lower the Cu(I) availability, which is the redox state required for the OH to be formed, via Fenton-like reactions. 4OHM turns off the oxidant effects of copper-ascorbate mixtures. The presence of a phenolic group was identified as the key structural feature in the antioxidant activity of 4OHM. On the other hand, 2OHM does not present a phenolic group, despite its formal name. Its keto tautomer was identified as the most abundant one (~100%). This may explain the relative low antioxidant protection of 2OHM. 4OHM significantly contributes to the overall antioxidant activity exhibited by melatonin, while the effects of 2OHM in this context are predicted to be only minor. This low reactivity might justify the relatively large abundance of 2OHM in biological systems. Hydroxylated melatonin metabolites, such as 4OHM, may play an important role in the protective effects of melatonin against oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Purification of ammonia-containing trap waters from atomic power plant by ozone treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachok, M.A.; Prokudina, S.A.; Shulyat'ev, M.I.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of research was to study the process of ozonation of ammonia-containing trap waters from the Kursk Atomic Power Plant both on the model solutions and on real ones. Different factors (pH of the medium, temperature, concentration of the initial substances) have been studied for their effect on ozonation of aqueous ammonia solutions, model solutions of trap waters from the Kursk Atomic Power Plant as well as ammonia-containing trap waters and liquid radioactive wastes delivered to special water treatment at the Kursk Atomic Power Plant. It is shown that in all the cases the highest rate of ammonia oxidation by ozone is observed in the alkaline medium (pH 1.4-11.0) and at 55 deg C. The obtained results have shown that a method of ozonation followed by evaporation of water to be purified can be used to treat ammonia-containing waters from atomic power plant

  19. Photochemical sensitization by azathioprine and its metabolites. Part 3. A direct EPR and spin-trapping study of light-induced free radicals from 6-mercaptopurine and its oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D E; Sik, R H; Bilski, P; Chignell, C F; Reszka, K J

    1994-12-01

    Sunlight has been implicated in the high incidence of skin cancer found in patients receiving 6-mercaptopurine (PSH) in the form of its pro-drug azathioprine. In this study we have used EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with the spin-trapping technique to determine whether PSH and its metabolic or photochemical oxidation products generate highly reactive free radicals upon UV irradiation. When an aqueous anaerobic solution (pH 5 or 9) of PSH (pKa = 7.7) and either 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) or nitromethane (NM) were irradiated (lambda > 300 nm) with a Xe arc lamp, the corresponding purine-6-thiyl (PS.) radical adduct and the reduced form of the spin trap (MNP/H. or CH3NO2.-) were observed. However, no radical adducts were detected when PSH and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) were irradiated (lambda = 320 nm) in oxygen-free buffer. These findings suggest that PSH does not photoionize but that instead MNP and NM are reduced by direct electron transfer from excited state PSH, 1.3(PSH)*. In aerobic solution, oxygen can act as an electron acceptor and the O2.- and PS. radicals are formed and trapped by DMPO. 6-Mercaptopurine did photoionize when irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as evidenced by the appearance of the DMPO/H.(eq- + H+) adduct, which decreased in intensity in the presence of N2O. 1.3(6-Mercaptopurine)* oxidized ascorbate, formate and reduced glutathione to the corresponding ascorbyl, CO2.- or glutathiyl radicals. The photochemical behavior of 6-thioxanthine and 6-thiouric acid was similar to PSH. However, the excited states of these metabolic oxidation products exhibited stronger reducing properties than 1.3(PSH)*.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Hydrogen treatment as a detergent of electronic trap states in lead chalcogenide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voros, Marton; Brawand, Nicholas; Galli, Giulia

    Lead chalcogenide (PbX) nanoparticles are promising materials for solar energy conversion. However, the presence of trap states in their electronic gap limits their usability, and developing a universal strategy to remove trap states is a persistent challenge. Using calculations based on density functional theory, we show that hydrogen acts as an amphoteric impurity on PbX nanoparticle surfaces; hydrogen atoms may passivate defects arising from ligand imbalance or off-stoichiometric surface terminations, irrespective of whether they originate from cation or anion excess. In addition, we show, using constrained density functional theory calculations, that hydrogen treatment of defective nanoparticles is also beneficial for charge transport in films. We also find that hydrogen adsorption on stoichiometric nanoparticles leads to electronic doping, preferentially n-type. Our findings suggest that post-synthesis hydrogen treatment of lead chalcogenide nanoparticle films is a viable approach to reduce electronic trap states or to dope well-passivated films. Work supported by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (NB) and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 (MV).

  1. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadasaki, Koichi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Ito, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The indications for and the efficacy of radiation therapy after radical operation for patients with prostate cancer are not clear. We analyzed the treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Between September 1997 and November 2004, 57 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients received radiation therapy because of positive margins and/or extracapsular invasion in surgical specimens (adjuvant group). Forty-two patients received radiation therapy because of rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during follow-up (salvage group). Radiation therapy was delivered to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles by a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique to a total dose of 60-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Biochemical control was defined as the maintenance of a PSA level of less than 0.2 ng/ml. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 33 months (range, 12-98 months). Three-year biochemical control rates were 87% for the adjuvant group and 61% for the salvage group. For patients in the salvage group treated without hormone therapy, the preradiation PSA value was the most significant factor for the biochemical control rate. The 3-year biochemical control rate was 93% in patients whose preradiation PSA was 0.5 ng/ml or less and 29% in patients whose preradiation PSA was more than 0.5 ng/ml. No severe adverse effects (equal to or more than grade 3) were seen in treated patients. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy seemed to be effective for adjuvant therapy and for salvage therapy in patients with a preradiation PSA of 0.5 ng/ml or less. Also, radiation to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles, to a total dose of 60-66 Gy, using a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique, seemed to be safe. (author)

  2. Phenix Power Plant Decommissioning Project. Treatment of the Primary Cold Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deluge, M.

    2008-01-01

    Phenix is a sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor located at the CEA's Rhone Valley Center where it was commissioned in 1974. It has an electric power rating of 250 MW and is operated jointly by the CEA and EDF. Its primary role today is to investigate the transmutation of long-lived radioactive waste into shorter-lived wasteform. Its final shutdown is scheduled for the beginning of 2009. In this context the Phenix Power Plant Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2003. It covers the definitive cessation of plant operation and the dismantling (D and D) operations together with the final shutdown preparatory phase. The final shutdown phase includes the operations authorized within the standard operating methodological framework. The dismantling phase also comprises treatment of sodium-bearing waste and dismantling of the nuclear facilities (reactor block, shielded cells, etc.). Treatment of the Phenix primary cold trap is scheduled to begin in 2016. The analysis program includes the following steps: - Accurately determine the contamination in the trap by carrying out gamma spectrometry measurement campaigns from 2007 to 2013 (the remaining difficulty will be to accurately determine the distribution of the contamination). - Validate the safety studies for the ELA facility. This work is currently in progress; ELA will be commissioned following inactive qualification testing. - Proceed with cutting tests on the knit mesh filter, which are scheduled to begin in 2008

  3. Evaluation of Polyphenol Anthocyanin-Enriched Extracts of Blackberry, Black Raspberry, Blueberry, Cranberry, Red Raspberry, and Strawberry for Free Radical Scavenging, Reactive Carbonyl Species Trapping, Anti-Glycation, Anti-β-Amyloid Aggregation, and Microglial Neuroprotective Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Ma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycation is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, where it potentiates the aggregation and toxicity of proteins such as β-amyloid (Aβ. Published studies support the anti-glycation and neuroprotective effects of several polyphenol-rich fruits, including berries, which are rich in anthocyanins. Herein, blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts were evaluated for: (1 total phenolic and anthocyanins contents, (2 free radical (DPPH scavenging and reactive carbonyl species (methylglyoxal; MGO trapping, (3 anti-glycation (using BSA-fructose and BSA-MGO models, (4 anti-Aβ aggregation (using thermal- and MGO-induced fibrillation models, and, (5 murine microglia (BV-2 neuroprotective properties. Berry crude extracts (CE were fractionated to yield anthocyanins-free (ACF and anthocyanins-enriched (ACE extracts. The berry ACEs (at 100 μg/mL showed superior free radical scavenging, reactive carbonyl species trapping, and anti-glycation effects compared to their respective ACFs. The berry ACEs (at 100 μg/mL inhibited both thermal- and MGO-induced Aβ fibrillation. In addition, the berry ACEs (at 20 μg/mL reduced H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production, and lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide species in BV-2 microglia as well as decreased H2O2-induced cytotoxicity and caspase-3/7 activity in BV-2 microglia. The free radical scavenging, reactive carbonyl trapping, anti-glycation, anti-Aβ fibrillation, and microglial neuroprotective effects of these berry extracts warrant further in vivo studies to evaluate their potential neuroprotective effects against AD.

  4. Essentially Trap-Free CsPbBr3 Colloidal Nanocrystals by Postsynthetic Thiocyanate Surface Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscher, Brent A; Swabeck, Joseph K; Bronstein, Noah D; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2017-05-17

    We demonstrate postsynthetic modification of CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals by a thiocyanate salt treatment. This treatment improves the quantum yield of both freshly synthesized (PLQY ≈ 90%) and aged nanocrystals (PLQY ≈ 70%) to within measurement error (2-3%) of unity, while simultaneously maintaining the shape, size, and colloidal stability. Additionally, the luminescence decay kinetics transform from multiexponential decays typical of nanocrystalline semiconductors with a distribution of trap sites, to a monoexponential decay, typical of single energy level emitters. Thiocyanate only needs to access a limited number of CsPbBr 3 nanocrystal surface sites, likely representing under-coordinated lead atoms on the surface, in order to have this effect.

  5. Does penile rehabilitation have a role in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Blecher

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In men undergoing radical treatment for prostate cancer, erectile function is one of the most important health-related quality-of-life outcomes influencing patient choice in treatment. Penile rehabilitation has emerged as a therapeutic measure to prevent erectile dysfunction and expedite return of erectile function after radical prostatectomy. Penile rehabilitation involves a program designed to increase the likelihood of return to baseline-level erectile function, as opposed to treatment, which implies the therapeutic treatment of symptoms, a key component of post–radical prostatectomy management. Several pathological theories form the basis for rehabilitation, and a plethora of treatments are currently in widespread use. However, whilst there is some evidence supporting the concept of penile rehabilitation from animal studies, randomised controlled trials are contradictory in outcomes. Similarly, urological guidelines are conflicted in terms of recommendations. Furthermore, it is clear that in spite of the lack of evidence for the role of penile rehabilitation, many urologists continue to employ some form of rehabilitation in their patients after radical prostatectomy. This is a significant burden to health resources in public-funded health economies, and no effective cost-benefit analysis has been undertaken to support this practice. Thus, further research is warranted to provide both scientific and clinical evidence for this contemporary practice and the development of preventative strategies in treating erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy.

  6. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  7. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  8. Free-Radical Scavenger Edaravone Treatment Confers Neuroprotection Against Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Hua; Li, Yong-Cai; Li, Xia; Shi, Hong; Gao, Yan-Qin; Vosler, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of neurological disability in young adults. Edaravone, a novel synthetic small-molecule free-radical scavenger, has been shown to have a neuroprotective effect in both animal models of cerebral ischemia and stroke patients; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this report, we investigated the potential mechanisms of edaravone treatment in a rat model of TBI. TBI was induced in the right cerebral cortex of male adult rats using Feeney's weight-drop method. Edaravone (0.75, 1.5, or 3 mg/kg) or vehicle (normal saline) was intravenously administered at 2 and 12 h after TBI. Edaravone treatment significantly decreased hippocampal CA3 neuron loss, reduced oxidative stress, and decreased neuronal programmed cell death compared to vehicle treatment. The protective effects of edaravone treatment were also related to the pathology of TBI on non-neuronal cells, as edaravone decreased astrocyte and glial activation. Lastly, edaravone treatment significantly reduced the presence of inflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and, importantly, neurological deficits following TBI. Our results suggest that edaravone exerts a neuroprotective effect in the rat model of TBI. The likely mechanism is via inhibiting oxidative stress, leading to a decreased inflammatory response and glial activation, and thereby reducing neuronal death and improving neurological function. PMID:21732763

  9. The Impact of Colleague Peer Review on the Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Process in the Radical Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, K P; McAleese, J; Crockett, C; Harney, J; Eakin, R L; Young, V A L; Dunn, M A; Johnston, R E; Hanna, G G

    2015-09-01

    Modern radiotherapy uses techniques to reliably identify tumour and reduce target volume margins. However, this can potentially lead to an increased risk of geographic miss. One source of error is the accuracy of target volume delineation (TVD). Colleague peer review (CPR) of all curative-intent lung cancer plans has been mandatory in our institution since May 2013. At least two clinical oncologists review plans, checking treatment paradigm, TVD, prescription dose tumour and critical organ tolerances. We report the impact of CPR in our institution. Radiotherapy treatment plans of all patients receiving radical radiotherapy were presented at weekly CPR meetings after their target volumes were reviewed and signed off by the treating consultant. All cases and any resultant change to TVD (including organs at risk) or treatment intent were recorded in our prospective CPR database. The impact of CPR over a 13 month period from May 2013 to June 2014 is reported. One hundred and twenty-two patients (63% non-small cell lung carcinoma, 17% small cell lung carcinoma and 20% 'clinical diagnosis') were analysed. On average, 3.2 cases were discussed per meeting (range 1-8). CPR resulted in a change in treatment paradigm in 3% (one patient proceeded to induction chemotherapy, two patients had high-dose palliative radiotherapy). Twenty-one (17%) had a change in TVD and one (1%) patient had a change in dose prescription. In total, 6% of patients had plan adjustment after review of dose volume histogram. The introduction of CPR in our centre has resulted in a change in a component of the treatment plan for 27% of patients receiving curative-intent lung radiotherapy. We recommend CPR as a mandatory quality assurance step in the planning process of all radical lung plans. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Derived Adaptive Radiotherapy for Radical Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, Maria A.; Brooks, Corrinne; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Aitken, Alexandra; Tait, Diana M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential for reduction in normal tissue irradiation by creating a patient specific planning target volume (PTV) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging acquired in the first week of radiotherapy for patients receiving radical radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Patients receiving radical RT for carcinoma of the esophagus were investigated. The PTV is defined as CTV(tumor, nodes) plus esophagus outlined 3 to 5 cm cranio-caudally and a 1.5-cm circumferential margin is added (clinical plan). Prefraction CBCT are acquired on Days 1 to 4, then weekly. No correction for setup error made. The images are imported into the planning system. The tumor and esophagus for the length of the PTV are contoured on each CBCT and 5 mm margin is added. A composite volume (PTV1) is created using Week 1 composite CBCT volumes. The same process is repeated using CBCT Week 2 to 6 (PTV2). A new plan is created using PTV1 (adaptive plan). The coverage of the 95% isodose of PTV1 is evaluated on PTV2. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for lungs, heart, and cord for two plans are compared. Results: A total of 139 CBCT for 14 cases were analyzed. For the adaptive plan the coverage of the 95% prescription isodose for PTV1 = 95.6% ± 4% and the PTV2 = 96.8% ± 4.1% (t test, 0.19). Lungs V20 (15.6 Gy vs. 10.2 Gy) and heart mean dose (26.9 Gy vs. 20.7 Gy) were significantly smaller for the adaptive plan. Conclusions: A reduced planning volume can be constructed within the first week of treatment using CBCT. A single plan modification can be performed within the second week of treatment with considerable reduction in organ at risk dose.

  11. Effect of tocopherol treatment on deterioration of edible oil quality (acid value, carbonyl value, free fatty acid and radical activity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Tanaka, Yuko; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2014-01-01

    In this study, waste edible oil was prepared by both heat and aeration treatment, and the increasing inhibitive effect of tocopherol treatment on the acid value (AV) and carbonyl value (CV) of the oil was investigated. The AV and CV of waste edible oil treated with tocopherol were 0.1-1.0% lower than those of the nontreated oil, indicating that tocopherol exerted a radical-scavenging activity. The concentration of tocopherol decreased with time, while that of the remaining 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals increased. These results suggest that the addition of tocopherol proved to be useful for preventing the deterioration of waste edible oil.

  12. Selective Trapping of Volatile Fission Products with an Off-Gas Treatment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.R. Westphal; J.J. Park; J.M. Shin; G.I. Park; K.J. Bateman; D.L. Wahlquist

    2008-07-01

    A head-end processing step, termed DEOX for its emphasis on decladding via oxidation, is being developed for the treatment of spent oxide fuel by pyroprocessing techniques. The head-end step employs high temperatures to oxidize UO2 to U3O8 resulting in the separation of fuel from cladding and the removal of volatile fission products. Development of the head-end step is being performed in collaboration with the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) through an International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Following the initial experimentation for the removal of volatile fission products, an off-gas treatment system was designed in conjunction with KAERI to collect specific fission gases. The primary volatile species targeted for trapping were iodine, technetium, and cesium. Each species is intended to be collected in distinct zones of the off-gas system and within those zones, on individual filters. Separation of the volatile off-gases is achieved thermally as well as chemically given the composition of the filter media. A description of the filter media and a basis for its selection will be given along with the collection mechanisms and design considerations. In addition, results from testing with the off-gas treatment system will be presented.

  13. TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE TUMOR AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Babintsev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC treatment is a pressing problem both inRussiaand worldwide. According to data for Saint-Petersburg, from 1990 to 2002 morbidity increase rate for PC was 141.3 %. Even after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP erectile dysfunction of some level is observed in 65–75 % of patients. During follow-up examination, data on sexual history were gathered including information on past and current sexual contacts. A questionnaire based on the International Index of Erectile Function was used which allows to evaluate different parameters of sexual function (sexual drive, erection, orgasm, ejaculation, sexual act, and satisfaction with sexual relationships, as well as determine treatment effectiveness. We performed combined two-stage treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with PC after RP. At the first stage, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil 100 mg were used. If the drug was ineffective, the second stage was initiated (intracavernosal alprostadil injections. Drug effectiveness, complications, patient compliancy were evaluated.

  14. Failure pattern and salvage treatment after radical treatment of head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Anja; Grau, Cai; Overgaard, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that head and neck cancer (HNC) patients benefit from specialized follow-up (FU), as this strategy ensures timely detection of relapses for successful salvage treatment. This was done by evaluation of the pattern of failure, the temporal...... recordings of recurrent disease in 567 patients with primary tumors of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses and salivary glands. A review of medical records was performed in order to update and supplement the database. Results Failures of the 567 patients were primarily in T...

  15. Meta-analysis of comparison between brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaodong; Jiang Qing; Yuan Gengbiao; Wang Jiawu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effect of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer using a Meta-analysis. Methods: The published data with randomized control trials (RCT) on comparison of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in PubMed, Wanfang database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBMdisc), the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Ovid and Cochrane library were searched and screened. The quality of the studies included was evaluated and the data with 5-year event free survival rate for comparison were extracted. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 5.0 (Cochrane reviews software). Results: From six trials, there were 5903 patients that were eligible for the analysis, in which 3323 patients were treated by brachytherapy and other 2580 by radical prostatectomy. The odds ratio of all trials was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.69-1.45, P=0.99) and there was no significant difference of 5-year event free survival rate between two treatment groups. Conclusion: This Meta analysis shows that brachytherapy may have comparable treatment effect than radical prostatectomy. (authors)

  16. Effect of free-radical spin trap N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone on seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S6 (2005), s. 375-375 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /26./. 28.08.2005-01.09.2005, Paris] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1238; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015 Keywords : free radical scavenger * epilepsy * immature rats * homocysteic acid Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  17. Solution phase and membrane immobilized iron-based free radical reactions: Fundamentals and applications for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Scott Romak

    Membrane-based separation processes have been used extensively for drinking water purification, wastewater treatment, and numerous other applications. Reactive membranes synthesized through functionalization of the membrane pores offer enhanced reactivity due to increased surface area at the polymer-solution interface and low diffusion limitations. Oxidative techniques utilizing free radicals have proven effective for both the destruction of toxic organics and non-environmental applications. Most previous work focuses on reactions in the homogeneous phase; however, the immobilization of reactants in membrane pores offers several advantages. The use of polyanions immobilized in a membrane or chelates in solution prevents ferric hydroxide precipitation at near-neutral pH, a common limitation of iron(Fe(II/III))-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H 2O2) decomposition. The objectives of this research are to develop a membrane-based platform for the generation of free radicals, degrade toxic organic compounds using this and similar solution-based reactions, degrade toxic organic compounds in droplet form, quantify hydroxyl radical production in these reactions, and develop kinetic models for both processes. In this study, a functionalized membrane containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to immobilize iron ions and conduct free radical reactions by permeating H2O2 through the membrane. The membrane's responsive behavior to pH and divalent cations was investigated and modeled. The conversion of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in the membrane and its effect on the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide were monitored and used to develop kinetic models for predicting H2O2 decomposition in these systems. The rate of hydroxyl radical production, and hence contaminant degradation can be varied by changing the residence time, H2O2 concentration, and/or iron loading. Using these membrane-immobilized systems, successful removal of toxic organic compounds, such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), from water

  18. Hormonal changes after localized prostate cancer treatment. Comparison between external beam radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, J; Celma, A; Placer, J; Maldonado, X; Trilla, E; Salvador, C; Lorente, D; Regis, L; Cuadras, M; Carles, J; Morote, J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on the hypothalamic pituitary axis of 120 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RP or EBRT exclusively. 120 patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. Ninety two patients underwent RP and 28 patients EBRT exclusively. We measured serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (T), free testosterone, and estradiol at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after treatment completion. Patients undergoing RP were younger and presented a higher prostate volume (64.3 vs. 71.1 years, p<0.0001 and 55.1 vs. 36.5 g, p<0.0001; respectively). No differences regarding serum hormonal levels were found at baseline. Luteinizing hormone and FSH levels were significantly higher in those patients treated with EBRT at three months (luteinizing hormone 8,54 vs. 4,76 U/l, FSH 22,96 vs. 8,18 U/l, p<0,0001) while T and free testosterone levels were significantly lower (T 360,3 vs. 414,83ng/dl, p 0,039; free testosterone 5,94 vs. 7,5pg/ml, p 0,018). At 12 months FSH levels remained significantly higher in patients treated with EBRT compared to patients treated with RP (21,01 vs. 8,51 U/l, p<0,001) while T levels remained significantly lower (339,89 vs. 402,39ng/dl, p 0,03). Prostate cancer treatment influences the hypothalamic pituitary axis. This influence seems to be more important when patients with prostate cancer are treated with EBRT rather than RP. More studies are needed to elucidate the role that prostate may play as an endocrine organ. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, T.; Hayakawa, N.; Kuriyama, I.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of alkyl radicals, the conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals and the trapping of allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene have been studied by electron spin resonance (e.s.r.). It has been suggested that in the crystal core alkyl radicals react with trans-vinylene double bonds and are converted into trans-vinylene allyl radicals; at the crystal surface, alkyl radicals react with vinyl end groups and are converted into allyl radicals with vinyl end groups. The decay of radical pairs and the formation of trans-vinylene double bonds are discussed. (author)

  20. Neoadjuvant treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorticati, Carlos; Aguilar, Jorge A.; Gonzalez Granda, Pablo; Mendez, Fernando; Montiel, Raul; Rege, Eduardo; Alvarez, Patricio; Lopez, Miguel A.; Rizzi, Alfredo; Mazza, Osvaldo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: To analyze the results of the treatment in patients with cancer of prostate of high risk. Material and Method: Retrospective and observational analysis of 130 patients operated by CAP of high risk (criteria of D'Amico) average 41,48 months, divided in form nonrandomized in three groups 1: radical prostatectomy, 2: neoadjuvant hormonoterapy (BAC) + PR, 3: BAC + PR + x-ray (RT). Statistical analysis: multivaried, test of curved Chi2 and p statistical and of Kaplan Meier. Results: Biochemical relapse 68 patients (52.3%), average 23,37 months. Without differences according to therapeutic modality (p: 0.043). In the multivaried analysis of the 3 factors of presurgical, single risk we found a statistically significant relation in the coexistence of the 3 factors with the presence of positive margin in the PR piece. (p: 0,002). The analysis to make or not, neoadjuvant BAC without significant difference (p: 0,403) evaluating in such the rate of M+, actuarial global survival according to curves of Kaplan Meier to 5 and 10 years (P: 0,5257) and survival 5 actuarial specific cancer to and 10a (P: 0,2165). Conclusions: Without significant differences in: RB, clinical progression, pathological relapse, global and specific survival, rate of positive surgical margins. The 3 criteria of D'Amico were predictive of positive surgical margins and RB, the patients with RB in group 2 presented/displayed greater risk of clinical progression, the PR demonstrated a global survival and specify actuarial to 10 years greater to 50%, considering it therapeutic an option been worth. (authors) [es

  1. Proposed salvage treatment strategy for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Makito; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Morizawa, Yosuke; Anai, Satoshi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Aoki, Katsuya; Yoneda, Tatsuo; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy include salvage radiotherapy of the prostatic bed and/or androgen deprivation therapy. To establish an effective treatment strategy for recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy, we retrospectively analyzed the outcome of salvage radiation monotherapy in such cases. Data from 61 men who had undergone salvage radiation monotherapy for biochemical recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy were retrospectively reviewed. In all patients, salvage radiotherapy consisted of iraradiation to the prostatic bed (70 Gy) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques. Treatment outcome was analyzed to identify predictive factors of salvage radiotherapy. The biochemical recurrence-free survival after salvage radiation monotherapy at 2 and 5 years was 55% and 38%, respectively. Cox proportional regression models revealed that the independent predictive factors for biochemical recurrence were Gleason Score ≥ 8, negative surgical margin, and PSA velocity ≥ 0.38 ng/mL/year. Negative surgical margin and PSA velocity ≥ 0.8 ng/mL/year were significantly associated with poor response in the serum PSA levels after salvage radiotherapy. Based on our findings, we propose a treatment strategy for biochemical recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy. Patients with Gleason score ≤ 7, positive surgical margin, and PSA velocity < 0.38 ng/mL/year are categorized the most favorable group, so that eradication by salvage radiation monotherapy could be expected. Other patients could be divided to two groups depending on surgical margin status and PSA velocity: 1) patients who might require combination of SRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy and 2) patients who should be treated by androgen deprivation monotherapy

  2. Treatment of carcinoma of uterine cervix stage III by adriamycin, bleomycin and cisplatinum, neoadjuvant, modified radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, J.C. do; Ribeiro, C.W.; Rezende, Magda C.; Figueiredo, E.; Chu, C.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with untreated carcinoma of the cervix stage III A and IIIB, were submitted to 3 to 5 cycles of a combination of adriamycin (ADR), bleomycin (BLEO) and cisplatinum (CDDP), followed by modified radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy, 6 cycles, of the same association. The surgical aspect is emphasized and the operative sequence is described. A comparative evaluation between the treatment presented and the radiotherapy is done. The survical rate is studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Clinical outcome of radical prostatectomy for stage C prostate cancer. Comparison with other treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Osamu; Meguro, Norio; Saiki, Shigeru; Kinouchi, Toshiaki; Kuroda, Masao; Usami, Michiyuki; Kotake, Toshihiko

    1997-01-01

    Of the 69 patients with clinical stage C prostate cancer under 75 years old and with good performance status between 1986 and 1995, 29 underwent radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy, 21 underwent radiation therapy combined with endocrine therapy and remaining 19 patients were treated by endocrine therapy alone. The median follow-up was 44 months (range 4 to 122). Radical prostatectomy resulted in progression-free rates of 79% and 61% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Progression-free rates were lower in patients with lymph node metastasis or positive surgical margins. In patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor, radical prostatectomy resulted in a progression-free rate of 100% at 5 years. However, in patients with clinical stage T4a or poorly differentiated tumor, radiation therapy resulted in a better progression-free rate than radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor will benefit from radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy and that radiation therapy will be effective for advanced diseases. (author)

  4. Impacts of silvicultural thinning treatments on beetle trap captures and tree attacks during low bark beetle populations in ponderosa pine forests of northern Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord, M L; Hofstetter, R W; Wagner, M R

    2010-10-01

    Our research used a combination of passive traps, funnel traps with lures, baited trees, and surveys of long-term thinning plots to assess the impacts of different levels of stand basal area (BA) on bark beetle tree attack and on trap captures of Ips spp., Dendroctonus spp., and their predators. The study occurred at two sites in ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws., forests, from 2004 to 2007 during low bark beetle populations. Residual stand BA ranged from 9.0 to 37.0 m2/ha. More predators and bark beetles were collected in passive traps in stands of lower BA than in stands of higher BA; however, significance varied by species and site, and total number of beetles collected was low. Height of the clear panel passive traps affected trap catches for some species at some sites and years. When pheromone lures were used with funnel traps [Ips pini (Say) lure: lanierone, +03/-97 ipsdienol], we found no significant difference in trap catches among basal area treatments for bark beetles and their predators. Similarly, when trees were baited (Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte lure: myrcene, exo-brevicomin and frontalin), we found no significant difference for days to first bark beetle attack. Surveys of long-term thinning treatments found evidence of bark beetle attacks only in unthinned plots (approximately 37 m2/ha basal area). We discuss our results in terms of management implications for bark beetle trapping and control.

  5. Planetary populations in the mass-period diagram: A statistical treatment of exoplanet formation and the role of planet traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro [Currently EACOA Fellow at Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), Taipei 10641, Taiwan. (China); Pudritz, Ralph E., E-mail: yasu@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca [Also at Origins Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1, Canada. (Canada)

    2013-11-20

    The rapid growth of observed exoplanets has revealed the existence of several distinct planetary populations in the mass-period diagram. Two of the most surprising are (1) the concentration of gas giants around 1 AU and (2) the accumulation of a large number of low-mass planets with tight orbits, also known as super-Earths and hot Neptunes. We have recently shown that protoplanetary disks have multiple planet traps that are characterized by orbital radii in the disks and halt rapid type I planetary migration. By coupling planet traps with the standard core accretion scenario, we showed that one can account for the positions of planets in the mass-period diagram. In this paper, we demonstrate quantitatively that most gas giants formed at planet traps tend to end up around 1 AU, with most of these being contributed by dead zones and ice lines. We also show that a large fraction of super-Earths and hot Neptunes are formed as 'failed' cores of gas giants—this population being constituted by comparable contributions from dead zone and heat transition traps. Our results are based on the evolution of forming planets in an ensemble of disks where we vary only the lifetimes of disks and their mass accretion rates onto the host star. We show that a statistical treatment of the evolution of a large population of planetary cores caught in planet traps accounts for the existence of three distinct exoplanetary populations—the hot Jupiters, the more massive planets around r = 1 AU, and the short-period super-Earths and hot Neptunes. There are very few populations that feed into the large orbital radii characteristic of the imaged Jovian planet, which agrees with recent surveys. Finally, we find that low-mass planets in tight orbits become the dominant planetary population for low-mass stars (M {sub *} ≤ 0.7 M {sub ☉}).

  6. Planetary populations in the mass-period diagram: A statistical treatment of exoplanet formation and the role of planet traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid growth of observed exoplanets has revealed the existence of several distinct planetary populations in the mass-period diagram. Two of the most surprising are (1) the concentration of gas giants around 1 AU and (2) the accumulation of a large number of low-mass planets with tight orbits, also known as super-Earths and hot Neptunes. We have recently shown that protoplanetary disks have multiple planet traps that are characterized by orbital radii in the disks and halt rapid type I planetary migration. By coupling planet traps with the standard core accretion scenario, we showed that one can account for the positions of planets in the mass-period diagram. In this paper, we demonstrate quantitatively that most gas giants formed at planet traps tend to end up around 1 AU, with most of these being contributed by dead zones and ice lines. We also show that a large fraction of super-Earths and hot Neptunes are formed as 'failed' cores of gas giants—this population being constituted by comparable contributions from dead zone and heat transition traps. Our results are based on the evolution of forming planets in an ensemble of disks where we vary only the lifetimes of disks and their mass accretion rates onto the host star. We show that a statistical treatment of the evolution of a large population of planetary cores caught in planet traps accounts for the existence of three distinct exoplanetary populations—the hot Jupiters, the more massive planets around r = 1 AU, and the short-period super-Earths and hot Neptunes. There are very few populations that feed into the large orbital radii characteristic of the imaged Jovian planet, which agrees with recent surveys. Finally, we find that low-mass planets in tight orbits become the dominant planetary population for low-mass stars (M * ≤ 0.7 M ☉ ).

  7. Results of tadalafil treatment in patients following an open nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Hirik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postoperatively administering a low daily dose of tadalafil on the erectile function of patients who underwent a nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy(NSRP due to localized prostate cancer (PCa. Materials and Methods: Of 138 patients, who underwent NSRP due to PCa between 2012 and 2014, 55 patients who had not had pre-operative erectile dysfunction (ED were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 64 (54-72. On the 15th day after surgery, after ultrasound evaluation, all 55 patients started on a daily dose of 5 mg tadalafil that was continued for 2.5 months. The erectile function of patients was evaluated pre-operatively, post-operatively, and at the 3rd and 6th month after surgery using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5 test. None of the patients was treated with hormonal therapy or radiotherapy before or after surgery. Results: Three patients were excluded from the study due to the adverse effects of tadalafil and two patients elected to discontinue the treatment. Of the remaining 50 patients whose pre-operative erectile function had been found normal, at 3 months after surgery, 36 (72% had normal erectile function; of the remaining patients in the study six (12% presented with mild, two (4% with moderate, and six (12% with severe ED. Six months after surgery, 35 patients (70% had normal erectile function while seven (14% had mild, three (6% moderate and five (10% severe ED. There was no statistically significant difference between the results obtained at the 3rd and 6thmonth follow-up (p > 0.05. Three patients reported adverse effects with tadalafil including flushes in 2 (3.6% and a headache in 1 (1.8%. Conclusions: The administration of a 5 mg post-operative dose of tadalafil to patients that had undergone a bilateral NSRP was found to have a positive effect on the recovery and maintenance of erectile function. However, there is still a need to investigate a larger series of

  8. Hypochlorite- and hypobromite-mediated radical formation and its role in cell lysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Brown, B E; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    . In this study it is shown that HOBr induces red blood cell lysis at approximately 10-fold lower concentrations than HOCl, whereas with monocyte (THP1) and macrophage (J774) cells HOCl and HOBr induce lysis at similar concentrations. The role of radical formation during lysis has been investigated by EPR spin...... trapping, and it is shown that reaction of both oxidants with each cell type generates cell-derived radicals. Red blood cells exposed to nonlytic doses of HOCl generate novel nitrogen-centered radicals whose formation is GSH dependent. In contrast, HOBr gives rise to nitrogen-centered, membrane......-derived protein radicals. With lytic doses of either oxidant, protein (probably hemoglobin)-derived, nitrogen-centered radicals are observed. Unlike the red blood cells, treatment of monocytes and macrophages with HOCl gives significant radical formation only under conditions where cell lysis occurs concurrently...

  9. Sugar Radical Formation by a Proton Coupled Hole Transfer in 2′-Deoxyguanosine Radical Cation (2′-dG•+): A Theoretical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical work has established that electronic excitation of a guanine cation radical in nucleosides or in DNA itself leads to sugar radical formation by deprotonation from the dexoxyribose sugar. In this work we investigate a ground electronic state pathway for such sugar radical formation in a hydrated one electron oxidized 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG•+ + 7H2O), using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functional and the 6-31G* basis set. We follow the stretching of the C5′-H bond in dG•+ to gain an understanding of the energy requirements to transfer the hole from the base to sugar ring and then to deprotonate to proton acceptor sites in solution and on the guanine ring. The geometries of reactant (dG•+ + 7H2O), transition state (TS) for deprotonation of C5′ site and product (dG(•C5′, N7-H+) + 7 H2O) were fully optimized. The zero point energy (ZPE) corrected activation energy (TS) for the proton transfer (PT) from C5′ is calculated to be 9.0 kcal/mol and is achieved by stretching the C5′-H bond by 0.13 Å from its equilibrium bond distance (1.099 Å). Remarkably, this small bond stretch is sufficient to transfer the “hole” (positive charge and spin) from guanine to the C5′ site on the deoxyribose group. Beyond the TS, the proton (H+) spontaneously adds to water to form a hydronium ion (H3O+) as an intermediate. The proton subsequently transfers to the N7 site of the guanine (product). The 9 kcal/mol barrier suggests slow thermal conversion of the cation radical to the sugar radical but also suggests that localized vibrational excitations would be sufficient to induce rapid sugar radical formation in DNA base cation radicals. PMID:19754084

  10. A national survey of current practices of preparation and management of radical prostate radiotherapy patients during treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nightingale, H.; Conroy, R.; Elliott, T.; Coyle, C.; Wylie, J.P.; Choudhury, A.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Radiotherapy is an important radical treatment for prostate cancer patients with services continually evolving. This survey aims to gain an insight in to the variation of radiotherapy practices in the UK, focussing on pre-treatment preparations, on-treatment review and management of radical prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. To our knowledge this is the first survey reported focussing on prostate radiotherapy practices with responses from a mix of health professionals. Materials and methods: A national survey was designed based on current known practices in supportive care and management of prostate cancer patients. The survey was distributed to lead radiotherapy personnel in radiotherapy services across the UK with a 77% response rate (n = 54). Results: Pre-treatment protocols were mandated in the majority of departments. Use of bladder filling (98%) and bowel emptying (66%) were frequently deployed. Bowel preparation varied between use of laxatives (13%) or enemas (41%) to achieve consistency. On-treatment reviews were carried out by a mix of health professionals; most commonly shared between oncologists and radiographers (20%). Radiographers reviewing patients were independent prescribers in 22% of departments. Toxicity grading tools were not used by almost half of departments (47%) either at baseline and/or on-treatment reviews. Written information about follow-up was given to patients towards the end of their radiotherapy; however, fewer departments included the length of hormone duration (13%). Conclusion: This survey has demonstrated variations in practice exist across the UK. These variations suggest that important questions about the best methods for treatment accuracy and patient management need to be established through further research. - Highlights: • Results of a national survey demonstrate wide variations in UK practice. • Lack of a clear evidence base could be a contributing factor to such variation. • Practices are

  11. Decay of organic free radicals in γ-ray irradiated pepper during thermal treatment as detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Mitsuko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2004-01-01

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy we analysed the thermal decay process of radicals in γ-Irradiated pepper Upon irradiation, the satellite signals were newly induced and appeared at the symmetric positions of the organic free radical, i.e., the g=2.0 signal. Heat treatment decreased the satellite signals exponentially. The ESR signal of the pepper heated for more than 10 min was essentially the same as that before irradiation. To evaluate the radical decay by heat-treatment, we formulated a time-dependent master equation. We could evaluate the time constant of the radical decay based upon the general solution of the equation together with the nonlinear least-squares method

  12. Modified radical mastectomy sparing one or both pectoral muscles in the treatment of breast cancer: intra and postoperative complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruffo Freitas-Júnior

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Modified radical mastectomy is widely utilized in breast cancer treatment. However, no prospective comparison has yet been made between the Madden technique (preservation of the pectoralis minor muscle and the Patey technique (resection of this muscle. The aim of this work was to compare these two modified radical mastectomy techniques, by analyzing their degrees of difficulty and complications. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized trial at the Breast Unit of Hospital Araújo Jorge, Goiás; and Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goiás. METHODS: 430 patients with breast cancer with an indication for modified radical mastectomy were included in the program, of whom 426 patients were available for analysis (225 allocated to Patey and 201 to Madden. The chi-squared and Student t tests were used for analysis. RESULTS: The patients’ demographics were well balanced between the two groups. The mean duration of the surgical procedures was 105 (± 29.9 and 102 minutes (± 33, for the Patey and Madden groups, respectively (p = 0.6. Hospitalization duration was 2.3 days for both groups. The mean number of lymph nodes resected was 20.3 (± 7.6 for Patey and 19.8 (± 8.1 for Madden (p = 0.5. There were no differences in terms of vascular or nerve sections, hematomas or infections. The surgeons reported the same degree of difficulty for the two methods. CONCLUSION: The removal of the pectoralis minor muscle did not influence any of the variables studied. Therefore, either technique can be performed, at the surgeon’s discretion.

  13. Survey of factors underlying treatment choice for patients with localized prostate cancer (radical prostatectomy vs extrabeam radiotherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramoto, Sakiko; Ota, Tomonori; Itaya, Naoshi; Maniwa, Akimitsu; Matsui, Takashi; Nishimura, Yoji; Shoji, Kazufusa

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding factors for decision-making on treatment by localized prostate cancer patients. We therefore conducted a survey series of cases for influence on treatment decision making, and also satisfaction after therapy. A total of 51 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) were mailed original questionnaires about their treatment decision-making factors and satisfaction and the results compared between the two groups. Some 48 (94.1%) patients responded to the questionnaire, 38 (79.2%) and 10 (20.8%) after RP and EBRT, respectively. The major factor determining the decision as to treatment approach was the physician in both groups (more than 90%). Excluding physicians, family or others were more important in the RP group than the EBRT group (p=0.023). RP group patients desired removal of their prostate for cancer control, while, EBRT group patients favored the less invasive approach in consideration of side effects. Over 80% patients indicated they would definitely or probably choose the same treatment again, although some of the RP group would switch to watchful-waiting because of sexual dysfunction, urinary incontinence and the invasive nature of the procedure. Physicians are in a most important position to help patients understand prostate cancer and treatment, outcomes, and need to help them make their best choice, with appropriate follow up including mental care. (author)

  14. Mesenteric ischemia after capecitabine treatment in rectal cancer and resultant short bowel syndrome is not an absolute contraindication for radical oncological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perpar, Ana; Brecelj, Erik; Kozjek, Nada Rotovnik; Anderluh, Franc; Oblak, Irena; Vidmar, Marija Skoblar; Velenik, Vaneja

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic events, arterial or venous in origin, still remain a source of substantial morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. The propensity for their development in oncology patients is partially a consequence of the disease itself and partially a result of our attempts to treat it. One of the rarest and deadliest thromboembolic complications is arterial mesenteric ischemia. The high mortality rate is caused by its rarity and by its non-specific clinical presentation, both of which make early diagnosis and treatment difficult. Hence, most diagnoses and treatments occur late in the course of the disease. The issue survivors of arterial mesenteric ischemia may face is short bowel syndrome, which has become a chronic condition after the introduction of parenteral nutrition at home. We present a 73-year-old rectal cancer patient who developed acute arterial mesenteric thrombosis at the beginning of the pre-operative radiochemotherapy. Almost the entire length of his small intestine, except for the proximal 50 cm of it, and the ascending colon had to be resected. After multiorgan failure his condition improved, and he was able to successfully complete radical treatment (preoperative radiotherapy and surgery) for the rectal carcinoma, despite developing short bowel syndrome (SBS) and being dependent upon home-based parenteral nutrition to fully cover his nutritional needs. Mesenteric ischemia and resultant short bowel syndrome are not absolute contraindications for radical oncological treatment since such patients can still achieve long-term remission

  15. IS TREATMENT-RESISTANCE IN PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS A TRAP FOR POLYPHARMACY?

    OpenAIRE

    Jašović-Gašić, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, more and more mental health professionals manage patients who fail treatment for major psychiatric disorders. There is not a consensus on how to deal with treatment-resistance patients, but usually psychiatrists result to polypharmacy. Method: In reviewing the evidence based clinical research we will try to answer some questions about treatment-resistant psychiatric disorders. Treatment-resistant symptoms complicate the clinical course of all psychiatric diso...

  16. Inclusion of molecular biotherapies with radical radiotherapy: modeling of combined modality treatment schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Bleddyn; Dale, Roger G.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The use of molecular biology based therapies concurrently with radical radiotherapy is likely to offer potential benefits, but there is relatively little use of classical radiobiology in the rationale for such applications. The biological mechanisms that govern the outcomes of radiotherapy need to be completely understood before rational application and optimization of such adjuvant biotherapies with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Existing biomathematical models of radiotherapy can be used to explore the possible impact of biotherapies that modify tumor proliferation rates and/or radiosensitivity parameters during radiotherapy. Equations that show how to incorporate biotherapies with the linear-quadratic model of radiation cell kill are presented. Also considered are changes in tumor physiology, such as improved blood flow with enhanced delivery of biotherapy to the tumor cells and accelerated clonogen repopulation during radiotherapy. Monte Carlo random sampling methods are used to simulate these effects in heterogenous tumor populations with variation in radiosensitivities, clonogen numbers, and doubling times, as well as variations in repopulation onset rates and in vascular perfusion rates with time. Results: The time onset and duration of exposure of each type of biotherapy during radical radiotherapy can influence the predicted tumor cure probabilities in subtle ways. In general, the efficacy of biotherapies that radiosensitize will depend upon the number of radiotherapy fractions that are sensitized and the change in blood flow with time during radiotherapy. Biotherapies that control repopulation will depend not only on the duration of exposure but also, where accelerated repopulation occurs, on the time at which biotherapy is initiated during radiotherapy. From the ranges of radiobiological parameters and biotherapy efficacies assumed for exploratory examples, large changes of tumor control probability (TCP) are encountered in individual

  17. Effect of overall treatment time on local control in radical radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajanti, Mikael; Kaleta, Remigiusz; Kankaanranta, Leena; Muhonen, Timo; Holsti, Lars

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of overall treatment time on local control in radical radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus. Methods and Materials: Three hundred and fifty-three patients with inoperable esophageal cancer (tumor length ≤ 10 cm in all cases) treated during 1963-1988 by radical radiotherapy alone either as continuous or split-course therapy. The overall treatment time varied from 35 to 55 days and the total dosage from 50 to 71 Gy in the continuous therapy group (n = 138), and in the split-course group (n = 215) with a planned 3-week rest interval in the middle of the treatment from 56 to 70 days and from 55 to 70 Gy, respectively. The logit method of the linear-quadratic formula for local control at 1 year was used to examine the effect of treatment time on local control. All patients were pooled to obtain a wide range of overall treatment times. Results: The 1-, 2-, and 5-year actuarial survival rates according to the T-stage in the continuous therapy group from the first day of the radiotherapy were: 57%, 32%, and 10% for the T1 tumors and 23%, 8%, and 5% for the T2 tumors. The corresponding figures for the split-course group were: 50%, 19%, and 4% for the T1 tumors and 17%, 6%, and 3% for the T2 tumors. The 1-year local control rate was 56% for the T1 tumors and 15% for the T2 tumors in the continuous therapy group and 48% for the T1 tumors and 10% for the T2 tumors in the split-course group. The results of the logit method did not fit well with the T1 tumors. For the T2 tumors, they showed Dprolif to be about 0.24 Gy/day for local control at 1 year. As a consequence, protraction of overall time by 1 week should be compensated by increasing the total dose by 1.8 Gy for 1 year local control. Conclusions: More attention should be focused on repopulation. Shortening of overall treatment time might be beneficial for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus

  18. Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzak, Eugene J; Eastham, James A

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal strategies combining local and systemic therapy offer the greatest chance of cure for many with men with high-risk prostate cancer who may harbor occult metastatic disease. However, no systemic therapy combined with radical prostatectomy has proven beneficial. This was in part due to a lack of effective systemic agents; however, there have been several advancements in the metastatic and castrate-resistant prostate cancer that might prove beneficial if given earlier in the natural history of the disease. For example, novel hormonal agents have recently been approved for castration-resistant prostate cancer with some early phase II neoadjuvant showing promise. Additionally, combination therapy with docetaxel-based chemohormonal has demonstrated a profound survival benefit in metastatic hormone-naïve patients and might have a role in eliminating pre-existing ADT-resistant tumor cells in the neoadjuvant setting. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)/Alliance 90203 trial has finished accrual and should answer the question as to whether neoadjuvant docetaxel-based chemohormonal therapy provides an advantage over prostatectomy alone. There are also several promising targeted agents and immunotherapies under investigation in phase I/II trials with the potential to provide benefit in the neoadjuvant setting.

  19. Inhibitory effect on nitric oxide production and free radical scavenging activity of Thai medicinal plants in osteoarthritic knee treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuthakoengkun, Areeya; Itharat, Arunporn

    2014-08-01

    Thai medicine plants used for Osteoarthritis of knee (OA) treatment consist of twelve plants such as Crinumn asiaticum, Cleome viscosa, Drypetes roxburghii, Piper longum, Piper nigrum, Plumbago indica, Alpinia galanga, Curcuma aromatica, Globba malaccensis, Zingiber montanum, Zingiber officinale andZingiberzerumbet. They showedhighfrequency in OA formula. To investigate inhibitory effect on LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) release from RAW264. 7 cell and free radical scavenging activity usingDPPH assay of these ethanolic plant extracts. Plant materials were extracted by maceration in 95% ethanol. Anti-inflammatory activity were tested on LPS-induced NO production. Free radical scavenging activity was performed by DPPH assay. All of ethanolic extracts exhibited potent inhibitory effect on NO release. The ethanolic extract of Z. zerumbet exhibited the highest inhibitory effect followed by Z. montanum and G. malaccensis, respectively. Except A. galanga and C. viscosa, all extracts possessed more influential than indomethacin (IC50 = 20.32±3.23 μLg/ml), a positive control. The investigation on antioxidant activity suggested that the ethanolic extracts of D. roxburghii, Z. officinale, Z. montanum, C. aromatic, A. galanga, P indica, G malaccensis, P nigrum exhibited antioxidant activity. By means ofD. roxburghii had the highest electron donating activity,followed by Z. officinale. Moreover both extracts were more effective than BHT apositive control (EC50 = 14.04±1.95 μg/ml). Thai medicinal plants had anti-inflammatory activity and could inhibit destruction of articular cartilage that corresponded to the traditional medicine and supported using these medicinal plants for OA treatment.

  20. Does ibuprofen treatment in patent ductus arteriosus alter oxygen free radicals in premature infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Melek; Yildirim, Tulin G; Sandal, Gonca; Bozdag, Senol; Erdeve, Omer; Altug, Nahide; Uras, Nurdan; Oguz, Serife S; Dilmen, Ugur

    2017-04-01

    Introduction Ibuprofen is used widely to close patent ductus arteriosus in preterm infants. The anti-inflammatory activity of ibuprofen may also be partly due to its ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. We evaluated the interaction between oxidative status and the medical treatment of patent ductus arteriosus with two forms of ibuprofen. Materials and methods This study enrolled newborns of gestational age ⩽32 weeks, birth weight ⩽1500 g, and postnatal age 48-96 hours, who received either intravenous or oral ibuprofen to treat patent ductus arteriosus. Venous blood was sampled before ibuprofen treatment from each patient to determine antioxidant and oxidant concentrations. Secondary samples were collected 24 hours after the end of the treatment. Total oxidant status and total antioxidant capacity were measured using Erel's method. This prospective randomised study enrolled 102 preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus. The patent ductus arteriosus closure rate was significantly higher in the oral ibuprofen group (84.6 versus 62%) after the first course of treatment (p=0.011). No significant difference was found between the pre- and post-treatment total oxidant status and total antioxidant capacity in the groups. Discussion Ibuprofen treatment does not change the total oxidant status or total antioxidant capacity. We believe that the effect of ibuprofen treatment in inducing ischaemia overcomes the scavenging effect of ibuprofen.

  1. A Study on the Necessary Number of Bolus Treatments in Radiotherapy after Modified Radical Mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Chae Seon; Kim, Jong Sik; Kim, Young Kon; Park, Young Hwan

    2006-01-01

    Post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMR) is known to decrease loco-regional recurrence. Adequate skin and dermal dose are achieved by adding bolus. The more difficult clinical issue is determining the necessary number of bolus treatment, given the limits of normal skin tolerance. The aim of this study is to evaluate the necessary number of bolus treatment after PMR in patients with breast cancer. Four female breast cancer patients were included in the study. The median age was 53 years(range, 38-74), tumor were left sided in 2 patients and right sided in 2 patients. All patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy after MRM. Radiotherapy was delivered to the chest wall (C.W) and supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCL) using 4 MV X-ray. The total dose was 50 Gy, in 2 Gy fractions (with 5 times a week). CT was performed for treatment planning, treatment planning was performed using A DAC-Pinnacles 3 (Phillips, USA) for all patients without and with bolus. Bolus treatment plans were generated using image tool (0.5 cm of thickness and 6 cm of width). Dose distribution was analyzed and the increased skin dose rate in the build-up region was computed and the skin dose using TLD-100 chips (Harshaw, USA) was measured. No significant difference was found in dose distribution without and with bolus; C.W coverage was 95-100% of the prescribed dose in both. But, there was remarkable difference in the skin dose to the scar. The skin dose to the scar without and with bolus were 100-105% and 50-75%. The increased skin dose rates in the build-up region for Pt. 1, Pt. 2. Pt. 3 and Pt. 4 were 23.3%, 35.6%, 34.9%, and 41.7%. The results of measured skin dose using TLD-100 chips in the cases without and with bolus were 209.3 cGy and 161.1 cGy, 200 cGy and 150.2 cGy, 211.4 cGy and 160.5 cGy, 198.6 cGy and 155.5 cGy for Pt. 1, Pt. 2, Pt. 3, and Pt. 4. It was concludes through this analysis that the adequate number of bolus treatments is 50-60% of the treatment program. Further, clinical

  2. Radical stereotactic radiosurgery with real-time tumor motion tracking in the treatment of small peripheral lung tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments in radiotherapeutic technology have resulted in a new approach to treating patients with localized lung cancer. We report preliminary clinical outcomes using stereotactic radiosurgery with real-time tumor motion tracking to treat small peripheral lung tumors. Methods Eligible patients were treated over a 24-month period and followed for a minimum of 6 months. Fiducials (3–5 were placed in or near tumors under CT-guidance. Non-isocentric treatment plans with 5-mm margins were generated. Patients received 45–60 Gy in 3 equal fractions delivered in less than 2 weeks. CT imaging and routine pulmonary function tests were completed at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 months. Results Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated, 15 with stage I lung cancer and 9 with single lung metastases. Pneumothorax was a complication of fiducial placement in 7 patients, requiring tube thoracostomy in 4. All patients completed radiation treatment with minimal discomfort, few acute side effects and no procedure-related mortalities. Following treatment transient chest wall discomfort, typically lasting several weeks, developed in 7 of 11 patients with lesions within 5 mm of the pleura. Grade III pneumonitis was seen in 2 patients, one with prior conventional thoracic irradiation and the other treated with concurrent Gefitinib. A small statistically significant decline in the mean % predicted DLCO was observed at 6 and 12 months. All tumors responded to treatment at 3 months and local failure was seen in only 2 single metastases. There have been no regional lymph node recurrences. At a median follow-up of 12 months, the crude survival rate is 83%, with 3 deaths due to co-morbidities and 1 secondary to metastatic disease. Conclusion Radical stereotactic radiosurgery with real-time tumor motion tracking is a promising well-tolerated treatment option for small peripheral lung tumors.

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez, Shaista, E-mail: shaista.hafeez@icr.ac.uk [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harris, Victoria [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, Karen [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, Shaista; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly; Harris, Victoria; Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent; Thomas, Karen; Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  5. Free radicals induced archive paper by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutrubinis, M.; Moise, I.V.; Negut, C.D.; Georgescu, R.; Suvaila, R.; Virgolici, M.; Manea, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Irradiation of archive paper (document archives of institutions, companies etc. and library or museum collections of books and documents) can solve the problems related to the bio-deterioration and bio-contamination of paper and sometimes save valuable cultural heritage paper items. For valuable paper items care should be taken to the degradation induced instantly by the ionising radiation to the cellulosic support and also to the long term post-irradiation effects. The free radicals formed due to the irradiation treatment could contribute to instant degradation of paper. Part of them are also trapped for months and years after irradiation and they could be related to the post-irradiation effects in paper items. In this study, different sorts of cellulosic support samples (soft wood and hard wood cellulose, contemporary paper, paper from archives and from collections etc.) have been irradiated with dosis up to 100 kGy and the radiation induced free radicals have been measured by ESR spectrometry. The ESR signals have shown the type and quantity of radiation induced free radicals. Their study can be used for a realistic estimation of the degradative effect of the ionising radiation treatment of archive paper.

  6. Intensification of UV-C tertiary treatment: Disinfection and removal of micropollutants by sulfate radical based Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Chueca, J; García-Cañibano, C; Lepistö, R-J; Encinas, Á; Pellinen, J; Marugán, J

    2018-04-21

    This study explores the enhancement of UV-C tertiary treatment by sulfate radical based Advanced Oxidation Processes (SR-AOPs), including photolytic activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and persulfate (PS) and their photocatalytic activation using Fe(II). Their efficiency was assessed both for the inactivation of microorganisms and the removal or micropollutants (MPs) in real wastewater treatment plant effluents. Under the studied experimental range (UV-C dose 5.7-57 J/L; UV-C contact time 3 to 28 s), the photolysis of PMS and PS (0.01 mM) increased up to 25% the bacterial removal regarding to UV-C system. The photolytic activation of PMS led to the total inactivation of bacteria (≈ 5.70 log) with the highest UV-C dose (57 J/L). However, these conditions were insufficient to remove the MPs, being required oxidant's dosages of 5 mM to remove above 90% of carbamazepine, diclofenac, atenolol and triclosan. The best efficiencies were achieved by the combination of PMS or PS with Fe(II), leading to the total removal of the MPs using a low UV-C dosage (19 J/L), UV-C contact time (9 s) and reagent's dosages (0.5 mM). Finally, high mineralization was reached (>50%) with photocatalytic activation of PMS and PS even with low reagent's dosages. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Radical Cystectomy Compared to Combined Modality Treatment for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashistha, Vishal; Wang, Hanzhang; Mazzone, Andrew; Liss, Michael A.; Svatek, Robert S.; Schleicher, Mary; Kaushik, Dharam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive comparison of overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), progression-free survival (PFS), and treatment-related complications between radical cystectomy (RC) and combined modality treatment (CMT—radiation therapy, concurrent chemotherapy, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor) in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched 7 databases (PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Proquest, CINAHL, and (ClinicalTrials.gov)) for randomized, controlled trials and prospective and retrospective studies directly comparing RC with CMT from database inception to March 2016. We conducted meta-analyses evaluating OS, DSS, and PFS with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Nineteen studies evaluating 12,380 subjects were selected. For the 8 studies encompassing 9554 subjects eligible for meta-analyses, we found no difference in OS at 5 years (HR 0.96, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.72-1.29; P=.778) or 10 years (HR 1.02, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.73-1.42; P=.905). No difference was observed in DSS at 5 years (HR 0.83, favoring radiation, 95% CI 0.54-1.28; P=.390) or 10 years (HR 1.17, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.89-1.55; P=.264), or PFS at 10 years (HR 0.85, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.43-1.67; P=.639). The cystectomy arms had higher rates of early major complications, whereas rates of minor complications were similar between the 2 treatments. Conclusion: Current meta-analysis reveals no differences in OS, DSS, or PFS between RC and CMT. Further randomized, controlled trials are necessary to identify the optimal treatment for specific patients.

  8. Radical Cystectomy Compared to Combined Modality Treatment for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashistha, Vishal [Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Wang, Hanzhang [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Mazzone, Andrew [Rush Medical College, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Liss, Michael A.; Svatek, Robert S. [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Schleicher, Mary [Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Kaushik, Dharam, E-mail: Kaushik@uthscsa.edu [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive comparison of overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), progression-free survival (PFS), and treatment-related complications between radical cystectomy (RC) and combined modality treatment (CMT—radiation therapy, concurrent chemotherapy, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor) in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched 7 databases (PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Proquest, CINAHL, and (ClinicalTrials.gov)) for randomized, controlled trials and prospective and retrospective studies directly comparing RC with CMT from database inception to March 2016. We conducted meta-analyses evaluating OS, DSS, and PFS with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Nineteen studies evaluating 12,380 subjects were selected. For the 8 studies encompassing 9554 subjects eligible for meta-analyses, we found no difference in OS at 5 years (HR 0.96, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.72-1.29; P=.778) or 10 years (HR 1.02, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.73-1.42; P=.905). No difference was observed in DSS at 5 years (HR 0.83, favoring radiation, 95% CI 0.54-1.28; P=.390) or 10 years (HR 1.17, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.89-1.55; P=.264), or PFS at 10 years (HR 0.85, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.43-1.67; P=.639). The cystectomy arms had higher rates of early major complications, whereas rates of minor complications were similar between the 2 treatments. Conclusion: Current meta-analysis reveals no differences in OS, DSS, or PFS between RC and CMT. Further randomized, controlled trials are necessary to identify the optimal treatment for specific patients.

  9. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  10. Trends in Radical Surgical Treatment Methods for Breast Malignancies in China: A Multicenter 10-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bai-Lin; Sivasubramaniam, Priya G; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Bin; Gao, Ji-Dong; Tang, Zhong-Hua; Chen, Guo-Ji; Xie, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Zhongzhao; Yang, Hong-Jian; He, Jian-Jun; Li, Hui; Li, Jia-Yuan; Fan, Jin-Hu; Wang, Xiang; Qiao, You-Lin

    2015-09-01

    Incidence rates of breast cancer continue to rise in the People's Republic of China. The purpose of this study was to describe Chinese trends in radical surgical modalities and influential imaging and demographic factors for breast malignancies. This study was a hospital-based, multicenter, 10-year (1999-2008), retrospective study. Descriptive statistical tests were used to illustrate information regarding radical surgical trends for the treatment of breast malignancies. Chi-square tests were used to assess effect of demographic factors in addition to imaging and pathological data on the specific surgical method. A total of 4,211 patients were enrolled in the survey. Among them, 3,335 patients with stage 0 to stage III disease undergoing mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included in the final analysis. The rate of BCS increased from 1.53% in 1999 to 11.88% in 2008. The rate of mastectomy declined over this time period, from 98.47% in 1999 to 88.12% in 2008, with increasing use of diagnostic imaging methods and pathological biopsies. A significantly greater percentage of patients with office work, high education levels, unmarried status, younger age, and early pathological stages preferred BCS compared with mastectomy. Rates of mastectomy in China remain elevated due to diagnosis at higher stages; however, because of increased use of diagnostic imaging, improvement of biopsy methods, and patient education, rates of less invasive lumpectomy are increasing and rates of mastectomy have decreased in China. In this study, 4,211 cases were collected from 1999 to 2008 through a multicenter retrospective study of varying geographic and socioeconomic areas to illustrate trends of surgeries in the People's Republic of China. The correlations between demographic and tumor characteristics and among methods of surgical treatment were explored. This study shows that the rate of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) increased and the rate of mastectomy declined over

  11. A multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) study on the antioxidant capacity of a neuroprotective drug, edaravone as compared with uric acid, glutathione, and trolox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogawa, Erisa; Sueishi, Yoshimi

    2014-03-01

    Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazoline-5-one) is a neuroprotective drug that has been used for brain ischemia injury treatment. Because its activity is speculated to be due to free radical scavenging activity, we carried out a quantitative determination of edaravone's free radical scavenging activity against multiple free radical species. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping-based multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) method was employed, where target free radicals were hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, alkoxyl radical, alkylperoxyl radical, methyl radical, and singlet oxygen. Edaravone showed relatively high scavenging abilities against hydroxyl radical (scavenging rate constant k=2.98×10(11) M(-1) s(-1)), singlet oxygen (k=2.75×10(7) M(-1) s(-1)), and methyl radical (k=3.00×10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Overall, edaravone's scavenging activity against multiple free radical species is as robust as other known potent antioxidant such as uric acid, glutathione, and trolox. A radar chart illustration of the MULTIS activity relative to uric acid, glutathione, and trolox indicates that edaravone has a high and balanced antioxidant activity with low specificity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cyclosporine treatment reduces oxygen free radical generation and oxidative stress in the brain of hypoxia-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richdeep S Gill

    Full Text Available Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1-4 d, 1.4-2.5 kg were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation (n = 8/group. At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4 underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe, cerebral cortical H(2O(2 production (electrochemical sensor, cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40-48% of baseline, hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27-31 mmHg and acidosis (pH 7.04 at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg, significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H(2O(2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H(2O(2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia-reoxygenation.

  13. A Honey Trap for the Treatment of Acne: Manipulating the Follicular Microenvironment to Control Propionibacterium acnes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Anne Eady

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, as 40 years ago, we still rely on a limited number of antibiotics and benzoyl peroxide to treat inflammatory acne. An alternative way of suppressing the growth of Propionibacterium acnes is to target the environment in which it thrives. We conjecture that P. acnes colonises a relatively “extreme” habitat especially in relation to the availability of water and possibly related factors such as ionic strength and osmolarity. We hypothesise that the limiting “nutrient” within pilosebaceous follicles is water since native sebum as secreted by the sebaceous gland contains none. An aqueous component must be available within colonised follicles, and water may be a major factor determining which follicles can sustain microbial populations. One way of preventing microbial growth is to reduce the water activity ( of this component with a biocompatible solute of very high water solubility. For the method to work effectively, the solute must be small, easily diffusible, and minimally soluble in sebaceous lipids. Xylose and sucrose, which fulfil these criteria, are nonfermentable by P. acnes and have been used to reduce water activity and hence bacterial colonisation of wounds. A new follicularly targeted topical treatment for acne based on this approach should be well tolerated and highly effective.

  14. Falls-risk in senior women after radical treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Biskup

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : It is estimated that 35–40% people over the age of 65 experience at least one fall per year; for those over the age of 80 this increases to 50%, and for residents of institutional care facilities, to 60%. Aim of the research : To evaluate the functional capacity and susceptibility to falling among women over 60 years of age, who had been treated for breast cancer. Material and methods : The study group comprised 173 women aged 61–85 years (mean: 68.75 years, all breast cancer survivors treated at the Holy Cross Cancer Centre in Kielce. Functional efficiency was measured using the Senior Fitness Test (SFT, and the falls-risk assessment was carried out using the POMA Tinetti test. An additional questionnaire was used to assess the anxiety associated with falls. The relationship between functional capacity and the falls-risk, and between the amount of medication used and the falls-risk, were also assessed. Results : In all SFT tests, the women had lower scores compared to the recommended standards. Medium and high falls-risk were reported in 27% of patients. Apart from an increase in falls-risk, the women reported poorer results in all physical fitness tests. An increase in the number of medications taken was associated with lower Tinetti test results. Conclusions: Women treated for breast cancer were exposed to a high falls-risk. The treatment management applied to women with breast cancer adversely affected their functional capacities. Furthermore, an increase in the amount of medication taken by post-mastectomy women resulted in a still higher exposure to falls-risk. Task-oriented, physical rehabilitation programmes should therefore promptly be introduced to address the problem of falls and resultant fractures among senior post-mastectomy women.

  15. Treatment outcome and prognostic variables for local control and survival in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokdal, Lars; Hoeyer, Morten; Maase, Hans von der [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the outcome of radical radiotherapy in 292 patients with bladder cancer and to identify prognostic factors for local control and survival. Median age was 72.3 years (range 45-83 years). Median follow up was 66 months (range 18-121 months). All patients were treated by use of a standard 3-field technique with 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the tumor and the bladder. The elective lymph nodes were treated with doses in the range from 46 Gy to 60 Gy. Complete response was obtained in 52% of the patients at 3-month control. However, 41% of all patients with an initial CR developed recurrence during follow-up. The 3-year and 5-year overall survival rate was 31% and 21%, respectively. Performance status, T-stage, macroscopic complete TURB, hydronephrosis, and serum creatinine were independent prognostic factors for overall survival and, thus, important for the selection of patients for curative intended radiotherapy. During radiotherapy acute transient side effects were recorded in 78% of the patients; severe bowel complications were recorded in 9 patients (3%). Following radiotherapy, 10 patients (3%) developed intestinal reactions requiring surgery. Three patients (1%) were cystectomized because of severe radiation reactions in the bladder. At 5-year follow-up, the actuarial risk of complications requiring surgery was 15%. Treatment-related mortality was 2%.

  16. Plasma treatment effect on charge carrier concentrations and surface traps in a-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Xing Piao, Ming; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Kim, Gyu-Tae, E-mail: gtkim@korea.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Min-Kyu [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); IMEP-LAHC, Grenoble INP, Minatec, CS 50257, 38016 Grenoble (France); Ahn, Seung-Eon [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics Corporations, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong-Hee [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics, Hwasung, Gyeonggi-do 445-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-21

    Various plasma treatment effects such as oxygen (O{sub 2}), nitrogen (N{sub 2}), and argon (Ar) on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs) are investigated. To study oxygen stoichiometry in a-IGZO TFTs with respect to various plasma environments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed. The results showed that oxygen vacancies were reduced by O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} plasmas while they were increased after Ar plasma treatment. Additionally, the effects of plasma treatment on trap distribution in bulk and surface channels were explored by means of low-frequency noise analysis. Details of the mechanisms used for generating and restoring traps on the surface and bulk channel are presented.

  17. Trapped antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, E., E-mail: eoin.butler@cern.ch [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Andresen, G. B. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Bowe, P. D. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Chapman, S. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Humphries, A. J. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only {approx}1 T ({approx}0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be 'born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 10{sup 4} times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released-the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  18. Jaundice as a prognostic factor in patients undergoing radical treatment for carcinomas of the ampulla of Vater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianguo; Zhang, Qian; Li, Peng; Shan, Yi; Zhao, Dongbing; Cai, Jianqiang

    2014-01-01

    Carcinomas of the ampulla of Vater (CAV) is a relatively rare malignant gastrointestinal tumor, and its postoperative prognostic factors have been well studied. However, as its first symptom, the impact of jaundice on the prognosis of CAV is not so clear. This study aims to explore the role of jaundice as a prognostic factor in patients undergoing radical treatment for CAV. The clinical data of 195 patients with CAV who were treated in the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, from January 1989 to January 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, 170 patients with pathologically confirmed CAV entered the statistical analysis. Jaundice was defined as a total bilirubin serum concentration of ≥ 3 mg/dl. Result Of these 170 patients, 99 (58.20%) had jaundice at presentation. Jaundice showed significant correlations with tumor differentiation (P = 0.002), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.016), pancreatic invasion (P = 0.000), elevated preoperative CA199 (P = 0.000), depth of invasion (P = 0.000), and tumor stage (P = 0.000). There were more patients with pancreatic invasion in the jaundice group than in the non-jaundice group. Also, lymph node metastasis was more common in the jaundice group (n = 26) than in the non-jaundice group (n = 8). The non-jaundice group had significant better overall 5-year disease-free survival (72.6%) than the jaundice group (41.2%, P = 0.013). Jaundice was not significantly correlated with the postoperative bleeding (P = 0.050). Jaundice in patients with CAV often predicts more advanced stages and poorer prognoses. Pancreatic invasion and lymph node metastasis are more common in CAV patients with jaundice. Jaundice is not a risk factor for postoperative bleeding and preoperative biliary drainage cannot reduce the incidence of postoperative complications.

  19. Radical treatment of extensive nevoid hyperkeratosis of the areola and breast with surgical excision after mild response to topical agents: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Tocco-Tussardi, MD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Indications for surgical treatment of NHNA can be: unsatisfying response to topical agents; young patients who want to restore the aesthetic appearance of the breast; and patients with concomitant indication for corrective surgery of the breast. Advantages are: predictable time of healing; predictable final result; radical excision of the affected tissue; and possibility of histologic analysis of the whole areola. In rare cases of lesions extending to the breast, preliminary treatment with topical agents can limit the extent of excision. Management and treatment should always be tailor-made for each individual case.

  20. Changes induced in spice paprika powder by treatment with ionizing radiation and saturated steam[Food conservation; Spice paprika; Rheology; Colorimetry; Free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispeter, J. E-mail: kispeter@szef.u-szeged.hu; Bajusz-Kabok, K.; Fekete, M.; Szabo, G.; Fodor, E.; Pali, T. E-mail: tpali@nucleus.szbk.u-szeged.hu

    2003-12-01

    The changes in spice paprika powder induced by ionizing radiation, saturated steam (SS) and their combination were studied as a function of the absorbed radiation dose and the storage time. The SS treatment lead to a decrease in color content (lightening) after 12 weeks of storage, together with the persistence of free radicals and viscosity changes for a longer period. The results suggest that ionizing radiation is a more advantageous method as concerns preservation of the quality of spice paprika.

  1. Biochemical failure as single abnormality in patients with prostate cancer following radical treatment with external radiotherapy: follow-up without immediate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Faria

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biochemical failure has been defined as 3 consecutive increases in PSA following curative treatment of prostate cancer. The appropriate management in such cases is controversial. The most usual treatment has been early introduction of hormones. Such patients will live for many years and hormone therapy causes important secondary effects and increases costs. The guideline in our Department of Radiotherapy has been to follow up, with no initial therapy, cases with low PSA and short PSA doubling time. The present study reports this experience. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 528 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by radical approach between 1992 and 1999, with external radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant hormone therapy. After a median follow-up of 77 months, there were 207 (39% cases with biochemical failure, 78 of which were followed without therapy after the identification of biochemical failure. All of them were asymptomatic patients and had negative radiographic examinations or did not have imaging exams requested since they presented a favorable outcome. The follow-up included at least 2 annual visits with physical examination and PSA. RESULTS: Of the 78 patients with biochemical failure followed without initial therapy, 7 died from other causes than prostate cancer and the remaining 71 cases were alive and asymptomatic in the last follow-up. Prognostic factors previous to radiotherapy such as stage and Gleason score were not considered when deciding for follow-up without initial therapy in these cases. The most significant aspects considered for this decision were low PSA value (median PSA on the last visit for the 78 cases was only 3.9 ng/mL and a slow PSA doubling time (in the present experience the median PSA doubling time was 22.5 months. CONCLUSION: There seems to be space for expectant management, without initial hormone therapy, in patients with prostate cancer who present biochemical failure and are

  2. Radical Evil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Manrique

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an aporia in Kant’s analysis of evil: he defines radical evilas an invisible disposition of the will, but he also demands an inferential connection between visible evil actions and this invisible disposition. This inference,however, undermines the radical invisibility of radical evil according to Kant’s own definition of the latter. Noting how this invisibility of moral worth is a distinctive feature of Kant’s approach to the moral problem, the paper then asks why, in the Groundwork, he nonetheless forecloses a question about evil that seems to be consistent with this approach. It is argued that to account for this aporia and this foreclosure, one has to interrogate the way in which the category of religion orients Kant’s incipient philosophy of history in Die Religion.

  3. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Laura; Zago, Giulia; Marulli, Giuseppe; Del Bianco, Paola; Schiavon, Marco; Pasello, Giulia; Polo, Valentina; Canova, Fabio; Tonetto, Fabrizio; Loreggian, Lucio; Rea, Federico; Conte, PierFranco; Favaretto, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1), paclitaxel (200 mg/m(2), d1), and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m(2) d1, 8) for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors-7th edition staging system). A total of 36 (62%) patients achieved partial response (PR), and six (10%) progressions were recorded. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62%) cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64%) patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, and two patients received radical-intent radiotherapy. The median PFS and OS were 11 months and 23 months, respectively. Both PFS and OS were significantly correlated to objective response (P<0.0001) and surgery (P<0.0001 and P=0.002). Patients obtaining PR and receiving local treatment achieved a median PFS and OS of 35 and 48 months, respectively. Median PFS and OS of patients not achieving PR or not receiving local treatment were 5-7 and 11-15 months, respectively. The extension of surgery did not affect the outcome. The multimodality treatment was feasible, and triple

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  5. Secondary radicals derived from chloramines of apolipoprotein B-100 contribute to HOCl-induced lipid peroxidation of low-density lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazell, L J; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Stocker, R

    1999-01-01

    component to be the major site of attack, whereas others describe extensive lipid peroxidation. The present study addresses this controversy. The results obtained are consistent with the hypothesis that radical-induced oxidation of LDL's lipids by HOCl is a secondary reaction, with most HOCl consumed via...... by an extended period of lipid peroxidation during which further protein oxidation does not occur. The secondary lipid peroxidation process involves EPR-detectable radicals, is attenuated by a radical trap or treatment of HOCl-oxidized LDL with methionine, and occurs less rapidly when the lipoprotein...

  6. Effects of scavengers of reactive oxygen and radical species on cell survival following photodynamic treatment in vitro: comparison to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, B.W.; Miller, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various scavengers of reactive oxygen and/or radical species on cell survival in vitro of EMT6 and CHO cells following photodynamic therapy (PDT) or gamma irradiation were compared. None of the agents used exhibited major direct cytotoxicity. Likewise, none interfered with cellular porphyrin uptake, and none except tryptophan altered singlet oxygen production during porphyrin illumination. The radioprotector cysteamine (MEA) was equally effective in reducing cell damage in both modalities. In part, this protection seems to have been induced by oxygen consumption in the system due to MEA autoxidation under formation of H 2 O 2 . The addition of catalase, which prevents H 2 O 2 buildup, reduced the effect of MEA to the same extent in both treatments. Whether the remaining protection was due to MEA's radical-reducing action or some remaining oxygen limitation is unclear. The protective action of MEA was not mediated by a doubling of cellular glutathione levels, since addition of buthionine sulfoximine, which prevented glutathione increase, did not diminish the observed MEA protection. The hydroxyl radical scavenger mannitol also afforded protection in both, but it was approximately twice as effective in gamma irradiation as in PDT. This is consistent with the predominant role of OH radicals in ionizing radiation damage and their presumed minor involvement in PDT damage. Superoxide dismutase, a scavenger of O 2 , acted as a radiation protector but was not significantly effective in PDT. Catalase, which scavenges H 2 O 2 , was ineffective in both modalities. Tryptophan, an efficient singlet oxygen scavenger, reduced cell death through PDT by several orders of magnitude while being totally ineffective in gamma irradiation. These data reaffirm the predominant role of 1O2 in the photodynamic cell killing but also indicate some involvement of free radical species

  7. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón, Gabriel J; Ramirez, Pedro T; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries.

  8. Flavonoids as scavengers of nitric oxide radical.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Acker, S.A.B.E.; Tromp, M.N.J.L.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; van der Vijgh, W.J.F.; Bast, A.

    1995-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of naturally occurring compounds used, e.g., in the treatment of vascular endothelial damage. They are known to be excellent scavengers of oxygen free radicals. Since the nitric oxide radical (

  9. Radiation therapy alone is not successful as salvage treatment for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oas, Lute G; Zagars, Gunar K; Pollack, Alan

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objectives: To evaluate radiotherapy (XRT) as potential salvage treatment for patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after redical prostatectomy (RP). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate who received definitive XRT between 1987 and 1993 for biopsy-proven (n=18) or for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) - producing (n=6) recurrent disease following RP were evaluated. No patient had clinically or radiographically evident distant disease. Biopsies of suspicious nodules or ultrasound findings in the prostatic fossa were positive in 18 and negative in 3. Three patients had no focal abnormalities and had no biopsy. The time between RP and XRT varied from 6 to 277 months (mean 52 months). XRT doses to the prostatic fossa ranged from 60 to 70 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Outcome was analyzed relative to local control, metastatic disease and PSA status. Persistently undetectable PSA was required to define freedom from disease. Results: Pre-XRT PSA levels ranged from 0.7 to 26.8 ng/ml (mean 7.3 ng/ml, median 2.5 ng/ml). Although PSA fell post-XRT in all but 3 patients and 10 (52%) achieved undetectable levels, the outcome at a median follow-up of 42 months (range 13-90 months) was poor, with 15 patients (63%) developing persistent/progressive disease. The patterns of progression in these 15 were: local 3, metastatic 3, persistent PSA 9. All patients whose PSA was persistently detectable developed a rising PSA profile. The actuarial incidence of freedom from disease at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years was 75%, 43%, 36% and 27% respectively. The only factor correlating to outcome was the pre-XRT PSA level. The 9 patients who remain free of disease had a mean PSA level of 3.6 ng/ml compared to a mean level of 9.6 ng/ml among the 15 who failed (p<0.01). All patients with a pre-XRT level >2.5 ng/ml developed disease relapse, whereas the 4-year freedom from disease in those with levels {<=}2.5 ng/ml was 52%. Eleven of the 15 patients

  10. Comparative study of the radical and standard lymphadenectomy in the surgical treatment of adenocarcinoma of the ampula of Vater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albagli, Rafael Oliveira; Carvalho, Gustavo Santos Stoduto de; Mali Junior, Jorge; Eulálio, José Marcos Raso; de Melo, Eduardo Linhares Rielo

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing surgical pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) in standard and radical lymphadenectomy for adenocarcinoma of papilla, analyzing the prognostic factors related to overall and disease-free survival. Were analyzed retrospectively from 1999 to 2007, in the Department of Abdominal and Pelvic Surgery (INCa-RJ), 50 cases of PD for adenocarcinoma of the duodenal papilla divided into two groups according to lymphadenectomy (group A: standard lymphadenectomy and group B: radical lymphadenectomy). The median age was similar in both groups, as well as the distribution between the sex. In the comparison between the lymphadenectomies, only the number of lymph nodes resected (group A: 12.3 and group B: 26.5) and operative time (group A: 421 and group B: 474) were significantly different. There were no statistically significant differences in the two groups with respect to morbidity and mortality rate and length of hospitalization. The disease-free survival (group A: 35 months and group B: 51 months) and overall survival (group A: 38 months and group B: 53 months) was higher in the group of radical lymphadenectomy, but were not statistically significant. In this study there were no cases of metastatic lymph nodes to other groups without nodal involvement of the pancreatic-duodenal lymph node chains (13, 17), suggesting a pattern of lymph node spread. Despite the radical lymphadenectomy present rates of disease-free survival and overall survival largest such data were not statistically significant. Further studies should be conducted to evaluate the real role of radical lymphadenectomy in adenocarcinoma of the duodenal papilla.

  11. Sexuality Following Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Serefoglu, Ege C; Albersen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    incontinence in relation to sexual activity after surgery. This can present at the time of orgasm (ie, climacturia) or arise during arousal. In general, the problem subsides with time and pelvic floor training and tension penile loops can be used as treatments. Orgasmic disturbances after radical prostatectomy...

  12. Use of Bio-Amp, a commercial bio-additive for the treatment of grease trap wastewater containing fat, oil, and grease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao L; Xie, Yuefeng F; Chen, Yen-Chih

    2012-11-01

    This research investigated the application of Bio-Amp, a commercial bio-additive for the treatment of fat, oil, and grease (FOG) in a grease trap, and evaluated potential impacts of treated effluent on downstream collection system and treatment processes. Results show that after Bio-Amp treatment, FOG deposit formation was reduced by 40%, implicating a potential reduction of sewer line blockages. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and total fatty acids were reduced by 39%, 33%, 56%, and 59%, respectively, which represents an overall loading reduction of 9% COD, 5% TN and 40% TP received by the treatment plant from all the dining halls. On the other hand, readily biodegradable COD fractions significantly increased, which implies a potential improvement on Bio-P removal. Overall, the results showed that application of Bio-Amp in grease trap provides potential reduction of sewer line blockages, and can also alleviate downstream treatment burden. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ripple Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    3 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the margin of a lava flow on a cratered plain in the Athabasca Vallis region of Mars. Remarkably, the cratered plain in this scene is essentially free of bright, windblown ripples. Conversely, the lava flow apparently acted as a trap for windblown materials, illustrated by the presence of the light-toned, wave-like texture over much of the flow. That the lava flow surface trapped windblown sand and granules better than the cratered plain indicates that the flow surface has a rougher texture at a scale too small to resolve in this image. Location near: 10.7oN, 204.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  14. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  15. The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Clini, Enrico M; Win, Thida; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Goldman, Lee

    2009-07-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated?

  16. The Use of Biodegradable Stents in Malignant Oesophageal Strictures for the Treatment of Dysphagia Before Neoadjuvant Treatment or Radical Radiotherapy: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokidis, Miltiadis, E-mail: mkrokidis@hotmail.com; Burke, Chris; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Gkoutzios, Panos [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Hynes, Orla [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Irfan; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Mason, Robert [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Adam, Andreas [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the clinical results of the use of biodegradable oesophageal stents in malignant strictures.MethodsEleven patients were included in this prospective analysis in which a woven polydioxanone biodegradable oesophageal stent was used. The inclusion criterion was that the patient underwent neoadjuvant treatment or radical radiotherapy after the stent insertion. Primary end points were dysphagia score at discharge, stent patency, and complication rate. Secondary end points were overall survival and surgical outcome of surgery.ResultsThere was a 100 % procedure technical success rate. Early complications occurred in three patients resulting in failure to restore oral nutrition. In the remaining eight patients, dysphagia was significantly improved at discharge. Mean stent patency rate in this group was 71.5 days. Stent dysfunction occurred in five of eight patients (62.5 %); in two of five patients this was due to local inflammatory reaction, and in three of five patients it was due to tumour growth after a mean time of 97.8 days, and a new metallic stent was consequently placed in four of five patients. One patient was successfully treated with esophagectomy. At the end of follow-up (mean time 102.1 days), three of eight stents were patent. The overall patient survival rate was 81.8 %.ConclusionAlthough short-term dysphagia scores improved, biodegradable stents do not appear to offer a clear beneficial effect in most cases of malignant strictures, particularly due to a local inflammatory reaction that may be induced. Technical improvement of the device and delineation of the patient group that would benefit from its use is necessary if further studies are to be conducted in the future.

  17. Prospective, longitudinal, multi-modal functional imaging for radical chemo-IMRT treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer: the INSIGHT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, Liam; Panek, Rafal; McQuaid, Dualta; Dunlop, Alex; Schmidt, Maria; Riddell, Angela; Koh, Dow-Mu; Doran, Simon; Murray, Iain; Du, Yong; Chua, Sue; Hansen, Vibeke; Wong, Kee H.; Dean, Jamie; Gulliford, Sarah; Bhide, Shreerang; Leach, Martin O.; Nutting, Christopher; Harrington, Kevin; Newbold, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Radical chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) is an effective organ-sparing treatment option for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). Despite advances in treatment for LAHNC, a significant minority of these patients continue to fail to achieve complete response with standard CRT. By constructing a multi-modality functional imaging (FI) predictive biomarker for CRT outcome for patients with LAHNC we hope to be able to reliably identify those patients at high risk of failing standard CRT. Such a biomarker would in future enable CRT to be tailored to the specific biological characteristics of each patients’ tumour, potentially leading to improved treatment outcomes. The INSIGHT study is a single-centre, prospective, longitudinal multi-modality imaging study using functional MRI and FDG-PET/CT for patients with LAHNC squamous cell carcinomas receiving radical CRT. Two cohorts of patients are being recruited: one treated with, and another treated without, induction chemotherapy. All patients receive radical intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Patients undergo functional imaging before, during and 3 months after completion of radiotherapy, as well as at the time of relapse, should that occur within the first two years after treatment. Serum samples are collected from patients at the same time points as the FI scans for analysis of a panel of serum markers of tumour hypoxia. The primary aim of the INSIGHT study is to acquire a prospective multi-parametric longitudinal data set comprising functional MRI, FDG PET/CT, and serum biomarker data from patients with LAHNC undergoing primary radical CRT. This data set will be used to construct a predictive imaging biomarker for outcome after CRT for LAHNC. This predictive imaging biomarker will be used in future studies of functional imaging based treatment stratification for patients with LAHNC. Additional objectives are: defining the reproducibility of FI parameters; determining robust

  18. A MULTICENTRE STUDY OF ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SALVAGING LYMPHADENECTOMY IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER WITH DISEASE PROGRESSION AFTER THE RADICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Y. Alekseev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most urgent problems of modern oncourology because of the continuing high incidence of this pathology. The main methods of radical treatment of patients with localized and locally advanced prostate cancer are radical prostatectomy (RP and radiotherapy – remote (RRT or brachytherapy.  However, the frequency of biochemical markers of disease progression after curative treatment is high and reaches up to 27–53%. It is extremely important to find the tumor lesion that leads to the increase of the marker. The  palliative hormone therapy (PHT was the only accepted method in patients with occurrence of distant metastases in recent time. However, a significant number of patients relapse marker may be associated with the so-called oligo-metastatic disease progression, in which the number of detected metastatic lesions is minimal. As the results of the research, the use of surgical or radiological treatment in selected patients of this cohort can significantly increase the length of time prior to the appointment of HT, and in some cases completely abandon its holding.Purpose. To evaluate the results of the saving pelvic lymphadenectomy in patients with prostate cancer with disease progression after radical therapies.Patients and methods. The article summarizes the results of surgical treatment of patients who have undergone life-saving lymphadenectomy about oligo-nodal metastatic progression of prostate cancer after treatment in 3 centers – P. Hertsen MORI, the branch of NMRRC; N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology and Russian scientific center of radiology and surgical technologies. In this multicenter study they evaluated the immediate and remote results of surgical treatment of 57 patients.Results. The results performed the high efficiency of the method of the saving pelvic lymphadenectomy in patients with prostate cancer with disease progression after radical treatment. So, response to therapy and reduction

  19. Direct evidence of iNOS-mediated in vivo free radical production and protein oxidation in acetone-induced ketosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dallas, Shannon; Duma, Danielle; Mason, Ronald P.; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic patients frequently encounter ketosis that is characterized by the breakdown of lipids with the consequent accumulation of ketone bodies. Several studies have demonstrated that reactive species are likely to induce tissue damage in diabetes, but the role of the ketone bodies in the process has not been fully investigated. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with novel spin-trapping and immunological techniques has been used to investigate in vivo free radical formation in a murine model of acetone-induced ketosis. A six-line EPR spectrum consistent with the α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone radical adduct of a carbon-centered lipid-derived radical was detected in the liver extracts. To investigate the possible enzymatic source of these radicals, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase knockout mice were used. Free radical production was unchanged in the NADPH oxidase knockout but much decreased in the iNOS knockout mice, suggesting a role for iNOS in free radical production. Longer-term exposure to acetone revealed iNOS overexpression in the liver together with protein radical formation, which was detected by confocal microscopy and a novel immunospin-trapping method. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation as a consequence of persistent free radical generation after 21 days of acetone treatment in control and NADPH oxidase knockout but not in iNOS knockout mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acetone administration, a model of ketosis, can lead to protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation through a free radical-dependent mechanism driven mainly by iNOS overexpression. PMID:18559982

  20. Oxygen free radicals in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Biemond (Pieter)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractCurrent knowledge strongly suggests that oxygen free radicals are involved in the pathogenesis of RA. Additional information about the mechanism of free radical attack is necessary in order to find out if interaction with the mechanism of free radical damage can be used in the treatment

  1. Metal-Diazo Radicals of α-Carbonyl Diazomethanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feifei; Xiao, Longqiang; Liu, Lijian

    2016-03-01

    Metal-diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes are new members of the radical family and are precursors to metal-carbene radicals. Herein, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-trapping, we detect diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes, induced by [RhICl(cod)]2, [CoII(por)] and PdCl2, at room temperature. The unique quintet signal of the Rh-diazo radical was observed in measurements of α-carbonyl diazomethane adducts of [RhICl(cod)]2 in the presence of 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-1-N-oxide (DMPO). DFT calculations indicated that 97.2% of spin density is localized on the diazo moiety. Co- and Pd-diazo radicals are EPR silent but were captured by DMPO to form spin adducts of DMPO-N• (triplet-of-sextets signal). The spin-trapping also provides a powerful tool for detection of metal-carbene radicals, as evidenced by the DMPO-trapped carbene radicals (DMPO-C•, sextet signal) and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane-carbene adducts (MNP-C•, doublet-of-triplets signal). The transformation of α-carbonyl diazomethanes to metal-carbene radicals was confirmed to be a two-step process via metal-diazo radicals.

  2. Radical fashion and radical fashion innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, D.; Benedetto, Di A.C.

    2010-01-01

    This is a study of the related concepts of radical fashion and radical fashion innovation. Radical fashions are defined here as those that may never enter the market at all, and exist primarily on runway shows, in exhibitions and in publicity; by contrast, radical fashion innovations may be very

  3. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonanno L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura Bonanno,1 Giulia Zago,1 Giuseppe Marulli,2 Paola Del Bianco,3 Marco Schiavon,2 Giulia Pasello,1 Valentina Polo,1,4 Fabio Canova,1 Fabrizio Tonetto,5 Lucio Loreggian,5 Federico Rea,2 PierFranco Conte,1,4 Adolfo Favaretto1 1Medical Oncology Unit 2, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, 2Thoracic Surgery Department, University of Padova, 3Clinical Trials and Biostatistics Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, 4Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, 5Radiotherapy Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padova, Italy Objectives: If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs. No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1, paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, d1, and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 d1, 8 for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. Results: In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors–7th edition staging system. A total of 36 (62% patients achieved partial response (PR, and six (10% progressions were recorded. Grade 3–4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62% cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64% patients underwent surgery

  4. A Coloured Spin Trap which works as a pH Sensor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Synthesis; free radical; spin-trapping; pH sensor; nitrone. 1. Introduction. There is a contemporary interest in ... easily used as sensors and markers in free radical chemistry.11 On the other hand, a coloured spin trap may .... methanol mixture, were as follows: for compound 6, at acidic. pH, the colour is yellow with λmax = 390 ...

  5. Surface modification of thermoplastic poly(vinyl alcohol)/saponite nanocomposites via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization enhanced by air dielectric discharges barrier plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen Weijun; Lu Canhui

    2012-01-01

    To improve the water resistance of thermoplastic poly(vinyl alcohol)/saponite nanocomposites (TPVA), a simple two-step method was developed for the covalent immobilization of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators on the TPVA surfaces enhanced by air dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) plasma treatment, and hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes were then grafted onto the surface of TPVA via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The chemical composition, morphology and hydrophobicity of the modified TPVA surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The water resistance of the surface-functionalized PMMA was evaluated by the contact angle and water adsorption method. It was shown that air DBD plasma treatment activated the TPVA surface and accelerated the immobilization of ATRP initiator on the TPVA surface. Compared with TPVA control, TPVA modified by SI-ATRP can be grafted well-defined and covalently tethered network PMMA brushes onto the surface and the hydrophobicity of TPVA were significantly enhanced.

  6. Trends in radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James; Tokuda, Yuji; Scardino, Peter

    2009-02-01

    The surgical treatment of prostate cancer ideally removes the entire cancer, avoids excessive blood loss or serious perioperative complications, and results in complete recovery of continence and potency. To achieve this, the surgeon must excise sufficient periprostatic tissue to cure the cancer while preserving the cavernosal nerves required for erectile function and the neuromusculature required for normal urinary and bowel function. Here we will examine recent trends in radical prostatectomy, focusing on surgical technique.

  7. How often parametrial involvement leads to post-operative adjuvant treatment in locally advanced cervical cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and type C radical hysterectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, F; Bogani, G; Ditto, A; Carcangiu, M; Papadia, A; Lecce, F; Chiappa, V; Lorusso, D; Raspagliesi, F

    2015-08-01

    Parametrial involvement (PMI) is one of the most important factors influencing prognosis in locally advanced stage cervical cancer (LACC) patients. We aimed to evaluate PMI rate among LACC patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), thus evaluating the utility of parametrectomy in tailor adjuvant treatments. Retrospective evaluation of consecutive 275 patients affected by LACC (IB2-IIB), undergoing NACT followed by type C/class III radical hysterectomy. Basic descriptive statistics, univariate and multivariate analyses were applied in order to identify factors predicting PMI. Survival outcomes were assessed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox models. PMI was detected in 37 (13%) patients: it was associated with vaginal involvement, lymph node positivity and both in 10 (4%), 5 (2%) and 12 (4%) patients, respectively; while PMI alone was observed in only 10 (4%) patients. Among this latter group, adjuvant treatment was delivered in 3 (1%) patients on the basis of pure PMI; while the remaining patients had other characteristics driving adjuvant treatment. Considering factors predicting PMI we observed that only suboptimal pathological responses (OR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.22) and vaginal involvement (OR: 1.29 (95%) CI: 1.17, 1.44) were independently associated with PMI. PMI did not correlate with survival (HR: 2.0; 95% CI: 0.82, 4.89); while clinical response to NACT (HR: 3.35; 95% CI: 1.59, 7.04), vaginal involvement (HR: 2.38; 95% CI: 1.12, 5.02) and lymph nodes positivity (HR: 3.47; 95% CI: 1.62, 7.41), independently correlated with worse survival outcomes. Our data suggest that PMI had a limited role on the choice to administer adjuvant treatment, thus supporting the potential embrace of less radical surgery in LACC patients undergoing NACT. Further prospective studies are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of blanching treatments on antioxidant activity of frozen green capsicum (Capsicum annuum L. var bell pepper) using radical scavenging activity (DPPH) assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizzuddin, Norafida; Abdullah, Aminah

    2016-11-01

    Blanching treatments are needed to deactivate enzymes in frozen vegetables. Antioxidant activity using DPPH radical scavenging activity assay were evaluated in steaming, boiling water, and microwave blanching at different temperature, time and microwave power level on frozen green capsicum. Green capsicum was chosen for frozen treatment compared to other capsicum with different maturity index because of the firm texture. The objective of this study was to compare the antioxidant activity of frozen green capsicum between conventional and Oxi Count Kit® assay for DPPH radical scavenging activity. Results showed frozen green capsicum blanched using microwave at high level/90 seconds (sample J) contained higher level of DPPH in both conventional method and Oxi Count Kit® compared to other treatments. However, there were no significant differences between sample J and fresh sample (sample A). Overall, the sequences from highest to lowest in blanching treatments for both DPPH conventional method, and DPPH Oxi Count Kit® were J (microwave high level/90 seconds) > A (Fresh) > H (Microwave Medium Level/120 seconds) > D (Boiling Water 80°C/150 seconds) > K (Microwave High Level/120 seconds) > I (Microwave Medium Level/150 seconds) > F (Microwave Low Level/150 seconds)> B (Steam 100°C/150 seconds) > E (Boiling Water 100°C /120 seconds) > G (Microwave Low Level /180 seconds)> C (Steam 100°C/180 seconds). Almost all frozen green capsicum samples showed no significant differences for comparison between test using DPPH conventional method and Oxi Count Kit®. Frozen storage for 0, and 3rd months showed no significant differences which indicate no changes on antioxidant activity during frozen storage at -18°C.

  9. Directly-observed therapy (DOT for the radical 14-day primaquine treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria on the Thai-Myanmar border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanyavanich Nipon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium vivax has a dormant hepatic stage, called the hypnozoite, which can cause relapse months after the initial attack. For 50 years, primaquine has been used as a hypnozoitocide to radically cure P. vivax infection, but major concerns remain regarding the side-effects of the drug and adherence to the 14-day regimen. This study examined the effectiveness of using the directly-observed therapy (DOT method for the radical treatment of P. vivax malaria infection, to prevent reappearance of the parasite within the 90-day follow-up period. Other potential risk factors for the reappearance of P. vivax were also explored. Methods A randomized trial was conducted from May 2007 to January 2009 in a low malaria transmission area along the Thai-Myanmar border. Patients aged ≥ 3 years diagnosed with P. vivax by microscopy, were recruited. All patients were treated with the national standard regimen of chloroquine for three days followed by primaquine for 14 days. Patients were randomized to receive DOT or self-administered therapy (SAT. All patients were followed for three months to check for any reappearance of P. vivax. Results Of the 216 patients enrolled, 109 were randomized to DOT and 107 to SAT. All patients recovered without serious adverse effects. The vivax reappearance rate was significantly lower in the DOT group than the SAT group (3.4/10,000 person-days vs. 13.5/10,000 person-days, p = 0.021. Factors related to the reappearance of vivax malaria included inadequate total primaquine dosage received (P. vivax-genotype infection, and presence of P. falciparum infection during the follow-up period. Conclusions Adherence to the 14-day primaquine regimen is important for the radical cure of P. vivax malaria infection. Implementation of DOT reduces the reappearance rate of the parasite, and may subsequently decrease P. vivax transmission in the area.

  10. New therapeutical strategies in adjuvant treatment of stage I B and II A cervical cancer after Wertheim-Mergs radical hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients after Wertheim-Mergs radical hysterectomy of stage I B and II A cervical cancer with positive lymph nodes and unfavourable prognostic factors are usually given adjuvant radiotherapy. The aim of our study was to research retrospectively and to analyse the survival of patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative radiotherapy. Prognostic factors, survival rate failures of treatment and the way of recurrence were evaluated for 420 patients in I B and II A stage for the period of 1990-2003. All patients were radically operated and underwent an adjuvant radiotherapy, 25 of them received adjuvant chemotherapy. Positive lymph nodes were found in 24.52%. All patients having positive for metastases lymph nodes and those with negative lymph nodes but unfavorable prognostic factors received adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). The 5 years survival rate was 63% for the patients with positive lymph nodes and 89% for those with negative lymph nodes. The level of recurrence was 14% for patients with negative and 35% for those with positive lymph nodes. There were 39 pelvic and 41 distant recurrences, but the behavior was different between patients with negative lymph nodes (32 pelvic and 12 distant recurrences) and with positive ones (7 pelvic and 29 distant recurrences). The updated 5 years survival was 24% for patients with pelvic recurrences and 6% for the patients with distant ones. Our therapy strategy for patients with negative lymph nodes who have distant recurrences involves an adjuvant chemotherapy. All patients with negative lymph nodes but positive parametric and positive surgical margins receive postsurgical radiotherapy or an intensive follow up. (author)

  11. Electron spin resonance study of radicals in irradiated polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Takashi

    1979-02-01

    In order to elucidate radiation effect in polyethylene, the nature and behavior of radicals produced in polyethylene and the model compound of polyethylene irradiated at 77 0 K were studied by using electron spin resonance. The structure of radical pairs, which are composed of two radicals produced very closely each other, was investigated in drawn polyethylene and the single crystal of n-eicosane. The radical pairs of intrachain type and interchain type were found in polyethylene and n-eicosane respectively. It was suggested that these two types of radical pairs are the precursors of double bonds and crosslinks respectively. The thermal decay reactions of radicals themselves produced in irradiated polyethylene were investigated. It was made clear that the short range distances between two radicals play an important role in the decay reaction of alkyl radicals at low temperatures. The trapping regions of radicals were studied and it was clarified that allyl radicals, which are produced by the reaction of alkyl radicals with double bonds, are trapped both in the crystalline and non-crystalline regions. (author)

  12. La modified TiO{sub 2} photoanode and its effect on DSSC performance: A comparative study of doping and surface treatment on deep and surface charge trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ako, Rajour Tanyi [Faculty of Science, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, BE1410, Negara Brunei Darussalam (Brunei Darussalam); Ekanayake, Piyasiri, E-mail: piyasiri.ekanayake@ubd.edu.bn [Faculty of Science, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, BE1410, Negara Brunei Darussalam (Brunei Darussalam); Centre for Advanced Material and Energy Sciences (CAMES), Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, BE1410, Negara Brunei Darussalam (Brunei Darussalam); Tan, Ai Ling [Faculty of Science, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, BE1410, Negara Brunei Darussalam (Brunei Darussalam); Young, David James [Faculty of Science, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, BE1410, Negara Brunei Darussalam (Brunei Darussalam); Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore DC, Queensland, 4558 (Australia); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR, #08-03, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, 138634 (Singapore)

    2016-04-01

    The effect of Lanthanum ions (La{sup 3+}) on charge trapping in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) photoanodes has been investigated with doped and surface-treated TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Doped nanoparticles consisting of 0.5 mol.% Mg and La co-doped TiO{sub 2}, 0.5 mol.% Mg doped TiO{sub 2} and pure TiO{sub 2} were synthesized by the sol gel method. Surface-treated nanoparticles of Mg doped TiO{sub 2} and pure TiO{sub 2} were prepared by ball milling in 0.05 M aqueous La{sup 3+} solution. All materials were analyzed by XRD, XPS and UV–Vis DRS. Cell performance, surface free energy state changes and electron injection efficiency of DSSCs based on these nanoparticles were evaluated using current –voltage measurements, EIS and Incident photon to current conversion efficiency. Doped materials had La and Mg ions incorporated into the TiO{sub 2} lattice, while no lattice changes were observed for the surface-treated materials. Less visible light was absorbed by treated oxides compared with doped oxide samples. The overall power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of DSSC photoanodes based on doped materials were twice those of photoanodes fabricated from treated nanoparticles. Doping establishes deep traps that reduce the recombination of electron–hole (e–h) pairs. Conversely, the presence of absorbed oxygen in treated materials enhances e–h recombination with electrolyte at surface trap sites. - Highlights: • DSSC performance is investigated using photoanodes of doped and La{sup 3+} surface treated TiO{sub 2}. • TiO{sub 2} and Mg–TiO{sub 2} treated with La{sup 3+} absorbed less visible light. • A high concentration of absorbed oxygen on surface treated oxides reduced band bending. • Increased surface free energy in the modified DSSC anodes is caused more by Mg{sup 2+} at Ti{sup 4+} than by La{sup 3+} at the surfaces. • Near surface charge traps due to La{sup 3+} treatment promotes e–h recombination.

  13. A phase 3, placebo controlled study of the safety and efficacy of avanafil for the treatment of erectile dysfunction after nerve sparing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhall, John P; Burnett, Arthur L; Wang, Run; McVary, Kevin T; Moul, Judd W; Bowden, Charles H; DiDonato, Karen; Shih, Winnie; Day, Wesley W

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of 100 and 200 mg avanafil for the treatment of adult males with erectile dysfunction after bilateral nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. This was a double-blind, placebo controlled, parallel group, phase 3 study in males age 18 to 70 years with a history of erectile dysfunction of 6 months or more after bilateral nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. Patients were randomized to 100 or 200 mg avanafil or placebo (taken 30 minutes before sexual activity) for 12 weeks. Primary end points included successful vaginal insertion (Sexual Encounter Profile [SEP] question 2), successful intercourse (SEP3) and change in score on the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EF) questionnaire. A total of 298 patients were randomized and 84.6% completed the study. At baseline 16.1% were age 65 years or older and 71.5% had severe erectile dysfunction (mean overall IIEF-EF domain score 9.2). After 12 weeks there were significantly greater increases in SEP2 and SEP3 and change in mean IIEF-EF domain score with 100 and 200 mg avanafil vs placebo (p erectile function after prostatectomy. Results suggest a rapid onset of action and sustained duration of effect, with all 3 primary end points being achieved at both dose levels. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radical prostatectomy. Results and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacqmin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy is the surgical curative treatment of localized prostate cancer. The survival is good in young patients (<70) with T2 N0M0 tumors and more than 10 year's life expectancy. Side-effects are urinary incontinence, impotence and anastomosis stricture. Quality of life should be considered as an important factor for the choice of the patient between radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy and follow-up. (author)

  15. Long term (five-year survival following radical surgical treatment plus adjuvant chemotherapy (FAM in advanced gastric cancer: a controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bresciani Cláudio

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Several drugs and their associations are being used for adjuvant or complementary chemotherapy with the aim of improving results of gastric cancer treatment. The objective of this study was to verify the impact of these drugs on nutrition and on survival rate after radical treatment of 53 patients with gastric cancer in stage III of the TNM classification. A control group including 28 patients who had only undergone radical resection was compared to a group of 25 patients who underwent the same operative technique followed by adjuvant polychemotherapy with FAM (5-fluorouracil, Adriamycin, and mitomycin C. In this latter group, chemotherapy toxicity in relation to hepatic, renal, cardiologic, neurological, hematologic, gastrointestinal, and dermatological functions was also studied. There was no significant difference on admission between both groups in relation to gender, race, macroscopic tumoral type of tumor according to the Borrmann classification, location of the tumor in the stomach, length of the gastric resection, or response to cutaneous tests on delayed sensitivity. Chemotherapy was started on average, 2.3 months following surgical treatment. Clinical and laboratory follow-up of all patients continued for 5 years. The following conclusions were reached: 1 The nutritional status and incidence of gastrointestinal manifestation were similar in both groups; 2 There was no occurrence of cardiac, renal, neurological, or hepatic toxicity or death due to the chemotherapeutic method per se; 3 Dermatological alterations and hematological toxicity occurred exclusively in patients who underwent polychemotherapy; 4 There was no significant difference between the rate and site of tumoral recurrence, the disease-free interval, or the survival rate of both study groups; 5 Therefore, we concluded, after a 5-year follow-up, chemotherapy with the FAM regimen did not increase the survival rate.

  16. Radical Chemistry and Structural Relationships of PPCP Degradation by UV/Chlorine Treatment in Simulated Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaiheng; Wu, Zihao; Shang, Chii; Yao, Bo; Hou, Shaodong; Yang, Xin; Song, Weihua; Fang, Jingyun

    2017-09-19

    The UV/chlorine process is an emerging advanced oxidation process (AOP) used for the degradation of micropollutants. However, the radical chemistry of this AOP is largely unknown for the degradation of numerous structurally diverse micropollutants in water matrices of varying quality. These issues were addressed by grouping 34 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) according to the radical chemistry of their degradation in the UV/chlorine process at practical PPCP concentrations (1 μg L -1 ) and in different water matrices. The contributions of HO • and reactive chlorine species (RCS), including Cl • , Cl 2 •- , and ClO • , to the degradation of different PPCPs were compound specific. RCS showed considerable reactivity with olefins and benzene derivatives, such as phenols, anilines, and alkyl-/alkoxybenzenes. A good linear relationship was found between the RCS reactivity and negative values of the Hammett ∑σ p + constant for aromatic PPCPs, indicating that electron-donating groups promote the attack of benzene derivatives by RCS. The contribution of HO • , but not necessarily RCS, to PPCP removal decreased with increasing pH. ClO • showed high reactivity with some PPCPs, such as carbamazepine, caffeine, and gemfibrozil, with second-order rate constants of 9.2 × 10 7 , 1.03 × 10 8 , and 4.16 × 10 8 M -1 s -1 , respectively, which contributed to their degradation. Natural organic matter (NOM) induced significant scavenging of ClO • and greatly decreased the degradation of PPCPs that was attributable to ClO • , with a second-order rate constant of 4.5 × 10 4 (mg L -1 ) -1 s -1 . Alkalinity inhibited the degradation of PPCPs that was primarily attacked by HO • and Cl • but had negligible effects on the degradation of PPCPs by ClO • . This is the first study on the reactivity of RCS, particularly ClO • , with structurally diverse PPCPs under simulated drinking water condition.

  17. Quality of Life, Psychological Functioning, and Treatment Satisfaction of Men Who Have Undergone Penile Prosthesis Surgery Following Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Brindha; Moon, Daniel; Love, Christopher; Meyer, Denny; Ferguson, Emma; Crowe, Helen; Howard, Nicholas; Mann, Sarah; Wootten, Addie

    2017-12-01

    Penile prosthesis surgery is last-line treatment to regaining erectile function after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer. To assess quality of life, psychological functioning, and treatment satisfaction of men who underwent penile implantation after RP; the psychosocial correlates of treatment satisfaction and sexual function after surgery; and the relation between patients' and partners' ratings of treatment satisfaction. 98 consecutive patients who underwent penile implantation after RP from 2010 and 2015 and their partners were invited to complete a series of measures at a single time point. Of these, 71 patients and 43 partners completed measures assessing sexual function, psychological functioning, and treatment satisfaction. Proportions of patients who demonstrated good sexual function and satisfaction with treatment and clinical levels of anxiety and depression were calculated. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to determine psychosocial factors associated with patient treatment satisfaction and sexual function and patient-partner differences in treatment satisfaction. Patients completed the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite Short Form (EPIC-26), Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS), Prostate Cancer-Related Quality of Life Scale, Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Partners completed the GAD-7, PHQ-9, EDITS (partner version), and SEAR. 94% of men reported satisfaction with treatment (EDITS score > 50). 77% of men reported good sexual function (EPIC-26 score > 60). Lower depression scores were associated with higher sexual confidence and sexual intimacy, and these were correlated with better treatment satisfaction and sexual function. Patients experienced higher sexual relationship satisfaction (median score = 90.6) than their partners (median score = 81.2), but there was no difference in

  18. Allylthioketone Mediated Free Radical Polymerization of Methacrylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available By combination of high trapping free radical efficiency of the thioketone and resonance of the allylic radical, a new type of mediating agent, 1,3,3-triphenylprop-2-ene-1-thione (TPPT has been successfully synthesized, and then is used to study controlled free radical polymerization of methacrylates. Very stable TPPT radicals at the end of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA are detected in the polymerization of MMA using TPPT and AIBN as the control agent and initiator. The MALDI-TOF MS spectra are used to identify terminal groups of the resultant poly(glycidyl methacrylate (PGMA, and major component of the obtained polymer has the structure, (CH32(CNC-PGMA-C7H9O3. Chain extension reaction tests ascertain formation of the dead polymers during the polymer storage and purification process of the polymers. Owing to very slow fragmentation reaction of the TPPT-terminated polymethacrylate radical and addition reaction of this radical with a primary radical, the growing chain radicals are difficult to be regenerated, leading to an unobvious change of the molecular weight with monomer conversion. The molecular weights of polymers can be controlled by the ratios of monomer/initiator and TPPT/initiator. However, the first order kinetics of the polymerization and the polymers with narrow polydispersity are obtained, and these phenomena are discussed. This study provides useful information on how to design a better controlling agent.

  19. Globalisation Trapped

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Caraça

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The promise of making society progress through the direct applications of science was finally fulfilled in the mid-20th century. Science progressed immensely, propelled by the effects of the two world wars. The first science-based technologies saw the daylight during the 1940s and their transformative power was such that neither the military, nor subsequently the markets, allowed science to return intact to its curiosity-driven nest. Technoscience was born then and (being progressively pulled away from curiosity-driven science was able to grow enormously, erecting a formidable structure of networks of institutions that impacted decisively on the economy. It is a paradox, or maybe a trap, that the fulfillment of science’s solemn promise of ‘transforming nature’ means seeing ourselves and our Western societies entangled in crises after crises with no clear outcome in view. A redistribution of geopolitical power is under way, along with the deployment of information and communication technologies, forcing dominant structures to oscillate, as knowledge about organization and methods, marketing, design, and software begins to challenge the role of technoscience as the main vector of economic growth and wealth accumulation. What ought to be done?

  20. Serum Hydroxyl Radical Scavenging Capacity as Quantified with Iron-Free Hydroxyl Radical Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Nobuyuki; Oowada, Shigeru; Sueishi, Yoshimi; Shimmei, Masashi; Makino, Keisuke; Fujii, Hirotada; Kotake, Yashige

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a simple ESR spin trapping based method for hydroxyl (OH) radical scavenging-capacity determination, using iron-free OH radical source. Instead of the widely used Fenton reaction, a short (typically 5 seconds) in situ UV-photolysis of a dilute hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution was employed to generate reproducible amounts of OH radicals. ESR spin trapping was applied to quantify OH radicals; the decrease in the OH radical level due to the specimen’s scavenging activity was converted into the OH radical scavenging capacity (rate). The validity of the method was confirmed in pure antioxidants, and the agreement with the previous data was satisfactory. In the second half of this work, the new method was applied to the sera of chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. We show for the first time that after hemodialysis, OH radical scavenging capacity of the CRF serum was restored to the level of healthy control. This method is simple and rapid, and the low concentration hydrogen peroxide is the only chemical added to the system, that could eliminate the complexity of iron-involved Fenton reactions or the use of the pulse-radiolysis system. PMID:19794928

  1. Health-related quality of life using SF-8 and EPIC questionnaires after treatment with radical retropubic prostatectomy and permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Kusuhara, Yoshito; Miura, Noriyoshi; Shirato, Akitomi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Kataoka, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after treatment of prostate cancer is examined using a new HRQOL tool. HRQOL, based on the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) and SF-8 questionnaires, was prospectively compared after either a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) or a permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) at a single institute. Between October 2005 and June 2007, 96 patients were treated by an RRP and 88 patients were treated by a PPB. A HRQOL survey was completed at baseline, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, prospectively. The general HRQOL in the RRP and PPB groups was not different after 3 months. However, at baseline and 1 month after treatment, the mental component summary was significantly better in the PPB group than in the RRP group. Moreover, the disease-specific HRQOL was worse regarding urinary and sexual functions in the RRP group. Urinary irritative/obstructive was worse in the PPB group, but urinary incontinence was worse in the RRP group and had not recovered to baseline after 12 months. The bowel function and bother were worse in the PPB group than in the RRP group after 3 months. In the RRP group, the patients with nerve sparing demonstrated the same scores in sexual function as the PPB group. This prospective study revealed the differences in the HRQOL after an RRP and PPB. Disease-specific HRQOL is clarified by using EPIC survey. These results will be helpful for making treatment decisions. (author)

  2. Radical radiotherapy treatment (EBRT + HDR-ICRT of carcinoma of the uterine cervix: Outcome in patients treated at a rural center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Vandana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the outcome of carcinoma of the uterine cervix patients treated radically by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT. Materials and Methods: Between January 1997 to December 2001, a total of 550 newly diagnosed cases of carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reported in the department. All cases were staged according to the International Federation of Gynecologists and Oncologists (FIGO staging system, but for analytical convenience, the staging was limited to stages I, II, III, and IV. Out of the 550 cases, 214 completed radical radiotherapy (EBRT + HDR-ICRT and were retrospectively analyzed for presence of local residual disease, local recurrence, distant metastases, radiation reactions, and disease-free survival. Results: There were 7 (3.27%, 88 (41.1%, 101 (47.1%, and 18 (8.4% patients in stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively. The median follow-up time for all patients was 43 months (range: 3-93 months and for patients who were disease free till the last follow-up it was 59 months (range: 24-93 months. The overall treatment time (OTT ranged from 52 to 73 days (median 61 days. The 5-year disease-free mean survival rate was 58%, 44%, 33%, and 15%, with 95% confidence interval of 48 to 68, 37 to 51, 24 to 35, and 6 to 24 for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. There were 62 (28.97% cases with local residual disease, 35 (16.3% developed local recurrence/distant metastases, 17 (7.9% developed distant metastases, and 9 (4.2% had local recurrence as well. Discussion and Conclusion: The overall outcome was poor in advanced stage disease, but might be improved by increasing the total dose, decreasing overall duration of treatment, and by adding chemotherapy in patients with disease limited to the pelvis.

  3. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  4. Charged particle traps II applications

    CERN Document Server

    Werth, Günther; Major, Fouad G

    2009-01-01

    This, the second volume of Charged Particle Traps, is devoted to applications, complementing the first volume’s comprehensive treatment of the theory and practice of charged particle traps, their many variants and refinements. In recent years, applications of far reaching importance have emerged ranging from the ultra-precise mass determinations of elementary particles and their antiparticles and short-lived isotopes, to high-resolution Zeeman spectroscopy on multiply-charged ions, to microwave and optical spectroscopy, some involving "forbidden" transitions from metastable states of such high resolution that optical frequency standards are realized by locking lasers to them. Further the potential application of trapped ions to quantum computing is explored, based on the extraordinary quantum state coherence made possible by the particle isolation. Consideration is given to the Paul and Penning traps as potential quantum information processors.

  5. Long-lived gas-phase radicals from combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Takashi; Furusawa, Koji; Amano, Toshiji; Okubo, Yoichi; Tsuchiya, Jun' ichi; Yoshizawa, Fujiroku; Akutsu, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Masamitsu; Yoshida, Tadao (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-04-20

    On indoor air pollution or fire, it is feared that the gas-phase radicals from the combustion of inflammables or fuel seriously exert an influence on the organisms as harmful matter. The gas-phase radicals were studied using the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique. For the spin trap solution, 0.1 mol solution of {alpha}-phenyl-N-t-butylnitron in benzene was used. As a result, apparently long-lived and highly reactive oxygen-centered radicals were detected in the smoke from polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, cellulose, kerosene, benzene, acetone, methanol and butylalcohol. It is suggested that the production mechanism for the radicals should be different from olefin-NOx-air system reaction, which is considered for the radicals from cigarette smoke. 11 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Nitroxide-mediated controlled radical polymerisation: towards control of molar mass Controlled Radical Polymerisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, S.A.F.; Bergman, F.A.C.; Es, van J.J.G.S.; Klumperman, B.; German, A.L.; Matyjaszewski, K.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of the TEMPO-mediated controlled radical polymerization of styrene in bulk is discussed. It is shown that the isotropic correlation time (tc) of a nitroxide can be used as a measure of the diffusive rate coefficient of trapping (ketD). A general empirical relationship for the density

  7. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy: key points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radical cystectomy remains the golden standard for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Objective: to duplicate with highest accuracy the open radical cystectomy procedure, which we successfully utilized earlier in our clinic, in the of laparoscopic conditions in order to preserve the advantages of minimally invasive procedures and retain the reliability of the tried and tested open surgery.Materials and methods. In the report were included 35 patients (27 men and 8 women with bladder cancer, who underwent laparoscopic radical cystectomy in Volgograd Regional Center of Urology and Nephrology between April 2013 and March 2016. Only the patients who had been submitted to full intracorporal ileal conduits were included.Results. The mean operative time was 378 minutes, the mean blood loss was 285 millilitres, the mean length of hospital stay was 12.4 days, only 20 % of patients required the narcotic anesthetics. The postoperative complication rate was 11.4 %. However, the majority of the patients were successfully treated with minimally invasive procedures. Generally, our results were similar to other reported studies.Conclusion. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy is a safe and efficient modality of treatment of bladder cancer. However, it needs more procedures and longer observation period to establish laparoscopic radical cystectomy as an alternative to open radical cystectomy.

  8. Leghemoglobin-derived radicals. Evidence for multiple protein-derived radicals and the initiation of peribacteroid membrane damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Mathieu, C

    1996-01-01

    , with the consequent generation of lipid-derived radicals. The formation of such radicals may result in the depletion of membrane antioxidants and the initiation of lipid peroxidation. This transfer of damage from the heme center via the protein surface to neighboring membranes may be of considerable biological......-derived phenoxyl radical present at Tyr-133 in the soybean protein and Tyr-138 in the lupin protein. To obtain further information on these protein radicals and their potential interaction with the physiologically important peribacteroid membrane (which surrounds the microsymbiont in vivo), EPR spin trapping......); these radicals may be side chain- or alpha-carbon-derived, their exact sites have not been determined. Some of these radicals are on the protein surface and may be key intermediates in the formation of protein dimers. These radicals have been shown to be capable of reacting with peribacteroid membrane fractions...

  9. Why whey? Camel whey protein as a new dietary approach to the management of free radicals and for the treatment of different health disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Gamal; Ramadan, Nancy K; Sayed, Leila H; Badr, Badr M; Omar, Hossam M; Selamoglu, Zeliha

    2017-01-01

    The balance between free radicals and antioxidants is an important factor for maintaining health and slowing disease progression. The use of antioxidants, particularly natural antioxidants, has become an important strategy for dealing with this cause of widespread diseases. Natural antioxidants have been used as therapeutic tools against many diseases because they are safe, effective, and inexpensive and are among the most commonly used adjuvants in the treatment of several diseases. Camel whey protein (CWP) is considered a strong natural antioxidant because it decreases oxidative stress, enhances immune system function, and increases glutathione levels. The structure of CWP is very similar to that of other types of whey protein from different types of milk. CWP contains many components, such as lactoferrin (LF), lactalbumin, lactoglobulins, lactoperoxidase, and lysozyme, and is rich in immunoglobulins. However, in contrast to other WPs, CWP lacks β-lactoglobulin, the main cause of milk allergies in children. The components of CWP have many beneficial effects, including stimulation of both innate and adaptive immunity and anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antibacterial, and antiviral activities. Recently, it has been shown that CWP and its unique components can facilitate the treatment of impaired diabetic wound healing. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of CWP in human and other animal disorders are not fully understood. Therefore, the current review presents a concise summary of the scientific evidence of the beneficial effects of CWP to support its therapeutic use in disease treatment and nutritional intervention. PMID:28804604

  10. Why whey? Camel whey protein as a new dietary approach to the management of free radicals and for the treatment of different health disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Badr

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The balance between free radicals and antioxidants is an important factor for maintaining health and slowing disease progression. The use of antioxidants, particularly natural antioxidants, has become an important strategy for dealing with this cause of widespread diseases. Natural antioxidants have been used as therapeutic tools against many diseases because they are safe, effective, and inexpensive and are among the most commonly used adjuvants in the treatment of several diseases. Camel whey protein (CWP is considered a strong natural antioxidant because it decreases oxidative stress, enhances immune system function, and increases glutathione levels. The structure of CWP is very similar to that of other types of whey protein from different types of milk. CWP contains many components, such as lactoferrin (LF, lactalbumin, lactoglobulins, lactoperoxidase, and lysozyme, and is rich in immunoglobulins. However, in contrast to other WPs, CWP lacks β-lactoglobulin, the main cause of milk allergies in children. The components of CWP have many beneficial effects, including stimulation of both innate and adaptive immunity and anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antibacterial, and antiviral activities. Recently, it has been shown that CWP and its unique components can facilitate the treatment of impaired diabetic wound healing. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of CWP in human and other animal disorders are not fully understood. Therefore, the current review presents a concise summary of the scientific evidence of the beneficial effects of CWP to support its therapeutic use in disease treatment and nutritional intervention.

  11. Treatment and outcomes of urethral recurrence of urinary bladder cancer in women after radical cystectomy and orthotopic neobladder: a series of 12 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrbáček, Jan; Macek, Petr; Ali-El-Dein, Bedeir; Thalmann, George N; Stenzl, Arnulf; Babjuk, Marek; Shaaban, Atallah A; Gakis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    The incidence, treatment, and outcome of urethral recurrence (UR) after radical cystectomy (RC) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer with orthotopic neobladder in women have rarely been addressed in the literature. A total of 12 patients (median age at recurrence: 60 years) who experienced UR after RC with an orthotopic neobladder were selected for this study from a cohort of 456 women from participating institutions. The primary clinical and pathological characteristics at RC, including the manifestation of the UR and its treatment and outcome, were reviewed. The primary bladder tumors in the 12 patients were urothelial carcinoma in 8 patients, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma in 1 patient each, and mixed histology in 2 patients. Three patients (25%) had lymph node-positive disease at RC. The median time from RC to the detection of UR was 8 months (range 4-55). Eight recurrences manifested with clinical symptoms and 4 were detected during follow-up or during a diagnostic work-up for clinical symptoms caused by distant metastases. Treatment modalities were surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and bacillus Calmette-Guérin urethral instillations. Nine patients died of cancer. The median survival after the diagnosis of UR was 6 months. UR after RC with an orthotopic neobladder in females is rare. Solitary, noninvasive recurrences have a favorable prognosis when detected early. Invasive recurrences are often associated with local and distant metastases and have a poor prognosis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Bilateral Mastectomy as Radical Treatment of Gynecomastia Secondary to Antiretroviral Therapy in a Low-Income Setting: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Mario; Schiavone, Marcella; Pizzol, Damiano; Di Gennaro, Francesco; Ludovico, Rossana; De Palma, Angela

    2018-05-11

    Gynecomastia is a common finding in males, with an incidence that varies widely globally. In 10-25% of cases, it is caused by drugs. Its pathophysiologic mechanism includes exposure to exogenous estrogens and medications that cause hypogonadism, antiandrogenic effects and hyperprolactinemia. Gynecomastia is associated with exposure to antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly efavirenz. Sometimes surgery may be required as treatment. We report a case of a 46-year-old man receiving ART presenting with a marked bilateral breast enlargement who underwent bilateral mastectomy as the only successful treatment in a low-income setting.

  13. Multiple free-radical scavenging capacity in serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oowada, Shigeru; Endo, Nobuyuki; Kameya, Hiromi; Shimmei, Masashi; Kotake, Yashige

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a method to determine serum scavenging-capacity profile against multiple free radical species, namely hydroxyl radical, superoxide radical, alkoxyl radical, alkylperoxyl radical, alkyl radical, and singlet oxygen. This method was applied to a cohort of chronic kidney disease patients. Each free radical species was produced with a common experimental procedure; i.e., uv/visible-light photolysis of free-radical precursor/sensitizer. The decrease in free-radical concentration by the presence of serum was quantified with electron spin resonance spin trapping method, from which the scavenging capacity was calculated. There was a significant capacity change in the disease group (n = 45) as compared with the healthy control group (n = 30). The percent values of disease’s scavenging capacity with respect to control group indicated statistically significant differences in all free-radical species except alkylperoxyl radical, i.e., hydroxyl radical, 73 ± 12% (p = 0.001); superoxide radical, 158 ± 50% (p = 0.001); alkoxyl radical, 121 ± 30% (p = 0.005); alkylperoxyl radical, 123 ± 32% (p>0.1); alkyl radical, 26 ± 14% (p = 0.001); and singlet oxygen, 57 ± 18% (p = 0.001). The scavenging capacity profile was illustrated using a radar chart, clearly demonstrating the characteristic change in the disease group. Although the cause of the scavenging capacity change by the disease state is not completely understood, the profile of multiple radical scavenging capacities may become a useful diagnostic tool. PMID:22962529

  14. What to choose as radical local treatment for lung metastases from colo-rectal cancer: surgery or radiofrequency ablation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlijper, R.C.; Grutters, J.P.C.; Houben, R.; Dingemans, A.M.; Wildberger, J.E.; Raemdonck, D. Van; Cutsem, E. van; Haustermans, K.; Lammering, G.; Lambin, P.; Ruysscher, D. de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term survival can be obtained with local treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. However, it is unclear as to what the optimal local therapy is: surgery, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT). METHODS: A systematic review included 27 studies

  15. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    .... How radical change in public policy has occurred in the past is then documented. We find examples of radical change by chance, radical change by consensus, radical change by learning, and radical change by entrepreneurial design...

  16. Investigations of structure, bonding, and reactions of radiation-induced free radicals in the solid state using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) has been used to study the structure, bonding, and reactions of several types of free radicals produced by γ irradiation of solids at 77K. Well-defined spectral patterns and the use of photolysis and annealing treatments assisted the analyses and interpretations. The radical anion BF 3 - was generated and identified unequivocally in a matrix of tetramethylsilane at 77K. Both the ESR data and theoretical calculations support a pyramidal structure with a bond angle of about 110 0 . The present experiments showed that BF 3 - has ESR parameters consistent with those of the isoelectronic radicals CF 3 , NF 3 + , and F 2 NO. γ irradiation of polycrystalline trimethyl borate at 77K gave an ESR spectrum which was assigned to the dimer radical anion [(MeO) 3 B.B(OMe) 3 ] - . Radical anions of dialkyl carbonates were observed for the first time and found to undergo a β-scission reaction to produce alkyl radicals. This free radical reaction is unusual in that it proceeds both thermally and photochemically. For the dimethyl carbonate radical anion, 13 C parameters were obtained from a 13 C enriched sample. The photolysis of trapped radicals in γ irradiated carboxylic esters, RC(O)OR', was studied by ESR spectroscopy and two different reactions were characterized. Two hypervalent silicon radical anions were prepared and examined in SI(OCH 3 ) 4 . The results of the present work thus represent the first complete sets of data on the silicon 3s and 3p spin densities for such species. The first PL 3 - radical anion was prepared by the γ irradiation of crystalline trimethylphosphite, and identified through its photolysis reactions and from the results of radiation chemical experiments

  17. Effect of combined treatment with salvage radiotherapy plus androgen suppression on quality of life in patients with recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, Andrew; Choo, Richard; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Szumacher, Ewa; Cheung, Patrick; Deboer, Gerrit; Chander, Sarat

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of salvage radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) on quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence or PSA relapse after radical prostatectomy were treated with salvage RT plus 2-year AS, as per a phase II study. Quality of life was prospectively assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-Item Version 3.0 with the added prostate cancer-specific module at baseline and predefined follow-up visits. Results: Patients experienced a significant increase in bowel dysfunction (23%) by the end of RT (p < 0.0001). This bowel dysfunction improved after RT but remained slightly elevated (5-10%) throughout the 2-year AS period. This extent of residual bowel dysfunction would be considered of minimal clinical importance. A similar, but less pronounced, pattern of change did occur for urinary dysfunction. Erectile function showed no change during RT, but had an abrupt decline (10%) with initiation of AS that was of moderate clinical significance (p < 0.01). None of the other QOL domains demonstrated a persistent, significant change from baseline that would be considered of major clinical significance. Conclusion: The combined treatment with salvage RT plus 2-year AS had relatively minor long-term effects on QOL

  18. Hypochlorite and superoxide radicals can act synergistically to induce fragmentation of hyaluronan and chondroitin sulphates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rees, Martin D; Hawkins, Clare Louise; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    at pH 7.4). Exposure of glycosaminoglycans to a MPO-H2O2-Cl- system or reagent HOCl generates long-lived chloramides [R-NCl-C(O)-R'] derived from the glycosamine N-acetyl functions. Decomposition of these species by transition metal ions gives polymer-derived amidyl (nitrogen-centred) radicals [R......-carboxybenzyl)hyponitrite] was demonstrated to be entirely chloramide dependent as no fragmentation occurred with the native polymers or when the chloramides were quenched by prior treatment with methionine. EPR spin-trapping experiments using 5,5-dimethyl1-pyrroline-N-oxide and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane have...

  19. An EPR study of positive hole transfer and trapping in irradiated frozen solutions containing aromatic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, A.V.; Zezin, A.A.; Feldman, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Processes of positive hole migration and trapping are of basic significance for understanding of the primary events in the radiation chemistry of solid molecular systems. Specific interest is concerned with the case, when ionization energies of 'hole traps' are rather close, so one may expect 'fine tuning' effects resulting from variations in conformation, weak interactions, molecular packing, etc. In this contribution we report the results of EPR study of formation of radical cations in irradiated frozen halocarbon solutions containing aromatic molecules of different structure. Using the 'two-trap' model made it possible to obtain an evidence for efficient long-range trap-to-trap positive hole transfer between alkyl benzene molecules with close ionization energies distributed in the matrices with high ionization potentials. The distance of transfer was found to be 2-4 nm. In the case of frozen solutions containing ethylbenzene and toluene, it was found that the efficiency and direction of hole transfer was controlled by the conformation of ethylbenzene radical cation. The study of positive hole localization in 'bridged' diphenyls of Ph(CH 2 ) n Ph type revealed that the structure of radical cations of these species was affected by local environment (type of halocarbon matrix) and the conformational flexibility of 'bridge'. In summary, we may conclude that migration and localization of positive hole in rigid systems containing aromatic 'traps' is quite sensitive to rather subtle effects. This conclusion may be of common significance for the radiation chemistry of systems with physical dispersion of the traps of similar chemical structure (e.g. macromolecules, adsorbed molecules, etc.)

  20. Leaving the placenta in situ versus conservative and radical surgery in the treatment of placenta accreta spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutuk, Mehmet S; Ak, Mehmet; Ozgun, Mahmut T

    2018-03-01

    To compare different treatment methods in the management of placenta accreta spectrum (PAS) disorders. In a retrospective cohort study, medical records were retrieved for patients who underwent elective surgery at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more after a diagnosis of PAS disorder (creta, increta, or percreta) at a center in Turkey between May 2, 2010, and August 10, 2016. The final analysis included patients whose diagnosis was confirmed intraoperatively and for whom complete data were available. Patients were divided into three groups: group 1 included those who underwent hysterectomy without placental removal, group 2 included patients whose placenta was left in situ, and group 3 included those who underwent placental removal and conservative surgery. Among 79 included patients (33 creta, 18 increta, 28 percreta), 27 (34%) were in group 1, 15 (19%) in group 2, and 37 (47%) in group 3. Total blood loss and the amounts of blood products transfused were lowest in group 2; significant differences between groups were noted (all P ≤ 0.001). Surgical complication rates were similar between groups (4/27 [15%], 1/15 [7%], and 11/37 [30%], respectively; P=0.119). Overall uterine preservation rates were not significantly different between groups 2 and 3 (14/15 [93%] vs 33/37 [89%]; P>0.99). Leaving the placenta in situ could become the treatment of choice for PAS disorders. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  1. Prospective Study of Plasmodium vivax Malaria Recurrence after Radical Treatment with a Chloroquine-Primaquine Standard Regimen in Turbo, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Silvia; Akinyi Okoth, Sheila; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Marcet, Paula L.; Escalante, Ananias A.; Alexander, Neal; Rojas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax recurrences help maintain malaria transmission. They are caused by recrudescence, reinfection, or relapse, which are not easily differentiated. A longitudinal observational study took place in Turbo municipality, Colombia. Participants with uncomplicated P. vivax infection received supervised treatment concomitantly with 25 mg/kg chloroquine and 0.25 mg/kg/day primaquine for 14 days. Incidence of recurrence was assessed over 180 days. Samples were genotyped, and origins of recurrences were established. A total of 134 participants were enrolled between February 2012 and July 2013, and 87 were followed for 180 days, during which 29 recurrences were detected. The cumulative incidence of first recurrence was 24.1% (21/87) (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.6 to 33.7%), and 86% (18/21) of these events occurred between days 51 and 110. High genetic diversity of P. vivax strains was found, and 12.5% (16/128) of the infections were polyclonal. Among detected recurrences, 93.1% (27/29) of strains were genotyped as genetically identical to the strain from the previous infection episode, and 65.5% (19/29) of infections were classified as relapses. Our results indicate that there is a high incidence of P. vivax malaria recurrence after treatment in Turbo municipality, Colombia, and that a large majority of these episodes are likely relapses from the previous infection. We attribute this to the primaquine regimen currently used in Colombia, which may be insufficient to eliminate hypnozoites. PMID:27185794

  2. Selective Grafting of Primary Amines onto Carbon Nanotubes via Free-Radical Treatment in Microwave Plasma Post-Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Dubois

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel strategy to graft functional groups at the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs is discussed. Aiming at grafting nitrogen containing groups, and more specifically primary amine covalent functionalization, CNTs were exposed under atomic nitrogen flow arising from an Ar + N2 microwave plasma. The primary amine functions were identified and quantified through chemical derivatization with 4-(trifluoromethylbenzaldehyde and characterized through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The increase of the selectivity in the primary amines grafting onto CNTs, up to 66.7% for treatment of CNT powder, was performed via the reduction of post-treatment oxygen contamination and the addition of hydrogen in the experimental set-up, more particularly in the plasma post-discharge chamber. The analyses of nitrogenated and primary amine functions grafting on the CNT surface suggest that atomic nitrogen (N• and reduced nitrogen species (NH• and NH2• react preferentially with defect sites of CNTs and, then, only atomic nitrogen continues to react on the CNT surface, creating defects.

  3. Preoperative radium therapy and radical hysterectomy in the treatment of cervical cancer stage IB, IIA, and initial IIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salum, Resalla; Lopes, Edison R.; Souza, Maria A.H. de

    1995-01-01

    Patients with IB, IIa and in initial IIb cervical cancer were randomized for combined therapy, consisting of one or two radium insertion followed by Wertheim Meigs operation performed 40 days later. We look for the early and late complications of the treatment, residual cancer after radiotherapy and survival without recurrence. The project begin in 1965 and ended in 1986. All the operations were done by one of the investigators and 116 patients were analysed. The age ranged from 21 to 75 years with an average of 4.18 years. During the operations 31 (26.72%) patients needed 1.500 cc or greater amount of blood transfusion and we have 3 iliac veins lesions. Managing the ureters, we do our best to leave the posterior fascia as intact as possible. Post operative complications ranged from minor (fever, localised pelvic infections, temporary popliteal nerve paralysis) to evisceration (3 patients) deep venous thrombosis (3 patients) and two early urinary fistulas. Late complications were seen in patients submitted to sequential teletherapy irradiation. One uretrovaginal fistula occurred 10 month after treatment, another one, 7 years later and the third one 24 years later. One patient develop hydronefrosis and enterocolite after 7.000 rads of teletherapy and another one rectovaginal fistula 13 years after initial therapy. The shortening of the vagina making impossible the intercourse was seen in 7 patients. By the histological examination, the cervix was sterilized in 73.3 % of the patients. Residual cancer was found according the original size of the tumour and the stage of the disease. Studying different combinations between the existence of residual cervical cancer with positive or negative limphnodes and making a correlation with survival, we found the critical points is to have positive cervix and [positive lymphonodes. The five years survival (life table methodology) for stage 1 lesion was 96%; stage II, 67%. At ten years survival was slighted different. With positive

  4. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap......, our results indicate that pitfall traps are the most efficient for capturing shrews: not only do they have a higher efficiency (yield), but the taxonomic diversity of shrews is also higher when pitfall traps are used....

  5. A radical approach to radical innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Deichmann (Dirk); J.C.M. van den Ende (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInnovation pays. Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google – nearly every one of today’s most successful companies has a talent for developing radical new ideas. But how best to encourage radical initiative taking from employees, and does their previous success or failure at it play a role?

  6. In vivo spin-trapping of the metabolites of 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iba, M.M.; Ghoshal, A.; Poyer, J.L.; Downs, P.; Massion, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The carcinogen 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine (DCB) is bioactivated by liver enzymes to lipid-binding derivatives. To characterize the intermediates involved, male rats were treated with 14 C[U]DCB (100 mg, po and ip), followed 4 hr later by the spin trap ∝ phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone [(PBN), 50 mg, po and ip]. The rats were sacrificed 30 min after PBN treatment and the livers isolated and homogenized in CHCl 3 :CH 3 OH (2:1, v:v). The Folch extracts were analyzed by electron spin resonance (esr) spectroscopy, TLC and HPLC. The solvent extract yielded a 6-line spectrum by esr spectroscopy characteristic of a PBN adduct of an aryl radical. HPLC analysis of the extract revealed the presence of benzidine and a paramagnetic fraction which contained a PBN adduct of a DCB derivative. It is concluded that DCB undergoes reductive dehalogenation with aryl radicals as intermediates

  7. Regeneration of phenolic antioxidants from phenoxyl radicals: An ESR and electrochemical study of antioxidant hierarchy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars V.; Madsen, Helle L.; Thomsen, Marianne K.

    1999-01-01

    Radicals from the flavonoids quercetin, (+)-catechin, (+/-)-taxifolin and luteolin, and from all-rac-alpha-tocopherol have been generated electrochemically by one-electron oxidation in deaerated dimethylformamide (DMF), and characterised by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) after spin......-trapping by 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). Simulations of the ESR spectrum based on estimated coupling constants of the spin-trapped quercetin radical, confirmed that this antioxidant radical is oxygen-centered. The complex mixture of radicals, quinoid intermediates and stable two-electron oxidation...

  8. Neutrophil extracellular traps and bacterial biofilms in middle ear effusion of children with recurrent acute otitis media--a potential treatment target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth B Thornton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteria persist within biofilms on the middle ear mucosa of children with recurrent and chronic otitis media however the mechanisms by which these develop remain to be elucidated. Biopsies can be difficult to obtain from children and their small size limits analysis. METHODS: In this study we aimed to investigate biofilm presence in middle ear effusion (MEE from children with recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM and to determine if these may represent infectious reservoirs similarly to those on the mucosa. We examined this through culture, viability staining and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH to determine bacterial species present. Most MEEs had live bacteria present using viability staining (32/36 and all effusions had bacteria present using the universal FISH probe (26/26. Of these, 70% contained 2 or more otopathogenic species. Extensive DNA stranding was also present. This DNA was largely host derived, representing neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs within which live bacteria in biofilm formations were present. When treated with the recombinant human deoxyribonuclease 1, Dornase alfa, these strands were observed to fragment. CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial biofilms, composed of multiple live otopathogenic species can be demonstrated in the MEEs of children with rAOM and that these contain extensive DNA stranding from NETs. The NETs contribute to the viscosity of the effusion, potentially contributing to its failure to clear as well as biofilm development. Our data indicates that Dornase alfa can fragment these strands and may play a role in future chronic OM treatment.

  9. EVALUATION OF FREEZE DRIED ALOE VERA AND NOPAL CACTUS FOR POSSIBLE HEALTH TREATMENTS BY COMPARISON OF ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES AND FREE RADICAL INHIBITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R; Jones, Anthony E; Belmont, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to characterize the antioxidant powers of lyophilized Aloe Vera ( Aloe barbadensis ) and Nopal Cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) by quantifying the phenolics content and radical scavenging abilities of preparations derived from these plants. Extracts of these lyophylized succulents were assayed for phenolic compounds by the Folin Ciocalteau method and compared for free radical scavenging capability by the DPPH method. We found that even though the Aloe lyophilizate extract contained more phenolic content, the Nopal lyophilizate exhibited better free radical scavenging ability. Aloe Vera extract contained 0.278 g/L of phenolic content and exhibited 11.1% free radical inhibition, with a free radical scavenging rate constant of 0.177±0.015 min -1 . Nopal Cactus extract contained 0.174 g/L of phenolic content and exhibited 13.2% free radical inhibition, with a free radical scavenging rate constant of 0.155±0.009 min -1 . These results showed Nopal to have greater antioxidant potency than Aloe.

  10. Findings from NSABP Protocol No. B-04: comparison of radical mastectomy with alternative treatments. II. The clinical and biologic significance of medial-central breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, B.; Wolmark, N.; Redmond, C.; Deutsch, M.; Fisher, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    Findings from 1665 women with primary breast cancer, treated at 34 NSABP institutions in Canada and the United States, have failed to demonstrate that patients with medial-central tumors had a greater probability of developing distant metastases or dying than did those with lateral tumors despite the greater incidence of internal mammary (IM) node involvement when tumors are medial-central in location. A comparison of patients with similar clinical nodal status and tumor location who were treated either by radical mastectomy (RM) or by total mastectomy plus radiation therapy (TM + RT) failed to indicate that radiation of IM nodes reduced the probability of distant treatment failure (TF) or mortality. When findings from patients having equivalent clinical nodal status and tumor location treated by TM alone or TM + RT were compared, it was found that the addition of RT failed to alter the probability of the occurrence of a distant TF or of death. This was despite the fact that in the nonradiated group two putative sources of further tumor spread, i.e., positive axillary and IM nodes, were left unremoved and untreated. The findings provide further insight into the biologic significance of the positive lymph node and confirm our prior contention that positive regional lymph nodes are indicators of a host-tumor relationship which permits the development of metastases and that they are not important investigators of distant disease

  11. Weekly Cisplatin and Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Radical Treatment of Advanced Cervical Cancer in Elderly Patients: Feasibility and Clinical Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Fiorentino, Alba; Levra, Niccolò Giaj; Fersino, Sergio; Di Paola, Gioacchino; Ruggieri, Ruggero

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the feasibility and clinical preliminary results of weekly cisplatin and volumetric-modulated arc therapy to the pelvis with simultaneous integrated boost to macroscopic disease in a cohort of elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Inclusion criteria of this prospective study were age ≥70 years, Karnofsky performance status 70 to 100, locally advanced histologically proven squamous cervical carcinoma, and patients unable to undergo brachytherapy. Radiation doses prescribed were 66 Gy to the macroscopic disease and 54 Gy to the pelvic nodes in 30 fractions. Weekly cisplatin dose was 40 mg/mq. Results: A total of 30 patients were recruited. Median follow-up was 32 months (range: 8-48 months). Median age was 72 years (range: 70-84 years). The 3-year overall survival and local control were 93% and 80%, respectively. The median time to progression was 24 months (range: 6-30 months). Analyzing clinical outcome grouping based on the stage of disease, II versus III, the 3-year overall survival was 100% and 85%, respectively. The 3-year local control was 91% for stage II and 67% for stage III. Acute and late toxicities were acceptable without severe events. Conclusion: Weekly cisplatin and volumetric-modulated arc therapy–simultaneous integrated boost for radical treatment of advanced cervical cancer in the current cohort of elderly patients were feasible. Long-term results and prospective randomized trials are advocated. PMID:27402633

  12. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  13. Angular trap for macroparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksyonov, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    Properties of angular macroparticle traps were investigated in this work. These properties are required to design vacuum arc plasma filters. The correlation between trap geometry parameters and its ability to absorb macroparticles were found. Calculations allow one to predict the behaviour of filtering abilities of separators which contain such traps in their design. Recommendations regarding the use of angular traps in filters of different builds are given.

  14. Effect of transcutaneous electrical stimulation treatment on lower urinary tract symptoms after class III radical hysterectomy in cervical cancer patients: study protocol for a multicentre, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiu-Li; Wang, Hai-Bo; Wang, Zhi-Qi; Cao, Ting-Ting; Yang, Xin; Han, Jing-Song; Wu, Yang-Feng; Reilly, Kathleen H; Wang, Jian-Liu

    2017-06-15

    Class III radical hysterectomy (RH III)_plus pelvic lymphadenectomy is the standard surgery for early stage cervical cancer (CC) patients, the 5 year survival rate is about 90%, but pelvic floor disorders especially bladder dysfunction are common due to damaged vessels and nerve fibers following surgery. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) treatment has been used to treat bladder disorders for many years, but its effect on cervical cancer patients, the best treatment time point and stimulated protocol, had never been assessed. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of TENS treatment on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) after RH III in CC patients. The study will be conducted as a clinical, multicentre, randomised controlled trial with balanced randomisation (1:1). The planned sample size is 208 participants (at 1:1 ratio, 104 subjects in each group). At 5-7 days after RH III, patients are screened according to operative and pathological findings. Enrolled participants are randomised into an intervention group (TENS plus conventional clinical care) or control group (conventional clinical care), with stratification by menopausal status (menopause vs. non-menopause) and surgical modality (laparoscopic RH or abdominal RH). Participants in both groups will be followed up at 14 days, 21 days, 28 days, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months after surgery. The primary endpoint is improvement rate of urination function which is defined as recovery (residual urine ≤50 ml) or improvement (residual urine 50-100 ml). Secondary endpoints include urodynamic parameter, urinary incontinence, anorectal function, pelvic function, quality of life (QOL), disease-free survival and adverse events. Primary endpoint analyses will be carried out by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests taking into center effect. To our knowledge this is the first trial to investigate the effect of TENS treatment on bladder function recovery after RH III among

  15. Characterization of beer flavour stability (EPR - spin trapping)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasko, A.; Liptakova, M.; Malik, F.

    1999-01-01

    The beer flavour stability is coupled with free radical degradation processes. Probably, aldehydes produced during the brewery but also generated by stalling are responsible for beer flavour as well as for its breaking down. The storing beer at the lower temperatures and in the dark place inhibits, and otherwise the rising temperature and illumination accelerate the rate of such radical processes. Beers contain naturally occurring radical scavengers - antioxidants which inhibit such unwanted reactions. Then depleting of scavengers results in the breaking down of the beer stability. EPR spin trapping technique was used as monitor such processes and for characterising so the flavour stability of beer. The probe was temperated at 60 grad C in the cavity of EPR spectrometer in the presence of spin trapping agent, N-tert.-butyl-α-phenyl nitrone (PBN) and EPR spectra were recorded for few hours. After beer antioxidants become depleted, free radicals formed by the beer degradation are scavenged by PBN spin trap and this point is characterised with a dramatically increased concentration of the free radicals trapped

  16. A comparison of speech outcomes using radical intravelar veloplasty or furlow palatoplasty for the treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency associated with occult submucous cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrooz, Paul Nader; MacIsaac, Zoe; Rottgers, Stephen Alex; Ford, Matthew; Grunwaldt, Lorelei J; Kumar, Anand R

    2015-02-01

    The safety, efficacy, and direct comparison of various surgical treatments for velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) associated with occult submucous cleft palate (OSMCP) are poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to report and analyze the safety and efficacy of Furlow palatoplasty (FP) versus radical intravelar veloplasty (IVV) for treatment of VPI associated with OSMCP. A retrospective review of one institution's experience treating VPI associated with OSMCP using IVV (group 1) or FP (group 2) during 24 months was performed. Statistical significance was determined by Wilcoxon matched-pair, Independent-Samples Mann-Whitney U, and analysis of variance (SPSS 20.0.0). In group 1 (IVV), 18 patients were identified from August 2010 to 2011 (12 male and 6 female patients; average age, 5.39 years). Seven patients were syndromic and 11 were nonsyndromic. In group 2 (FP), 17 patients were identified from August 2009 to 2011 (8 male and 9 female patients; average age, 8.37 years). Three patients were syndromic and 14 patients were nonsyndromic. There was statistical significance between the average pretreatment Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Score (PWSS) of the 2 groups (group 1 and 2 averages 19.06 and 11.05, respectively, P=0.002), but there was no statistical significance postoperatively (group 1 and 2 averages 4.50 and 4.69, respectively, P=0.405). One patient from each group required secondary speech surgery. Average operative time was greater for FP (140 minutes; range, 93-177 minutes) compared to IVV (95 minutes; range, 58-135 minutes), Pspeech are treated effectively and safely with either IVV or FP. Intravelar veloplasty trended toward lower speech scores than FP (76% IVV, 58% FP PWSS absolute reduction). Syndromic patients with OSMCP may be more effectively treated with FP (72% IVV vs 79% FP PWSS absolute reduction). Intravelar veloplasty is associated with shorter operative times. Both techniques are associated with low morbidity, improved speech scores, and

  17. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudina, Ivana; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl 3 COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 20 0 C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl 3 COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl 3 COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  18. ESR-spin trapping studies on the interaction between anthraquinone triplets and aromatic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moger, G.; Rockenbauer, A.; Simon, P.

    1980-01-01

    The ESR spin trapping technique was used for the detection of transient C-centered radicals in the photochemical interaction between triplet anthraquinone and aromatic hydroperoxide and alcohol. (author)

  19. Free radical mediated formation of 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) fatty acid diesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Gao, Boyan; Qin, Fang; Shi, Haiming; Jiang, Yuangrong; Xu, Xuebing; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2013-03-13

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that a free radical was formed and mediated the formation of 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) fatty acid diesters, a group of food contaminants, from diacylglycerols at high temperature under a low-moisture condition for the first time. The presence of free radicals in a vegetable oil kept at 120 °C for 20 min was demonstrated using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy examination with 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as the spin trap agent. ESR investigation also showed an association between thermal treatment degree and the concentration of free radicals. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis of sn-1,2-stearoylglycerol (DSG) at 25 and 120 °C suggested the possible involvement of an ester carbonyl group in forming 3-MCPD diesters. On the basis of these results, a novel free radical mediated chemical mechanism was proposed for 3-MCPD diester formation. Furthermore, a quadrupole-time of flight (Q-TOF) MS/MS investigation was performed and detected the DMPO adducts with the cyclic acyloxonium free radical (CAFR) and its product MS ions, proving the presence of CAFR. Furthermore, the free radical mechanism was validated by the formation of 3-MCPD diesters through reacting DSG with a number of organic and inorganic chlorine sources including chlorine gas at 120 and 240 °C. The findings of this study might lead to the improvement of oil and food processing conditions to reduce the level of 3-MCPD diesters in foods and enhance food safety.

  20. Flow Giese reaction using cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide Fukuyama

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tin-free Giese reactions, employing primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl iodides as radical precursors, ethyl acrylate as a radical trap, and sodium cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator, were examined in a continuous flow system. With the use of an automated flow microreactor, flow reaction conditions for the Giese reaction were quickly optimized, and it was found that a reaction temperature of 70 °C in combination with a residence time of 10–15 minutes gave good yields of the desired addition products.

  1. Treatment Outcomes from 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT-Informed Salvage Radiation Treatment in Men with Rising PSA After Radical Prostatectomy: Prognostic Value of a Negative PSMA PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Louise; van Leeuwen, Pim J; Nandurkar, Rohan; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Cusick, Thomas; Hruby, George; Kneebone, Andrew; Eade, Thomas; Fogarty, Gerald; Jagavkar, Raj; Nguyen, Quoc; Ho, Bao; Joshua, Anthony M; Stricker, Phillip

    2017-12-01

    68 Ga-PSMA (prostate-specific membrane antigen) PET/CT is increasingly used in men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy (RP) to triage those who will benefit from salvage radiation treatment (SRT). This study examines the value of PSMA-informed SRT in improving treatment outcomes in the context of biochemical failure after RP. Methods: We analyzed men with rising PSA after RP with PSA readings between 0.05 and 1.0 ng/mL, considered eligible for SRT at the time of PSMA. For each patient, clinical and pathologic features as well as scan results, including site of PSMA-positive disease, number of lesions, and a certainty score, were documented. Subsequent management, including SRT, and most recent PSA were recorded using medical records. Treatment response was defined as both PSA ≤ 0.1 ng/mL and >50% reduction in PSA. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed for association of clinical variables and treatment response to SRT. Results: One hundred sixty-four men were included. PSMA was positive in 62% ( n = 102/164): 38 of 102 in the prostatic fossa, 41 of 102 in pelvic nodes, and 23 of 102 distantly. Twenty-four patients received androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and were excluded for outcomes analysis. In total, 99 of 146 received SRT with a median follow-up after radiation treatment of 10.5 mo (interquartile range, 6-14 mo). Overall treatment response after SRT was 72% ( n = 71/99). Forty-five percent ( n = 27/60) of patients with a negative PSMA underwent SRT whereas 55% (33/60) did not. In men with a negative PSMA who received SRT, 85% ( n = 23/27) demonstrated a treatment response, compared with a further PSA increase in 65% (22/34) in those not treated. In 36 of 99 patients with disease confined to the prostate fossa on PSMA, 81% ( n = 29/36) responded to SRT. In total, 26 of 99 men had nodal disease on PSMA, of whom 61% ( n = 16/26) had treatment response after SRT. On multivariate logistic regression

  2. Successful peroral endoscopic myotomy performed in Endoscopy Department as a radical, long-term treatment for esophageal achalasia – the Greek experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheriadis N

    2017-02-01

    with sigmoid-type achalasia showed moderate-to-significant clinical improvement. Erosive esophagitis was reported in 15%.Conclusion: Our results are in accordance with international data, and proved the safety and efficacy of the POEM technique for radical long-term treatment of all types of achalasia, including end-stage sigmoid-type achalasia, in the Endoscopy Department. However, long-term follow-up is necessary and awaited. Keywords: achalasia, Heller myotomy, peroral endoscopic myotomy

  3. Successful peroral endoscopic myotomy performed in Endoscopy Department as a radical, long-term treatment for esophageal achalasia - the Greek experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadis, Nikolas; Eleftheriadou, Eleni Damianos

    2017-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been considered as a minimal-invasive, innovative technique for long-term treatment of all types of esophageal achalasia and other esophageal motility disorders. We report on 20 consecutive Greek patients with manometrically proved esophageal achalasia (14 patients with type I, 4 with type II, 2 with type III, and 4 with sigmoid esophagus), with an age range of 32-92 years, mean age 59 years, 12 males, successfully treated by POEM from 2013 to 2015. The Eckardt score was 7-12 (type III). Seventeen (85%) POEM procedures were performed in the Endoscopy Department, according to a previous study. During POEM, CO 2 insufflation was mandatory, while the Triangle Tip knife was the only knife used in all procedures. Eckardt score, esophagogram and manometry before and after performing POEM were used for evaluation of our results. The follow-up period was 6 months to 3 years. Selective circular myotomy, 10-13 cm in length, was successfully completed in all patients without severe acute or late complications. Three patients (15%) showed moderate pneumomediastinum and pneumoperitoneum, which was successfully managed by abdominal needle drainage during the procedure. One patient showed mild pleural collection, and in one patient the clip-endoloop technique was used to successfully close the mucosal entry after the completion of POEM. The outcome was uneventful without any further clinical consequences. No other short- or long-term serious complications were reported. Patients were discharged after 1-3 days of hospitalization. Six months to 3 years after the POEM procedure, all patients were alive; the majority (90%) had complete clinical improvement, while two patients with sigmoid-type achalasia showed moderate-to-significant clinical improvement. Erosive esophagitis was reported in 15%. Our results are in accordance with international data, and proved the safety and efficacy of the POEM technique for radical long-term treatment of all

  4. Free Radical Scavenging and Cellular Antioxidant Properties of Astaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose, Janina; Matsugo, Seiichi; Yokokawa, Haruka; Koshida, Yutaro; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Seidel, Ulrike; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Rimbach, Gerald; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba

    2016-01-14

    Astaxanthin is a coloring agent which is used as a feed additive in aquaculture nutrition. Recently, potential health benefits of astaxanthin have been discussed which may be partly related to its free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. Our electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping data suggest that synthetic astaxanthin is a potent free radical scavenger in terms of diphenylpicryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and galvinoxyl free radicals. Furthermore, astaxanthin dose-dependently quenched singlet oxygen as determined by photon counting. In addition to free radical scavenging and singlet oxygen quenching properties, astaxanthin induced the antioxidant enzyme paroxoanase-1, enhanced glutathione concentrations and prevented lipid peroxidation in cultured hepatocytes. Present results suggest that, beyond its coloring properties, synthetic astaxanthin exhibits free radical scavenging, singlet oxygen quenching, and antioxidant activities which could probably positively affect animal and human health.

  5. Efficacy of multifunnel traps for capturing emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): effect of color, glue, and other trap coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Mastro, Victor C

    2011-06-01

    Tens of thousands of adhesive-coated purple prism traps are deployed annually in the United States to survey for the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). A reusable, more user-friendly trap is desired by program managers, surveyors, and researchers. Field assays were conducted in southeastern Michigan to ascertain the feasibility of using nonsticky traps as survey and detection tools for emerald ash borer. Three nonsticky trap designs, including multifunnel (Lindgren), modified intercept panel, and drainpipe (all painted purple) were compared with the standard purple prism trap; no statistical differences in capture of emerald ash borer adults were detected between the multifunnel design and the prism. In subsequent color comparison assays, both green- and purple-painted multifunnel traps (and later, plastic versions of these colors) performed as well or better than the prism traps. Multifunnel traps coated with spray-on adhesive caught more beetles than untreated traps. The increased catch, however, occurred in the traps' collection cups and not on the trap surface. In a separate assay, there was no significant difference detected between glue-coated traps and Rain-X (normally a glass treatment)-coated traps, but both caught significantly more A. planipennis adults than untreated traps.

  6. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    variations of ion traps, including (1) the cylindrically symmetric 3D ring trap; (2) the linear trap with a combination of cavity QED; (#) the symmetric...concepts of quantum information. The major demonstration has been the test of a Bell inequality as demonstrated by Rowe et al. [50] and a decoherence...famous physics experiment [62]. Wolfgang Paul demonstrated a similar apparatus during his Nobel Prize speech [63]. This device is hyperbolic- parabolic

  7. Reduction enhances yields of nitric oxide trapping by iron-diethyldithiocarbamate complex in biological systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanin, A.F.; Bevers, L.M.; Mikoyan, V.D.; Poltorakov, A.P.; Kubrina, L.N.; Faassen, E. van

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of NO trapping by iron-diethylthiocarbamate complexes was investigated in cultured cells and animal and plant tissues. Contrary to common belief, the NO radicals are trapped by iron-diethylthiocarbamates not only in ferrous but in ferric state also in the biosystems. When DETC was

  8. Identification of free nitric oxide radicals in rat bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleksinskaya, Marina A; van Faassen, Ernst E H; Nelissen, Jelly

    2013-01-01

    trapping and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy we give the first experimental confirmation of free NO radicals in rodent BM. NO production was quantified and attributed to enzymatic activity of NO synthases (NOS). Although endothelial NOS (eNOS) accounts for most (66%) of basal NO, we...

  9. Enantioselective radical reactions. Evaluation of nitrogen protecting groups in the synthesis of β2-amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P.; Patil, Kalyani

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of nitrogen protecting groups in radical addition trapping experiments leading to β2-amino acids. Of the three N-protecting groups examined, the phthalimido group was optimal with respect to both yields and enantioselectivity. Additionally, radical additions to more complex acrylates were also investigated, which provided access to functionalized β2-amino acids in modest selectivity. PMID:16799704

  10. Enantioselective radical reactions. Evaluation of nitrogen protecting groups in the synthesis of beta-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Patil, Kalyani

    2006-02-20

    We have investigated the effect of nitrogen protecting groups in radical addition trapping experiments leading to beta(2)-amino acids. Of the three N-protecting groups examined, the phthalimido group was optimal with respect to both yields and enantioselectivity. Additionally, radical additions to more complex acrylates were also investigated, which provided access to functionalized beta(2)-amino acids in modest selectivity.

  11. Adriamycin and derivatives interaction with the mitochondrial membrane: O2 consumption and free radicals formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollakis, G.; Goormaghtigh, E.; Delmelle, M.; Lion, Y.; Ruysschaert, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Adriamycin induces the formation of semiquinone free radicals, O(2) and OH. species, in beef heart intact mitochondria, submitochondrial particles and complex I-III containing proteoliposomes. Free radicals were detected by the use of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy with the spin trapping

  12. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, L V; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  13. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rock, K

    2012-01-03

    improved survival outcomes consistent with those published in the literature for the addition of concurrent and adjuvant TMZ to radical RT for the treatment of GBM. Although 63% of patients seen in the clinic were suitable for a combined modality approach, the prognosis for the lower Radiation Therapy Oncology Group classes still remains poor.

  14. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    survival outcomes consistent with those published in the literature for the addition of concurrent and adjuvant TMZ to radical RT for the treatment of GBM. Although 63% of patients seen in the clinic were suitable for a combined modality approach, the prognosis for the lower Radiation Therapy Oncology Group classes still remains poor.

  15. Preliminary results of a randomized trial of mitomycin C as an adjunct to radical radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Kenneth B.; Urdaneta, Nelson; Vera, Raul; Vera, Andres; Gutierrez, Enrique; Rockwell, Sara; Sartorelli, Alan C.; Fischer, Diana B.; Fischer, James J.

    1996-01-01

    -hematologic toxicity has been seen thus far with CMT. Conclusion: In this Phase III trial, MC as an adjunct to radical RT for CCa was associated only with minimal acute hematologic effects and, importantly, produced no appreciable increase in radiation reactions within the treatment fields. Preliminary analysis shows trends in favor of CMT in terms of both survival and local control, but these have not as yet reached statistical significance. This trial continues to accrue pts

  16. Free radicals in biology. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryor, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    This volume continues the treatment of topics in free radical biology and free radical pathology from Volume I. In the first chapter, pyridinyl radicals, radicals which are models for those derived from NAD, are discussed. Pyridinyl radicals can be synthesized and isolated and directly studied in a number of chemical systems. The next chapter treats the role of glutathione in the cell. It is becoming even more apparent that this vital thiol controls a large number of important cellular functions. The GSH/GSSG balance has recently been implicated as a control for cellular development; this balance also may be important in relaying the effects of oxidants from one site to another in the body. The next chapter outlines the reactions of singlet oxygen; some of these involve free radicals and some do not. This reactive intermediate appears to be important both in photochemical smog and in cellular chemistry where singlet oxygen is produced by nonphotochemical processes. The production of free radicals from dry tissues, a controversial area with conflicting claims is reviewed. The next chapter outlines the current status of the studies of photochemical smog. The next two chapters treat specific reactive materials which are present in smog. The first discusses the chemistry of nitrogen oxides and ozone. The second chapter treats the chemistry of the peroxyacyl nitrites. These compounds, although present in only small concentration, are among the most toxic components of smog. The last two chapters treat radiation damage to proteins and radiation protection and radical reactions produced by radiation in nucleic acids

  17. Theoretical Treatment of Degenerate Electron Exchange and Dimerization in Spin Dynamics of Radical Ion Pairs as Observed by Magnetic Field Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanov, K.L.; Stass, D.V.; Kalneus, E.V.; Kaptein, R.; Lukzen, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we have compared manifestations of degenerate electron exchange (DEE) and dimerization reactions in MARY (magnetically affected reaction yield) spectroscopy and time-resolved magnetic field effects (TR-MFE) of radical ion pairs (RIPs). It is shown that dimerization results in phase and

  18. Radical-mediated annulation reactions. A versatile strategy for the preparation of a series of carbocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, M P; Chen, J; Rheault, T R

    2001-11-15

    [reaction--see text] A series of novel 6-endo [4 + 2] and 7-endo [5 + 2] radical-mediated annulation reactions are described. These annulation sequences involve an intermolecular radical addition followed by intramolecular trapping with an allyltin moiety incorporated into the radical precursor fragment. This methodology allows for access to functionalized 6- and 7-membered carbocycles as well as bicyclic compounds with good to excellent levels of stereocontrol.

  19. Trapping technology for gaseous fission products from voloxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jin Myeong; Park, J. J.; Park, G. I.; Jung, I. H.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, G. H.; Yang, M. S.

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this report is to review the different technologies for trapping the gaseous wastes containing Cs, Ru, Tc, 14 C, Kr, Xe, I and 3 H from a voloxidation process. Based on literature reviews and KAERI's experimental results on the gaseous fission products trapping, appropriate trapping method for each fission product has been selected considering process reliability, simplicity, decontamination factor, availability, and disposal. Specifically, the most promising trapping method for each fission product has been proposed for the development of the INL off-gas trapping system. A fly ash filter is proposed as a trapping media for a cesium trapping unit. In addition, a calcium filter is proposed as a trapping media for ruthenium, technetium, and 14 C trapping unit. In case of I trapping unit, AgX is proposed. For Kr and Xe, adsorption on solid is proposed. SDBC (Styrene Divinyl Benzene Copolymer) is also proposed as a conversion media to HTO for 3 H. This report will be used as a useful means for analyzing the known trapping technologies and help selecting the appropriate trapping methods for trapping volatile and semi-volatile fission products, long-lived fission products, and major heat sources generated from a voloxidation process. It can also be used to design an off-gas treatment system

  20. Trapping technology for gaseous fission products from voloxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jin Myeong; Park, J. J.; Park, G. I.; Jung, I. H.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, G. H.; Yang, M. S

    2005-05-15

    The objective of this report is to review the different technologies for trapping the gaseous wastes containing Cs, Ru, Tc, {sup 14}C, Kr, Xe, I and {sup 3}H from a voloxidation process. Based on literature reviews and KAERI's experimental results on the gaseous fission products trapping, appropriate trapping method for each fission product has been selected considering process reliability, simplicity, decontamination factor, availability, and disposal. Specifically, the most promising trapping method for each fission product has been proposed for the development of the INL off-gas trapping system. A fly ash filter is proposed as a trapping media for a cesium trapping unit. In addition, a calcium filter is proposed as a trapping media for ruthenium, technetium, and {sup 14}C trapping unit. In case of I trapping unit, AgX is proposed. For Kr and Xe, adsorption on solid is proposed. SDBC (Styrene Divinyl Benzene Copolymer) is also proposed as a conversion media to HTO for {sup 3}H. This report will be used as a useful means for analyzing the known trapping technologies and help selecting the appropriate trapping methods for trapping volatile and semi-volatile fission products, long-lived fission products, and major heat sources generated from a voloxidation process. It can also be used to design an off-gas treatment system.

  1. Combining the catalytic enantioselective reaction of visible-light-generated radicals with a by-product utilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Luo, Shipeng; Burghaus, Olaf; Webster, Richard D; Harms, Klaus; Meggers, Eric

    2017-10-01

    We report an unusual reaction design in which a chiral bis-cyclometalated rhodium(iii) complex enables the stereocontrolled chemistry of photo-generated carbon-centered radicals and at the same time catalyzes an enantioselective sulfonyl radical addition to an alkene. Specifically, employing inexpensive and readily available Hantzsch esters as the photoredox mediator, Rh-coordinated prochiral radicals generated by a selective photoinduced single electron reduction are trapped by allyl sulfones in a highly stereocontrolled fashion, providing radical allylation products with up to 97% ee. The hereby formed fragmented sulfonyl radicals are utilized via an enantioselective radical addition to form chiral sulfones, which minimizes waste generation.

  2. Versatile electrostatic trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhoven, J.; Bethlem, H.L.; Schnell, M.; Meijer, G.

    2006-01-01

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of ND315 molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to

  3. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  4. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  5. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D 2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  6. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, M

    2004-07-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D{sub 2} molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  7. Orgasm after radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeman, M; VanDriel, MF; Schultz, WCMW; Mensink, HJA

    Objective To evaluate the ability to obtain and the quality of orgasm after radical prostatectomy, Patients and methods The orgasms experienced after undergoing radical prostatectomy were evaluated in 20 men (median age 65 years, range 56-76) using a semi-structured interview and a self-administered

  8. Physiology of free radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals imply that every atom, molecule, ion, group of atoms, or molecules with one or several non-paired electrons in outer orbital. Among these are: nitrogenoxide (NO•, superoxide-anion-radical (O2•-, hydroxyl radical (OH•, peroxyl radical (ROO•, alcoxyl radical (RO• and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2•. However, reactive oxygen species also include components without non-paired electrons in outer orbital (so-called reactive non-radical agents, such as: singlet oxygen (1O2, peroxynitrite (ONOO-, hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2, hypochloric acid (eg. HOCl and ozone (O3. High concentrations of free radicals lead to the development of oxidative stress which is a precondition for numerous pathological effects. However, low and moderate concentrations of these matter, which occur quite normally during cell metabolic activity, play multiple significant roles in many reactions. Some of these are: regulation of signal pathways within the cell and between cells, the role of chemoattractors and leukocyte activators, the role in phagocytosis, participation in maintaining, changes in the position and shape of the cell, assisting the cell during adaption and recovery from damage (e.g.caused by physical effort, the role in normal cell growth, programmed cell death (apoptosis and cell ageing, in the synthesis of essential biological compounds and energy production, as well as the contribution to the regulation of the vascular tone, actually, tissue vascularization.

  9. Radicals in arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Palenstijn (Willem Jan)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractLet K be a field. A radical is an element of the algebraic closure of K of which a power is contained in K. In this thesis we develop a method for determining what we call entanglement. This describes unexpected additive relations between radicals, and is encoded in an entanglement

  10. Radicals in arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palenstijn, Willem Jan

    2014-01-01

    Let K be a field. A radical is an element of the algebraic closure of K of which a power is contained in K. In this thesis we develop a method for determining what we call entanglement. This describes unexpected additive relations between radicals, and is encoded in an entanglement group. We give

  11. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  12. Trapping radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning

  13. Vinylcyclopropylacyl and polyeneacyl radicals. Intramolecular ketene alkyl radical additions in ring synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Benoit; Herbert, Nicola M A; Harrington-Frost, Nicole M; Pattenden, Gerald

    2005-01-21

    Treatment of a variety of substituted vinylcyclopropyl selenyl esters, e.g. 11, with Bu(3)SnH-AIBN in refluxing benzene leads to the corresponding acyl radical intermediates, which undergo rearrangement and intramolecular cyclisations via their ketene alkyl radical equivalents producing cyclohexenones in 50-60% yield. By contrast, treatment of conjugated triene selenyl esters, e.g. 32, with Bu(3)SnH-AIBN produces substituted 2-cyclopentenones via intramolecular cyclisations of their ketene alkyl radical intermediates. Under the same radical-initiating conditions the selenyl esters derived from o-vinylbenzoic acid and o-vinylcinnamic acid undergo intramolecular cyclisations producing 1-indanone and 5,6-dihydrobenzocyclohepten-7-one respectively in 60-70% yields. A tandem radical cyclisation from the alpha,beta,gamma,delta-diene selenyl ester 31 provides an expeditious synthesis of the diquinane 35 in 69% yield.

  14. Muonium and muonic radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, P.; Fischer, H.; Roduner, E.; Strub, W.; Geeson, D.; Symons, M.C.R.

    1985-01-01

    An energetic positive muon which is injected in a liquid sample of substrate molecules (S) creates an ionization track consisting of substrate cations (S + ) and electrons. Near the end of this track the muon may combine with an electron to form muonium (Mu) which is observable in inert liquids, but which reacts by addition to form a radical. Alternatively, the electron can add to S to form S - , which then combines with the muon to form the radical. Furthermore, instead of ending up in Mu or in a radical the muon may stay in a diamagnetic environment as a solvated muon, or as a muon substituting a proton in a molecule. Of interest in these schemes are the mechanisms and rates of formation of muonated radicals and in particular the rate constants for their reactions to products. Investigations are based on the observation of Mu and the radical by means of the μSR technique in transverse magnetic fields. (Auth.)

  15. Potential Use of Spin Traps to Control ROS in Antipollution Cosmetics—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant D. Sawant

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollution from air and sunlight has adverse effects on human health, particularly skin health. It creates oxidative stress, which results in skin diseases, including skin cancer and aging. Different types of antioxidants are used as preventative actives in skin-care products. However, they have some limitations as they also scavenge oxygen. Recently, spin traps are being explored to trap free radicals before these radicals generating more free radicals (cascading effect and not the oxygen molecules. However, not all spin traps can be used in the topical cosmetic skin-care products due to their toxicity and regulatory issues. The present review focuses on the different pathways of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation due to pollution and the potential use of spin traps in anti-pollution cosmetics to control ROS.

  16. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    Full Text Available Particles leaving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E×B drift. This effect which we refer to as "centrifugal trapping" appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E×B drift speed plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  17. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Particles leaving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E×B drift. This effect which we refer to as "centrifugal trapping" appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E×B drift speed plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  18. IRON AND FREE RADICAL OXIDATIONS IN CELL MEMBRANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Freya Q.; Yue Qian, Steven; Buettner, Garry R.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue being rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, is very susceptible to lipid peroxidation. Iron is well known to be an important initiator of free radical oxidations. We propose that the principal route to iron-mediated lipid peroxidations is via iron-oxygen complexes rather than the reaction of iron with hydrogen peroxide, the Fenton reaction. To test this hypothesis, we enriched leukemia cells (K-562 and L1210 cells) with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a model for brain tissue, increasing the amount of DHA from approximately 3 mole % to 32 mole %. These cells were then subjected to ferrous iron and dioxygen to initiate lipid peroxidation in the presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide. Lipid-derived radicals were detected using EPR spin trapping with α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (POBN). As expected, lipid-derived radical formation increases with increasing cellular lipid unsaturation. Experiments with Desferal demonstrate that iron is required for the formation of lipid radicals from these cells. Addition of iron to DHA-enriched L1210 cells resulted in significant amounts of radical formation; radical formation increased with increasing amount of iron. However, the exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide before the addition of ferrous iron did not increase cellular radical formation, but actually decreased spin adduct formation. These data suggest that iron-oxygen complexes are the primary route to the initiation of biological free radical oxidations. This model proposes a mechanism to explain how catalytic iron in brain tissue can be so destructive. PMID:10872752

  19. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  20. Free radical reaction pathway, thermohemistry of peracetic acid homolysis and its application for phenol degradation: spectroscopic sti=udy and quantum chemistry calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rokhina, E.V.; Makarova, K.; Golovina, E.A.; As, van H.; Virkutyte, J.

    2010-01-01

    The homolysis of peracetic acid (PAA) as a relevant source of free radicals (e.g., •OH) was studied in detail. Radicals formed as a result of chain radical reactions were detected with electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance spin trapping techniques and subsequently identified by

  1. Gnosticism and Radical Feminism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahana, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and radical feminism would easily fall under this definition. There is, however, one major difference: since radical feminism is a relatively recent phenomenon which also benefited from modern modes of text production and preservation, almost all of the sources are still with us. This, in turn, may allow us...... to use radical feminism to make certain aspects of ancient Gnosticism re-emerge from their long submersion, provided that enough similarities can be independently drawn between the two phenomena to merit such a comparison. This paper therefore presents a comparison between concepts and positions...

  2. Homegrown religious radicalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    It has been reported that a growing number of youngsters from Western Europe are engaging in conflicts motivated by religious and political conflicts in the Middle East. This paper explores the reasons behind this seemingly religious radicalization from the point of view of the youngsters...... youngsters and parents of youngsters who have chosen a radicalized path in life. The paper will shed light on how the sense of and yearning for belonging and recognition have to be taken into account in our understanding of homegrown religious radicalization...

  3. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Solodova, S L; Denisova, Taisa G [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-29

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  4. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  5. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Solodova, S L; Denisova, Taisa G

    2010-01-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  6. Radical's view of sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: General concept in radiation biology is that free radicals are highly reactive and they can damage vital cellular molecules leading to injurious effects. However, in this talk, evidence will be presented through the techniques of electron paramagnetic resonance ( EPR ) and pulse radiolysis that free radicals can be highly selective in their reaction with the target molecules. In addition, attempts will be made to present a brief account of emerging scenario of free radical generation, identification and their involvement in radiation damage mechanisms in chemical and biological systems

  7. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Solodova, S L; Denisova, Taisa G [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-29

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  8. The structure and properties of free radicals: An electron spin resonance study of radiation damage to nucleic acid and protein components and to some sulfur-substituted derivitives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagstuen, E.

    1979-01-01

    When cellular systems are exposed to ionizing radiation the long-term effects may range from minor disturbances to such dramatic changes as mutations and cell death. The processes leading to these macroscopical injuries are primarily confined at the molecular level. In all models aimed at a description of the action of radiation at the molecular level the formation of free radicals (which are species containing unpaired electrons) is a central concept. The technique of ESR spectroscopy is uniquely suited to study free radicals, as it is based on resonance absorption of energy by unpaired electrons in a magnetic field. ESR spectroscopy makes it possible to detect free radicals and, in some cases, to identify them. In order to study free radicals by ESR it is necessary to build up a sufficient number of unpaired spins in the sample (approximately 10 11 or more, depending on the shape of the resonance). This may be different techniques have been used to trap the induced radicals or to attain a sufficient steady state concentration level. A procedure which seems to contain a large amount of information is to irradiate at low temperatures, and, by subsequent heat-treatment of the sample to study the reactions and fate of the induced radicals. In this thesis single crystal studies of aromatic amino acids and pyrimidine derivitives together with some substituted purine derivitives are presented, and the results are discussed in relation to the present knowledge about radical formation in these classes of compounds. Single crystal studies of some sulfur-containing aromatic compounds have been presented with the purpose of shedding light on the electronic structure of sulfur-centred radicals. (JIW)

  9. PHOTOPHORETIC LEVITATION AND TRAPPING OF DUST IN THE INNER REGIONS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, Colin P. [Niels Bohr International Academy, The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); McClure, Melissa K., E-mail: cmcnally@nbi.dk, E-mail: mmcclure@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany)

    2017-01-01

    In protoplanetary disks, the differential gravity-driven settling of dust grains with respect to gas and with respect to grains of varying sizes determines the observability of grains, and sets the conditions for grain growth and eventually planet formation. In this work, we explore the effect of photophoresis on the settling of large dust grains in the inner regions of actively accreting protoplanetary disks. Photophoretic forces on dust grains result from the collision of gas molecules with differentially heated grains. We undertake one-dimensional dust settling calculations to determine the equilibrium vertical distribution of dust grains in each column of the disk. In the process we introduce a new treatment of the photophoresis force which is consistent at all optical depths with the representation of the radiative intensity field in a two-stream radiative transfer approximation. The levitation of large dust grains creates a photophoretic dust trap several scale heights above the mid-plane in the inner regions of the disk where the dissipation of accretion energy is significant. We find that differential settling of dust grains is radically altered in these regions of the disk, with large dust grains trapped in a layer below the stellar irradiation surface, where the dust to gas mass ratio can be enhanced by a factor of a hundred for the relevant particles. The photophoretic trapping effect has a strong dependence on particle size and porosity.

  10. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtele, Jonathan [UC Berkeley and LBNL

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  11. EBIT trapping program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, S.R.; Beck, B.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Church, D.; DeWitt, D.; Knapp, D.K.; Marrs, R.E.; Schneider, D.; Schweikhard, L.

    1993-01-01

    The LLNL electron beam ion trap provides the world's only source of stationary highly charged ions up to bare U. This unique capability makes many new atomic and nuclear physics experiments possible. (orig.)

  12. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  13. EPR detection of free radicals in UV-irradiated skin: mouse versus human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, B.A.; Buettner, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation produces free radicals in Skh-1 mouse skin, contributing to photoaging and carcinogenesis. If a mouse model is a general indicator of free radical processes in human skin photobiology, then radical production observed in mouse and human skin should be directly comparative. In this work we show that UV radiation (λ > 300 nm, 14 μW/cm 2 UVB; 3.5 mW/cm 2 UVA) increases the ascorbate free radical (Asc) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal in both Skh-1 mouse skin (45%) and human facial skin biopsies (340%). Visible light (λ > 400 nm; 0.23 mW/cm 2 UVA) also increased the Ascsignal in human skin samples (45%) but did not increase baseline mouse Asc, indicating that human skin is more susceptible to free radical formation and that a chromophore for visible light may be present. Using EPR spin-trapping techniques, UV radiation produced spin adducts consistent with trapping lipid alkyl radicals in mouse skin (α-[4-pyridyl 1-oxide]-N-tert-butyl nitrone/alkyl radical adduct; a N = 15.56 G and a H 2.70 G) and lipid alkoxyl radicals in human skin (5,5-dimethylpyrroline -1-oxide/alkoxyl radical adduct; a N = 14.54 G and a H = 16.0 G). Topical application of the iron chelator Desferal to human skin significantly decreases these radicals (∼50%), indicating a role for iron in lipid peroxidation. (Author)

  14. Defect trapping of deuterium implanted in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Y.; Kakeno, M.; Yamada, K.; Hioki, T.; Kawamoto, J.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of deuterium implanted in Al was studied by the D( 3 He,p) 4 He and the D(d,p)T nuclear reactions. Changes of the depth profiles of the deuterium after heat treatments indicated that the implanted deuterium was trapped by the defect produced during the deuterium implantation and the release probability of the trapped deuterium increased as the specimen temperature was raised. Assuming a thermal equilibrium locally in the region of high defect concentration, the trapping energy of deuterium in Al was determined to be 0.12eV. Since the release probability for the single crystal was considerably larger than that for the polycrystal specimens, the deuterium was considered to be strongly trapped in the grain boundaries. Distributions of displaced Al atoms and the recovery of the lattice damage by annealing were measured by the channelling technique. (author)

  15. Degradation and intermediates of diclofenac as instructive example for decomposition of recalcitrant pharmaceuticals by hydroxyl radicals generated with pulsed corona plasma in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaschik, Robert; Jablonowski, Helena; Bednarski, Patrick J; Kolb, Juergen F

    2018-01-15

    Seven recalcitrant pharmaceutical residues (diclofenac, 17α-ethinylestradiol, carbamazepine, ibuprofen, trimethoprim, diazepam, diatrizoate) were decomposed by pulsed corona plasma generated directly in water. The detailed degradation pathway was investigated for diclofenac and 21 intermediates could be identified in the degradation cascade. Hydroxyl radicals have been found primarily responsible for decomposition steps. By spin trap enhanced electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), OH-adducts and superoxide anion radical adducts were detected and could be distinguished applying BMPO as a spin trap. The increase of concentrations of adducts follows qualitatively the increase of hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Hydrogen peroxide is eventually consumed in Fenton-like processes but the concentration is continuously increasing to about 2mM for a plasma treatment of 70min. Degradation of diclofenac is inversely following hydrogen peroxide concentrations. No qualitative differences between byproducts formed during plasma treatment or due to degradation via Fenton-induced processes were observed. Findings on degradation kinetics of diclofenac provide an instructive understanding of decomposition rates for recalcitrant pharmaceuticals with respect to their chemical structure. Accordingly, conclusions can be drawn for further development and a first risk assessment of the method which can also be applied towards other AOPs that rely on the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Moderate and Radical Islam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabasa, Angel

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the statement of Angel Rabasa, PhD, Senior Policy Analyst, The RAND Corporation, to the Committee on Armed Services, Defense Review Terrorism and Radical Islam Gap Panel, United...

  17. Violent Radicalization in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard-Nielsen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    When, why, and how do people living in a democracy become radicalized to the point of being willing to use or directly support the use of terrorist violence against fellow citizens? This question has been at the center of academic and public debate over the past years as terrorist attacks...... within this field and to answer the question: From an empirical point of view, what is known and what is not known about radicalization connected to militant Islamism in Europe?...

  18. Search For Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B.; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D.; Bray, Crystal C.; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L.; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C.; Gill, David R.; Hangst, Jeffrey S.; Hardy, Walter N.; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Hayden, Michael E.; Humphries, Andrew J.; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Jorgensen, Lars V.; Kurchaninov, Lenoid; Lambo, Ricardo; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Nasr, Sarah Seif El; Silveira, Daniel M.; So, Chukman; Storey, James W.; Thompson, Robert I.; van der Werf, Dirk P.; Wilding, Dean; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ~30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10^7 antiprotons with 1.3 10^9 positrons to produce 6 10^5 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consist...

  19. Preoperative radium therapy and radical hysterectomy in the treatment of cervical cancer stage IB, IIA, and initial IIB.; Radiumterapia pre-operatoria e histerectomia radical no tratamento do cancer do colo uterino IB, IIA e IIB inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salum, Resalla; Lopes, Edison R.; Souza, Maria A.H. de [Faculdade de Medicina do Triangulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Hospital Escola

    1995-07-01

    Patients with IB, IIa and in initial IIb cervical cancer were randomized for combined therapy, consisting of one or two radium insertion followed by Wertheim Meigs operation performed 40 days later. We look for the early and late complications of the treatment, residual cancer after radiotherapy and survival without recurrence. The project begin in 1965 and ended in 1986. All the operations were done by one of the investigators and 116 patients were analysed. The age ranged from 21 to 75 years with an average of 4.18 years. During the operations 31 (26.72%) patients needed 1.500 cc or greater amount of blood transfusion and we have 3 iliac veins lesions. Managing the ureters, we do our best to leave the posterior fascia as intact as possible. Post operative complications ranged from minor (fever, localised pelvic infections, temporary popliteal nerve paralysis) to evisceration (3 patients) deep venous thrombosis (3 patients) and two early urinary fistulas. Late complications were seen in patients submitted to sequential teletherapy irradiation. One uretrovaginal fistula occurred 10 month after treatment, another one, 7 years later and the third one 24 years later. One patient develop hydronefrosis and enterocolite after 7.000 rads of teletherapy and another one rectovaginal fistula 13 years after initial therapy. The shortening of the vagina making impossible the intercourse was seen in 7 patients. By the histological examination, the cervix was sterilized in 73.3 % of the patients. Residual cancer was found according the original size of the tumour and the stage of the disease. Studying different combinations between the existence of residual cervical cancer with positive or negative limphnodes and making a correlation with survival, we found the critical points is to have positive cervix and positive lymphonodes. The five years survival (life table methodology) for stage 1 lesion was 96%; stage II, 67%. At ten years survival was slighted different. With positive

  20. Retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L.; Chang, I.; Kim, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dicentric chromosome aberrations technique scoring of aberrations in metaphases prepared from human lymphocytes is most commonly used. This is considered as a reliable technique because the sample is extracted from the individual human body itself. There are other techniques in biological dosimetry such as Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using translocations, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and micronucleus assay. However the minimum detectable doses (MDD) are relatively high and sample preparation time is also relatively longer. Therefore, there is limitation in use of these techniques for the purpose of triage in a short time in case of emergency situation relating large number of persons. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique is based on the signal from unpaired electrons such as free radicals in irradiated materials especially tooth enamel, however it has also limitation for the purpose of triage because of difficulty of sample taking and its high MDD. Recently as physical methods, thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique have been attracted due to its lower MDD and simplicity of sample preparation. Density of the trapped charges is generally proportional to the radiation dose absorbed and the intensity of emitting light is also proportional to the density of trapped charges, thus it can be applied to measure radiation dose retrospectively. In this presentation, TL and OSL techniques are going to introduced and discussed as physical methods for retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges especially in electronic component materials. As a tool for dose reconstruction for emergency situation, thermoluminescece and optically stimulated luminescence techniques which are based on trapped charges during exposure of material are introduced. These techniques have several advantages such as high sensitivity, fast evaluation and ease to sample collection over common biological dosimetry and EPR

  1. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Combination is the dominant free radical process initiated in DNA by ionizing radiation: an overview based on solid-state EPR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, W.A.; Mroczka, N.; Barnes, J.

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the early processes initiated in DNA by ionizing radiation is given from the perspective of studies done by solid-state EPR with the focus on radical combination. Comparisons with free radical formation and trapping in crystalline pyrimidines (1-methylcytosine, thymine, 1-methylthymine, 1-methyluracil, and cytosine monohydrate) provide insight into the processes occurring in DNA. Between 25 and 50% of low LET ionizations in fully hydrated DNA at 4 K lead to trapped free radicals, the remaining unobserved radicals are assumed to have combined. The majority of the radicals trapped in DNA at 4 K (G ∼ 0.3 μmol/J) are believed to be in clusters. Based on the value of G, it is argued that the range of holes and bound electrons in DNA at 4 K are, in the main, limited to within the cluster diameter, ∼ 4 nm. Proton transfer across hydrogen bonds promotes radical trapping and inhibits combination but is thermally reversible. Warming to room temperature mobilizes the reversibly trapped radicals and gives additional combination (50-80% of those trapped at 4 K). The yield of free radicals, after anneal, is sufficient to account for the yield of single-strand breaks produced by direct effects. (Author)

  3. Radicals in DNA as seen by ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, M.C.R.

    1997-01-01

    This is a review of ESR studies, mainly of DNA systems, after exposure to ionising radiation at low temperatures. Under this conditions 'direct' damage is of major significance, and ESR evidence for the concept of the initial formation of electron-gain and electron-loss centers localised within DNA bases, and deeply trapped by proton-gain and loss, will be discussed. It is stressed that 'negative' evidence, showing that various phosphate and sugar centred radicals are not detected, is of major importance since the ESR 'fingerprints' of base-radicals are relatively ill defined. (author)

  4. Medfly female attractant trapping studies in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeronimo, F.; Rendon, P.; Villatoro, C.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted from 1994 - 1998 to test the attractiveness of combinations of food-based chemicals for C. capitata (medfly) in Guatemala. Most studies were done in coffee. The 1995 studies, using the FA-2 attractants (ammonium acetate and putrescine) showed that this combination was attractive for females and had potential for use in conjunction with a SIT program. The 1996 studies at three elevations demonstrated that, in general, these attractants, when used in either the Open Bottom Dry Trap (OBDT), Closed Bottom Dry Trap (CBDT), or International Pheromone's McPhail Trap (IPMT) performed better than the Jumbo McPhail trap (JMT) baited with NuLure and borax (NU+B) for capture of feral females. At the high elevation (1400 m), the IPMT with FA-2 and OBDT with FA-2 were best; at the middle elevation (1100 m), the ORDT, IPMT, and CBDT with FA-2 were best; and at low elevations (659 m), the IPMT with FA-2, JMT with NU+B and ORDT with FA-2 were equal in performance. At the middle elevation, using sterile flies, the OBDT with FA-2 worked best. When experiments were carried out in pear, the traps using the FA-2 attractants captured more female flies than the JMT, NU+B, but not significantly more. During the 1997 trials, a third component, trimethylamine was added to the two component lure (FA-3). This attractant was tested in a number of locally produced traps using 2 I soft drink bottles with different color bottoms. The dry versions of the traps contained a yellow sticky insert. All study sites were at low elevation 600 - 650 m, in coffee, testing both sterile and feral flies. With the feral flies during the first phase of the study at finca San Carlos, there were no significant differences between treatments, at finca San Luis, the clear local trap with sticky insert and the green local trap with sticky insert were best, and at finca Valapraiso, the green local trap with yellow sticky insert and yellow local trap with sticky insert captured more flies

  5. The free radical species in polyacrylonitrile fibers induced by γ-radiation and their decay behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weihua; Wang Mouhua; Xing Zhe; Wu Guozhong

    2012-01-01

    Free radicals in vacuum, air and oxygen atmospheres were studied using electron spin resonance (ESR). Mainly two types of radicals, namely alkyl radicals and polyimine radicals, are formed in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers after γ-ray irradiation. The G value of the radical formation was calculated to be 2.1 (number of radicals per 100 eV absorbed) in air at room temperature based on the ESR measurements. The radical stability and decay behaviors at room temperature and elevated temperatures were also investigated under different atmospheres. The alkyl radicals were found to be rather stable when stored in vacuum at room temperature, but they decayed via reaction with oxygen when stored in air. The alkyl radicals disappeared completely after a thermal treatment at 110 °C in vacuum, but only 15% of the polyimine radicals decayed; this indicates that polyimine radicals are more stable compared to the alkyl radicals due to their lower mobility. - Highlights: ► Radicals formed by radiation were assigned to polyimine and alkyl radicals. ► G-value of radicals was measured to be 2.1 per 100 eV. ► The radicals were found to be extremely stable in vacuum at room temperature. ► Effect of oxygen on radical decay under various conditions was studied.

  6. Physics with Trapped Antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Michael

    2017-04-01

    For more than a decade antihydrogen atoms have been formed by mixing antiprotons and positrons held in arrangements of charged particle (Penning) traps. More recently, magnetic minimum neutral atom traps have been superimposed upon the anti-atom production region, promoting the trapping of a small quantity of the antihydrogen yield. We will review these advances, and describe some of the first physics experiments performed on anrtihydrogen including the observation of the two-photon 1S-2S transition, invesigation of the charge neutrailty of the anti-atom and studies of the ground state hyperfine splitting. We will discuss the physics motivations for undertaking these experiments and describe some near-future initiatives.

  7. Comparación de costes de tres tratamientos del cáncer de próstata localizado en España: prostatectomía radical, braquiterapia prostática y radioterapia conformacional externa 3D Cost comparison of three treatments for localized prostate cancer in Spain: radical prostatectomy, prostate brachytherapy and external 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Becerra Bachino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar los costes de los tratamientos más establecidos para el cáncer de próstata localizado según grupos de riesgo, edad y comorbilidad, desde la perspectiva del proveedor asistencial. Métodos: Comparación de costes en pacientes reclutados consecutivamente entre 2003 y 2005 en una unidad funcional de tratamiento del cáncer de próstata. La utilización de servicios hasta 6 meses después del inicio del tratamiento se obtuvo de las bases de datos hospitalarias, y los costes directos se estimaron mediante cálculo microcoste. La información sobre las características clínicas de los pacientes y los tratamientos recogió prospectivamente. Los costes se compararon mediante tests no paramétricos de comparación de medianas (Kruskall-Wallis y un modelo semilogarítmico de regresión múltiple. Resultados: La diferencia de costes fue estadísticamente significativa: medianas de 3229.10 €, 5369.00 € y 6265.60 € para los pacientes tratados con radioterapia conformacional externa 3D, braquiterapia, y prostatectomía radical retropública, respectivamente (pObjective: To compare the initial costs of the three most established treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer according to risk, age and comorbidity groups, from the healthcare provider's perspective. Methods: We carried out a cost comparison study in a sample of patients consecutively recruited between 2003 and 2005 from a functional unit for prostate cancer treatment in Catalonia (Spain. The use of services up to 6 months after the treatment start date was obtained from hospital databases and direct costs were estimated by micro-cost calculation. Information on the clinical characteristics of patients and treatments was collected prospectively. Costs were compared by using nonparametric tests comparing medians (Kruskall-Wallis and a semi-logarithmic multiple regression model. Results: Among the 398 patients included, the cost difference among treatments was

  8. Ion trap device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  9. Asymmetric ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  10. Radical dematerialization and degrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallis, Giorgos

    2017-05-01

    The emission targets agreed in Paris require a radical reduction of material extraction, use and disposal. The core claim of this article is that a radical dematerialization can only be part and parcel of degrowth. Given that capitalist economies are designed to grow, this raises the question of whether, and under what circumstances, the inevitable `degrowth' can become socially sustainable. Three economic policies are discussed in this direction: work-sharing, green taxes and public money. This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'.

  11. Muon substituted free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, P.; Fischer, H.; Roduner, E.; Strub, W.; Gygax, F.N.; Brinkman, G.A.; Louwrier, P.W.F.; McKenna, D.; Ramos, M.; Webster, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    Spin polarized energetic positive muons are injected as magnetic probes into unsaturated organic liquids. They are implemented via fast chemical processes ( -10 s) in various molecules. Of particular interest among these are muonium substituted free radicals. The technique allows determination of accurate rate coefficients for fast chemical reactions of radicals. Furthermore, radiochemical processes occuring in picoseconds after injection of the muon are studied. Of fundamental interest are also the structural and dynamical implications of substituting a proton by a muon, or in other terms, a hydrogen atom by a muonium atom. Selected examples for each of these three types of experiments are given. (Auth.)

  12. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  13. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO 2 + with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H 2 densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH + , CH 2 + , and CH 4 + have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  14. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO 2 as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe

  15. Redesigning octopus traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In order to minimise the identified problems in the actual traps, the present work proposes a new design with the aim of reducing the volume and weight during transport, and also during onshore storage. Alternative materials to avoid corrosion and formation of encrustations were also proposed.

  16. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  17. Counter radicalization development assistance

    OpenAIRE

    van Hippel, Karin

    2006-01-01

    The paper reviews current research and practice and recommends strategies for development agencies working in the Arab and Muslim world. It builds on the basic assumption that the realization of the Millennium Development Goals will be vital to reduce support for terrorism in the long term. Within this overall framework, emphasis is placed on particular programs that could be specifically applied to counter radicalization.

  18. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen M.; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Coti, Karla K.; Bení tez, Diego S.; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmieli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William Andrew III; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, Fraser Fraser Raser

    2009-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  19. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Online Radicalization: Bangladesh Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    radicalization through cyberspace, Bangladesh mostly implements hard powers such as removing contents and restricting access to the internet. However, freedom...cyberspace, Bangladesh mostly implements hard powers such as removing contents and restricting access to the internet. However, freedom of speech...67 An Organizational Approach to Implement the Measures........................................ 69 Formation of

  1. Cation radicals of xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, Mary Grace I; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Deal, Cailin; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2007-10-01

    Carotenes and xanthophylls are well known to act as electron donors in redox processes. This ability is thought to be associated with the inhibition of oxidative reactions in reaction centers and light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, cation radicals of neoxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, beta-carotene, and lycopene were generated in solution using ferric chloride as an oxidant and then studied by absorption spectroscopy. The investigation provides a view toward understanding the molecular features that determine the spectral properties of cation radicals of carotenoids. The absorption spectral data reveal a shift to longer wavelength with increasing pi-chain length. However, zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin exhibit cation radical spectra blue-shifted compared to that of beta-carotene, despite all of these molecules having 11 conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. CIS molecular orbital theory quantum computations interpret this effect as due to the hydroxyl groups in the terminal rings selectively stabilizing the highest occupied molecular orbitals of preferentially populated s-trans-isomers. The data are expected to be useful in the analysis of spectral results from PSII pigment-protein complexes seeking to understand the role of carotene and xanthophyll cation radicals in regulating excited state energy flow, in protecting PSII reaction centers against photoinhibition, and in dissipating excess light energy absorbed by photosynthetic organisms but not used for photosynthesis.

  2. Comparing Positively and Negatively Charged Distonic Radical Ions in Phenylperoxyl Forming Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peggy E; Marshall, David L; Poad, Berwyck L J; Narreddula, Venkateswara R; Kirk, Benjamin B; Trevitt, Adam J; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2018-06-04

    In the gas phase, arylperoxyl forming reactions play a significant role in low-temperature combustion and atmospheric processing of volatile organic compounds. We have previously demonstrated the application of charge-tagged phenyl radicals to explore the outcomes of these reactions using ion trap mass spectrometry. Here, we present a side-by-side comparison of rates and product distributions from the reaction of positively and negatively charge tagged phenyl radicals with dioxygen. The negatively charged distonic radical ions are found to react with significantly greater efficiency than their positively charged analogues. The product distributions of the anion reactions favor products of phenylperoxyl radical decomposition (e.g., phenoxyl radicals and cyclopentadienone), while the comparable fixed-charge cations yield the stabilized phenylperoxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations rationalize these differences as arising from the influence of the charged moiety on the energetics of rate-determining transition states and reaction intermediates within the phenylperoxyl reaction manifold and predict that this influence could extend to intra-molecular charge-radical separations of up to 14.5 Å. Experimental observations of reactions of the novel 4-(1-carboxylatoadamantyl)phenyl radical anion confirm that the influence of the charge on both rate and product distribution can be modulated by increasing the rigidly imposed separation between charge and radical sites. These findings provide a generalizable framework for predicting the influence of charged groups on polarizable radicals in gas phase distonic radical ions. Graphical Abstract.

  3. Involvement of active oxygen in lipid peroxide radical reaction of epidermal homogenate following ultraviolet light exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, J.; Ogura, R.; Sugiyama, M.; Hidaka, T.; Kohno, M.

    1991-01-01

    To elucidate the radical mechanism of lipid peroxidation induced by ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, an electron spin resonance (ESR) study was made on epidermal homogenate prepared from albino rat skin. The exposure of the homogenate to UV light resulted in an increase in lipid peroxide content, which was proportional to the time of UV exposure. Using ESR spin trapping (dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide, DMPO), the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals (L.) was measured following UV exposure (DMPO-L.:aN = 15.5 G, aH = 22.7 G), as was the spectrum of DMPO-hydroxyl radical (DMPO-OH, aN = aH = 15.5 G). In the presence of superoxide dismutase, the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals was found to be reduced remarkably. Therefore, it was shown that the generation of the lipid radicals partially involves superoxide anion radicals, in addition to hydroxyl radicals. In the ESR free-radical experiment, an ESR signal appeared at g = 2.0064 when the ESR tube filled with homogenate was exposed to UV light at -150 degrees C. The temperature-dependent change in the ESR free radical signal of homogenate exposed to UV light was observed at temperatures varying from -150 degrees C to room temperature. By using degassed samples, it was confirmed that oxygen is involved in the formation of the lipid peroxide radicals (LOO.) from the lipid radicals (L.)

  4. Calorimetric and spectroscopic properties of small globular proteins (bovine serum albumin, hemoglobin) after free radical generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, N.; Belagyi, J.; Lorinczy, D.

    2003-01-01

    Mild oxidation of -SH-containing proteins (serum albumin, hemoglobin) by Ce(IV)-ions in the presence of the spin trap phenyl-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) resulted in the appearance of strongly immobilized nitroxide free radicals which evidences the formation of thiyl radicals on the thiol site of the proteins. In hydroxyl free radical generating system a fraction of strongly immobilized nitroxide radicals was also detected in these proteins, which implies that the oxidation of a fraction of the thiol groups was also involved in the free radical reaction. According to the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments the melting processes of the proteins were calorimetrically irreversible, therefore the two-state kinetic model was used to evaluate the experiments. The results support the view that site-specific interaction of SH-containing proteins with hydroxyl and thiyl free radicals is able to modify the internal dynamics of proteins and affect the conformation of large molecules

  5. Radical polarization in double switching of external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukzen, N.N.; Morozov, V.A.; Sagdeev, R.Z.

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical treatment of radical spin evolution under the action of double switching of external magnetic field is proposed. Account is taken of evolution of the radical spin state during laser pulse which generates paramagnetic particles. It is shown that the most effective beats in the nuclear magnetization of diamagnetic products of recombination occur upon the jump into zero magnetic field after laser pulse. The phase of observed beats bears information about the type of the initial radical polarization. The frequency of the beats is determined by radical hyperfine structure. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. ESR-based Identification of Radiation-Induced Free Radicals in Gamma-Irradiated Basil and Clove Using Different Sample Pre-Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, J.Y.; Ahn, J.J.; Kashif Akram; Kwon, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    An improved detection of radiation-induced paramagnetic faults was developed to identify the irradiation status of basil and clove. The effectiveness of different sample pretreatments, including freeze-drying (FD), oven-drying (OD), alcoholic-extraction (AE), and water-washing and alcoholic-extraction (WAE), were examined. All non-irradiated samples showed a single central signal (g 0 = 2.006), whereas radicals representing two additional side peaks (g 1 = 2.023 and g 2 = 1.986) with a mutual distance of 6 mT were detected in the irradiated samples. AE and WAE produced the best results for irradiated clove in terms of intensities of radiation-specific ESR signals and their ratios to the central signal. However, FD provided the highest intensities of radiation-specific ESR signals for basil, whereas their ratios to the major signal were better in the cases of AE and WAE. Signal noise, particularly due to Mn 2+ signals, was observed, whereas it decreased in AE and WAE pretreatments. Based on our results, AE and WAE can improve the detection conditions for radiation-specific ESR signals in irradiated samples. (author)

  7. Phytochemical screening, free radical scavenging and antibacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassia sieberiana is a tropical plant, widely distributed throughout Sudan and Guinea savannah. It is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of malarial, cancer and stomach ache. The study was conducted to screen for phytochemicals, free radical scavenging and antibacterial potentials of the root bark.

  8. Free radical transfer in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, C. von; Bothe, E.; Ulanski, P.

    1998-01-01

    For the present study of free-radical transfer in polymers pulse radiolysis and product studies have been carried out in aqueous solutions using thus far only the water-soluble polymers polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid and polyvinyl alcohol. When OH radicals, generated in the radiolysis of N 2 O-saturated aqueous solutions, react with polymers the lifetime of the polymer radical thus created very much depends on the number of radicals per polymer chain. When there are a large number of radicals per chain their bimolecular decay may be faster than the corresponding (diffusion controlled) decay of monomeric radicals, but when the macromolecule contains only few or even just one radical their lifetime is considerably prolonged. Highly charged polymers such as polyacrylic acid at high pH attain a rod-like conformation which again favors a long lifetime of the radicals. Under such conditions, radical transfer reactions can occur. For example, in polyacrylic acid OH radicals generate two kinds of radicals side by side. The radical in β-position to the carboxylate group converts into the thermodynamically more stable α-radicals by an H-transfer reaction as can be followed by spectrophotometry. Besides radical transfer reactions β-fragmentation reactions occur causing chain scission. Such reactions can be followed in a pulse radiolysis experiment by conductometry, because counter ions are released upon chain scission. Such a process is especially effective in the case of polymethacrylic acid, where it results in a chain depolymerization. An intramolecular H-abstraction is also observed in the γ-radiolysis of polyacrylic acid with the corresponding peroxyl radicals. This causes a chain reaction to occur. The resulting hydroperoxides are unstable and decarboxylate given rise to acetylacetone-like products. In polyvinyl alcohol the peroxyl radicals in α-position to the alcohol function undergo HO 2 -elimination. This prevents a scission of the polymer chain in the

  9. Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos Alivizatos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy remains the treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer in age-appropriate and health-appropriate men. Although cancer control is the most important aspect of a radical prostatectomy, minimization of postoperative morbidity, especially urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, is becoming a greater concern. We reviewed recent data available on Medline regarding the incidence, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of incontinence and sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. Health-related quality of life issues have been specifically addressed. Although low incidences of incontinence and erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy have been reported in the hands of experienced surgeons, the literature review revealed a great variety, with incontinence rates ranging from 0.3–65.6% and potency rates ranging from 11–87%. Several factors contribute to this wide difference, the most important being the application of a meticulous surgical technique. General and cancer-specific health-related quality of life is not being affected after radical prostatectomy. The incidence of incontinence and erectile dysfunction is higher after radical prostatectomy when compared to the incidence observed when other therapies for localized prostate cancer are applied. However, the majority of the patients undergoing radical prostatectomy would vote for the operation again. Today, avoidance of major complications after radical prostatectomy depends mostly on a high-quality surgical technique. When incontinence or erectile dysfunction persists after radical prostatectomy, the majority of the treated patients can be managed effectively by various methods.

  10. [Trapping techniques for Solenopsis invicta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-song; Zhang, Qiang; Zhuang, Yiong-lin; Li, Gui-wen; Ji, Lin-peng; Wang, Jian-guo; Dai, Hua-guo

    2007-06-01

    A field study was made to investigate the trapping effects of different attractants, traps, and wind directions on Solenopsis invicta. The results showed that among the test attractants, TB1 (50 g fishmeal, 40 g peptone, 10 ml 10% sucrose water solution and 20 ml soybean oil) had the best effect, followed by TB2 (ham), TB6 (100 g cornmeal and 20 ml soybean oil) and TB4 (10 ml 10% sucrose water solution, 100 g sugarcane powder and 20 ml soybean oil), with a mean capture efficiency being 77.6, 58.7, 29 and 7.7 individuals per trap, respectively. No S. invicta was trapped with TB3 (10 ml 10% sucrose water solution, 100 g cornmeal and 20 ml soybean oil) and TB5 (honey). Tube trap was superior to dish trap, with a trapping efficiency of 75.2 and 35 individuals per trap, respectively. The attractants had better effects in leeward than in windward.

  11. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped...... in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping...... of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing...

  12. Muonium-containing vinyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.J.; Symons, M.C.R.; Roduner, E.; Heming, M.

    1987-01-01

    Exposure of trimethylsilylacetylene and bis(trimethylsilyl)acetylene to positive muons gave radicals whose muon-electron hyperfine coupling constants establish that the corresponding vinyl radicals were formed. (author)

  13. A randomized, controlled trial of aerobic exercise for treatment-related fatigue in men receiving radical external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Phyllis M; Nicol, Kathleen F; Potter, Joan

    2004-08-01

    Advice to rest and take things easy if patients become fatigued during radiotherapy may be detrimental. Aerobic walking improves physical functioning and has been an intervention for chemotherapy-related fatigue. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was performed to determine whether aerobic exercise would reduce the incidence of fatigue and prevent deterioration in physical functioning during radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma. Sixty-six men were randomized before they received radical radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma, with 33 men randomized to an exercise group and 33 men randomized to a control group. Outcome measures were fatigue and distance walked in a modified shuttle test before and after radiotherapy. There were no significant between group differences noted with regard to fatigue scores at baseline (P = 0.55) or after 4 weeks of radiotherapy (P = 0.18). Men in the control group had significant increases in fatigue scores from baseline to the end of radiotherapy (P = 0.013), with no significant increases observed in the exercise group (P = 0.203). A nonsignificant reduction (2.4%) in shuttle test distance at the end of radiotherapy was observed in the control group; however, in the exercise group, there was a significant increase (13.2%) in distance walked (P = 0.0003). Men who followed advice to rest and take things easy if they became fatigued demonstrated a slight deterioration in physical functioning and a significant increase in fatigue at the end of radiotherapy. Home-based, moderate-intensity walking produced a significant improvement in physical functioning with no significant increase in fatigue. Improved physical functioning may be necessary to combat radiation fatigue.

  14. OKN-007 decreases free radical levels in a preclinical F98 rat glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Smith, Nataliya; Atolagbe, Oluwatomisin; Ziegler, Jadith; Njoku, Charity; Lerner, Megan; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Mason, Ronald P; Meek, Bill; Plafker, Scott M; Saunders, Debra; Mamedova, Nadezda; Towner, Rheal A

    2015-10-01

    Free radicals are associated with glioma tumors. Here, we report on the ability of an anticancer nitrone compound, OKN-007 [Oklahoma Nitrone 007; a disulfonyl derivative of α-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN)] to decrease free radical levels in F98 rat gliomas using combined molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI) and immunospin-trapping (IST) methodologies. Free radicals are trapped with the spin-trapping agent, 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), to form DMPO macromolecule radical adducts, and then further tagged by immunospin trapping by an antibody against DMPO adducts. In this study, we combined mMRI with a biotin-Gd-DTPA-albumin-based contrast agent for signal detection with the specificity of an antibody for DMPO nitrone adducts (anti-DMPO probe), to detect in vivo free radicals in OKN-007-treated rat F98 gliomas. OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease (P free radical levels detected with an anti-DMPO probe in treated animals compared to untreated rats. Immunoelectron microscopy was used with gold-labeled antibiotin to detect the anti-DMPO probe within the plasma membrane of F98 tumor cells from rats administered anti-DMPO in vivo. OKN-007 was also found to decrease nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, 3-nitrotyrosine, and malondialdehyde in ex vivo F98 glioma tissues via immunohistochemistry, as well as decrease 3-nitrotyrosine and malondialdehyde adducts in vitro in F98 cells via ELISA. The results indicate that OKN-007 effectively decreases free radicals associated with glioma tumor growth. Furthermore, this method can potentially be applied toward other types of cancers for the in vivo detection of macromolecular free radicals and the assessment of antioxidants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Optimal pain management for radical prostatectomy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Grish P; Jaschinski, Thomas; Bonnet, Francis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased the incidence of radical prostatectomy. However, the literature assessing pain therapy for this procedure has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, optimal pain therapy for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy remains...... controversial. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for studies assessing the effects of analgesic and anesthetic interventions on pain after radical prostatectomy. All searches were conducted in October 2012 and updated in June 2015. RESULTS: Most...... treatments studied improved pain relief and/or reduced opioid requirements. However, there were significant differences in the study designs and the variables evaluated, precluding quantitative analysis and consensus recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review reveals that there is a lack...

  16. Escaping the tolerance trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammoudeh, S.; Madan, V.

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the implications of the weakening of OPEC's responsiveness in adjusting its production levels, this paper explicitly incorporates rigidity in the quantity adjustment mechanism, thereby extending previous research which assumed smooth quantity adjustments. The rigidity is manifested in a tolerance range for the discrepancy between the declared target price and that of the market. This environment gives rise to a 'tolerance trap' which impedes the convergence process and inevitably brings the market to a standstill before its reaches the targeted price and revenue objectives. OPEC's reaction to the standstill has important implications for the achievement of the target-based equilibrium and for the potential collapse of the market price. This paper examines OPEC's policy options in the tolerance trap and reveals that the optional policy in order to break this impasse and move closer to the equilibrium point is gradually to reduce output and not to flood the market. (Author)

  17. Trapped Ion Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    Qubits can be encoded in clock states of trapped ions. These states are well isolated from the environment resulting in long coherence times [1] while enabling efficient high-fidelity qubit interactions mediated by the Coulomb coupled motion of the ions in the trap. Quantum states can be prepared with high fidelity and measured efficiently using fluorescence detection. State preparation and detection with 99.93% fidelity have been realized in multiple systems [1,2]. Single qubit gates have been demonstrated below rigorous fault-tolerance thresholds [1,3]. Two qubit gates have been realized with more than 99.9% fidelity [4,5]. Quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on systems of 5 to 15 qubits [6–8].

  18. Analysis of radicals induced in irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, Keigo; Kaimori, Yoshihiko; Kawamura, Shoei; Sakamoto, Yuhki; Nakamura, Hideo; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    By electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed free radicals in γ-ray irradiated foods; black pepper, green coffee bean and ginseng. We also analyzed the decay behavior of radiation induced free radicals during storage of irradiated foods. The ESR spectrum of experimental irradiated foods consists of a sextet signal centered at g=2.0 and a singlet signal at the same g-value position and a singlet signal at g=4.0. The singlet signal at g=2.0 is originated from organic free radicals and its peak intensity showed the dependence of γ-ray irradiation dose levels. The signal intensity was decreased during storage. Only after 3 hours of radiation treatment the peak intensity was decreased fast and after that the intensity was decreased slowly. The relaxation times, T 1 and T 2 , of radiation induced free radicals showed the variations before and after irradiation. During long time storage period it was shown that T 1 was increased and T 2 was decreased. By analysis of decay process using the simulation methods based on the theory of reaction speed, it is considered that at least two kinds of radicals were induced in irradiated foods during long time storage. (author)

  19. Free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  20. Sediment Trapping in Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Ralston, David K.

    2018-01-01

    Estuarine turbidity maxima (ETMs) are generated by a large suite of hydrodynamic and sediment dynamic processes, leading to longitudinal convergence of cross-sectionally integrated and tidally averaged transport of cohesive and noncohesive suspended particulate matter (SPM). The relative importance of these processes for SPM trapping varies substantially among estuaries depending on topography, fluvial and tidal forcing, and SPM composition. The high-frequency dynamics of ETMs are constrained by interactions with the low-frequency dynamics of the bottom pool of easily erodible sediments. Here, we use a transport decomposition to present processes that lead to convergent SPM transport, and review trapping mechanisms that lead to ETMs at the landward limit of the salt intrusion, in the freshwater zone, at topographic transitions, and by lateral processes within the cross section. We use model simulations of example estuaries to demonstrate the complex concurrence of ETM formation mechanisms. We also discuss how changes in SPM trapping mechanisms, often caused by direct human interference, can lead to the generation of hyperturbid estuaries.

  1. Linac-based isocentric electron-photon treatment of radically operated breast carcinoma with enhanced dose uniformity in the field gap area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenhunen, Mikko; Nyman, Heidi; Strengell, Satu; Vaalavirta, Leila

    2009-10-01

    Isocentric treatment technique is a standard method in photon radiotherapy with the primary advantage of requiring only a single patient set-up procedure for multiple fields. However, in electron treatments the size of the standard applicators does not generally allow to use an isocentric treatment technique. In this work we have modified and dosimetrically tested electron applicators for isocentric treatments in combination with photons. An isocentric treatment technique with photons and electrons for postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been developed with special emphasis on improving the dose uniformity in the field gap area. Standard electron applicators of two Varian Clinac 2100CD linear accelerators were shortened by 10cm allowing isocentric treatments of 90cmelectron fields. Shortened applicators were commissioned and configured for the electron calculation algorithm of the treatment planning system. The field arrangement of PMRT was modified by combining three photon field segments with different gaps and overlaps with the electron field to improve dose uniformity. The developed technique and two other methods for PMRT were compared with each other in the group of 20 patients. Depth dose characteristics of the shortened applicators remained unchanged from those of the standard applicators. Penumbrae were broadened by 0-3mm depending on electron energy and depth as the air gap was increased from 5cm (standard applicator at SSD=100cm) to 10cm (shortened applicator at SSD=95cm). The dose calculation performance of the modified applicators at 95cmelectron dose calculation algorithm of the treatment planning system (Varian Eclipse). The modified isocentric treatment technique for PMRT was superior than the traditional two-dimensional technique. However, with the tangential photon fields without electrons the even better dose uniformity within PTV could be achieved but with increased irradiation of healthy tissues (lung, heart, and contralateral breast

  2. Thermally induced structural modifications and O2 trapping in highly porous silica nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessi, A.; Agnello, S.; Iovino, G.; Buscarino, G.; Melodia, E.G.; Cannas, M.; Gelardi, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate by Raman spectroscopy the effect of isochronal (2 h) thermal treatments in air in the temperature range 200–1000 °C of amorphous silicon dioxide porous nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5 up to 15 nm and specific surface 590–690 m 2 /g. Our results indicate that the amorphous structure changes similarly to other porous systems previously investigated, in fact superficial SiOH groups are removed, Si–O–Si linkages are created and the ring statistic is modified, furthermore these data evidence that the three membered rings do not contribute significantly to the Raman signal detected at about 495 cm −1 . In addition, after annealing at 900 and 1000 °C we noted the appearance of the O 2 emission at 1272 nm, absent in the not treated samples. The measure of the O 2 emission has been combined with electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of the γ irradiation induced HO · 2 radicals to investigate the O 2 content per mass unit of thin layers of silica. Our data reveal that the porous nanoparticles have a much lower ability to trap O 2 molecules per mass units than nonporous silica supporting a model by which O 2 trapping inside a surface layer of about 1 nm of silica is always limited. - Highlights: • O 2 emission and HO · 2 electron paramagnetic resonance signals are investigated. • Silica surface ability to trap O 2 molecules is explored by thermal treatments. • Raman study of thermally induced structural changes in porous silica nanoparticles. • Raman signal attributable to the three membered rings in silica

  3. Thermally induced structural modifications and O{sub 2} trapping in highly porous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, A., E-mail: antonino.alessi@unipa.it; Agnello, S.; Iovino, G.; Buscarino, G.; Melodia, E.G.; Cannas, M.; Gelardi, F.M.

    2014-12-15

    In this work we investigate by Raman spectroscopy the effect of isochronal (2 h) thermal treatments in air in the temperature range 200–1000 °C of amorphous silicon dioxide porous nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5 up to 15 nm and specific surface 590–690 m{sup 2}/g. Our results indicate that the amorphous structure changes similarly to other porous systems previously investigated, in fact superficial SiOH groups are removed, Si–O–Si linkages are created and the ring statistic is modified, furthermore these data evidence that the three membered rings do not contribute significantly to the Raman signal detected at about 495 cm{sup −1}. In addition, after annealing at 900 and 1000 °C we noted the appearance of the O{sub 2} emission at 1272 nm, absent in the not treated samples. The measure of the O{sub 2} emission has been combined with electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of the γ irradiation induced HO{sup ·}{sub 2} radicals to investigate the O{sub 2} content per mass unit of thin layers of silica. Our data reveal that the porous nanoparticles have a much lower ability to trap O{sub 2} molecules per mass units than nonporous silica supporting a model by which O{sub 2} trapping inside a surface layer of about 1 nm of silica is always limited. - Highlights: • O{sub 2} emission and HO{sup ·}{sub 2} electron paramagnetic resonance signals are investigated. • Silica surface ability to trap O{sub 2} molecules is explored by thermal treatments. • Raman study of thermally induced structural changes in porous silica nanoparticles. • Raman signal attributable to the three membered rings in silica.

  4. Use of spin traps to detect superoxide production in living cells by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Kahina; Babić, Nikola; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2016-10-15

    Detection of superoxide produced by living cells has been an on-going challenge in biology for over forty years. Various methods have been proposed to address this issue, among which spin trapping with cyclic nitrones coupled to EPR spectroscopy, the gold standard for detection of radicals. This technique is based on the nucleophilic addition of superoxide to a diamagnetic cyclic nitrone, referred to as the spin trap, and the formation of a spin adduct, i.e. a persistent radical with a characteristic EPR spectrum. The first application of spin trapping to living cells dates back 1979. Since then, considerable improvements of the method have been achieved both in the structures of the spin traps, the EPR methodology, and the design of the experiments including appropriate controls. Here, we will concentrate on technical aspects of the spin trapping/EPR technique, delineating recent breakthroughs, inherent limitations, and potential artifacts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radical surgery compared with intracavitary cesium followed by radical surgery in cervical carcinoma stage IB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinga, D.J.; Bouma, J.; Aalders, J.G. (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)); Hollema, H. (Dept. of Pathology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    Forty-nine patients aged {le} 45 years, with cervical carcinoma stage IB ({le} 3 cm) were treated with either primary radical surgery (n = 26), or intracavitary irradiation followed by radical surgery (n = 23). With primary surgery, ovarian function had been preserved in 15 of the 25 patients, who were alive and well. Seven of the primary surgery patients were irradiated postoperatively and 2 others with a central recurrence were cured by irradiation. One other patient, who was not irradiated postoperatively, had an intestinal metastasis and died of the disease. If any of the adverse prognostic factors (as reported in the literature) had been considered as an indication for postoperative irradiation, 17 patients instead of 7 would have been irradiated after primary radical surgery. In the comparable group of 23 patients treated by intracavitary irradiation and radical surgery (and in 4 cases postoperative irradiation as well) there was no recurrence. There was no significant statistical difference between the treatment results in the cesium + surgery group and those who underwent primary radical surgery. Young patients with early cervical carcinoma without prognostic indicators for postoperative irradiation can benefit from primary radical surgery, because their ovarian function can be preserved. (authors).

  6. Radical surgery compared with intracavitary cesium followed by radical surgery in cervical carcinoma stage IB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinga, D.J.; Bouma, J.; Aalders, J.G.; Hollema, H.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-nine patients aged ≤ 45 years, with cervical carcinoma stage IB (≤ 3 cm) were treated with either primary radical surgery (n = 26), or intracavitary irradiation followed by radical surgery (n = 23). With primary surgery, ovarian function had been preserved in 15 of the 25 patients, who were alive and well. Seven of the primary surgery patients were irradiated postoperatively and 2 others with a central recurrence were cured by irradiation. One other patient, who was not irradiated postoperatively, had an intestinal metastasis and died of the disease. If any of the adverse prognostic factors (as reported in the literature) had been considered as an indication for postoperative irradiation, 17 patients instead of 7 would have been irradiated after primary radical surgery. In the comparable group of 23 patients treated by intracavitary irradiation and radical surgery (and in 4 cases postoperative irradiation as well) there was no recurrence. There was no significant statistical difference between the treatment results in the cesium + surgery group and those who underwent primary radical surgery. Young patients with early cervical carcinoma without prognostic indicators for postoperative irradiation can benefit from primary radical surgery, because their ovarian function can be preserved. (authors)

  7. Investigation on the Use of trapping in the Management of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this 11-month study, the potential of two trap types (pseudostem and pheromone traps) to lure weevils in banana fields was determined at three different ecological sites (Clemencia, Nouvelle France and Rivière du Poste). The effect of treatment of pseudostem trap with insecticides (Imidachloprid, Cyfluthrin and ...

  8. Generation of radicals in hard biological tissues under the action of laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, Alexander P.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Sobol, Emil N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Lunina, Elena V.; Zhitnev, Yurii N.; Markaryan, Galina L.; Lunin, Valerii V.

    2002-07-01

    The formation of radicals upon UV and IR laser irradiation of some biological tissues and their components was studied by the EPR technique. The radical decay kinetics in body tissue specimens after their irradiation with UV light were described by various models. By the spin trapping technique, it was shown that radicals were not produced during IR laser irradiation of cartilaginous tissue. A change in optical absorption spectra and the dynamics of optical density of cartilaginous tissue, fish scale, and a collagen film under exposure to laser radiation in an air, oxygen, and nitrogen atmosphere was studied.

  9. Magnetic trapping of buffer-gas-cooled chromium atoms and prospects for the extension to paramagnetic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, Joost M [Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Stoll, Michael [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Weise, Dennis R [Universitaet Konstanz, Fachbereich Physik, 78457 Constance (Germany); Vogelsang, Oliver [Universitaet Konstanz, Fachbereich Physik, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Meijer, Gerard [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Peters, Achim [Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-10-14

    We report the successful buffer-gas cooling and magnetic trapping of chromium atoms with densities exceeding 10{sup 12} atoms per cm{sup 3} at a temperature of 350 mK for the trapped sample. The possibilities of extending the method to buffer-gas cool and magnetically trap molecules are discussed. To minimize the most important loss mechanism in magnetic trapping, molecules with a small spin-spin interaction and a large rotational constant are preferred. Both the CrH ({sup 6}{sigma}{sup +} ground state) and MnH ({sup 7}{sigma}{sup +}) radicals appear to be suitable systems for future experiments.

  10. Magnetic trapping of buffer-gas-cooled chromium atoms and prospects for the extension to paramagnetic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, Joost M; Stoll, Michael; Weise, Dennis R; Vogelsang, Oliver; Meijer, Gerard; Peters, Achim

    2006-01-01

    We report the successful buffer-gas cooling and magnetic trapping of chromium atoms with densities exceeding 10 12 atoms per cm 3 at a temperature of 350 mK for the trapped sample. The possibilities of extending the method to buffer-gas cool and magnetically trap molecules are discussed. To minimize the most important loss mechanism in magnetic trapping, molecules with a small spin-spin interaction and a large rotational constant are preferred. Both the CrH ( 6 Σ + ground state) and MnH ( 7 Σ + ) radicals appear to be suitable systems for future experiments

  11. Stable Trapping of Multielectron Helium Bubbles in a Paul Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, E. M.; Vadakkumbatt, V.; Pal, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2017-06-01

    In a recent experiment, we have used a linear Paul trap to store and study multielectron bubbles (MEBs) in liquid helium. MEBs have a charge-to-mass ratio (between 10^{-4} and 10^{-2} C/kg) which is several orders of magnitude smaller than ions (between 10^6 and 10^8 C/kg) studied in traditional ion traps. In addition, MEBs experience significant drag force while moving through the liquid. As a result, the experimental parameters for stable trapping of MEBs, such as magnitude and frequency of the applied electric fields, are very different from those used in typical ion trap experiments. The purpose of this paper is to model the motion of MEBs inside a linear Paul trap in liquid helium, determine the range of working parameters of the trap, and compare the results with experiments.

  12. Catalase expression is modulated by vancomycin and ciprofloxacin and influences the formation of free radicals in Staphylococcus aureus cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ying; Hougaard, Anni Bygvrå; Paulander, Wilhelm Erik Axel

    2015-01-01

    Detection of free radicals in biological systems is challenging due to their short half-lives. We have applied electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy combined with spin traps using the probes PBN (N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone) and DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) to assess free radical...... that in S. aureus, bactericidal antibiotics modulate catalase expression, which in turn influences the formation of free radicals in the surrounding broth medium. If similar regulation is found in other bacterial species, it might explain why bactericidal antibiotics are perceived as inducing formation...... of free radicals....

  13. A randomized two arm phase III study in patients post radical resection of liver metastases of colorectal cancer to investigate bevacizumab in combination with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CAPOX vs CAPOX alone as adjuvant treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schouten Sander B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 50% of patients with colorectal cancer are destined to develop hepatic metastases. Radical resection is the most effective treatment for patients with colorectal liver metastases offering five year survival rates between 36-60%. Unfortunately only 20% of patients are resectable at time of presentation. Radiofrequency ablation is an alternative treatment option for irresectable colorectal liver metastases with reported 5 year survival rates of 18-30%. Most patients will develop local or distant recurrences after surgery, possibly due to the outgrowth of micrometastases present at the time of liver surgery. This study aims to achieve an improved disease free survival for patients after resection or resection combined with RFA of colorectal liver metastases by adding the angiogenesis inhibitor bevacizumab to an adjuvant regimen of CAPOX. Methods/design The Hepatica study is a two-arm, multicenter, randomized, comparative efficacy and safety study. Patients are assessed no more than 8 weeks before surgery with CEA measurement and CT scanning of the chest and abdomen. Patients will be randomized after resection or resection combined with RFA to receive CAPOX and Bevacizumab or CAPOX alone. Adjuvant treatment will be initiated between 4 and 8 weeks after metastasectomy or resection in combination with RFA. In both arms patients will be assessed for recurrence/new occurrence of colorectal cancer by chest CT, abdominal CT and CEA measurement. Patients will be assessed after surgery but before randomization, thereafter every three months after surgery in the first two years and every 6 months until 5 years after surgery. In case of a confirmed recurrence/appearance of new colorectal cancer, patients can be treated with surgery or any subsequent line of chemotherapy and will be followed for survival until the end of study follow up period as well. The primary endpoint is disease free survival. Secondary endpoints are overall

  14. Modelling the influence of austenitisation temperature on hydrogen trapping in Nb containing martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Peter; Rath, Markus; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen trapping behaviour is investigated by means of thermokinetic simulations in a martensitic steel. The heat treatment consists of austenitisation followed by quenching and tempering. The model prescribes a minimum in hydrogen trapping at an austenitisation temperature of 1050 °C. Below this temperature, austenite grain boundaries are the prevailing trap, whereas niobium atoms in solid solution are the main traps above 1050 °C. The model describes precisely the experimental results

  15. Hearing Status after Radical Mastoidectomy without Tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamaila Nawaz; Udaipurwala, Iqbal Hussain; Mehmood, Talat; Rahat, Zahid Mehmood

    2017-12-01

    To find out the impairment of hearing associated with radical mastoidectomy by measuring the quantitative difference in the functional hearing level before and after radical mastoidectomy operation without tympanoplasty. Cross-sectional comparative study. Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur and PNS Shifa Hospital, Karachi, from November 2009 to January 2013. Eighty-five patients, diagnosed clinically as chronic suppurative otitis media with extensive cholesteatoma having history of ear discharge and hearing impairment for more than 6 weeks duration and requiring radical mastoidectomy for treatment, were included in this study. Pure tone audiogram was done before and after radical mastoidectomy. Hearing impairment was compared in each patient before and after the operation. Among the 85 patients, 54 (63.5%) were males and 31 (36.5%) were females, with the age ranged between 18 to 63 years, mean age being 42.31 4.8 years. The mean increase in hearing loss after radical mastoidectomy in air conduction was 7.19 dB, bone conduction was 4.16 dB, and air-bone gap was 3.75 dB (0.001). The ear became dry and safe in 82 patients (96.5%) out of a total of 85, and only 3 patients required revision surgery at a second stage. Radical mastoidectomy has a least negligible effect on hearing status and one should not limit this technique due to the concern of aggravated hearing in patients with extensive cholesteatoma at the cost of dry and safe ears, which should be of prime importance.

  16. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  17. Atom trap trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-01-01

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual 85 Kr and 81 Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10 -11 and 10 -13 , respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications

  18. Manipulating radicals: Using cobalt to steer radical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chirilă, A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes research aimed at understanding and exploiting metallo-radical reactivity and explores reactions mediated by square planar, low-spin cobalt(II) complexes. A primary goal was to uncover novel reactivity of discrete cobalt(III)-bound carbene radicals generated upon reaction of the cobalt(II) catalysts with carbene precursors. Another important goal was to replace cobalt(II)-porphyrin catalysts with cheaper and easier to prepare metallo-radical analogues. Therefore the cata...

  19. Magnetic traps with a sperical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregood, B.P.; Lehnert, B.

    1979-11-01

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphesis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasmas in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In additio, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is being described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps for the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (author)

  20. Magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregood, B.P.; Lehnert, B.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphasis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasms in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In addition, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps in the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (orig.)

  1. Characteristics of trapped electrons and electron traps in single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzinski, E.E.; Potter, W.R.; Potienko, G.; Box, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Two additional carbohydrates are reported whose crystal structures trap electrons intermolecularly in single crystals x irradiated at low temperature, namely sucrose and rhamnose. Five carbohydrate and polyhydroxy compounds are now known which exhibit this phenomenon. The following characteristics of the phenomenon were investigated: (1) the hyperfine couplings of the electron with protons of the polarized hydroxy groups forming the trap; (2) the distances between these protons and the trapped electron; (3) the spin density of the electron at the protons and (4) the relative stabilities of the electron trapped in various crystal structures

  2. Cell-mediated reduction of protein and peptide hydroperoxides to reactive free radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Radical attack on proteins in the presence of O(2) gives protein hydroperoxides in high yields. These peroxides are decomposed by transition metal ions, reducing agents, UV light and heat, with the formation of a range of reactive radicals that are capable of initiating further damage. Evidence has...... been presented for the formation of alcohols as stable products of peroxide decomposition, and these have been employed as markers of oxidative damage in vivo. The mechanism of formation of these alcohols is unclear, with both radical and nonradical pathways capable of generating these products....... In this study we have investigated the reduction of peptide and protein hydroperoxides by THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells and it is shown that this process is accompanied by radical formation as detected by EPR spin trapping. The radicals detected, which are similar to those detected from metal-ion catalyzed...

  3. Titanium dioxide induced cell damage: A proposed role of the carboxyl radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, Nicholas J.F. [Ecotoxicology and Stress Biology Research Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N. [Ecotoxicology and Stress Biology Research Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.jha@plymouth.ac.uk

    2009-01-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles have been shown to be genotoxic to cells exposed to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. Using the technique of electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping, we have confirmed that the primary damaging species produced on irradiation of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles is the hydroxyl (OH) radical. We have applied this technique to TiO{sub 2}-treated fish and mammalian cells under in vitro conditions and observed the additional formation of carboxyl radical anions (CO{sub 2}{sup -}) and superoxide radical anions (O{sub 2}{sup -}). This novel finding suggests a hitherto unreported pathway for damage, involving primary generation of OH radicals in the cytoplasm, which react to give CO{sub 2}{sup -} radicals. The latter may then react with cellular oxygen to form O{sub 2}{sup -} and genotoxic hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})

  4. Phase II study of a trimodal preoperative treatment followed by radical surgery or radiotherapy in non-resectable cervical cancer ≥ Figo IIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, C.; Gellermann, J.; Jungnickel, K.; Kuemmel, S.; Hildebrandt, B.; Wust, P

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Regional hyperthermia is combined with radiochemotherapy to achieve resectability in non-resectable cervical carcinoma. In a phase II study at the Charite Medical School approved by the institutionals ethical committee non-resectable cervical carcinoma of at least FIGO IIB were treated with radiochemotherapy combined with regional hyperthermia. The treatment concept comprises cisplatinum therapy of 40 mg/sqm body surface once weekly during regional hyperthermia supplementing radiation therapy of 5 x 1.8 Gy to a total dose of 45 - 50.4 Gy. A gynecological status and imaging is performed for evaluation of resectability of the tumor. If a tumor resection was not feasable radiation was completed to 59.4 - 63 Gy supplemented by 4 - 5 afterloading sessions. Regional hyperthermia was conducted with SIGMA 60 or SIGMA Eye applicator of the system BSD-2000, on average steady state temperatures between 40-41 o C were achieved over the therapeutic time. From 2000 to 2003 we recruited 30 patients. Acute toxicity was in the usual range (10-15 % grade ≥ 3). Two thirds were FIGO stage III/IV with tumor diameters > 6 cm. After treatment 20/30 (67 %) of the former inoperable cases were evaluated as resectable, 3 of these patients refused surgery. Of the remaining 17 cases 14 patients were R0-resected, 2 patients were R1-resected, and 1 patient had a positive paraaortal lymphnode. In 13/30 patients nonsurgical treatment was continued. Response was achieved in 23/30 patients (77 %), i.e. 14 resectable cases with downstaging and 9 partial remissions (PR) after hyperthermic radiochemotherapy with 45 - 50.4 Gy. Response correlated well with thermal parameters, in particular the mean temperature in the vaginal reference point. For the whole group a three year overall survival of 60 % was achieved together with a moderate late toxicity ≥ 3 in 4/30 patients (13 %). R0-resected patients have an excellent prognosis with a 3-year survival of 95 % and a late toxicity ≥ 3 below

  5. ATRAP - Progress Towards Trapped Antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzonka, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E.A.; Storry, C.H.; Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Lesage, D.; Levitt, B.; Speck, A.; Haensch, T.W.; Pittner, H.; Walz, J.

    2005-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom.Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen.For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trapping tests of charged particles within a combined magnetic/Penning trap have started at ATRAP

  6. ATRAP Progress Towards Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Grzonka, D; Gabrielse, G; Goldenbaum, F; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A; Larochelle, P; Le Sage, D; Levitt, B; Oelert, W; Pittner, H; Sefzick, T; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Walz, J; Zhang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s‐2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom. Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen. For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trapping tests of charged particles within a combined magnetic/Penning trap have started at ATRAP.

  7. Spin trapping studies of essential oils in lipid systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarova Katerina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we report the results of a spin trapping ESR study of four essential oils widely used for skin care products such as creams and bath salts. The studied essential oils are Rosmarini aetheroleum (rosemary, Menthae piperitae aetheroleum (mint, Lavandulae aetheroleum (lavender, and Thymi aetheroleum (thyme. Fenton reaction in the presence of ethanol was used to generate free radicals. The N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN was used as a spin trap. In the Fenton reaction, the rosemary oil had the lowest effect on radical adduct formation as compared to the reference Fenton system. Since essential oils are known to be lipid soluble, we also conducted studies of essential oils in Fenton reaction in the presence of lipids. Two model lipids were used, namely 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC. The obtained results suggested that in the presence of DOPC lipids, the •OH and PBN/•CHCH3(OH radicals are formed in both phases, that is, water and lipids, and all the studied essential oils affected the Fenton reaction in a similar way. Whereas, in the DPPC system, the additional type of PBN/X (aN = 16.1 G, aH = 2.9 G radical adduct was generated. DFT calculations of hyperfine splittings were performed at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p/EPR-II level of theory for the set of c-centered PBN adducts in order to identify PBN/X radical.

  8. Calibration of optically trapped nanotools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carberry, D M; Simpson, S H; Grieve, J A; Hanna, S; Miles, M J [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Wang, Y; Schaefer, H; Steinhart, M [Institute for Chemistry, University of Osnabrueck, Osnabrueck (Germany); Bowman, R; Gibson, G M; Padgett, M J, E-mail: m.j.miles@bristol.ac.uk [SUPA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Science Road, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-30

    Holographically trapped nanotools can be used in a novel form of force microscopy. By measuring the displacement of the tool in the optical traps, the contact force experienced by the probe can be inferred. In the following paper we experimentally demonstrate the calibration of such a device and show that its behaviour is independent of small changes in the relative position of the optical traps. Furthermore, we explore more general aspects of the thermal motion of the tool.

  9. Direct access to dithiobenzoate RAFT agent fragmentation rate coefficients by ESR spin-trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Kayte; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Junkers, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The β-scission rate coefficient of tert-butyl radicals fragmenting off the intermediate resulting from their addition to tert-butyl dithiobenzoate-a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agent-is estimated via the recently introduced electron spin resonance (ESR)-trapping methodology as a function of temperature. The newly introduced ESR-trapping methodology is critically evaluated and found to be reliable. At 20 °C, a fragmentation rate coefficient of close to 0.042 s(-1) is observed, whereas the activation parameters for the fragmentation reaction-determined for the first time-read EA = 82 ± 13.3 kJ mol(-1) and A = (1.4 ± 0.25) × 10(13) s(-1) . The ESR spin-trapping methodology thus efficiently probes the stability of the RAFT adduct radical under conditions relevant for the pre-equilibrium of the RAFT process. It particularly indicates that stable RAFT adduct radicals are indeed formed in early stages of the RAFT poly-merization, at least when dithiobenzoates are employed as controlling agents as stipulated by the so-called slow fragmentation theory. By design of the methodology, the obtained fragmentation rate coefficients represent an upper limit. The ESR spin-trapping methodology is thus seen as a suitable tool for evaluating the fragmentation rate coefficients of a wide range of RAFT adduct radicals. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Optical traps with geometric aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roichman, Yael; Waldron, Alex; Gardel, Emily; Grier, David G.

    2006-01-01

    We assess the influence of geometric aberrations on the in-plane performance of optical traps by studying the dynamics of trapped colloidal spheres in deliberately distorted holographic optical tweezers. The lateral stiffness of the traps turns out to be insensitive to moderate amounts of coma, astigmatism, and spherical aberration. Moreover holographic aberration correction enables us to compensate inherent shortcomings in the optical train, thereby adaptively improving its performance. We also demonstrate the effects of geometric aberrations on the intensity profiles of optical vortices, whose readily measured deformations suggest a method for rapidly estimating and correcting geometric aberrations in holographic trapping systems

  11. EPR study of free radicals in bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Mladenova, Ralitsa

    2004-05-01

    The features of the recorded EPR spectra of paramagnetic species formed in bread and rusk are reported. The appearance of free radicals in them is only connected with their thermal treatment since the starting materials (flour and grains) exhibit very weak EPR signal. The obtained EPR spectra are complex and indicate that: (i) the relative number of paramagnetic species depends on the temperature and treating time of the raw product; (ii) the g-values are strongly temperature dependent with a tendency to coincide at t≥220 °C. Because of the relatively low (150-220 °C) temperature of thermal treatment, the studied free radicals can be assumed to appear in the course of the browning (Maillard) reaction and not to the carbonization of the material.

  12. A live-trap and trapping technique for fossorial mammals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mammals. G.C. Hickman. An effective live-trap was designed for Cryptomys hottentotus .... that there is an animal in the burrow system, and to lessen the likelihood of the .... the further testing and modification of existing trap types. Not only is it ...

  13. Electron traps in semiconducting polymers : Exponential versus Gaussian trap distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H. T.; Mandoc, M. M.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2011-01-01

    The low electron currents in poly(dialkoxy-p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives and their steep voltage dependence are generally explained by trap-limited conduction in the presence of an exponential trap distribution. Here we demonstrate that the electron transport of several PPV derivatives can

  14. Electron traps in semiconducting polymers: exponential versus Gaussian trap distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H.T.; Mandoc, M.M.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The low electron currents in poly(dialkoxy-p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives and their steep voltage dependence are generally explained by trap-limited conduction in the presence of an exponential trap distribution. Here we demonstrate that the electron transport of several PPV derivatives can

  15. Quantification of Radicals Generated in a Sonicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassim Badmus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl radical (OH• is a powerful oxidant produced as a consequence of cavitation in water. It can react nonspecifically in breaking down persistent organic pollutants in water into their mineral form. It can also recombine to form hydrogen peroxide which is very useful in water treatment. In this study, terephthalic acid (TA and potassium iodide dosimetry were used to quantify and investigate the behaviour of the generated OH radical in a laboratory scale sonicator. The 2-hydroxyl terephthalic acid (HTA formed during terephthalic acid dosimetry was determined by optical fibre spectrometer. The production rate of HTA served as a means of evaluating and characterizing the OH• generated over given time in a sonicator. The influence of sonicator power intensity, solution pH and irradiation time upon OH• generation were investigated. Approximately 2.2 ´ 10-9 M s-1 of OH radical was generated during the sonication process. The rate of generation of the OH radicals was established to be independent of the concentration of the initial reactant. Thus, the rate of generation of OH• can be predicted by zero order kinetics in a sonicator.

  16. Radical prostatectomy and adjuvant radioactive gold seed placement: Results of treatment at 5 and 10 years for clinical stages A2, B1 and B2 cancer of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, E.D.; Loening, S.A.; Hawtrey, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1988, 131 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate underwent combined radical prostatectomy and intraoperative radioactive gold seed placement. Of these 131 patients 80 were clinically assessed as having stage A2 (12), B1 (43) or B2 (25) cancer and they are the subject of this review. The average dose of radioactivity administered to each patient was 96.6 mCi, and mean followup was 65 months (median 64 months). No patient in this series received any other form of adjuvant therapy until disease recurrence was demonstrated. Local recurrences were observed in 2 patients (2.5%) in this series while distant recurrences were observed in 10 (12.5%). Cancer specific survival free of disease at 5 years was 100% for clinical stage A2, 91% for B1 and 75% for B2 cancers. The 10-year survival free of disease was 100% for clinical stage A2, 82% for B1 and 68% for B2 cancers. Covariants of clinical stage and seminal vesicle involvement influenced survival free of disease in a statistically significant manner (p less than 0.05) while pathological stage and degree of tumor differentiation did not. Mild to severe complications were observed in 12 patients (15%). Intraoperative placement of radioactive gold seeds into unresected pelvic tissues surrounding the site of prostatectomy offers a theoretical advantage in treatment by delivering tumoricidal levels of irradiation to residual foci of cancer not appreciated at the time of surgery. Our results suggest that increases in cancer specific survival free of disease over that previously reported for prostatectomy alone may be achieved through this combined treatment regimen. Furthermore, it is our opinion that therapeutic gains can be achieved without the attendant increases in morbidity and treatment delay often associated with adjuvant external beam radiotherapy

  17. Computed tomography after radical pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.L.; Hampson, F.; Duxbury, M.; Rae, D.M.; Sinclair, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Whipple's procedure (radical pancreaticoduodenectomy) is currently the only curative option for patients with periampullary malignancy. The surgery is highly complex and involves multiple anastomoses. Complications are common and can lead to significant postoperative morbidity. Early detection and treatment of complications is vital, and high-quality multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is currently the best method of investigation. This review outlines the surgical technique and illustrates the range of normal postoperative appearances together with the common complications

  18. The effect of aerobic exercise on treatment-related acute toxicity in men receiving radical external beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, G; Windsor, P M; McCowan, C

    2010-09-01

    We retrospectively analysed acute radiation toxicity data for patients who had participated in a randomised controlled study in our centre in order to assess the impact of aerobic exercise on acute rectal and bladder morbidity during treatment. Data from 65 of 66 patients were analysed: 33 allocated into a control group (standard advice) and 33 into an exercise group (aerobic walking for 30 min at least three times per week) during 4 weeks of external beam radiotherapy; one patient in the exercise group withdrew after randomisation before starting radiotherapy. There was a trend towards less severe acute rectal toxicity in the exercise group with a statistically significant difference in mean toxicity scores over the 4 weeks of radiotherapy (P=0.004), with no significant difference in bladder toxicity scores between the two groups (P=0.123). The lack of an association for severity of bladder toxicity could be attributed to the confounding effect of lower urinary tract symptoms from their prostate cancer. Keeping active and being asked to adhere to a well-defined exercise schedule appears to reduce the severity of rectal toxicity during radiotherapy to the prostate.

  19. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  20. Detection of trapped antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hydomako, Richard [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2013-02-01

    A landmark thesis describing the first ever trapping of antihydrogen atoms in CERN's ALPHA apparatus. Opens the way to crucial tests of fundamental theories. Nominated as an outstanding contribution by the University of Calgary. In 2010, the ALPHA collaboration achieved a first for mankind: the stable, long-term storage of atomic antimatter, a project carried out a the Antiproton Decelerator facility at CERN. A crucial element of this observation was a dedicated silicon vertexing detector used to identify and analyze antihydrogen annihilations. This thesis reports the methods used to reconstruct the annihilation location. Specifically, the methods used to identify and extrapolate charged particle tracks and estimate the originating annihilation location are outlined. Finally, the experimental results demonstrating the first-ever magnetic confinement of antihydrogen atoms are presented. These results rely heavily on the silicon detector, and as such, the role of the annihilation vertex reconstruction is emphasized.

  1. MRI and contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging for evaluation of focal irreversible electroporation treatment: results from a phase I-II study in patients undergoing IRE followed by radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, Willemien van den; Bruin, D.M. de; Randen, A. van; Engelbrecht, M.R.W.; Postema, A.W.; Muller, B.G.; Zondervan, P.J.; Laguna Pes, M.P.; Reijke, T.M. de; Rosette, J.J.M.C.H. de la; Varkarakis, I.M.; Skolarikos, A.; Savci-Heijink, C.D.; Jurhill, R.R.; Wijkstra, H.

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an ablative therapy with a low side-effect profile in prostate cancer. The objective was: 1) To compare the volumetric IRE ablation zone on grey-scale transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) with histopathology findings; 2) To determine a reliable imaging modality to visualize the IRE ablation effects accurately. A prospective phase I-II study was performed in 16 patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy (RP). IRE of the prostate was performed 4 weeks before RP. Prior to, and 4 weeks after the IRE treatment, imaging was performed by TRUS, CEUS, and mpMRI. 3D-analysis of the ablation volumes on imaging and on H and E-stained whole-mount sections was performed. The volumes were compared and the correlation was calculated. Evaluation of the imaging demonstrated that with T2-weighted MRI, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, and CEUS, effects of IRE are visible. T2MRI and CEUS closely match the volumes on histopathology (Pearson correlation r = 0.88 resp. 0.80). However, IRE is not visible with TRUS. mpMRI and CEUS are appropriate for assessing IRE effects and are the most feasible imaging modalities to visualize IRE ablation zone. The imaging is concordant with results of histopathological examination. (orig.)

  2. Trapping processes in CaS:Eu2+,Tm3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Dongdong; Jia, Weiyi; Evans, D. R.; Dennis, W. M.; Liu, Huimin; Zhu, Jing; Yen, W. M.

    2000-01-01

    CaS:Eu 2+ ,Tm 3+ is a persistent red phosphor. Thermoluminescence was measured under different excitation and thermal treatment conditions. The results reveal that the charge defects, created by substituting Tm 3+ for Ca 2+ , serve as hole traps for the afterglow at room temperature. Tm 3+ plays the role of deep electron trapping centers, capturing electrons either through the conduction band or directly from the excited Eu 2+ ions. These two processes, in which two different sites of Tm 3+ are involved, correspond to two traps with different depths. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  3. Flux trapping in superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, C.; Bolore, M.; Bonin, B.; Charrier, J.P.; Daillant, B.; Gratadour, J.; Koechlin, F.; Safa, H.

    1992-01-01

    The flux trapped in various field cooled Nb and Pb samples has been measured. For ambient fields smaller than 3 Gauss, 100% of the flux is trapped. The consequences of this result on the behavior of superconducting RF cavities are discussed. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs

  4. Injection into electron plasma traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorgadze, Vladimir; Pasquini, Thomas A.; Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2003-01-01

    Computational studies and experimental measurements of plasma injection into a Malmberg-Penning trap reveal that the number of trapped particles can be an order of magnitude higher than predicted by a simple estimates based on a ballistic trapping model. Enhanced trapping is associated with a rich nonlinear dynamics generated by the space-charge forces of the evolving trapped electron density. A particle-in-cell simulation is used to identify the physical mechanisms that lead to the increase in trapped electrons. The simulations initially show strong two-stream interactions between the electrons emitted from the cathode and those reflected off the end plug of the trap. This is followed by virtual cathode oscillations near the injection region. As electrons are trapped, the initially hollow longitudinal phase-space is filled, and the transverse radial density profile evolves so that the plasma potential matches that of the cathode. Simple theoretical arguments are given that describe the different dynamical regimes. Good agreement is found between simulation and theory

  5. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Carpenter, P.T. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Escallier, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2014-01-21

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  6. Electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is a new branch of applied physics that has potential for application in many areas. The authors present an introduction to laser cooling and magnetic trapping. Some basic ideas and fundamental limitations are discussed, and the first successful experiments are reviewed. Trapping a neutral object depends on the interaction between an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and a multiple moment that results in the exchange of kinetic for potential energy. In neutral atom traps, the potential energy must be stored as internal atomic energy, resulting in two immediate and extremely important consequences. First, the atomic energy levels will necessarily shift as the atoms move in the trap, and, second, practical traps for ground state neutral atoms atr necessarily very shallow compared to thermal energy. This small depth also dictates stringent vacuum requirements because a trapped atom cannot survive a single collision with a thermal energy background gas molecule. Neutral trapping, therefore, depends on substantial cooling of a thermal atomic sample and is inextricably connected with the cooling process

  7. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  8. Trapped surfaces in spherical stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizon, P.; Malec, E.; O'Murchadha, N.

    1988-01-01

    We give necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of trapped surfaces in spherically symmetric spacetimes. These conditions show that the formation of trapped surfaces depends on both the degree of concentration and the average flow of the matter. The result can be considered as a partial validation of the cosmic-censorship hypothesis

  9. Preoperative radiochemotherapy and radical surgery in comparison with radical surgery alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, C.; Schettler, D.; Bohndorf, W.

    1994-01-01

    A multicentric, randomized study of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and the oropharynx has been undertaken by DOeSAK. The results after radical surgery alone have been compared with the results of combined preoperative radiochemotherapy followed by radical surgery. Patients with primary (biopsy proven) SCC of the oral cavity or the oropharynx with tumor nodes metastasis (TNM) stages T2-4, N0-3, M0 were included in the study. A total of 141 patients were treated by radical surgery alone, whereas 127 patients were treated by radical surgery preceded by preoperative radiochemotherapy. The pre-operative treatment consisted of conventionally fractioned irradiation on the primary and the regional lymph nodes with a total dose of 36 Gy (5 x 2 Gy per week) and low-dose cisplatin chemotherapy with 5 x 12.5 mg cisplatin per m 2 of body surface during the first week of treatment. Radical surgery according to be DOeSAK definitions (DOeSAK, 1982) was performed after a delay of 10-14 days. During the follow-up period, 28.2% of all patients suffered from locoregional recurrence, and 27.2% of the patients died. The percentages were higher after radical surgery alone for locoregional recurrence (31% and 15.6%) and for death (28% and 18.6%). The life-table analysis showed improved survival rates of 4.5% after 1 year and 8.3% after 2 years in the group of patients treated with combined therapy. The demonstrated improvement appeared to be significant with the Gehan-Wilcoxon test as well as with the log rank test below a P value of 5%. (au) (29 refs.)

  10. Observation of OH radicals produced by pulsed discharges on the surface of a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Kawano, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Furuki, Takashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Ohkubo, Toshikazu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu, Oita 870-1192 (Japan); Kocik, Marek; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy, E-mail: skana@cc.oita-u.ac.jp [Szewalski Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences Fiszera 14, 80-952, Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-06-15

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure. OH radicals have a higher oxidation potential compared with other oxidative species such as free radical O, atomic oxygen, hydroperoxyl radical (HO{sub 2}), hydrogen peroxide(H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and ozone. In this study, surface discharges on liquids (water and its solutions) were investigated experimentally. A pulsed streamer discharge was generated on the liquid surface using a point-to-plane electrode geometry. The primary generation process of OH radicals is closely related to the streamer propagation, and the subsequent secondary process after the discharge has an influence on the chemical reaction. Taking into account the timescale of these processes, we investigated the behavior of OH radicals using two different diagnostic methods. Time evolution of the ground-state OH radicals above the liquid surface after the discharge was observed by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. In order to observe the ground-state OH, an OH [A {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}(v' = 1) <- X {sup 2}{Pi}(v'' = 0)] system at 282 nm was used. As the secondary process, a portion of OH radicals diffused from gas phase to the liquid surface and dissolved in the liquid. These dissolved OH radicals were measured by a chemical probe method. Terephthalic acid was used as an OH radical trap and fluorescence of the resulting 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid was measured. This paper directly presents visualization of OH radicals over the liquid surface by means of LIF, and indirectly describes OH radicals dissolved in water by means of a chemical method.

  11. Observation of OH radicals produced by pulsed discharges on the surface of a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Kawano, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Furuki, Takashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Ohkubo, Toshikazu; Kocik, Marek; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2011-06-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure. OH radicals have a higher oxidation potential compared with other oxidative species such as free radical O, atomic oxygen, hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and ozone. In this study, surface discharges on liquids (water and its solutions) were investigated experimentally. A pulsed streamer discharge was generated on the liquid surface using a point-to-plane electrode geometry. The primary generation process of OH radicals is closely related to the streamer propagation, and the subsequent secondary process after the discharge has an influence on the chemical reaction. Taking into account the timescale of these processes, we investigated the behavior of OH radicals using two different diagnostic methods. Time evolution of the ground-state OH radicals above the liquid surface after the discharge was observed by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. In order to observe the ground-state OH, an OH [A 2∑+(v' = 1) <-- X 2Π(v'' = 0)] system at 282 nm was used. As the secondary process, a portion of OH radicals diffused from gas phase to the liquid surface and dissolved in the liquid. These dissolved OH radicals were measured by a chemical probe method. Terephthalic acid was used as an OH radical trap and fluorescence of the resulting 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid was measured. This paper directly presents visualization of OH radicals over the liquid surface by means of LIF, and indirectly describes OH radicals dissolved in water by means of a chemical method.

  12. Hydroxyl radical reactivity with diethylhydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorse, R.A. Jr.; Lii, R.R.; Saunders, B.B.

    1977-01-01

    Diethylhydroxylamine (DEHA) reacts with gas-phase hydroxyl radicals on every third collision, whereas the corresponding reaction in aqueous solution is considerably slower. The high gas-phase reactivity explains the predicted inhibitory effect of DEHA in atmospheric smog processes. Results from the studies in the aqueous phase are helpful in predicting the mechanism of the reaction of DEHA with hydroxyl radicals

  13. Muoniated acyl and thioacyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, Iain; Brodovitch, Jean-Claude; Ghandi, Khashayar; Percival, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    The product of the reaction of muonium with tert-butylisocyanate was previously assigned as the muoniated tert-butylaminyl radical (I. McKenzie, J.-C. Brodovitch, K. Ghandi, S. Kecman, P. W. Percival, Physica B 326 (2003) 76). This assignment is incorrect since the muon and 14 N hyperfine-coupling constants (hfcc) of this radical would have the opposite sign, which is in conflict with the experimental results. The radical is now reassigned as the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical, based on the similarities between the experimental muon and 14 N hfcc and hfcc calculated at the UB3LYP/6-311G(d,p)//UB3LYP/EPR-III level. The large zero-point energy in the N-Mu bond results in the dissociation barrier of the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical being above the combined energy of the reactants, in contrast to the N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical where the dissociation barrier lies below the combined energy of the reactants. The reaction of muonium with tert-butylisothiocyanate produced both conformers of the muoniated N-tert-butylthiocarbamoyl radical and their assignment was based on the similarities between the experimental and calculated muon hfcc. These are the first acyl and thioacyl radicals to be directly detected by muon spin spectroscopy

  14. Muoniated acyl and thioacyl radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Iain [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Brodovitch, Jean-Claude [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Ghandi, Khashayar [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Percival, Paul W. [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada)]. E-mail: percival@sfu.ca

    2006-03-31

    The product of the reaction of muonium with tert-butylisocyanate was previously assigned as the muoniated tert-butylaminyl radical (I. McKenzie, J.-C. Brodovitch, K. Ghandi, S. Kecman, P. W. Percival, Physica B 326 (2003) 76). This assignment is incorrect since the muon and {sup 14}N hyperfine-coupling constants (hfcc) of this radical would have the opposite sign, which is in conflict with the experimental results. The radical is now reassigned as the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical, based on the similarities between the experimental muon and {sup 14}N hfcc and hfcc calculated at the UB3LYP/6-311G(d,p)//UB3LYP/EPR-III level. The large zero-point energy in the N-Mu bond results in the dissociation barrier of the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical being above the combined energy of the reactants, in contrast to the N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical where the dissociation barrier lies below the combined energy of the reactants. The reaction of muonium with tert-butylisothiocyanate produced both conformers of the muoniated N-tert-butylthiocarbamoyl radical and their assignment was based on the similarities between the experimental and calculated muon hfcc. These are the first acyl and thioacyl radicals to be directly detected by muon spin spectroscopy.

  15. Spin resonance with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Ch; Balzer, Ch; Hannemann, T; Mintert, F; Neuhauser, W; Reiss, D; Toschek, P E [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 9, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-03-14

    A modified ion trap is described where experiments (in particular related to quantum information processing) that usually require optical radiation can be carried out using microwave or radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Instead of applying the usual methods for coherent manipulation of trapped ions, a string of ions in such a modified trap can be treated like a molecule in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments taking advantage of spin-spin coupling. The collection of trapped ions can be viewed as an N-qubit molecule with adjustable spin-spin coupling constants. Given N identically prepared quantum mechanical two-level systems (qubits), the optimal strategy to estimate their quantum state requires collective measurements. Using the ground state hyperfine levels of electrodynamically trapped {sup 171}Yb{sup +}, we have implemented an adaptive algorithm for state estimation involving sequential measurements on arbitrary qubit states.

  16. Spin resonance with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Ch; Balzer, Ch; Hannemann, T; Mintert, F; Neuhauser, W; Reiss, D; Toschek, P E

    2003-01-01

    A modified ion trap is described where experiments (in particular related to quantum information processing) that usually require optical radiation can be carried out using microwave or radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Instead of applying the usual methods for coherent manipulation of trapped ions, a string of ions in such a modified trap can be treated like a molecule in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments taking advantage of spin-spin coupling. The collection of trapped ions can be viewed as an N-qubit molecule with adjustable spin-spin coupling constants. Given N identically prepared quantum mechanical two-level systems (qubits), the optimal strategy to estimate their quantum state requires collective measurements. Using the ground state hyperfine levels of electrodynamically trapped 171 Yb + , we have implemented an adaptive algorithm for state estimation involving sequential measurements on arbitrary qubit states

  17. The Radical Tragic Imaginary: Castoriadis On Aeschylus & Sophocles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Biluš Abaffy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Castoriadis’ entire colossal politico-philosophical-psychoanalytical project is based around the notion of radical autonomy, which, he argues, was most closely appropriated by the ancient Greek imaginary and the newly born dēmokratía. This paper critically examines Castoriadis’ treatment of the earliest democrats in the world—the ancient tragedians—and argues, contra Castoriadis, that it was Aeschylus, rather than Sophocles, that embodied the classical apotheosis of radical human autonomy.

  18. Radiolytic reduction of nifurtimose by CO2-· free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filali-Mouhim, A.; Champion, B.; Jore, D.; Ferradini, C.; Hickel, B.

    1991-01-01

    Nifurtimox is an antiparasitic drug often used in the treatment of the Chagas disease. Its therapeutic action seems to involve its monoelectronic reduction leading to a reduced radical capable of providing superoxide anion by reaction with oxygen. The oxidation reduction mechanisms involved in this action have been studied by steady state and pulse radiolysis methods. This study is devoted to the monoelectronic exchanges observed in the absence of air, the reducing radicals being the CO 2 - · anions [fr

  19. Study progress on free radicals and graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruiguo; Jin Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidative injury has been closely implicated in the occurrence and development of many diseases. Graves disease was also accompanied by changes of the free radicals, especially for reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen, et al, and the oxidative stress can cause a certain degree of injury on the thyroid and other human important organs. Antithyroid drug and 131 I treatment of Graves disease, the oxidative and antioxidative parameters can also be changed. (authors)

  20. The role of water radicals in thermorestoration of bacterial spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Y S; Grecz, N [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago (USA). Dept. of Biology

    1974-01-01

    Fully hydrated bacterial spores exposed to 0.45 Mrad showed a characteristic pattern of survival associated with thermorestoration. When temperature during radiation was controlled at -15/sup 0/ to +120/sup 0/C, the lowest viable cell counts were at 0/sup 0/C. Above 0/sup 0/C radiosurvival gradually increased by 2 to 3 log cycles reaching peak at 75/sup 0/C (Bacillus cereus T heat sensitive spores) and at 95/sup 0/C (B.stearothermophilus, heat resistant spores). Simultaneously high survival was observed in the solidly frozen state at -15/sup 0/C to -5/sup 0/C since harmful radicals produced by radiation were trapped in ice. Radiation modifying effects, i.e., protection by 2M ethanol (a scavenger of OH radicals) and sensitization by 1M sodium nitrate (a scavenger of H radicals and hydrated electrons), were studied. The results with ethanol and nitrate confirm the idea that in aqueous sytems below 50/sup 0/C the lethal action is due to oxidizing OH radicals known to attack cell DNA. However, the reversal of scavenger actions above 50/sup 0/C indicates that at those high temperatures lethal effects may also involve the reducing H and esub(aq), which at lower temperatures appear not to affect spore survival though they are known to attack proteins. In this case, it is proposed that radiation inactivation of spores at temperatures below 50/sup 0/C is due to DNA damage inflicted by OH radicals whereas spore death above 50/sup 0/C seems to involve protein /enzyme/ inactivation due to a combined action of heat plus reducing (H, esub(aq)) as well as oxidizing (OH) radical species. From the practical point of view it is important that normally radioprotective effects of such substances as ethanol or ground beef are progressively lost when radiation is carried out at temperatures above 50/sup 0/C.

  1. The role of water radicals in thermorestoration of bacterial spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Y.S.; Grecz, N.

    1974-01-01

    Fully hydrated bacterial spores exposed to 0.45 Mrad showed a characteristic pattern of survival associated with thermorestoration. When temperature during radiation was controlled at -15 0 to +120 0 C, the lowest viable cell counts were at 0 0 C. Above 0 0 C radiosurvival gradually increased by 2 to 3 log cycles reaching peak at 75 0 C (Bacillus cereus T heat sensitive spores) and at 95 0 C (B.stearothermophilus, heat resistant spores). Simultaneously high survival was observed in the solidly frozen state at -15 0 C to -5 0 C since harmful radicals produced by radiation were trapped in ice. Radiation modifying effects, i.e., protection by 2M ethanol (a scavenger of OH radicals) and sensitization by 1M sodium nitrate (a scavenger of H radicals and hydrated electrons), were studied. The results with ethanol and nitrate confirm the idea that in aqueous sytems below 50 0 C the lethal action is due to oxidizing OH radicals known to attack cell DNA. However, the reversal of scavenger actions above 50 0 C indicates that at those high temperatures lethal effects may also involve the reducing H and esub(aq), which at lower temperatures appear not to affect spore survival though they are known to attack proteins. In this case, it is proposed that radiation inactivation of spores at temperatures below 50 0 C is due to DNA damage inflicted by OH radicals whereas spore death above 50 0 C seems to involve protein /enzyme/ inactivation due to a combined action of heat plus reducing (H, esub(aq)) as well as oxidizing (OH) radical species. From the practical point of view it is important that normally radioprotective effects of such substances as ethanol or ground beef are progressively lost when radiation is carried out at temperatures above 50 0 C. (F.J.)

  2. Trapping tsetse flies on water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveissière C.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Riverine tsetse flies such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are the vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in West Africa. Despite intimate links between tsetse and water, to our knowledge there has never been any attempt to design trapping devices that would catch tsetse on water. In mangrove (Guinea one challenging issue is the tide, because height above the ground for a trap is a key factor affecting tsetse catches. The trap was mounted on the remains of an old wooden dugout, and attached with rope to nearby branches, thereby allowing it to rise and fall with the tide. Catches showed a very high density of 93.9 flies/”water-trap”/day, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than all the catches from other habitats where the classical trap had been used. In savannah, on the Comoe river of South Burkina Faso, the biconical trap was mounted on a small wooden raft anchored to a stone, and catches were compared with the classical biconical trap put on the shores. G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides densities were not significantly different from those from the classical biconical one. The adaptations described here have allowed to efficiently catch tsetse on the water, which to our knowledge is reported here for the first time. This represents a great progress and opens new opportunities to undertake studies on the vectors of trypanosomoses in mangrove areas of Guinea, which are currently the areas showing the highest prevalences of sleeping sickness in West Africa. It also has huge potential for tsetse control using insecticide impregnated traps in savannah areas where traps become less efficient in rainy season. The Guinean National control programme has already expressed its willingness to use such modified traps in its control campaigns in Guinea, as has the national PATTEC programme in Burkina Faso during rainy season.

  3. Status of THe-Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streubel, Sebastian; Eronen, Tommi; Hoecker, Martin; Ketter, Jochen; Blaum, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Van Dyck, Robert S. Jr. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    THe-Trap (short for Tritium-{sup 3}He Trap) is a Penning-trap setup dedicated to measure the {sup 3}H to {sup 3}He mass-ratio with a relative uncertainty of better than 10{sup -11}. The ratio is of relevance for the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN), which aims to measure the electron anti-neutrino mass, by measuring the shape of the β-decay energy spectrum close to its endpoint. An independent measurement of the {sup 3}H to {sup 3}He mass-ratio pins down this endpoint, and thus will help to determine the systematics of KATRIN. The trap setup consists of two Penning-traps: One trap for precision measurements, the other trap for ion storage. Ideally, the trap content will be periodically switched, which reduces the time between the measurements of the two ions' motional frequencies. In 2012, a mass ratio measurement of {sup 12}C{sup 4+} to {sup 14}N{sup 5+} was performed to characterize systematic effects of the traps. This measurement yielded a accuracy of 10{sup -9}. Further investigations revealed that a major reason for the modest accuracy is the large axial amplitude of ∼100 μm, compared to a ideal case of 3 μm at 4 K. In addition, relative magnetic fluctuations at a 3 x 10{sup -10} level on a 10 h timescale need to be significantly improved. In this contribution, the aforementioned findings and further systematic studies will be presented.

  4. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Capogrosso

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients’ overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function.

  5. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Cazzaniga, Walter; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP) have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs) have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients' overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia) has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function. PMID:28459142

  6. Evaluating potential sources of variation in Chironomidae catch rates on sticky traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua T.; Muehlbauer, Jeffrey D.; Kennedy, Theodore A.

    2016-01-01

    Sticky traps are a convenient tool for assessing adult aquatic insect population dynamics, but there are many practical questions about how trap sampling artefacts may affect observed results. Utilising study sites on the Colorado River and two smaller streams in northern Arizona, USA, we evaluated whether catch rates and sex ratios of Chironomidae, a ubiquitous aquatic insect, were affected by spraying traps with insecticide, placing traps at different heights above ground, and placing traps at different locations within a terrestrial habitat patch. We also evaluated temporal variation in Chironomidae counts monthly over a 9-month growing season. We found no significant variation in catch rates or sex ratios between traps treated versus untreated with insecticide, nor between traps placed at the upstream or downstream end of a terrestrial habitat patch. Traps placed near ground level did have significantly higher catch rates than traps placed at 1.5 m, although sex ratios were similar across heights. Chironomidae abundance and sex ratios also varied from month-to-month and seemed to be related to climatic conditions. Our results inform future sticky trap studies by demonstrating that trap height, but not insecticide treatment or precise trap placement within a habitat patch, is an important source of variation influencing catch rates.

  7. Influence of trap color and host volatiles on capture of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Khrimian, Ashot; Cossé, Allard; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C

    2012-04-01

    Field trapping assays were conducted in 2009 and 2010 throughout western Michigan, to evaluate lures for adult emerald ash borer, A. planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Several ash tree volatiles were tested on purple prism traps in 2009, and a dark green prism trap in 2010. In 2009, six bark oil distillate lure treatments were tested against manuka oil lures (used in 2008 by USDA APHIS PPQ emerald ash borer cooperative program). Purple traps baited with 80/20 (manuka/phoebe oil) significantly increased beetle catch compared with traps baited with manuka oil alone. In 2010 we monitored emerald ash borer attraction to dark green traps baited with six lure combinations of 80/20 (manuka/phoebe), manuka oil, and (3Z)-hexenol. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol caught significantly more male and total count insects than traps baited with manuka oil alone. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol did not catch more beetles when compared with traps baited with (3Z)-hexenol alone. When compared with unbaited green traps our results show that (3Z)-hexenol improved male catch significantly in only one of three field experiments using dark green traps. Dark green traps caught a high number of A. planipennis when unbaited while (3Z)-hexenol was seen to have a minimal (nonsignificant) trap catch effect at several different release rates. We hypothesize that the previously reported kairomonal attractancy of (3Z)-hexenol (for males) on light green traps is not as obvious here because of improved male attractancy to the darker green trap.

  8. Radical production in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Akabani, G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes our effort to develop a metric for radiation exposure that is more fundamental than adsorbed dose and upon which a metric for exposure to chemicals could be based. This metric is based on the production of radicals by the two agents. Radicals produced by radiation in biological systems commonly assumed to be the same as those produced in water despite the presence of a variety of complex molecules. This may explain why the extensive efforts to describe the relationship between energy deposition (track structure) and molecular damage to DNA, based on the spectrum of radicals produced, have not been successful in explaining simple biological effects such as cell killing. Current models assume that DNA and its basic elements are immersed in water-like media and only model the production and diffusion of water-based radicals and their interaction with DNA structures; these models lack the cross sections associated with each macro-component of DNA and only treat water-based radicals. It has been found that such models are not realistic because DNA is not immersed in pure water. A computer code capable of simulating electron tracks, low-energy electrons, energy deposition in small molecules, and radical production and diffusion in water like media has been developed. This code is still in at a primitive stage and development is continuing. It is being used to study radical production by radiation, and radical diffusion and interactions in simple molecular systems following their production. We are extending the code to radical production by chemicals to complement our PBPK modeling efforts. It therefore has been developed primarily for use with radionuclides that are in biological materials, and not for radiation fields

  9. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  10. Surgical treatment of postcircumcision trapped penis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the prepubic or scrotal skin mostly following neonatal circumcision or trauma [1]. This condition occurs when excessive preputial and shaft skin is removed, during circumcision (overzealous circumcision), or other trauma to the penis. As a result, either the entire or a part of the penile shaft becomes entrapped in the scarred ...

  11. Guest Editorial: Processes of Radicalization and De-Radicalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Della Porta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of radicalization and de-radicalization, understood as processes leading towards the increased or decreased use of political violence, is central to the question of how political violence emerges, how it can be prevented, and how it can be contained. The focus section of this issue of the International Journal of Conflict and Violence addresses radicalization and de-radicalization, seeking to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the processes, dynamics, and mechanisms involved and taking an interdisciplinary approach to overcome the fragmentation into separate disciplines and focus areas. Contributions by Pénélope Larzillière, Felix Heiduk, Bill Kissane, Hank Johnston, Christian Davenport and Cyanne Loyle, Veronique Dudouet, and Lasse Lindekilde address repressive settings, legitimacy, institutional aspects, organizational outcomes, and dynamics in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

  12. Redox properties of free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Results of electron transfer reactions observed and monitored by pulse radiolysis are reported. This technique allows determination of the first one-electron reduction or oxidation of a compound rather than the overall two-electron transfer usually reported. Pulse radiolysis allows the determination of absolute rate constants for reactions of free radicals and helps elucidate the mechanisms involved. Studies using this technique to study radicals derived from quinones, nitro compounds, pyridines, phenols, and anilines are reported. Radicals of biochemical interest arising from riboflavin, ascorbic acid, vitamin K 3 , vitamin E, MAD + , porphyrins, etc. have also been studied

  13. Hot wire radicals and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure radical (and stable gas) densities at the substrate of a tungsten hot wire (HW) reactor. We report measurements of the silane reaction probability on the HW and the probability of Si and H release from the HW. We describe a model for the atomic H release, based on the H 2 dissociation model. We note major variations in silicon-release, with dependence on prior silane exposure. Measured radical densities versus silane pressure yield silicon-silane and H-silane reaction rate coefficients, and the dominant radical fluxes to the substrate

  14. Acute Pre-/Post-Treatment with 8th Day SOD-Like Supreme (a Free Radical Scavenging Health Product Protects against Oxidant-Induced Injury in Cultured Cardiomyocytes and Hepatocytes In Vitro as Well as in Mouse Myocardium and Liver In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pou Kuan Leong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available 8th Day superoxide dismutase (SOD-Like Supreme (SOD-Like Supreme, a free radical scavenging health product is an antioxidant-enriched fermentation preparation with free radical scavenging properties. In the present study, the cellular/tissue protective actions of SOD-Like Supreme against menadione toxicity in cultured H9c2 cardiomyocytes and in AML12 hepatocytes as well as oxidant-induced injury in the mouse myocardium and liver were investigated. SOD-Like Supreme was found to possess potent free radical scavenging activity in vitro as assessed by an oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. Incubation with SOD-Like Supreme (0.5–3% (v/v was shown to protect against menadione-induced toxicity in H9c2 and AML12 cells, as evidenced by increases in cell viability. The ability of SOD-Like Supreme to protect against menadione cytotoxicity was associated with an elevation in the cellular reduced glutathione (GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG ratio in menadione-challenged cells. Consistent with the cell-based studies, pre-/post-treatment with SOD-Like Supreme (0.69 and 2.06 mL/kg, three intermittent doses per day for two consecutive days was found to protect against isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury and carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity in mice. The cardio/hepatoprotection afforded by SOD-Like Supreme was also paralleled by increases in myocardial/hepatic mitochondrial GSH/GSSG ratios in the SOD-Like Supreme-treated/oxidant-challenged mice. In conclusion, incubation/treatment with SOD-Like Supreme was found to protect against oxidant-induced injury in vitro and in vivo, presumably by virtue of its free radical scavenging activity.

  15. Urban fall traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia de Almeida Valsecchi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the repercussion of falls in the elderly peoplewho live in the city of São Paulo and address - though synthetically- some questions regarding the city and its relation to aging and thequality of life of the elderly. Methods: This is a qualitative study. As fordata collection, “in-depth individual interviews” were applied. Selectionof subjects was guided by a procedure named as “network”. Results:Ten interviews were performed, nine with elderly individuals who werevictims of falls and one with a public authority representative. Dataresulting from interviews confirmed that significant changes occurin live of the elderly, who are victims of what has been called “urbantraps”, and that, by extrapolating mobility and dependence contexts,invade feelings, emotions and desires. The inappropriate environmentprovided by the city of São Paulo is confirmed by absence of adequateurban planning and lack of commitment of public authorities. It alsorevealed that the particular way of being old and living an elderlylife, in addition to right to citizenship, is reflected by major or lesserdifficulties imposed to the elderly to fight for their rights and have theirpublic space respected. Conclusion: The city of São Paulo is not anideal locus for an older person to live in. To the traps that are found inpublic places one can add those that are found in private places andthat contribute to the hard experience of falls among the elderly, anexperience that is sometimes fatal. In Brazil, the attention is basicallyfocused on the consequences of falls and not on prevention, by meansof urban planning that should meet the needs of the most vulnerablegroups - the physically disabled and the elderly.

  16. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  17. Long-term follow-up of treatment of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy using nerve grafts and end-to-side somatic-autonomic neurorraphy: a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Trindade, José Carlos; Viterbo, Fausto; Petean Trindade, André; Fávaro, Wagner José; Trindade-Filho, José Carlos Souza

    2017-06-01

    To study a novel penile reinnervation technique using four sural nerve grafts and end-to-side neurorraphies connecting bilaterally the femoral nerve and the cavernous corpus and the femoral nerve and the dorsal penile nerves. Ten patients (mean [± sd; range] age 60.3 [± 4.8; 54-68] years), who had undergone radical prostatectomy (RP) at least 2 years previously, underwent penile reinnervation in the present study. Four patients had undergone radiotherapy after RP. All patients reported satisfactory sexual activity prior to RP. The surgery involved bridging of the femoral nerve to the dorsal nerve of the penis and the inner part of the corpus cavernosum with sural nerve grafts and end-to-side neurorraphies. Patients were evaluated using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire and pharmaco-penile Doppler ultrasonography (PPDU) preoperatively and at 6, 12 and 18 months postoperatively, and using a Clinical Evolution of Erectile Function (CEEF) questionnaire, administered after 36 months. The IIEF scores showed improvements with regard to erectile dysfunction (ED), satisfaction with intercourse and general satisfaction. Evaluation of PPDU velocities did not reveal any difference between the right and left sides or among the different time points. The introduction of nerve grafts neither caused fibrosis of the corpus cavernosum, nor reduced penile vascular flow. CEEF results showed that sexual intercourse began after a mean of 13.7 months with frequency of sexual intercourse varying from once daily to once monthly. Acute complications were minimal. The study was limited by the small number of cases. A total of 60% of patients were able to achieve full penetration, on average, 13 months after reinnervation surgery. Patients previously submitted to radiotherapy had slower return of erectile function. We conclude that penile reinnervation surgery is a viable technique, with effective results, and could offer a new treatment method for ED after

  18. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  19. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  20. Scavenging of free-radical metabolites of aniline xenobiotics and drugs by amino acid derivatives: toxicological implications of radical-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Karim; Baghdasarian, Argishti; Narwaley, Malyaj; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-12-16

    We investigated a novel scavenging mechanism of arylamine free radicals by poly- and monoaminocarboxylates. Free radicals of arylamine xenobiotics and drugs did not react with oxygen in peroxidase-catalyzed reactions; however, they showed marked oxygen uptake in the presence of an aminocarboxylate. These free-radical intermediates were identified using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), a polyaminocarboxylate, caused a concentration-dependent attenuation of N-centered radicals produced by the peroxidative metabolism of arylamines with the subsequent formation of secondary aliphatic carbon-centered radicals stemming from the cosubstrate molecule. Analogously, N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) and N-methyliminodiacetate (MIDA), but not iminodiacetic acid (IDA), demonstrated a similar scavenging effect of arylamine-derived free radicals in a horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 system. Using human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell lysate as a model of human neutrophils, DTPA, MIDA, and DMG readily reduced anilinium cation radicals derived from the arylamines and gave rise to the corresponding carbon radicals. The rate of peroxidase-triggered polymerization of aniline was studied as a measure of nitrogen-radical scavenging. Although, IDA had no effect on the rate of aniline polymerization, this was almost nullified in the presence of DTPA and MIDA at half of the molar concentration of the aniline substrate, whereas a 20 molar excess of DMPO caused only a partial inhibition. Furthermore, the yield of formaldehyde, a specific reaction endproduct of the oxidation of aminocarboxylates by aniline free-radical metabolites, was quantitatively determined. Azobenzene, a specific reaction product of peroxidase-catalyzed free-radical dimerization of aniline, was fully abrogated in the presence of DTPA, as confirmed by GC/MS. Under aerobic conditions, a radical-transfer reaction

  1. Xanthine oxidase activity and free radical generation in patients with sepsis syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, H F; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Webster, N R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine xanthine oxidase activity, free radical concentrations, and lipid peroxidation in patients with sepsis syndrome compared with noninfected critically ill patients. DESIGN: A prospective observational study. SETTING: A nine-bed intensive care unit in a university teaching......). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with sepsis have xanthine oxidase activation, high free-radical concentrations, and evidence of free radical damage. The finding that xanthine oxidase activity was lower in those patients who died, coupled with increased lactate concentrations implies more severe ischemia with incomplete...... to the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score or to the presence of organ dysfunction. The mean ascorbyl radical concentration (arbitrary units) determined by electron paramagnetic resonance following spin trapping was increased in patients compared with healthy subjects (p

  2. Radicals derived from histone hydroperoxides damage nucleobases in RNA and DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luxford, C; Dean, R T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of individual histone proteins (H1, H2A, H2B, H3, or H4) and histone octamers (consisting of two molecules each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) to hydroxyl radicals, generated by gamma-irradiation, in the presence of O(2) generates protein-bound hydroperoxides in a dose-dependent fashion......; this is in accord with previous studies with other proteins. These histone hydroperoxides are stable in the absence of exogenous catalysts (e.g., heat, light, and transition metal ions), but in the presence of these agents decompose rapidly to give a variety of radicals which have been identified by EPR spin...... trapping. Histone hydroperoxide-derived radicals generated on decomposition of the hydroperoxides with Cu(+) react with both pyrimidine and purine nucleobases. Thus, with uridine the histone hydroperoxide-derived radicals undergo addition across the C(5)-C(6) double bond of the pyrimidine ring to give...

  3. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  4. Holes in magneto electrostatic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.

    1996-01-01

    We observe that in magneto electrostatic confinement (MEC) devices the magnetic surfaces are not always equipotentials. The lack of symmetry in the equipotential surfaces can result in holes in MEC plasma traps. (author)

  5. Trapping Triatominae in Silvatic Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireau François

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale trials of a trapping system designed to collect silvatic Triatominae are reported. Live-baited adhesive traps were tested in various ecosystems and different triatomine habitats (arboreal and terrestrial. The trials were always successful, with a rate of positive habitats generally over 20% and reaching 48.4% for palm trees of the Amazon basin. Eleven species of Triatominae belonging to the three genera of public health importance (Triatoma, Rhodnius and Panstrongylus were captured. This trapping system provides an effective way to detect the presence of triatomines in terrestrial and arboreal silvatic habitats and represents a promising tool for ecological studies. Various lines of research are contemplated to improve the performance of this trapping system.

  6. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    .... Radical change by entrepreneurial design then becomes the focal point, in order to acquaint the reader with the strategies and tactics of well-known entrepreneurs who have been successful in molding...

  7. Penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Ralph, David

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy (RP) is believed to include neuropraxia, which leads to temporarily reduced oxygenation and subsequent structural changes in penile tissue. This results in veno-occlusive dysfunction, therefore, penile rehabilitation programmes...

  8. Characterization of Free Radicals By Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochars from Pyrolysis at High Heating Rates and at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker Degn; Larsen Andresen, Mogens

    of mathematical models that can predict yields, composition and rates of product (char, tar, light gases) formation from fast pyrolysis. The modeling of cross-linking and polymerization reactions in biomass pyrolysis includes the formation of free radicals and their disappearance. Knowledge about these radical...... reactions is important in order to achieve the high fuel conversion at short residence times. However, little is known about the extent of free radical reactions in pulverized biomass at fast pyrolysis conditions.The concentration and type of free radicals from the decay (termination stage) of pyrolysis...... to the less efficient catalytic effects of potassium on the bond-breaking and radical re-attachments. The high Si levels in the rice husk caused an increase in the char radical concentration compared to the wheat straw because the free radicals were trapped in a char consisting of a molten amorphous silica...

  9. Radical Islamism and Failed Developmentalism

    OpenAIRE

    Rahnema, Saeed

    2008-01-01

    The rise of radical Islamism in recent years does not limit the applicability of the concept of cultural nationalism. Rather the two are intertwined in ways which this article will attempt to highlight. Islam took specific national forms as modern nation-states arose and the contemporary resurgence of radical Islamism also follows that modern pattern. I examine the emergence of the three most important movements in the Islamic world, namely, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Jama'at-e Islami i...

  10. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  11. Status of THe-trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketter, Jochen; Eronen, Tommi; Hoecker, Martin; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Van Dyck, Robert S. Jr. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Originally developed at the University of Washington and relocated to the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in 2008, the Penning-trap spectrometer THe-Trap is specially tailored for a {sup 3}H/{sup 3}He mass-ratio measurement, from which the Q-value of the beta-decay of {sup 3}H to {sup 3}He can be derived. Improving the current best value by at least an order of magnitude will provide an important independent test parameter for the determination of the electron-antineutrino's mass by the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN). However, Penning-trap mass spectrometry has to be pushed to its limits in a dedicated experiment for a sufficiently accurate mass-ratio measurement with a relative uncertainty of 10{sup -11}. Unlike the closed-envelope, single-trap predecessor, the new spectrometer features an external ion source, owing to the radioactive nature of tritium, and two traps in order to speed up the measurement cycle. While the double-trap technique holds great promise, it also calls for more intricate procedures, such as ion transfer. Details about the recent progress of the experiment are given.

  12. Initial decay process of radicals induced in irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaimori, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Hideo; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kameya, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    In order to determine radial decay behaviors of γ-irradiated food, we analyzed radicals in the food using ESR. We detected the ESR signal of specimens just several minutes after irradiation. The singlet signal intensity at g=2.0, originated from organic free radicals was increased as followed by the increasing radiation dose. Singlet signal intensity that increased by γ-irradiation was decreased with time. The phenomena of decay of the ESR singlet signal showed two phase that are rapid decay and slow decay. It was suggested that those two phase decay is due to at least the two radical species. Also we concluded that after three hours of radiation treatment long life radical as ESR signal intensity was detected in irradiated specimen; black pepper, green coffee bean and ginseng, showed the same decay phenomena. But the signal intensity of irradiated black pepper was three times larger than that of irradiated green coffee bean and irradiated ginseng. (author)

  13. Analysis of radicals induced in irradiated cereal flour using ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Shoei; Kishita, Keigo; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed radicals induced in cereal flour irradiated with gamma-ray or electron beam. Sample was wheat and rice. We detected a broad singlet signal at g = 2.0. It consists of a singlet signal and a triplet signal. It suggested that the singlet signal is originated from organic free radicals and the triplet signal is from 14 N. There were no differences of ESR spectra between irradiated wheat flour and rice flour. The signal intensity of radiation induced radical was tend to increase following with the increase of radiation dose level. After radiation treatment, relaxation time of radiation induced radical was changed during storage. T 1 was decreased and T 2 was increased. In this study, the relaxation time is calculated using the parameters obtained from the ESR signal. It is necessary to analyze the relaxation time directly with pulsed ESR spectroscopy in future. (author)

  14. Evaluation of capture techniques on lesser prairie-chicken trap injury and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, Blake A.; Boal, Clint W.; Mitchell, Natasia R.; Gicklhorn, Trevor S.; Borsdorf, Philip K.; Haukos, David A.; Dixon, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Ethical treatment of research animals is required under the Animal Welfare Act. This includes trapping methodologies that reduce unnecessary pain and duress. Traps used in research should optimize animal welfare conditions within the context of the proposed research study. Several trapping techniques are used in the study of lesser prairie-chickens, despite lack of knowledge of trap injury caused by the various methods. From 2006 to 2012, we captured 217, 40, and 144 lesser prairie-chickens Tympanuchus pallidicinctus using walk-in funnel traps, rocket nets, and drop nets, respectively, in New Mexico and Texas, to assess the effects of capture technique on injury and survival of the species. We monitored radiotagged, injured lesser prairie-chickens 7–65 d postcapture to assess survival rates of injured individuals. Injuries occurred disproportionately among trap type, injury type, and sex. The predominant injuries were superficial cuts to the extremities of males captured in walk-in funnel traps. However, we observed no mortalities due to trapping, postcapture survival rates of injured birds did not vary across trap types, and the daily survival probability of an injured and uninjured bird was ≥99%. Frequency and intensity of injuries in walk-in funnel traps are due to the passive nature of these traps (researcher cannot select specific individuals for capture) and incidental capture of individuals not needed for research. Comparatively, rocket nets and drop nets allow observers to target birds for capture and require immediate removal of captured individuals from the trap. Based on our results, trap injuries would be reduced if researchers monitor and immediately remove birds from walk-in funnels before they injure themselves; move traps to target specific birds and reduce recaptures; limit the number of consecutive trapping days on a lek; and use proper netting techniques that incorporate quick, efficient, trained handling procedures.

  15. NOx removal characteristics of corona radical shower with ammonia and methylamine radical injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urashima, K.; Ara, M.; Chang, J.S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Uchida, Y. [Aichi Inst. of Technology, (Japan). Dept. of Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur oxides (SOx) are the major cause of acid rain. There are different types of NOx and SOx conversion techniques such as wet scrubber, selective catalytic reactor, sorbent injection, and low NOx burner. Non-thermal plasma techniques have also been utilized in commercial plants, but the energy efficiency of the non-thermal plasma reactors have not yet been optimized. The direct plasma treatments of flue gases including, the electron beam, barrier discharge and pulsed corona reactors, may lose input energy to activate unwanted components of flue gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}). The corona discharge ammonia radical shower system has demonstrated significant NOx removal with higher energy efficiency for large bench scale and pilot plant tests for combustion exhausts. An experiment has also demonstrated that methane can replace ammonia as an injection gas with less NOx removal efficiency. This paper presented an experimental investigation that compared methylamine radical injection with traditional ammonia and methane radical injections. The paper discussed the bench scale test facilities and corona radical shower plasma reactor. It was concluded that the processes to form ammonium nitrate could be observed from trace white solid particles deposited on the reactor wall as observed by scanning electron microscopy pictures. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 appendices.

  16. Effects of oxide traps, interface traps, and ''border traps'' on metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Reber, R.A. Jr.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Riewe, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    We have identified several features of the 1/f noise and radiation response of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices that are difficult to explain with standard defect models. To address this issue, and in response to ambiguities in the literature, we have developed a revised nomenclature for defects in MOS devices that clearly distinguishes the language used to describe the physical location of defects from that used to describe their electrical response. In this nomenclature, ''oxide traps'' are simply defects in the SiO 2 layer of the MOS structure, and ''interface traps'' are defects at the Si/SiO 2 interface. Nothing is presumed about how either type of defect communicates with the underlying Si. Electrically, ''fixed states'' are defined as trap levels that do not communicate with the Si on the time scale of the measurements, but ''switching states'' can exchange charge with the Si. Fixed states presumably are oxide traps in most types of measurements, but switching states can either be interface traps or near-interfacial oxide traps that can communicate with the Si, i.e., ''border traps'' [D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-39, 269 (1992)]. The effective density of border traps depends on the time scale and bias conditions of the measurements. We show the revised nomenclature can provide focus to discussions of the buildup and annealing of radiation-induced charge in non-radiation-hardened MOS transistors, and to changes in the 1/f noise of MOS devices through irradiation and elevated-temperature annealing

  17. Trapping, self-trapping and the polaron family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneham, A M; Gavartin, J; Shluger, A L; Kimmel, A V; Ramo, D Munoz; Roennow, H M; Aeppli, G; Renner, C

    2007-01-01

    The earliest ideas of the polaron recognized that the coupling of an electron to ionic vibrations would affect its apparent mass and could effectively immobilize the carrier (self-trapping). We discuss how these basic ideas have been generalized to recognize new materials and new phenomena. First, there is an interplay between self-trapping and trapping associated with defects or with fluctuations in an amorphous solid. In high dielectric constant oxides, like HfO 2 , this leads to oxygen vacancies having as many as five charge states. In colossal magnetoresistance manganites, this interplay makes possible the scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) observation of polarons. Second, excitons can self-trap and, by doing so, localize energy in ways that can modify the material properties. Third, new materials introduce new features, with polaron-related ideas emerging for uranium dioxide, gate dielectric oxides, Jahn-Teller systems, semiconducting polymers and biological systems. The phonon modes that initiate self-trapping can be quite different from the longitudinal optic modes usually assumed to dominate. Fourth, there are new phenomena, like possible magnetism in simple oxides, or with the evolution of short-lived polarons, like muons or excitons. The central idea remains that of a particle whose properties are modified by polarizing or deforming its host solid, sometimes profoundly. However, some of the simpler standard assumptions can give a limited, indeed misleading, description of real systems, with qualitative inconsistencies. We discuss representative cases for which theory and experiment can be compared in detail

  18. The games radicals play : special issue on free radicals and radical ions

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, J.C.; Williams, F.

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry and Physics have aptly been described as “most excellent children of Intellect and Art” [1]. Both these “children” engage with many playthings, and molecules rank as one of their first favorites, especially radicals, which are amongst the most lively and exciting. Checking out radicals dancing to the music of entropy round their potential energy ballrooms is surely both entertaining and enlightening. Radicals’ old favorite convolutions are noteworthy, but the new styles, modes and a...

  19. EPR and optical spectroscopic studies of neutral free radicals in an adamantane matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, J.E.

    1975-03-01

    Recent work in our laboratory has demonstrated that neutral free radicals produced by x-irradiation and trapped in adamantane exhibit exceedingly long lifetimes because of the lack of rapid diffusion in the solid matrix. This observation and the fact that samples can be pressed into pellets with high optical transparency in the visible and near uv regions of the spectrum suggested to us that this unique matrix might be used for studying the optical properties of free radicals. The results of a wide variety of experiments of this type are described in this thesis. These include experiments in which secondary free radicals are produced by photoinduced decomposition of primary free radicals by selective irradiation with visible light, the observation of strong optical absorption spectra of free radicals at room temperature using a Cary 14 spectrophotometer, the finding that certain free radicals exhibit strong, visible fluorescence when irradiated with uv light, and the discovery that the absorption intensity of multiplicity-forbidden transition in singlet and doublet state species is enhanced relative to spin-allowed transitions by at least three orders of magnitude. An analysis of these results in terms of molecular orbital theory is given, and experiments designed to obtain the epr spectra of electronically-excited states of free radicals are described

  20. Radical pancreaticoduodenectomy for benign disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2008-01-01

    Whipple\\'s procedure is the treatment of choice for pancreatic and periampullary malignancies. Preoperative histological confirmation of malignancy is frequently unavailable and some patients will subsequently be found to have benign disease. Here, we review our experience with Whipple\\'s procedure for patients ultimately proven to have benign disease. The medical records of all patients who underwent Whipple\\'s procedure during a 15-year period (1987-2002) were reviewed; 112 patients underwent the procedure for suspected malignancy. In eight cases, the final histology was benign (7.1%). One additional patient was known to have benign disease at resection. The mean age was 50 years (range: 30-75). The major presenting features included jaundice (five), pain (two), gastric outlet obstruction (one), and recurrent gastrointestinal haemorrhage (one). Investigations included ultrasound (eight), computerised tomography (eight), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (seven; of these, four patients had a stent inserted and three patients had sampling for cytology), and endoscopic ultrasound (two). The pathological diagnosis included benign biliary stricture (two), chronic pancreatitis (two), choledochal cyst (one), inflammatory pseudotumour (one), cystic duodenal wall dysplasia (one), duodenal angiodysplasia (one), and granular cell neoplasm (one). There was no operative mortality. Morbidity included intra-abdominal collection (one), anastomotic leak (one), liver abscess (one), and myocardial infarction (one). All patients remain alive and well at mean follow-up of 41 months. Despite recent advances in diagnostic imaging, 8% of the patients undergoing Whipple\\'s procedure had benign disease. A range of unusual pathological entities can mimic malignancy. Accurate preoperative histological diagnosis may have allowed a less radical operation to be performed. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) may reduce the need for Whipple\\'s operation

  1. Radical Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Benign Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Kavanagh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Whipple's procedure is the treatment of choice for pancreatic and periampullary malignancies. Preoperative histological confirmation of malignancy is frequently unavailable and some patients will subsequently be found to have benign disease. Here, we review our experience with Whipple's procedure for patients ultimately proven to have benign disease. The medical records of all patients who underwent Whipple's procedure during a 15-year period (1987–2002 were reviewed; 112 patients underwent the procedure for suspected malignancy. In eight cases, the final histology was benign (7.1%. One additional patient was known to have benign disease at resection. The mean age was 50 years (range: 30–75. The major presenting features included jaundice (five, pain (two, gastric outlet obstruction (one, and recurrent gastrointestinal haemorrhage (one. Investigations included ultrasound (eight, computerised tomography (eight, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (seven; of these, four patients had a stent inserted and three patients had sampling for cytology, and endoscopic ultrasound (two. The pathological diagnosis included benign biliary stricture (two, chronic pancreatitis (two, choledochal cyst (one, inflammatory pseudotumour (one, cystic duodenal wall dysplasia (one, duodenal angiodysplasia (one, and granular cell neoplasm (one. There was no operative mortality. Morbidity included intra-abdominal collection (one, anastomotic leak (one, liver abscess (one, and myocardial infarction (one. All patients remain alive and well at mean follow-up of 41 months. Despite recent advances in diagnostic imaging, 8% of the patients undergoing Whipple'’s procedure had benign disease. A range of unusual pathological entities can mimic malignancy. Accurate preoperative histological diagnosis may have allowed a less radical operation to be performed. Endoscopic ultrasound–guided fine needle aspirate (EUS-FNA may reduce the need for Whipple's operation in

  2. Effects of Solvent and Temperature on Free Radical Formation in Electronic Cigarette Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Zachary T; Goel, Reema; Reilly, Samantha M; Foulds, Jonathan; Muscat, Joshua; Elias, Ryan J; Richie, John P

    2018-01-16

    The ever-evolving market of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) presents a challenge for analyzing and characterizing the harmful products they can produce. Earlier we reported that e-cigarette aerosols can deliver high levels of reactive free radicals; however, there are few data characterizing the production of these potentially harmful oxidants. Thus, we have performed a detailed analysis of the different parameters affecting the production of free radical by e-cigarettes. Using a temperature-controlled e-cigarette device and a novel mechanism for reliably simulating e-cigarette usage conditions, including coil activation and puff flow, we analyzed the effects of temperature, wattage, and e-liquid solvent composition of propylene glycol (PG) and glycerol (GLY) on radical production. Free radicals in e-cigarette aerosols were spin-trapped and analyzed using electron paramagnetic resonance. Free radical production increased in a temperature-dependent manner, showing a nearly 2-fold increase between 100 and 300 °C under constant-temperature conditions. Free radical production under constant wattage showed an even greater increase when going from 10 to 50 W due, in part, to higher coil temperatures compared to constant-temperature conditions. The e-liquid PG content also heavily influenced free radical production, showing a nearly 3-fold increase upon comparison of ratios of 0:100 (PG:GLY) and 100:0 (PG:GLY). Increases in PG content were also associated with increases in aerosol-induced oxidation of biologically relevant lipids. These results demonstrate that the production of reactive free radicals in e-cigarette aerosols is highly solvent dependent and increases with an increase in temperature. Radical production was somewhat dependent on aerosol production at higher temperatures; however, disproportionately high levels of free radicals were observed at ≥100 °C despite limited aerosol production. Overall, these findings suggest that e-cigarettes can be

  3. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-01-08

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  4. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Liang, Cai; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  5. Research concerning ionic and free radical reactions in radiation chemistry. Progress report, September 15, 1974--September 15, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.F.

    1975-01-01

    The following papers accepted for publication are presented in their entirety: Ligand Electronegativity Effect on the Spin Distribution in Phosphoranyl Radicals; Mercury-201 Quadrupole Interaction in the Electron Spin Resonance of the CH 2 HgCl Radical; Electron Spin Resonance Spectra of F 2 NO and F 3 NO - : A Hypervalent Radical from First-Row Elements; Detection of Thiyl Radicals by Spin Trapping in the Radiolysis of Liquids; Electron Spin Resonance Studies of γ-Irradiated Phosphite and Phosphate Esters: Identification of Phosphinyl, Phosphonyl, Phosphoranyl, and Phosphine Dimer Cation Radicals; and Electron Spin Resonance Studies of γ-Irradiated Phosphorus Compounds Containing Phosphorus-Chlorine Bonds. Abstracts of reports published during the year are included. (LK)

  6. Particle trapping in stimulated scattering processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karttunen, S.J.; Heikkinen, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Particle trapping effects on stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering are investigated. A time and space dependent model assumes a Maxwellian plasma which is taken to be homogeneous in the interaction region. Ion trapping has a rather weak effect on stimulated Brillouin scattering and large reflectivities are obtained even in strong trapping regime. Stimulated Raman scattering is considerably reduced by electron trapping. Typically 15-20 times larger laser intensities are required to obtain same reflectivity levels than without trapping. (author)

  7. Calcium Atom Trap for Atom Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kwang Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Han, Jae Min; Kim, Taek Soo; Cha, Yong Ho; Lim, Gwon; Jeong, Do Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Trace isotope analysis has been an important role in science, archaeological dating, geology, biology and nuclear industry. Artificially produced fission products such as Sr-90, Cs-135 and Kr-85 can be released to the environment when nuclear accident occurs and the reprocessing factory operates. Thus, the analysis of them has been of interest in nuclear industry. But it is difficult to detect them due to low natural abundance less then 10-10. The ultra-trace radio isotopes have been analyzed by the radio-chemical method, accelerator mass spectrometer, and laser based method. The radiochemical method has been used in the nuclear industry. But this method has disadvantages of long measurement time for long lived radioisotopes and toxic chemical process for the purification. The accelerator mass spectrometer has high isotope selectivity, but the system is huge and it has the isobar effects. The laser based method, such as RIMS (Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry) is a basically isobar-effect free method. Recently, ATTA (Atom Trap Trace Analysis), one of the laser based method, has been successfully demonstrated sufficient isotope selectivity with small system size. It has been applied for the detection of Kr-81 and Kr-85. However, it is not suitable for real sample detection, because it requires steady atomic beam generation during detection and is not allowed simultaneous detection of other isotopes. Therefore, we proposed the coupled method of Atom Trap and Mass Spectrometer. It consists of three parts, neutral atom trap, ionization and mass spectrometer. In this paper, we present the demonstration of the magneto-optical trap of neutral calcium. We discuss the isotope selective characteristics of the MOT (Magneto Optical Trap) of calcium by the fluorescence measurement. In addition, the frequency stabilization of the trap beam will be presented

  8. Formation of radical anions of radiosensitizers and related model compounds via electrospray ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feketeová, Linda; Albright, Abigail L; Sørensen, Brita Singers

    2014-01-01

    Radiosensitizers are used in radiotherapy to enhance tumour control of radioresistant hypoxic tumours. While the detailed mechanism of radiosensitization is still unknown, the formation of radical anions is believed to be a key step. Thus understanding the ionization reactions of radiosensitizers......, misonidazole and related compounds using a hybrid linear ion trap – Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometer (Finnigan-LTQ-FT). A key finding is that negative electrospray ionization of these radiosensitizers leads to the formation of radical anions, allowing their fragmentation reactions...

  9. Manganese-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Aryl Halides and Grignard Reagents by a Radical Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Ahlburg, Andreas; Fristrup, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The substrate scope and the mechanism have been investigated for the MnCl2-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction between aryl halides and Grignard reagents. The transformation proceeds rapidly and in good yield when the aryl halide component is an aryl chloride containing a cyano or an ester group....... Two radical-clock experiments were carried out, and in both cases an intermediate aryl radical was successfully trapped. The cross-coupling reaction is therefore believed to proceed by an SRN1 mechanism, with a triorganomanganate complex serving as the most likely nucleophile and single-electron donor...

  10. 17.9.3 Radical cations of diazo compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.

    This document is part of Subvolume E2 `Phosphorus-Centered Radicals, Radicals Centered on Other Heteroatoms, Organic Radical Ions' of Volume 26 `Magnetic Properties of Free Radicals' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'.

  11. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear β decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left up to other presenters

  12. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear beta decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left...

  13. Trapped atoms along nanophotonic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Brian; Kim, May; Chang, Tzu-Han; Hung, Chen-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Many-body systems subject to long-range interactions have remained a very challenging topic experimentally. Ultracold atoms trapped in extreme proximity to the surface of nanophotonic structures provides a dynamic system combining the strong atom-atom interactions mediated by guided mode photons with the exquisite control implemented with trapped atom systems. The hybrid system promises pair-wise tunability of long-range interactions between atomic pseudo spins, allowing studies of quantum magnetism extending far beyond nearest neighbor interactions. In this talk, we will discuss our current status developing high quality nanophotonic ring resonators, engineered on CMOS compatible optical chips with integrated nanostructures that, in combination with a side illuminating beam, can realize stable atom traps approximately 100nm above the surface. We will report on our progress towards loading arrays of cold atoms near the surface of these structures and studying atom-atom interaction mediated by photons with high cooperativity.

  14. Potential for the use of male pheromone components in female trapping: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howse, P.E.; Underwood, K.L.; Knapp, J.J.; Alemany Ferra, A.; Miranda, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine if reducing the male population using TML traps and pheromone baited traps would enhance female Mediterranean fruit fly capture. Investigations were conducted in citrus plantations in Mallorca. In the first trial (0.36 ha, Son Coll Vey, Palma) Agrisense yellow delta traps were deployed on every third tree in adjacent rows. On each other tree, a TML bait was placed with an insecticide strip containing Dichlorvos. Thus, each of the delta traps was surrounded by a hexagon of TML + insecticide baited trees. The rationale of this experiment was to remove males from the vicinity of pheromone-baited traps and thereby increase the apparency of the female lure. Before the trial, male catches averaged 4.1 per day in TML traps. During the trial, this was reduced to approximately 0.6 males/trap/day. The traps with pheromone (pyrazines in various combinations and ratios) caught around 0.05 females/trap/day. The pheromone traps remained female selective, with a negligible male catch, similar to that in unbaited traps. The most likely cause for the very low female catch may be that insufficient males were removed by the lure and kill devices. In the second trial (0.67 ha, Inca, Mallorca) the proprietor had deployed 83 traps, baited with TML and insecticide, for 18 days prior to the placement of five treatments with six replicates. The delta traps were placed on every third tree, with replicates every third row. The female catch showed a progressive enhancement over a period of 6 weeks, reaching a level about six times that of males in TML traps. (author)

  15. Photoionization of the OH radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is one of the most thoroughly studied free radicals because of its importance in atmospheric chemistry, combustion processes, and the interstellar medium. Detailed experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the ground electronic state (X 2 PI/sub i/) and on the four lowest bound excited electronic states (A 2 Σ + , B 2 Σ + , D 2 Σ - , and C 2 Σ + ). However, because it is difficult to distinguish the spectrum of OH from the spectra of the various radical precursors, the absorption spectrum in the wavelength region below 1200 A has not been well characterized. In the present work, the spectrum of OH has been determined in the wavelength region from 750 to 950 A using the technique of photoionization mass spectrometry. This technique allows complete separation of the spectrum of OH from that of the other components of the discharge and permits the unambiguous determination of the spectrum of OH

  16. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  17. Quantized motion of trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, J.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a theoretical and numerical study of the preparation and coherent manipulation of quantum states in the external and internal degrees of freedom of trapped ions. In its first part, this thesis proposes and investigates schemes for generating several nonclassical states for the quantized vibrational motion of a trapped ion. Based on dark state preparation specific laser excitation configurations are presented which, given appropriately chosen initial states, realize the desired motional states in the steady-state, indicated by the cessation of the fluorescence emitted by the ion. The focus is on the SU(1,1) intelligent states in both their single- and two-mode realization, corresponding to one- and two-dimensional motion of the ion. The presented schemes are also studied numerically using a Monte-Carlo state-vector method. The second part of the thesis describes how two vibrational degrees of freedom of a single trapped ion can be coupled through the action of suitably chosen laser excitation. Concentrating on a two-dimensional ion trap with dissimilar vibrational frequencies a variety of quantized two-mode couplings are derived. The focus is on a linear coupling that takes excitations from one mode to another. It is demonstrated how this can result in a state rotation, in which it is possible to coherently transfer the motional state of the ion between orthogonal directions without prior knowledge of that motional state. The third part of this thesis presents a new efficient method for generating maximally entangled internal states of a collection of trapped ions. The method is deterministic and independent of the number of ions in the trap. As the essential element of the scheme a mechanism for the realization of a controlled NOT operation that can operate on multiple ions is proposed. The potential application of the scheme for high-precision frequency standards is explored. (author)

  18. Open trap with ambipolar mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimov, G.I.; Zakajdakov, V.V.; Kishinevskij, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Results of numerical calculations on the behaviour of a thermonuclear plasma, allowing for α-particles in a trap with longitudinal confinement of the main ions by ambipolar electric fields are presented. This trap is formed by connecting two small-volume ''mirrortrons'' to an ordinary open trap. Into the extreme mirrortrons, approximately 1-MeV ions are introduced continuously by ionization of atomic beams on the plasma, and approximately 10-keV ions are similarly introduced into the main central region of the trap. By a suitable choice of injection currents, the plasma density established in the extreme mirrortrons is higher than in the central region. As a result of the quasi-neutrality condition, a longitudinal ambipolar field forming a potential well not only for electrons but also for the central ions is formed in the plasma. When the depth of the well for the central ions is much greater than their temperature, their life-time considerably exceeds the time of confinement by the magnetic mirrors. As a result, the plasma density is constant over the entire length of the central mirrortron, including the regions near the mirrors, and an ambipolar field is formed only in the extreme mirrortrons. The distribution of central ions and ambipolar potential in the extreme mirrortrons is uniquely determined by the density distribution of fast extreme ions. It is shown in the present study that an amplification coefficient Q as high as desired can, in principle, be reached in the trap under consideration, allowing for α-particles. However, this requires high magnetic fields in the mirrors and a sufficient length of the central mirrotron. It is shown that for moderate values of Q=3-8, it is desirable not to confine the central fast α-particles. To achieve a coefficient of Q=5, it is necessary to create fields of 250 kG in the mirrors, and the length of the trap must not be greater than 100 m. (author)

  19. Donor free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  20. Radical feminists & trans activists truce

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, F.

    2014-01-01

    #GenderWeek: Truce! When radical feminists and trans feminists empathise\\ud Feminist Times\\ud By Finn Mackay \\ud read all #GenderWeek articles.\\ud We wanted to explore the ground between the polarised, entrenched positions in the so-called “TERF-war”. Radical feminists on one pole, trans-inclusionary feminists and trans activists on the other. The disputed territory being women-only space, language and the ever changing legal framework surrounding gender.\\ud Entrenchment leads to stalemate. S...

  1. Ion trap architectures and new directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siverns, James D.; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2017-12-01

    Trapped ion technology has seen advances in performance, robustness and versatility over the last decade. With increasing numbers of trapped ion groups worldwide, a myriad of trap architectures are currently in use. Applications of trapped ions include: quantum simulation, computing and networking, time standards and fundamental studies in quantum dynamics. Design of such traps is driven by these various research aims, but some universally desirable properties have lead to the development of ion trap foundries. Additionally, the excellent control achievable with trapped ions and the ability to do photonic readout has allowed progress on quantum networking using entanglement between remotely situated ion-based nodes. Here, we present a selection of trap architectures currently in use by the community and present their most salient characteristics, identifying features particularly suited for quantum networking. We also discuss our own in-house research efforts aimed at long-distance trapped ion networking.

  2. Contemporary open and robotic radical prostatectomy practice patterns among urologists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T; Eastham, James A; Savage, Caroline; Maschino, A C; Laudone, Vincent P; Dechet, Christopher B; Stephenson, Robert A; Scardino, Peter T; Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2012-06-01

    We describe current trends in robotic and open radical prostatectomy in the United States after examining case logs for American Board of Urology certification. American urologists submit case logs for initial board certification and recertification. We analyzed logs from 2004 to 2010 for trends and used logistic regression to assess the impact of urologist age on robotic radical prostatectomy use. A total of 4,709 urologists submitted case logs for certification between 2004 and 2010. Of these logs 3,374 included 1 or more radical prostatectomy cases. Of the urologists 2,413 (72%) reported performing open radical prostatectomy only while 961 (28%) reported 1 or more robotic radical prostatectomies and 308 (9%) reported robotic radical prostatectomy only. During this 7-year period we observed a large increase in the number of urologists who performed robotic radical prostatectomy and a smaller corresponding decrease in those who performed open radical prostatectomy. Only 8% of patients were treated with robotic radical prostatectomy by urologists who were certified in 2004 while 67% underwent that procedure in 2010. Median age of urologists who exclusively performed open radical prostatectomy was 43 years (IQR 38-51) vs 41 (IQR 35-46) for those who performed only robotic radical prostatectomy. While the rate was not as high as the greater than 85% industry estimate, 67% of radical prostatectomies were done robotically among urologists who underwent board certification or recertification in 2010. Total radical prostatectomy volume almost doubled during the study period. These data provide nonindustry based estimates of current radical prostatectomy practice patterns and further our understanding of the evolving surgical treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Indications to radical surgical interventions in chondrosarcomas of the limbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of analysis carried out in treatment of 229 patients suffering from chondrosarcomas of the limbs it is established that radical surgical intervention in bulk of amputation or exarticulation is the choice of the treatment method at the 3d clinical stage of disease. Sex does not influence the chondrosarcomas prognosis. 20-years age patients have the shortest life-time after operation. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy does not improve the results of surgical treatment

  4. Laccase catalyzed grafting of-N-OH type mediators to lignin via radical-radical coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Line; Punt, A. M.; Kabel, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Lignin is an underexploited resource in biomass refining. Laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze oxidation of phenolic hydroxyls using O2 as electron acceptor and may facilitate lignin modification in the presence of mediators. This study assessed the reactivity of four different synthetic mediators...... better than HBT (1-hydroxybenzotriazole). Three different mechanisms are suggested to explain the grafting of HPI and HBT, all involving radical-radical coupling to produce covalent bonding to lignin. Lignin from exhaustive cellulase treatment of wheat straw was more susceptible to grafting than beech...... organosolv lignin with the relative abundance of grafting being 35% vs. 11% for HPI and 5% vs. 1% for HBT on these lignin substrates. The data imply that lignin can be functionalized via laccase catalysis with-N-OH type mediators....

  5. Artificial covering on trap nests improves the colonization of trap-nesting wasps

    OpenAIRE

    Taki, Hisatomo; Kevan, Peter G.; Viana, Blandina Felipe; Silva, Fabiana O.; Buck, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Acesso restrito: Texto completo. p. 225-229 To evaluate the role that a trap-nest cover might have on sampling methodologies, the abundance of each species of trap-nesting Hymenoptera and the parasitism rate in a Canadian forest were compared between artificially covered and uncovered traps. Of trap tubes exposed at eight forest sites in six trap-nest boxes, 531 trap tubes were occupied and 1216 individuals of 12 wasp species of four predatory families, Vespidae (Eumeninae), Crabronidae...

  6. Evaluation of pseudostem trapping as a control measure against banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, C S; Gold, C S; Okech, S H; Nokoe, S

    2002-02-01

    Controlled studies to determine the efficacy of pseudostem trapping in reducing adult populations of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar), were conducted under farmer conditions in Ntungamo district, Uganda. Twenty-seven farms were stratified on the basis of C. sordidus population density (estimated by mark and recapture methods) and divided among three treatments: (i) researcher-managed trapping (one trap per mat per month): (ii) farmer-managed trapping (trap intensity at discretion of farmer); and (iii) controls (no trapping). Intensive trapping (managed by researchers) resulted in significantly lower C. sordidus damage after one year. Over the same period, C. sordidus numbers declined by 61% on farms where trapping was managed by researchers, 53% where farmers managed trapping and 38% on farms without trapping; however, results varied greatly among farms and, overall, there was no significant effect of trapping on C. sordidus numbers. Moreover, there was only a weak relationship between the number of C. sordidus removed and the change in population density. Trapping success appeared to be affected by management levels and immigration from neighbouring farms. Although farmers were convinced that trapping was beneficial, adoption has been low due to resource requirements.

  7. Traps for phosphorus adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Nawer D; Villegas, Wilson E; Rodriguez, Lino M; Taborda, Nelson; Montes de C, Consuelo

    2001-01-01

    Several AL 2 O 3 supported oxides such as: NiO, CuO, Co 2 O 3 BaO, CeO 2 and ZnO were investigated for phosphorus adsorption. Zno/y-Al 2 O 3 exhibited the highest phosphorus adsorption capacity. However, since it diminishes the activity of to the reaction mixture it should be located upstream of the NoX catalyst, i.e. 0,3% Pd-H-MOR, in order to protect it against p poisoning. The treatment procedure with citric acid was effective for the removal of more than 70% phosphorus from the adsorbent, ZnO/y-Al 2 O 3

  8. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Michael A [Albuquerque, NM; Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM; Linker, Kevin L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  9. Asymmetric Penning trap coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernandez, David J.

    2010-01-01

    By using a matrix technique, which allows to identify directly the ladder operators, the coherent states of the asymmetric Penning trap are derived as eigenstates of the appropriate annihilation operators. They are compared with those obtained through the displacement operator method.

  10. Indeterminacy, sunspots, and development traps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodyan, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, 1-2 (2005), s. 159-185 ISSN 0165-1889 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : indeterminacy * development trap * stochastic stability Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.691, year: 2005 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jedc.2003.04.011

  11. Efficiency of subaquatic light traps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ditrich, Tomáš; Čihák, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 3 (2017), s. 171-184 ISSN 0165-0424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29857S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Heteroptera * Diptera * light trap Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 0.524, year: 2016

  12. The rise of trapped populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April T Humble

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As border security increases and borders become less permeable, cross-border migration is becoming increasingly difficult, selective and dangerous. Growing numbers of people are becoming trapped in their own countries or in transit countries, or being forced to roam border areas, unable to access legal protection or basic social necessities.

  13. Magnetic trapping of Rydberg atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niestadt, D.; Naber, J.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Spreeuw, R.J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic trapping is a well-established technique for ground state atoms. We seek to extend this concept to Rydberg atoms. Rydberg atoms are important for current visions of quantum simulators that will be used in the near future to simulate and analyse quantum problems. Current efforts in Amsterdam

  14. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeffner, H.; Roos, C.F.; Blatt, R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computers hold the promise of solving certain computational tasks much more efficiently than classical computers. We review recent experimental advances towards a quantum computer with trapped ions. In particular, various implementations of qubits, quantum gates and some key experiments are discussed. Furthermore, we review some implementations of quantum algorithms such as a deterministic teleportation of quantum information and an error correction scheme

  15. Reaction between protein radicals and other biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østdal, H.; Davies, M.J.; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates the reactivity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) radicals towards different biomolecules (urate, linoleic acid, and a polypeptide, poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr)). The BSA radical was formed at room temperature through a direct protein-to-protein radical transfer from H(2)O(2....... Subsequent analysis showed a decrease in the concentration of urate upon reaction with the BSA radical, while the BSA radical in the presence of poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr) resulted in increased formation of the characteristic protein oxidation product, dityrosine. Reaction between the BSA radical and a linoleic acid...

  16. Free radical generation from an aniline derivative in HepG2 cells: a possible captodative effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, Yuya; Summers, Fiona A; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Mason, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    Xenobiotic metabolism can induce the generation of protein radicals, which are believed to play an important role in the toxicity of chemicals and drugs. It is therefore important to identify chemical structures capable of inducing macromolecular free radical formation in living cells. In this study, we evaluated the ability of four structurally related environmental chemicals, aniline, nitrosobenzene, N,N-dimethylaniline, and N,N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline (DMNA), to induce free radicals and cellular damage in the hepatoma cell line HepG2. Cytotoxicity was assessed using lactate dehydrogenase assays, and morphological changes were observed using phase contrast microscopy. Protein free radicals were detected by immuno-spin trapping using in-cell western experiments and confocal microscopy to determine the subcellular locale of free radical generation. DMNA induced free radical generation, lactate dehydrogenase release, and morphological changes in HepG2 cells, whereas aniline, nitrosobenzene, N,N-dimethylaniline did not. Confocal microscopy showed that DMNA induced free radical generation mainly in the cytosol. Preincubation of HepG2 cells with N-acetylcysteine and 2,2'-dipyridyl significantly prevented free radical generation on subsequent incubation with DMNA, whereas preincubation with apocynin and dimethyl sulfoxide had no effect. These results suggest that DMNA is metabolized to reactive free radicals capable of generating protein radicals which may play a critical role in DMNA toxicity. We propose that the captodative effect, the combined action of the electron-releasing dimethylamine substituent, and the electron-withdrawing nitroso substituent, leads to a thermodynamically stabilized radical, facilitating enhanced protein radical formation by DMNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielik, T.; Karovic, M.; Trska, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radical trachelectomy is a fertility-sparing procedure with the aim to provide adequate oncological safety to patients with cervical cancer while preserving their fertility. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate, in a series of 3 patients, the feasibility, morbidity, and safety of laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy for early cervical cancer. Patients and Methods: Three non consecutive patients with FIGO stage IA1 and IB1 cervical cancer was evaluated in a period of years 2008 - 2011. The patients underwent a laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy and radical parametrectomy class II procedure according to the Piver classification. The section of vaginal cuff, trachelectomy, permanent cerclage and isthmo-vaginal anastomosis ware realised by vaginal approach. Results: The median operative time, the median blood loss and the mean number of resected pelvic nodes was comparable with published data. Major intraoperative complications did not occur and no patient required a blood transfusion. The median follow-up time was 33 (38-59) months. One vaginal recurrence occurred in 7 months after primary surgery. The patient was underwent a radicalisation procedure and adjuvant oncologic therapy and now is free of disease. Conclusions: Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy (LAVRT)may be an alternative in fertility-preserving surgery for early cervical cancer. The procedure offers patients potential benefits of minimally invasive surgery with adequate oncological safety, but it should be reserved for oncologic surgeons trained in advanced laparoscopic procedures. (author)

  18. Is Radical Innovation Management Misunderstood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Jimmi Normann; Gertsen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This paper poses a critical view on radical innovation (RI) management research and practice. The study investigates how expected RI performance influences firms’ under- standing of their RI capability. RI performance is often based on output measures such as market shares or fiscal return...

  19. Exploring the Theories of Radicalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskaliūnaitė Asta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available After the London bombings in July 2005, the concern of terrorism scholars and policy makers has turned to “home-grown” terrorism and potential for political violence from within the states. “Radicalization” became a new buzz word. This article follows a number of reviews of the literature on radicalization and offers another angle for looking at this research. First, it discusses the term “radicalization” and suggests the use of the following definition of radicalization as a process by which a person adopts belief systems which justify the use of violence to effect social change and comes to actively support as well as employ violent means for political purposes. Next, it proposes to see the theories of radicalization focusing on the individual and the two dimensions of his/her motivation: whether that motivation is internal or external and whether it is due to personal choice or either internal (due to some psychological traits or external compulsion. Though not all theories fall neatly within these categories, they make it possible to make comparisons of contributions from a variety of different areas thus reflecting on the interdisciplinary nature of the study of terrorism in general and radicalization as a part of it.

  20. Ultrasound-induced radical polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.W.A.; Kemmere, M.F.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2004-01-01

    Sonochemistry comprises all chemical effects that are induced by ultrasound. Most of these effects are caused by cavitations, ie, the collapse of microscopic bubbles in a liquid. The chemical effects of ultrasound include the formation of radicals and the enhancement of reaction rates at ambient

  1. Erectile function after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Frey, Anders; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    collected database and a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study in patients following radical prostatectomy. Erectile function was assessed with the IIEF-5 and the question "Is your erectile function as good as before the surgery (yes/no)". Patients were included if they were sexually active before...

  2. Impact of radical nephrectomy on renal functional outcome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H.H. Qureshi

    2015-10-09

    Oct 9, 2015 ... Abstract. Introduction: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 3% of all adult tumors. The mainstay of treatment of. RCCs in the past has remained radical nephrectomy (RN). Studies have found a higher cumulative incidence of development of chronic renal insufficiency in patients undergoing RN for RCC ...

  3. Apoptotic and free radical scavenging properties of the methanolic extract of Gentianella alborosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Nuria; Llinares, Francisco; Galán de Mera, Antonio; Oltra, Beatriz; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores

    2006-09-01

    Gentianella alborosea ("Hercampure") is a Peruvian species used in folk medicine for the treatment of a variety of health disorders. We tested the free radical scavenging (DPPH) and induction of apoptosis on a human uterus tumor cell line (HeLa) by its methanolic extract. The results showed a noticeable radical scavenging activity and a dose-dependent apoptotic effect.

  4. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one or...

  5. Effect of shear stress and free radicals induced by ultrasound on erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Kon, H.; Riesz, P.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of hemolysis induced by ultrasound. Ar or N2O gas was used to distinguish between cavitation with or without free radical formation (hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms). Free radical formation was examined by the method of spin trapping combined with ESR. After sonication of erythrocyte suspensions, several structural and functional parameters of the erythrocyte membrane--hemolysis, membrane fluidity, membrane permeability, and membrane deformability--were examined. Although free radical formation was observed in the erythrocyte suspensions sonicated in the presence of Ar, no free radical formation was observed in the presence of N2O. However, the hemolysis behavior induced by ultrasound was similar in the presence of Ar or N2O. The membrane fluidity, permeability, and deformability of the remaining unlysed erythrocytes after sonication in the presence of Ar or N2O were unchanged and identical to those of the control cells. On the other hand, after gamma irradiation (700 Gy), the hemolysis behavior was quite different from that after sonication, and the membrane properties were significantly changed. These results suggest that hemolysis induced by sonication was due to mechanical shearing stress arising from cavitation, and that the membrane integrity of the remaining erythrocytes after sonication was the same as that of control cells without sonication. The triatomic gas, N2O, may be useful for ultrasonically disrupting cells without accompanying free radical formation

  6. Spin-trapping and ESR studies of the direct photolysis of aromatic amino acids, dipeptides, tripeptides and polypeptides in aqueous solutions-II. Tyrosine and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lion, Y; Kuwabara, M; Riesz, P [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1982-01-01

    The UV-photolysis of peptides containing tyrosine (Tyr) was investigated in aqueous solutions at room temperature at 220 and 265 nm. The short-lived free radicals formed during photolysis were spin-trapped by t-nitrosobutane and identified by electron spin resonance. For N-acetyl-and N-formyl-L-Tyr and for peptides containing L-Tyr as the middle residue, photolysis at 265 nm under neutral conditions produced mainly spin-adducts due to the scission between the alpha carbon and the methylene group attached to the aromatic ring, while at 220 nm decarboxylation radicals were spin-trapped. Photolysis of di- and tripeptides at 275 nm in alkaline solutions predominantly generated deamination radicals. The radicals produced in the photolysis of the oxidized A chain of insulin were tentatively characterized by comparison with the results for di- and tripeptides.

  7. Scaling ion traps for quantum computing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a chipscale, multi-zone, surface electrode ion trap is reported. The modular design and fabrication techniques used are anticipated to advance scalability of ion trap quantum computing architectures...

  8. Servo control of an optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Kurt D; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2007-08-01

    A versatile optical trap has been constructed to control the position of trapped objects and ultimately to apply specified forces using feedback control. While the design, development, and use of optical traps has been extensive and feedback control has played a critical role in pushing the state of the art, few comprehensive examinations of feedback control of optical traps have been undertaken. Furthermore, as the requirements are pushed to ever smaller distances and forces, the performance of optical traps reaches limits. It is well understood that feedback control can result in both positive and negative effects in controlled systems. We give an analysis of the trapping limits as well as introducing an optical trap with a feedback control scheme that dramatically improves an optical trap's sensitivity at low frequencies.

  9. Novel Profluorescent Nitroxides for Monitoring Alkyl Radical Reactions During Radiation Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, G.

    2006-01-01

    Hindered amine stabilizers (HAS) are effective at retarding the photo-oxidative and high energy radiation degradation of PP and in certain circumstances, also thermo-oxidative degradation. The effectiveness of HAS as retarders of oxidation relies on the oxidation of the N-C bond by polymer hydroperoxide, ROOH, to form the nitroxyl group -NO which is the scavenger of polymer alkyl radicals, R. This reaction, which produces the alkoxy amine: -NO-R, must be competitive with the reaction of R with oxygen (which gives the chain-carrying peroxy radical, RO 2 ) if this stabilization mechanism is to be important in the inhibition of radiation-induced oxidative degradation of polyolefins by HAS. The rate of this reaction is high and in solution the rate coefficient is from 1 to 9x10 8 l mol - 1 s - 1. The efficient radical trapping by nitroxides has been widely employed in spin-trapping studies by electron spin resonance (esr) spectroscopy]. In addition to the hindered piperidine structure of commercial HAS, more rigid aromatic systems have been studied that are more stable to oxidative degradation and are more efficient at scavenging alkyl radicals. One such family is the iso-indoline nitroxide system, TMDBIO, shown below which, as it contains the phenanthrene fluorophore, is termed phenanthrene nitroxide. This nitroxide only becomes fluorescent when it reacts with alkyl radicals or is reduced and is termed profluorescent. TMDBIO has a vanishingly small fluorescence quantum yield (φ∼10 - 4) due to the enhanced intersystem crossing from the first excited singlet state to the ground state due to electron exchange interactions of the nitroxyl radical. When the nitroxide traps an alkyl radical, R, the resulting alkoxy amine is fluorescent (φ∼10 - 1) and the emission intensity is a measure of the number of reactions that have occurred. This property may be exploited by using quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy to follow the reaction of the nitroxide with alkyl radicals

  10. Temperature Activated Diffusion of Radicals through Ion Implanted Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakelin, Edgar A.; Davies, Michael J.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a promising technique for immobilizing biomolecules on the surface of polymers. Radicals generated in a subsurface layer by PIII treatment diffuse throughout the substrate, forming covalent bonds to molecules when they reach the surface. Understanding...... to the surface. The model makes useful predictions for the lifetime over which the surface is sufficiently active to covalently immobilize biomolecules and it can be used to determine radical fluence during biomolecule incubation for a range of storage and incubation temperatures so facilitating selection...

  11. O conceito de mal radical The concept of radical evil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Correia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A noção de mal radical aparece em Kant no contexto da discussão da religião nos limites da simples razão e busca dar conta da complexa relação entre o respeito pela lei moral e o amor-próprio na definição do móbil para a ação. Na busca por identificar o fundamento da propensão para o mal no homem, Kant se vê diante da dificuldade de ter de articular natureza e liberdade, e ainda que a noção de mal radical possa conservar algumas ambigüidades, permite conceber uma noção de responsabilidade compatível com uma inata propensão para o mal. Neste texto busco explicitar alguns passos fundamentais na construção do conceito por Kant.The concept of radical evil appears in Kant's theory when he discusses the religion in the limits of the mere reason and aims explain the complex relationship between respect for the moral law and the self-love, for establish the motive of the action. By aiming identify the basis of human inclination to evil, Kant is faced with the trouble of have to put nature and freedom in connection. Despite of the concept of radical evil retain some ambiguity, it allows conceive a notion of responsibility suitable to an inherent inclination to evil. In this paper is my purpose to explain some basic moments of Kantian formulation of that notion.

  12. Two-baffle trap for macroparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksyonov, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, properties of two-baffle macroparticle traps were investigated. These properties are needed for designing and optimization of vacuum arc plasma filters. The dependencies between trap geometry parameters and its ability to absorb macroparticles were found. Calculations made allow one to predict the behaviour of filtering abilities of separators containing such traps in their design. Recommendations regarding the use of two-baffle traps in filters of different builds are given

  13. Study of the mechanism of the gamma radiolysis of saccharose and its derivatives in aqueous or solid phase. Study by spin trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triolet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Powder or aqueous solutions of saccharose, deoxysaccharose and fructanes are irradiated. Radicals created during gamma radiolysis are converted into sugar-nitroxide radicals by reaction with 2 methyl 2 nitroso-propane. They are stable enough to be studied in solution by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) coupled or not to high performance liquid chromatography. EPR spectra obtained are simulated with the Voyons program for the determination of spectrocopic characteristics of trapped species. The study of glucosides, disaccharides and sugar labelled with carbon 13 allows to suggest a chemical structure for 5 out of the 7 species trapped during saccharose radiolysis. Influence of irradiation conditions is studied and mechanisms are proposed [fr

  14. Synoviocytes, not chondrocytes, release free radicals after cycles of anoxia/re-oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Nicole; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange L.; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe; Deby-Dupont, Ginette P.; Hoebeke, Maryse; Serteyn, Didier A.

    2005-01-01

    By oxymetry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we investigated the effects of repeated anoxia/re-oxygenation (A/R) periods on the respiration and production of free radicals by synoviocytes (rabbit HIG-82 cell line and primary equine synoviocytes) and equine articular chondrocytes. Three periods of 20 min anoxia followed by re-oxygenation were applied to 10 7 cells; O 2 consumption was measured before anoxia and after each re-oxygenation. After the last A/R, cellular free radical formation was investigated by EPR spectroscopy with spin trapping technique (n = 3 for each cell line). Both types of synoviocytes showed a high O 2 consumption, which was slowered after anoxia. By EPR with the spin trap POBN, we proved a free radical formation. Results were similar for equine and rabbit synoviocytes. For chondrocytes, we observed a low O 2 consumption, unchanged by anoxia, and no free radical production. These observations suggest an oxidant activity of synoviocytes, potentially important for the onset of osteoarthritis

  15. Increased cerebral output of free radicals during hypoxia: implications for acute mountain sickness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Taudorf, Sarah; Berg, Ronan M G

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether hypoxia causes free radical-mediated disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and impaired cerebral oxidative metabolism and whether this has any bearing on neurological symptoms ascribed to acute mountain sickness (AMS). Ten men provided internal jugular vein...... paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and ozone-based chemiluminescence were employed for direct detection of spin-trapped free radicals and nitric oxide metabolites. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100beta, and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were determined by ELISA. Hypoxia increased the arterio-jugular venous...... concentration difference (a-v(D)) and net cerebral output of lipid-derived alkoxyl-alkyl free radicals and lipid hydroperoxides (P

  16. Synthesis and Photochemistry of 1-Iodocyclohexene:Influence of Ultrasound on Ionic vs. Radical Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Blasko

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous application of UV light and ultrasonic irradiation to a reaction mixture containing 1-iodocyclohexene is reported. The irradiation of 1-iodocyclohexene in methanol was carried out with or without addition of zinc. The effect of ultrasound or mechanical stirring on this solid-liquid system was also compared. The irradiation of 1-iodocyclohexene in methanol in the presence of zinc increases the yield of the nucleophilic trapping product, compared with the yield after irradiation in the absence of zinc. The photodegradation of 1-iodocyclohexene was slightly accelerated after addition of zinc. A rapid formation of radical product was accompanied by substantial decrease of 1-iodocyclohexene after application of ultrasound and irradiation without the zinc. The ultrasound significantly affects the photobehaviour of this reaction, predominantly its radical route. The joint application of ultrasound and zinc contributes positively to the production of radical and ionic products. The sonochemical stirring is more effective than mechanical stirring.

  17. Molecular design of high performance fused heteroacene radical cations: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Shigekazu; Matsushige, Kazumi; Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out for neutral and radical cation of fused furan oligomer, denoted by F(n) where n means number of furan rings in the oligomer, to elucidate the electronic structures at ground and low-lying excited states. A polymer of fused furan was also investigated using one-dimensional periodic boundary condition (PBC) for comparison. It was found that the reorganization energy of radical cation of F(n) from vertical hole trapping point to its relaxed structure is significantly small. Also, the reorganization energy decreased gradually with increasing n, indicating that F(n) has an effective hole transport property. It was found that the cation radical of F(n) has a low energy band at near IR region, which is strongly correlated to hole conductivity. The relation between the electronic states and hole conductivity was discussed on the basis of theoretical calculations

  18. Temperature Effects on Free Radicals in Gamma-sterilized Beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, S. I.; Jahan, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    Gamma irradiation has become the method of choice for sterilizing frozen meat and their products to reduce levels of food-borne pathogens and to extend shelf life. In this report we have employed ESR technique for detection of free radicals in sterilized and non-sterilized dry beef without bone. We have also determined the heating effects on free radicals at temperatures 176^°C and 250^°C. Meat samples were dried in a food dehydrator at 60^°C and were packaged in dry N_2. They were then sterilized by γ-irradiation (2.5 MRad), ground into powder, and placed in ESR sample tubes. Non-sterilized powder samples were used as control. While all powder samples, sterilized or not, produced a broad single line in the ESR spectra with (Δ H_pp ~ 9 G) and g = 2.013, the radical concentration in the sterilized samples increased by a factor of five. Heat treatment at 176^°C produced similar radicals. But, when samples were heated 250^°C different radical species were formed which are characterized by narrow width (Δ H_pp ~ 6 G) and lower g-value (g =2.010). In contrast with previous work, where free radicals in chicken bones were reduced by heating [1], we observed an increase in concentration. Results of structural analyses of the radicals will be presented. Ref.[1]: Radiat. Phys. Chem., 49, 477-481, 1997. Work supported by Grants from the University of Memphis

  19. EPR detection of hydroxyl radical generation and its interaction with antioxidant system in Carassius auratus exposed to pentachlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yi [Key Laboratory of Pollution Processes and Environmental Criteria (Nankai University), Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang Xiaorong, E-mail: yiyluo@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ji Liangliang; Su Yan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-11-15

    In the present study, direct evidence of hydroxyl radical production in livers of Carassius auratus exposed to pentachlorophenol (PCP) was provided using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with spin-trapping. A dose-effect relationship was obtained between hydroxyl radical intensities and PCP exposure. It was observed that hydroxyl radical was significantly induced by 0.001 mg l{sup -1} (below the criteria for Chinese fishery water quality) of PCP exposure. A strong positive correlation (r = 0.9581, p < 0.001) was observed between PCP liver concentrations and hydroxyl radical intensities within 7 d of PCP exposure, which suggests that hydroxyl radical are mainly produced from PCP itself. However, no correlation was observed between PCP liver concentrations and hydroxyl radical intensities after 7 d, and a higher intensity of hydroxyl radical could still be observed when the PCP liver concentrations decreased to a lower level, which suggests that other mechanisms may possibly contribute to hydroxyl radical production after 7 d. The glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio decreased below that of the control level during the entire period of PCP exposure (0.05 mg l{sup -1}), which suggested oxidative stress occurred.

  20. Free radicals in chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, M R

    1991-12-15

    During the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of cancer-causing agents, mechanisms of cancer formation and the behavior of cancer cells. Cancer is characterized primarily by an increase in the number of abnormal cells derived from a given normal tissue, invasion of adjacent tissues by these abnormal cells, and lymphatic or blood-borne spread of malignant cells to regional lymph nodes and to distant sites (metastasis). It has been estimated that about 75-80% of all human cancers are environmentally induced, 30-40% of them by diet. Only a small minority, possibly no more than 2% of all cases, result purely from inherent genetic changes. Several lines of evidence confirm that the fundamental molecular event or events that cause a cell to become malignant occur at the level of the DNA and a variety of studies indicate that the critical molecular event in chemical carcinogenesis is the interaction of the chemical agent with DNA. The demonstration that DNA isolated from tumor cells can transfect normal cells and render them neoplastic provides direct proof that an alteration of the DNA is responsible for cancer. The transforming genes, or oncogenes, have been identified by restriction endonuclease mapping. One of the characteristics of tumor cells generated by transformation with viruses, chemicals, or radiation is their reduced requirement for serum growth factors. A critical significance of electrophilic metabolites of carcinogenes in chemical carcinogenesis has been demonstrated. A number of "proximate" and "ultimate" metabolites, especially those of aromatic amines, were described. The "ultimate" forms of carcinogens actually interact with cellular constituents to cause neoplastic transformation and are the final metabolic products in most pathways. Recent evidence indicates that free radical derivatives of chemical carcinogens may be produced both metabolically and nonenzymatically during their metabolism. Free radicals carry no

  1. Muonium radicals in benzene-styrene mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, B.W.; Stadlbauer, J.W.; Walker, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Muonium radicals were observed through their μ + SR precession frequencies in high transverse magnetic fields in pure benzene, pure styrene and their mixtures, all as liquids at room temperature. In benzene-styrene mixtures, the radicals obtained in each pure liquid are both present, so no slow (10 -9 -10 -5 s) intermolecular exchange occurs; but strong selectivity was found with the formation of the radical from styrene being about eight-times more probable than the radical from benzene. (Auth.)

  2. Cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Morigi, Giovanna; Pinkse, Pepijn Willemszoon Harry; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules is theoretically investigated for the case in which the infrared transition between two rovibrational states is used as a cycling transition. The molecules are assumed to be trapped either by a radiofrequency or optical trapping

  3. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrester, Tavis; O'Brien, Tim; Fegraus, Eric; Jansen, P.A.; Palmer, Jonathan; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge; Stern, Beth; McShea, William

    2016-01-01

    Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an

  4. Processing of free radical damaged DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.

    2003-01-01

    while cells overexpressing one of the oxidative DNA glycosylases are radiosensitive. Human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells overexpressing the oxidative DNA glycosylases are also radiosensitive. Furthermore, both radioresistance and radiosensitivity correlated with the enzymatic production of double strand breaks produced after irradiation during attempted repair. Because these data indicated the potential harmful effects of the ordinarily beneficial presence of the oxidative DNA glycosylases after treatment of cells with ionizing radiation, it was of interest to see if the base excision repair enzymes were induced by ionizing radiation. We found that ionizing radiation does not induce the oxidative DNA glycosylases in either bacterial or in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells. Interestingly, during this past year, three novel DNA glycosylases that recognize free radical-damaged bases have been identified. The characterization of these activities will also be discussed

  5. Influence of trap location on the efficiency of trapping in dendrimers and regular hyperbranched polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2013-03-07

    The trapping process in polymer systems constitutes a fundamental mechanism for various other dynamical processes taking place in these systems. In this paper, we study the trapping problem in two representative polymer networks, Cayley trees and Vicsek fractals, which separately model dendrimers and regular hyperbranched polymers. Our goal is to explore the impact of trap location on the efficiency of trapping in these two important polymer systems, with the efficiency being measured by the average trapping time (ATT) that is the average of source-to-trap mean first-passage time over every staring point in the whole networks. For Cayley trees, we derive an exact analytic formula for the ATT to an arbitrary trap node, based on which we further obtain the explicit expression of ATT for the case that the trap is uniformly distributed. For Vicsek fractals, we provide the closed-form solution for ATT to a peripheral node farthest from the central node, as well as the numerical solutions for the case when the trap is placed on other nodes. Moreover, we derive the exact formula for the ATT corresponding to the trapping problem when the trap has a uniform distribution over all nodes. Our results show that the influence of trap location on the trapping efficiency is completely different for the two polymer networks. In Cayley trees, the leading scaling of ATT increases with the shortest distance between the trap and the central node, implying that trap's position has an essential impact on the trapping efficiency; while in Vicsek fractals, the effect of location of the trap is negligible, since the dominant behavior of ATT is identical, respective of the location where the trap is placed. We also present that for all cases of trapping problems being studied, the trapping process is more efficient in Cayley trees than in Vicsek fractals. We demonstrate that all differences related to trapping in the two polymer systems are rooted in their underlying topological structures.

  6. Ultracold molecules for the masses: Evaporative cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, B. K.

    While cold molecule experiments are rapidly moving towards their promised benefits of precision spectroscopy, controllable chemistry, and novel condensed phases, heretofore the field has been greatly limited by a lack of methods to cool and compress chemically diverse species to temperatures below ten millikelvin. While in atomic physics these needs are fulfilled by laser cooling, magneto-optical trapping, and evaporative cooling, until now none of these techniques have been applicable to molecules. In this thesis, two major breakthroughs are reported. The first is the observation of evaporative cooling in magnetically trapped hydroxyl (OH) radicals, which potentially opens a path all the way to Bose-Einstein condensation of dipolar radicals, as well as allowing cold- and ultracold-chemistry studies of fundamental reaction mechanisms. Through the combination of an extremely high gradient magnetic quadrupole trap and the use of the OH Λ-doublet transition to enable highly selective forced evaporation, cooling by an order of magnitude in temperature was achieved and yielded a final temperature no higher than 5mK. The second breakthrough is the successful application of laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping to molecules. Motivated by a proposal in this thesis, laser cooling of molecules is now known to be technically feasible in a select but substantial pool of diatomic molecules. The demonstration of not only Doppler cooling but also two-dimensional magneto-optical trapping in yttrium (II) oxide, YO, is expected to enable rapid growth in the availability of ultracold molecules—just as the invention of the atomic magneto-optical trap stimulated atomic physics twenty-five years ago.

  7. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyr, Douglas Robert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The photodissociation of free radicals is studied in order to characterize the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a novel method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with a highly complementary form of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopy of transitions to dissociative states is determined by monitoring the total photofragment yield as a function of dissociation photon energy. Branching ratios to various product channels, internal energy distributions of the fragments, bond dissociation energies, and the translational energy-dependent photofragment recoil angular distributions are then determined at selected excitation energies. A detailed picture of the dissociation dynamics can then be formulated, allowing insight concerning the interactions of potential energy surfaces involved in the dissociation. After an introduction to the concepts and techniques mentioned above, the experimental apparatus used in these experiments is described in detail. The basis and methods used in the treatment of data, especially in the dissociation dynamics experiments, are then put forward.

  8. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyr, D.R.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1993-11-01

    The photodissociation of free radicals is studied in order to characterize the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a novel method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with a highly complementary form of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopy of transitions to dissociative states is determined by monitoring the total photofragment yield as a function of dissociation photon energy. Branching ratios to various product channels, internal energy distributions of the fragments, bond dissociation energies, and the translational energy-dependent photofragment recoil angular distributions are then determined at selected excitation energies. A detailed picture of the dissociation dynamics can then be formulated, allowing insight concerning the interactions of potential energy surfaces involved in the dissociation. After an introduction to the concepts and techniques mentioned above, the experimental apparatus used in these experiments is described in detail. The basis and methods used in the treatment of data, especially in the dissociation dynamics experiments, are then put forward

  9. Free radicals in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonet, B.

    1993-01-01

    Free radicals appear in the cells as the result of exogenic factors (ionizing radiation, UV) or reactions naturally occurring in the cell. Free radical reactions may cause destruction of macromolecules (DNA, lipids, proteins). Free radical pathology is important in many diseases and aging processes in organisms

  10. Radical carbonylations using a continuous microflow system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide Fukuyama

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Radical-based carbonylation reactions of alkyl halides were conducted in a microflow reactor under pressurized carbon monoxide gas. Good to excellent yields of carbonylated products were obtained via radical formylation, carbonylative cyclization and three-component coupling reactions, using tributyltin hydride or TTMSS as a radical mediator.

  11. Free radicals in dicarboxylic acids: an e.s.r. study of radical conversions in γ-irradiated single crystals of glutaric acid and glutaric-2,2,4,4-d4 acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergene, R.; Minegishi, A.; Riesz, P.

    1980-01-01

    The γ-radiation-induced free radicals in single crystals of glutaric acid and glutaric-2,2,4,4-d 4 acid were studied in the temperature range 77-300 K by e.s.r. techniques. At 77 K the decarboxylation radical and the anion are stabilized. At higher temperatures the decarboxylation radical is found to be converted into a hydrogen abstraction radical with an activation energy of 6.3 +- 0.5 kcal/mole for the non-deuterated crystal. This radical is stable at room temperature. The anion seems to be converted to a unidentified intermediate radical which in turn is converted to the σ-acyl radical. An analysis of the g-value anisotropy and of the 13 C hyperfine splitting variation for this radical in the deuterated crystal is consistent with the assigned radical structure. By heat treatment the σ-acyl radical is converted to another form of the hydrogen abstraction radical with an activation energy of 9.6 +- 0.6 kcal/mole in the deuterated crystal. U.V.-light (lambda= 254 nm) transforms one of the room temperature radicals into the other. (author)

  12. Excimer laser corneal surgery and free oxygen radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Bilgihan, A; Akata, F; Hasanreisoğlu, B; Türközkan, N

    1996-01-01

    Corneal photoablation with 193 nm argon fluoride excimer laser is a new technique for the treatment of refractive errors and for removing corneal opacities and irregularities. Ultraviolet radiation and thermal injury induce free radical formation in the tissues. The aim of this study was to confirm the production of free radicals by excimer laser photoablation in rabbits. The thermal changes of the posterior corneal surface were recorded during excimer laser photoablation. The lipid peroxide (LPO) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of aqueous humour were measured after excimer laser keratectomy. The aqueous LPO levels were not changed after excimer laser ablation, but both the thermal increase in the cornea during the photoablation and the decreased aqueous SOD activities suggest that free radicals are formed in the cornea during excimer laser keratectomy, and that they may be responsible for some of the complications of excimer laser corneal surgery.

  13. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF ENDOSCOPIC EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL INTRAFASCIAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endoscopic radical prostatectomy is a highly effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Intrafascial prostate dissection ensures early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. This article sums up our own experience of performing intrafascial endoscopic prostatectomy.Materials and methods. 25 patients have undergone this procedure. 12 months after surgery 88.2 % of the patients were fully continent, 11.7 % had symptoms of minimal stress urinary incontinence. We encountered no cases of positive surgical margins and one case of bio-chemical recurrence of the disease.Conclusion. Oncologically, intrafascial endoscopic radical prostatectomy is as effective as other modifications of radical prostatectomy and has the benefits of early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. 

  14. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TRAPS ON CAPTURES OF ADULT CORN ROOTWORM BEETLES (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte IN EAST SLAVONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ivezić

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1995 the corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte was detected for the first time in east Slavonia, Croatia. Its expansion to the west part has been very fast and from year to year populations of the pest are higher, especially when corn is planted after corn. The aim of this investigation was to find the best trap for monitoring Diabrotica. The studies were conducted by using three types of traps: the USA Trece lure trap, Multigard yellow sticky trap and Hungarian pheromone trap. The treatments were replicated four times in a maize field located in the east of Croatia, very near to the Yugoslavia border. The traps were placed in the field on the 23rd of June and the experiment continued until the 15th of September. Pheromone and Multigard sticky traps were replaced with new ones each month. Traps were positioned 60 m apart within a row and 70 m apart across maize rows. Silking occurred from 30 June to 8 August (exposed silk thoroughly brown and dry. This year was extremely dry, and the first beetles were noticed on the 15th of June. It was 20 days earlier than in 1999. Adult rootworm beetles were removed from the traps once weekly. Pheromone traps captured the most beetles (2263, Multigard sticky traps caught the second most (214 and lure traps the fewest (182 for the whole period. After the replacement of pheromone and Multigard traps, the capture of beetles increased. Of the total number of beetles caught, 85.10% was caught by the pheromone traps, 8.05% by the Multigard sticky traps and 6.85% by the lure traps. Due to this year’s dryness (50% less rainfall than the 20 year average, the investigation should be continued in the future to get more precise results.

  15. Fundamental physics in particle traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quint, Wolfgang; Vogel, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The individual topics are covered by leading experts in the respective fields of research. Provides readers with present theory and experiments in this field. A useful reference for researchers. This volume provides detailed insight into the field of precision spectroscopy and fundamental physics with particles confined in traps. It comprises experiments with electrons and positrons, protons and antiprotons, antimatter and highly charged ions, together with corresponding theoretical background. Such investigations represent stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics and the Standard model, antiparticle and antimatter research, test of fundamental symmetries, constants, and their possible variations with time and space. They are key to various aspects within metrology such as mass measurements and time standards, as well as promising to further developments in quantum information processing. The reader obtains a valuable source of information suited for beginners and experts with an interest in fundamental studies using particle traps.

  16. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, Claudio Lenz

    1997-01-01

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 10 12 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 10 18 . While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen

  17. Vapor trap for liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T

    1968-05-22

    In a pipe system which transfers liquid metal, inert gas (cover gas) is packed above the surface of the liquid metal to prevent oxidization of the liquid. If the metal vapor is contained in such cover gas, the circulating system of the cover gas is blocked due to condensation of liquid metal inside the system. The present invention relates to an improvement in vapor trap to remove the metal vapor from the cover gas. The trap consists of a cylindrical outer body, an inlet nozzle which is deeply inserted inside the outer body and has a number of holes to inject the cove gas into the body, metal mesh or steel wool which covers the exterior of the nozzle and on which the condensation of the metal gas takes place, and a heater wire hich is wound around the nozzle to prevent condensation of the metal vapor at the inner peripheral side of the mesh.

  18. Optical trapping for analytical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C; Dholakia, Kishan

    2012-02-01

    We describe the exciting advances of using optical trapping in the field of analytical biotechnology. This technique has opened up opportunities to manipulate biological particles at the single cell or even at subcellular levels which has allowed an insight into the physical and chemical mechanisms of many biological processes. The ability of this technique to manipulate microparticles and measure pico-Newton forces has found several applications such as understanding the dynamics of biological macromolecules, cell-cell interactions and the micro-rheology of both cells and fluids. Furthermore we may probe and analyse the biological world when combining trapping with analytical techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms of free radical-induced damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Jaruga, Pawel

    2012-04-01

    Endogenous and exogenous sources cause free radical-induced DNA damage in living organisms by a variety of mechanisms. The highly reactive hydroxyl radical reacts with the heterocyclic DNA bases and the sugar moiety near or at diffusion-controlled rates. Hydrated electron and H atom also add to the heterocyclic bases. These reactions lead to adduct radicals, further reactions of which yield numerous products. These include DNA base and sugar products, single- and double-strand breaks, 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides, tandem lesions, clustered sites and DNA-protein cross-links. Reaction conditions and the presence or absence of oxygen profoundly affect the types and yields of the products. There is mounting evidence for an important role of free radical-induced DNA damage in the etiology of numerous diseases including cancer. Further understanding of mechanisms of free radical-induced DNA damage, and cellular repair and biological consequences of DNA damage products will be of outmost importance for disease prevention and treatment.

  20. Effect of Free Radicals & Antioxidants on Oxidative Stress: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Shinde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently free radicals have attracted tremendous importance in the field of medicine including dentistry and molecular biology. Free radicals can be either harmful or helpful to the body. When there is an imbalance between formation and removal of free radicals then a condition called as oxidative stress is developed in body. To counteract these free radicals body has protective antioxidant mechanisms which have abilities to lower incidence of various human morbidities and mortalities. Many research groups in the past have tried to study and confirm oxidative stress. Many authors also have studied role of antioxidants in reducing oxidative stress. They have come across with controversial results and furthermore it is not yet fully confirmed whether oxidative stress increases the need for dietary antioxidants. Recently, an association between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has received considerable attention. Various forms of antioxidants have been introduced as an approach to fight dental diseases and improve general gingival health. The implication of oxidative stress in the etiology of many chronic and degenerative diseases suggests that antioxidant therapy represents a promising avenue for treatment. This study was conducted with the objective of reviewing articles relating to this subject. A Pub Med search of all articles containing key words free radicals, oxidative stress, and antioxidants was done. A review of these articles was undertaken.