WorldWideScience

Sample records for radical production based

  1. Radical production in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Akabani, G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes our effort to develop a metric for radiation exposure that is more fundamental than adsorbed dose and upon which a metric for exposure to chemicals could be based. This metric is based on the production of radicals by the two agents. Radicals produced by radiation in biological systems commonly assumed to be the same as those produced in water despite the presence of a variety of complex molecules. This may explain why the extensive efforts to describe the relationship between energy deposition (track structure) and molecular damage to DNA, based on the spectrum of radicals produced, have not been successful in explaining simple biological effects such as cell killing. Current models assume that DNA and its basic elements are immersed in water-like media and only model the production and diffusion of water-based radicals and their interaction with DNA structures; these models lack the cross sections associated with each macro-component of DNA and only treat water-based radicals. It has been found that such models are not realistic because DNA is not immersed in pure water. A computer code capable of simulating electron tracks, low-energy electrons, energy deposition in small molecules, and radical production and diffusion in water like media has been developed. This code is still in at a primitive stage and development is continuing. It is being used to study radical production by radiation, and radical diffusion and interactions in simple molecular systems following their production. We are extending the code to radical production by chemicals to complement our PBPK modeling efforts. It therefore has been developed primarily for use with radionuclides that are in biological materials, and not for radiation fields

  2. Distribution of free radical products among the bases of x-irradiated DNA model systems: an ESR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalletta, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Exposure of solid state DNA to ionizing radiation results in an ESR spectrum that has been attributed to a nonstoichiometric distribution of free radicals among the bases. At low temperatures radical cations appear to be stabilized on the purines while radical anions are stabilized on the pyrimidines. This distribution could arise from at least two different mechanisms. The first, charge transfer, involves the transfer of electrons and/or holes between stacked bases. In the second, saturation asymmetry, the free radical distribution arises from differences in the dose saturation characteristics of individual bases. The present study addresses the relative importance of charge transfer versus saturation asymmetry in the production of these population differences. Radicals formed by dissolving irradiated polycrystalline pyrimidines in aqueous solutions containing NtB or PBN spin traps were analyzed using ESR. The relative importance of the two free radical production and distribution mechanisms was assessed using DNA model systems. Saturation asymmetry plays a significant role in determining the free radical population while charge transfer was unambiguously observed in only one, the complex of dAMP and TMP. The results demonstrate that any quantitative analysis of charge transfer must take saturation asymmetry into account

  3. Information bias condemning radical food innovators? The case of insect-based products in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascucci, S.; Magistris, de T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we analyze whether information bias is affecting consumers' WTP for radical food innovations. We collect data in the Netherlands on consumers' WTP for insect-based products. We used product attributes directly affected by information and EU legislation such as the visualization of

  4. Resveratrol products resulting by free radical attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Yvonne; Quint, R.M. [Section Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, UZAII, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Getoff, Nikola [Section Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, UZAII, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: nikola.getoff@univie.ac.at

    2008-06-15

    Trans-resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene; RES), which is contained in red wine and many plants, is one of the most relevant and extensively investigated stilbenes with a broad spectrum of biological activities. Among other duties, RES has been reported to have anti-carcinogenetic activities, which could be attributed to its antioxidant properties. The degradation of RES was studied under various conditions. The products (aldehydes, carboxylic acids, etc.) generated from RES by the attack of free radicals were registered as a function of the radical concentration (absorbed radiation dose). Based on the obtained data it appears that the OH radicals are initiating the rather complicated process, which involves of the numerous consecutive reactions. A possible starting reaction mechanism is presented.

  5. Hydrogen Radicals, Nitrogen Radicals, and the Production of O3 in the Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Hanisco, T. F.; Jaegle, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Hintsa, E. J.; Lanzendorf, E. J.; Anderson, J. G.; Gao, R.-S.; Keim, E. R.; Donnelly, S. G.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The concentrations of the hydrogen radicals OH and HO2 in the middle and upper troposphere were measured simultaneously with those of NO, O3, CO, H2O, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and with the ultraviolet and visible radiation field. The data allow a direct examination of the processes that produce O3, in this region of the atmosphere. Comparison of the measured concentrations of OH and HO2 with calculations based on their production from water vapor, ozone, and methane demonstrate that these sources are insufficient to explain the observed radical concentrations in the upper troposphere. The photolysis of carbonyl and peroxide compounds transported to this region from the lower troposphere may provide the source of HO(x) required to sustain the measured abundances of these radical species. The mechanism by which NO affects the production of 03 is also illustrated by the measurements. In the upper tropospheric air masses sampled, the production rate for ozone (determined from the measured concentrations of HO2 and NO) is calculated to be about 1 part per billion by volume each day.This production rate is faster than previously thought and implies that anthropogenic activities that add NO to the upper troposphere, such as biomass burning and aviation, will lead to production of more 03 than expected.

  6. Sulfate radical-based water treatment in presence of chloride: formation of chlorate, inter-conversion of sulfate radicals into hydroxyl radicals and influence of bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutze, Holger V; Kerlin, Nils; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2015-04-01

    Sulfate radical (SO4(-)) based oxidation is discussed as a potential water treatment option and is already used in ground water remediation. However, the complex SO4(-) chemistry in various matrices is poorly understood. In that regard, the fast reaction of SO4(-) with Cl(-) is of high importance since Cl(-) belongs to the main constituents in aqueous environments. This reaction yields chlorine atoms (Cl) as primary products. Cl initiate a cascade of subsequent reactions with a pH dependent product pattern. At low pH ( 5 Cl mainly react with water yielding hydroxyl radicals. Thus, at moderate Cl(-) concentrations (mM range) the SO4(-)-based process may be converted into a conventional (hydroxyl radical -based) advanced oxidation process. The conversion of SO4(-) into OH, however, is interrupted in presence of bicarbonate by scavenging of Cl. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Radical production in the radiolysis of benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaVerne, J.A.; Araos, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Benzene is the prototypical aromatic compound and yet the radiation chemistry of the radicals formed in its radiolysis is not well understood. Temporal information on the yield of phenyl radical, the major radical produced in the radiolysis, is important for understanding the radiation chemistry of many other types of aromatic compounds including some polymers. The effects of track structure on the production of phenyl radicals have been examined using iodine-scavenging techniques. The variation of the yields of iodobenzene and the other major molecular products such as biphenyl as a function of iodine concentration gives a good indication of the competition kinetics occurring in particle tracks. Experimental results of the scavenger experiments will be shown and their implications in the radiolysis of condensed hydrocarbons will be discussed

  8. Aerosol Fragmentation Driven by Coupling of Acid-Base and Free-Radical Chemistry in the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Aqueous Citric Acid by OH Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Matthew J; Wiegel, Aaron A; Wilson, Kevin R; Houle, Frances A

    2017-08-10

    A key uncertainty in the heterogeneous oxidation of carboxylic acids by hydroxyl radicals (OH) in aqueous-phase aerosol is how the free-radical reaction pathways might be altered by acid-base chemistry. In particular, if acid-base reactions occur concurrently with acyloxy radical formation and unimolecular decomposition of alkoxy radicals, there is a possibility that differences in reaction pathways impact the partitioning of organic carbon between the gas and aqueous phases. To examine these questions, a kinetic model is developed for the OH-initiated oxidation of citric acid aerosol at high relative humidity. The reaction scheme, containing both free-radical and acid-base elementary reaction steps with physically validated rate coefficients, accurately predicts the experimentally observed molecular composition, particle size, and average elemental composition of the aerosol upon oxidation. The difference between the two reaction channels centers on the reactivity of carboxylic acid groups. Free-radical reactions mainly add functional groups to the carbon skeleton of neutral citric acid, because carboxylic acid moieties deactivate the unimolecular fragmentation of alkoxy radicals. In contrast, the conjugate carboxylate groups originating from acid-base equilibria activate both acyloxy radical formation and carbon-carbon bond scission of alkoxy radicals, leading to the formation of low molecular weight, highly oxidized products such as oxalic and mesoxalic acid. Subsequent hydration of carbonyl groups in the oxidized products increases the aerosol hygroscopicity and accelerates the substantial water uptake and volume growth that accompany oxidation. These results frame the oxidative lifecycle of atmospheric aerosol: it is governed by feedbacks between reactions that first increase the particle oxidation state, then eventually promote water uptake and acid-base chemistry. When coupled to free-radical reactions, acid-base channels lead to formation of low molecular

  9. Measurement of J/{psi} production in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R.; Amoraal, J.; Bauer, T.; Beuzekom, M. van; Bos, E.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Coco, V.; Eijk, D. van; Farinelli, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Leerdam, J. van; Merk, M.; Mous, I.; Oggero, S.; Pellegrino, A.; Pree, T. du; Serra, N.; Storaci, B.; Terrier, H.; Tuning, N.; Wiggers, L.; Ybeles Smit, G. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Adeva, B.; Cartelle, P.A.; Carson, L.; Cid Vidal, X.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Albor, V.F.; Fungueirino Pazos, J.L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Morata, J.A.H.; Iglesias Escudero, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Trigo, E.P.; Plo Casasus, M.; Cobo, C.R.; Perez, P.R.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Seco, M.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Visniakov, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N.H.; Coombes, M.; Hampson, T.; Imong, J.; Naik, P.; Rademacker, J.H.; Solomin, A.; Velthuis, J.J.; Voong, D. [University of Bristol, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol (United Kingdom); Adrover, C.; Aslanides, E.; Cogan, J.; Khanji, B.; Le Gac, R.; Leroy, O.; Mancinelli, G.; Maurice, E.; Sapunov, M.; Serrano, J.; Tsaregorodtsev, A. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM, Marseille (France); Affolder, A.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Brown, H.; Casse, G.; Donleavy, S.; Hennessy, K.; Hicks, E.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Liles, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Patel, G.D.; Rinnert, K.; Shears, T. [University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Lab., Liverpool (United Kingdom); Ajaltouni, Z.; Deschamps, O.; Henrard, P.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Lefevre, R.; Gioi, L. Li; Monteil, S.; Niess, V.; Perret, P.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Sobczak, K. [Univ. Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC, Clermont Univ., Clermont-Ferrand (France); Albrecht, J.; Barschel, C.; Buytaert, J.; Caicedo Carvajal, J.M.; Cattaneo, M.; Charpentier, P.; Clemencic, M.; Closier, J.; Collins, P.; Corti, G.; D' Ambrosio, C.; Dijkstra, H.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Garnier, J.C. [and others

    2011-05-15

    The production of J/{psi} mesons in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 {proportional_to} TeV is studied with the LHCb detector at the LHC. The differential cross-section for prompt J/{psi} production is measured as a function of the J/{psi} transverse momentum p{sub T} and rapidity y in the fiducial region p{sub T} in[0;14]{proportional_to}GeV mskip-2{mu} mskip-1mu c and y element of [2.0;4.5]. The differential cross-section and fraction of J/{psi} from b-hadron decays are also measured in the same p{sub T} and y ranges. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.2 pb{sup -1}. The measured cross-sections integrated over the fiducial region are for prompt J/{psi} production and for J/{psi} from b-hadron decays, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The prompt J/{psi} production cross-section is obtained assuming no J/{psi} polarisation and the third error indicates the acceptance uncertainty due to this assumption. (orig.)

  10. Modification of DNA bases in mammalian chromatin by radiation-generated free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, E.; Rao, G.; Nackerdien, Z.; Dizdaroglu, M.

    1990-01-01

    Modification of DNA bases in mammalian chromatin in aqueous suspension by ionizing radiation generated free radicals was investigated. Argon, air, N2O, and N2O/O2 were used for saturation of the aqueous system in order to provide different radical environments. Radiation doses ranging from 20 to 200 Gy (J.kg-1) were used. Thirteen products resulting from radical interactions with pyrimidines and purines in chromatin were identified and quantitated by using the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring after acidic hydrolysis and trimethylsilylation of chromatin. The methodology used permitted analysis of the modified bases directly in chromatin without the necessity of isolation of DNA from chromatin first. The results indicate that the radical environment provided by the presence of different gases in the system had a substantial effect on the types of products and their quantities. Some products were produced only in the presence of oxygen, whereas other products were detected only in the absence of oxygen. Products produced under all four gaseous conditions were also observed. Generally, the presence of oxygen in the system increased the yields of the products with the exception of formamidopyrimidines. Superoxide radical formed in the presence of air, and to a lesser extent in the presence of N2O/O2, had no effect on product formation. The presence of oxygen dramatically increased the yields of 8-hydroxypurines, whereas the yields of formamidopyrimidines were not affected by oxygen, although these products result from respective oxidation and reduction of the same hydroxyl-adduct radicals of purines. The yields of the products were much lower than those observed previously with DNA

  11. Glutathione as a radical scavenger and the biological consequences of thiyl radical production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterbourn, C.C.

    1996-01-01

    A large number of compounds that have toxic effects can be metabolised to free radicals and secondary reactive oxygen species. These may be directly damaging or affect cell function by altering regulatory mechanisms through changing redox status. Protection is provided by an integrated system of antioxidant defenses. This includes reduced glutathione (GSH), one of the functions of which is as a free radical scavenger. For GSH to be an effective radical scavenging antioxidant, therefore, it must act in concert with superoxide dismutase to remove the superoxide so generated. Superoxide is produced in a variety of metabolic processes. It is also a secondary product of radicals reacting with oxygen either directly or through GSH. The biological reactivity of superoxide has been the subject of much debate ever since the discovery of superoxide dismutase in 1968. It has more recently become apparent that its rapid reaction with nitric oxide to give peroxynitrite, and its ability to reversibly oxidise and inactivate iron sulphur enzymes, contribute to the toxicity of superoxide. Another mechanism that could be important involves addition reactions of superoxide with other radicals to give organic peroxides. This reaction, to form a tyrosine peroxide, has come to authors attention through the study of the scavenging of tyrosyl radicals by GSH. It is also shown that a tyrosine peroxide is a major product of the oxidation of tyrosine by neutrophils

  12. Radical-pair based avian magnetoreception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    Behavioural experiments suggest that migratory birds possess a magnetic compass sensor able to detect the direction of the geomagnetic. One hypothesis for the basis of this remarkable sensory ability is that the coherent quantum spin dynamics of photoinduced radical pair reactions transduces directional magnetic information from the geomagnetic field into changes of reaction yields, possibly involving the photoreceptor cryptochrome in the birds retina. The suggested radical-pair based avian magnetoreception has attracted attention in the field of quantum biology as an example of a biological sensor which might exploit quantum coherences for its biological function. Investigations on such a spin-based sensor have focussed on uncovering the design features for the design of a biomimetic magnetic field sensor. We study the effects of slow fluctuations in the nuclear spin environment on the directional signal. We quantitatively evaluate the robustness of signals under fluctuations on a timescale longer than the lifetime of a radical pair, utilizing two models of radical pairs. Our results suggest design principles for building a radical-pair based compass sensor that is both robust and highly directional sensitive.

  13. Radiolytic production and thermal decay kinetics of free radicals in n-alkoxyazoxybenzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tria, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Free radical production and decay over several temperature ranges have been studied by ESR for three members of the series of n-alkoxyazoxybenzenes, those with one, two and seven carbon atoms respectively in the alkoxy chain: p,p'-azoxydianisole (PAA), p,p'-azoxydiphenetole (PAP) and 4,4'-bis-heptyloxyazoxybenzene (HAB). Radical yields per 100 ev absorbed at room temperature were: PAA 0.018, 0.019; PAP 0.033, 0.046; HAB 0.10, 0.14 for powder and single crystal samples respectively. Radicals present at room temperature and above are believed to be formed by loss of hydrogen from the benzene rings and the alkoxy groups, with more of the latter (probably α-alkoxy radicals) occurring as the alkoxy group becomes longer, based on the poorly resolved powder spectra. No cyclohexadienyl radicals or alkoxy radicals were seen. Decay of radicals between room temperature and the first liquid crystal phase transition occurred in a ''stepwise'' manner without radical conversions and was analyzed according to a model due to Waite (Phys. Rev., 107, 463 (1957) for diffusion-controlled reaction of randomly distributed reactants with a significant activation energy for the reaction step. Thermodynamic data are included for PAA powder samples and for toluene-grown single crystals. Reactions are postulated for the higher radical yields in powder samples of the three compounds irradiated at 77 0 K

  14. J/{psi} production in {radical}(s)=7 TeV pp collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Frederick

    2012-07-01

    In the first part of this work the inclusive cross section for J/{psi} production in inelastic {radical}(s) = 7 TeV pp collisions has been determined within vertical stroke y vertical stroke < 0.9 and in the decay channel J/{psi} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}. The result for the integrated value is: {sigma}{sub J/{psi}}(vertical stroke y vertical stroke < 0.9) = 10.7 {+-} 0.8 (stat.) {+-} 1.4 (syst.) {+-} 0.4 (lumi.) {mu}b. Together with the ALICE measurement in the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decay channel at forward rapidities and data from other experiments this result fills the gap at mid-rapidity for a comprehensive measurement of the J/{psi} rapidity distribution. Furthermore, results of the differential analysis as a function of the J/{psi} transverse momentum were presented. Finally the data are shown together with various theoretical predictions representing the current status of the three most common theoretical approaches for the description of quarkonia production: the Color-Singlet Model, the Color-Evaporation Model and NRQCD.

  15. Hydroxyl radical production in plasma electrolysis with KOH electrolyte solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saksono, Nelson; Febiyanti, Irine Ayu, E-mail: irine.ayu41@ui.ac.id; Utami, Nissa; Ibrahim [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424, Indonesia Phone: +62217863516, Fax: +62217863515 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Plasma electrolysis is an effective technology for producing hydroxyl radical (•OH). This method can be used for waste degradation process. This study was conducted to obtain the influence of applied voltage, electrolyte concentration, and anode depth in the plasma electrolysis system for producing hydroxyl radical. The materials of anode and cathode, respectively, were made from tungsten and stainless steel. KOH solution was used as the solution. Determination of hydroxyl radical production was done by measuring H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount formed in plasma system using an iodometric titration method, while the electrical energy consumed was obtained by measuring the electrical current throughout the process. The highest hydroxyl radical production was 3.51 mmol reached with 237 kJ energy consumption in the power supply voltage 600 V, 0.02 M KOH, and 0.5 cm depth of anode.

  16. The role of technological innovation in creating radically new product meanings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Anders Dahl

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of technological epiphanies from the literature on design driven innovation. A technological epiphany is defined as a product innovation that can be considered radical, both in terms of technology as well as the meaning and experiences it creates through its design....... Three cases of technological epiphanies from the hearing aid industry are analyzed and discussed in terms of how they represent a radical innovation in technology as well as in product meaning and which role the technological aspect has played in the radical innovation of the meaning of the product....... Three different ways in which technology can function as an enabler for the innovation of product meanings are explored and a fourth is found is found during the analysis. The paper concludes by suggesting directions for future research....

  17. Production of free radical by magnetized sheet plasma with vertical gas-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonegawa, Akira; Takatori, Masahiko; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    1995-01-01

    Free radicals play an important role in plasma processing, environment problem, and space plasma and so on because of their outstanding physical properties. Although much work has been done on the free radicals in the reactive plasma, very little is known about the production mechanism of the free radicals against various plasma parameters. To overcome this problem, we have proposed to do a new system of a magnetized sheet plasma with vertical gas-flow. The sheet plasma is a special type of strongly magnetized highly ionized slab plasma. This system is controlled to the parameters of radicals and plasma independently. Therefore, it is possible to make a quantitative analysis of free radicals as the simple one. In this paper, we describe the magnetized sheet plasma with vertical gas-flow system and report the preliminary results of production of the free radical. In particular, we show to produce and control the OH free radical which has been the most commonly studied combustion species

  18. The role of individuals' domain knowledge in evaluating radical new product ideas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denker, F.; Eling, K.; Herstatt, C.

    2016-01-01

    Radical new products are essential drivers of a firm’s profitability and growth. However, two aspects might hinder the proficient selection of radical new product ideas into a firm’s development pipeline. However, the question of whether only individuals with high domain knowledge are able to

  19. Hydroxyl free radical production during torsional phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Steven D; Hebdon, Thomas; Humbert, Jordan; Dimalanta, Ramon

    2010-12-01

    To quantitate free radical generation during phacoemulsification using an ultrasonic phacoemulsification device that includes a torsional mode and evaluate tip designs specific to the torsional mode. Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA. Experimental study. Experiments were performed using the Infiniti Vision System and OZil handpiece. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the aspirated irrigation solution during torsional phacoemulsification were quantitated as nanomolar malondialdehyde (nM MDA) and determined spectrophotometrically using the deoxyribose assay. The mean free radical production during phacoemulsification with torsional modality at 100% amplitude was 30.1 nM MDA ± 5.1 (SD) using a 0.9 mm 45-degree Kelman tapered ABS tip. With other tip designs intended for use with the torsional modality, free radical production was further reduced when fitted with the 0.9 mm 45-degree Kelman mini-flared ABS tip (13.2 ± 5.6 nM MDA) or the 0.9 mm 45-degree OZil-12 mini-flared ABS tip (14.3 ± 6.7 nM MDA). Although the measurements resulting from the use of the latter 2 tips were not statistically significantly different (P ≈ .25), they were different from those of the tapered tip (P<.0001). The MDA concentration in the aspirated irrigation solution using the torsional modality was approximately one half that reported for the handpiece's longitudinal modality in a previous study using the same bent-tip design (Kelman tapered, P<.0001). The level of MDA was further reduced approximately one half with torsional-specific tips. Copyright © 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanisms of free radical-induced damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Jaruga, Pawel

    2012-04-01

    Endogenous and exogenous sources cause free radical-induced DNA damage in living organisms by a variety of mechanisms. The highly reactive hydroxyl radical reacts with the heterocyclic DNA bases and the sugar moiety near or at diffusion-controlled rates. Hydrated electron and H atom also add to the heterocyclic bases. These reactions lead to adduct radicals, further reactions of which yield numerous products. These include DNA base and sugar products, single- and double-strand breaks, 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides, tandem lesions, clustered sites and DNA-protein cross-links. Reaction conditions and the presence or absence of oxygen profoundly affect the types and yields of the products. There is mounting evidence for an important role of free radical-induced DNA damage in the etiology of numerous diseases including cancer. Further understanding of mechanisms of free radical-induced DNA damage, and cellular repair and biological consequences of DNA damage products will be of outmost importance for disease prevention and treatment.

  1. Regulated production of free radicals by the mitochondrial electron transport chain: Cardiac ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi; Szweda, Pamela A; Szweda, Luke I; Humphries, Kenneth M

    2009-11-30

    Excessive production of free radicals by mitochondria is associated with, and likely contributes to, the progression of numerous pathological conditions. Nevertheless, the production of free radicals by the mitochondria may have important biological functions under normal or stressed conditions by activating or modulating redox-sensitive cellular signaling pathways. This raises the intriguing possibility that regulated mitochondrial free radical production occurs via mechanisms that are distinct from pathologies associated with oxidative damage. Indeed, the capacity of mitochondria to produce free radicals in a limited manner may play a role in ischemic preconditioning, the phenomenon whereby short bouts of ischemia protect from subsequent prolonged ischemia and reperfusion. Ischemic preconditioning can thus serve as an important model system for defining regulatory mechanisms that allow for transient, signal-inducing, production of free radicals by mitochondria. Defining how these mechanism(s) occur will provide insight into therapeutic approaches that minimize oxidative damage without altering normal cellular redox biology. The aim of this review is to present and discuss evidence for the regulated production of superoxide by the electron transport chain within the ischemic preconditioning paradigm of redox regulation.

  2. Lipid-derived free radical production in superantigen-induced interstitial pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Hisako; Mason, Ronald P.; Jiang, JinJie; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the free radical generation involved in the development of interstitial pneumonia (IP) in an animal model of autoimmune disease. We observed an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum of α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN) radical adducts detected in the lipid extract of lungs in autoimmune-prone mice after intratracheal instillation of staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The POBN adducts detected by ESR were paralleled by infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To further investigate the mechanism of free radical generation, mice were pretreated with the macrophage toxicant gadolinium chloride, which significantly suppressed the radical generation. Free radical generation was also decreased by pretreatment with the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor allopurinol, the iron chelator Desferal, and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor 1400W. Histopathologically, these drugs significantly reduced both the cell infiltration to alveolar septal walls and the synthesis of pulmonary collagen fibers. Experiments with NADPH oxidase knockout mice showed that NADPH oxidase did not contribute to lipid radical generation. These results suggest that lipid-derived carbon-centered free radical production is important in the manifestation of IP and that a macrophage toxicant, an XO inhibitor, an iron chelator, and an iNOS inhibitor protect against both radical generation and the manifestation of IP. PMID:19376221

  3. Products of aqueous vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) formed by free radical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schittl, H.; Quint, R.M.; Getoff, N.

    2007-01-01

    The radiolysis of aqueous vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) has been investigated under various experimental conditions. The highest vitamin degradation (G=3.22) was observed in solutions saturated with N 2 O, where 90% OH radicals are operating. As final products, the following were established: aldehydes, carboxylic acids and ammonia. Their yield strongly depends on the presence/absence of air as well as on N 2 O (used to convert e aq - into OH) and was determined as a function of absorbed radiation dose. HPLC-analysis showed that in all media, a main product is formed, having the highest yield in aerated solutions. Based on the chemical analysis, it appears that the OH radicals are most involved in the degradation process. A precise sequence of the reaction steps could not be given presently, because of the implication of many simultaneous reactions

  4. A Model of Rapid Radicalization Behavior Using Agent-Based Modeling and Quorum Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Noah; Drucker, Nick; Campbell, Kenyth

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of radicalization, especially rapid radicalization, has become increasingly important to US policy in the past several years. Traditionally, radicalization is considered a slow process, but recent social and political events demonstrate that the process can occur quickly. Examining this rapid process, in real time, is impossible. However, recreating an event using modeling and simulation (M&S) allows researchers to study some of the complex dynamics associated with rapid radicalization. We propose to adapt the biological mechanism of quorum sensing as a tool to explore, or possibly explain, rapid radicalization. Due to the complex nature of quorum sensing, M&S allows us to examine events that we could not otherwise examine in real time. For this study, we employ Agent Based Modeling (ABM), an M&S paradigm suited to modeling group behavior. The result of this study was the successful creation of rapid radicalization using quorum sensing. The Battle of Mogadishu was the inspiration for this model and provided the testing conditions used to explore quorum sensing and the ideas behind rapid radicalization. The final product has wider applicability however, using quorum sensing as a possible tool for examining other catalytic rapid radicalization events.

  5. Numerical simulation for production of O and N radicals in an atmospheric-pressure streamer discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Atsushi; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2012-01-01

    A streamer discharge model is developed to analyse the characteristics of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in point-to-plane electrodes filled with oxygen-nitrogen mixed gas at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In this paper we study the mechanisms of O and N radical production in an atmospheric-pressure streamer discharge. To confirm the validity of the simulation model, the discharge emission of light and the discharge current are compared with experimental data at several voltages in gas mixtures with 2-20% oxygen concentrations. The calculated streak picture and the axial distribution of streamer luminous intensity are in good agreement with our previous experimental results. After demonstrating the reliability of the model, we performed a numerical study on radical production by the streamer discharge. The experimentally obtained axial distributions of oxygen radical production in O 2 (20%)/N 2 and nitrogen radical production in O 2 (2%)/N 2 are successfully reproduced in our simulation. For the production of nitrogen radicals, two-step dissociation through the vibrationally excited states is predominant. (paper)

  6. Processing of free radical damaged DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.

    2003-01-01

    while cells overexpressing one of the oxidative DNA glycosylases are radiosensitive. Human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells overexpressing the oxidative DNA glycosylases are also radiosensitive. Furthermore, both radioresistance and radiosensitivity correlated with the enzymatic production of double strand breaks produced after irradiation during attempted repair. Because these data indicated the potential harmful effects of the ordinarily beneficial presence of the oxidative DNA glycosylases after treatment of cells with ionizing radiation, it was of interest to see if the base excision repair enzymes were induced by ionizing radiation. We found that ionizing radiation does not induce the oxidative DNA glycosylases in either bacterial or in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells. Interestingly, during this past year, three novel DNA glycosylases that recognize free radical-damaged bases have been identified. The characterization of these activities will also be discussed

  7. Products of aqueous vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) formed by free radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schittl, H. [Section of Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, UZA II, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Quint, R.M. [Section of Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, UZA II, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Getoff, N. [Section of Radiation Biology, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, UZA II, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: nikola.getoff@univie.ac.at

    2007-10-15

    The radiolysis of aqueous vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) has been investigated under various experimental conditions. The highest vitamin degradation (G=3.22) was observed in solutions saturated with N{sub 2}O, where 90% OH radicals are operating. As final products, the following were established: aldehydes, carboxylic acids and ammonia. Their yield strongly depends on the presence/absence of air as well as on N{sub 2}O (used to convert e{sub aq} {sup -} into OH) and was determined as a function of absorbed radiation dose. HPLC-analysis showed that in all media, a main product is formed, having the highest yield in aerated solutions. Based on the chemical analysis, it appears that the OH radicals are most involved in the degradation process. A precise sequence of the reaction steps could not be given presently, because of the implication of many simultaneous reactions.

  8. Formation of 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine-type products in DNA by hydroxyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remsen, J.F.; Roti, J.L.R.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine whether 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine type products in purified DNA and in intact cells results from direct or indirect action and, if indirect, which radical species is primarily responsible. It is concluded that hydroxyl radical is primarily responsible. (U.K.)

  9. Free radical production by high energy shock waves--comparison with ionizing irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T R; Laudone, V P; Heston, W D; Zeitz, L; Fair, W R

    1988-01-01

    Fricke chemical dosimetry is used as an indirect measure of the free radical production of ionizing irradiation. We adapted the Fricke ferrous sulfate radiation dosimeter to examine the chemical effects of high energy shock waves. Significant free radical production was documented. The reaction was dose dependent, predictably increased by acoustic impedance, but curvilinear. A thousand shocks at 18 kilovolts induced the same free radical oxidation as 1100 rad cobalt-60 gamma ionizing irradiation, increasing to 2900 rad in the presence of an air-fluid zone of acoustic impedance. The biological effect of these free radicals was compared to that of cobalt-60 ionizing irradiation by measuring the affect on Chinese hamster cells by clonogenic assay. While cobalt-60 irradiation produced a marked decrease in clonogenic survivors, little effect was noted with high energy shock waves. This suggested that the chemical effects produced by shock waves were either absent or attenuated in the cells, or were inherently less toxic than those of ionizing irradiation.

  10. New era of silicon technologies due to radical reaction based semiconductor manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, Tadahiro; Hirayama, Masaki; Teramoto, Akinobu

    2006-01-01

    Current semiconductor technology, the so-called the molecule reaction based semiconductor manufacturing, now faces a very severe standstill due to the drastic increase of gate leakage currents and drain leakage currents. Radical reaction based semiconductor manufacturing has been developed to completely overcome the current standstill by introducing microwave excited high density plasma with very low electron temperatures and without accompanying charge-up damage. The introduction of radical reaction based semiconductor manufacturing has made it possible to fabricate LSI devices on any crystal orientation Si substrate surface as well as (100) Si substrate surfaces, and to eliminate a very severe limitation to the antenna ratio in the circuit layout patterns, which is strictly limited to less than 100-200 in order to obtain a relatively high production yield. (topical review)

  11. Radical carbonylations using a continuous microflow system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide Fukuyama

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Radical-based carbonylation reactions of alkyl halides were conducted in a microflow reactor under pressurized carbon monoxide gas. Good to excellent yields of carbonylated products were obtained via radical formylation, carbonylative cyclization and three-component coupling reactions, using tributyltin hydride or TTMSS as a radical mediator.

  12. Hydroxyl-radical-induced oxidation of cyclic dipeptides: Reactions of free peptide radicals and their peroxyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieden, O.J.

    1989-01-01

    In the course of this study investigations were carried out into the reactions of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms with cyclic dipeptides as well as the subsequent reactions of peptide radicals and their peroxyl radicals in aqueous solution. The radiolysis products formed in the absence and presence of oxygen or transient metal complexes were characterized and determined on a quantitative basis. The linking of information from product analyses to the kinetic data for transient species obtained by time-resolving UV/VIS and conductivity measurements (pulse radiolysis) as well as computer-assisted simulations of individual events during the reaction permitted an evaluation of the mechanisms underlying the various processes and an identification of interim products with short life-times, which did or did not belong to the group of radicals. Through the characterization of key reactions of radicals and peroxyl radicals of this substance class a major advance has been made towards a better understanding of the role of radicals in the peptide compound and the mechanisms involved in indirect radiation effects on long-chain peptides and proteins. (orig.) [de

  13. Cultured rat and purified human Pneumocystis carinii stimulate intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T; Aliouat, E M; Lundgren, B

    1998-01-01

    The production of free radicals in human neutrophils was studied in both Pneumocystis carinii derived from cultures of L2 rat lung epithelial-like cells and Pneumocystis carinii purified from human lung. Using the cytochrome C technique, which selectively measured extracellular superoxide...... generation, hardly any free radical production was observed after stimulation with cultured rat-derived P. carinii. A chemiluminescence technique, which separately measured intra- and extracellular free radical production, was subsequently employed to differentiate the free radical generation....... It was established that 1) P. carinii stimulated intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils, 2) opsonized cultured rat-derived P. carinii stimulated human neutrophils to a strong intracellular response of superoxide production, and 3) opsonized P. carinii, purified from human lung also...

  14. With medium-chain triglycerides, higher and faster oxygen radical production by stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes occurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruimel, J W; Naber, A H; Curfs, J H; Wenker, M A; Jansen, J B

    2000-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions are suspected of suppressing the immune function. However, study results are contradictory and mainly concern the conventional long-chain triglyceride emulsions. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes were preincubated with parenteral lipid emulsions. The influence of the lipid emulsions on the production of oxygen radicals by these stimulated leukocytes was studied by measuring chemiluminescence. Three different parenteral lipid emulsions were tested: long-chain triglycerides, a physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides, and structured triglycerides. Structured triglycerides consist of triglycerides where the medium- and long-chain fatty acids are attached to the same glycerol molecule. Stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes preincubated with the physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides showed higher levels of oxygen radicals (p triglycerides or structured triglycerides. Additional studies indicated that differences in results of various lipid emulsions were not caused by differences in emulsifier. The overall production of oxygen radicals was significantly lower after preincubation with the three lipid emulsions compared with controls without lipid emulsion. A physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides induced faster production of oxygen radicals, resulting in higher levels of oxygen radicals, compared with long-chain triglycerides or structured triglycerides. This can be detrimental in cases where oxygen radicals play either a pathogenic role or a beneficial one, such as when rapid phagocytosis and killing of bacteria is needed. The observed lower production of oxygen radicals by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the presence of parenteral lipid emulsions may result in immunosuppression by these lipids.

  15. Quantification of superoxide radical production in thylakoid membrane using cyclic hydroxylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuleva, Marina; Klenina, Irina; Mysin, Ivan; Kirilyuk, Igor; Opanasenko, Vera; Proskuryakov, Ivan; Ivanov, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Applicability of two lipophilic cyclic hydroxylamines (CHAs), CM-H and TMT-H, and two hydrophilic CHAs, CAT1-H and DCP-H, for detection of superoxide anion radical (O2(∙-)) produced by the thylakoid photosynthetic electron transfer chain (PETC) of higher plants under illumination has been studied. ESR spectrometry was applied for detection of the nitroxide radical originating due to CHAs oxidation by O2(∙-). CHAs and corresponding nitroxide radicals were shown to be involved in side reactions with PETC which could cause miscalculation of O2(∙-) production rate. Lipophilic CM-H was oxidized by PETC components, reducing the oxidized donor of Photosystem I, P700(+), while at the same concentration another lipophilic CHA, TMT-H, did not reduce P700(+). The nitroxide radical was able to accept electrons from components of the photosynthetic chain. Electrostatic interaction of stable cation CAT1-H with the membrane surface was suggested. Water-soluble superoxide dismutase (SOD) was added in order to suppress the reaction of CHA with O2(∙-) outside the membrane. SOD almost completely inhibited light-induced accumulation of DCP(∙), nitroxide radical derivative of hydrophilic DCP-H, in contrast to TMT(∙) accumulation. Based on the results showing that change in the thylakoid lumen pH and volume had minor effect on TMT(∙) accumulation, the reaction of TMT-H with O2(∙-) in the lumen was excluded. Addition of TMT-H to thylakoid suspension in the presence of SOD resulted in the increase in light-induced O2 uptake rate, that argued in favor of TMT-H ability to detect O2(∙-) produced within the membrane core. Thus, hydrophilic DCP-H and lipophilic TMT-H were shown to be usable for detection of O2(∙-) produced outside and within thylakoid membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metal-free carbon materials-catalyzed sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes: A review on heterogeneous catalysts and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingxia; Mao, Qiming; Zhou, Yaoyu; Wei, Jianhong; Liu, Xiaocheng; Yang, Junying; Luo, Lin; Zhang, Jiachao; Chen, Hong; Chen, Hongbo; Tang, Lin

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), especially sulfate radical based AOPs have been widely used in various fields of wastewater treatment due to their capability and adaptability in decontamination. Recently, metal-free carbon materials catalysts in sulfate radical production has been more and more concerned because these materials have been demonstrated to be promising alternatives to conventional metal-based catalysts, but the review of metal-free catalysts is rare. The present review outlines the current state of knowledge on the generation of sulfate radical using metal-free catalysts including carbon nanotubes, graphene, mesoporous carbon, activated carbon, activated carbon fiber, nanodiamond. The mechanism such as the radical pathway and non-radical pathway, and factors influencing of the activation of sulfate radical was also be revealed. Knowledge gaps and research needs have been identified, which include the perspectives on challenges related to metal-free catalyst, heterogeneous metal-free catalyst/persulfate systems and their potential in practical environmental remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reactions of clofibric acid with oxidative and reductive radicals-Products, mechanisms, efficiency and toxic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csay, Tamás; Rácz, Gergely; Salik, Ádám; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2014-09-01

    The degradation of clofibric acid induced by hydroxyl radical, hydrated electron and O2-•/HO2• reactive species was studied in aqueous solutions. Clofibric acid was decomposed more effectively by hydroxyl radical than by hydrated electron or O2-•/HO2•. Various hydroxylated, dechlorinated and fragmentation products have been identified and quantified. A new LC-MS method was developed based on 18O isotope labeling to follow the formation of hydroxylated derivatives of clofibric acid. Possible degradation pathways have been proposed. The overall degradation was monitored by determination of sum parameters like COD, TOC and AOX. It was found that the organic chlorine degrades very effectively prior to complete mineralization. After the treatment no toxic effect was found according to Vibrio fischeri tests. However, at early stages some of the reaction products were more harmful than clofibric acid.

  18. EPR and NMR detection of transient radicals and reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic resonance methods in radiation chemistry are illustrated. The most recent developments in pulsed EPR and NMR studies in pulse radiolysis are outlined with emphasis on the study of transient radicals and their reaction products. 12 figures

  19. EPR imaging and HPLC characterization of the pigment-based organic free radical in black soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Maeda, Hayato

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the location and distribution of paramagnetic species in dry black, brown, and yellow (normal) soybean seeds using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-band (9 GHz) EPR imaging (EPRI), and HPLC. EPR primarily detected two paramagnetic species in black soybean. These two different radical species were assigned as stable organic radical and Mn 2+  species based on the g values and hyperfine structures. The signal from the stable radical was noted at g ≈ 2.00 and was relatively strong and stable. Subsequent noninvasive two-dimensional (2D) EPRI of the radical present in black soybean revealed that the stable radical was primarily located in the pigmented region of the soybean coat, with very few radicals observed in the soybean cotyledon (interior). Pigments extracted from black soybean were analyzed using HPLC. The major compound was found to be cyanidin-3-glucoside. Multi-EPR and HPLC results indicate that the stable radical was only found within the pigmented region of the soybean coat, and it could be cyanidin-3-glucoside or an oxidative decomposition product.

  20. Chemical determination of free radical-induced damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdaroglu, M

    1991-01-01

    Free radical-induced damage to DNA in vivo can result in deleterious biological consequences such as the initiation and promotion of cancer. Chemical characterization and quantitation of such DNA damage is essential for an understanding of its biological consequences and cellular repair. Methodologies incorporating the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) have been developed in recent years for measurement of free radical-induced DNA damage. The use of GC/MS with selected-ion monitoring (SIM) facilitates unequivocal identification and quantitation of a large number of products of all four DNA bases produced in DNA by reactions with hydroxyl radical, hydrated electron, and H atom. Hydroxyl radical-induced DNA-protein cross-links in mammalian chromatin, and products of the sugar moiety in DNA are also unequivocally identified and quantitated. The sensitivity and selectivity of the GC/MS-SIM technique enables the measurement of DNA base products even in isolated mammalian chromatin without the necessity of first isolating DNA, and despite the presence of histones. Recent results reviewed in this article demonstrate the usefulness of the GC/MS technique for chemical determination of free radical-induced DNA damage in DNA as well as in mammalian chromatin under a vast variety of conditions of free radical production.

  1. Muoniated acyl and thioacyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, Iain; Brodovitch, Jean-Claude; Ghandi, Khashayar; Percival, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    The product of the reaction of muonium with tert-butylisocyanate was previously assigned as the muoniated tert-butylaminyl radical (I. McKenzie, J.-C. Brodovitch, K. Ghandi, S. Kecman, P. W. Percival, Physica B 326 (2003) 76). This assignment is incorrect since the muon and 14 N hyperfine-coupling constants (hfcc) of this radical would have the opposite sign, which is in conflict with the experimental results. The radical is now reassigned as the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical, based on the similarities between the experimental muon and 14 N hfcc and hfcc calculated at the UB3LYP/6-311G(d,p)//UB3LYP/EPR-III level. The large zero-point energy in the N-Mu bond results in the dissociation barrier of the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical being above the combined energy of the reactants, in contrast to the N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical where the dissociation barrier lies below the combined energy of the reactants. The reaction of muonium with tert-butylisothiocyanate produced both conformers of the muoniated N-tert-butylthiocarbamoyl radical and their assignment was based on the similarities between the experimental and calculated muon hfcc. These are the first acyl and thioacyl radicals to be directly detected by muon spin spectroscopy

  2. Muoniated acyl and thioacyl radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Iain [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Brodovitch, Jean-Claude [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Ghandi, Khashayar [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Percival, Paul W. [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada)]. E-mail: percival@sfu.ca

    2006-03-31

    The product of the reaction of muonium with tert-butylisocyanate was previously assigned as the muoniated tert-butylaminyl radical (I. McKenzie, J.-C. Brodovitch, K. Ghandi, S. Kecman, P. W. Percival, Physica B 326 (2003) 76). This assignment is incorrect since the muon and {sup 14}N hyperfine-coupling constants (hfcc) of this radical would have the opposite sign, which is in conflict with the experimental results. The radical is now reassigned as the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical, based on the similarities between the experimental muon and {sup 14}N hfcc and hfcc calculated at the UB3LYP/6-311G(d,p)//UB3LYP/EPR-III level. The large zero-point energy in the N-Mu bond results in the dissociation barrier of the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical being above the combined energy of the reactants, in contrast to the N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical where the dissociation barrier lies below the combined energy of the reactants. The reaction of muonium with tert-butylisothiocyanate produced both conformers of the muoniated N-tert-butylthiocarbamoyl radical and their assignment was based on the similarities between the experimental and calculated muon hfcc. These are the first acyl and thioacyl radicals to be directly detected by muon spin spectroscopy.

  3. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on sucrose radical production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Sato, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    We investigated sucrose radicals produced by heavy-ion irradiation with various LETs (linear energy transfer) and the possibility for a sucrose ESR (electron spin resonance) dosimeter. The obtained spectral pattern was the same as that for helium (He) ions, carbon (C) ions, neon (Ne) ions, argon (Ar) ions, and iron (Fe) ions. Identical spectra were measured after one year, but the initial intensities decreased by a few percent when the samples were kept in ESR tubes with the caps at ambient temperature. The total spin concentration obtained by heavy-ion irradiation had a linear relation with the absorbed dose, and correlated logarithmically with the LET. Qualitative ESR analyses showed that the production of sucrose radicals depended on both the particle identity and the LET at the same dose. The production of spin concentration by He ions was the most sensitive to LET. Empirical relations between the LET and the spin yield for various particles imply that the LET at a certain dose can be estimated by the spin concentration. (authors)

  4. Oxygen activation at the plasma membrane: relation between superoxide and hydroxyl radical production by isolated membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyno, Eiri; Mary, Véronique; Schopfer, Peter; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2011-07-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (hydroxyl radicals, superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide) was studied using EPR spin-trapping techniques and specific dyes in isolated plasma membranes from the growing and the non-growing zones of hypocotyls and roots of etiolated soybean seedlings as well as coleoptiles and roots of etiolated maize seedlings. NAD(P)H mediated the production of superoxide in all plasma membrane samples. Hydroxyl radicals were only produced by the membranes of the hypocotyl growing zone when a Fenton catalyst (FeEDTA) was present. By contrast, in membranes from other parts of the seedlings a low rate of spontaneous hydroxyl radical formation was observed due to the presence of small amounts of tightly bound peroxidase. It is concluded that apoplastic hydroxyl radical generation depends fully, or for the most part, on peroxidase localized in the cell wall. In soybean plasma membranes from the growing zone of the hypocotyl pharmacological tests showed that the superoxide production could potentially be attributed to the action of at least two enzymes, an NADPH oxidase and, in the presence of menadione, a quinone reductase.

  5. Comparative study of radical oxidation of DNA and its nucleosides by hydroxyl radicals and ferryl ions generated by the Fenton reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, J.F.; Berger, M.; Anselmino, C.; Polverelli, M.; Cadet, J.

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals and Fenton type oxidative species with DNA and 2'-deoxyribonucleosides was investigated. This study was based on the characterization of the diamagnetic products resulting from the chemical transformation of the transient radicals. Emphasis was placed on the radical oxidative reactions of the purine nucleosides. It is interesting to note that oxidative purine radicals can be reduced by reagents such as ascorbic acid or N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1, 4-p-phenylenediamine. The observed differences in the nature of the decomposition products resulting from the Fenton reaction are not consistent with the nature of the oxidative species (hydroxyl radicals or ferryl ions) involved, but due to the presence of ferrous sulfate [fr

  6. Drivers and Consequences of Narrative Transportation : Understanding the Role of Stories and Domain-Specific Skills in Improving Radically New Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweitzer, F; van den Hende, E.A.

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the role of transportation in concept tests (i.e., a vivid mental image of a new product concept and the way of using it) for radically new products. Based on transportation literature, the article proposes that concept descriptions in a story format can stimulate

  7. Combining the catalytic enantioselective reaction of visible-light-generated radicals with a by-product utilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Luo, Shipeng; Burghaus, Olaf; Webster, Richard D; Harms, Klaus; Meggers, Eric

    2017-10-01

    We report an unusual reaction design in which a chiral bis-cyclometalated rhodium(iii) complex enables the stereocontrolled chemistry of photo-generated carbon-centered radicals and at the same time catalyzes an enantioselective sulfonyl radical addition to an alkene. Specifically, employing inexpensive and readily available Hantzsch esters as the photoredox mediator, Rh-coordinated prochiral radicals generated by a selective photoinduced single electron reduction are trapped by allyl sulfones in a highly stereocontrolled fashion, providing radical allylation products with up to 97% ee. The hereby formed fragmented sulfonyl radicals are utilized via an enantioselective radical addition to form chiral sulfones, which minimizes waste generation.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of the 2,2'-Azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) Radical Cation-Scavenging Reaction Products of Arbutin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Akihiro; Ohno, Asako; Ito, Hideyuki

    2016-09-28

    Arbutin, a glucoside of hydroquinone, has shown strong 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation-scavenging activity, especially in reaction stoichiometry. This study investigated the reaction mechanism of arbutin against ABTS radical cation that caused high stoichiometry of arbutin in an ABTS radical cation-scavenging assay. HPLC analysis of the reaction mixture of arbutin and ABTS radical cation indicated the existence of two reaction products. The two reaction products were purified and identified to be a covalent adduct of arbutin with an ABTS degradation fragment and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone. A time-course study of the radical-scavenging reactions of arbutin and the two reaction products suggested that one molecule of arbutin scavenges three ABTS radical cation molecules to generate an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct as a final reaction product. The results suggest that one molecule of arbutin reduced two ABTS radical cation molecules to ABTS and then cleaved the third ABTS radical cation molecule to generate two products, an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone.

  9. Muonium and muonic radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, P.; Fischer, H.; Roduner, E.; Strub, W.; Geeson, D.; Symons, M.C.R.

    1985-01-01

    An energetic positive muon which is injected in a liquid sample of substrate molecules (S) creates an ionization track consisting of substrate cations (S + ) and electrons. Near the end of this track the muon may combine with an electron to form muonium (Mu) which is observable in inert liquids, but which reacts by addition to form a radical. Alternatively, the electron can add to S to form S - , which then combines with the muon to form the radical. Furthermore, instead of ending up in Mu or in a radical the muon may stay in a diamagnetic environment as a solvated muon, or as a muon substituting a proton in a molecule. Of interest in these schemes are the mechanisms and rates of formation of muonated radicals and in particular the rate constants for their reactions to products. Investigations are based on the observation of Mu and the radical by means of the μSR technique in transverse magnetic fields. (Auth.)

  10. Solution phase and membrane immobilized iron-based free radical reactions: Fundamentals and applications for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Scott Romak

    Membrane-based separation processes have been used extensively for drinking water purification, wastewater treatment, and numerous other applications. Reactive membranes synthesized through functionalization of the membrane pores offer enhanced reactivity due to increased surface area at the polymer-solution interface and low diffusion limitations. Oxidative techniques utilizing free radicals have proven effective for both the destruction of toxic organics and non-environmental applications. Most previous work focuses on reactions in the homogeneous phase; however, the immobilization of reactants in membrane pores offers several advantages. The use of polyanions immobilized in a membrane or chelates in solution prevents ferric hydroxide precipitation at near-neutral pH, a common limitation of iron(Fe(II/III))-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H 2O2) decomposition. The objectives of this research are to develop a membrane-based platform for the generation of free radicals, degrade toxic organic compounds using this and similar solution-based reactions, degrade toxic organic compounds in droplet form, quantify hydroxyl radical production in these reactions, and develop kinetic models for both processes. In this study, a functionalized membrane containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to immobilize iron ions and conduct free radical reactions by permeating H2O2 through the membrane. The membrane's responsive behavior to pH and divalent cations was investigated and modeled. The conversion of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in the membrane and its effect on the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide were monitored and used to develop kinetic models for predicting H2O2 decomposition in these systems. The rate of hydroxyl radical production, and hence contaminant degradation can be varied by changing the residence time, H2O2 concentration, and/or iron loading. Using these membrane-immobilized systems, successful removal of toxic organic compounds, such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), from water

  11. Transformations of dissolved organic matter induced by UV photolysis, Hydroxyl radicals, chlorine radicals, and sulfate radicals in aqueous-phase UV-Based advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanasi, Lathika; Coscarelli, Erica; Khaksari, Maryam; Mazzoleni, Lynn R; Minakata, Daisuke

    2018-05-15

    Considering the increasing identification of trace organic contaminants in natural aquatic environments, the removal of trace organic contaminants from water or wastewater discharge is an urgent task. Ultraviolet (UV) and UV-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H 2 O 2 ), UV/free chlorine and UV/persulfate, are attractive and promising approaches for the removal of these contaminants due to the high reactivity of active radical species produced in these UV-AOPs with a wide variety of organic contaminants. However, the removal efficiency of trace contaminants is greatly affected by the presence of background dissolved organic matter (DOM). In this study, we use ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry to evaluate the transformation of a standard Suwanee River fulvic acid DOM isolate in UV photolysis and UV-AOPs. The use of probe compounds allows for the determination of the steady-state concentrations of active radical species in each UV-AOP. The changes in the H/C and O/C elemental ratios, double bond equivalents, and the low-molecular-weight transformation product concentrations of organic acids reveal that different DOM transformation patterns are induced by each UV-AOP. By comparison with the known reactivities of each radical species with specific organic compounds, we mechanistically and systematically elucidate the molecular-level DOM transformation pathways induced by hydroxyl, chlorine, and sulfate radicals in UV-AOPs. We find that there is a distinct transformation in the aliphatic components of DOM due to HO• in UV/H 2 O 2 and UV/free chlorine. Cl• induced transformation of olefinic species is also observed in the UV/free chlorine system. Transformation of aromatic and olefinic moieties by SO 4 •- are the predominant pathways in the UV/persulfate system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancing production through optimisation of DPPH and radical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of dry matter for DPPH radical scavenging activity. Methanol had the lowest value (78 mg g-1 dry matter) for polyphenol extracts and 80 mg g-1 for the DPPH radical scavenging activity. The main extract compounds were gallic acid, catechin and epicatechin. Key Words: High density lipids, polyphenol, radical scavenging ...

  13. Radical production efficiency and electrical characteristics of a coplanar barrier discharge built by multilayer ceramic technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jõgi, Indrek; Erme, Kalev; Levoll, Erik; Stamate, Eugen

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the electrical characteristics and radical production efficiency of a coplanar barrier discharge (CBD) device manufactured by Kyocera by multilayer ceramic technology. The device consisted of a number of linear electrodes with electrode and gap widths of 0.75 mm, immersed into a ceramic dielectric barrier. A closed flow-through system necessary for the measurements was prepared by placing a quartz plate at a height of 3 mm from the ceramic barrier. The production of nitrogen radicals was determined from the removal of a trace amount of NO in pure N 2 gas, while the production of oxygen radicals was determined by ozone production in pure O 2 or synthetic air. The production efficiency of N and O radicals and NO oxidation in synthetic air was comparable with the efficiency of a volume barrier discharge device. The power density per unit of surface area of the CBD device was more than two times larger than that of a similar volume barrier discharge setup, which makes the CBD device a compact alternative for gas treatment. The production of ozone and different nitrogen oxides was also evaluated for the open system of the CBD which is usable for surface treatment. The ozone concentration of this system was nearly independent from the input power, while the concentration of nitrogen oxides increased with input power. The open system of the CBD was additionally tested for the treatment of a silicon surface. An increase of applied power decreased the time required to reduce the water contact angle below 10 degrees but also started to have an impact on the surface roughness. (paper)

  14. Measurement of the differential cross-sections of inclusive, prompt and non-prompt J/{psi} production in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G [Fakultaet fuer Mathematik und Physik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg i.Br. (Germany); Abbott, B [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman OK (United States); Abdallah, J [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and ICREA, Barcelona (Spain); Abdelalim, A A [Section de Physique, Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Abdesselam, A [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Abdinov, O [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Abi, B [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK (United States); Abolins, M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI (United States); Abramowicz, H [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abreu, H [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud and CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Acerbi, E [INFN Sezione di Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy); Acharya, B S [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Udine (Italy); ICTP, Trieste [Italy; Adams, D L [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY (United States); Addy, T N [Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton VA (United States); Adelman, J [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven CT (United States); Aderholz, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Muenchen (Germany); Adomeit, S [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Adragna, P [Department of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Adye, T [Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Aefsky, S [Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham MA (United States)

    2011-09-21

    The inclusive J/{psi} production cross-section and fraction of J/{psi} mesons produced in B-hadron decays are measured in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, as a function of the transverse momentum and rapidity of the J/{psi}, using 2.3 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The cross-section is measured from a minimum p{sub T} of 1 GeV to a maximum of 70 GeV and for rapidities within |y|<2.4 giving the widest reach of any measurement of J/{psi} production to date. The differential production cross-sections of prompt and non-prompt J/{psi} are separately determined and are compared to Colour Singlet NNLO{sup *}, Colour Evaporation Model, and FONLL predictions.

  15. A new face of phenalenyl-based radicals in the transition metal-free C-H arylation of heteroarenes at room temperature: trapping the radical initiator via C-C σ-bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Jasimuddin; P, Sreejyothi; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Jose, Anex; Raj, Manthan; Mandal, Swadhin K

    2017-11-01

    The radical-mediated transition metal-free approach for the direct C-H bond functionalization of arenes is considered as a cost effective alternative to transition metal-based catalysis. An organic ligand-based radical plays a key role by generating an aryl radical which undergoes a subsequent functionalization process. The design principle of the present study takes advantage of a relatively stable odd alternant hydrocarbon-based phenalenyl (PLY) radical. In this study, the first transition metal-free catalyzed direct C-H arylation of a variety of heteroarenes such as azoles, furan, thiophene and pyridine at room temperature has been reported using a phenalenyl-based radical without employing any photoactivation step. This protocol has been successfully applied to the gram scale synthesis of core moieties of bioactive molecules. The phenalenyl-based radical initiator has been characterized crystallographically by trapping it via the formation of a C-C σ-bond between the phenalenyl radical and solvent-based radical species.

  16. Levofloxacin oxidation by ozone and hydroxyl radicals: kinetic study, transformation products and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi El Najjar, Nasma; Touffet, Arnaud; Deborde, Marie; Journel, Romain; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2013-10-01

    This work was carried out to investigate the fate of the antibiotic levofloxacin upon oxidation with ozone and hydroxyl radicals. A kinetic study was conducted at 20 °C for each oxidant. Ozonation experiments were performed using a competitive kinetic method with carbamazepin as competitor. Significant levofloxacin removal was observed during ozonation and a rate constant value of 6.0×10(4) M(-1) s(-1) was obtained at pH 7.2. An H2O2/UV system was used for the formation of hydroxyl radicals HO. The rate constant of HO was determined in the presence of a high H2O2 concentration. The kinetic expressions yielded a [Formula: see text] value of 4.5×10(9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 6.0 and 5.2×10(9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.2. These results were used to develop a model to predict the efficacy of the ozonation process and pharmaceutical removal was estimated under different ozonation conditions (i.e. oxidant concentrations and contact times). The results showed that levofloxacin was completely degraded by molecular ozone during ozonation of water and that hydroxyl radicals had no effect in real waters conditions. Moreover, LC/MS/MS and toxicity assays using Lumistox test were performed to identify ozonation transformation products. Under these conditions, four transformation products were observed and their chemical structures were proposed. The results showed an increase in toxicity during ozonation, even after degradation of all of the observed transformation products. The formation of other transformation products not identified under our experimental conditions could be responsible for the observed toxicity. These products might be ozone-resistant and more toxic to Vibrio fisheri than levofloxacin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of gas-flow structures on radical and etch-product density distributions on wafers in magnetomicrowave plasma etching reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegawa, Masato; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi; Fukuyama, Ryoji

    2001-01-01

    To achieve high etch rate, uniformity, good selectivity, and etch profile control across large diameter wafers, the distributions of ions, radicals, and etch products in magnetomicrowave high-etch-rate plasma etching reactors must be accurately controlled. In this work the effects of chamber heights, a focus ring around the wafer, and gas supply structures (or gas flow structures) on the radicals and etch products flux distribution onto the wafer were examined using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method and used to determine the optimal reactor geometry. The pressure uniformity on the wafer was less than ±1% when the chamber height was taller than 60 mm. The focus ring around the wafer produced uniform radical and etch-product fluxes but increased the etch-product flux on the wafer. A downward-flow gas-supply structure (type II) produced a more uniform radical distribution than that produced by a radial gas-supply structure (type I). The impact flow of the type II structure removed etch products from the wafer effectively and produced a uniform etch-product distribution even without the focus ring. Thus the downward-flow gas-supply structure (type II) was adopted in the design for the second-generation of a magnetomicrowave plasma etching reactor with a higher etching rate

  18. Zwitterion radicals and anion radicals from electron transfer and solvent condensation with the fingerprint developing agent ninhydrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertz, T D; Reiter, R C; Stevenson, C D

    2001-11-16

    Ninhydrin (the fingerprint developing agent) spontaneously dehydrates in liquid ammonia and in hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA) to form indantrione, which has a sufficiently large solution electron affinity to extract an electron from the solvent (HMPA) to produce the indantrione anion radical. In liquid NH(3), the presence of trace amounts of amide ion causes the spontaneous formation of an anion radical condensation product, wherein the no. 2 carbon (originally a carbonyl carbon) becomes substituted with -NH(2) and -OH groups. In HMPA, the indantrione anion radical spontaneously forms condensation products with the HMPA to produce a variety of zwitterionic radicals, wherein the no. 2 carbon becomes directly attached to a nitrogen of the HMPA. The mechanisms for the formation of the zwitterionic paramagnetic condensation products are analogous to that observed in the reaction of ninhydrin with amino acids to yield Ruhemann's Purple, the contrast product in fingerprint development. The formation of anion and zwitterionic radical condensation products from ninhydrin and nitrogen-containing solvents may represent an example of a host of analogous polyketone-solvent reactions.

  19. SULFATE RADICAL-BASED ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES- ACS MEETING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper will present an overview of sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation technologies for the destruction of environmentally toxic chemicals in wastewater, industrial water, groundwater and sources of water supply. The paper will include fundamental aspects of the generati...

  20. Direct evidence of iNOS-mediated in vivo free radical production and protein oxidation in acetone-induced ketosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dallas, Shannon; Duma, Danielle; Mason, Ronald P.; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic patients frequently encounter ketosis that is characterized by the breakdown of lipids with the consequent accumulation of ketone bodies. Several studies have demonstrated that reactive species are likely to induce tissue damage in diabetes, but the role of the ketone bodies in the process has not been fully investigated. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with novel spin-trapping and immunological techniques has been used to investigate in vivo free radical formation in a murine model of acetone-induced ketosis. A six-line EPR spectrum consistent with the α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone radical adduct of a carbon-centered lipid-derived radical was detected in the liver extracts. To investigate the possible enzymatic source of these radicals, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase knockout mice were used. Free radical production was unchanged in the NADPH oxidase knockout but much decreased in the iNOS knockout mice, suggesting a role for iNOS in free radical production. Longer-term exposure to acetone revealed iNOS overexpression in the liver together with protein radical formation, which was detected by confocal microscopy and a novel immunospin-trapping method. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation as a consequence of persistent free radical generation after 21 days of acetone treatment in control and NADPH oxidase knockout but not in iNOS knockout mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acetone administration, a model of ketosis, can lead to protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation through a free radical-dependent mechanism driven mainly by iNOS overexpression. PMID:18559982

  1. Determination of free radical reaction products and metabolites of salicylic acid using capillary electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, S.A.J.; Huf, F.A.; Reijenga, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Hydroxylated radical products of salicylic acid are often used as a relative measurement in free radical research. Several analytical methods exist to determine the amount of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. In this study we use capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and

  2. p53 Mutagenesis by Benzo[a]pyrene derived Radical Cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sushmita; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik; Francey, Lauren; Lu, Ding; Jeffrey Field, Trevor M. Penning

    2013-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a major human carcinogen in combustion products such as cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust, is metabolically activated into DNA-reactive metabolites via three different enzymatic pathways. The pathways are the anti-(+)-benzo[a]pyrene 7,8-diol 9, 10-epoxide pathway (P450/ epoxide hydrolase catalyzed) (B[a]PDE), the benzo[a]pyrene o-quinone pathway (aldo ketose reductase (AKR) catalyzed) and the B[a]P radical cation pathway (P450 peroxidase catalyzed). We used a yeast p53 mutagenesis system to assess mutagenesis by B[a]P radical cations. Because radical cations are short-lived, they were generated in situ by reacting B[a]P with cumene hydroperoxide (CuOOH) and horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and then monitoring the generation of the more stable downstream products, B[a]P-1,6-dione and B[a]P-3,6-dione. Based on the B[a]P-1,6 and 3,6-dione formation, approximately 4µM of radical cation was generated. In the mutagenesis assays, the radical cations produced in situ showed a dose-dependent increase in mutagenicity from 0.25 µM to 10 µM B[a]P with no significant increase seen with further escalation to 50 µM B[a]P. However, mutagenesis was 200-fold less than with the AKR pathway derived B[a]P, 7–8 dione. Mutant p53 plasmids, which yield red colonies, were recovered from the yeast to study the pattern and spectrum of mutations. The mutation pattern observed was G to T (31%) > G to C (29%) > G to A (14%). The frequency of codons mutated by the B[a]P radical cations was essentially random and not enriched at known cancer hotspots. The quinone products of radical cations, B[a]P-1,6-dione and B[a]P-3,6-dione were more mutagenic than the radical cation reactions, but still less mutagenic than AKR derived B[a]P-7,8-dione. We conclude that B[a]P radical cations and their quinone products are weakly mutagenic in this yeast-based system compared to redox cycling PAH o-quinones. PMID:22768918

  3. Sulfate radical-based degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls: Effects of chloride ion and reaction kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Guo-Dong [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Dionysiou, Dionysios D. [Environmental Engineering and Science Program, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0071 (United States); Wang, Yu [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Zhou, Dong-Mei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A kinetic model was used to predict the radical species and their distributions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The generated radical species were identified by EPR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second-order rate constants of sulfate radical with PCBs were determined. - Abstract: Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}{center_dot}{sup -}) have been recently used for soil and groundwater remediation. The presence of chloride ion in natural or wastewater decreases the reactivity of sulfate radical system, but explanations for this behavior were inconsistent, and the mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, in this paper we investigated the effect of chloride ion on the degradation of 2,4,4 Prime -CB (PCB28) and biphenyl (BP) by persulfate, based on the produced SO{sub 4}{center_dot}{sup -}. The results showed that the presence of chloride ion greatly inhibited the transformation of PCB28 and BP. Transformation intermediates of BP were monitored, suggesting that the chloride ion can react with SO{sub 4}{center_dot}{sup -} to produce chlorine radical, which reacts with BP to generate chlorinated compounds. To better understand the underlying mechanisms of these processes, a kinetic model was developed for predicting the effect of chloride ion on the types of radical species and their distributions. The results showed that chloride ion could influence the selectivity of radical species and their distribution, and increase the concentration of the sum of radical species. In addition, the second-order rate constants of sulfate radical with PCBs were determined, and quantum-chemical descriptors were introduced to predict the rate constants of other PCBs based on our experimental data.

  4. Research progress on trifluoromethyl-based radical reaction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hao

    2017-12-01

    Due to the unique properties imparted by the trifluoromethyl group, such as high electron density and strong lipotropy, which effectively improve acidity, lipophilicity and metabolic stability of the molecule itself, trifluoromethyl-substituted organic compounds are becoming increasingly important as structural motifs in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. In this review, we present several methods developed for the direct introduction of a trifluoromethyl group, beginning with its rich and storied history. Then the present article addresses mechanism and process in carbon-carbon bond forming reaction based on radical process which is divided into three parts according to the way of CF3 radical generation. Finally, challenges and opportunities of researches on trifluoromethylation reactions facing are prospected.

  5. EPR study of the production of OH radicals in aqueous solutions of uranium irradiated by ultraviolet light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARKO DAKOVIĆ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish whether hydroxyl radicals (•OH were produced in UV-irradiated aqueous solutions of uranyl salts. The production of •OH was studied in uranyl acetate and nitrate solutions by an EPR spin trap method over a wide pH range, with variation of the uranium concentrations. The production of •OH in uranyl solutions irradiated with UV was unequivocally demonstrated for the first time using the EPR spin-trapping method. The production of •OH can be connected to speciation of uranium species in aqueous solutions, showing a complex dependence on the solution pH. When compared with the results of radiative de-excitation of excited uranyl (*UO22+ by the quenching of its fluorescence, the present results indicate that the generation of hydroxyl radicals plays a major role in the fluorescence decay of *UO22+. The role of the presence of carbonates and counter ions pertinent to environmental conditions in biological systems on the production of hydroxyl radicals was also assessed in an attempt to reveal the mechanism of *UO22+ de-excitation. Various mechanisms, including •OH production, are inferred but the main point is that the generation of •OH in uranium containing solutions must be considered when assessing uranium toxicity.

  6. Free radical transfer in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, C. von; Bothe, E.; Ulanski, P.

    1998-01-01

    For the present study of free-radical transfer in polymers pulse radiolysis and product studies have been carried out in aqueous solutions using thus far only the water-soluble polymers polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid and polyvinyl alcohol. When OH radicals, generated in the radiolysis of N 2 O-saturated aqueous solutions, react with polymers the lifetime of the polymer radical thus created very much depends on the number of radicals per polymer chain. When there are a large number of radicals per chain their bimolecular decay may be faster than the corresponding (diffusion controlled) decay of monomeric radicals, but when the macromolecule contains only few or even just one radical their lifetime is considerably prolonged. Highly charged polymers such as polyacrylic acid at high pH attain a rod-like conformation which again favors a long lifetime of the radicals. Under such conditions, radical transfer reactions can occur. For example, in polyacrylic acid OH radicals generate two kinds of radicals side by side. The radical in β-position to the carboxylate group converts into the thermodynamically more stable α-radicals by an H-transfer reaction as can be followed by spectrophotometry. Besides radical transfer reactions β-fragmentation reactions occur causing chain scission. Such reactions can be followed in a pulse radiolysis experiment by conductometry, because counter ions are released upon chain scission. Such a process is especially effective in the case of polymethacrylic acid, where it results in a chain depolymerization. An intramolecular H-abstraction is also observed in the γ-radiolysis of polyacrylic acid with the corresponding peroxyl radicals. This causes a chain reaction to occur. The resulting hydroperoxides are unstable and decarboxylate given rise to acetylacetone-like products. In polyvinyl alcohol the peroxyl radicals in α-position to the alcohol function undergo HO 2 -elimination. This prevents a scission of the polymer chain in the

  7. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in the muon-electron decay channel at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marienfeld, Markus

    2011-07-15

    The start of proton-proton collisions at the LHC inaugurates a new era in high-energy physics. It enables the possibility of discoveries at the high-energy frontier and also allows for studies of known Standard Model processes with unrivalled precision. Top quark pairs are produced at high rates and allow for precision measurements of the properties of the top quark with high statistics. The measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV is presented using the dileptonic decay channel with a muon-electron pair in the final state. The data sample, which is used in this analysis, corresponds the complete 2010 data taking period with an integrated luminosity of 35.9 pb{sup -1}. Top quark pair candidate events are selected in a cut-based event selection. Based on 59 observed muon-electron events in the final state event sample, the top quark pair production cross section is measured to be {sigma}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t}=(156{+-}25(stat.){+-}14(sys.)) pb. Furthermore, a kinematic event reconstruction is applied, which is complementary to the use of b-tagging techniques, and validates the top quark-like topology of the selected events. First results from the measurement of differential cross sections based on the data from the complete 2010 data taking period are presented. For the first time in the CMS collaboration, the cross section of the production of top quark pairs is measured differentially as a function of the kinematic observables of the final state objects, such as the transverse momentum p{sub T} of the leptons and the invariant mass of the lepton pair. Based on the solution of the kinematic event reconstruction, the cross section is also calculated differentially as a function of the kinematic properties of the reconstructed top-antitop quark pair. First results from the measurement of differential cross sections as a function of the kinematics of the final state leptons are presented, using the

  8. Measurement of the ratio of prompt {chi}{sub c} to J/{psi} production in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Abellan Beteta, C. [Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Adrover, C. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Affolder, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Ajaltouni, Z. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Alexander, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ali, S. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), Gatchina (Russian Federation); Alvarez Cartelle, P. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves, A.A. [Sezione INFN di Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Amato, S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Amhis, Y. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Anderson, J. [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Appleby, R.B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Aquines Gutierrez, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (MPIK), Heidelberg (Germany); Archilli, F. [Laboratori Nazionali dell' INFN di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); and others

    2012-12-05

    The prompt production of charmonium {chi}{sub c} and J/{psi} states is studied in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. The {chi}{sub c} and J/{psi} mesons are identified through their decays {chi}{sub c}{yields}J/{psi}{gamma} and J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} using 36 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the LHCb detector in 2010. The ratio of the prompt production cross-sections for {chi}{sub c} and J/{psi}, {sigma}({chi}{sub c}{yields}J/{psi}{gamma})/{sigma}(J/{psi}), is determined as a function of the J/{psi} transverse momentum in the range 2

  9. Damage of polyesters by the atmospheric free radical oxidant NO3 •: a product study involving model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeschen, Catrin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Manufactured polymer materials are used in increasingly demanding applications, but their lifetime is strongly influenced by environmental conditions. In particular, weathering and ageing leads to dramatic changes in the properties of the polymers, which results in decreased service life and limited usage. Despite the heavy reliance of our society on polymers, the mechanism of their degradation upon exposure to environmental oxidants is barely understood. In this work, model systems of important structural motifs in commercial high-performing polyesters were used to study the reaction with the night-time free radical oxidant NO3 • in the absence and presence of other radical and non-radical oxidants. Identification of the products revealed ‘hot spots’ in polyesters that are particularly vulnerable to attack by NO3 • and insight into the mechanism of oxidative damage by this environmentally important radical. It is suggested that both intermediates as well as products of these reactions are potentially capable of promoting further degradation processes in polyesters under environmental conditions. PMID:24204400

  10. Radicals of DNA and DNA nucleotides generated by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybytniak, G.

    2004-01-01

    A first stage of cell processes leading to DNA damage of initiated by radical reactions. In a model system such transformations were generated by ionising radiation which involves production of electron loss and electron gain centers of the substrate and radical formation. Using cryogenic ESR spectroscopy it was found that the DNA nucleotides, which convert to radical anions upon electron capture undergo the separation of unpaired spin and charge due to protonation. Circular and linear dichroism studies enabled to conclude that iron ions(III) induce strong changes in the DNA helical structure indicating their coordination with nitrogen bases. The repair of DNA radicals produced via radiolytic oxidation, i.e. the guanine radical cation and the allyl type radical of thymine, is possible at elevated temperatures due to the involvement of sulphydryl groups. The influence of the thiol charge is then limited

  11. Copper-mediated homogeneous living radical polymerization of acrylamide with waxy potato starch-based macroinitiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifei; Cao, Huatang; van Mastrigt, Frank; Pei, Yutao; Picchioni, Francesco

    2018-07-15

    Cu 0 -mediated living radical polymerization (Cu 0 -mediated LRP) was employed in this research for the synthesis of starch-g-polyacrylamide (St-g-PAM). The use of a controlled radical grafting technique is necessary, as compared to the traditional free-radical polymerization methods, in order to obtain a well-defined structure of the final product. This is in turn essential for studying the relationship between such structure and the end-properties. Waxy potato starch-based water-soluble macroinitiator was first synthesized by esterification with 2-bromopropionyl bromide in the mixture of dimethylacetamide and lithium chloride. With the obtained macroinitiator, St-g-PAM was homogeneously synthesized by aqueous Cu 0 -mediated LRP using CuBr/hexamethylated tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Me 6 Tren) as catalyst. The successful synthesis of the macroinitiator and St-g-PAM was proved by NMR, FT-IR, SEM, XRD and TGA analysis. The molecular weight and polydispersity of PAM chains were analyzed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) after hydrolyzing the starch backbone. Monomer conversion was monitored by gas chromatography (GC), on the basis of which the kinetics were determined. A preliminarily rheological study was performed on aqueous solutions of the prepared materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Watson-Crick Base Pair Radical Cation as a Model for Oxidative Damage in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feketeová, Linda; Chan, Bun; Khairallah, George N; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maitre, Philippe; Radom, Leo; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2017-07-06

    The deleterious cellular effects of ionizing radiation are well-known, but the mechanisms causing DNA damage are poorly understood. The accepted molecular events involve initial oxidation and deprotonation at guanine sites, triggering hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from the sugar moieties, causing DNA strand breaks. Probing the chemistry of the initially formed radical cation has been challenging. Here, we generate, spectroscopically characterize, and examine the reactivity of the Watson-Crick nucleobase pair radical cation in the gas phase. We observe rich chemistry, including proton transfer between the bases and propagation of the radical site in deoxyguanosine from the base to the sugar, thus rupturing the sugar. This first example of a gas-phase model system providing molecular-level details on the chemistry of an ionized DNA base pair paves the way toward a more complete understanding of molecular processes induced by radiation. It also highlights the role of radical propagation in chemistry, biology, and nanotechnology.

  13. Antitumor potential induction and free radicals production in melanoma cells by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faiao-Flores, F. [Biochemical and Biophysical Laboratory, Butantan Institute, 1500 Vital Brasil Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, 455 Doutor Arnaldo Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coelho, P.R.P.; Muniz, R.O.R.; Souza, G.S. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Research, 2242 Lineu Prestes Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Arruda-Neto, J. [Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, 187 Matao Street, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [FESP, Sao Paulo Engineering School, 5520 Nove de Julho Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Maria, Durvanei A., E-mail: durvaneiaugusto@yahoo.com.br [Biochemical and Biophysical Laboratory, Butantan Institute, 1500 Vital Brasil Avenue, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    Antiproliferative and oxidative damage effects occurring in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in normal fibroblasts and melanoma cell lines were analyzed. Melanoma cells and normal fibroblasts were treated with different concentrations of Boronophenylalanine and irradiated with thermal neutron flux. The cellular viability and the oxidative stress were determined. BNCT induced free radicals production and proliferative potential inhibition in melanoma cells. Therefore, this therapeutic technique could be considered efficient to inhibit growth of melanoma with minimal effects on normal tissues. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) induces melanoma cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BNCT stimulates free radicals production and proliferative inhibition in melanoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It produces tumor membrane degeneration and destruction with apoptotic bodies formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This therapy damages tumor cells selectively, with minimum effects on normal adjacent tissue.

  14. Evaluation of radical scavenging activity, intestinal cell viability and antifungal activity of Brazilian propolis by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Francisco, Lizziane; Pinto, Diana; Rosseto, Hélen; Toledo, Lucas; Santos, Rafaela; Tobaldini-Valério, Flávia; Svidzinski, Terezinha; Bruschi, Marcos; Sarmento, Bruno; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Rodrigues, Francisca

    2018-03-01

    Propolis is a natural adhesive resinous compound produced by honeybees to protect hives from bacteria and fungi, being extremely expensive for food industry. During propolis production, a resinous by-product is formed. This resinous waste is currently undervalued and underexploited. Accordingly, in this study the proximate physical and chemical quality, as well as the antioxidant activity, radical scavenging activity and cell viability of this by-product were evaluated and compared with propolis in order to boost new applications in food and pharmaceutical industries. The results revealed that the by-product meets the physical and chemical quality standards expected and showed that the propolis waste contains similar amounts of total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) to propolis. Also, a good scavenging activity against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) determined by the assays of superoxide anion radical (O 2 - ), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), nitric oxide (NO) and peroxyl radical (ROO) were determined. Linear positive correlations were established between the TPC of both samples and the antioxidant activity evaluated by three different methods (DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays). The extracts were also screened for cell viability assays in two different intestinal cell lines (HT29-MTX and Caco-2), showing a viability concentration-dependent. Similarly, the Artemia salina assay, used to assess toxicity, demonstrated the concentration influence on results. Finally, the antifungal activity against ATCC species of Candida was demonstrated. These results suggest that propolis by-product can be used as a new rich source of bioactive compounds for different areas, such as food or pharmaceutical. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gnosticism and Radical Feminism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahana, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and radical feminism would easily fall under this definition. There is, however, one major difference: since radical feminism is a relatively recent phenomenon which also benefited from modern modes of text production and preservation, almost all of the sources are still with us. This, in turn, may allow us...... to use radical feminism to make certain aspects of ancient Gnosticism re-emerge from their long submersion, provided that enough similarities can be independently drawn between the two phenomena to merit such a comparison. This paper therefore presents a comparison between concepts and positions...

  16. Role of the NMDA receptor and iron on free radical production and brain damage following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Doo Soon; Jeon, Jeong Wook; Lee, Jin Soo; Won, Seok Joon; Cho, Sung Ig; Lee, Yong Beom; Gwag, Byoung Joo

    2012-05-21

    Excess activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and iron is believed to contribute to free radical production and neuronal death following hypoxic ischemia. We examined the possibility that both NMDA receptor activation and iron overload determine spatial and temporal patterns of free radical production after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Mitochondrial free radical (MFR) levels were maximally increased in neurons in the core at 1 h and 24 h after tMCAO. Early MFR production was blocked by administration of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, but not deferoxamine, an iron chelator. Neither MK-801 nor deferoxamine attenuated late MFR production in the core. Increased MFRs were observed in penumbral neurons within 6 h and gradually increased over 24 h after tMCAO. Slowly-evolving MFRs in the core and penumbra were accompanied by iron overload. Deferoxamine blocked iron overload but reduced MFR production only in the penumbra. Combined MK-801/deferoxamine reduced late MFR production in both core and penumbra in an additive manner. Combination therapy significantly ameliorated infarction compared with monotherapy. These findings suggest that the NMDA receptor activation and iron overload mediate late MFR production and infarction after tMCAO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lipophilic fluorescent products of free radicals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ivica, Josko; Wilhelm, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 3 (2014), s. 365-372 ISSN 1213-8118 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0298 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : lipofuscin-like pigments * lipid peroxidation * free radical s * fluorescence Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2014

  18. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mourrain; J.B. Lasserre; M. Laurent (Monique); P. Rostalski; P. Trebuchet (Philippe)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming it complex (resp. real) variety is nte. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and

  19. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mourrain; J.B. Lasserre; M. Laurent (Monique); P. Rostalski; P. Trebuchet (Philippe)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming it complex (resp. real) variety is nte. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and

  20. Moment matrices, border bases and radical computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasserre, J.B.; Laurent, M.; Mourrain, B.; Rostalski, P.; Trébuchet, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe new methods to compute the radical (resp. real radical) of an ideal, assuming its complex (resp. real) variety is finite. The aim is to combine approaches for solving a system of polynomial equations with dual methods which involve moment matrices and semi-definite

  1. Reaction between protein radicals and other biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østdal, H.; Davies, M.J.; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates the reactivity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) radicals towards different biomolecules (urate, linoleic acid, and a polypeptide, poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr)). The BSA radical was formed at room temperature through a direct protein-to-protein radical transfer from H(2)O(2....... Subsequent analysis showed a decrease in the concentration of urate upon reaction with the BSA radical, while the BSA radical in the presence of poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr) resulted in increased formation of the characteristic protein oxidation product, dityrosine. Reaction between the BSA radical and a linoleic acid...

  2. Sugar Radical Formation by a Proton Coupled Hole Transfer in 2′-Deoxyguanosine Radical Cation (2′-dG•+): A Theoretical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical work has established that electronic excitation of a guanine cation radical in nucleosides or in DNA itself leads to sugar radical formation by deprotonation from the dexoxyribose sugar. In this work we investigate a ground electronic state pathway for such sugar radical formation in a hydrated one electron oxidized 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG•+ + 7H2O), using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functional and the 6-31G* basis set. We follow the stretching of the C5′-H bond in dG•+ to gain an understanding of the energy requirements to transfer the hole from the base to sugar ring and then to deprotonate to proton acceptor sites in solution and on the guanine ring. The geometries of reactant (dG•+ + 7H2O), transition state (TS) for deprotonation of C5′ site and product (dG(•C5′, N7-H+) + 7 H2O) were fully optimized. The zero point energy (ZPE) corrected activation energy (TS) for the proton transfer (PT) from C5′ is calculated to be 9.0 kcal/mol and is achieved by stretching the C5′-H bond by 0.13 Å from its equilibrium bond distance (1.099 Å). Remarkably, this small bond stretch is sufficient to transfer the “hole” (positive charge and spin) from guanine to the C5′ site on the deoxyribose group. Beyond the TS, the proton (H+) spontaneously adds to water to form a hydronium ion (H3O+) as an intermediate. The proton subsequently transfers to the N7 site of the guanine (product). The 9 kcal/mol barrier suggests slow thermal conversion of the cation radical to the sugar radical but also suggests that localized vibrational excitations would be sufficient to induce rapid sugar radical formation in DNA base cation radicals. PMID:19754084

  3. Quantification of hydroxyl radical produced during phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan M; Aust, Steven D

    2009-12-01

    To quantitate hydroxyl radicals produced during phacoemulsification with various irrigating solutions and conditions used in cataract surgery. Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA. All experiments were performed using an Infiniti Vision System phacoemulsifier with irrigation and aspiration. Hydroxyl radicals were quantitated using electron spin resonance spectroscopy and a spectrophotometric assay for malondialdehyde, which is formed by the oxidation of deoxyribose by the hydroxyl radical. Hydroxyl radical production increased during longitudinal-stroking phacoemulsification as power levels were increased in a nonlinear, nonexponential fashion. The detection of hydroxyl radical was reduced in irrigating solutions containing organic molecules (eg, citrate, acetate, glutathione, dextrose) and further reduced in Navstel, an irrigating solution containing a viscosity-modifying agent, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose. Hydroxyl radicals produced in settings representative of those used in phacoemulsification cataract surgery were quantitated using the deoxyribose method. Hydroxyl radical production was dependent on the level of ultrasound power applied and the irrigating solution used. Oxidative stress on the eye during phacoemulsification may be minimized by using irrigating solutions that contain organic molecules, including the viscosity-modifying agent hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, that can compete for reaction with hydroxyl radicals.

  4. Metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization and radical polyaddition for precision polymer synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, M; Satoh, K [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kamigaito, M, E-mail: kamigait@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.j

    2009-08-01

    The metal-catalyzed radical addition reaction can be evolved into two different polymerization mechanisms, i.e.; chain- and step-growth polymerizations, while both the polymerizations are based on the same metal-catalyzed radical formation reaction. The former is a widely employed metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization or atom transfer radical polymerization of common vinyl monomers, and the latter is a novel metal-catalyzed radical polyaddition of designed monomer with an unconjugated C=C double bond and a reactive C-Cl bond in one molecule. The simultaneous ruthenium-catalyzed living radical polymerization of methyl acrylate and radical polyaddition of 3-butenyl 2-chloropropionate was achieved with Ru(Cp*)Cl(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2} to afford the controlled polymers, in which the homopolymer segments with the controlled chain length were connected by the ester linkage.

  5. Interaction of radiation-generated radicals with myoglobin in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitburn, K.D.; Hoffman, M.Z.

    1985-01-01

    The γ-radiolysis of aqueous solutions of ferrimyoglobin in the presence of N 2 O at pH 7.3 has been examined as a function of added catalase and oxygen. Changes in the nature of the heme group have been monitored by visible absorption spectrophotometry and analysed quantitatively by a multiple wavelength method based on Beer's Law. Simple chemical analyses have been used to confirm qualitative identification of the product derivatives. As observed previously, the ferriheme is reduced by indirect globin-mediated action initiated by radical OH/H radical. The yield of reduced product decreases as [O 2 ] derived from irradiated water and from protein-mediated processes in oxygenated solution, is eliminated by the presence of catalase. Formation of a hemichrome form of ferrimyoglobin is apparent at higher doses in the presence of O 2 . These results demonstrate that oxygen plays an important role in controlling the nature and extent of redox that manifests ultimately on the heme group of ferrimyoglobin as a result of the initial interaction of radical OH/H radical. (author)

  6. Habitat of in vivo transformation influences the levels of free radical scavengers in Clinostomum complanatum: implications for free radical scavenger based vaccines against trematode infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Atif; Rizvi, Asim; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Masood

    2014-01-01

    Since free radical scavengers of parasite origin like glutathione-S-transferase and superoxide dismutase are being explored as prospective vaccine targets, availability of these molecules within the parasite infecting different hosts as well as different sites of infection is of considerable importance. Using Clinostomum complanatum, as a model helminth parasite, we analysed the effects of habitat of in vivo transformation on free radical scavengers of this trematode parasite. Using three different animal models for in vivo transformation and markedly different sites of infection, progenetic metacercaria of C. complanatum were transformed to adult ovigerous worms. Whole worm homogenates were used to estimate the levels of lipid peroxidation, a marker of oxidative stress and free radical scavengers. Site of in vivo transformation was found to drastically affect the levels of free radical scavengers in this model trematode parasite. It was observed that oxygen availability at the site of infection probably influences levels of free radical scavengers in trematode parasites. This is the first report showing that habitat of in vivo transformation affects levels of free radical scavengers in trematode parasites. Since free radical scavengers are prospective vaccine targets and parasite infection at ectopic sites is common, we propose that infections at different sites, may respond differently to free radical scavenger based vaccines.

  7. Physiology of free radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals imply that every atom, molecule, ion, group of atoms, or molecules with one or several non-paired electrons in outer orbital. Among these are: nitrogenoxide (NO•, superoxide-anion-radical (O2•-, hydroxyl radical (OH•, peroxyl radical (ROO•, alcoxyl radical (RO• and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2•. However, reactive oxygen species also include components without non-paired electrons in outer orbital (so-called reactive non-radical agents, such as: singlet oxygen (1O2, peroxynitrite (ONOO-, hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2, hypochloric acid (eg. HOCl and ozone (O3. High concentrations of free radicals lead to the development of oxidative stress which is a precondition for numerous pathological effects. However, low and moderate concentrations of these matter, which occur quite normally during cell metabolic activity, play multiple significant roles in many reactions. Some of these are: regulation of signal pathways within the cell and between cells, the role of chemoattractors and leukocyte activators, the role in phagocytosis, participation in maintaining, changes in the position and shape of the cell, assisting the cell during adaption and recovery from damage (e.g.caused by physical effort, the role in normal cell growth, programmed cell death (apoptosis and cell ageing, in the synthesis of essential biological compounds and energy production, as well as the contribution to the regulation of the vascular tone, actually, tissue vascularization.

  8. Experimental study of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals: kinetics and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braure, Tristan; Bedjanian, Yuri; Romanias, Manolis N; Morin, Julien; Riffault, Véronique; Tomas, Alexandre; Coddeville, Patrice

    2014-10-09

    The kinetics of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals has been studied using a low-pressure flow tube reactor coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer: OH + C10H16 → products (1), OD + C10H16 → products (2). The rate constants of the title reactions were determined using four different approaches: either monitoring the kinetics of OH (OD) radicals or limonene consumption in excess of limonene or of the radicals, respectively (absolute method), and by the relative rate method using either the reaction OH (OD) + Br2 or OH (OD) + DMDS (dimethyl disulfide) as the reference one and following HOBr (DOBr) formation or DMDS and limonene consumption, respectively. As a result of the absolute and relative measurements, the overall rate coefficients, k1 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(-11) exp((515 ± 50)/T) and k2 = (2.5 ± 0.6) × 10(-11) exp((575 ± 60)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), were determined at a pressure of 1 Torr of helium over the temperature ranges 220-360 and 233-353 K, respectively. k1 was found to be pressure independent over the range 0.5-5 Torr. There are two possible pathways for the reaction between OH (OD) and limonene: addition of the radical to one of the limonene double bonds (reactions 1a and 2a ) and abstraction of a hydrogen atom (reactions 1b and 2b ), resulting in the formation of H2O (HOD). Measurements of the HOD yield as a function of temperature led to the following branching ratio of the H atom abstraction channel: k2b/k2 = (0.07 ± 0.03) × exp((460 ± 140)/T) for T = (253-355) K.

  9. Biochemistry and pathology of radical-mediated protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, R T; Fu, S; Stocker, R

    1997-01-01

    Radical-mediated damage to proteins may be initiated by electron leakage, metal-ion-dependent reactions and autoxidation of lipids and sugars. The consequent protein oxidation is O2-dependent, and involves several propagating radicals, notably alkoxyl radicals. Its products include several catego...

  10. Theoretical investigation of the production of strand breaks in DNA by water radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Magee, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    A calculation has been made of the indirect action of radiation on SV40 DNA in dilute aqueous solution, including the extent of OH reaction with both the sugar moiety and the bases. A realistic DNA model is used along with a track model that gives the correct decay rates of hydrated electrons and OH radicals in pure water with the same calculational techniques. It was found, in agreement with experiment, that 80% of the OH attack on DNA is on the bases and 20% is on the sugar. It is estimated that the probability is almost non-existent ( -6 ) for two OH radicals from the same track or from two tracks to reach sugars on opposite strands within 12 base pairs from each other. Thus double strand breaks that depend linearly on the dose (as we find in a companion experimental programme) must arise from some other mechanism. The calculated single strand break probabilities are in good agreement with experiment. (author)

  11. Oxidation of benzene by radiolytically produced OH radicals. [x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, G W; Schuler, R H [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1978-01-01

    The radiolysis of N/sub 2/O saturated-aqueous solutions of benzene-/sup 14/C has been examined using radio-liquid chromatographic methods to follow the quantitative aspects of the reactions of hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals. In the absence of a radical oxidant, at least five important products are produced. The total yield of 5.8 observed for the incorporation of benzene into products accounts for essentially all of the radicals initially produced from the water. Dimeric products predominate with a total yield of 4.1. Phenol is produced with a yield of only 0.8 indicating a disproportionation/combination ratio for hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals of < = 0.4. In the presence of 2mM ferricyanide the hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals are quantitatively oxidized to phenol with no trace (< 1%) remaining of dimeric or other high molecular weight products. The initial yield for phenol formation (6.0 molecules/100 eV) provides a measure for OH production in N/sub 2/O saturated aqueous solutions.

  12. The first radical-based spintronic memristors: Towards resistive RAMs made of organic magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Karin; Krist, Florian; Seyfferle, Simon; Hoefel, Udo; Paretzki, Alexa; Dressel, Martin; Bogani, Lapo; Institut Fuer Anorganische Chemie, University of Stuttgart Collaboration; 1. Physikalisches Institut, University of Stuttgart Team

    2014-03-01

    Using molecules as building blocks for electronic devices offers ample possibilities for new device functionalities due to a chemical tunability much higher than that of standard inorganic materials, and at the same time offers a decrease in the size of the electronic component down to the single-molecule level. Purely organic molecules containing no metallic centers such as organic radicals can serve as an electronic component with magnetic properties due to the unpaired electron in the radical state. Here we present memristive logic units based on organic radicals of the nitronyl-nitroxide kind. Integrating these purely molecular units as a spin coated layer into crossbar arrays, electrically induced unipolar resistive switching is observed with a change in resistance of up to 100%. We introduce a model based on filamentary reorganization of molecules of different oxidation state revealing the importance of the molecular nature for the switching properties. The major role of the oxidation state of these paramagnetic molecules introduces a magnetic field dependence to the device functionality, which goes along with magnetoresistive charactistics observed for the material. These are the first steps towards a spintronic implementation of organic radicals in electronic devices.

  13. Toll-Like Receptor-Mediated Free Radical Generation in Clonorchis sinensis Excretory-Secretory Product-Treated Cholangiocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahk, Young Yil; Pak, Jhang Ho

    2016-10-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by direct contact with Clonorchis sinensis worms and their excretory-secretory products (ESPs), is associated with chronic inflammation, malignant changes in bile ducts, and even cholangiocarcinogenesis. Our previous report revealed that intracellular free radicals enzymatically generated by C. sinensis ESPs cause NF-κB-mediated inflammation in human cholangiocarcinoma cells (HuCCT1). Therefore, the present study was conducted to examine the role of upstream Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on the initial host innate immune responses to infection. We found that treatment of HuCCT1 cells with native ESPs induced changes in TLR mRNA levels in a time-dependent manner, concomitant with the generation of free radicals. ESP-mediated free radical generation was markedly attenuated by preincubation of the cells with TLR1-4-neutralizing antibodies, indicating that at least TLR1 through 4 participate in stimulation of the host innate immune responses. These findings indicate that free radicals triggered by ESPs are critically involved in TLR signal transduction. Continuous signaling by this pathway may function in initiating C. sinensis infection-associated inflammation cascades, a detrimental event leading to progression to more severe hepatobiliary diseases.

  14. Production of perhydroxy radical (HO2) and oxygen in the radiolysis of aqueous solution and the LET effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Masashi

    1987-01-01

    This article aims to review the results concerning the production of perhydroxy radical (HO 2 ) and oxygen from irradiated aqueous solutions and the LET effects on these products, beginning with a brief introduction to the elementary primary processes in radiolysis of aqueous solution. Oxygen, if produced in the radiolysis of aqueous solution, may be considered responsible for the decreased oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) in biological systems exposed to high LET radiation. A Harwell's group has determined oxygen generated from aqueous ferrous solutions irradiated with heavy ions and concluded that the oxygen is a precursor of perhydroxy radicals. The LET-dependent yields for perhydroxy radical have been determined by LaVerne and Schuler; the analysis of their results sheds light into the reactions taking place in high-LET track cores. In conjunction with these results, the possible contributions to the LET effects are pointed out and discussed of the energetic secondary electrons ejected from the track core by knock-on collision with heavy ions and of the variation in the track core size with energy of the heavy particles. (author)

  15. Electron gain and electron loss radicals stabilized on the purine and pyrimidine of a cocrystal exhibiting base-base interstacking: ESR-ENDOR of X-irradiated adenosine:5-bromouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, L.; Bernhard, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    The predominant free radicals trapped in cocrystals of adenosine:5-bromouracil X-irradiated at 12 0 K were identified by ESR-ENDOR spectroscopy and the radical reactions were followed upon annealing to 480 0 K. The dominant electron abstraction and electron addition products stabilized on the bases at 12 0 K are observed to be the bromouracil π-cation and the adenine π-cation and π-anion. The formation of an anion on bromouracil is inferred from the presence of a radical formed by deuterium addition to C 6 of bromouracil at higher temperatures. Above 40 0 K the bromouracil π-cation appears to decay by recombination and is reduced to undetectable levels at approx.170 0 K. Both adenine π-ions are also observed to decay within the same temperature range. Above 200 0 K hydrogen adducts are stabilized on the bases. Experiments using partially deuterated cocrystals indicate that the H-adducts are formed via both hydrogen addition and protonation of the respective anions. Two hydrogen abstraction radicals stabilized on the sugar residue are detectable at temperatures above 200 0 K, but these may be present at much lower temperatures. The results presented here question the generally accepted hypothesis that, in the presence of purine:pyrimidine stacking interactions, holes are predominantly transferred to the purines while electrns are predominantly transferred to the pyrimidines

  16. Effects of Solvent and Temperature on Free Radical Formation in Electronic Cigarette Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Zachary T; Goel, Reema; Reilly, Samantha M; Foulds, Jonathan; Muscat, Joshua; Elias, Ryan J; Richie, John P

    2018-01-16

    The ever-evolving market of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) presents a challenge for analyzing and characterizing the harmful products they can produce. Earlier we reported that e-cigarette aerosols can deliver high levels of reactive free radicals; however, there are few data characterizing the production of these potentially harmful oxidants. Thus, we have performed a detailed analysis of the different parameters affecting the production of free radical by e-cigarettes. Using a temperature-controlled e-cigarette device and a novel mechanism for reliably simulating e-cigarette usage conditions, including coil activation and puff flow, we analyzed the effects of temperature, wattage, and e-liquid solvent composition of propylene glycol (PG) and glycerol (GLY) on radical production. Free radicals in e-cigarette aerosols were spin-trapped and analyzed using electron paramagnetic resonance. Free radical production increased in a temperature-dependent manner, showing a nearly 2-fold increase between 100 and 300 °C under constant-temperature conditions. Free radical production under constant wattage showed an even greater increase when going from 10 to 50 W due, in part, to higher coil temperatures compared to constant-temperature conditions. The e-liquid PG content also heavily influenced free radical production, showing a nearly 3-fold increase upon comparison of ratios of 0:100 (PG:GLY) and 100:0 (PG:GLY). Increases in PG content were also associated with increases in aerosol-induced oxidation of biologically relevant lipids. These results demonstrate that the production of reactive free radicals in e-cigarette aerosols is highly solvent dependent and increases with an increase in temperature. Radical production was somewhat dependent on aerosol production at higher temperatures; however, disproportionately high levels of free radicals were observed at ≥100 °C despite limited aerosol production. Overall, these findings suggest that e-cigarettes can be

  17. Radical production efficiency and electrical characteristics of a coplanar barrier discharge built by multilayer ceramic technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jõgi, Indrek; Erme, Kalev; Levoll, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the electrical characteristics and radical production efficiency of a coplanar barrier discharge (CBD) device manufactured by Kyocera by multilayer ceramic technology. The device consisted of a number of linear electrodes with electrode and gap widths of 0.75 mm...

  18. The chemistry of separations ligand degradation by organic radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezyk, S.P.; Horne, G.P.; Mincher, B.J.; Zalupski, P.R.; Cook, A.R.; Wishart, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Solvent based extractions of used nuclear fuel use designer ligands in an organic phase extracting ligand complexed metal ions from an acidic aqueous phase. These extractions will be performed in highly radioactive environments, and the radiation chemistry of all these complexing agents and their diluents will play a major role in determining extraction efficiency, separation factors, and solvent-recycle longevity. Although there has been considerable effort in investigating ligand damage occurring in acidic water radiolysis conditions, only minimal fundamental kinetic and mechanistic data has been reported for the degradation of extraction ligands in the organic phase. Extraction solvent phases typically use normal alkanes such as dodecane, TPH, and kerosene as diluents. The radiolysis of such diluents produce a mixture of radical cations (R"."+), carbon-centered radicals (R".), solvated electrons, and molecular products such as hydrogen. Typically, the radical species will preferentially react with the dissolved oxygen present to produce relatively inert peroxyl radicals. This isolates the alkane radical cation species, R"."+ as the major radiolytically-induced organic species that can react with, and degrade, extraction agents in this phase. Here we report on our recent studies of organic radical cation reactions with 2 ligands: CMPO and TODGA. Elucidating these parameters, and combining them with the known acidic aqueous phase chemistry, will allow a full, fundamental, understanding of the impact of radiation on solvent extraction based separation processes to be achieved. (authors)

  19. Chemical repair of trypsin-histidinyl radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, S.V.; Ruvarac, I.; Jankovic, I.; Josimovic, L.

    1991-01-01

    Oxyl radicals, such as hydroxyl, alkoxyl and peroxyl, react with biomolecules to produce bioradicals. Unless chemically repaired by suitable antioxidants, these bioradicals form stable products. This leads to loss of biological function of parent biomolecules with deleterious biological results, such as mutagenesis and cancer. Consequently, the understanding of the mechanisms of oxyl radical damage to biomolecules and chemical repair of such damage is crucial for the development of strategies for anticarcinogenesis and radioprotection. In this study the chemical repair of the histidinyl radical generated upon the trichloromethylperoxyl radical reaction with trypsin vas investigated by gamma radiolysis. The trypsin histidinyl radical is a resonance-stabilized heterocyclic free radical which was found to be unreactive with oxygen. The efficacy of the chemical repair of the trypsin-histidinyl radical by endogenous antioxidants which are electron donors (e.g. 5-hydroxytryptophan, uric acid) is compared to that of antioxidants which are H-atom donors (e. g. glutathione). 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Free radicals in an Adamantane matrix. XI. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of conformations in the β-halo-tert-butyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.V.; Wood, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    The β-halo-tert-butyl radicals were prepared by x-irradiation of the corresponding isobutyl halides in an adamantane matrix at 77 0 K and their conformations were determined by analysis of their EPR spectra. The radicals are nonplanar at the radical site, the fluoro and chloro radicals trans eclipsed and the bromo and iodo radicals gauche staggered with respect to the relative orientation of the carbon halogen bond and the direction of the singly occupied orbital. Vibration-rotation motions about the favored conformation are much larger for the fluoro radical than for the others. The rate of interconversion of the inequivalent methylene protons is approximately 1.5 x 10 9 sec -1 for the bromo radical at 202 0 K while it is too slow to measure for the iodo radical at the same temperature. The barrier to interconversion has a lower limit of 3 kcal/mol for the bromo radical and higher than that for the iodo radical. The halogen and proton hfsc in gauss and the g values for the XCH 2 C(CH 3 ) 2 radicals are: 19 F = 103.7, CH 2 = 10.4, CH 3 = 23.3, g = 2.0030 at 214 K; 35 Cl = 19.5, CH 2 = 6.3, CH 3 = 21.1, g = 2.0042 at 215 K; 81 Br = 6.7, CH 2 = 21.4, 42.7, CH 3 = 21.4, g = 2.0010 at 202 K; 127 I = 7.0, CH 2 = 21.9, 43.8, CH 3 = 21.9, g = 2.0009 at 208 K. The fluoro radical decays to nonradical products above 318 0 K, the chloro radical converts to 2-methyl allyl radical above 306 0 K, the bromo radical converts to tert-butyl radical by exchange with a matrix proton (or deuteron) at 209 0 K as does the iodo radical above 225 0 K. Photolysis with a Xe lamp converts the bromo and iodo radicals to nonradical products in less than the experimental time constant of 0.3 sec. The hypothesis is put forward that the nonplanarity and high barrier to rotation observed explain the retention of stereochemical configuration in reactions involving β-chloro, β-bromo, and β-iodo alkyl radicals. (auth)

  1. Radicalization as a Vector: Exploring Non-Violent and Benevolent Processes of Radicalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Reidy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful radicalization posits three outcomes: extremism, terrorism or both. As these are undesirable, radicalization is understood as wholly malevolent and governments work to prevent and/or stop it. Nonetheless, a handful of scholars have recognized that the same radicalization process which results in either outcome may, theoretically at least, also have beneficial outcomes such as environmental awareness or human rights. This article explores one such outcome. Based on interviews with British Muslim aid workers (n=6 operating in Jihadist conflict zones post Arab spring and using constructivist grounded theory, it illustrates how the research participants radicalized to humanitarianism which resulted in them assisting the most plighted of Muslims by deploying to the most wanton of areas: ones commonly referred to as Jihadist conflict zones. Evidently, these destinations are shared with Jihadists and given the array of other observable similarities (socio-demographics and [pre-]mobilization behaviours, these morally opposed groups become conflated by the security services. This is further compounded by the fact that Jihadists manipulate and/or impersonate aid workers so as to funnel people and funds. To distinguish both, this article documents the benevolent pathway of the research participants and juxtaposes it to scholarly knowledge on Jihadist pathways. Socialization was revealed to be the key distinguishing feature rather than descriptive risk factors (such as ideology or moral outrage because the process of radicalization was not found to be the start of the radicalized pathway. It concludes that benevolently radicalized Islamic groups constitute an effective means of pathway divergence for particular typologies by offering an attractive and prosocial alternative to Jihadism. This strengths-based preventative approach (“what’s right” takes the form of a community-centric market competitor to Jihadism rather than a problem-based

  2. Radical fragmentation of six-membered oxygen-containing heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petryaev, E.P.; Kosobutskij, V.S.; Shadyro, O.I.

    1982-01-01

    Using chromatography, the composition and radiation-chemical yields of final products of desctruction of six-member saturated oxygen-containing heterocycles (the effect of #betta#-radiation on aqueous solutions of tetrahydropyran, 1,3-dioxane, 2,2 dimethyl-1,3 dioxane, 1,4-dioxane, paraldehyde) have been determined. It is established that the identified products are formed at the expense of decomposition of primary radicals of the initial compounds and point to the realization of the following fragmentation ways: 1) #betta#-scattering, 2) #betta#-scattering with a subsequent 1,5 migration of an H atom, 3) simultaneous rupture of two vicinal, relative to the radical center, bonds. A formation mechanism of the substances desctruction products is suggested. Material balance of the product yields of 1,3-dioxane radical synchronous decomposition is presented

  3. Reactions of carbonate radical with cobalt(II) aminopolycarboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, P.C.; Bardhan, D.K.; Bhattacharyya, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    Reactions of carbonate (CO 3 - radical) and bicarbonate (HCO 3 radical) radicals generated by photolysis of a carbonate or bicarbonate solution at pH 11.2 and 8.5, respectively, with Co(II) complexes of iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) have been studied. The rate constants for the reactions were in the order of 10 6 -10 7 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . From the time-resolved spectroscopy of the products formed after reaction of CO 3 - radical or HCO 3 radical, it is observed that CO 3 - radical or HCO 3 radical oxidize the metal center to its higher oxidation state. (author) 26 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  4. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of the Production of Free Radicals during Exercise and Their Function on Skeletal Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is an integral part of human life. Among significant biological changes during physical activity are increase of metabolism and production of free radicals. Free radical can be defined as molecule or molecular fragments containing unpaired electron in the outer orbital, which react with nearby molecules to obtain stability. These highly reactive molecules have various deleterious effects, such as reduced force generation and increased muscle atrophy. There is evidence that ROS produced during exercise has positive adaptation effects. ROS production leads to increased expression of the anti-oxidants. These molecules, by neutralizing free radicals, neutralize the negative effects of ROS. In addition, exercise-induced ROS leads to the expression of PGC-1α  protein, having a significant impact on various aspects of cell metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular respiration as well as metabolism of fat and glucose. This paper provides an overview of the evidence to date on the effects of ROS on exercising muscle. These aspects include the sources of ROS, their positive and negative cellular effects,  role of antioxidants, and ROS-dependent adaptations of muscle cells in response to physical exercise

  5. Investigating Pigment Radicals in Black Rice Using HPLC and Multi-EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Maeda, Hayato

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the location and distribution of paramagnetic species in black and white rice using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-band (9 GHz) EPR imaging (EPRI), and HPLC. EPR primarily detected two paramagnetic species in black rice, which were identified as a stable radical and Mn 2+ species, based on the g values and hyperfine components of the EPR signals. The signal from the stable radical appeared at g ≈ 2.00 and was relatively strong and stable. Subsequent noninvasive two-dimensional (2D) EPRI revealed that this stable radical was primarily located in the pigmented region of black rice, while very few radicals were observed in the rice interior. Pigments extracted from black rice were analyzed using HPLC; the major compound was found to be cyanidin-3-glucoside. EPR and HPLC results indicate that the stable radical was only found within the pigmented region of the rice, and that it could either be cyanidin-3-glucoside, or one of its oxidative decomposition products.

  6. Measurement of the cross-section ratio {sigma}({chi}{sub c2})/{sigma}({chi}{sub c1}) for prompt {chi}{sub c} production at {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Abellan Beteta, C. [Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Adrover, C. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Affolder, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Ajaltouni, Z. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Alexander, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), Gatchina (Russian Federation); Alvarez Cartelle, P. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves, A.A. [Sezione INFN di Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Amato, S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Amhis, Y. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Anderson, J. [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Appleby, R.B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Aquines Gutierrez, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (MPIK), Heidelberg (Germany); Archilli, F. [Laboratori Nazionali dell' INFN di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Arrabito, L. [CC-IN2P3, CNRS/IN2P3, Lyon-Villeurbanne (France); and others

    2012-08-14

    The prompt production of the charmonium {chi}{sub c1} and {chi}{sub c2} mesons has been studied in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The {chi}{sub c} mesons are identified through their decays {chi}{sub c}{yields}J/{psi}{gamma} with J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} using 36 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the LHCb detector in 2010. The ratio of the prompt production cross-sections for the two {chi}{sub c} spin states, {sigma}({chi}{sub c2})/{sigma}({chi}{sub c1}), has been determined as a function of the J/{psi} transverse momentum, p{sub T}{sup J/{psi}}, in the range from 2 to 15 GeV/c. The results are in agreement with the next-to-leading order non-relativistic QCD model at high p{sub T}{sup J/{psi}} and lie consistently above the pure leading-order colour-singlet prediction.

  7. Ozone production, nitrogen oxides, and radical budgets in Mexico City: observations from Pico de Tres Padres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Onasch, T. B.; Kroll, J. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Neuman, J. A.; Seila, R.; Zavala, M.; Knighton, W. B.

    2008-08-01

    Observations at a mountain-top site within the Mexico City basin are used to characterize ozone production and destruction, the nitrogen oxide budget, and the radical budget during the MILAGRO campaign. An ozone production rate of ~50 ppbv/h was observed in a stagnant air mass during the afternoon of 12 March 2006, which is among the highest observed anywhere in the world. Approximately half of the ozone destruction was due to the oxidation of NO2. During this time period ozone production was VOC-limited, deduced by a comparison of the radical production rates and the formation rate of NOx oxidation products (NOz) For [NOx]/[NOy] values between 0.2 and 0.8, gas-phase HNO3 typically accounted for less than 10% of NOz and accumulation-mode particulate nitrate (NO3-(PM)) accounted for 20% 70% of NOz, consistent with high ambient NH3 concentrations. The fraction of NOz accounted for by the sum of HNO3(g) and NO3-(PM) decreased with photochemical processing. This decrease is apparent even when dry deposition of HNO3 is accounted for, and indicates that HNO3 formation decreased relative to other NOx "sink" processes during the first 12 h of photochemistry and/or a significant fraction of the nitrate was associated with the coarse aerosol size mode. The ozone production efficiency of NOx on 11 and 12 March 2006 was approximately 7 on a time scale of one day. A new metric for ozone production efficiency that relates the dilution-adjusted ozone mixing ratio to cumulative OH exposure is proposed.

  8. Understanding in situ ozone production in the summertime through radical observations and modelling studies during the Clean air for London project (ClearfLo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Lisa K.; Stone, Daniel; Dunmore, Rachel; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Hopkins, James R.; Lee, James D.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Williams, Paul; Kleffmann, Jörg; Laufs, Sebastian; Woodward-Massey, Robert; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2018-02-01

    Measurements of OH, HO2, RO2i (alkene and aromatic-related RO2) and total RO2 radicals taken during the ClearfLo campaign in central London in the summer of 2012 are presented. A photostationary steady-state calculation of OH which considered measured OH reactivity as the OH sink term and the measured OH sources (of which HO2+ NO reaction and HONO photolysis dominated) compared well with the observed levels of OH. Comparison with calculations from a detailed box model utilising the Master Chemical Mechanism v3.2, however, highlighted a substantial discrepancy between radical observations under lower NOx conditions ([NO] model was missing a significant peroxy radical sink; the model overpredicted HO2 by up to a factor of 10 at these times. Known radical termination steps, such as HO2 uptake on aerosols, were not sufficient to reconcile the model-measurement discrepancies alone, suggesting other missing termination processes. This missing sink was most evident when the air reaching the site had previously passed over central London to the east and when elevated temperatures were experienced and, hence, contained higher concentrations of VOCs. Uncertainties in the degradation mechanism at low NOx of complex biogenic and diesel related VOC species, which were particularly elevated and dominated OH reactivity under these easterly flows, may account for some of the model-measurement disagreement. Under higher [NO] (> 3 ppbv) the box model increasingly underpredicted total [RO2]. The modelled and observed HO2 were in agreement, however, under elevated NO concentrations ranging from 7 to 15 ppbv. The model uncertainty under low NO conditions leads to more ozone production predicted using modelled peroxy radical concentrations ( ˜ 3 ppbv h-1) versus ozone production from peroxy radicals measured ( ˜ 1 ppbv h-1). Conversely, ozone production derived from the predicted peroxy radicals is up to an order of magnitude lower than from the observed peroxy radicals as [NO

  9. Modification of Cys-418 of pyruvate formate-lyase by methacrylic acid, based on its radical mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaga, W; Vielhaber, G; Wallach, J; Knappe, J

    2000-01-21

    The recently determined crystal structure of pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) suggested a new view of the mechanism of this glycyl radical enzyme, namely that intermediary thiyl radicals of Cys-418 and Cys-419 participate in different ways [Becker, A. et al. (1999) Nat. Struct. Biol. 6, 969-975]. We report here a suicide reaction of PFL that occurs with the substrate-analog methacrylate with retention of the protein radical (K(I)=0.42 mM, k(i)=0.14 min(-1)). Using [1-(14)C]methacrylate (synthesized via acetone cyanhydrin), the reaction end-product was identified by peptide mapping and cocrystallization experiments as S-(2-carboxy-(2S)-propyl) substituted Cys-418. The stereoselectivity of the observed Michael addition reaction is compatible with a radical mechanism that involves Cys-418 thiyl as nucleophile and Cys-419 as H-atom donor, thus supporting the functional assignments of these catalytic amino acid residues derived from the protein structure.

  10. Radical fashion and radical fashion innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, D.; Benedetto, Di A.C.

    2010-01-01

    This is a study of the related concepts of radical fashion and radical fashion innovation. Radical fashions are defined here as those that may never enter the market at all, and exist primarily on runway shows, in exhibitions and in publicity; by contrast, radical fashion innovations may be very

  11. Pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity in DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-11-01

    Nucleobase radicals are major products of the reactions between nucleic acids and hydroxyl radical, which is produced via the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. The nucleobase radicals also result from hydration of cation radicals that are produced via the direct effect of ionizing radiation. The role that nucleobase radicals play in strand scission has been investigated indirectly using ionizing radiation to generate them. More recently, the reactivity of nucleobase radicals resulting from formal hydrogen atom or hydroxyl radical addition to pyrimidines has been studied by independently generating the reactive intermediates via UV-photolysis of synthetic precursors. This approach has provided control over where the reactive intermediates are produced within biopolymers and facilitated studying their reactivity. The contributions to our understanding of pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity by this approach are summarized.

  12. Comparing Positively and Negatively Charged Distonic Radical Ions in Phenylperoxyl Forming Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peggy E; Marshall, David L; Poad, Berwyck L J; Narreddula, Venkateswara R; Kirk, Benjamin B; Trevitt, Adam J; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2018-06-04

    In the gas phase, arylperoxyl forming reactions play a significant role in low-temperature combustion and atmospheric processing of volatile organic compounds. We have previously demonstrated the application of charge-tagged phenyl radicals to explore the outcomes of these reactions using ion trap mass spectrometry. Here, we present a side-by-side comparison of rates and product distributions from the reaction of positively and negatively charge tagged phenyl radicals with dioxygen. The negatively charged distonic radical ions are found to react with significantly greater efficiency than their positively charged analogues. The product distributions of the anion reactions favor products of phenylperoxyl radical decomposition (e.g., phenoxyl radicals and cyclopentadienone), while the comparable fixed-charge cations yield the stabilized phenylperoxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations rationalize these differences as arising from the influence of the charged moiety on the energetics of rate-determining transition states and reaction intermediates within the phenylperoxyl reaction manifold and predict that this influence could extend to intra-molecular charge-radical separations of up to 14.5 Å. Experimental observations of reactions of the novel 4-(1-carboxylatoadamantyl)phenyl radical anion confirm that the influence of the charge on both rate and product distribution can be modulated by increasing the rigidly imposed separation between charge and radical sites. These findings provide a generalizable framework for predicting the influence of charged groups on polarizable radicals in gas phase distonic radical ions. Graphical Abstract.

  13. Fluorophore-based sensor for oxygen radicals in processing plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Faraz A.; Shohet, J. Leon; Sabat, Grzegorz; Sussman, Michael R.; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    A high concentration of radicals is present in many processing plasmas, which affects the processing conditions and the properties of materials exposed to the plasma. Determining the types and concentrations of free radicals present in the plasma is critical in order to determine their effects on the materials being processed. Current methods for detecting free radicals in a plasma require multiple expensive and bulky instruments, complex setups, and often, modifications to the plasma reactor. This work presents a simple technique that detects reactive-oxygen radicals incident on a surface from a plasma. The measurements are made using a fluorophore dye that is commonly used in biological and cellular systems for assay labeling in liquids. Using fluorometric analysis, it was found that the fluorophore reacts with oxygen radicals incident from the plasma, which is indicated by degradation of its fluorescence. As plasma power was increased, the quenching of the fluorescence significantly increased. Both immobilized and nonimmobilized fluorophore dyes were used and the results indicate that both states function effectively under vacuum conditions. The reaction mechanism is very similar to that of the liquid dye

  14. Fluorophore-based sensor for oxygen radicals in processing plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Faraz A.; Shohet, J. Leon, E-mail: shohet@engr.wisc.edu [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Sabat, Grzegorz; Sussman, Michael R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nishi, Yoshio [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A high concentration of radicals is present in many processing plasmas, which affects the processing conditions and the properties of materials exposed to the plasma. Determining the types and concentrations of free radicals present in the plasma is critical in order to determine their effects on the materials being processed. Current methods for detecting free radicals in a plasma require multiple expensive and bulky instruments, complex setups, and often, modifications to the plasma reactor. This work presents a simple technique that detects reactive-oxygen radicals incident on a surface from a plasma. The measurements are made using a fluorophore dye that is commonly used in biological and cellular systems for assay labeling in liquids. Using fluorometric analysis, it was found that the fluorophore reacts with oxygen radicals incident from the plasma, which is indicated by degradation of its fluorescence. As plasma power was increased, the quenching of the fluorescence significantly increased. Both immobilized and nonimmobilized fluorophore dyes were used and the results indicate that both states function effectively under vacuum conditions. The reaction mechanism is very similar to that of the liquid dye.

  15. Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Bernabé; Ceacero-Vega, Antonio A; Jiménez, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298 ± 2 K and 720 ± 5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.26), and (2.61 ± 0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18 ± 0.12), (1.49 ± 0.16), (1.41 ± 0.15), and (1.77 ± 0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed

  16. The chemistry of separations ligand degradation by organic radical cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezyk, S.P.; Horne, G.P. [California State University at Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840 (United States); Mincher, B.J.; Zalupski, P.R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Cook, A.R.; Wishart, J.F. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, 11973 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Solvent based extractions of used nuclear fuel use designer ligands in an organic phase extracting ligand complexed metal ions from an acidic aqueous phase. These extractions will be performed in highly radioactive environments, and the radiation chemistry of all these complexing agents and their diluents will play a major role in determining extraction efficiency, separation factors, and solvent-recycle longevity. Although there has been considerable effort in investigating ligand damage occurring in acidic water radiolysis conditions, only minimal fundamental kinetic and mechanistic data has been reported for the degradation of extraction ligands in the organic phase. Extraction solvent phases typically use normal alkanes such as dodecane, TPH, and kerosene as diluents. The radiolysis of such diluents produce a mixture of radical cations (R{sup .+}), carbon-centered radicals (R{sup .}), solvated electrons, and molecular products such as hydrogen. Typically, the radical species will preferentially react with the dissolved oxygen present to produce relatively inert peroxyl radicals. This isolates the alkane radical cation species, R{sup .+} as the major radiolytically-induced organic species that can react with, and degrade, extraction agents in this phase. Here we report on our recent studies of organic radical cation reactions with 2 ligands: CMPO and TODGA. Elucidating these parameters, and combining them with the known acidic aqueous phase chemistry, will allow a full, fundamental, understanding of the impact of radiation on solvent extraction based separation processes to be achieved. (authors)

  17. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yiteng [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kais, Sabre [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Berman, Gennady Petrovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-02

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on 1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and 2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence of product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects of noise. We believe that the quantum avian compass can play an important role in avian navigation and can also provide the foundation for a new generation of sensitive and selective magnetic-sensing nano-devices.

  18. Role of free radicals in radiation chemical aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenstock, C L

    1986-01-01

    Ionizing radiation initiates chemical changes in DNA, phospholipid membranes and other critical cell targets, that, if allowed to accumulate unrepaired, may lead to aging and other chronic effects. The chemical effects are free radical mediated, the principal damaging species being radical OH and to a lesser extent O2-anion radical and the molecular product H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Many compounds can act in combination with ionizing radiation, to amplify the potential oxidative stress. Chemicals, ultra-violet light, lipid peroxides and their breakdown products may increase the extent of acute and chronic radiobiological effects.

  19. Experimental and theoretical study of 2,6-difluorophenylnitrene, its radical cation, and their rearrangement products in argon matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, Claudio; Nussbaum, Rafael; Bally, Thomas

    2006-06-12

    2,6-Difluorophenylnitrene was reinvestigated both experimentally, in Ar matrices at 10 K, and computationally, by DFT and CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations. Almost-pure samples of both neutral rearrangement products (the bicyclic azirine and the cyclic ketenimine) of a phenylnitrene were prepared and characterized for the first time. These samples were then subjected to X-irradiation in the presence of CH2Cl2 as an electron scavenger, which led to ionization of the neutral intermediates. Thereby, it was shown that only the phenylnitrene and the cyclic ketenimine yield stable radical cations, whereas the bicyclic azirine decays to both of these compounds on ionization. The cyclic ketenimine yields a novel aromatic azatropylium-type radical cation. The electronic structure of the title compound is discussed in detail, and its relation to those of the iso-pi-electronic benzyl radical and phenylcarbene is traced.

  20. Laboratorio di Comunicazione Militante, Isola Art Centre, and MACAO: enhancing autonomous social organisation through artistic means and rethinking the radical imaginary and the radical imagination in curatorial practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Spinelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the relation between curatorial practice and political theory, through a recuperation and proposal of the philosophical work of Greek-French philosopher Cornelius Castoriadis. In it, I will isolated the terms the radical imaginary and the radical imagination, and argue that their relation to curatorial practice is exemplified in the politics of cultural spaces that use autonomous social organisation as their means for artistic production. In his writings, specifically in his manuscript The Imaginary Institution of Society (1998, Castoriadis uses the terms to describe the capacity of socialized human beings to rethink and criticize social structures, and sees the radical imaginary and the radical imagination as means of a radical social transformation towards autonomy, or rather towards autonomous social organisation. Within this framework, this article proposes a historical parallelism between three self-organised platforms for art and activism from Milan, such as Laboratorio di Comunicazione Militante, Isola Art Centre, and MACAO, arguing that they are three cases in which autonomous social organisation is a means for artistic and curatorial production. This historical parallelism, constructed around the concepts of the radical imaginary and the radical imagination, demonstrates how the work of Castoriadis is a valuable resource for contextualising and analysing processes politicization of artistic, curatorial and cultural practices. Based on his writings, this article wants to also highlight the importance of autonomous social organisation as a functional framework capable unpacking the complexity of the relation between artistic, curatorial and cultural practices and political and social activism.

  1. MRI of Retinal Free Radical Production With Laminar Resolution In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Biswal, Manas R.; Bredell, Bryce X.; Davis, Christopher; Roberts, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have suggested the hypothesis that quench-assisted 1/T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures free radical production with laminar resolution in vivo without the need of a contrast agent. Here, we test this hypothesis further by examining the spatial and detection sensitivity of quench-assisted 1/T1 MRI to strain, age, or retinal cell layer-specific genetic manipulations. Methods We studied: adult wild-type mice; mice at postnatal day 7 (P7); cre dependent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-specific MnSOD knockout mice; doxycycline-treated Sod2flox/flox mice lacking the cre transgene; and α-transducin knockout (Gnat1−/−) mice on a C57Bl/6 background. Transretinal 1/T1 profiles were mapped in vivo in the dark without or with antioxidant treatment, or followed by light exposure. We calibrated profiles spatially using optical coherence tomography. Results Dark-adapted RPE-specific MnSOD knockout mice had greater than normal 1/T1 in the RPE and outer nuclear layers that was corrected to wild-type levels by antioxidant treatment. Dark and light Gnat1−/− mice also had greater than normal outer retinal 1/T1 values. In adult wild-type mice, dark values of 1/T1 in the ellipsoid region and in the outer segment were suppressed by 13 minutes of light. By 29 minutes of light, 1/T1 reduction extended to the outer nuclear layer. Gnat1−/− mice demonstrated a faster light-evoked suppression of 1/T1 values in the outer retina. In P7 mice, transretinal 1/T1 profiles were the same in dark and light. Conclusions Quench-assisted MRI has the laminar resolution and detection sensitivity to evaluate normal and pathologic production of free radicals in vivo. PMID:26886890

  2. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, K.-C.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, S.-H.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2008-01-01

    each of these product channels calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory, although a clean determination of the barrier energy to H+acrolein is precluded by the substantial partitioning into rotational energy during the photolytic production of the nascent radicals. We compare the measured branching fraction to the H+acrolein product channel with a statistical prediction based on the calculated transition states

  3. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2008-08-01

    calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory, although a clean determination of the barrier energy to H+acrolein is precluded by the substantial partitioning into rotational energy during the photolytic production of the nascent radicals. We compare the measured branching fraction to the H+acrolein product channel with a statistical prediction based on the calculated transition states.

  4. Studies of radiation-produced radicals and radical ions. Progress report, June 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.F.

    1982-01-01

    The discovery and characterization of novel radical ions produced by the γ irradiation of solids continues to be a fertile field for investigation. This Progress Report describes the generation and ESR identification of several new paramagnetic species, some of which have long been sought as important intermediates in radiation chemistry. We have also contributed to a general theoretical problem in ESR spectroscopy. Solid-state studies of electron attachment reactions, both non-dissociative and dissociative, reveal interesting structural and chemical information about the molecular nature of these processes for simple compounds. In particular, ESR measurements of the spin distribution in the products allow a fairly sharp distinction to be drawn between radical anions and radical-anion pairs or adducts. Dimer radical anion formation can also take place but the crystal structure plays a role in this process, as expected. Some radical anions undergo photolysis to give radical-anion pairs which may then revert back to the original radical anion by a thermal reaction. The chemistry of these reversible processes is made more intricate by a competing reaction in which the radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from a neighboring molecule. However, the unraveling of this complication has also served to extend our knowledge of the role of quantum tunneling in chemical reactions. The results of this investigation testify to the potential of solid-state techniques for the study of novel and frangible radical ions. Progress in this field shows no sign of abating, as witness the recent discovery of perfluorocycloalkane radical anions and alkane radical cations

  5. Quenching of photoluminescence of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals by nitronyl nitroxide radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroyuk, Oleksandr L., E-mail: stroyuk@inphyschem-nas.kiev.ua [L.V. Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 31 Nauky avenue, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Yakovenko, Anastasiya V.; Raevskaya, Oleksandra E. [L.V. Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 31 Nauky avenue, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Plyusnin, Victor F. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Quenching of the photoluminescence of colloidal zinc oxide nanocrystals by a series of stable nitronyl nitroxide radicals was studied by means of stationary and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Among the studied radicals the most efficient quenchers of the ZnO luminescence are the carboxyl-substituted species. The meta-substituted radical was found to be a more active quencher, than para-substituted one due to a closer proximity of the radical center to the nanocrystals surface. The PL quenching has a complex dynamic/static character. The dynamic quenching arises from photocatalytic radical reduction by ZnO conduction band electrons, while the static quenching is caused by adsorption of the photoreduction products on the nanocrystal surface. The non-substituted and OH-substituted radicals are inferior to the products of their photoreduction in capability of adsorption of the ZnO surface, and the quenching is dominated by interactions between the nanocrystals and photoreduced hydroxylamines. In case of COOH-substituted radicals, however, the radicals compete with the photoreduction products for the surface sites of ZnO nanocrystals resulting in a dynamic character of photoluminescence quenching.

  6. Selective deuteration illuminates the importance of tunneling in the unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates to hydroxyl radical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy M; Barber, Victoria P; Fang, Yi; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Lester, Marsha I

    2017-11-21

    Ozonolysis of alkenes, an important nonphotolytic source of hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the atmosphere, proceeds through unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates. Here, we report a large kinetic isotope effect associated with the rate-limiting hydrogen-transfer step that releases OH radicals for a prototypical Criegee intermediate, CH 3 CHOO. IR excitation of selectively deuterated syn -CD 3 CHOO is shown to result in deuterium atom transfer and release OD radical products. Vibrational activation of syn -CD 3 CHOO is coupled with direct time-resolved detection of OD products to measure a 10-fold slower rate of unimolecular decay upon deuteration in the vicinity of the transition state barrier, which is confirmed by microcanonical statistical theory that incorporates quantum mechanical tunneling. The corresponding kinetic isotope effect of ∼10 is attributed primarily to the decreased probability of D-atom vs. H-atom transfer arising from tunneling. Master equation modeling is utilized to compute the thermal unimolecular decay rates for selectively and fully deuterated syn methyl-substituted Criegee intermediates under atmospheric conditions. At 298 K (1 atm), tunneling is predicted to enhance the thermal decay rate of syn -CH 3 CHOO compared with the deuterated species, giving rise to a significant kinetic isotope effect of ∼50.

  7. Hydroxyl radicals' production and ECG parameters during ischemia and reperfusion in rat, guinea pig and rabbit isolated heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulova, Hana; Stracina, Tibor; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Novakova, Marie; Taborska, Eva

    2013-06-01

    Ischemic and reperfusion injury is a serious condition related to numerous biochemical and electrical abnormalities of the myocardium. It has been repeatedly studied in various animal models. In this study, the production of hydroxyl radicals and electrophysiological parameters were compared in three species. Rat, guinea pig and rabbit isolated hearts were perfused according to Langendorff under strictly identical conditions. The heart rate and arrhythmia were monitored during ischemia and reperfusion periods at defined time intervals; the production of hydroxyl radical was determined by HPLC as 2.5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2.5-DHBA) formed by salicylic acid hydroxylation. Relationship between arrhythmias and production of 2.5-DHBA was studied. The inter-species differences were observed in timing of arrhythmias onset and their severity, and in the production of 2.5-DHBA in both ischemia and reperfusion. The most considerable changes were observed in rats, where arrhythmias appeared early and with highest severity during ischemia on one side and the regular rhythm was restored early and completely during reperfusion. The corresponding changes in the production of 2.5-DHBA were observed. It can be concluded that rat isolated heart is the most suitable model for evaluation of ischemia/reperfusion injury under given experimental conditions.

  8. Free radical interactions between raw materials in dry soup powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitio, Riikka; Orlien, Vibeke; Skibsted, Leif H

    2011-12-01

    Interactions at the free radical level were observed between dry ingredients in cauliflower soup powder, prepared by dry mixing of ingredients and rapeseed oil, which may be of importance for quality deterioration of such dry food products. The free radical concentrations of cauliflower soup powder, obtained by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, rapidly become smaller during storage (40°C and relative humidity of 75%) than the calculated concentrations of free radicals based on the free radical concentrations of the powder ingredients used to make the soup powder and stored separately under similar conditions. Similarly, free radical concentrations decreased faster when any combination of two powder ingredients (of the three major ingredients of the soup powder) were mixed together and stored at 50°C for 1week than when each powder component was stored separately. Furthermore, yeast extract powder was found to play a key role when free radical interactions between powder ingredients occurred. The incubation of rapeseed oil with powder ingredients at 45°C for 24h, indicated the ability of cauliflower powder to increase the concentration of hydroperoxides in rapeseed oil, while yeast extract powder was found to prevent this hydroperoxide formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental and theoretical understanding of the gas phase oxidation of atmospheric amides with OH radicals: kinetics, products, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borduas, Nadine; da Silva, Gabriel; Murphy, Jennifer G; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-05-14

    Atmospheric amides have primary and secondary sources and are present in ambient air at low pptv levels. To better assess the fate of amides in the atmosphere, the room temperature (298 ± 3 K) rate coefficients of five different amides with OH radicals were determined in a 1 m(3) smog chamber using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Formamide, the simplest amide, has a rate coefficient of (4.44 ± 0.46) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) against OH, translating to an atmospheric lifetime of ∼1 day. N-methylformamide, N-methylacetamide and propanamide, alkyl versions of formamide, have rate coefficients of (10.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-12), (5.42 ± 0.19) × 10(-12), and (1.78 ± 0.43) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1), respectively. Acetamide was also investigated, but due to its slow oxidation kinetics, we report a range of (0.4-1.1) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) for its rate coefficient with OH radicals. Oxidation products were monitored and quantified and their time traces were fitted using a simple kinetic box model. To further probe the mechanism, ab initio calculations are used to identify the initial radical products of the amide reactions with OH. Our results indicate that N-H abstractions are negligible in all cases, in contrast to what is predicted by structure-activity relationships. Instead, the reactions proceed via C-H abstraction from alkyl groups and from formyl C(O)-H bonds when available. The latter process leads to radicals that can readily react with O2 to form isocyanates, explaining the detection of toxic compounds such as isocyanic acid (HNCO) and methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO). These contaminants of significant interest are primary oxidation products in the photochemical oxidation of formamide and N-methylformamide, respectively.

  10. Numerical modeling of positive streamer in air in nonuniform fields: Efficiency of radicals production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikovsky, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency of streamer corona depends on a number of factors such as geometry of electrodes, voltage pulse parameters, gas pressure etc. In a past 5 years a two-dimensional models of streamer in nonuniform fields in air have been developed. These models allow to simulate streamer dynamics and generation of species and to investigate the influence of external parameters on species production. In this work the influence of Laplacian field on efficiency of radicals generation is investigated

  11. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyr, Douglas Robert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The photodissociation of free radicals is studied in order to characterize the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a novel method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with a highly complementary form of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopy of transitions to dissociative states is determined by monitoring the total photofragment yield as a function of dissociation photon energy. Branching ratios to various product channels, internal energy distributions of the fragments, bond dissociation energies, and the translational energy-dependent photofragment recoil angular distributions are then determined at selected excitation energies. A detailed picture of the dissociation dynamics can then be formulated, allowing insight concerning the interactions of potential energy surfaces involved in the dissociation. After an introduction to the concepts and techniques mentioned above, the experimental apparatus used in these experiments is described in detail. The basis and methods used in the treatment of data, especially in the dissociation dynamics experiments, are then put forward.

  12. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyr, D.R.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1993-11-01

    The photodissociation of free radicals is studied in order to characterize the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a novel method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with a highly complementary form of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopy of transitions to dissociative states is determined by monitoring the total photofragment yield as a function of dissociation photon energy. Branching ratios to various product channels, internal energy distributions of the fragments, bond dissociation energies, and the translational energy-dependent photofragment recoil angular distributions are then determined at selected excitation energies. A detailed picture of the dissociation dynamics can then be formulated, allowing insight concerning the interactions of potential energy surfaces involved in the dissociation. After an introduction to the concepts and techniques mentioned above, the experimental apparatus used in these experiments is described in detail. The basis and methods used in the treatment of data, especially in the dissociation dynamics experiments, are then put forward

  13. Simulating Controlled Radical Polymerizations with mcPolymer—A Monte Carlo Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Drache

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing model calculations may lead to a better understanding of the complex kinetics of the controlled radical polymerization. We developed a universal simulation tool (mcPolymer, which is based on the widely used Monte Carlo simulation technique. This article focuses on the software architecture of the program, including its data management and optimization approaches. We were able to simulate polymer chains as individual objects, allowing us to gain more detailed microstructural information of the polymeric products. For all given examples of controlled radical polymerization (nitroxide mediated radical polymerization (NMRP homo- and copolymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT, we present detailed performance analyses demonstrating the influence of the system size, concentrations of reactants, and the peculiarities of data. Different possibilities were exemplarily illustrated for finding an adequate balance between precision, memory consumption, and computation time of the simulation. Due to its flexible software architecture, the application of mcPolymer is not limited to the controlled radical polymerization, but can be adjusted in a straightforward manner to further polymerization models.

  14. 1,2-Fluorine Radical Rearrangements: Isomerization Events in Perfluorinated Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoomissen, Daniel J; Vyas, Shubham

    2017-11-16

    Devising effective degradation technologies for perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) is an active area of research, where the molecular mechanisms involving both oxidative and reductive pathways are still elusive. One commonly neglected pathway in PFAS degradation is fluorine atom migration in perfluoroalkyl radicals, which was largely assumed to be implausible because of the high C-F bond strength. Using density functional theory calculations, it was demonstrated that 1,2-F atom migrations are thermodynamically favored when the fluorine atom migrated from a less branched carbon center to a more branched carbon center. Activation barriers for these rearrangements were within 19-29 kcal/mol, which are possible to easily overcome at elevated temperatures or in photochemically activated species in the gas or aqueous phase. It was also found that the activation barriers for the 1,2-F atom migration are lowered as much as by 10 kcal/mol when common oxidative degradation products such as HF assisted the rearrangements or if the resulting radical center was stabilized by vicinal π-bonds. Natural bond orbital analyses showed that fluorine moves as a radical in a noncharge-separated state. These findings add an important reaction to the existing knowledge of mechanisms for PFAS degradation and highlights the fact that 1,2-F atom shifts may be a small channel for isomerization of these compounds, but upon availability of mineralization products, this isomerization process could become more prominent.

  15. Crotylations of alpha-carbonyl radicals with crotylstannane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Miyabe, Hideto

    2002-10-03

    Electrophilic radicals undergo crotylation with crotylstannane with moderate to good efficiency. The reaction provides the syn isomer as the major product. The present methodology is complementary to Claisen protocols for the synthesis of gamma,delta-unsaturated carboxylic acid derivatives. Details of the new radical methodology are presented. [reaction: see text

  16. Effect of flavoring chemicals on free radical formation in electronic cigarette aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Zachary T; Goel, Reema; Reilly, Samantha M; Elias, Ryan J; Silakov, Alexey; Foulds, Jonathan; Muscat, Joshua; Richie, John P

    2018-05-20

    Flavoring chemicals, or flavorants, have been used in electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) since their inception; however, little is known about their toxicological effects. Free radicals present in e-cigarette aerosols have been shown to induce oxidative stress resulting in damage to proliferation, survival, and inflammation pathways in the cell. Aerosols generated from e-liquid solvents alone contain high levels of free radicals but few studies have looked at how these toxins are modulated by flavorants. We investigated the effects of different flavorants on free radical production in e-cigarette aerosols. Free radicals generated from 49 commercially available e-liquid flavors were captured and analyzed using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The flavorant composition of each e-liquid was analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GCMS). Radical production was correlated with flavorant abundance. Ten compounds were identified and analyzed for their impact on free radical generation. Nearly half of the flavors modulated free radical generation. Flavorants with strong correlations included β-damascone, δ-tetradecalactone, γ-decalactone, citral, dipentene, ethyl maltol, ethyl vanillin, ethyl vanillin PG acetal, linalool, and piperonal. Dipentene, ethyl maltol, citral, linalool, and piperonal promoted radical formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Ethyl vanillin inhibited the radical formation in a concentration dependent manner. Free radical production was closely linked with the capacity to oxidize biologically-relevant lipids. Our results suggest that flavoring agents play an important role in either enhancing or inhibiting the production of free radicals in flavored e-cigarette aerosols. This information is important for developing regulatory strategies aimed at reducing potential harm from e-cigarettes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Unimolecular reaction dynamics of free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry A. Miller

    2006-01-01

    Free radical reactions are of crucial importance in combustion and in atmospheric chemistry. Reliable theoretical models for predicting the rates and products of these reactions are required for modeling combustion and atmospheric chemistry systems. Unimolecular reactions frequently play a crucial role in determining final products. The dissociations of vinyl, CH2= CH, and methoxy, CH3O, have low barriers, about 13,000 cm-1 and 8,000 cm-1, respectively. Since barriers of this magnitude are typical of free radicals these molecules should serve as benchmarks for this important class of reactions. To achieve this goal, a detailed understanding of the vinyl and methoxy radicals is required. Results for dissociation dynamics of vinyl and selectively deuterated vinyl radical are reported. Significantly, H-atom scrambling is shown not to occur in this reaction. A large number of spectroscopic experiments for CH3O and CHD2O have been performed. Spectra recorded include laser induced fluorescence (LIF), laser excited dispersed fluorescence (LEDF), fluorescence dip infrared (FDIR) and stimulated emission pumping (SEP). Such results are critical for implementing dynamics experiments involving the dissociation of methoxy

  18. Serum Hydroxyl Radical Scavenging Capacity as Quantified with Iron-Free Hydroxyl Radical Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Nobuyuki; Oowada, Shigeru; Sueishi, Yoshimi; Shimmei, Masashi; Makino, Keisuke; Fujii, Hirotada; Kotake, Yashige

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a simple ESR spin trapping based method for hydroxyl (OH) radical scavenging-capacity determination, using iron-free OH radical source. Instead of the widely used Fenton reaction, a short (typically 5 seconds) in situ UV-photolysis of a dilute hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution was employed to generate reproducible amounts of OH radicals. ESR spin trapping was applied to quantify OH radicals; the decrease in the OH radical level due to the specimen’s scavenging activity was converted into the OH radical scavenging capacity (rate). The validity of the method was confirmed in pure antioxidants, and the agreement with the previous data was satisfactory. In the second half of this work, the new method was applied to the sera of chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. We show for the first time that after hemodialysis, OH radical scavenging capacity of the CRF serum was restored to the level of healthy control. This method is simple and rapid, and the low concentration hydrogen peroxide is the only chemical added to the system, that could eliminate the complexity of iron-involved Fenton reactions or the use of the pulse-radiolysis system. PMID:19794928

  19. Measurements of hydroxyl and hydroperoxy radicals during CalNex-LA: Model comparisons and radical budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, S. M.; Hansen, R. F.; Dusanter, S.; Michoud, V.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Veres, P. R.; Graus, M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Roberts, J.; Young, C.; Washenfelder, R.; Brown, S. S.; Thalman, R.; Waxman, E.; Volkamer, R.; Tsai, C.; Stutz, J.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Mielke, L. H.; Osthoff, H. D.; Stevens, P. S.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2*) radical concentrations were made at the Pasadena ground site during the CalNex-LA 2010 campaign using the laser-induced fluorescence-fluorescence assay by gas expansion technique. The measured concentrations of OH and HO2* exhibited a distinct weekend effect, with higher radical concentrations observed on the weekends corresponding to lower levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The radical measurements were compared to results from a zero-dimensional model using the Regional Atmospheric Chemical Mechanism-2 constrained by NOx and other measured trace gases. The chemical model overpredicted measured OH concentrations during the weekends by a factor of approximately 1.4 ± 0.3 (1σ), but the agreement was better during the weekdays (ratio of 1.0 ± 0.2). Model predicted HO2* concentrations underpredicted by a factor of 1.3 ± 0.2 on the weekends, while measured weekday concentrations were underpredicted by a factor of 3.0 ± 0.5. However, increasing the modeled OH reactivity to match the measured total OH reactivity improved the overall agreement for both OH and HO2* on all days. A radical budget analysis suggests that photolysis of carbonyls and formaldehyde together accounted for approximately 40% of radical initiation with photolysis of nitrous acid accounting for 30% at the measurement height and ozone photolysis contributing less than 20%. An analysis of the ozone production sensitivity reveals that during the week, ozone production was limited by volatile organic compounds throughout the day during the campaign but NOx limited during the afternoon on the weekends.

  20. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  1. Glutathione--hydroxyl radical interaction: a theoretical study on radical recognition process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Fiser

    Full Text Available Non-reactive, comparative (2 × 1.2 μs molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to characterize the interactions between glutathione (GSH, host molecule and hydroxyl radical (OH(•, guest molecule. From this analysis, two distinct steps were identified in the recognition process of hydroxyl radical by glutathione: catching and steering, based on the interactions between the host-guest molecules. Over 78% of all interactions are related to the catching mechanism via complex formation between anionic carboxyl groups and the OH radical, hence both terminal residues of GSH serve as recognition sites. The glycine residue has an additional role in the recognition of OH radical, namely the steering. The flexibility of the Gly residue enables the formation of further interactions of other parts of glutathione (e.g. thiol, α- and β-carbons with the lone electron pair of the hydroxyl radical. Moreover, quantum chemical calculations were carried out on selected GSH/OH(• complexes and on appropriate GSH conformers to describe the energy profile of the recognition process. The relative enthalpy and the free energy changes of the radical recognition of the strongest complexes varied from -42.4 to -27.8 kJ/mol and from -21.3 to 9.8 kJ/mol, respectively. These complexes, containing two or more intermolecular interactions, would be the starting configurations for the hydrogen atom migration to quench the hydroxyl radical via different reaction channels.

  2. Long-lived gas-phase radicals from combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Takashi; Furusawa, Koji; Amano, Toshiji; Okubo, Yoichi; Tsuchiya, Jun' ichi; Yoshizawa, Fujiroku; Akutsu, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Masamitsu; Yoshida, Tadao (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-04-20

    On indoor air pollution or fire, it is feared that the gas-phase radicals from the combustion of inflammables or fuel seriously exert an influence on the organisms as harmful matter. The gas-phase radicals were studied using the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique. For the spin trap solution, 0.1 mol solution of {alpha}-phenyl-N-t-butylnitron in benzene was used. As a result, apparently long-lived and highly reactive oxygen-centered radicals were detected in the smoke from polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, cellulose, kerosene, benzene, acetone, methanol and butylalcohol. It is suggested that the production mechanism for the radicals should be different from olefin-NOx-air system reaction, which is considered for the radicals from cigarette smoke. 11 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Hydrogen Radicals, Nitrogen Radicals, and the Production of Ozone in the Middle and Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, T. P.

    1997-01-01

    The concentrations of hydrogen radicals, OH and HO2, in the middle and upper troposphere were measured simultaneously with those of NO, O3,CO, H20, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and with the ultraviolet and visible radiation field.

  4. DFT study on the attacking mechanisms of H and OH radicals to G-C and A-T base pairs in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okutsu, N.; Shimamura, K.; Shimizu, E.; Kurita, N., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan); Shulga, S. [Institute for Food Biotechnology and Genomics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Danilov, V. I. [Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2016-02-01

    To elucidate the effect of radicals on DNA base pairs, we investigated the attacking mechanism of OH and H radicals to the G-C and A-T base pairs, using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations in water approximated by the continuum solvation model. The DFT calculations revealed that the OH radical abstracts the hydrogen atom of a NH{sub 2} group of G or A base and induces a tautomeric reaction for an A-T base pair more significantly than for a G-C base pair. On the other hand, the H radical prefers to bind to the Cytosine NH{sub 2} group of G-C base pair and induce a tautomeric reaction from G-C to G*-C*, whose activation free energy is considerably small (−0.1 kcal/mol) in comparison with that (42.9 kcal/mol) for the reaction of an A-T base pair. Accordingly, our DFT calculations elucidated that OH and H radicals have a significant effect on A-T and G-C base pairs, respectively. This finding will be useful for predicting the effect of radiation on the genetic information recorded in the base sequences of DNA duplexes.

  5. DFT study on the attacking mechanisms of H and OH radicals to G-C and A-T base pairs in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutsu, N.; Shimamura, K.; Shimizu, E.; Kurita, N.; Shulga, S.; Danilov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the effect of radicals on DNA base pairs, we investigated the attacking mechanism of OH and H radicals to the G-C and A-T base pairs, using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations in water approximated by the continuum solvation model. The DFT calculations revealed that the OH radical abstracts the hydrogen atom of a NH 2 group of G or A base and induces a tautomeric reaction for an A-T base pair more significantly than for a G-C base pair. On the other hand, the H radical prefers to bind to the Cytosine NH 2 group of G-C base pair and induce a tautomeric reaction from G-C to G*-C*, whose activation free energy is considerably small (−0.1 kcal/mol) in comparison with that (42.9 kcal/mol) for the reaction of an A-T base pair. Accordingly, our DFT calculations elucidated that OH and H radicals have a significant effect on A-T and G-C base pairs, respectively. This finding will be useful for predicting the effect of radiation on the genetic information recorded in the base sequences of DNA duplexes

  6. A case study of ozone production, nitrogen oxides, and the radical budget in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Wood

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations at a mountain-top site within the Mexico City basin are used to characterize ozone production and destruction, nitrogen oxide speciation and chemistry, and the radical budget, with an emphasis on a stagnant air mass observed on one afternoon. The observations compare well with the results of recent photochemical models. An ozone production rate of ~50 ppbv/h was observed in a stagnant air mass during the afternoon of 12 March 2006, which is among the highest observed anywhere in the world. Approximately half of the ozone destruction was due to the oxidation of NO2. During this time period ozone production was VOC-limited, deduced by a comparison of the radical production rates and the formation rate of NOx oxidation products (NOz. For [NOx]/[NOy] values between 0.2 and 0.8, gas-phase HNO3 typically accounted for less than 10% of NOz and accumulation-mode particulate nitrate (NO3(PM1 accounted for 20%–70% of NOz, consistent with high ambient NH3 concentrations. The fraction of NOz accounted for by the sum of HNO3(g and NO3(PM1 decreased with photochemical processing. This decrease is apparent even when dry deposition of HNO3 is accounted for, and indicates that HNO3 formation decreased relative to other NOx "sink" processes during the first 12 h of photochemistry and/or a significant fraction of the nitrate was associated with the coarse aerosol size mode. The ozone production efficiency of NOx on 11 and 12 March 2006 was approximately 7 on a time scale of one day. A new metric for ozone production efficiency that relates the dilution-adjusted ozone mixing ratio to cumulative OH exposure is proposed.

  7. Peroxy Radical Measurements during the IRRONIC Field Project by C2H6 - NO Chemical Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. C. D.; Kundu, S.; Deming, B.; Lew, M.; Stevens, P. S.; Sklaveniti, S.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present measurements of total peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2) during the Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC) field project in Bloomington, Indiana during July 2015. Peroxy radicals were measured by chemical amplification using ethane and nitric oxide in dual PFA reaction chambers, and the amplification product NO2 was quantified by cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy. On sunny days mid-day peroxy radical mixing ratios were typically between 20 and 70 ppt and were well correlated with "HO2*" measured by the Indiana University Laser-Induced Fluorescence with Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (IU-FAGE) instrument. The ratio of total peroxy radicals (UMass) to the IU-FAGE HO2* measurements was greater than two. We also describe results from an informal intercomparison of the two instruments' calibration sources, which are based on acetone photolysis (UMass) and water photolysis (IU). In addition to sampling the IU calibration source in "amplification" mode, the UMass instrument also separately quantified the HO2 mixing ratio in the IU calibration gas by reaction with excess NO and subsequent quantification of the NO2 produced.

  8. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  9. Edaravone, a potent free radical scavenger, reacts with peroxynitrite to produce predominantly 4-NO-edaravone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Akio; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2016-05-01

    3-Methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (edaravone) is used in clinical treatment of acute brain infarction to rescue the penumbra, based on its ability to prevent lipid peroxidation by scavenging lipid peroxyl radicals. Here, we show that edaravone also reacts with peroxynitrite to yield 4-NO-edaravone as the major product and 4-NO2-edaravone as a minor product. We observed little formation of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-4,5-dione (4-oxoedaravone) and its hydrate, 2-oxo-3-(phenylhydrazono)butanoic acid, which are the major free radical-induced oxidation products of edaravone, suggesting that free radicals are not involved in the reaction with peroxynitrite. The reaction of peroxynitrite with edaravone is approximately 30-fold greater than with uric acid, a physiological peroxynitrite scavenger (reaction rate k = 1.5 × 10 (4)  M(-1) s(-1) vs. 480 M(-1) s(-1)). These results suggest that edaravone functions therapeutically as a scavenger of peroxynitrite as well as lipid peroxyl radicals, which is consistent with a report that edaravone treatment reduced levels of 3-nitrotyrosine in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  10. Structural Mass Spectrometry of Proteins Using Hydroxyl Radical Based Protein Footprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liwen; Chance, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Structural MS is a rapidly growing field with many applications in basic research and pharmaceutical drug development. In this feature article the overall technology is described and several examples of how hydroxyl radical based footprinting MS can be used to map interfaces, evaluate protein structure, and identify ligand dependent conformational changes in proteins are described.

  11. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products-A gamma radiolysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike [University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology (Austria); Solar, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.solar@univie.ac.a [University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology (Austria); Reznicek, Gottfried [Department of Pharmacognosy, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-12-15

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH{sub 3} by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 2. HOx radical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Robert J

    2004-02-01

    The production of HOx radicals in the South Coast Air Basin of California is investigated during the smog episode of September 9, 1993 using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) air-quality model. Sources of HOx(hydroxyl, hydroperoxy, and organic peroxy radicals) incorporated into the associated gas-phase chemical mechanism include the combination of excited-state singlet oxygen (formed from ozone (O3) photolysis (hv)) with water, the photolysis of nitrous acid, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and carbonyl compounds (formaldehyde (HCHO) or higher aldehydes and ketones), the consumption of aldehydes and alkenes (ALK) by the nitrate radical, and the consumption of alkenes by O3 and the oxygen atom (O). At a given time or location for surface cells and vertical averages, each route of HOx formation may be the greatest contributor to overall formation except HCHO-hv, H2O2-hv, and ALK-O, the latter two of which are insignificant pathways in general. The contribution of the ALK-O3 pathway is dependent on the stoichiometric yield of OH, but this pathway, at least for the studied smog episode, may not be as generally significant as previous research suggests. Future emissions scenarios yield lower total HOx production rates and a shift in the relative importance of individual pathways.

  13. Some biochemical consequences of the spatial distribution of ionizing radiation-produced free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ionizing radiation deposits energy nonhomogeneously in the medium through which it passes. Mozumder and Magee (Radiat. Res. 28, 203-214(1966)) have classified the events as spurs, blobs, and short tracks. These are defined by size and amount of energy deposited. Thus the initial chemically reactive species are distributed in an inhomogeneous manner. In these volumes of high radical concentration, radical-radical reactions can occur which can only be scavenged by solutes at high concentration. Making the reasonable assumption that similar events occur intracellularly, the consequences of such events must be considered. In the case of DNA, several authors have shown that OH radicals diffuse only tens of angstroms prior to reaction. In the volume from which these radicals originate, DNA is necessarily at high concentration and consequently will interact with the radicals formed in the spur, etc. Such events are probably the source of radiation-production double-strand breaks in cellular DNA. However, the radicals cause other types of damage than strand breaks-potential strand breaks and base damage. An attempt is made to present the interrelation of multiply damaged sites - their constitution, the problems they present to cell repair mechanisms, and their possible relationship to cell survival

  14. Production of sulfate radical from peroxymonosulfate induced by a magnetically separable CuFe2O4 spinel in water: Efficiency, stability, and mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao

    2013-03-19

    A simple, nonhazardous, efficient and low energy-consuming process is desirable to generate powerful radicals from peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for recalcitrant pollutant removal. In this work, the production of radical species from PMS induced by a magnetic CuFe2O4 spinel was studied. Iopromide, a recalcitrant model pollutant, was used to investigate the efficiency of this process. CuFe2O4 showed higher activity and 30 times lower Cu2+ leaching (1.5 μg L-1 per 100 mg L-1) than a well-crystallized CuO at the same dosage. CuFe 2O4 maintained its activity and crystallinity during repeated batch experiments. In comparison, the activity of CuO declined significantly, which was ascribed to the deterioration in its degree of crystallinity. The efficiency of the PMS/CuFe2O4 was highest at neutral pH and decreased at acidic and alkaline pHs. Sulfate radical was the primary radical species responsible for the iopromide degradation. On the basis of the stoichiometry of oxalate degradation in the PMS/CuFe 2O4, the radical production yield from PMS was determined to be near 1 mol/mol. The PMS decomposition involved an inner-sphere complexation with the oxide\\'s surface Cu(II) sites. In situ characterization of the oxide surface with ATR-FTIR and Raman during the PMS decomposition suggested that surface Cu(II)-Cu(III)-Cu(II) redox cycle was responsible for the efficient sulfate radical generation from PMS. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Search for flavour changing neutral currents in single top-quark production at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhroob, Muhammad

    2013-03-15

    This thesis represents the search for single top-quark production through flavour changing neutral currents using data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2011, at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb{sup -1}. Candidate events are selected with one isolated lepton, missing transverse momentum associated to the undetected neutrino and a jet originated from the hadronisation of a b quark. Given the large expected number of background events and the small number of expected signal events, a neural network classifier is developed to combine many kinematic variables to create a powerful separator in order classify the events as a signal- or a background-like events. As no sign of new physics is seen in the neural network output distribution, a Bayesian statistical method is used to set an upper limit at 95% confidence level (C.L.) on the single top-quark production cross section through FCNC processes. The observed upper limit at 95% C.L. on the cross-section multiplied by the t{yields}Wb branching fraction is measured to be {sigma}{sub qg{yields}t} x B(t {yields}Wb)< 3.9 pb. This upper limit is converted using a model-independent approach into upper limits on the coupling strengths (K{sub ugt})/({Lambda})<6.9.10{sup -3} TeV{sup -1} and (K{sub cgt})/({Lambda})<1.6.10{sup -2} TeV{sup -1}, where {Lambda} is the new physics scale, and on the branching fractions B(t{yields}ug)<5.7 .10{sup -5} and B(t{yields}cg)< 2.7.10{sup -4}. The limits on the branching fractions are the world's best limits to date and significantly improving the previous limits obtained by the DOe collaboration by a factor of 15.

  16. Evaluation of free radical scavenging activity of tea infusion of commercial tea products available in uae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nessa, F.; Khan, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, twenty four commercial tea samples were assayed to determine their free radical scavenging activity and polyphenolic contents based on the brewing/infusing period. Tea samples were infused/brewed in 200 mL boiled water at 120 degree C for 1, 2 and 5 min, respectively. The radical scavenging activities of tea infusion/brewing were measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) assay method. The results were ranged from 67.81-90.51% for black tea bags, 90.37-94.51% for green tea bags, 24.66-92.25% for black tea powder, 16.08-93.06% for green tea powder and 32.90- 45.54% for Camomile herbal infusion. The results showed that 1 or 2 min black tea bags infusion exhibited highest radical scavenging activity than 5 min infusion. Antioxidant activities of tea powders were variable with the amount of tea powder. It was observed that antioxidant activity increased with increasing boiling time for smaller amount of sample. In contrary, shorter boiling time was better for larger amount of sample. The polyphenol contents of tea infusion were determined and the results were expressed as milligram quercetin equivalent/200 mL of tea infusion. The polyphenol content was increased with increased brewing period. In contrary, brewing for longer time rendered extract less antiradical activity. This study suggests that infusing tea bag for 1 or 2 min is sufficient for getting infusion with maximum radical scavenging activity and in case of tea powder, shorter boiling time is better for larger amount of powder or small amount of powder should be boiled for minimum 5 min for rendering extract with maximum radical scavenging activity. (author)

  17. Influence of environmental factors on the contents of active ingredients and radical scavenging property of potentilla fruticosa in the main production areas of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.; Yin, D. X.; Wang, D. M.; Li, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Extracts from Potentilla fruticosa have been applied in traditional medicine and exhibited antioxidant property, but little has been known about the diversity of phytochemicals and properties on this species from different growing environment. This study investigated the influence of environmental factors on the active ingredient contents and radical scavenging property of P. fruticosa from different production areas of China in order to discover a location could produce high-quality resources for pharmaceutical products. The contents of tannin, total flavonoids, and rutin were determined and varied within the range of 7.64 ± 0.43 ∼ 10.68 ± 0.67 percentage, 2.29 ± 0.34 ∼ 5.37 ± 0.36 percentage, and 0.19 ± 0.053 ∼ 0.79 ± 0.125 percentage, respectively. Radical scavenging property was quantified, with the IC /sub 50/ of 7.24 ± 0.423 to 17.23 ± 0.551 μ g mL-1. Principal component analysis, multiple linear stepwise regression analysis, and path analysis were conducted to further analysis the relationship between the variations of active ingredients and radical scavenging capacity and growth environment. The results showed dominant environmental factors for these variations were rapidly available nitrogen, rapidly available phosphorus, pH, July average temperature, and annual sunshine duration. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation was observed between pH, annual sunshine duration and active ingredients and radical scavenging property (p<0.05). Considering the high active ingredient contents and strong radical scavenging property, leaf extracts from P. fruticosa could become useful supplements for pharmaceutical products as a new antioxidant agent, and Huzhu Northern Mountain in Qinghai Province and E-mei Mountain in Sichuan Province were selected as favorable production locations. (author)

  18. Fragmentation characteristics of the unstable [CH3 CO][radical sign] radicals generated by neutralization of [CH3CO]+ cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hop, C. E. C. A.; Holmes, J. L.

    1991-03-01

    The stability and fragmentation characteristics of [CH3 CO][radical sign] radicals, generated by vertical charge exchange between acetyl cations and permanent gases or metal vapours (He, Xe, NO, Cd, Na and K), were examined mass spectrometrically. Two dissociation reactions were observed, the losses of CH[radical sign]3 and H[radical sign]. The H[radical sign] loss reaction, the higher energy dissociation, became of greater importance as the exothermicity of the charge exchange was increased. Based on the analysis of the kinetic energy releases it was concluded that these decompositions arose from the population of two excited states of the [CH3 CO][radical sign] radical.

  19. Youth De-Radicalization: A Canadian Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafal (Haval Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Youth radicalization leading to violence has become a growing fear among Canadians, as terrorist attacks are carried out in Western states. Although Canada has suffered relatively fewer acts of violence, this fear has intensified and a de-radicalization strategy is needed in the Canadian context. In a qualitative case study methodology, interviews were conducted with school counsellors, religious leaders, and academics to explore solutions to youth radicalization. Youth de-radicalization approaches from the United Kingdom were analyzed and found that community-based initiatives were missing from programming. Social identity theory is used to explain that youth join radicalized groups to feel a sense of belonging and have to be provided an alternative and moderate group identity to de-radicalize. This study found youth de-radicalization in Canada is best served through a community collaboration approach.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Ethylenedithio-MPTTF-PTM Radical Dyad as a Potential Neutral Radical Conductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souto, Manuel; Bendixen, Dan; Jensen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    During the last years there has been a high interest in the development of new purely-organic single-component conductors. Very recently, we have reported a new neutral radical conductor based on the perchlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radical moiety linked to a monopyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene (MPTTF...

  1. Formation of brominated disinfection byproducts from natural organic matter isolates and model compounds in a sulfate radical-based oxidation process

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yuru; Le Roux, Julien; Zhang, Tao; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation process (SR-AOP) has received increasing application interest for the removal of water/wastewater contaminants. However, limited knowledge is available on its side effects. This study investigated the side effects in terms of the production of total organic bromine (TOBr) and brominated disinfection byproducts (Br-DBPs) in the presence of bromide ion and organic matter in water. Sulfate radical was generated by heterogeneous catalytic activation of peroxymonosulfate. Isolated natural organic matter (NOM) fractions as well as low molecular weight (LMW) compounds were used as model organic matter. Considerable amounts of TOBr were produced by SR-AOP, where bromoform (TBM) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were identified as dominant Br-DBPs. In general, SR-AOP favored the formation of DBAA, which is quite distinct from bromination with HOBr/OBr- (more TBM production). SR-AOP experimental results indicate that bromine incorporation is distributed among both hydrophobic and hydrophilic NOM fractions. Studies on model precursors reveal that LMW acids are reactive TBM precursors (citric acid > succinic acid > pyruvic acid > maleic acid). High DBAA formation from citric acid, aspartic acid, and asparagine was observed; meanwhile aspartic acid and asparagine were the major precursors of dibromoacetonitrile and dibromoacetamide, respectively.

  2. Formation of brominated disinfection byproducts from natural organic matter isolates and model compounds in a sulfate radical-based oxidation process

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yuru

    2014-12-16

    A sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation process (SR-AOP) has received increasing application interest for the removal of water/wastewater contaminants. However, limited knowledge is available on its side effects. This study investigated the side effects in terms of the production of total organic bromine (TOBr) and brominated disinfection byproducts (Br-DBPs) in the presence of bromide ion and organic matter in water. Sulfate radical was generated by heterogeneous catalytic activation of peroxymonosulfate. Isolated natural organic matter (NOM) fractions as well as low molecular weight (LMW) compounds were used as model organic matter. Considerable amounts of TOBr were produced by SR-AOP, where bromoform (TBM) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were identified as dominant Br-DBPs. In general, SR-AOP favored the formation of DBAA, which is quite distinct from bromination with HOBr/OBr- (more TBM production). SR-AOP experimental results indicate that bromine incorporation is distributed among both hydrophobic and hydrophilic NOM fractions. Studies on model precursors reveal that LMW acids are reactive TBM precursors (citric acid > succinic acid > pyruvic acid > maleic acid). High DBAA formation from citric acid, aspartic acid, and asparagine was observed; meanwhile aspartic acid and asparagine were the major precursors of dibromoacetonitrile and dibromoacetamide, respectively.

  3. Engineering a horseradish peroxidase C stable to radical attacks by mutating multiple radical coupling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Joo, Jeong Chan; Song, Bong Keun; Yoo, Young Je; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2015-04-01

    Peroxidases have great potential as industrial biocatalysts. In particular, the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds catalyzed by peroxidases has been extensively examined because of the advantage of this method over other conventional chemical methods. However, the industrial application of peroxidases is often limited because of their rapid inactivation by phenoxyl radicals during oxidative polymerization. In this work, we report a novel protein engineering approach to improve the radical stability of horseradish peroxidase isozyme C (HRPC). Phenylalanine residues that are vulnerable to modification by the phenoxyl radicals were identified using mass spectrometry analysis. UV-Vis and CD spectra showed that radical coupling did not change the secondary structure or the active site of HRPC. Four phenylalanine (Phe) residues (F68, F142, F143, and F179) were each mutated to alanine residues to generate single mutants to examine the role of these sites in radical coupling. Despite marginal improvement of radical stability, each single mutant still exhibited rapid radical inactivation. To further reduce inactivation by radical coupling, the four substitution mutations were combined in F68A/F142A/F143A/F179A. This mutant demonstrated dramatic enhancement of radical stability by retaining 41% of its initial activity compared to the wild-type, which was completely inactivated. Structure and sequence alignment revealed that radical-vulnerable Phe residues of HPRC are conserved in homologous peroxidases, which showed the same rapid inactivation tendency as HRPC. Based on our site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, we have shown that engineering radical-vulnerable residues to eliminate multiple radical coupling can be a good strategy to improve the stability of peroxidases against radical attack. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Supplier's involvement and success of radical new product development in new ventures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Michael; Di Benedetto, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Supplier involvement is essential to a new venture seeking to develop a radical innovation. Despite this, prior literature has not adequately addressed supplier involvement in radical innovation, nor what the antecedents to increased supplier involvement are. We build and test a conceptual model of

  5. Free Radical Exposure Creates Paler Carotenoid-Based Ornaments: A Possible Interaction in the Expression of Black and Red Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos; Galván, Ismael

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress could be a key selective force shaping the expression of colored traits produced by the primary animal pigments in integuments: carotenoids and melanins. However, the impact of oxidative stress on melanic ornaments has only recently been explored, whereas its role in the expression of carotenoid-based traits is not fully understood. An interesting study case is that of those animal species simultaneously expressing both kinds of ornaments, such as the red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa). In this bird, individuals exposed to an exogenous source of free radicals (diquat) during their development produced larger eumelanin-based (black) plumage traits than controls. Here, we show that the same red-legged partridges exposed to diquat simultaneously developed paler carotenoid-based ornaments (red beak and eye rings), and carried lower circulating carotenoid levels as well as lower levels of some lipids involved in carotenoid transport in the bloodstream (i.e., cholesterol). Moreover, partridges treated with a hormone that stimulates eumelanin production (i.e., alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) also increased blood carotenoid levels, but this effect was not mirrored in the expression of carotenoid-based traits. The redness of carotenoid-based ornaments and the size of a conspicuous eumelanic trait (the black bib) were negatively correlated in control birds, suggesting a physiological trade-off during development. These findings contradict recent studies questioning the sensitivity of carotenoids to oxidative stress. Nonetheless, the impact of free radicals on plasma carotenoids seems to be partially mediated by changes in cholesterol metabolism, and not by direct carotenoid destruction/consumption. The results highlight the capacity of oxidative stress to create multiple phenotypes during development through differential effects on carotenoids and melanins, raising questions about evolutionary constraints involved in the production of multiple

  6. Free radical exposure creates paler carotenoid-based ornaments: a possible interaction in the expression of black and red traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alonso-Alvarez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress could be a key selective force shaping the expression of colored traits produced by the primary animal pigments in integuments: carotenoids and melanins. However, the impact of oxidative stress on melanic ornaments has only recently been explored, whereas its role in the expression of carotenoid-based traits is not fully understood. An interesting study case is that of those animal species simultaneously expressing both kinds of ornaments, such as the red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa. In this bird, individuals exposed to an exogenous source of free radicals (diquat during their development produced larger eumelanin-based (black plumage traits than controls. Here, we show that the same red-legged partridges exposed to diquat simultaneously developed paler carotenoid-based ornaments (red beak and eye rings, and carried lower circulating carotenoid levels as well as lower levels of some lipids involved in carotenoid transport in the bloodstream (i.e., cholesterol. Moreover, partridges treated with a hormone that stimulates eumelanin production (i.e., alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone also increased blood carotenoid levels, but this effect was not mirrored in the expression of carotenoid-based traits. The redness of carotenoid-based ornaments and the size of a conspicuous eumelanic trait (the black bib were negatively correlated in control birds, suggesting a physiological trade-off during development. These findings contradict recent studies questioning the sensitivity of carotenoids to oxidative stress. Nonetheless, the impact of free radicals on plasma carotenoids seems to be partially mediated by changes in cholesterol metabolism, and not by direct carotenoid destruction/consumption. The results highlight the capacity of oxidative stress to create multiple phenotypes during development through differential effects on carotenoids and melanins, raising questions about evolutionary constraints involved in the production of

  7. Peroxy Radical Measurements during PROPHET-AMOS 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. C. D.; Deming, B.; Rollings, D.

    2016-12-01

    We present measurements of total peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2) using the Ethane Chemical Amplifier (ECHAMP) technique during the PROPHET-AMOS project in Pellston, Michigan during July 2016. The C2H6/NO amplification chemistry occurred in FEP reaction chambers at the top of the PROPHET tower at a height of 34 m. The NO2 amplification product was transported through tubing to two cavity attenuated phase shift spectrometers (CAPS) housed inside the PROPHET laboratory. Two calibration sources were used: one based on water photolysis in the presence of isoprene and ozone actinometry, and another based on methyl iodide (CH3I) photolysis. The former was integrated into the inlet system, allowing for daily calibrations, whereas the latter was used twice during the campaign. Peak mixing ratios on warm, sunny days were approximately 40 ppt. Nighttime concentrations varied from below the instrumental detection limit to approximately 5 ppt. The measured peroxy radical concentrations will be compared to HO2 and HO2* mixing ratios measured by the Indiana University LIF-FAGE instrument.

  8. 1H DNP at 1.4 T of Water Doped with a Triarylmethyl-Based Radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, Robert A.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Recently a triarylmethyl-based (TAM) radical has been developed for research in biological and other aqueous systems, and in low magnetic fields, 10 mT or less, large 1H dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhancements have been reported. In this paper the DNP properties of this radical have been...... perpendicular to the electric component of the microwave field. It was found that with this probe the temperature increase in the sample after 4 s of microwave irradiation with an incident power of 10 W was only 16°C. For the investigations, 10 mM of the TAM radical was dissolved in deionized, but not degassed...... than the largest high-resolution magnet available to date. It is concluded that DNP MRM in this field, which corresponds to a standard microwave frequency of 9 GHz, has the potential to significantly increase the sensitivity in NMR and MRI experiments of small aqueous samples doped with the TAM radical....

  9. Adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy: A failure of marketing-based medicine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk patients after radical prostatectomy has been shown to reduce local and metastatic failure, improve overall survival and improve quality of life (QOL). The evidence, based on three randomised studies and a meta-analysis, is so compelling that the national and internatioanl professional bodies, representing urologists and radiation oncologist alike, recommend that high-risk patients be offered immediate adjuvant radiotherapy. Despite this being the standard of care, few patients fo on to recive it. This paper looks at the possibilities of why this is so, highlighting that it could possibly be related to poor marketing, communication and delivery of health information to patients and professional alike. It concludes that we need a more coordinated way to increase utilisation of the gold standard adjuvant radiotherapy post-radical prostatectomy, perhaps learning some valuable lessons from the business community.

  10. Well-defined polyethylene-based graft terpolymers by combining nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization, polyhomologation and azide/alkyne “click” chemistry†

    KAUST Repository

    Alkayal, Nazeeha

    2016-03-30

    Novel well–defined polyethylene–based graft terpolymers were synthesized via the “grafting onto” strategy by combining nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization (NMP), polyhomologation and copper (I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) “click” chemistry. Three steps were involved in this approach: (i) synthesis of alkyne-terminated polyethylene-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PE-b-PCL-alkyne) block copolymers (branches) by esterification of PE-b-PCL-OH with 4-pentynoic acid; the PE-b-PCL-OH was obtained by polyhomologation of dimethylsulfoxonium methylide to afford PE-OH, followed by ring opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone using the PE-OH as macroinitiator, (ii) synthesis of random copolymers of styrene (St) and 4-chloromethylstyrene (4-CMS) with various CMS contents, by nitroxide-mediated radical copolymerization (NMP), and conversion of chloride to azide groups by reaction with sodium azide (NaN3) (backbone) and (iii) “click” linking reaction to afford the PE-based graft terpolymers. All intermediates and final products were characterized by high-temperature size exclusion chromatography (HT-SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  11. Evaluation of Free Radical Scavenging Activity in Ethanolic Extract from Promising Accessions of Curcuma aeruginosa RoxB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waras Nurcholis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the free radical scavenging activity in ethanolic extracts from 20 accessions of Curcuma aeruginosa. The radical scavenging activity of the extract accessions was investigated with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical. IC50 values for DPPH radical scavenging activity ranged from 89.81 to 505.65 µg mL-1. Based on IC50 values, twenty accessions of C. aeruginosa can be divided into three groups: strong (two accessions; moderate (seventeen accessions; and low (one accession of DPPH scavenger. Sukoharjo (SH and Muara Bungo (MB showed promising accessions for antioxidant potential, thus these accessions important to selection for future breeding program in pharmaceutical products.

  12. Measurement of the pair production of b-jets in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neusiedl, Andrea

    2012-11-19

    In hadronic collisions, a large amount of processes with large momentum transfer produce a pair of high-p{sub T} jets. Their production rate and event properties can be predicted with good precision using perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The production of bottom-quarks in such collisions is a benchmark process in perturbative QCD because they probe the underlying strong dynamics at a well-defined scale. Because of their large mass, bottom-flavoured particles hold the most direct correspondence between the parton-level production and the observed hadron level. The large pair production rate of bottom-quarks and their corresponding decay products makes them important as background source for many analyses including searches for new physics. Besides this, quarks of the third generation could take an exceptional position among the quarks concerning the sensitivity to new massive objects. Studies on the fraction of jets containing bottom-flavoured particles, known as b-jets, relative to all-flavour jets could reveal such new phenomena. In this thesis the production rate of and the correlation between pairs of b-jets is measured. The invariant dijet mass spectrum is searched for indications for a new resonance in context of physics beyond the Standard Model. At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) two proton beams at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV collide, producing a large number of such pairs of b-jets. This measurement makes use of the data recorded with the ATLAS detector. The total integrated luminosity available for the analysis is about 34 pb{sup -1}. b-jets are identified via their long lifetime and the reconstruction of their charged decay products. For this analysis differences between jets originating from light objects, like gluons and light quarks, compared to jets containing bottom-flavoured objects have to be taken into account. The jet energy scale of b-jets is established and the additional uncertainty on the jet energy measurement is

  13. Geoscientists and the Radical Middle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Addressing the great challenges facing society requires industry, government, and academia to work together. I call this overlap space, where compromises are made and real solutions determined, the Radical Middle. Radical because it can appear at times as if the loudest and most publicly influential voices lie outside of the actual solution space, content to provoke but not problem-solve. One key area where geoscientists can play a lead role in the Radical Middle is in the overlap between energy, the environment, and the economy. Globally, fossil fuels still represent 85% of the aggregate energy mix. As existing conventional oil and natural-gas reservoir production continues to slowly decline, unconventional reservoirs, led today by shale and other more expensive resources, will represent a growing part of the oil and gas production mix. Many of these unconventional reservoirs require hydraulic fracturing. The positive economic impact of hydraulic fracturing and associated natural gas and oil production on the United States economy is well documented and undeniable. Yet there are environmental concerns about fracking, and some states and nations have imposed moratoria. This energy-environment-economy space is ideal for leadership from the geosciences. Another such overlap space is the potential for geoscience leadership in relations with China, whose economy and global presence continue to expand. Although China is building major hydropower and natural-gas power plants, as well as nuclear reactors, coal is still king—with the associated environmental impacts. Carbon sequestration—onshore in brine and to enhance oil recovery, as well as offshore—could prove viable. It is vital that educated and objective geoscientists from industry, government, and academia leave their corners and work together in the Radical Middle to educate the public and develop and deliver balanced, economically sensible energy and environmental strategies.

  14. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C2H5O, and linear Cn (n = 4--6).

  15. The role of melanin as protector against free radicals in skin and its role as free radical indicator in hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrling, Thomas; Jung, Katinka; Fuchs, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    Throughout the body, melanin is a homogenous biological polymer containing a population of intrinsic, semiquinone-like radicals. Additional extrinsic free radicals are reversibly photo-generated by UV and visible light. Melanin photochemistry, particularly the formation and decay of extrinsic radicals, has been the subject of numerous electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy studies. Several melanin monomers exist, and the predominant monomer in a melanin polymer depends on its location within an organism. In skin and hair, melanin differs in content of eumelanin or pheomelanin. Its bioradical character and its susceptibility to UV irradiation makes melanin an excellent indicator for UV-related processes in both skin and hair. The existence of melanin in skin is strongly correlated with the prevention against free radicals/ROS generated by UV radiation. Especially in the skin melanin (mainly eumelanin) ensures the only natural UV protection by eliminating the generated free radicals/ROS. Melanin in hair can be used as a free radical detector for evaluating the efficacy of hair care products. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of melanin as protector of skin against UV generated free radicals and as free radical indicator in hair.

  16. ESR investigation of radicals formed in γ-irradiated vinylidene fluoride based copolymer: P(VDF-co-HFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, Ludovic; Albela, Belén; Bonneviot, Laurent; Portinha, Daniel; Fleury, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Samples of copolymer based on vinylidene fluoride and hexafluoropropene P(VDF-co-HFP) were exposed to γ-radiation performed under an inert atmosphere and the total amount of radicals was quantified by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR). An in-depth study of recorded ESR spectra allowed the identification of several types of radical species formed during radiolysis. Starting from an ESR simulation model established for irradiated PVDF, seven radical species have been identified in the case of P(VDF-co-HFP): five of them are related to the VDF units while the two others are derived from the HFP unit. The model used to simulate the complex superimposed ESR signals is presented. The proportions of each species are discussed and correlated to the amount of HFP units contained in the copolymer, and to the stability of each species depending on their local environment. Furthermore, the evolution of radical density with radiation dose and the decay resulting from annealing at a given temperature are presented. Corresponding spectral evolution shows the progressive predominance of most stable species. - Highlights: ► ESR signal of γ-irradiated P(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene) containing 6 wt% of hexafluoropropene is modeled. ► The formation of seven major radical species is proposed for the first time. ► Despite a low comonomer content, 43% of radicals are localized on hexafluoropropene. ► Effect of dose and annealing highlight radical stability. ► Radical stability is found to depend on both chemical environment and chain location

  17. Identification of Radical Scavengers in Sweet Grass (Hierochloe odorata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pukalskas, A.; Beek, van T.A.; Venskutonis, R.P.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Veldhuizen, van A.; Groot, de Æ.

    2002-01-01

    Extracts from aerial parts of sweet grass (Hierochloe odorata) were active DPPH free radical scavengers, The active compounds were detected in extract fractions using HPLC with on-line radical scavenging detection. After multistep fractionation of the extract, two new natural products possessing

  18. Synchrotron-based valence shell photoionization of CH radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gans, B., E-mail: berenger.gans@u-psud.fr, E-mail: christian.alcaraz@u-psud.fr; Falvo, C. [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay (ISMO), CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91405 Orsay (France); Holzmeier, F.; Röder, A. [Institut of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Krüger, J.; Garcia, G. A. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin BP 48, F-91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Lopes, A.; Alcaraz, C., E-mail: berenger.gans@u-psud.fr, E-mail: christian.alcaraz@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, UMR 8000 CNRS—Univ. Paris-Sud, Univ. Paris-Saclay, Bât. 350, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Fittschen, C. [Université Lille, CNRS, UMR 8522–PC2A–Physicochimie des Processus de Combustion et de l’Atmosphère, F-59000 Lille (France); Loison, J.-C. [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires, UMR 5255 CNRS—Université de Bordeaux, Bât. A12, 351 cours de la Libération, F-33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2016-05-28

    We report the first experimental observations of X{sup +} {sup 1}Σ{sup +}←X {sup 2}Π and a{sup +} {sup 3}Π←X {sup 2}Π single-photon ionization transitions of the CH radical performed on the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. The radical was produced by successive hydrogen-atom abstractions on methane by fluorine atoms in a continuous microwave discharge flow tube. Mass-selected ion yields and photoelectron spectra were recorded as a function of photon energy using a double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectrometer. The ion yield appears to be strongly affected by vibrational and electronic autoionizations, which allow the observation of high Rydberg states of the neutral species. The photoelectron spectra enable the first direct determinations of the adiabatic ionization potential and the energy of the first triplet state of the cation with respect to its singlet ground state. This work also brings valuable information on the complex electronic structure of the CH radical and its cation and adds new observations to complement our understanding of Rydberg states and autoionization processes.

  19. Heterogeneous kinetics, products, and mechanisms of ferulic acid particles in the reaction with NO3 radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Peng; Wen, Xiaoying; Wu, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Methoxyphenols, as an important component of wood burning, are produced by lignin pyrolysis and considered to be the potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction between ferulic acid particles and NO3 radicals was investigated. Six products including oxalic acid, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, 5-nitrovanillin, 5-nitroferulic acid, and caffeic acid were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and the main pathways were NO3 electrophilic addition to olefin and the meta-position to the hydroxyl group. The uptake coefficient of NO3 radicals on ferulic acid particles was 0.17 ± 0.02 and the effective rate constant under experimental conditions was (1.71 ± 0.08) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results indicate that ferulic acid degradation by NO3 can be an important sink at night.

  20. Comparison of fluorescence-based techniques for the quantification of particle-induced hydroxyl radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Corey A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species including hydroxyl radicals can cause oxidative stress and mutations. Inhaled particulate matter can trigger formation of hydroxyl radicals, which have been implicated as one of the causes of particulate-induced lung disease. The extreme reactivity of hydroxyl radicals presents challenges to their detection and quantification. Here, three fluorescein derivatives [aminophenyl fluorescamine (APF, amplex ultrared, and dichlorofluorescein (DCFH] and two radical species, proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac have been compared for their usefulness to measure hydroxyl radicals generated in two different systems: a solution containing ferrous iron and a suspension of pyrite particles. Results APF, amplex ultrared, and DCFH react similarly to the presence of hydroxyl radicals. Proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac do not react with hydroxyl radicals directly, which reduces their sensitivity. Since both DCFH and amplex ultrared will react with reactive oxygen species other than hydroxyl radicals and another highly reactive species, peroxynitite, they lack specificity. Conclusion The most useful probe evaluated here for hydroxyl radicals formed from cell-free particle suspensions is APF due to its sensitivity and selectivity.

  1. Radiolytic studies of the cumyloxyl radical in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neta, P.; Dizdaroglu, M.; Simic, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Formation and reactions of the cumyloxyl radical in aqueous solutions were studied by steady-state and pulse radiolytic techniques. Cumene hydroperoxide reacts with esub(aq)sup(-) (k = 4.4x10 9 M -1 s -1 ) to yield the cumyloxyl radical. The spectrum recorded after the pulse indicates formation of a species absorbing at 250 nm. This product was identified as acetophenone, which is formed by the fragmentation of the cumyloxyl radical. By comparison of the pseudo-first-order rates of esub(aq)sup(-) decay at 600 nm with the rate of production of acetophenone at 245 nm at increasing concentrations of cumene hydroperoxide, it was possible to derive a rate constant of 1.0x10 7 s -1 for the cleavage of cumyloxyl to acetophenone and methyl radical. This value is higher than that measured previously in organic solvents (1x10 6 s -1 ), as expected. HPLC analysis of the radiation products acetophenone and cumyl alcohol permitted determination of rate constants for hydrogen abstraction by the cumyloxyl radical, in competition with the fragmentation. The rate constants for H abstraction from i-PrOH, EtOH, and MeOH by CmO were found to be 9.9x10 6 , 3.8x10 6 , and 8.5x10 5 M -1 s -1 , respectively

  2. Radical zinc-atom-transfer-based carbozincation of haloalkynes with dialkylzincs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Chemla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of alkylidenezinc carbenoids by 1,4-addition/carbozincation of dialkylzincs or alkyl iodides based on zinc atom radical transfer, in the presence of dimethylzinc with β-(propargyloxyenoates having pendant iodo- and bromoalkynes, is disclosed. Formation of the carbenoid intermediate is fully stereoselective at −30 °C and arises from a formal anti-selective carbozincation reaction. Upon warming, the zinc carbenoid is stereochemically labile and isomerizes to its more stable form.

  3. Oxidative capacity of the Mexico City atmosphere – Part 1: A radical source perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Volkamer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of OH, HO2 and RO2 radical sources is presented for the near field photochemical regime inside the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA. During spring of 2003 (MCMA-2003 field campaign an extensive set of measurements was collected to quantify time-resolved ROx (sum of OH, HO2, RO2 radical production rates from day- and nighttime radical sources. The Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv3.1 was constrained by measurements of (1 concentration time-profiles of photosensitive radical precursors, i.e., nitrous acid (HONO, formaldehyde (HCHO, ozone (O3, glyoxal (CHOCHO, and other oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs; (2 respective photolysis-frequencies (J-values; (3 concentration time-profiles of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic VOCs (103 compound are treated and oxidants, i.e., OH- and NO3 radicals, O3; and (4 NO, NO2, meteorological and other parameters. The ROx production rate was calculated directly from these observations; the MCM was used to estimate further ROx production from unconstrained sources, and express overall ROx production as OH-equivalents (i.e., taking into account the propagation efficiencies of RO2 and HO2 radicals into OH radicals.

    Daytime radical production is found to be about 10–25 times higher than at night; it does not track the abundance of sunlight. 12-h average daytime contributions of individual sources are: Oxygenated VOC other than HCHO about 33%; HCHO and O3 photolysis each about 20%; O3/alkene reactions and HONO photolysis each about 12%, other sources <3%. Nitryl chloride photolysis could potentially contribute ~15% additional radicals, while NO2* + water makes – if any – a very small contribution (~2%. The peak radical production of ~7.5 107 molec cm−3 s−1 is

  4. Free radicals in biology. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryor, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    This volume continues the treatment of topics in free radical biology and free radical pathology from Volume I. In the first chapter, pyridinyl radicals, radicals which are models for those derived from NAD, are discussed. Pyridinyl radicals can be synthesized and isolated and directly studied in a number of chemical systems. The next chapter treats the role of glutathione in the cell. It is becoming even more apparent that this vital thiol controls a large number of important cellular functions. The GSH/GSSG balance has recently been implicated as a control for cellular development; this balance also may be important in relaying the effects of oxidants from one site to another in the body. The next chapter outlines the reactions of singlet oxygen; some of these involve free radicals and some do not. This reactive intermediate appears to be important both in photochemical smog and in cellular chemistry where singlet oxygen is produced by nonphotochemical processes. The production of free radicals from dry tissues, a controversial area with conflicting claims is reviewed. The next chapter outlines the current status of the studies of photochemical smog. The next two chapters treat specific reactive materials which are present in smog. The first discusses the chemistry of nitrogen oxides and ozone. The second chapter treats the chemistry of the peroxyacyl nitrites. These compounds, although present in only small concentration, are among the most toxic components of smog. The last two chapters treat radiation damage to proteins and radiation protection and radical reactions produced by radiation in nucleic acids

  5. Deciphering free-radical code of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volovyk, S.; Bazyka, D.; Loganovsky, K.; Bebeshko, V.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Ionizing radiation is fundamental environmental factor for life origin and evolution. Free radicals, primordial 'sea' for life conceiving and existence, induced by cosmic and terrestrial background radiation, are evolutionally archetypal, ubiquitous, and omnipotent in physiological- pathophysiological dichotomy. Classical free-radical paradigm in radiation biology and medicine, focused in essence on oxidative damage, needs new conceptualization and generalization. Methods: Suggested novel insights into free radicals dual immanent nature and functions in organism systems are based on original concepts of radicals dynamic charge transfer (CT) - redox ambivalence (interactional nucleo-, electro-, and ambiphilicity spectrum); pertinent chemical reactivity and selectivity delocalization model; physiological functional ambivalence and complementarity, and dynamic free-radical homeostasis. Results: Subtle perturbations in radicals CT spatiotemporal homeodynamics, in responsive signaling / controlling networks, concomitant alterations in genes expression, transcription, and apoptosis, redox control of mitochondrial ET chain, telomere/telomerase balance, DNA CT, circadian clock, hemispheric biochemical dominance/accentuation, including alteration of nitric oxide-superoxide complementarity, membranes permeability, neurotransmission pattern, synaptic circuitry, etc under radiation exposure have more fundamental impact on organism systems (especially CNS and CVS) deterioration than simple radicals inflicted oxidative (nitrosative) damage of cellular constituents. Conclusions: This novel conceptualization of free-radical paradigm constitutes new dimension in deciphering molecular mechanisms of radiation effects on subtle borderline norm-pathology and continuity-discontinuity dichotomy in organisms systems disorders - CT(redox)omics, which involves investigation of CT, redox, and spin states of free radicals, DNA bases

  6. Radical polarization in double switching of external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukzen, N.N.; Morozov, V.A.; Sagdeev, R.Z.

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical treatment of radical spin evolution under the action of double switching of external magnetic field is proposed. Account is taken of evolution of the radical spin state during laser pulse which generates paramagnetic particles. It is shown that the most effective beats in the nuclear magnetization of diamagnetic products of recombination occur upon the jump into zero magnetic field after laser pulse. The phase of observed beats bears information about the type of the initial radical polarization. The frequency of the beats is determined by radical hyperfine structure. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Measurement of hydroxyl radical production in ultrasonic aqueous solutions by a novel chemiluminescence method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufei; Zhang, Zhujun; Yang, Chunyan

    2008-07-01

    Measurement methods for ultrasonic fields are important for reasons of safety. The investigation of an ultrasonic field can be performed by detecting the yield of hydroxyl radicals resulting from ultrasonic cavitations. In this paper, a novel method is introduced for detecting hydroxyl radicals by a chemiluminescence (CL) reaction of luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-K5[Cu(HIO6)2](DPC). The yield of hydroxyl radicals is calculated directly by the relative CL intensity according to the corresponding concentration of H2O2. This proposed CL method makes it possible to perform an in-line and real-time assay of hydroxyl radicals in an ultrasonic aqueous solution. With flow injection (FI) technology, this novel CL reaction is sensitive enough to detect ultra trace amounts of H2O2 with a limit of detection (3sigma) of 4.1 x 10(-11) mol L(-1). The influences of ultrasonic output power and ultrasonic treatment time on the yield of hydroxyl radicals by an ultrasound generator were also studied. The results indicate that the amount of hydroxyl radicals increases with the increase of ultrasonic output power (< or = 15 W mL(-1)). There is a linear relationship between the time of ultrasonic treatment and the yield of H2O2. The ultrasonic field of an ultrasonic cleaning baths has been measured by calculating the yield of hydroxyl radicals.

  8. Enantioselective conjugate radical addition to alpha'-hydroxy enones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunggi; Lim, Chae Jo; Kim, Sunggak; Subramaniam, Rajesh; Zimmerman, Jake; Sibi, Mukund P

    2006-09-14

    Enantioselective conjugate radical addition to alpha'-hydroxy alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones, compounds containing bidentate donors, has been investigated. It has been found that radical additions to alpha'-hydroxy alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones in the presence of Mg(NTf2)2 and bisoxazoline ligand 5a proceeded cleanly, yielding the addition products in high chemical yields and good enantiomeric excesses.

  9. Missing Peroxy Radical Sources Within a Rural Forest Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, G. M.; Cantrell, C.; Kim, S.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Karl, T.; Harley, P.; Turnipseed, A.; Zheng, W.; Flocke, F.; Apel, E. C.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Organic peroxy (RO2) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key intermediates in the photochemical processes that generate ozone, secondary organic aerosol and reactive nitrogen reservoirs throughout the troposphere. In regions with ample biogenic hydrocarbons, the richness and complexity of peroxy radical chemistry presents a significant challenge to current-generation models, especially given the scarcity of measurements in such environments. We present peroxy radical observations acquired within a Ponderosa pine forest during the summer 2010 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study (BEACHON-ROCS). Total peroxy radical mixing ratios reach as high as 180 pptv and are among the highest yet recorded. Using the comprehensive measurement suite to constrain a near-explicit 0-D box model, we investigate the sources, sinks and distribution of peroxy radicals below the forest canopy. The base chemical mechanism underestimates total peroxy radicals by as much as a factor of 3. Since primary reaction partners for peroxy radicals are either measured (NO) or under-predicted (HO2 and RO2, i.e. self-reaction), missing sources are the most likely explanation for this result. A close comparison of model output with observations reveals at least two distinct source signatures. The first missing source, characterized by a sharp midday maximum and a strong dependence on solar radiation, is consistent with photolytic production of HO2. The diel profile of the second missing source peaks in the afternoon and suggests a process that generates RO2 independently of sun-driven photochemistry, such as ozonolysis of reactive hydrocarbons. The maximum magnitudes of these missing sources (approximately 120 and 50 pptv min-1, respectively) are consistent with previous observations alluding to unexpectedly intense oxidation within forests. We conclude that a similar mechanism may underlie many such observations.

  10. The Diurnal Variation of Hydrogen, Nitrogen, and Chlorine Radicals: Implications for the Heterogeneous Production of HNO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R. S.; Keim, E. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Stimpfle, R. M.; hide

    1994-01-01

    In situ measurements of hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine radicals obtained through sunrise and sunset in the lower stratosphere during SPADE are compared to results from a photochemical model constrained by observed concentrations of radical precursors and environmental conditions. Models allowing for heterogeneous hydrolysis of N205 on sulfate aerosols agree with measured concentrations of NO, NO2, and ClO throughout the day, but fail to account for high concentrations of OH and H02 observed near sunrise and sunset. The morning burst of [OH] and [HO2] coincides with the rise of [NO] from photolysis of N02, suggesting a new source of HO, that photolyzes in the near UV (350 to 400 nm) spectral region. A model that allows for the heterogeneous production of HN02 results in an excellent simulation of the diurnal variations of [OH] and [HO2].

  11. Mechanisms of radical removal by SO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Lund; Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2007-01-01

    It is well established from experiments in premixed, laminar flames, jet-stirred reactors, flow reactors, and batch reactors that SO2 acts to catalyze hydrogen atom removal at stoichiometric and reducing conditions. However, the commonly accepted mechanism for radical removal, SO2 + H......(+M) reversible arrow HOSO(+M), HOSO + H/OH reversible arrow SO2 + H-2/H2O, has been challenged by recent theoretical and experimental results. Based on ab initio calculations for key reactions, we update the kinetic model for this chemistry and re-examine the mechanism of fuel/SO2 interactions. We find...... that the interaction of SO, with the radical pool is more complex than previously assumed, involving HOSO and SO, as well as, at high temperatures also HSO, SH, and S. The revised mechanism with a high rate constant for H + SO2 recombination and with SO + H2O, rather than SO2 + H-2, as major products of the HOSO + H...

  12. Ring-Expansion/Contraction Radical Crossover Reactions of Cyclic Alkoxyamines: A Mechanism for Ring Expansion-Controlled Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Narumi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrocyclic polymers present an important class of macromolecules, displaying the reduced radius of gyration or impossibility to entangle. A rare approach for their synthesis is the ring expansion-controlled radical “vinyl” polymerization, starting from a cyclic alkoxyamine. We here describe ring-expansion radical crossover reactions of cyclic alkoxyamines which run in parallel to chain-propagation reactions in the polymerization system. The radical crossover reactions extensively occurred at 105–125 °C, eventually producing high molecular weight polymers with multiple inherent dynamic covalent bonds (NOC bonds. A subsequent ring-contraction radical crossover reaction and the second ring-expansion radical crossover reaction are also described. The major products for the respective three stages were shown to possess cyclic morphologies by the molecular weight profiles and the residual ratios for the NOC bonds (φ in %. In particular, the high φ values ranging from ca. 80% to 98% were achieved for this cyclic alkoxyamine system. This result verifies the high availability of this system as a tool demonstrating the ring-expansion “vinyl” polymerization that allows them to produce macrocyclic polymers via a one-step vinyl polymerization.

  13. Hot wire radicals and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure radical (and stable gas) densities at the substrate of a tungsten hot wire (HW) reactor. We report measurements of the silane reaction probability on the HW and the probability of Si and H release from the HW. We describe a model for the atomic H release, based on the H 2 dissociation model. We note major variations in silicon-release, with dependence on prior silane exposure. Measured radical densities versus silane pressure yield silicon-silane and H-silane reaction rate coefficients, and the dominant radical fluxes to the substrate

  14. Heterogeneous reaction of particulate chlorpyrifos with NO3 radicals: Products, pathways, and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nana; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Bo; Shu, Jinian; Wang, Youfeng; Sun, Wanqi

    2014-08-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a typical chlorinated organophosphorus pesticide. The heterogeneous reaction of chlorpyrifos particles with NO3 radicals was investigated using a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS) and a real-time atmospheric gas analysis mass spectrometer. Chlorpyrifos oxon, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, O,O-diethyl O-hydrogen phosphorothioate, O,O-diethyl ester thiophosphoric acid, diethyl hydrogen phosphate and a phosphinyl disulfide compound were identified as the main degradation products. The heterogeneous reaction pathways were proposed and their kinetic processes were investigated via a mixed-phase relative rate method. The observed effective rate constant is 3.4 ± 0.2 × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  15. Alternative Chemical Amplification Methods for Peroxy Radical Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Peroxy radicals (HO2, CH3O2, etc.) are commonly detected by the chemical amplification technique, in which ambient air is mixed with high concentrations of CO and NO, initiating a chain reaction that produces 30 - 200 NO2 molecules per sampled peroxy radical. The NO2 is then measured by one of several techniques. With the exception of CIMS-based techniques, the chemical amplification method has undergone only incremental improvements since it was first introduced in 1982. The disadvantages of the technique include the need to use high concentrations of CO and the greatly reduced sensitivity of the amplification chain length in the presence of water vapor. We present a new chemical amplification scheme in which either ethane or acetaldehyde is used in place of CO, with the NO2 product detected using Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift spectroscopy (CAPS). Under dry conditions, the amplification factor of the alternative amplifiers are approximately six times lower than the CO-based amplifier. The relative humidity "penalty" is not as severe, however, such that at typical ambient relative humidity (RH) values the amplification factor is within a factor of three of the CO-based amplifier. Combined with the NO2 sensitivity of CAPS and a dual-channel design, the detection limit of the ethane amplifier is less than 2 ppt (1 minute average, signal-to-noise ratio 2). The advantages of these alternative chemical amplification schemes are improved safety, a reduced RH correction, and increased sensitivity to organic peroxy radicals relative to HO2.

  16. Influence of the irradiation temperature on the free-radical response of alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Siegele, R.; Regulla, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    GSF operates the only IAEA high-level dosimetry reference laboratory and, as a joint project with the IAEA, the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS). Dosimetry is based on long-lived free radicals in organic alanine induced by ionizing radiation and readout by ESR spectroscopy. The thermal time response of the radical concentration in alanine is fairly constant after irradiation provided that the alanine samples are stored at temperatures below 50 0 C. By contrast, a positive temperature coefficient had earlier been found at GSF for the production rate of alanine radicals, for irradiation temperatures between 0 and 50 0 C. This effect has to be considered for reference dosimetry in radiation processing. Radiation processing is also of interest at irradiation temperatures below 0 0 C. The present study describes experiments on the influence of irradiation temperatures between +50 and -100 0 C. Comparison is made between the present and earlier results, in the overlapping temperature range. An empirical function is proposed for the temperature coefficient based on the experimental data. (author)

  17. Identification of mitochondrial electron transport chain-mediated NADH radical formation by EPR spin-trapping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi; Kotake, Yashige; Humphries, Kenneth M

    2011-12-20

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) is a major source of free radical production. However, due to the highly reactive nature of radical species and their short lifetimes, accurate detection and identification of these molecules in biological systems is challenging. The aim of this investigation was to determine the free radical species produced from the mitochondrial ETC by utilizing EPR spin-trapping techniques and the recently commercialized spin-trap, 5-(2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propoxycyclophosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (CYPMPO). We demonstrate that this spin-trap has the preferential quality of having minimal mitochondrial toxicity at concentrations required for radical detection. In rat heart mitochondria and submitochondrial particles supplied with NADH, the major species detected under physiological pH was a carbon-centered radical adduct, indicated by markedly large hyperfine coupling constant with hydrogen (a(H) > 2.0 mT). In the presence of the ETC inhibitors, the carbon-centered radical formation was increased and exhibited NADH concentration dependency. The same carbon-centered radical could also be produced with the NAD biosynthesis precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide, in the presence of a catalytic amount of NADH. The results support the conclusion that the observed species is a complex I derived NADH radical. The formation of the NADH radical could be blocked by hydroxyl radical scavengers but not SOD. In vitro experiments confirmed that an NADH-radical is readily formed by hydroxyl radical but not superoxide anion, further implicating hydroxyl radical as an upstream mediator of NADH radical production. These findings demonstrate the identification of a novel mitochondrial radical species with potential physiological significance and highlight the diverse mechanisms and sites of production within the ETC.

  18. When 'national innovation system' meet 'varieties of capitalism' arguments on labour qualifications: On the skill types and scientific knowledge needed for radical and incremental product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, A.M.; Peine, A.

    2011-01-01

    The literatures on 'varieties of capitalism' (VoC) and 'national innovation systems' (NIS) propose very similar arguments about how firms require different types of labour qualifications to pursue strategies of radical product innovation (RPI), incremental product innovation (IPI), and product

  19. Validation study of a web-based assessment of functional recovery after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Andrew J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good clinical care of prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy depends on careful assessment of post-operative morbidities, yet physicians do not always judge patient symptoms accurately. Logistical problems associated with using paper questionnaire limit their use in the clinic. We have implemented a web-interface ("STAR" for patient-reported outcomes after radical prostatectomy. Methods We analyzed data on the first 9 months of clinical implementation to evaluate the validity of the STAR questionnaire to assess functional outcomes following radical prostatectomy. We assessed response rate, internal consistency within domains, and the association between survey responses and known predictors of sexual and urinary function, including age, time from surgery, nerve sparing status and co-morbidities. Results Of 1581 men sent an invitation to complete the instrument online, 1235 responded for a response rate of 78%. Cronbach's alpha was 0.84, 0.86 and 0.97 for bowel, urinary and sexual function respectively. All known predictors of sexual and urinary function were significantly associated with survey responses in the hypothesized direction. Conclusions We have found that web-based assessment of functional recovery after radical prostatectomy is practical and feasible. The instrument demonstrated excellent psychometric properties, suggested that validity is maintained when questions are transferred from paper to electronic format and when patients give responses that they know will be seen by their doctor and added to their clinic record. As such, our system allows ready implementation of patient-reported outcomes into routine clinical practice.

  20. Oxidation of spin-traps by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) radical in aqueous solutions: first ESR evidence of formation of new nitroxide radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, T; Miura, Y; Ueda, J

    1996-01-01

    The reactivities of the chlorine dioxide (ClO2), which is a stable free radical towards some water-soluble spin-traps were investigated in aqueous solutions by an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The ClO2 radical was generated from the redox reaction of Ti3+ with potassium chlorate (KClO3) in aqueous solutions. When one of the spin-traps, 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), was included in the Ti3+-KClO3 reaction system, ESR spectrum due to the ClO2 radical completely disappeared and a new ESR spectrum [aN(1) = 0.72 mT, aH(2) = 0.41 mT], which is different from that of DMPO-ClO2 adduct, was observed. The ESR parameters of this new ESR signal was identical to those of 5,5-dimethylpyrrolidone-(2)-oxyl-(1) (DMPOX), suggesting the radical species giving the new ESR spectrum is assignable to DMPOX. The similar ESR spectrum consisting of a triplet [aN(1) = 0.69 mT] was observed when the derivative of DMPO, 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (M4PO) was included in the Ti3+-KClO3 reaction system. This radical species is attributed to the oxidation product of M4PO, 3,3,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidone-(2)-oxyl-(1) (M4POX). When another nitrone spin-trap, alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (POBN) was used as a spin-trap, the ESR signal intensity due to the ClO2 radical decreased and a new ESR signal consisting of a triplet [aN(1) = 0.76 mT] was observed. The similar ESR spectrum was observed when N-t-butyl-alpha- nitrone (PBN) was used as a spin-trap. This ESR parameter [a(N)(1) = 0.85 mT] was identical to the oxidation product of PBN, PBNX. Thus, the new ESR signal observed from POBN may be assigned to the oxidation product of POBN, POBNX. These results suggest that the ClO2, radical does not form the stable spin adducts with nitrone spin-traps, but oxidizes these spin-traps to give the corresponding nitroxyl radicals. On the other hand, nitroso spin-traps, 5,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzenesulfonate (DBNBS), and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) did not trap

  1. Binding of radiation-induced phenylalanine radicals to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Rijn, C.J.S. van; Bleichrodt, J.F.

    1975-11-01

    When an aqueous solution of double-stranded DNA of bacteriophage PM2 containing phenylalanine and saturated with N 2 O is irradiated with γ-rays, radiation-induced phenylalanine radicals are bound covalently. Under the conditions used about 25 phenylalanine molecules may be bound per lethal hit. Also for single-stranded PM2 DNA, most of the phenylalanine radicals bound are non-lethal. Evidence is presented that in double-stranded DNA an appreciable fraction of the single-strand breaks is induced by phenylalanine radicals. Radiation products of phenylalanine and the phenylalanine bound to the DNA decrease the sensitivity of the DNA to the induction of single-strand breaks. There are indications that the high efficiency of protection by radiation products of phenylalanine is due to their positive charge, which will result in a relatively high concentration of these compounds in the vicinity of the negatively charged DNA molecules

  2. Scavenging of free-radical metabolites of aniline xenobiotics and drugs by amino acid derivatives: toxicological implications of radical-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Karim; Baghdasarian, Argishti; Narwaley, Malyaj; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-12-16

    We investigated a novel scavenging mechanism of arylamine free radicals by poly- and monoaminocarboxylates. Free radicals of arylamine xenobiotics and drugs did not react with oxygen in peroxidase-catalyzed reactions; however, they showed marked oxygen uptake in the presence of an aminocarboxylate. These free-radical intermediates were identified using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), a polyaminocarboxylate, caused a concentration-dependent attenuation of N-centered radicals produced by the peroxidative metabolism of arylamines with the subsequent formation of secondary aliphatic carbon-centered radicals stemming from the cosubstrate molecule. Analogously, N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) and N-methyliminodiacetate (MIDA), but not iminodiacetic acid (IDA), demonstrated a similar scavenging effect of arylamine-derived free radicals in a horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 system. Using human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell lysate as a model of human neutrophils, DTPA, MIDA, and DMG readily reduced anilinium cation radicals derived from the arylamines and gave rise to the corresponding carbon radicals. The rate of peroxidase-triggered polymerization of aniline was studied as a measure of nitrogen-radical scavenging. Although, IDA had no effect on the rate of aniline polymerization, this was almost nullified in the presence of DTPA and MIDA at half of the molar concentration of the aniline substrate, whereas a 20 molar excess of DMPO caused only a partial inhibition. Furthermore, the yield of formaldehyde, a specific reaction endproduct of the oxidation of aminocarboxylates by aniline free-radical metabolites, was quantitatively determined. Azobenzene, a specific reaction product of peroxidase-catalyzed free-radical dimerization of aniline, was fully abrogated in the presence of DTPA, as confirmed by GC/MS. Under aerobic conditions, a radical-transfer reaction

  3. Flow Giese reaction using cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide Fukuyama

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tin-free Giese reactions, employing primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl iodides as radical precursors, ethyl acrylate as a radical trap, and sodium cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator, were examined in a continuous flow system. With the use of an automated flow microreactor, flow reaction conditions for the Giese reaction were quickly optimized, and it was found that a reaction temperature of 70 °C in combination with a residence time of 10–15 minutes gave good yields of the desired addition products.

  4. Reactivity Of Radiolytically-Produced Nitrogen Oxide Radicals Toward Aromatic Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Gracy

    2010-01-01

    The nitration of aromatic compounds in the gas phase is an important source of toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic species in the atmosphere and has therefore received much attention. Gas phase nitration typically occurs by free-radical reactions. Condensed-phase free-radical reactions, and in particular nitrite and nitrate radical chemistry, have been studied far less. These condensed-phase free-radical reactions may be relevant in fog and cloud water in polluted areas, in urban aerosols with low pH, in water treatment using advanced oxidation processes such as electron beam (e-beam) irradiation, and in nuclear waste treatment applications. This study discusses research toward an improved understanding of nitration of aromatic compounds in the condensed phase under conditions conducive to free-radical formation. The results are of benefit in several areas of environmental chemistry, in particular nuclear waste treatment applications. The nitration reactions of anisole and toluene as model compounds were investigated in γ-irradiated acidic nitrate, neutral nitrate, and neutral nitrite solutions. Cs-7SB, 1-(2,2,3,3,-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, is used as a solvent modifier in the fission product extraction (FPEX) formulation for the extraction of Cs and Sr from dissolved nuclear fuel. The formulation also contains the ligands calix(4)arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) for Cs extraction and 4,4(prime),(5(prime))-di-(t-butyldicyclohexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) for Sr extraction, all in Isopar L, a branched-chain alkane diluent. FPEX solvent has favorable extraction efficiency for Cs and Sr from acidic solution and was investigated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for changes in extraction efficiency after γ-irradiation. Extraction efficiency decreased after irradiation. The decrease in solvent extraction efficiency was identical for Cs and Sr, even though they are complexed by different ligands. This suggests that

  5. Reaction between peroxynitrite and boronates: EPR spin-trapping, HPLC analyses, and quantum mechanical study of the free radical pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Adam; Zielonka, Jacek; Lopez, Marcos; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Joseph, Joy; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recently we showed that peroxynitrite (ONOO−) reacts directly and rapidly with aromatic and aliphatic boronic acids (k ≈ 106 M−1s−1). Product analyses and substrate consumption data indicated that ONOO− reacts stoichiometrically with boronates, yielding the corresponding phenols as the major product (~85–90%), and the remaining products (10–15%) were proposed to originate from free radical intermediates (phenyl and phenoxyl radicals). Here we investigated in detail the minor, free radical pathway of boronate reaction with ONOO−. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique was used to characterize the free radical intermediates formed from the reaction between boronates and ONOO−. Using 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) and 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps, phenyl radicals were trapped and detected. Although phenoxyl radicals were not detected, the positive effects of molecular oxygen, and inhibitory effects of hydrogen atom donors (acetonitrile, and 2-propanol) and general radical scavengers (GSH, NADH, ascorbic acid and tyrosine) on the formation of phenoxyl radical-derived nitrated product, suggest that phenoxyl radical was formed as the secondary species. We propose that the initial step of the reaction involves the addition of ONOO− to the boron atom in boronates. The anionic intermediate undergoes both heterolytic (major pathway) and homolytic (minor pathway) cleavage of the peroxy (O-O) bond to form phenol and nitrite as a major product (via a non-radical mechanism), or a radical pair PhB(OH)2O•−…•NO2 as a minor product. It is conceivable that phenyl radicals are formed by the fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion. According to the DFT quantum mechanical calculations, the energy barrier for the dissociation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion to form phenyl radicals is only a few kcal/mol, suggesting rapid and spontaneous fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion

  6. FT-IR kinetic and product study of the Br-radical initiated oxidation of α, β-unsaturated organic carbonyl compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, C. G.; Barnes, I.; Becker, K. H.

    Using the relative kinetic technique the kinetics of the gas-phase reactions of Br radicals with acrolein, methacrolein and methylvinyl ketone have been investigated at (301±3) K in 1013 mbar of (N 2+O 2) bath gas at varying proportions. In 1013 mbar of synthetic air the following rate coefficients have been obtained (in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1): acrolein (3.21±0.11)×10 -12; methacrolein (2.33±0.08)×10 -11; methyl vinyl ketone (1.87±0.06)×10 -11. This study represents the first determination of the rate coefficients for these compounds. As for other unsaturated hydrocarbons the rate coefficient with Br was found to increase with increasing partial pressure of O 2. From the product studies of the reactions it has been established that addition of Br radicals to the terminal C-atom is the major pathway in all three cases. However, for acrolein H atom abstraction from the -CO-H group is also significant. Mechanisms are proposed to explain the observed products, mainly β-brominated carbonyl compounds.

  7. Reactions of Hydroxyalkyl Radicals with Cysteinyl Peptides in a NanoESI Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Craig A.; Xia, Yu

    2014-07-01

    In biological systems, carbon-centered small molecule radicals are primarily formed via external radiation or internal radical reactions. These radical species can react with a variety of biomolecules, most notably nucleic acids, the consequence of which has possible links to gene mutation and cancer. Sulfur-containing peptides and proteins are reactive toward a variety of radical species and many of them behave as radical scavengers. In this study, the reactions between alkyl alcohol carbon-centered radicals (e.g., •CH2OH for methanol) and cysteinyl peptides within a nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) plume were explored. The reaction system involved ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of a nanoESI plume using a low pressure mercury lamp consisting of 185 and 254 nm emission bands. The alkyl alcohol was added as solvent into the nanoESI solution and served as the precursor of hydroxyalkyl radicals upon UV irradiation. The hydroxyalkyl radicals subsequently reacted with cysteinyl peptides either containing a disulfide linkage or free thiol, which led to the formation of peptide- S-hydroxyalkyl product. This radical reaction coupled with subsequent MS/MS was shown to have analytical potential by cleaving intrachain disulfide linked peptides prior to CID to enhance sequence information. Tandem mass spectrometry via collision-induced dissociation (CID), stable isotope labeling, and accurate mass measurement were employed to verify the identities of the reaction products.

  8. Cell-mediated reduction of protein and peptide hydroperoxides to reactive free radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Radical attack on proteins in the presence of O(2) gives protein hydroperoxides in high yields. These peroxides are decomposed by transition metal ions, reducing agents, UV light and heat, with the formation of a range of reactive radicals that are capable of initiating further damage. Evidence has...... been presented for the formation of alcohols as stable products of peroxide decomposition, and these have been employed as markers of oxidative damage in vivo. The mechanism of formation of these alcohols is unclear, with both radical and nonradical pathways capable of generating these products....... In this study we have investigated the reduction of peptide and protein hydroperoxides by THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells and it is shown that this process is accompanied by radical formation as detected by EPR spin trapping. The radicals detected, which are similar to those detected from metal-ion catalyzed...

  9. Radical inactivation of a biological sulphydryl molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.S.; Lal, M.; Gaucher, G.M.; Armstrong, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reactive species produced from the free radical-induced chain oxidation of low molecular weight sulphydryl-containing molecules in aerated solutions deactivate the sulphydryl-containing enzyme papain, forming both reparable mixed disulphides and non-reparable products. This inactivation is highly efficient for penicillamine and glutathione, but almost negligible with cysteine, which is a protector of papain for [cysteine] / [papain] >= 5 under all conditions used. In the case of glutathione, superoxide dismutase caused only a small reduction in the inactivation and peroxide yields were small, implying that the deactivating species are not .O 2 - but RSOO. radicals or products from them. For penicillamine, however, dimutase was highly effective and the peroxide yields were relatively large, demonstrating that .O 2 - or a radical with similar capabilities for forming H 2 O 2 and being deactivated by dismutase was involved. Although in the presence of dismutase penicillamine is a better protector of non-reparable papain inactivation than glutathione, it suffers from a deficiency in that the papain-penicillamine mixed disulphide, which is always formed, cannot be repaired by spontaneous reaction with RSH molecules. (author)

  10. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  11. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen M.; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Coti, Karla K.; Bení tez, Diego S.; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmieli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William Andrew III; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, Fraser Fraser Raser

    2009-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. The Rise of Radicals in Bioinorganic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2016-01-01

    Prior to 1950, the consensus was that biological transformations occurred in two-electron steps, thereby avoiding the generation of free radicals. Dramatic advances in spectroscopy, biochemistry, and molecular biology have led to the realization that protein-based radicals participate in a vast array of vital biological mechanisms. Redox processes involving high-potential intermediates formed in reactions with O_2 are particularly susceptible to radical formation. Clusters of tyrosine (Tyr) a...

  13. Photoisomerization and photodissociation dynamics of reactive free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bise, Ryan T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-08-01

    The photofragmentation pathways of chemically reactive free radicals have been examined using the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Measurements of the photodissociation cross-sections, product branching ratios, product state energy distributions, and angular distributions provide insight into the excited state potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic processes involved in the dissociation mechanisms. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of the predissociative $\\tilde{A}$2A1 and $\\tilde{B}$2A2 states of CH3S have been investigated. At all photon energies, CH3 + S(3Pj), was the main reaction channel. The translational energy distributions reveal resolved structure corresponding to vibrational excitation of the CH3 umbrella mode and the S(3Pj) fine-structure distribution from which the nature of the coupled repulsive surfaces is inferred. Dissociation rates are deduced from the photofragment angular distributions, which depend intimately on the degree of vibrational excitation in the C-S stretch. Nitrogen combustion radicals, NCN, CNN and HNCN have also been studied. For all three radicals, the elimination of molecular nitrogen is the primary reaction channel. Excitation to linear excited triplet and singlet electronic states of the NCN radical generates resolved vibrational structure of the N2 photofragment. The relatively low fragment rotational excitation suggests dissociation via a symmetric C2V transition state. Resolved vibrational structure of the N2 photofragment is also observed in the photodissociation of the HNCN radical. The fragment vibrational and rotational distributions broaden with increased excitation energy. Simple dissociation models suggest that the HNCN radical isomerizes to a cyclic intermediate (c-HCNN) which then dissociates via a tight cyclic

  14. Generation of hydrogen free radicals from water for fuels by electric field induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Yiyi; Li, Ming; Zhou, Zongwen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen free radicals are generated from water splitting. • Hydrogen fuel is generated from water by electric field induction. • Hydrocarbon fuel is generated from CO_2 and water by electric field induction. - Abstract: Water is the most abundant resource for generating hydrogen fuel. In addition to dissociating H"+ and "−OH ions, certain water molecules dissociate to radicals under an electric field are considered. Therefore, an electric field inducing reactor is constructed and operated to generate hydrogen free radicals in this paper. Hydrogen free radicals begin to be generated under a 1.0 V electric field, and increasing the voltage and temperature increases the number of hydrogen free radicals. The production rate of hydrogen free radicals is 0.245 mmol/(L h) at 5.0 V and room temperature. The generated hydrogen free radicals are converted to polymer fuel and hydrogen fuel at production rates of 0.0093 mmol/(L h) and 0.0038 mmol/(L h) respectively, under 5.0 V and 0.25 mA. The results provide a way to generate hydrogen free radicals, which might be used to generate hydrocarbon fuel in industrial manufacture.

  15. Nuclear reaction of 10 B (n, α) 7 Li and grain size effects on the production of free radicals in alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurita Petatan, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    In general, it is important to know the physical and chemical properties of any material that is exposed to ionizing radiation. In particular, in dosimetric work, the amount of the absorbed doses by these materials is of much interest, in such a way that several methods have been developed in the past. An important and quantitatively accessible radiation effect in organic substances is the production of free radicals that can be easily measured by 'ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY (EPR)'. Numerous studies have been now been made on pure D L-Alanine irradiated with different radiation sources. Examination of the irradiated samples reveals the production of a stable free radical (CH 3 - CH. -COOH). In particular, gamma and electron irradiated D L-Alanine has received wide attention in the high doses interval (10 - 10 5 Gy). In contrast, there are very few EPR studies on thermal neutron radiation induced free radicals in pure D L-alanine. This may be due to the weak EPR signals observed in the irradiated samples. The objective of this work is to study for the first time the increase of the radical yield produced in neutron irradiated borated alanine by the EPR technique. For this purpose alanine has been mixed with borax in different stoichiometric proportions and grain sizes. When the mixture is neutron irradiated, the boron of the borax may experience a neutron capture reaction, 10 B (n, α) 7 Li. With this nuclear reaction it is supposed that the α particles will may impinge on the alanine molecules, producing in this way extra free radicals. Samples were irradiated in the thermal column of a Triga Mark III nuclear reactor with a thermal neutron flux of 5 x 10 7 n/Cm 2 -s. A signal enhancement of up to 1260 % is observed when samples of alanine-borax were intimately mixed in a stoichiometric ratio of 1:1. We also studied dosimetric characteristics of the mixed samples such as: a) Sensibility. b) Accuracy. c) Traceability. d) Stability. e)Fading. f

  16. A radical approach to radical innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Deichmann (Dirk); J.C.M. van den Ende (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInnovation pays. Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google – nearly every one of today’s most successful companies has a talent for developing radical new ideas. But how best to encourage radical initiative taking from employees, and does their previous success or failure at it play a role?

  17. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenylhydrazine Schiff bases as DPPH radical and super oxide anion scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Shah, Zarbad; Ahmad, Viqar Uddin; Khan, Momin; Taha, Muhammad; Rahim, Fazal; Ali, Sajjad; Ambreen, Nida; Perveen, Shahnaz; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    Syntheses of thirty 2,4,6-trichlorophenylhydrazine Schiff bases 1-30 were carried out and evaluated for their in vitro DPPH radical and super oxide anion scavenging activities. Compounds 1-30 have shown a varying degree of DPPH radical scavenging activity and their IC50 values range between 4.05-369.30 µM. The compounds 17, 28, 18, 14, 8, 15, 12, 2, 29, and 7 exhibited IC50 values ranging between 4.05±0.06-24.42±0.86 µM which are superior to standard n-propylgallate (IC50=30.12±0.27 µM). Selected compounds have shown a varying degree of superoxide anion radical scavenger activity and their IC50 values range between 91.23-406.90 µM. The compounds 28, 8, 17, 15, and 14, showed IC50 values between 91.23±1.2-105.31±2.29 µM which are superior to standard n-propylgallate (IC50=106.34±1.6 µM).

  18. Peroxy radical chemistry and the control of ozone photochemistry at Mace Head, Ireland during the summer of 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. L. Fleming

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxy radical (HO2+ΣRO2 measurements, using the PEroxy Radical Chemical Amplification (PERCA technique at the North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer EXperiment (NAMBLEX at Mace Head in summer 2002, are presented and put into the context of marine, boundary-layer chemistry. A suite of other chemical parameters (NO, NO2, NO3, CO, CH4, O3, VOCs, peroxides, photolysis frequencies and meteorological measurements, are used to present a detailed analysis of the role of peroxy radicals in tropospheric oxidation cycles and ozone formation. Under the range of conditions encountered the peroxy radical daily maxima varied from 10 to 40 pptv. The diurnal cycles showed an asymmetric shape typically shifted to the afternoon. Using a box model based on the master chemical mechanism the average model measurement agreement was 2.5 across the campaign. The addition of halogen oxides to the model increases the level of model/measurement agreement, apparently by respeciation of HOx. A good correlation exists between j(HCHO.[HCHO] and the peroxy radicals indicative of the importance of HCHO in the remote atmosphere as a HOx source, particularly in the afternoon. The peroxy radicals showed a strong dependence on [NO2] with a break point at 0.1 ppbv, where the radicals increased concomitantly with the reactive VOC loading, this is a lower value than seen at representative urban campaigns. The HO2/(HO2+ΣRO2 ratios are dependent on [NOx] ranging between 0.2 and 0.6, with the ratio increasing linearly with NOx. Significant night-time levels of peroxy radicals were measured up to 25 pptv. The contribution of ozone-alkenes and NO3-alkene chemistry to night-time peroxy radical production was shown to be on average 59 and 41%. The campaign mean net ozone production rate was 0.11±0.3 ppbv h-1. The ozone production rate was strongly dependent on [NO] having linear sensitivity (dln(P(O3/dln(NO=1.0. The results imply that the N(O3 (the in-situ net photochemical rate of ozone

  19. Radicalization In Pakistan And The Spread Of Radical Islam In Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahir ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is pertinent to mention that radicalism is not intrinsic to Islam and radical interpretations of the religion or for that matter may occur within any way of life and religion Saikal 2003 and yet the question remains as to why Muslims in certain geographical regions have more radical approaches towards their religion and also that what are the causes of such radicalization. Becoming a radical Muslim is not even a matter of a day nor is it a sudden process. There are several reasons behind making a person radical peaceful angry smiling or tolerant. For knowing the reason behind radicalization or radicals persons one has to understand the causes. Tracing these causes is one of the ways to eliminate such behavior. The first step in the elimination of the radical sentiments in a person is to develop peace in his personality Fair Malhotra amp Shapiro 2010. The chapter which has been addressed here is going to shed light on the roots and symptoms of the radicalism. There will be a brief discussion on how the roots of radicalism can be traced and can be eliminated. The assessment and discussion will be conducted on the parameters of the economy media politics and theology from social cultural point of view. According to the analysis of Ahrari 2000 political factor is one of the major and direct factors which have resulted in causing of the radicalism. These factors however intertwine with one another. Radical actions cannot take place only because of the political factors.

  20. Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the benzyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Zheng, Xianfeng; Lucas, Michael; Zhang, Jingsong

    2011-05-14

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation dynamics of jet-cooled benzyl radical via the 4(2)B(2) electronically excited state is studied in the photolysis wavelength region of 228 to 270 nm using high-n Rydberg atom time-of-flight (HRTOF) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) techniques. In this wavelength region, H-atom photofragment yield (PFY) spectra are obtained using ethylbenzene and benzyl chloride as the precursors of benzyl radical, and they have a broad peak centered around 254 nm and are in a good agreement with the previous UV absorption spectra of benzyl. The H + C(7)H(6) product translational energy distributions, P(E(T))s, are derived from the H-atom TOF spectra. The P(E(T)) distributions peak near 5.5 kcal mol(-1), and the fraction of average translational energy in the total excess energy, , is ∼0.3. The P(E(T))s indicate the production of fulvenallene + H, which was suggested by recent theoretical studies. The H-atom product angular distribution is isotropic, with the anisotropy parameter β ≈ 0. The H/D product ratios from isotope labeling studies using C(6)H(5)CD(2) and C(6)D(5)CH(2) are reasonably close to the statistical H/D ratios, suggesting that the H/D atoms are scrambled in the photodissociation of benzyl. The dissociation mechanism is consistent with internal conversion of the electronically excited benzyl followed by unimolecular decomposition of the hot benzyl radical on the ground state.

  1. Radical C-H functionalization to construct heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin-Tao; Pan, Changduo

    2016-02-07

    Heterocyclic compounds are widely present in natural products, pharmaceuticals and bioactive molecules. Thus, organic and pharmaceutical chemists have been making extensive efforts to construct those heterocyclic frameworks through developing versatile and efficient synthetic strategies. The direct C-H functionalization via the radical pathway has emerged as a promising and dramatic approach towards heterocycles with high atom- and step-economy. Heterocyclic compounds such as coumarins, furans, benzofurans, xanthones, benzothiazoles, indoles, indolines, oxindoles, quinolines, isoquinolines, quinoxaline, and phenanthridines have been successfully synthesized by C-H functionalization through the radical pathway. In this review, recent advances on radical C-H functionalization to construct heterocyclic compounds are highlighted with discussions.

  2. Precision design of ethylene- and polar-monomer-based copolymers by organometallic-mediated radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermagoret, Anthony; Debuigne, Antoine; Jérôme, Christine; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    The copolymerization of ethylene with polar monomers is a major challenge when it comes to the manufacture of materials with potential for a wide range of commercial applications. In the chemical industry, free-radical polymerization is used to make a large proportion of such copolymers, but the forcing conditions result in a lack of fine control over the architecture of the products. Herein we introduce a synthetic tool, effective under mild experimental conditions, for the precision design of unprecedented ethylene- and polar-monomer-based copolymers. We demonstrate how an organocobalt species can control the growth of the copolymer chains, their composition and the monomer distribution throughout the chain. By fine tuning the ethylene pressure during polymerization and by exploiting a unique reactive mode of the end of the organometallic chain, novel block-like copolymer structures can be prepared. This highly versatile synthetic platform provides access to a diverse range of polymer materials.

  3. Radical species involved in hotwire (catalytic) deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure the radicals that cause deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by 'hotwire' (HW), or 'catalytic,' chemical vapor deposition. We provide the probability of silane (SiH 4 ) decomposition on the HW, and of Si and H release from the HW. The depositing radicals, and H atoms, are measured versus conditions to obtain their radical-silane reaction rates and contributions to film growth. A 0.01-3 Pa range of silane pressures and 1400-2400 K range of HW temperatures were studied, encompassing optimum device production conditions. Si 2 H 2 is the primary depositing radical under optimum conditions, accompanied by a few percent of Si atoms and a lot of H-atom reactions. Negligible SiH n radical production is observed and only a small flux of disilane is produced, but at the higher pressures some Si 3 H n is observed. A Si-SiH 4 reaction rate coefficient of 1.65 * 10 -11 cm 3 /s and a H + SiH 4 reaction rate coefficient of 5 * 10 -14 cm 3 /s are measured

  4. A population-based study of the use and outcome of radical radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, Charles R.R.; Paszat, Lawrence F.; Groome, Patti A.; Schulze, Karleen; Mackillop, William J.

    1999-01-01

    nonpapillary transitional cell carcinoma [TCC]) and advanced age. Conclusion: This population-based study confirms previous institutional studies and clinical trials and shows that radical RT has a curative role in the management of invasive bladder cancer and allows about one-quarter of patients receiving radiotherapy to survive 5 years while retaining the bladder. Salvage cystectomy following RT provides a chance of cure at the time of bladder relapse

  5. Laboratory studies of nitrate radical chemistry - application to atmospheric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noremsaune, Ingse

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies atmospheric chemistry and tries in particular to fill gaps in the data base of atmospheric reactions. It studies the nitrate radical reactions with chloroethenes and with but-2-yne (2-butyne). The mechanisms and rate coefficients for the NO{sub 3}-initiated degradation of the chloroethenes and 2-butyne were investigated by means of the static reaction chamber and the fast flow-discharge technique. The reactions between the nitrate radical and the chloroethenes were studied at atmospheric pressure in a reaction chamber with synthetic air as bath gas. FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy) spectroscopy was used to follow the reactions and to identify the products. Products were observed for the reactions with (E)-1,2-dichloroethene and tetrachloroethene, although the absorption bands are weak. The alkyl peroxynitrate and nitrate compounds form very strong and characteristic absorption bands. The rate coefficients for the reactions between NO{sub 3} and the chloroethenes were investigated at room temperature by three different methods. The results are given in tables. 132 refs., 44 figs., 21 tabs.

  6. Hydroxyl radical induced degradation of ibuprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illés, Erzsébet, E-mail: erzsebet.illes@chem.u-szeged.hu [Institute of Chemistry, Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Institute of Isotopes, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Takács, Erzsébet [Institute of Isotopes, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Dombi, András [Institute of Chemistry, Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Gajda-Schrantz, Krisztina [Institute of Chemistry, Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); EMPA, Laboratory for High Performance Ceramics, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Rácz, Gergely; Gonter, Katalin; Wojnárovits, László [Institute of Isotopes, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-03-01

    Pulse radiolysis experiments were used to characterize the intermediates formed from ibuprofen during electron beam irradiation in a solution of 0.1 mmol dm{sup −3}. For end product characterization {sup 60}Co γ-irradiation was used and the samples were evaluated either by taking their UV–vis spectra or by HPLC with UV or MS detection. The reactions of {sup ·}OH resulted in hydroxycyclohexadienyl type radical intermediates. The intermediates produced in further reactions hydroxylated the derivatives of ibuprofen as final products. The hydrated electron attacked the carboxyl group. Ibuprofen degradation is more efficient under oxidative conditions than under reductive conditions. The ecotoxicity of the solution was monitored by Daphnia magna standard microbiotest and Vibrio fischeri luminescent bacteria test. The toxic effect of the aerated ibuprofen solution first increased upon irradiation indicating a higher toxicity of the first degradation products, then decreased with increasing absorbed dose. Highlights: ► In hydroxyl radical attack on the ring mainly hydroxylated products form ► The hydrated electron attacks the carboxyl group. ► Oxidative conditions are more effective in ibuprofen decomposition than reductive. ► Ecotoxicity of ibuprofen solution first increases then decreases with irradiation.

  7. Hydroxyl radical induced degradation of ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illés, Erzsébet; Takács, Erzsébet; Dombi, András; Gajda-Schrantz, Krisztina; Rácz, Gergely; Gonter, Katalin; Wojnárovits, László

    2013-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis experiments were used to characterize the intermediates formed from ibuprofen during electron beam irradiation in a solution of 0.1 mmol dm −3 . For end product characterization 60 Co γ-irradiation was used and the samples were evaluated either by taking their UV–vis spectra or by HPLC with UV or MS detection. The reactions of · OH resulted in hydroxycyclohexadienyl type radical intermediates. The intermediates produced in further reactions hydroxylated the derivatives of ibuprofen as final products. The hydrated electron attacked the carboxyl group. Ibuprofen degradation is more efficient under oxidative conditions than under reductive conditions. The ecotoxicity of the solution was monitored by Daphnia magna standard microbiotest and Vibrio fischeri luminescent bacteria test. The toxic effect of the aerated ibuprofen solution first increased upon irradiation indicating a higher toxicity of the first degradation products, then decreased with increasing absorbed dose. Highlights: ► In hydroxyl radical attack on the ring mainly hydroxylated products form ► The hydrated electron attacks the carboxyl group. ► Oxidative conditions are more effective in ibuprofen decomposition than reductive. ► Ecotoxicity of ibuprofen solution first increases then decreases with irradiation

  8. Some aspects of radiation-induced free-radical chemistry of biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, C. von

    1992-01-01

    Biologically relevant material is usually associated with considerable amounts of water. When ionizing radiation interacts with such material one must consider two modes of energy deposition: the direct effect (ionizing radiation is absorbed by the biomolecules) and the indirect effect (ionizing radiation is absorbed by the surrounding water). In the direct effect, radical cations plus electrons, and excited states of the biomolecules are formed. In the indirect effect the water is decomposed resulting in the formation of the water radicals OH,H and e aq - . These reactive intermediates then interact with the biomolecules. When such systems are irradiated oxygen is often present. As a result of this, the radicals formed in the biomolecules by the various routes are converted into the corresponding peroxyl radicals. In certain cases, e.g. with the nucleobases of DNA, radical cations can be produced in dilute aqueous solutions by radiation-generated SO 4 - radicals, and the fate of these nucleobase radical cations studied by pulse radiolysis and product analysis. Attention will be drawn to the fact that frequently some of the reaction products of the radical cations with water are identical to those formed by OH radical attack, but that there are also marked differences. Similarly, protonation of radical anions (formed by the reaction of solvated electrons with the biomolecules) and the reaction of H-atoms with these molecules can lead to radical intermediates with considerably differing characteristics. Our present knowledge of the variety of reactions of the peroxyl radicals occurring in aqueous solutions will be briefly discussed, emphasizing the large variety of HO 2 /O 2 - elimination reactions and pointing to the reversibility of the oxygen addition (RO 2 →R + O 2 ) in some systems recently studied. (author)

  9. Radiation-induced polymerisation of 2,3-dihydrofuran: free-radical or cationic mechanism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janovsky, Igor; Naumov, Sergej; Knolle, Wolfgang; Mehnert, Reiner

    2005-01-01

    Concentrated (10 mol%) solutions of 2,3-dihydrofuran in CFCl 2 CF 2 Cl matrix were irradiated at 77 K and several intermediates (dimer radical cation, dihydrofuryl radical, and polymer radicals) were observed by low-temperature EPR spectroscopy. The irradiated solutions yielded after melting a polymeric product, which was characterised by IR spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography. The polydisperse polymer is assumed to be formed mainly by a cationic process initiated by a dimer carbocation. The free-radical mechanism via the dihydrofuryl radical leads to low molecular weight oligomers only. Quantum chemical calculations support the interpretation of the experimental results

  10. Evaluation of pulsed streamer corona experiments to determine the O* radical yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Heesch, E J M; Winands, G J J; Pemen, A J M

    2008-01-01

    The production of O* radicals in air by a pulsed streamer plasma is studied by integration of a large set of precise experimental data and the chemical kinetics of ozone production. The measured data comprise ozone production, plasma energy, streamer volume, streamer length, streamer velocity, humidity and gas-flow rate. Instead of entering input parameters into a kinetic model to calculate the end products the opposite strategy is followed. Since the amount of end-products (ozone) is known from the measurements the model had to be applied in the reverse direction to determine the input parameters, i.e. the O* radical concentration.

  11. Evaluation of pulsed streamer corona experiments to determine the O* radical yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heesch, E. J. M.; Winands, G. J. J.; Pemen, A. J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The production of O* radicals in air by a pulsed streamer plasma is studied by integration of a large set of precise experimental data and the chemical kinetics of ozone production. The measured data comprise ozone production, plasma energy, streamer volume, streamer length, streamer velocity, humidity and gas-flow rate. Instead of entering input parameters into a kinetic model to calculate the end products the opposite strategy is followed. Since the amount of end-products (ozone) is known from the measurements the model had to be applied in the reverse direction to determine the input parameters, i.e. the O* radical concentration.

  12. Structure reactivity relationship in the reaction of DNA guanyl radicals with hydroxybenzoates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Trinh T.; Tang, Vicky J.; Aguilera, Joseph A. [Department of Radiology University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0610 (United States); Milligan, Jamie R., E-mail: jmilligan@ucsd.ed [Department of Radiology University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0610 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    In DNA, guanine bases are the sites from which electrons are most easily removed. As a result of hole migration to this stable location on guanine, guanyl radicals are major intermediates in DNA damage produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself and not through the intermediacy of water radicals). We have modeled this process by employing gamma irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions, a method which also produces single electron oxidized guanyl radicals in plasmid DNA in aqueous solution. The stable products formed in DNA from these radicals are detected as strand breaks after incubation with the FPG protein. When a phenolic compound is present in the solution during gamma irradiation, the formation of guanyl radical species is decreased by electron donation from the phenol to the guanyl radical. We have quantified the rate of this reaction for four different phenolic compounds bearing carboxylate substituents as proton acceptors. A comparison of the rates of these reactions with the redox strengths of the phenolic compounds reveals that salicylate reacts ca. 10-fold faster than its structural analogs. This observation is consistent with a reaction mechanism involving a proton coupled electron transfer, because intra-molecular transfer of a proton from the phenolic hydroxyl group to the carboxylate group is possible only in salicylate, and is favored by the strong 6-membered ring intra-molecular hydrogen bond in this compound.

  13. Inhibition of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by hoechst 33258: OH-radical scavenging and DNA radical quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikary, A.; Bothe, E.; Von Sonntag, C.; Adhikary, A.

    1997-01-01

    The minor-groove-binding dye Hoechst 33258 has been found to protect pBR322 DNA in aqueous solution against radiation-induced single-strand breaks (ssb). This protective effect has been assumed to be largely due to the scavenging of the strand-break-generating OH radicals by Hoechst. From D 37 values for ssb at different Hoechst concentrations the value of the OH radical scavenging constant of DNA-bound Hoechst has been estimated at k Ho/DNA = 2.7 * 10 11 dm 3 mol -1 . This unexpectedly high value has led us to study the reactions of OH radicals with Hoechst in the absence and in the presence of double-stranded calf thymus DNA (ds DNA) by pulse radiolysis, and the formation of radiation-induced ssb by low angle laser light scattering. The D 37 /D 37 0 values at different Hoechst concentrations agree with the values obtained by Martin and al. and demonstrate the protection. However, this protection cannot be explained on the basis of OH radical scavenging alone using the above rate constants. There must, in addition, be some quenching of DNA radicals. Hoechst radicals are formed in the later ms time range, i.e a long time after the disappearance of the OH radicals. This delayed Hoechst radical formation has been assigned to a a reaction of DNA radicals with Hoechst, thereby inhibiting strand breakage. In confirmation, pulse radiolysis of aqueous solution of nucleotides in the presence of Hoechst yields a similar delayed Hoechst radical formation. The data indicate that in DNA the cross-section of this quenching has a diameter of 3 to 4 base pairs per Hoechst molecule. (N.C.)

  14. Formation of gas-phase π-allyl radicals from propylene over bismuth oxide and γ-bismuth molybdate catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martir, W.; Lunsford, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Gas-phase π-allyl radicals were produced when propylene reacted over Bi 2 O 3 and γ-bismuth molybdate catalysts at 723 K. The pressure in the catalyst zone was varied between 5 x 10 -3 and 1 torr. The radicals were detected by EPR spectroscopy together with a matrix isolation technique in which argon was used as the diluent. The matrix was formed on a sapphire rod at 12 K which was located 33-cm downstream from the catalyst. Bismuth oxide was more effective in the production of gas-phase allyl radicals than γ-bismuth molybdate. By contrast α-bismuth molybdate was ineffective in forming allyl radicals and MoO 3 acted as a sink for radicals which were produced elsewhere in the system. Comparison of the π-allyl radical and the stable product concentrations over Bi 2 O 3 revealed that gas-phase radical recombination reactions served as a major pathway for the formation of 1,5-hexadiene. Addition of small amounts of gas-phase oxygen increased the concentration of allyl radicals, and at greater oxygen levels allyl peroxy radicals were detected. Because of the effect of temperature on the equilibrium between allyl and allyl peroxy radicals, the latter product must be formed in the cooler part of the system

  15. Aminoxyl (nitroxyl) radicals in the early decomposition of the nitramine RDX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irikura, Karl K

    2013-03-14

    The explosive nitramine RDX (1,3,5-trinitrohexahydro-s-triazine) is thought to decompose largely by homolytic N-N bond cleavage, among other possible initiation reactions. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the resulting secondary aminyl (R2N·) radical can abstract an oxygen atom from NO2 or from a neighboring nitramine molecule, producing an aminoxyl (R2NO·) radical. Persistent aminoxyl radicals have been detected in electron-spin resonance (ESR) experiments and are consistent with autocatalytic "red oils" reported in the experimental literature. When the O-atom donor is a nitramine, a nitrosamine is formed along with the aminoxyl radical. Reactions of aminoxyl radicals can lead readily to the "oxy-s-triazine" product (as the s-triazine N-oxide) observed mass-spectrometrically by Behrens and co-workers. In addition to forming aminoxyl radicals, the initial aminyl radical can catalyze loss of HONO from RDX.

  16. Effects of sphingosine and sphingosine analogues on the free radical production by stimulated neutrophils: ESR and chemiluminescence studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mouithys-Mickalad

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids inhibit the activation of the neutrophil (PMN NADPH oxidase by protein kinase C pathway. By electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR and chemiluminescence (CL, we studied the effects of sphingosine (SPN and ceramide analogues on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 5 × 10-7M stimulated PMN (6 × 106 cells. By ESR with spin trapping (100 mM DMPO: 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-Noxide, we showed that SPN (5 to 8 × 10-6M, C2-ceramide (N-acetyl SPN and C6-ceramide (N-hexanoyl SPN at the final concentration of 2 × 10-5 and 2 × 10-4M inhibit the production of free radicals by stimulated PMN. The ESR spectrum of stimulated PMN was that of DMPO-superoxide anion spin adduct. Inhibition by 5 × 10-6M SPN was equivalent to that of 30 U/ml SOD. SPN (5 to 8 × 10-6M has no effect on in vitro systems generating superoxide anion (xanthine 50 mM/xanthine oxidase 110 mU/ml or hydroxyl radical (Fenton reaction: 88 mM H2O2, 0.01 mM Fe2+ and 0.01 mM EDTA. SPN and N-acetyl SPN also inhibited the CL of PMA stimulated PMN in a dose dependent manner (from 2 × 10-6 to 10-5M, but N-hexanoyl SPN was less active (from 2 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-4M. These effects were compared with those of known PMN inhibitors, superoxide dismutase, catalase and azide. SPN was a better inhibitor compared with these agents. The complete inhibition by SPN of ESR signal and CL of stimulated PMN confirms that this compound or one of its metabolites act at the level of NADPH-oxidase, the key enzyme responsible for production of oxygen-derived free radicals.

  17. Structure of Radicals from X-irradiated Guanine Derivatives: An Experimental and Computational Study of Sodium Guanosine Dihydrate Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilaka, Nayana; Nelson, William H.

    2008-01-01

    In sodium guanosine dihydrate single crystals, the guanine moiety is deprotonated at N1 due to growth from high-pH (>12) solutions. EPR and ENDOR study of crystals x-irradiated at 10 K detected evidence for three radical forms. Radical R1,characterized by two proton and two nitrogen hyperfine interactions, was identified as the product of net hydrogenation at N7 of the N1-deprotonated guanine unit. R1 exhibited an unusually distorted structure leading to net positive isotropic components of the hydrogen couplings. Radical R2, characterized by one proton and one nitrogen hyperfine coupling was identified as the primary electron loss product. This product is equivalent to that of deprotonation at N1 by the guanine cation and represents the first ENDOR characterization of that product. Radical R3, characterized by a single hydrogen hyperfine coupling, was identified as the product of net dehydrogenation at C1 of the ribose moiety. The identification of radicals R1-R3 was supported by DFT calculations on several possible structures using the B3LYP/6-311G(2df,p)//6-31G(d,p) approach. Radical R4, detected after warming the crystals to room temperature, was identified as the well-known product of net hydrogenation of C8 of the (N1-deprotonated) guanine component. Radical R1, evidently formed by protonation of the primary electron addition product, was present as roughly 60% of the total radicals detected at 10 K. Radical R2 was present as roughly 27% of the total yield, and the concentration of R3 contributed the remaining 13%. R3 is evidently the product of oneelectron oxidation followed by deprotonation; thus, the balance of oxidation and reduction products is approximately equal within experimental uncertainty. PMID:17249824

  18. A measurement of the t anti t production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s=1.96 TeV with the DOe detector at the Tevatron using final states with a muon and jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klute, M.

    2004-02-01

    A preliminary measurement of the t anti t production cross section at {radical}s=1.96 TeV is presented. The {mu}-plus-jets final state is analyzed in a data sample of 94 pb{sup -1} and a total of 14 events are selected with a background expectation of 11.7{+-}1.9 events. The measurement yields: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X}=2.4{sub -3.5}{sup +4.2}(stat.){sub -2.6}{sup +2.5}(syst.){+-}0.3(lumi.) pb. The analysis, being part of a larger effort to re-observe the top quark in Tevatron Run II data and to measure the production cross section, is combined with results from the available analysis channels. The combined result yields: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X}=8.1{sub -2.0}{sup +2.2}(stat.){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(syst.){+-}0.8(lumi.) pb.

  19. Radical-scavenging Activity of the Reaction Products of Isoeugenol with Thiol, Thiophenol, Mercaptothiazoline or Mercaptomethylimidazole Using the Induction Period Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichiro Fujisawa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The reaction products in the presence of Lewis acid of isoeugenol (1 with ethanethiol, thiophenol, 2-mercaptothiazoline or 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (ISO-S1 – ISO-S-4 were obtained. The radical-scavenging activity of these compounds was investigated using the induction period method for polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA initiated by thermal decomposition of 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN and benzoyl peroxide (BPO and monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. For BPO, the stoichiometric factor (number of free radicals trapped by one mole of antioxidant moiety, n declined in the order isoeugenol (1.8 > ISO-S-1 (1.6 > ISO-S-2 (1.2 > ISOS- 3 (0.9 > ISO-S-4 (0.3, whereas for AIBN, their n values were about 1, except for ISOS- 3 (0.6. The ratio of the rate constant of inhibition to that of propagation (kinh/kp for BPO declined in the order ISO-S-4 (56 > ISO-S-3 (15 > ISO-S-2 (11 >ISO-S-1 (9 > isoeugenol (8. Similarly, for AIBN the kinh/kp of the reaction products (33-57 was greater than that of isoeugenol (31. The reaction products of isoeugenol with a SH group showed greater inhibition rate constants (kinh than the parent compound isoeugenol.

  20. Particle size-dependent radical generation from wildland fire smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Stephen S.; Castranova, Vince; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Hoover, Mark; Piacitelli, Chris; Gaughan, Denise M.

    2007-01-01

    Firefighting, along with construction, mining and agriculture, ranks among the most dangerous occupations. In addition, the work environment of firefighters is unlike that of any other occupation, not only because of the obvious physical hazards but also due to the respiratory and systemic health hazards of smoke inhalation resulting from combustion. A significant amount of research has been devoted to studying municipal firefighters; however, these studies may not be useful in wildland firefighter exposures, because the two work environments are so different. Not only are wildland firefighters exposed to different combustion products, but their exposure profiles are different. The combustion products wildland firefighters are exposed to can vary greatly in characteristics due to the type and amount of material being burned, soil conditions, temperature and exposure time. Smoke inhalation is one of the greatest concerns for firefighter health and it has been shown that the smoke consists of a large number of particles. These smoke particles contain intermediates of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen free radicals, which may pose a potential health risk. Our investigation looked into the involvement of free radicals in smoke toxicity and the relationship between particle size and radical generation. Samples were collected in discrete aerodynamic particle sizes from a wildfire in Alaska, preserved and then shipped to our laboratory for analysis. Electron spin resonance was used to measure carbon-centered as well as hydroxyl radicals produced by a Fenton-like reaction with wildfire smoke. Further study of reactive oxygen species was conducted using analysis of cellular H 2 O 2 generation, lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes and DNA damage. Results demonstrate that coarse size-range particles contained more carbon radicals per unit mass than the ultrafine particles; however, the ultrafine particles generated more ·OH radicals in the acellular Fenton-like reaction. The

  1. Manipulating radicals: Using cobalt to steer radical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chirilă, A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes research aimed at understanding and exploiting metallo-radical reactivity and explores reactions mediated by square planar, low-spin cobalt(II) complexes. A primary goal was to uncover novel reactivity of discrete cobalt(III)-bound carbene radicals generated upon reaction of the cobalt(II) catalysts with carbene precursors. Another important goal was to replace cobalt(II)-porphyrin catalysts with cheaper and easier to prepare metallo-radical analogues. Therefore the cata...

  2. Atmospheric hydroxyl radical production from electronically excited NO2 and H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuping; Matthews, Jamie; Sinha, Amitabha

    2008-03-21

    Hydroxyl radicals are often called the "detergent" of the atmosphere because they control the atmosphere's capacity to cleanse itself of pollutants. Here, we show that the reaction of electronically excited nitrogen dioxide with water can be an important source of tropospheric hydroxyl radicals. Using measured rate data, along with available solar flux and atmospheric mixing ratios, we demonstrate that the tropospheric hydroxyl contribution from this source can be a substantial fraction (50%) of that from the traditional O(1D) + H2O reaction in the boundary-layer region for high solar zenith angles. Inclusion of this chemistry is expected to affect modeling of urban air quality, where the interactions of sunlight with emitted NOx species, volatile organic compounds, and hydroxyl radicals are central in determining the rate of ozone formation.

  3. Yields of base damage products in crystalline DNA produced by the direct-type effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, D.C.; Bernhard, W.A.; Swarts, S.G.

    2003-01-01

    Our aim is to determine the yields of base damage products due to direct-type effects in well-defined DNA samples. The sample, crystalline d(GCACGCGTGC) 2 , which contains Co(III), has been structurally characterized by others using X-ray crystallography and the free radical yields measured by our laboratory using EPR spectroscopy. Polycrystalline samples were x-irradiated (70 KeV) at room temperature (RT) to doses up to 150 kGy. Following dissolution under air, the base products were identified and quantified using GC-MS. 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) is the primary base damage product found, with a yield of ∼0.09 μmoles/J, whereas 2,6-diamino-4-oxo-5-formamidopyrimidine (FpyG) was below the limits of detection of the GC-MS assay. Radiation yields for 5,6-dihydrothymine (DHT) and 5-hydroxymethyluracil of 0.0017 and 0.0042 μmoles/J, respectively, were also observed. These results differ from those obtained in a previous study of solid-state hydrated DNA irradiated at RT (Swarts et al., Radiat. Res. 145: 304-14, 1996), where the yields of FpyG and DHT were approximately 11% and 20% that of 8-oxo-G, respectively. Our working hypothesis is that Co(III) in crystalline d(GCACGCGTGC) 2 modifies the product distribution. Based on the EPR data, the influence of Co(III) on the initial distribution of radical trapping is negligible. This suggests that electron transfer from the pyrimidines to Co(III) occurs either upon annealing and/or upon solvation, thereby competing with dihydropyrimidine formation. While strand break (sb) yields for d(GCACGCGTGC) 2 are not yet completed, in earlier work on crystals of other oligomers, we obtained sb yields of 0.06-0.16 μmoles/J. We anticipate, therefore, that the stoichiometry between 8-oxo-G and sb formation will be about 1:1

  4. Free-radical-mediated conjugate additions. Enantioselective synthesis of butyrolactone natural products: (-)-enterolactone, (-)-arctigenin, (-)-isoarctigenin, (-)-nephrosteranic acid, and (-)-roccellaric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Liu, Pingrong; Ji, Jianguo; Hajra, Saumen; Chen, Jian-xie

    2002-03-22

    Lewis acid-mediated conjugate addition of alkyl radicals to a differentially protected fumarate 10 produced the monoalkylated succinates with high chemical efficiency and excellent stereoselectivity. A subsequent alkylation or an aldol reaction furnished the disubstituted succinates with syn configuration. The chiral auxiliary, 4-diphenylmethyl-2-oxazolidinone, controlled the stereoselectivity in both steps. Manipulation of the disubstituted succinates obtained by alkylation furnished the natural products (-)-enterolactone, (-)-arctigenin, and (-)-isoarctigenin. The overall yields for the target natural products were 20-26% over six steps. Selective functionalization of the disubstituted succinates obtained by aldol condensation gave the paraconic acid natural products (-)-nephrosteranic acid (8) and (-)-roccellaric acid (9). The overall yield of the natural products 8 and 9 over four steps was 53% and 42%, respectively.

  5. An EPR spin-probe and spin-trap study of the free radicals produced by plant plasma membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORAN BACIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant plasma membranes are known to produce superoxide radicals, while the production of hydroxyl radical is thought to occur only in the cell wall. In this work it was demonstrated using combined spin-trap and spin-probe EPR spectroscopic techniques, that plant plasma membranes do produce superoxide and hydroxyl radicals but by kinetically different mechanisms. The results show that superoxide and hydroxyl radicals can be detected by DMPO spin-trap and that the mechanisms and location of their production can be differentiated using the reduction of spin-probes Tempone and 7-DS. It was shown that the mechanism of production of oxygen reactive species is NADH dependent and diphenylene iodonium inhibited. The kinetics of the reduction of Tempone, combined with scavengers or the absence of NADH indicates that hydroxyl radicals are produced by a mechanism independent of that of superoxide production. It was shown that a combination of the spin-probe and spin-trap technique can be used in free radical studies of biological systems, with a number of advantages inherent to them.

  6. Protonated o-semiquinone radical as a mimetic of the humic acids native radicals: A DFT approach to the molecular structure and EPR properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierska, Julia

    2012-06-01

    Organic radicals are known to be an indispensable component of the humic acids (HA) structure. In HA two forms of radicals, stable (native) and short-lived (transient), are identified. Importantly, these radical forms can be easily differentiated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. This article provides a DFT-based insight into the electronic and molecular structure of the native radicals. The molecular models including an increase of the radical aromaticity and the hydrogen bonding between the radical and other functional groups of HA are taken under investigation. In consequence the interesting pieces of information on the structure of the native radical centers in HA are revealed and discussed, especially in terms of differences between the electronic structure of the native and transient forms.

  7. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudina, Ivana; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl 3 COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 20 0 C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl 3 COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl 3 COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  8. RADICAL. Radiation information centre with analysing logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, H.

    1998-01-01

    in an emergency, the production of data is overwhelming and the need of accurate and up-to-date information is essential. In Finland a new system (RADICAL) has been developed in order to automatically collect and maintain an overall view of the radiation situation and to facilitate the analysis of the consequences of any radiation incident. The project was started in the beginning of 1992 and the system was operational in summer 1994. The main objectives of the development process and how they are being fulfilled with the RADICAL system are discussed. (author)

  9. The determination of the radical power - an in vitro test for the evaluation of cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrling, T; Seifert, M; Sandig, G; Jung, K

    2016-06-01

    Cosmetic formulations are influenced by environmental impacts and ageing, resulting in rancidity and change of colour and structure. These changes are caused by free radicals (FRs). The sensitivity of cosmetics generating FRs is a metric for its quality and should be determined. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy in combination with UV irradiation tested cosmetics such as creams, milks, lotions and fragrances. The probes were directly measured without expensive preparation. Nine formulations are tested for its radical generation and ranked corresponding to the radical power. The transformation of the FR properties of three formulations to skin is measured by the radical skin status factor (RSF) method. It shows that the higher the radical power (RP) is, the lower the radical status RSF of skin will be. The knowledge of the sensitivity of cosmetics to generate FRs is necessary for its stabilization and prevention of potential damages to skin. It is a new way in development of cosmetics which has to be considered. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  10. When ‘national innovation system’ meet ‘varieties of capitalism’ arguments on labour qualifications: On the skill types and scientific knowledge needed for radical and incremental product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, A.M.; Peine, A.

    2012-01-01

    The literatures on ‘varieties of capitalism’ (VoC) and ‘national innovation systems’ (NIS) propose very similar arguments about how firms require different types of labour qualifications to pursue strategies of radical product innovation (RPI), incremental product innovation (IPI), and product

  11. Radical Documentaries, Neoliberal Crisis and Post-Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Siapera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines radical documentaries in Greece as a response to neoliberal crisis and post democracy. In a context where mainstream media have made themselves irrelevant, facing historical lows in trust and credibility, we found that radical documentaries have emerged outside the commodification of information and form part of the growing social or solidarity economy in Greece. Our analysis shows that these documentaries operate through a different political economy, that involves collaborative practices and that they are firmly oriented towards society rather than the political sphere. Overall, we found that radical documentaries are seeking to recuperate the media through engaging professional media workers, journalists, film directors, academics and actors; they operate through reclaiming media know-how; through radicalizing the financing, production and distribution by refusing to participate in commodification processes; and through recreating commonalities by thematizing the common, the public, and responsibility towards others.Their specific political role is found to be one of helping to restore the social body and to contribute to processes of commoning, whereby solidarity and social trust is recovered.

  12. Kinetic model for the radical degradation of tri-halonitromethane disinfection byproducts in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezyk, Stephen P.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Cooper, William J.; Kirkham Cole, S.; Fox, Robert V.; Gardinali, Piero R.

    2012-01-01

    The halonitromethanes (HNMs) are byproducts of the ozonation and chlorine/chloramine treatment of drinking waters. Although typically occurring at low concentrations HNMs have high cytotoxicity and mutagenicity, and may therefore represent a significant human health hazard. In this study, we have investigated the radical based mineralization of fully-halogenated HNMs in water using the congeners bromodichloronitromethane and chlorodibromonitromethane. We have combined absolute reaction rate constants for their reactions with the hydroxyl radical and the hydrated electron as measured by electron pulse radiolysis and analytical measurements of stable product concentrations obtained by 60 Co steady-state radiolysis with a kinetic computer model that includes water radiolysis reactions and halide/nitrogen oxide radical chemistry to fully elucidate the reaction pathways of these HNMs. These results are compared to our previous similar study of the fully chlorinated HNM chloropicrin. The full optimized computer model, suitable for predicting the behavior of this class of compounds in irradiated drinking water, is provided. - Highlights: ► Radical-based mineralization of aqueous halonitromethane disinfection byproducts. ► Constructed kinetic computer model for tri-halogenated halonitromethane removal. ► Model predicted that superoxide reaction is unimportant for halonitromethanes. ► Measured superoxide reaction with chloropicrin was negligibly slow, 4 M −1 s −1 . ► Determined that superoxide reaction with nitrate also insignificant at ∼10 4 M −1 s −1 .

  13. In vitro antioxidant properties, free radicals scavenging activities of extracts and polyphenol composition of a non-timber forest product used as spice: Monodora myristica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Moukette Moukette

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive production of free radicals causes direct damage to biological molecules such as DNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates leading to tumor development and progression. Natural antioxidant molecules from phytochemicals of plant origin may directly inhibit either their production or limit their propagation or destroy them to protect the system. In the present study, Monodora myristica a non-timber forest product consumed in Cameroon as spice was screened for its free radical scavenging properties, antioxidant and enzymes protective activities. Its phenolic compound profile was also realized by HPLC. RESULTS: This study demonstrated that M. myristica has scavenging properties against DPPH',OH',NO', and ABTS'radicals which vary in a dose depending manner. It also showed an antioxidant potential that was comparable with that of Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT and vitamin C used as standard. The aqueous ethanol extract of M. myristica barks (AEH; showed a significantly higher content in polyphenolic compounds (21.44 ±0.24 mg caffeic acid/g dried extract and flavonoid (5.69 ± 0.07 quercetin equivalent mg/g of dried weight as compared to the other studied extracts. The HPLC analysis of the barks and leaves revealed the presence of several polyphenols. The acids (3,4-OH-benzoic, caffeic, gallic, O- and P- coumaric, syringic, vanillic, alcohols (tyrosol and OH-tyrosol, theobromine, quercetin, rutin, catechine and apigenin were the identified and quantified polyphenols. All the tested extracts demonstrated a high protective potential on the superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase and peroxidase activities. CONCLUSION: Finally, the different extracts from M. myristica and specifically the aqueous ethanol extract reveal several properties such as higher free radical scavenging properties, significant antioxidant capacities and protective potential effects on liver enzymes.

  14. Introducing Stable Radicals into Molecular Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2017-09-27

    Ever since their discovery, stable organic radicals have received considerable attention from chemists because of their unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. Currently, one of the most appealing challenges for the chemical community is to develop sophisticated artificial molecular machines that can do work by consuming external energy, after the manner of motor proteins. In this context, radical-pairing interactions are important in addressing the challenge: they not only provide supramolecular assistance in the synthesis of molecular machines but also open the door to developing multifunctional systems relying on the various properties of the radical species. In this Outlook, by taking the radical cationic state of 1,1'-dialkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY •+ ) as an example, we highlight our research on the art and science of introducing radical-pairing interactions into functional systems, from prototypical molecular switches to complex molecular machines, followed by a discussion of the (i) limitations of the current systems and (ii) future research directions for designing BIPY •+ -based molecular machines with useful functions.

  15. UV-generated free radicals (FR) in skin: Their prevention by sunscreens and their induction by self-tanning agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, K.; Seifert, M.; Herrling, Th.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-05-01

    In the past few years, the cellular effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced in skin have become increasingly recognized. Indeed, it is now well known that UV irradiation induces structural and cellular changes in all the compartments of skin tissue. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the first and immediate consequence of UV exposure and therefore the quantitative determination of free radical reactions in the skin during UV radiation is of primary importance for the understanding of dermatological photodamage. The RSF method (radical sun protection factor) herein presented, based on electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR), enables the measurement of free radical reactions in skin biopsies directly during UV radiation. The amount of free radicals varies with UV doses and can be standardized by varying UV irradiance or exposure time. The RSF method allows the determination of the protective effect of UV filters and sunscreens as well as the radical induction capacity of self-tanning agents as dihydroxyacetone (DHA). The reaction of the reducing sugars used in self-tanning products and amino acids in the skin layer (Maillard reaction) leads to the formation of Amadori products that generate free radicals during UV irradiation. Using the RSF method three different self-tanning agents were analyzed and it was found, that in DHA-treated skin more than 180% additional radicals were generated during sun exposure with respect to untreated skin. For this reason the exposure duration in the sun must be shortened when self-tanners are used and photoaging processes are accelerated.

  16. Asymmetric Radical Cyclopropanation of Alkenes with In Situ-Generated Donor-Substituted Diazo Reagents via Co(II)-Based Metalloradical Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Wen, Xin; Cui, Xin; Wojtas, Lukasz; Zhang, X Peter

    2017-01-25

    Donor-substituted diazo reagents, generated in situ from sulfonyl hydrazones in the presence of base, can serve as suitable radical precursors for Co(II)-based metalloradical catalysis (MRC). The cobalt(II) complex of D 2 -symmetric chiral porphyrin [Co(3,5-Di t Bu-Xu(2'-Naph)Phyrin)] is an efficient metalloradical catalyst that is capable of activating different N-arylsulfonyl hydrazones for asymmetric radical cyclopropanation of a broad range of alkenes, affording the corresponding cyclopropanes in high yields with effective control of both diastereo- and enantioselectivity. This Co(II)-based metalloradical system represents the first catalytic protocol that can effectively utilize donor-type diazo reagents for asymmetric olefin cyclopropanation.

  17. Free-radical sensing by using naphthalimide based mesoporous silica (MCM-41) nanoparticles: A combined fluorescence and cellular imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Gaurav; Roy, Subhasis; Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Banerjee, Somnath; Anoop, N.; Rahaman, Abdur; Sarkar, Moloy

    2018-01-01

    Keeping in mind the advantages of material-based systems over simple molecule-based systems, we have designed and developed three inorganic-organic hybrid systems by anchoring 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives to mesoporous silica nanoparticles for detection of free radicals. Prior to photophysical study, systems are characterized by spectroscopic, microscopic and thermo-gravimetric techniques. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence studies demonstrate that the hydrazine based system is senstive towards detection of various free radicals. Cellular imaging study reveals cell permeability and toxicity study demonstrates the non-toxic nature of the material. These studies have suggested that present system has the potential to be used in various biological applications.

  18. A new class of free radical scavengers reducing adriamycin mitochondrial toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praet, M.; Calderon, P. B.; Pollakis, G.; Roberfroid, M.; Ruysschaert, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Beef heart mitochondria were incubated with ADM and NADH. An adriamycin semiquinone radical was detected using ESR spectroscopy. The semiquinone radical production rate is decreased upon addition of a scavenger (AD 20) in the reaction medium. NMRI mice were treated with AD 20 (70 mg/kg, i.p.) 15 min

  19. Rapid Hydrogen Shift Reactions in Acyl Peroxy Radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Hasse Christian; Jørgensen, Solvejg

    2017-01-01

    -shift with X = 6, 7, 8, or 9) in the hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals, this H-shift is a reversible reaction and it scrambles between two peroxides, hydroperoxy acyl peroxy and peroxy peroxoic acid radicals. The forward reaction rate constants of the 1,X-OOH H-shift reactions are estimated to be above 103 s–1...... with transition state theory corrected with Eckart quantum tunnelling correction. The ratio between the forward and reverse reaction rate constant of the 1,X-OOH H-shift reactions is around ∼105. Therefore, the equilibrium is pushed toward the production of peroxy peroxoic acid radicals. These very fast 1,X-OOH H......We have used quantum mechanical chemical calculations (CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ) to investigate the hydrogen shift (H-shift) reactions in acyl peroxy and hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals. We have focused on the H-shift reactions from a hydroperoxy group (OOH) (1,X-OOH H...

  20. Conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, T.; Hayakawa, N.; Kuriyama, I.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of alkyl radicals, the conversion of alkyl radicals to allyl radicals and the trapping of allyl radicals in irradiated single crystal mats of polyethylene have been studied by electron spin resonance (e.s.r.). It has been suggested that in the crystal core alkyl radicals react with trans-vinylene double bonds and are converted into trans-vinylene allyl radicals; at the crystal surface, alkyl radicals react with vinyl end groups and are converted into allyl radicals with vinyl end groups. The decay of radical pairs and the formation of trans-vinylene double bonds are discussed. (author)

  1. Porphyrin Co(III-Nitrene Radical Mediated Pathway for Synthesis of o-Aminoazobenzenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa Goswami

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Azobenzenes are versatile compounds with a range of applications, including dyes and pigments, food additives, indicators, radical reaction initiators, molecular switches, etc. In this context, we report a general method for synthesizing o-aminoazobenzenes using the commercially available cobalt(II tetraphenyl porphyrin [CoII(TPP]. The net reaction is a formal dimerization of two phenyl azides with concomitant loss of two molecules of dinitrogen. The most commonly used methodology to synthesize azobenzenes is based on the initial diazotization of an aromatic primary amine at low temperatures, which then reacts with an electron rich aromatic nucleophile. As such, this limits the synthesis of azobenzenes with an amine functionality. In contrast, the method we report here relies heavily on the o-amine moiety and retains it in the product. The reaction is metal catalyzed and proceeds through a porphyrin Co(III-nitrene radical intermediate, which is known to form on activation of organic azides at the cobalt center. The synthesized o-aminoazobenzenes are bathochromatically shifted, as compared to azobenzenes without amine substituents. Based on the crystal structure of one of the products, strong H-bonding between the N-atom of the azo functionality and the H of the NH2 substituent is shown to stabilize the trans isomeric form of the product. The NH2 substituents offers possibilities for further functionalization of the synthesized azo compounds.

  2. Customers as Partners in Radical Service Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2009-01-01

      Purpose- The main purpose of this paper is to investigate customer involvement and related challenges in radical service innovations in engineering consulting services Design/methodology/approach - The paper uses a case study approach and so called rich descriptions to investigate customer...... involvement, roles and related challenges and conditions in radical service innovations.Findings- One main finding is that customers can engage in radical service innovations in engineering consultancy services and may play a decisive role. In doing this they most likely take on all the three user involvement...... roles defined in the literature of New Service and New Product Development. Also a number of conditions are found to be necessary in order for this collaboration to succeed. The conclusion is that another understanding and handling of the customer/supplier relation is needed along with a need...

  3. Combination is the dominant free radical process initiated in DNA by ionizing radiation: an overview based on solid-state EPR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, W.A.; Mroczka, N.; Barnes, J.

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the early processes initiated in DNA by ionizing radiation is given from the perspective of studies done by solid-state EPR with the focus on radical combination. Comparisons with free radical formation and trapping in crystalline pyrimidines (1-methylcytosine, thymine, 1-methylthymine, 1-methyluracil, and cytosine monohydrate) provide insight into the processes occurring in DNA. Between 25 and 50% of low LET ionizations in fully hydrated DNA at 4 K lead to trapped free radicals, the remaining unobserved radicals are assumed to have combined. The majority of the radicals trapped in DNA at 4 K (G ∼ 0.3 μmol/J) are believed to be in clusters. Based on the value of G, it is argued that the range of holes and bound electrons in DNA at 4 K are, in the main, limited to within the cluster diameter, ∼ 4 nm. Proton transfer across hydrogen bonds promotes radical trapping and inhibits combination but is thermally reversible. Warming to room temperature mobilizes the reversibly trapped radicals and gives additional combination (50-80% of those trapped at 4 K). The yield of free radicals, after anneal, is sufficient to account for the yield of single-strand breaks produced by direct effects. (Author)

  4. Gamma radiolysis of aliphatic sulfur compounds in aqueous solutions. A study to contribute to the analysis of the end products of the OH radical-induced oxidation of aliphatic mercaptanes, sulfides, and disulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, J.

    1982-01-01

    By identifying and determining numerous hitherto unknown end products, the study in hand contributes to a better insight into the radiation chemical processes occurring in OH radical-induced oxidation of aliphatic sulfur compounds. An extraction method has been developed for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of end products in aqueous solution in order to determine these compounds down to the level of trace amounts. Separation of endproducts is achieved by means of gas chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography, subsequent identification by GC-MS analysis. Aliphatic mercaptanes are oxidized by OH radicals to thiyl radicals which after combination can be detected as disulfide. At high radiation doses, secondary reactions will lead to polysulfides of which the homologues could first be prepared as the pure substance. The end products of the γ-radiolysis of aliphatic thioethers are determined to be dithia compounds, symmetrical or asymmetrical disulfides, or polysulfides, depending on the thioethers. With some end products, the radiation chemical yield is found to be a function of the absorbed dose so that material balances are impossible. Intermediate thiyl, α-alkyl mercaptoalkyl or alkyl radicals can be captured by tetramethyl ethylene, cyclohexene or p-benzoquinone, and can then be identified as the relevant adducts. (orig./RB) [de

  5. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. II. Radical-pair reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, A.; Górecka, A.; Kurzyński, P.; Paterek, T.; Kaszlikowski, D.

    2016-03-01

    We apply the quantum-walk approach proposed in the preceding paper [A. Chia et al., preceding paper, Phys. Rev. E 93, 032407 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.032407] to a radical-pair reaction where realistic estimates for the intermediate transition rates are available. The well-known average hitting time from quantum walks can be adopted as a measure of how quickly the reaction occurs and we calculate this for varying degrees of dephasing in the radical pair. The time for the radical pair to react to a product is found to be independent of the amount of dephasing introduced, even in the limit of no dephasing where the transient population dynamics exhibits strong coherent oscillations. This can be seen to arise from the existence of a rate-limiting step in the reaction and we argue that in such examples, a purely classical model based on rate equations can be used for estimating the time scale of the reaction but not necessarily its population dynamics.

  6. Polysulfides and products of H2S/S-nitrosoglutathione in comparison to H2S, glutathione and antioxidant Trolox are potent scavengers of superoxide anion radical and produce hydroxyl radical by decomposition of H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misak, Anton; Grman, Marian; Bacova, Zuzana; Rezuchova, Ingeborg; Hudecova, Sona; Ondriasova, Elena; Krizanova, Olga; Brezova, Vlasta; Chovanec, Miroslav; Ondrias, Karol

    2018-06-01

    Exogenous and endogenously produced sulfide derivatives, such as H 2 S/HS - /S 2- , polysulfides and products of the H 2 S/S-nitrosoglutathione interaction (S/GSNO), affect numerous biological processes in which superoxide anion (O 2 - ) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals play an important role. Their cytoprotective-antioxidant and contrasting pro-oxidant-toxic effects have been reported. Therefore, the aim of our work was to contribute to resolving this apparent inconsistency by studying sulfide derivatives/free radical interactions and their consequent biological effects compared to the antioxidants glutathione (GSH) and Trolox. Using the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping technique and O 2 - , we found that a polysulfide (Na 2 S 4 ) and S/GSNO were potent scavengers of O 2 - and cPTIO radicals compared to H 2 S (Na 2 S), GSH and Trolox, and S/GSNO scavenged the DEPMPO-OH radical. As detected by the EPR spectra of DEPMPO-OH, the formation of OH in physiological solution by S/GSNO was suggested. All the studied sulfide derivatives, but not Trolox or GSH, had a bell-shaped potency to decompose H 2 O 2 and produced OH in the following order: S/GSNO > Na 2 S 4  ≥ Na 2 S > GSH = Trolox = 0, but they scavenged OH at higher concentrations. In studies of the biological consequences of these sulfide derivatives/H 2 O 2 properties, we found the following: (i) S/GSNO alone and all sulfide derivatives in the presence of H 2 O 2 cleaved plasmid DNA; (ii) S/GSNO interfered with viral replication and consequently decreased the infectivity of viruses; (iii) the sulfide derivatives induced apoptosis in A2780 cells but inhibited apoptosis induced by H 2 O 2 ; and (iv) Na 2 S 4 modulated intracellular calcium in A87MG cells, which depended on the order of Na 2 S 4 /H 2 O 2 application. We suggest that the apparent inconsistency of the cytoprotective-antioxidant and contrasting pro-oxidant-toxic biological effects of sulfide derivatives results from their time

  7. Oxidation of aromatic amines and diamines by OH radicals. Formation and ionization constants of amine cation radicals in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayon, E.; Rao, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    The one-electron oxidation by hydroxyl radicals of aromatic amines and diamines in water was studied using the fast-reaction technique of pulse radiolysis and kinetic absorption spectrophotometry. The following compounds were examined: N,N,N 1 ,N 1 - tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), p-phenylenediamine (PD), N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamene (DMPD), N,N,N 1 ,N 1 -tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and diphenylamine (DPA). The main initial reaction of the OH radicals is suggested to be an addition to these compounds to give absorption spectra which absorb strongly in the visible and uv regions. These OH radical adducts decay by first-order kinetics and have lifetimes of approximately 5-50 μsec, dependent on the pH, buffer concentration, and the nature of the aromatic amines and diamines. They decay to give species with somewhat similar absorption spectra and extinction coefficients, which are very long lived in the absence of oxygen. The latter species are assigned to the cation radicals TMPD. + , PD. + , DMPD. + , TMB. + , and DPA. + . The OH radical adducts and the cation radicals have acid-base properties. The pK/sub a/ values of the cation radicals TMPDH. 2+ , PDH. 2+ , DMPDH. 2+ , TMBH. 2+ , and DPAH. 2+ were found to be 5.3, 5.9, 6.1, 5.1, and 4.2, respectively. The results indicate that these aromatic amines and diamines can be oxidized by free radicals to yield the corresponding cation radicals. (U.S.)

  8. DPPH and oxygen free radicals as pro-oxidant of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letelier, María Eugenia; Molina-Berríos, Alfredo; Cortés-Troncoso, Juan; Jara-Sandoval, José; Holst, Marianne; Palma, Karina; Montoya, Margarita; Miranda, Dante; González-Lira, Víctor

    2008-03-01

    Numerous investigations exist about the alterations that oxygen free radicals can provoke on biomolecules; these modifications can be prevented and/or reversed by different antioxidants agents. On the other hand, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), a stable nitrogen synthetic radical, is used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of medicinal herbal products; however, the structural changes that this radical provoke on the herbal active principles are not clear yet. In this work, we compared the redox reactivity of oxygen free radicals and DPPH radical on phospholipids and protein thiol groups present in rat liver microsomes. Cu2+/ascorbate was used as generator system of oxygen free radical and as antioxidant, an extract of Buddleja globosa's leaves. Cu2+/ascorbate provoked microsomal lipid peroxidation, microsomal thiols oxidation and oxygen consumption; all of these phenomena were inhibited by B. globosa extract. On the other hand, DPPH was bleached in different extension by the herbal extract and phosphatidyl choline; beside, DPPH decreased microsomal thiols content, but this phenomenon were not prevented by the herbal extract. Furthermore, DPPH did not induce oxygen consumption and neither modified the oxygen consumption induced by Cu2+/ascorbate. Distinct redox mechanisms may explain the differences between the reactivity of DPPH and oxygen free radicals on biomolecules, which is discussed.

  9. Electron transfer oxidation of DNA radicals by paranitroacetophenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillans, D W; Adams, G E [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK)

    1975-12-01

    The reaction of a typical electron-affinic sensitizer, paranitroacetophenone (PNAP) with the model compounds thymine, thymidine, thymidylic acid, deoxyribose and single and double-stranded DNA has been investigated by pulse radiolysis. Radicals formed by one-electron reduction of the bases and of DNA reacted rapidly and efficiently with PNAP by electron transfer. A small yield of transfer (< 10 per cent) was also observed arising from oxidation of the radicals formed by the small proportion of OH which reacted at the sugar moieties in DNA. In contrast, electron transfer oxidation by PNAP of radicals formed by the addition of OH to the base moieties, e.g. thymine, was not an efficient process. Further, addition of the sensitizer to the thymine OH-adduct proceeded at a rate that was too low to measure the pulse radiolysis. We conclude that, since the major sites of OH reaction by DNA are the heterocyclic bases (> 80 per cent), oxidation of the resultant radicals is unlikely to be a major step in the mechanism of sensitization by this typical hypoxic-cell sensitizer.

  10. Free radicals, oxygen and radiosensitizing drugs: a very brief introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, R.

    1981-01-01

    A review is presented of the historical aspects of the search for radiation sensitizing drugs. Metronidazole, Flagyl and misonidazole are undergoing clincial trials as the result of basic free radical and cellular research. Studies at the molecular, biochemical and cellular levels are described. From the information obtained it now appears that several processes may be involved in sensitization: interference with charge recombination due to a sensitizer having a high electron affinity; an increase in the yield of oxidizing hydroxyl radicals by electron sequestration; interference with radical combination reactions due to a sensitizer having a high one electron oxidation potential; oxidation or organic radicals so fixing them; formation of products which are toxic; and changes in the biochemistry of the cell. 106 references, 4 figures

  11. Redox potentials of free radicals. III. Reevaluation of the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, P.S.; Hayon, E.

    1974-01-01

    A reevaluation of the method described in ref 1 and 2 to determine the redox potentials of free radicals (.RH) in water using the techniques of pulse radiolysis and absorption spectrophotometry is presented. This method is based on the dependence of the percentage efficiency for the one-electron oxidation (or reduction) of .RH radicals on the redox potentials E 01 of the electron acceptors, A. The reaction .RH + A → .A - + R + H + (kappa/sub ox/) is not reversible for most radicals under the experimental conditions used, and the derived potentials are, therefore, not thermodynamic values. A reinterpretation of the results is made on the basis of the kinetic competition between the above reaction and .RH + A → .RHA (kappa/sub add/) (radical adducts). Based on kappa/ sub ox/ and kappa/sub add/, it is concluded that the observed experimental ''titration'' curves do represent a measure of the redox property of the free radicals. From the midpoint on the curves, the kinetic potential, E/sub kappa/ 01 : of the free radicals can be derived based on the known two-electron redox potentials of the electron acceptors. These and other questions are discussed. (U.S.)

  12. Studies of short-lived radicals in the. gamma. -irradiated aqueous solution of uridine-5'-monophosphate by the spin-trapping method and the liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kominami, S [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Rokushika, S; Hatano, H

    1976-12-01

    An aerated aqueous solution of uridine-5'-monophosphate was ..gamma..-irradiated with 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane as a spin-trapping reagent. Liquid chromatography was applied to separate the stable nitroxide radicals in the irradiated solution. The radicals were detected by U.V. and e.s.r. spectrometry. The e.s.r. detection showed four peaks in the chromatogram. The orcinol method for detection of the residual sugar moieties was applied before and after reduction of the base to determine the existence of the 5,6-double bond for the molecules in each fraction. From the combined results of the e.s.r. and orcinol methods, the short-lived radicals which were trapped by 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane were identified as radicals of N-1 and C-6 positions of the base moiety and t-butyl radicals which was the radiolytic product of the trapping reagent.

  13. Guest Editorial: Processes of Radicalization and De-Radicalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Della Porta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of radicalization and de-radicalization, understood as processes leading towards the increased or decreased use of political violence, is central to the question of how political violence emerges, how it can be prevented, and how it can be contained. The focus section of this issue of the International Journal of Conflict and Violence addresses radicalization and de-radicalization, seeking to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the processes, dynamics, and mechanisms involved and taking an interdisciplinary approach to overcome the fragmentation into separate disciplines and focus areas. Contributions by Pénélope Larzillière, Felix Heiduk, Bill Kissane, Hank Johnston, Christian Davenport and Cyanne Loyle, Veronique Dudouet, and Lasse Lindekilde address repressive settings, legitimacy, institutional aspects, organizational outcomes, and dynamics in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

  14. Ethylene formation from methionine as a method to evaluate oxygen free radical scavenging and metal inactivation by cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galey, J B; Millecamps, F; Nguyen, Q L

    1991-04-01

    Synopsis It has been proposed that oxygen free radicals are involved in skin aging. This paper describes a new method for the evaluation of oxygen free radical scavenging by cosmetic products. It is based on the measurement, by gas chromatography, of ethylene produced during the oxidation of methionine by the hydroxyl radical. OH. is produced by an iron catalyzed superoxide-driven Fenton reaction in which superoxide is obtained by photochemical oxygen reduction. The cosmetic is applied, together with methionine, riboflavine, NADH, FeCl(3) and EDTA, on a glass microfibre filter and submitted to UVA exposure through a quartz cell. Ethylene is then measured from aliquots of the atmosphere inside the cell. Catalase or Desferal completely inhibits ethylene production. SOD or high concentrations of hydroxyl radical scavengers (Mannitol, DMSO etc.) afford a partial protection. Thus the efficiency of O(2) (-)., H(2)O(2) and OH. scavengers and iron chelators can be measured. The main advantage of this test is that it is performed in conditions which simulate skin during UV exposure (e.g. air and UV exposed thin layer). Furthermore, as it is non-invasive, it can also be applied to human skin in vivo.

  15. Novel denture-cleaning system based on hydroxyl radical disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Ikai, Hiroyo; Hayashi, Eisei; Shirato, Midori; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new denture-cleaning device using hydroxyl radicals generated from photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Electron spin resonance analysis demonstrated that the yield of hydroxyl radicals increased with the concentration of H2O2 and light irradiation time. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and methicillin-resistant S aureus were killed within 10 minutes with a > 5-log reduction when treated with photolysis of 500 mM H2O2; Candida albicans was killed within 30 minutes with a > 4-log reduction with photolysis of 1,000 mM H2O2. The clinical test demonstrated that the device could effectively reduce microorganisms in denture plaque by approximately 7-log order within 20 minutes.

  16. Oxidative generation of guanine radicals by carbonate radicals and their reactions with nitrogen dioxide to form site specific 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole lesions in oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Avrum; Mock, Steven; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2003-08-01

    A simple photochemical approach is described for synthesizing site specific, stable 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole (NIm) adducts in single- and double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides containing single and multiple guanine residues. The DNA sequences employed, 5'-d(ACC CG(1)C G(2)TC CG(3)C G(4)CC) and 5'-d(ACC CG(1)C G(2)TC C), were a portion of exon 5 of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, including the codons 157 (G(2)) and 158 (G(3)) mutation hot spots in the former sequence with four Gs and the codon 157 (G(2)) mutation hot spot in the latter sequence with two Gs. The nitration of oligodeoxynucleotides was initiated by the selective photodissociation of persulfate anions to sulfate radicals induced by UV laser pulses (308 nm). In aqueous solutions, of bicarbonate and nitrite anions, the sulfate radicals generate carbonate anion radicals and nitrogen dioxide radicals by one electron oxidation of the respective anions. The guanine residue in the oligodeoxynucleotide is oxidized by the carbonate anion radical to form the neutral guanine radical. While the nitrogen dioxide radicals do not react with any of the intact DNA bases, they readily combine with the guanine radicals at either the C8 or the C5 positions. The C8 addition generates the well-known 8-nitroguanine (8-nitro-G) lesions, whereas the C5 attack produces unstable adducts, which rapidly decompose to NIm lesions. The maximum yields of the nitro products (NIm + 8-nitro-G) were typically in the range of 20-40%, depending on the number of guanine residues in the sequence. The ratio of the NIm to 8-nitro-G lesions gradually decreases from 3.4 in the model compound, 2',3',5'-tri-O-acetylguanosine, to 2.1-2.6 in the single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides and to 0.8-1.1 in the duplexes. The adduct of the 5'-d(ACC CG(1)C G(2)TC C) oligodeoxynucleotide containing the NIm lesion in codon 157 (G(2)) was isolated in HPLC-pure form. The integrity of this adduct was established by a detailed analysis of exonuclease digestion

  17. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, R.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  18. Generation and photosensitization properties of the oxidized radical of riboflavin: a laser flash photolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Zhenhui; Lu Changyuan; Wang Wenfeng; Lin Weizhen; Yao Side; Lin Nianyun

    2000-01-01

    Direct excitation of riboflavin with 248 nm laser gives rise to a transient absorption spectrum with contributions from (1) oxidized radical, (2) hydrated electron, (3) triplet state and reduced radical, and distinction between the transient species below 360 nm is difficult for the absorption overlapped. The RF ·+ or RF(-H) · has been clearly produced via direct photoionization by 248 nm laser in aqueous solution, which has been unambiguously identified by SO 4 ·- radical oxidation, although its transient absorption can not be observed clearly for both lower absorption coefficient (ε = 2000 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1 at 640 nm at pH 7.1) and overlap from others. In the present paper, electron transfer from purine and pyrimidine nucleotides to one-electron oxidized radical of riboflavin were observed for the first time in aqueous solution, and the reaction rate constants were determined respectively, which would obviously be of considerable significance in vivo and in vitro. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of oxidized radical of riboflavin in flavin photochemistry and photobiology. These reaction paths are important for the elucidation of the interaction between riboflavin and DNA nucleotides under photoexcitation. When riboflavin was excited, triplet state and oxidized radical can be formed directly or by sequence reactions of triplet state. In the presence of DNA, electron transfer can take place to form a base radical cation, then hole migration to GG step along base-stacking of DNA leads to DNA strand scission, which has been verified by many steady product analysis. This selective cleavage of DNA shows the potential application of riboflavin as a site-specify photonuclease, which has become a highlight' in the currently photochemistry, photomedicine and photobiology areas. The mechanism implies that riboflavin can be applied potentially to photosensitization of oxygen deficient or under high intensity pulsed laser irradiation. (author)

  19. Protonation Reaction of Benzonitrile Radical Anion and Absorption of Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holcman, Jerzy; Sehested, Knud

    1975-01-01

    The rate constant for the protonation of benzonitrile radical anions formed in pulse radiolysis of aqueous benzonitrile solutions is (3.5 ± 0.5)× 1010 dm3 mol–1 s–1. A new 270 nm absorption band is attributed to the protonated benzonitrile anion. The pK of the protonation reaction is determined t...

  20. Synoviocytes, not chondrocytes, release free radicals after cycles of anoxia/re-oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Nicole; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange L.; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe; Deby-Dupont, Ginette P.; Hoebeke, Maryse; Serteyn, Didier A.

    2005-01-01

    By oxymetry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we investigated the effects of repeated anoxia/re-oxygenation (A/R) periods on the respiration and production of free radicals by synoviocytes (rabbit HIG-82 cell line and primary equine synoviocytes) and equine articular chondrocytes. Three periods of 20 min anoxia followed by re-oxygenation were applied to 10 7 cells; O 2 consumption was measured before anoxia and after each re-oxygenation. After the last A/R, cellular free radical formation was investigated by EPR spectroscopy with spin trapping technique (n = 3 for each cell line). Both types of synoviocytes showed a high O 2 consumption, which was slowered after anoxia. By EPR with the spin trap POBN, we proved a free radical formation. Results were similar for equine and rabbit synoviocytes. For chondrocytes, we observed a low O 2 consumption, unchanged by anoxia, and no free radical production. These observations suggest an oxidant activity of synoviocytes, potentially important for the onset of osteoarthritis

  1. Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals in aqueous solutions; electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matasović, Brunislav; Bonifačić, Marija

    2011-06-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals CO2-rad , rad CH 2OH, rad CH(CH 3)OH, and rad CH(CH 3)O - have been studied in oxygen free aqueous solutions in the presence of organic additives: formate, methanol or ethanol. For radicals production 60Co γ-radiolysis was employed and the yield of bromide was measured by means of ion chromatography. Both radical anions have reducing potential negative enough to transfer an electron to BrU producing bromide ion and U rad radical. High yields of bromide have been measured increasing proportional to the concentration of the corresponding organic additives at a constant dose rate. This is characteristic for a chain process where regeneration of radical ions occurs by H-atom abstraction by U rad radical from formate or ethanol. Results with the neutral radicals conformed earlier proposition that the reduction reaction of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals proceeds by the proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism ( Matasović and Bonifačić, 2007). Thus, while both rad CH 2OH and rad CH(CH 3)OH did not react with BrU in water/alcohol solutions, addition of bicarbonate and acetate in mmol dm -3 concentrations, pH 7, brought about chain debromination to occur in the case of rad CH(CH 3)OH radical as reactant. Under the same conditions phosphate buffer, a base with higher bulk proton affinity, failed to have any influence. The results are taken as additional proofs for the specific complex formation of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals with suitable bases which enhances radicals' reduction potential in comparison with only water molecules as proton acceptors. Rate constants for the H-atom abstraction from ethanol and formate by U rad radicals have been estimated to amount to about ≥85 and 1200 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, respectively.

  2. Oxidative degradation of lignin by photochemical and chemical radical generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, M.H.; Kutsuki, H.; Morgan, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Oxidation of specifically radiolabeled 14 C-lignins by UV/H 2 O 2 , Fenton's reagent, photosensitizing riboflavin, UV- and γ-irradiation was examined. In the presence of UV/H 2 O 2 , a hydroxyl radical (radicalOH) generating system, 14 C-methoxy, 2-[ 14 C-sidechain] and 14 C-ring labeled lignin were rapidly and extensively degraded as measured by gel filtration of the reaction products on Sephadex LH-20. This suggested that exposure to radicalOH leads to rapid, nonspecific lignin degradation. Rapid degradation of 14 C-methoxy, 2-[ 14 C-sidechain] and 14 C-ring labeled lignin also occurred in the presence of the radicalOH generating system, Fenton's reagent, confirming the primary role of radicalOH in these reactions. Photosensitizing riboflavin, also capable of effecting transformation of organic compounds via Type I hydrogen radical abstractions, caused extensive oxidative degradation of 14 C-methoxy labeled lignin and significant degradation of 2-[ 14 C-sidechain] and 14 C-ring labeled lignin. In addition, UV- and γ-irradiation caused slower but extensive degradation of the polymers, probably via radical type mechanisms. All of these results indicate that radicalOH as well as organic radical generating systems are effective agents for the purpose of degrading this heterogeneous, optically inactive and random biopolymer. (author)

  3. Uma análise behaviorista radical dos sonhos A radical behaviorist analysis of the dreams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francynete Melo e Silva

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Embora não haja um consenso acerca de questões sobre o que são os sonhos, porque sonhamos, etc., a maioria dos estudos sobre a natureza dos sonhos concorda que ela está relacionada a condições internas do organismo. Contrariamente, o behaviorismo radical analisa os sonhos como comportamentos privados, sendo produtos das histórias filogenética, ontogenética e cultural. Neste sentido, este trabalho tem como objetivo analisar os sonhos a partir da perspectiva behaviorista radical, considerando-os como comportamentos perceptuais encobertos, argumentando-se que são aprendidos. Afirma-se que a interpretação dos sonhos é impossível se não se conhecem as contingências de reforço com as quais a pessoa está interagindo.In spite of the fact that there is no consensus concerning questions about the nature and origin of dreams, the majority of the studies on the nature of the dreams agrees that they are related to internal conditions of the organism. As opposed to that notion, the radical behaviorism analyses the dreams as private behaviors and, thus, as products of philogenetical, ontogenetical, and cultural histories. In this sense, this paper aims to analyze the dreams from a radical behaviorism perspective, considering them as private events, perceptual behaviors, and arguing that they are learned processes. It is asserted that the dreams interpretation is impossible if the contingencies that control such activity are unknown.

  4. Charged particle multiplicities at {radical}(s)=0.9, 2.36 and 7.0 TeV with the CMS detector at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougny, Romain [Universiteit Antwerpen, Gratiekapelstraat 10, BE-2000 Antwerpen (Belgium); De Wolf, E.A.; Janssen, X.; Mucibello, L.; Van Remortel, N.; Lee, Y.J.; Busza, Wit

    2010-07-01

    The charged particle multiplicity, n, is an essential observable in hadron collisions. It is the result of the counting of all charged particles produced by the primary proton-proton interaction. In particular, the events collected by minimum bias triggers contain soft interactions and produce mostly particles with low transverse momenta. The shape of the charged particle multiplicity spectrum is sensitive to the particle production mechanism of these soft interactions which are described by non-perturbative models, inspired by QCD. The correlations between produced hadrons are reflected in the shape of the multiplicity spectrum, while the mean multiplicity increases with the center of mass energy of the collision. We present the measurement of the charged particle multiplicity distributions, 1/s d{sigma}/dn, in increasing sub-domains of pseudorapidity and transverse momentum acceptance, for non single diffractive interactions. The data are further corrected for the trigger and event selection efficiency and the effects of tracking inefficiency and secondary tracks originating from the decay of long lived particles and products of interaction with the beam pipe and the detector material. This measurement is based on minimum bias data collected by the CMS detector at {radical}(s) = 0.9, 2.36 and 7 TeV. The data were collected during the LHC commissioning run in 2009 and at the beginning of 2010. (authors)

  5. Free radical reactions of hematoporphyrin: a pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Guleria, Apurav; Singh, Ajay K.; Sarkar, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation chemistry of porphyrin derivatives has been given much attention in recent years. Although till date photo dynamic therapy (PDT) with Hematoporphyrin (HP) has already proved its effectiveness in the treatment of cancer, the molecular mechanisms by which this therapy-destroys tumour cells as well as its optimal physical parameters are still not fully understood. Thus it becomes necessary to understand the interaction of different free radicals with HP. Pulse radiolysis studies have been performed to understand the interaction of different free radicals with HP. The product formation along with bleaching and presence of a number of transients makes it difficult to pin point the mode and site of free radical attack. The radiation-induced formation of various transients (HP-OH, HO - , HP + ) in aqueous solution was investigated at various pHs by pulse radiolysis technique by means of N 3 , O - and CCl 3 O 2 radicals with and without triethyl-amine, under different dose conditions. The observed intermediates are characterized by their kinetic and spectroscopic data. The absorption spectrum of each transient could be differentiated from each other by their absorption maxima, extinction coefficients and kinetics. A clear indication of product formation has also been observed by employing continuous electron pulse and the solution shows a green coloration. It is conceivable that under certain conditions, similar transients may be produced when HP is used as a sensitizer in radiation chemotherapy of cancer patients. Our study may throw some light into the breakdown mechanism of haemoglobin to BV in addition to the understanding of free radical interaction of HP. (author)

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of recombination of vinyl and hydroxyl radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Vadim D.

    2017-10-01

    The recombination of the vinyl (C2H3) and the hydroxyl (OH) radicals was studied computationally using quantum chemistry and master equation/RRKM. The reaction mechanism includes the initial addition, several isomerization steps, and decomposition via seven different channels. The spectrum of products demonstrates temperature dependence in the 300-3000 K range. At low temperatures (below 1600 K), CH3 + HCO products are dominant but at elevated temperatures vinoxy radical (CH2CHO) and hydrogen atom become more important. The acetyl (CH3CO) + H products and formation of vinylidene (CH2C:) and water products are minor but non-negligible.

  7. Characterization of 60 Co y-radiation induced radical products of antipyrine by means of high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, capillary zone electrophoresis, micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, S.A.J.; Everaerts, F.M.; Huf, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    Monitoring the amount of oxidative damage, caused by free radicals, is a major problem in free radical and aging research. Antipyrine is proposed as an exogenous marker for the biomolecular monitoring of oxidative stress. In this paper the characterization of the 60Co γ-radiation products of

  8. Characterization of 60Co gamma-radiation induced radical products of antipyrine by means of high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, capillary zone electrophoresis, micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, S.A.J.; Everaerts, F.M.; Huf, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    Monitoring the amount of oxidative damage, caused by free radicals, is a major problem in free radical and aging research. Antipyrine is proposed as an exogenous marker for the biomolecular monitoring of oxidative stress. In this paper the characterization of the 60Co ¿-radiation products of

  9. Quantification of Radicals Generated in a Sonicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassim Badmus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl radical (OH• is a powerful oxidant produced as a consequence of cavitation in water. It can react nonspecifically in breaking down persistent organic pollutants in water into their mineral form. It can also recombine to form hydrogen peroxide which is very useful in water treatment. In this study, terephthalic acid (TA and potassium iodide dosimetry were used to quantify and investigate the behaviour of the generated OH radical in a laboratory scale sonicator. The 2-hydroxyl terephthalic acid (HTA formed during terephthalic acid dosimetry was determined by optical fibre spectrometer. The production rate of HTA served as a means of evaluating and characterizing the OH• generated over given time in a sonicator. The influence of sonicator power intensity, solution pH and irradiation time upon OH• generation were investigated. Approximately 2.2 ´ 10-9 M s-1 of OH radical was generated during the sonication process. The rate of generation of the OH radicals was established to be independent of the concentration of the initial reactant. Thus, the rate of generation of OH• can be predicted by zero order kinetics in a sonicator.

  10. Enantioselective cyclizations and cyclization cascades of samarium ketyl radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Nicolas; Plesniak, Mateusz P.; McDouall, Joseph J. W.; Procter, David J.

    2017-12-01

    The rapid generation of molecular complexity from simple starting materials is a key challenge in synthesis. Enantioselective radical cyclization cascades have the potential to deliver complex, densely packed, polycyclic architectures, with control of three-dimensional shape, in one step. Unfortunately, carrying out reactions with radicals in an enantiocontrolled fashion remains challenging due to their high reactivity. This is particularly the case for reactions of radicals generated using the classical reagent, SmI2. Here, we demonstrate that enantioselective SmI2-mediated radical cyclizations and cascades that exploit a simple, recyclable chiral ligand can convert symmetrical ketoesters to complex carbocyclic products bearing multiple stereocentres with high enantio- and diastereocontrol. A computational study has been used to probe the origin of the enantioselectivity. Our studies suggest that many processes that rely on SmI2 can be rendered enantioselective by the design of suitable ligands.

  11. Influence of anoxia on the induction of mutations by phenylalanine radicals during gamma-irradiation of plasmid DNA in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Gitta K; Slotman, Ben J; Reitsma-Wijker, Carola A; van Andel, Rob J; Poldervaart, Hester A; Lafleur, M Vincent M

    2004-12-21

    When DNA is irradiated in aqueous solution, most of the damage is inflicted by water-derived radicals. This is called the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. However in whole cells not only the primary formed water radicals play a role, because some cellular compounds form secondary radicals which can also damage DNA. It is known that the amino acid phenylalanine is able to react with water radicals, resulting in the production of secondary phenylalanine radicals which can damage and inactivate DNA. In a previous study the influence of the presence of phenylalanine during gamma-irradiation of DNA in aqueous solution under oxic conditions was studied. Under anoxic irradiation conditions different amounts and types of reactive water-derived radicals are formed compared to oxic conditions and also different phenylalanine radicals are formed. Therefore, this study examines the influence of the presence of phenylalanine under anoxic conditions on the gamma-radiation-induced mutation spectrum. The results indicate that phenylalanine radicals are damaging to DNA, but less effective compared to primary water radicals. On the mutational level, in the presence of phenylalanine radicals under anoxic conditions, the amount of mutations on G:C base pairs was significantly decreased as compared to oxic conditions. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that nucleotide excision repair is involved in repair of both inactivating and mutagenic damage induced by phenylalanine radicals under anoxic conditions.

  12. Radical intermediates of low temperature radiolysis of di-tert-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6/1-octanol extractant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakurdaeva, O.A.; Nesterov, S.V.; Moscow State Univ.; Feldman, V.I.

    2013-01-01

    Intermediates of low temperature (77 K) X-rays radiolysis of 1-octanol and di-tert-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 solutions in 1-octanol were studied by ESR spectroscopy. Hydroxyalkyl CH 3 (CH 2 ) 6 C circle HOH and interior-type alkyl R 1 C circle HR 2 OH radicals were found to be main paramagnetic products stabilized in 1-octanol irradiated at 77 K. In addition to abovementioned radicals, macrocyclic -O-CH 2 -C circle H- and acyclic -C circle H-C(H)=O radicals produced from crown ether were identified in irradiated 1.0 M DtBuCH18C6 solution in octanol. No deviation in radiation-chemical yield of the stabilized acyclic radicals from the value expected in accord with 'additive' rule was observed in the latter case. It was supposed that macrocycle cleavage in DtBuCH18C6 occurred at early stages of radiolysis rather than in secondary radical reactions between products of 1-octanol radiolysis and crown ether. Meanwhile, alkyl radicals formed from 1-octanol can react with crown ether, resulting in formation of macrocyclic products of radiolysis. (orig.)

  13. Radical intermediates of low temperature radiolysis of di-tert-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6/1-octanol extractant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakurdaeva, O.A.; Nesterov, S.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Enikolopov Institute of Synthetic Polymer Materials; Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Feldman, V.I. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-03-01

    Intermediates of low temperature (77 K) X-rays radiolysis of 1-octanol and di-tert-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 solutions in 1-octanol were studied by ESR spectroscopy. Hydroxyalkyl CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}C {sup circle} HOH and interior-type alkyl R{sub 1}C {sup circle} HR{sub 2}OH radicals were found to be main paramagnetic products stabilized in 1-octanol irradiated at 77 K. In addition to abovementioned radicals, macrocyclic -O-CH{sub 2}-C {sup circle} H- and acyclic -C {sup circle} H-C(H)=O radicals produced from crown ether were identified in irradiated 1.0 M DtBuCH18C6 solution in octanol. No deviation in radiation-chemical yield of the stabilized acyclic radicals from the value expected in accord with 'additive' rule was observed in the latter case. It was supposed that macrocycle cleavage in DtBuCH18C6 occurred at early stages of radiolysis rather than in secondary radical reactions between products of 1-octanol radiolysis and crown ether. Meanwhile, alkyl radicals formed from 1-octanol can react with crown ether, resulting in formation of macrocyclic products of radiolysis. (orig.)

  14. Aqueous-phase oxidation of green leaf volatiles by hydroxyl radical as a source of SOA: Product identification from methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Amie K.; Ehrenhauser, Franz S.; Richards-Henderson, Nicole K.; Anastasio, Cort; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.

    2015-02-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a group of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) released into the atmosphere by vegetation. BVOCs produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via gas-phase reactions, but little is known of their aqueous-phase oxidation as a source of SOA. GLVs can partition into atmospheric water phases, e.g., fog, mist, dew or rain, and be oxidized by hydroxyl radicals (˙OH). These reactions in the liquid phase also lead to products that have higher molecular weights, increased polarity, and lower vapor pressures, ultimately forming SOA after evaporation of the droplet. To examine this process, we investigated the aqueous, ˙OH-mediated oxidation of methyl jasmonate (MeJa) and methyl salicylate (MeSa), two GLVs that produce aqueous-phase SOA. High performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) was used to monitor product formation. The oxidation products identified exhibit higher molecular mass than their parent GLV due to either dimerization or the addition of oxygen and hydroxyl functional groups. The proposed structures of potential products are based on mechanistic considerations combined with the HPLC/ESI-MS data. Based on the structures, the vapor pressure and the Henry's law constant were estimated with multiple methods (SPARC, SIMPOL, MPBPVP, Bond and Group Estimations). The estimated vapor pressures of the products identified are significantly (up to 7 orders of magnitude) lower than those of the associated parent compounds, and therefore, the GLV oxidation products may remain as SOA after evaporation of the water droplet. The contribution of the identified oxidation products to SOA formation is estimated based on measured HPLC-ESI/MS responses relative to previous aqueous SOA mass yield measurements.

  15. Behaviour of OH radicals in an atmospheric-pressure streamer discharge studied by two-dimensional numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Atsushi; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2013-01-01

    The production process of OH radicals in an atmospheric-pressure streamer discharge is studied. A streamer discharge model is developed to analyse the characteristics of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in point-to-plane electrodes filled with humid air at atmospheric pressure. The results indicate that the behaviour of OH radicals in and after the discharge pulse is characterized by three reaction processes: ‘OH-production’, ‘OH-cycle’ and ‘OH-recombination’. The first process of OH-production includes dissociation reactions of H 2 O with O( 1 D) and N 2 (a' 1 Σ u - ), which are the main production processes of OH in the discharge. Immediately after the OH-production process, the OH radicals are destroyed by a reaction with O( 3 P) to form O 2 and H. Then the subsequent reactions produce OH again through the reaction of H + HO 2 , which is the OH-cycle process. Finally, the OH radicals are consumed by the OH-recombination process. (paper)

  16. Atmospheric degradation of 2- nitrobenzaldehyde: Photolysis and reaction with OH radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouya, H.; Al Rashidi, M.; Roth, E.; Salghi, R.; Chakir, A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents an experimental study of the gas phase kinetics of 2-nitrobenzaldehyde (2-NBA) photolysis and oxidation by OH radicals. The experiments were carried out in an atmospheric simulation chamber coupled to an FTIR spectrometer and CG/MS. The UV spectra of 2-NBA were also measured and the experimentally determined absorption cross sections were used to estimate the atmospheric photo-dissociation constant of 2-NBA with a global quantum yield of 0.5. The obtained results indicate that 2-NBA is a highly photolysable. A mechanism of 2-NBA photolysis was proposed based on the identification of photolysis degradation products. The kinetics of oxidation of 2-NBA by OH radicals was investigated over the temperature range 308-352 K. The obtained rate coefficients exhibits slight negative temperature dependence and the Arrhenius expression obtained is as follows: kOH+2-NBA(T)= (7.00 ± 3.40) × 10-12exp (577 ± 156/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The calculated rate coefficients lead to tropospheric lifetimes of 2-NBA that are in the order of a few minutes, relative to photolysis, or a few hours, relative to oxidation by OH radicals.

  17. Isomerization of Second-Generation Isoprene Peroxy Radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ambro, Emma L.; Møller, Kristian Holten; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.

    2017-01-01

    kinetics box model, we find that to explain the behavior of low-volatility products and SOA mass yields relative to input H2O2 concentrations, the second-generation dihydroxy hydroperoxy peroxy radical (C5H11O6·) must undergo an intramolecular H-shift with a net forward rate constant of order 0.1 s-1...... products under atmospheric conditions and, thus, on the importance of nonreactive gas-particle partitioning of isoprene oxidation products as an SOA source....

  18. DNA damage produced by exposure of supercoiled plasmid DNA to high- and low-LET ionizing radiation: Effects of hydroxyl radical quenchers. DNA breakage, neutrons, OH radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Ito, T.; Peak, M.J.; Robb, F.T.

    1994-01-01

    A supercoiled plasmid of 7300 base pairs was isolated and exposed in an aqueous environment to 60 Co γ rays and JANUS 0.85 MeV fission-spectrum neutrons. Dose responses for the production of single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs) and alkali-labile sites (ALSs) were compared with computations made from the conversion of the supercoil to its relaxed and linear forms. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for production of SSBs and DSBs was similar to that previously measured in the cellular environment. The RBE for destruction of genetic transforming activity of M13 viral DNA followed that for DNA damage. This is in contrast to the situation for biological effects such as lethality, mutagenesis, and cellular transformation measured in mammalian cells, where the RBE values are reversed. The role of hydroxyl (OH) radical in DNA damage induction by neutrons was investigated by exposure of plasmid in the presence of known quenchers of this species. Of four quenchers tested, all were able to reduce the yields of both SSBs and DSBs. These findings are consistent with a model for SSB and DSB induction by high linear energy transfer that involves OH radical mediation

  19. Proton exchange between oxymethyl radical and acids and bases: semiempirical quantum-chemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Pustolaikina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The reactions with proton participation are widely represented in the analytical, technological and biological chemistry. Quantum-chemical study of the exchange processes in hydrogen bonding complexes will allow us to achieve progress in the understanding of the elementary act mechanism of proton transfer in hydrogen bonding chain as well as the essence of the acid-base interactions. Oxymethyl radical •CH2ОН is small in size and comfortable as a model particle that well transmits protolytic properties of paramagnetic acids having more complex structure. Quantum-chemical modeling of proton exchange reaction oxymethyl radical ∙CH2OH and its diamagnetic analog CH3OH with amines, carboxylic acids and water was carried out using UAM1 method with the help of Gaussian-2009 program. QST2 method was used for the search of transition state, IRC procedure was applied for the calculation of descents along the reaction coordinate. The difference in the structure of transition states of ∙CH2OH/ CH3OH with bases and acids has been shown. It has been confirmed that in the case of bases, consecutive proton exchange mechanism was fixed, and in the case of complexes with carboxylic acids parallel proton exchange mechanism was fixed. The similarity in the reaction behavior of paramagnetic and diamagnetic systems in the proton exchange has been found. It was suggested that the mechanism of proton exchange reaction is determined by the structure of the hydrogen bonding cyclic complex, which is, in turn, depends from the nature of the acid-base interactions partners.

  20. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    .... How radical change in public policy has occurred in the past is then documented. We find examples of radical change by chance, radical change by consensus, radical change by learning, and radical change by entrepreneurial design...

  1. Importance of iron complexation for Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical production at circumneutral pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Miller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The reaction between Fe(II and H2O2 to yield hydroxyl radicals (HO•, the Fenton reaction, is of interest due to its role in trace metal and natural organic matter biogeochemistry, its utility in water treatment and its role in oxidative cell degradation and associated human disease. There is significant dispute over whether HO•, the most reactive of the so-called reactive oxygen species, is formed in this reaction, particularly under circumneutral conditions relevant to natural systems. In this work we have studied the oxidation kinetics of Fe(II complexed by L = citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA and also measured HO• production using phthalhydrazide as a probe compound at pH 8.2. It is shown that HO• is the sole product of the Fe(IIL-H2O2 reaction for L = EDTA and DTPA, with kinetic modelling of the full reaction pathway utilized to confirm this finding. Quantitative HO• production also appears likely for L = citrate, although uncertainties with the speciation of Fe(II-citrate complexes as well as difficulties in modelling the oxidation kinetics of these complexes has prevented a definitive conclusion. In the absence of ligands at circumneutral pH, inorganic Fe(II reacts with H2O2 to yield a species other than HO•, contrary to the well-established production of HO• from inorganic Fe(II at low pH. Our results suggest that at high pH Fe(II must be complexed for HO• production to occur.

  2. Organization Strategy and Structural Differences for Radical Versus Incremental Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    John E. Ettlie; William P. Bridges; Robert D. O'Keefe

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model of the organizational innovation process that suggests that the strategy-structure causal sequence is differentiated by radical versus incremental innovation. That is, unique strategy and structure will be required for radical innovation, especially process adoption, while more traditional strategy and structure arrangements tend to support new product introduction and incremental process adoption. This differentiated theory is strongly supported ...

  3. Formation and transformations of radicals in frozen aqueous solutions of components of nucleic acids and H3PO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkhadzhidinova, D.R.; Chefranova, O.A.; Sharpatyj, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Radiolysis of frozen aqueous solutions of 6-16 M H 3 PO 4 and 5 M NaH 2 PO 4 was studied, as well as radiolysis of these systems in the presence of nitrous bases and glucose. In aqueous solutions of H 3 PO 4 and NaH 2 PO 4 irradiated at 77 K, two groups of radicals formed as a result of interaction of the oxidative component of radiolysis of water with phosphate ions were identified. Their photolytic properties were studied. Primary products of radiolysis of the nitrous bases in phosphoric- acid solutions are anion- and cation-radicals. The molal absorption coefficients of the particles were determined

  4. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Lester, Marsha I., E-mail: milester@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 (United States); Klippenstein, Stephen J. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO of ca. 10{sup 7} s{sup −1}, which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO or (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s{sup −1} at 298 K.

  5. The games radicals play : special issue on free radicals and radical ions

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, J.C.; Williams, F.

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry and Physics have aptly been described as “most excellent children of Intellect and Art” [1]. Both these “children” engage with many playthings, and molecules rank as one of their first favorites, especially radicals, which are amongst the most lively and exciting. Checking out radicals dancing to the music of entropy round their potential energy ballrooms is surely both entertaining and enlightening. Radicals’ old favorite convolutions are noteworthy, but the new styles, modes and a...

  6. Time resolved resonance Raman spectra of anilino radical and aniline radical cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, G.N.R.; Schuler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    We report, in this paper, submicrosecond time resolved resonance Raman spectra of anilino radical and its radical cation as observed in pulse radiolytic studies of the oxidation of aniline in aqueous solution. By excitation in resonance with the broad and weak electronic transition of anilino radical at 400 nm (ε--1250 M -1 cm -1 ) we have observed, for the first time, the vibrational features of this radical. The Wilson ν 8 /sub a/ ring stretching mode at 1560 cm -1 is most strongly resonance enhanced. The ν 7 /sub a/ CN stretching band at 1505 cm -1 , which is shifted to higher frequency by 231 cm -1 with respect to aniline, is also prominent. The frequency of this latter mode indicates that the CN bond in the radical has considerable double bond character. The Raman spectrum of aniline radical cation, excited in resonance with the --425 nm electronic absorption (ε--4000 M -1 cm -1 ), shows features which are similar to phenoxyl radical. Most of the observed frequencies of this radical in solution are in good agreement with vibrational energies determined by recent laser photoelectron spectroscopic studies in the vapor phase. The bands most strongly enhanced in the resonance Raman spectrum are, however, weak in the photoelectron spectrum. While the vibrational frequencies observed for anilino radical and its isoelectronic cation are quite similar, the resonance enhancement patterns are very different. In particular the ν 14 b 2 mode of anilino radical observed at 1324 cm -1 is highly resonance enhanced because of strong vibronic coupling between the 400 nm 2 A 2 -- 2 B 1 and the higher 2 B 1 -- 2 B 1 electronic transitions

  7. Temperature Effects on Free Radicals in Gamma-sterilized Beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, S. I.; Jahan, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    Gamma irradiation has become the method of choice for sterilizing frozen meat and their products to reduce levels of food-borne pathogens and to extend shelf life. In this report we have employed ESR technique for detection of free radicals in sterilized and non-sterilized dry beef without bone. We have also determined the heating effects on free radicals at temperatures 176^°C and 250^°C. Meat samples were dried in a food dehydrator at 60^°C and were packaged in dry N_2. They were then sterilized by γ-irradiation (2.5 MRad), ground into powder, and placed in ESR sample tubes. Non-sterilized powder samples were used as control. While all powder samples, sterilized or not, produced a broad single line in the ESR spectra with (Δ H_pp ~ 9 G) and g = 2.013, the radical concentration in the sterilized samples increased by a factor of five. Heat treatment at 176^°C produced similar radicals. But, when samples were heated 250^°C different radical species were formed which are characterized by narrow width (Δ H_pp ~ 6 G) and lower g-value (g =2.010). In contrast with previous work, where free radicals in chicken bones were reduced by heating [1], we observed an increase in concentration. Results of structural analyses of the radicals will be presented. Ref.[1]: Radiat. Phys. Chem., 49, 477-481, 1997. Work supported by Grants from the University of Memphis

  8. Investigation of the role of bicyclic peroxy radicals in the oxidation mechanism of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsall, Adam W; Andreoni, John F; Elrod, Matthew J

    2010-10-07

    The products of the primary OH-initiated oxidation of toluene were investigated using the turbulent flow chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique under different oxygen, NO, and initial OH radical concentrations as well as a range of total pressures. The bicyclic peroxy radical intermediate, a key proposed intermediate species in the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) for the atmospheric oxidation of toluene, was detected for the first time. The toluene oxidation mechanism was shown to have a strong oxygen concentration dependence, presumably due to the central role of the bicyclic peroxy radical in determining the stable product distribution at atmospheric oxygen concentrations. The results also suggest a potential role for bicyclic peroxy radical + HO(2) reactions at high HO(2)/NO ratios. These reactions are postulated to be a source of the inconsistencies between environmental chamber results and predictions from the MCM.

  9. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in malonaldehyde and its radical analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen; Kumar, Manoj; Finney, Brian A; Francisco, Joseph S

    2017-09-28

    High level Brueckner doubles with triples correction method-based ab initio calculations have been used to investigate the nature of intramolecular hydrogen bonding and intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer in cis-malonaldehyde (MA) and its radical analogues. The radicals considered here are the ones that correspond to the homolytic cleavage of C-H bonds in cis-MA. The results suggest that cis-MA and its radical analogues, cis-MA RS , and cis-MA RA , both exist in planar geometry. The calculated intramolecular O-H⋯O=C bond in cis-MA is shorter than that in the radical analogues. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in cis-MA is stronger than in its radicals by at least 3.0 kcal/mol. The stability of a cis-malonaldehyde radical correlates with the extent of electron spin delocalization; cis-MA RA , in which the radical spin is more delocalized, is the most stable MA radical, whereas cis-MA RS , in which the radical spin is strongly localized, is the least stable radical. The natural bond orbital analysis indicates that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (O⋯H⋯O) in cis-malonaldehyde radicals is stabilized by the interaction between the lone pair orbitals of donor oxygen and the σ * orbital of acceptor O-H bond (n → σ * OH ). The calculated barriers indicate that the intramolecular proton transfer in cis-MA involves 2.2 kcal/mol lower barrier than that in cis-MA RS .

  10. Tyrosine-lipid peroxide adducts from radical termination: para coupling and intramolecular Diels-Alder cyclization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepin, Roman; Möller, Matias N; Kim, Hye-young H; Hatch, Duane M; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Radi, Rafael; Porter, Ned A

    2010-12-15

    Free radical co-oxidation of polyunsaturated lipids with tyrosine or phenolic analogues of tyrosine gave rise to lipid peroxide-tyrosine (phenol) adducts in both aqueous micellar and organic solutions. The novel adducts were isolated and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry (MS). The spectral data suggest that the polyunsaturated lipid peroxyl radicals give stable peroxide coupling products exclusively at the para position of the tyrosyl (phenoxy) radicals. These adducts have characteristic (13)C chemical shifts at 185 ppm due to the cross-conjugated carbonyl of the phenol-derived cyclohexadienone. The primary peroxide adducts subsequently undergo intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) cyclization, affording a number of diastereomeric tricyclic adducts that have characteristic carbonyl (13)C chemical shifts at ~198 ppm. All of the NMR HMBC and HSQC correlations support the structure assignments of the primary and Diels-Alder adducts, as does MS collision-induced dissociation data. Kinetic rate constants and activation parameters for the IMDA reaction were determined, and the primary adducts were reduced with cuprous ion to give a phenol-derived 4-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienone. No products from adduction of peroxyls at the phenolic ortho position were found in either the primary or cuprous reduction product mixtures. These studies provide a framework for understanding the nature of lipid-protein adducts formed by peroxyl-tyrosyl radical-radical termination processes. Coupling of lipid peroxyl radicals with tyrosyl radicals leads to cyclohexenone and cyclohexadienone adducts, which are of interest in and of themselves since, as electrophiles, they are likely targets for protein nucleophiles. One consequence of lipid peroxyl reactions with tyrosyls may therefore be protein-protein cross-links via interprotein Michael adducts.

  11. Adenine radicals generated in alternating AT duplexes by direct absorption of low-energy UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyasz, Akos; Ketola, Tiia; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Improta, Roberto; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2018-04-17

    There is increasing evidence that the direct absorption of photons with energies that are lower than the ionization potential of nucleobases may result in oxidative damage to DNA. The present work, which combines nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations, studies this process in alternating adenine-thymine duplexes (AT)n. We show that the one-photon ionization quantum yield of (AT)10 at 266 nm (4.66 eV) is (1.5 ± 0.3) × 10-3. According to our PCM/TD-DFT calculations carried out on model duplexes composed of two base pairs, (AT)1 and (TA)1, simultaneous base pairing and stacking does not induce important changes in the absorption spectra of the adenine radical cation and deprotonated radical. The adenine radicals, thus identified in the time-resolved spectra, disappear with a lifetime of 2.5 ms, giving rise to a reaction product that absorbs at 350 nm. In parallel, the fingerprint of reaction intermediates other than radicals, formed directly from singlet excited states and assigned to AT/TA dimers, is detected at shorter wavelengths. PCM/TD-DFT calculations are carried out to map the pathways leading to such species and to characterize their absorption spectra; we find that, in addition to the path leading to the well-known TA* photoproduct, an AT photo-dimerization path may be operative in duplexes.

  12. Measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmacher, Marc

    2013-06-15

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The data is reconstructed with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and the full data sample of 2010 is used. Three types of jet flavours, bottom, charm and light, are distinguished and thus six possible flavour combinations are identified in the dijet events. Kinematic variables, based on the properties of displaced decay vertices and optimised for jet flavour identification, are employed in an event-based likelihood fit. Multidimensional templates derived from Monte Carlo are used to measure the fractions of the six dijet flavour states as functions of the leading jet transverse momentum in the range 40 GeV to 500 GeV and jet rapidity vertical stroke y vertical stroke <2.1. The fit results agree with the predictions of leading- and next-to-leading-order calculations, with the exception of the dijet fraction composed of a bottom and a light flavour jet, which is underestimated by all models at large transverse jet momenta. In addition, the difference between bottom jet production rates in leading and subleading jets is measured and found to be consistent with the next-to-leadingorder predictions. The ability to identify jets containing two b-hadrons is demonstrated and used to identify a deficiency in the predictions of leading order Monte Carlo for the contribution of these jets to dijet production.

  13. The mitochondrial free radical theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barja, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial free radical theory of aging is reviewed. Only two parameters currently correlate with species longevity in the right sense: the mitochondrial rate of reactive oxygen species (mitROS) production and the degree of fatty acid unsaturation of tissue membranes. Both are low in long-lived animals. In addition, the best-known manipulation that extends longevity, dietary restriction, also decreases the rate of mitROS production and oxidative damage to mtDNA. The same occurs during protein restriction as well as during methionine restriction. These two manipulations also increase maximum longevity in rodents. The decrease in mitROS generation and oxidative stress that takes place in caloric restriction seems to be due to restriction of a single dietary substance: methionine. The information available supports a mitochondrial free radical theory of aging focused on low generation of endogenous damage and low sensitivity of membranes to oxidation in long-lived animals. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V→T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V→T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH 3 production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam

  15. {phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-06-01

    We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

  16. Intramolecular transformation of thiyl radicals to α-aminoalkyl radicals: 'ab initio' calculations on homocystein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhun, S.; Berges, J.; Bleton, V.; Abedinzadeh, Z.

    2000-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of thiols by oxidizing radicals leads to the formation of thiyl radical and carbon-centered radicals. It has been shown experimentally that in the absence of oxygen, the thiyl radicals derived from certain thiols of biological interest such as glutathion, cysteine and homocysteine decay rapidly by intramolecular rearrangement reactions into the carbon-centered radical. In the present work we have investigated theoretically the structure and the stability of thiyl and carbon-centered radicals of homocysteine in order to check the possibility of this rearrangement. (author)

  17. Degradation of acetic acid with sulfate radical generated by persulfate ions photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2009-09-01

    The photolysis of S(2)O(8)(2-) was studied for the removal of acetic acid in aqueous solution and compared with the H(2)O(2)/UV system. The SO(4)(-) radicals generated from the UV irradiation of S(2)O(8)(2-) ions yield a greater mineralization of acetic acid than the ()OH radicals. Acetic acid is oxidized by SO(4)(-) radicals without significant formation of intermediate by-products. Increasing system pH results in the formation of ()OH radicals from SO(4)(-) radicals. Maximum acetic acid degradation occurred at pH 5. The results suggest that above this pH, competitive reactions with the carbon mineralized inhibit the reaction of the solute with SO(4)(-) and also ()OH radicals. Scavenging effects of two naturally occurring ions were tested; in contrast to HCO(3)(-) ions, the presence of Cl(-) ions enhances the efficiency of the S(2)O(8)(2-)/UV process towards the acetate removal. It is attributed to the formation of the Cl() radical and its great reactivity towards acetate.

  18. Pyrones to pyrans: enantioselective radical additions to acyloxy pyrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Zimmerman, Jake

    2006-10-18

    This paper describes a highly site-, diastereo-, and enantioselective intermolecular radical addition/hydrogen atom transfer to hydroxypyrone pyromeconic and kojic acids. The methodology can be extended to the formation of chiral quaternary centers. The products obtained are densely functionalized pyran moieties. The products contain structural features amenable for the introduction of additional substituents.

  19. Carp head kidney leukocytes display different patterns of oxygen radical production after stimulation with PAMPs and DAMPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez, Natalia Ivonne Vera; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2013-01-01

    . Consistent with a pathogen eradication strategy, ROS responses to PAMP stimulation (β-glucan) was fast, vigorous and highly dominated by production of superoxide anion. In contrast, stimulation with DAMPs led to a slow, subtle but long-lasting production of oxygen radicals dominated by hydrogen peroxide....... Using an in vitro model of scratch-wounded CCB fibroblast cell cultures and a novel PhotoID proliferation assay, stimulation with low and continuous levels of hydrogen peroxide (5μM) led to a slight increase in the percentage of wound recovery and thus promoted wound closure. In contrast, high doses...... and thereby potential tissue damage. Direct in vitro stimulation with β-glucans did not impact fibroblast scratch-wound recovery, which further suggests that interaction with tissue-resident leukocytes or other components of the fish immune system are required to induce fibroblast proliferation and thus...

  20. Psychopathology according to behaviorism: a radical restatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Alvarez, Marino

    2004-11-01

    This article is a radical restatement of the predominant psychopathology, which is characterized by nosological systems and by its approach towards a neurobiological conception of the so-called mental disorders. The "radical" sense of this restatement is that of radical behaviorism itself. As readers will recall, "radical" applied to behaviorism means total (not ignoring anything that interests psychology), pragmatic (referring to the practical sense of knowledge), and it also derives from the Latin word for "root" (and thus implies change beginning at a system's roots or getting to the root of things, in this case, of psychological disorders). Based on this, I introduce the Aristotelian distinction of material and form, which, besides being behaviorist avant la lettre, is used here as a critical instrument to unmask the hoax of psychopathology as it is presented. The implications of this restatement are discussed, some of them already prepared for clinical practice.

  1. Airborne measurement of peroxy radicals in the lower troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés Hernández, Maria Dolores; Horstjann, Markus; Kartal, Deniz; Krebsbach, Marc; Linke, Christian; Lichtenstern, Michael; Andrey, Javier; Burrows, John P.

    2013-04-01

    The importance of peroxy radicals in the tropospheric chemistry is well recognized in the scientific literature. Hydroxy- and organic peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2, R being an organic chain) are key intermediates in the OH radical initiated oxidation of CO and SO2, of volatile organic compounds (VOC), in the ozonolysis of alkenes and photo-oxidation of carbonyl species. Peroxy radicals are responsible for the ozone production in the troposphere, the formation of peroxides and other oxidants. Although radical chemistry in the troposphere has been subject of intensive research in the past three decades, it is still very few known about the vertical distribution of peroxy radicals. Airborne observations are scarce in spite of their particular importance to improve the understanding of the tropospheric chemistry and the oxidising capacity of the atmosphere at different altitudes. In situ trace gas measurements were carried out in summer 2010 on board of the INTA (Instituto Nacional de Técnicas Aeroespaciales) C212 aircraft over Spain in the frame of the EUFAR project VERDRILLT (VERtical Distribution of Radicals In the Lower Layers of the Troposphere), and in cooperation with the DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt), the University of Wuppertal, the CEAM (Centro de Estudios Ambientales del Mediterráneo) and the UPV-EHU University in Bilbao. VERDRILLT aimed at getting a deeper understanding of the vertical distribution of peroxy radicals in the lower layers of the troposphere. Measurements were taken over urban areas and extensions of different vegetation under meteorological conditions favouring active photochemistry and convection from the ground into close atmospheric layers. Results and main findings will be presented and discussed.

  2. In vitro antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of different parts of Tabebuia pallida growing in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Islam, Md Badrul; Biswas, Mohitosh; Khurshid Alam, A H M

    2015-10-30

    In humans, many diseases are associated with the accumulation of free radicals. Antioxidants can scavenge free radicals and minimize their impact. Therefore, the search for naturally occurring antioxidants of plant origin is imperative. Here, we aimed to investigate the antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties of methanolic extracts from Tabebuia pallida (T. pallida) stem bark (TPSB), root bark (TPRB), leaves (TPL), and flowers (TPF). The antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity were determined by several standard methods using spectrophotomer. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were estimated using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and aluminum chloride colorimetric assay methods, respectively. Among the extracts, TPL showed the highest total antioxidant capacity followed by TPRB, TPF, and TPSB. Based on DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, TPL showed strong scavenging activity (91.05 ± 1.10 and 62.00 ± 0.57) with IC50 of 9.20 ± 0.28 and 46.00 ± 2.84 μg/mL, respectively when compared with standard BHT (IC50 of 7.00 ± 0.25 μg/mL) and CA (75.00 ± 0.14 μg/mL). These results suggest that TPL had the highest radical scavenging activity among the extractives that closely resembled the standard's. In lipid peroxidation inhibition assay, TPL exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity (83.18 ± 2.12 %) with IC50 of 12.00 ± 2.12 μg/mL, which closely resembled standard CA (IC50 of 10.50 ± 0.28 μg/mL). Also, the reducing capacity on ferrous ion was in the following order: TPL > TPRB > TF > TPSB. The phenolic and flavonoid contents of TPL were higher than other extractives. A positive correlation (p value free radical (DPPH(·) and (·)OH) scavenging efficiencies and lipid peroxidation inhibition activity. Methanolic extract of T. pallida leaf is a potential source of natural antioxidants and serves as an effective free radical scavenger and/or inhibitor. Hence, T. pallida might be a good plant-based pharmaceutical product for several

  3. Synthesis and Photochemistry of 1-Iodocyclohexene:Influence of Ultrasound on Ionic vs. Radical Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Blasko

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous application of UV light and ultrasonic irradiation to a reaction mixture containing 1-iodocyclohexene is reported. The irradiation of 1-iodocyclohexene in methanol was carried out with or without addition of zinc. The effect of ultrasound or mechanical stirring on this solid-liquid system was also compared. The irradiation of 1-iodocyclohexene in methanol in the presence of zinc increases the yield of the nucleophilic trapping product, compared with the yield after irradiation in the absence of zinc. The photodegradation of 1-iodocyclohexene was slightly accelerated after addition of zinc. A rapid formation of radical product was accompanied by substantial decrease of 1-iodocyclohexene after application of ultrasound and irradiation without the zinc. The ultrasound significantly affects the photobehaviour of this reaction, predominantly its radical route. The joint application of ultrasound and zinc contributes positively to the production of radical and ionic products. The sonochemical stirring is more effective than mechanical stirring.

  4. Gastric injury induced by hemorrhage, local ischemia, and oxygen radical generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Perry, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Gastric mucosal injury caused by local intra-arterial generation of oxygen-derived free radicals was compared with gastric injury caused by 30 min of hemorrhage-induced ischemia or local ischemia. The index of injury was the loss of 51 Cr-labeled red cells across the gastric mucosa. Generation of oxygen radicals in the celiac artery caused a rapid increase in mucosal blood loss during the period of radical generation, and this loss was maintained after radical production ceased. Local ischemia produced similar mucosal injury; however, this occurred after reperfusion of the stomach and not during the ischemic episode. Hemorrhage-induced ischemia produced a threefold greater mucosal blood loss than local ischemia. The results of this study indicate that (1) oxygen radicals generated enzymatically in the blood supply to the stomach cause mucosal bleeding of similar magnitude to that observed after local ischemia and (2) that gastric ischemia induced by systemic hypotension produces more severe gastric injury than the same level of local hypotension

  5. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone. Reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Kuniki; Katsumura, Yosuke; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–1000 μmol dm -3 ) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. (author)

  6. Mechanism of pyrogallol red oxidation induced by free radicals and reactive oxidant species. A kinetic and spectroelectrochemistry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atala, E; Velásquez, G; Vergara, C; Mardones, C; Reyes, J; Tapia, R A; Quina, F; Mendes, M A; Speisky, H; Lissi, E; Ureta-Zañartu, M S; Aspée, A; López-Alarcón, C

    2013-05-02

    Pyrogallol red (PGR) presents high reactivity toward reactive (radical and nonradical) species (RS). This property of PGR, together with its characteristic spectroscopic absorption in the visible region, has allowed developing methodologies aimed at evaluating the antioxidant capacity of foods, beverages, and human fluids. These methods are based on the evaluation of the consumption of PGR induced by RS and its inhibition by antioxidants. However, at present, there are no reports regarding the degradation mechanism of PGR, limiting the extrapolation to how antioxidants behave in different systems comprising different RS. In the present study, we evaluate the kinetics of PGR consumption promoted by different RS (peroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitrogen dioxide, and hypochlorite) using spectroscopic techniques and detection of product by HPLC mass spectrometry. The same pattern of oxidation and spectroscopic properties of the products is observed, independently of the RS employed. Mass analysis indicates the formation of only one product identified as a quinone derivative, excluding the formation of peroxides or hydroperoxides and/or chlorinated compounds, in agreement with FOX's assays and oxygen consumption experiments. Cyclic voltammetry, carried out at different pH's, shows an irreversible oxidation of PGR, indicating the initial formation of a phenoxy radical and a second charge transfer reaction generating an ortho-quinone derivative. Spectroelectrochemical oxidation of PGR shows oxidation products with identical UV-visible absorption properties to those observed in RS-induced oxidation.

  7. The prescriptive quality of 11 design principles for knowledge productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonschot, S.G.M.; Kessels, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the learning processes that contribute to knowledge productivity: gradual improvement and radical innovation of an organisation’s operating procedures, products, and services, based on the development and application of new knowledge. The research is based on the assumption that

  8. Fingerprinting DNA oxidation processes: IR characterization of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine radical cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Dominik B; Pilles, Bert M; Pfaffeneder, Toni; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-02-24

    Methylated cytidine plays an important role as an epigenetic signal in gene regulation. Its oxidation products are assumed to be involved in active demethylation processes but also in damaging DNA. Here, we report the photochemical production of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine radical cation via a two-photon ionization process. The radical cation is detected by time-resolved IR spectroscopy and identified by band assignment using density functional theory calculations. Two final oxidation products are characterized with liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals in aqueous solutions; electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matasovic, Brunislav [Division of Physical Chemistry, ' Ruder Boskovic' Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bonifacic, Marija, E-mail: bonifacic@irb.h [Division of Physical Chemistry, ' Ruder Boskovic' Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-06-15

    Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals {sup {center_dot}C}O{sub 2}{sup -}, {sup {center_dot}C}H{sub 2}OH, {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})OH, and {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})O{sup -} have been studied in oxygen free aqueous solutions in the presence of organic additives: formate, methanol or ethanol. For radicals production {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiolysis was employed and the yield of bromide was measured by means of ion chromatography. Both radical anions have reducing potential negative enough to transfer an electron to BrU producing bromide ion and U{sup {center_dot}} radical. High yields of bromide have been measured increasing proportional to the concentration of the corresponding organic additives at a constant dose rate. This is characteristic for a chain process where regeneration of radical ions occurs by H-atom abstraction by U{sup {center_dot}} radical from formate or ethanol. Results with the neutral radicals conformed earlier proposition that the reduction reaction of {alpha}-hydroxyalkyl radicals proceeds by the proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism (). Thus, while both {sup {center_dot}C}H{sub 2}OH and {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})OH did not react with BrU in water/alcohol solutions, addition of bicarbonate and acetate in mmol dm{sup -3} concentrations, pH 7, brought about chain debromination to occur in the case of {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})OH radical as reactant. Under the same conditions phosphate buffer, a base with higher bulk proton affinity, failed to have any influence. The results are taken as additional proofs for the specific complex formation of {alpha}-hydroxyalkyl radicals with suitable bases which enhances radicals' reduction potential in comparison with only water molecules as proton acceptors. Rate constants for the H-atom abstraction from ethanol and formate by U{sup {center_dot}} radicals have been estimated to amount to about {>=}85 and 1200 dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1

  10. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions of CF, CHF, and CF2 radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, D.S.Y.; Umstead, M.E.; Lin, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    This chapter reviews briefly methods for the production of CF, CHF and CF 2 , and inmore detail, the reactions of these interesting and important radicals. Although a considerable, but not extensive, amount of work has been done on the reactions of CF 2 , little of the chemistry of CF and CHF is known. This chapter also includes the preliminary results of some experiments carried out in this Laboratory on the dynamics of some of the reactions involving these radicals. These results were largely arrived at through investigations of the degree of vibrational excitation of the HF and CO reaction products, determined by HF and CO laser emission and CO laser resonance absorption measurements. The coverage of this review is restricted to the gas phase chemistry of these radicals, and does not include their addition reactions to olefins

  11. Excimer laser corneal surgery and free oxygen radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Bilgihan, A; Akata, F; Hasanreisoğlu, B; Türközkan, N

    1996-01-01

    Corneal photoablation with 193 nm argon fluoride excimer laser is a new technique for the treatment of refractive errors and for removing corneal opacities and irregularities. Ultraviolet radiation and thermal injury induce free radical formation in the tissues. The aim of this study was to confirm the production of free radicals by excimer laser photoablation in rabbits. The thermal changes of the posterior corneal surface were recorded during excimer laser photoablation. The lipid peroxide (LPO) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of aqueous humour were measured after excimer laser keratectomy. The aqueous LPO levels were not changed after excimer laser ablation, but both the thermal increase in the cornea during the photoablation and the decreased aqueous SOD activities suggest that free radicals are formed in the cornea during excimer laser keratectomy, and that they may be responsible for some of the complications of excimer laser corneal surgery.

  12. Photodissociation dynamics and spectroscopy of free radical combustion intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, David Lewis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals is studied by the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Photodetachment of internally cold, mass-selected negative ions produces a clean source of radicals, which are subsequently dissociated and detected. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states of the radical. In addition, the photodissociation dynamics, product branching ratios, and bond energies are probed at fixed photon energies by measuring the translational energy, P(ET), and angular distribution of the recoiling fragments using a time- and position-sensitive detector. Ab initio calculations are combined with dynamical and statistical models to interpret the observed data. The photodissociation of three prototypical hydrocarbon combustion intermediates forms the core of this work.

  13. First examples of intramolecular addition of primary amidyl radicals to olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudreault, P.; Drouin, C.; Lessard, J. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. de Chimie

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the first examples of radical cyclization involving a primary amidyl radical and a pendant olefin. Amidyl radicals have attracted interest in terms of their structure, reactivity, and ways to generate them. The intramolecular addition of an amidyl radical on a pendant olefin appears to be a powerful synthetic tool for creating nitrogen-containing heterocycles. Although several examples of cyclization involving secondary amidyl radicals are cited in the the literature, there are no examples of a successful cyclization involving a primary amidyl radical. This is because all attempts to prepare the usual radical precursors have failed when applied to olefinic primary amides. This study reveals that N-(phenylthio) derivatives of olefinic primary amides can be easily prepared and that nitrogen heterocycles resulting from their radical cyclization can be obtained in good to very good yields. Four olefinic primary amides were chosen as models for radical cyclization of primary amidyl radicals. They were prepared from the corresponding carboxylic acids via the acid chlorides. Conversion of primary amides into suitable amidyl radical precursors was also examined. The study showed that N-(phenylthio) amides could be easily prepared by following a slightly modified protocol developed by Esker and Newcomb, by reacting the anion of the amide with phenylsulfenyl chloride. In particular, olefinic N-(phenylthio) amides were prepared and used as primary amidyl radical precursors in a reaction with a solution of 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) in catalytic quantities and tributyltin hydride in benzene. The resulting yields of cyclic products ranged from 63 to 85 per cent. The intent of the study was to demonstrate that it is no longer necessary to prepare an N-protected precursor and then remove the protecting group after cyclization. Further studies are currently underway. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Supercharging by m-NBA Improves ETD-Based Quantification of Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) is an MS-based technique for analyzing protein structure based on measuring the oxidation of amino acid side chains by hydroxyl radicals diffusing in solution. Spatial resolution of HRPF is limited by the smallest portion of the protein for which oxidation amounts can be accurately quantitated. Previous work has shown electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to be the most reliable method for quantifying the amount of oxidation of each amino acid side chain in a mixture of peptide oxidation isomers, but efficient ETD requires high peptide charge states, which limits its applicability for HRPF. Supercharging reagents have been used to enhance peptide charge state for ETD analysis, but previous work has shown supercharging reagents to enhance charge state differently for different peptides sequences; it is currently unknown if different oxidation isomers will experience different charge enhancement effects. Here, we report the effect of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA) on the ETD-based quantification of peptide oxidation. The addition of m-NBA to both a defined mixture of synthetic isomeric oxidized peptides and Robo-1 protein subjected to HRPF increased the abundance of higher charge state ions, improving our ability to perform efficient ETD of the mixture. No differences in the reported quantitation by ETD were noted in the presence or absence of m-NBA, indicating that all oxidation isomers were charge-enhanced to a similar extent. These results indicate the utility of m-NBA for residue-level quantification of peptide oxidation in HRPF and other applications.

  15. Homegrown religious radicalization and the quest for belonging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    this seemingly religious radicalization, from the point of view of the youngsters, by drawing on a study of young Muslims in religious communities in Copenhagen and combining it with existing blogs, twitter profiles etc. of youngsters sympathizing with Islamic radicalized movements. What are the youngsters...... framework based on a focus on belonging, self-construction and the sense of community will be proposed. The framework will be utilized in an analysis of narratives from youngsters who have chosen a radicalized path in life. The paper will shed light on how the sense of and yearning for belonging...

  16. Photolysis and oxidation of azidophenyl-substituted radicals: delocalization in heteroatom-based radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwinski, Paul R; Esat, Burak; Lahti, Paul M; Liao, Yi; Walton, Richard; Lan, Jiang

    2004-08-06

    2-(4-Azidophenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole-3-oxide-1-oxyl (14), 2-(4-azidophenyl)benzimidazole-1-oxide-3-oxyl (16), 2-(4-azidophenyl)-1,2,6-triphenylverdazyl (19), 2-(3-azidophenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole-3-oxide-1-oxyl (21), and (3-azidophenyl)-N-tert-butyl-N-aminoxyl (25) were photolyzed in frozen solution to give S = 3/2 state ESR spectra of the corresponding nitrenophenyl radicals with the following zero-field splitting parameters: |D/hc| = 0.277 cm(-1), |E/hc| ions were unsuccessful: Cu(ClO4)2 x 6H2O instead oxidized them to the corresponding diamagnetic nitrosonium perchlorate salts. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  17. Spin trapping combined with quantitative mass spectrometry defines free radical redistribution within the oxidized hemoglobin:haptoglobin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallelian, Florence; Garcia-Rubio, Ines; Puglia, Michele; Kahraman, Abdullah; Deuel, Jeremy W; Engelsberger, Wolfgang R; Mason, Ronald P; Buehler, Paul W; Schaer, Dominik J

    2015-08-01

    Extracellular or free hemoglobin (Hb) accumulates during hemolysis, tissue damage, and inflammation. Heme-triggered oxidative reactions can lead to diverse structural modifications of lipids and proteins, which contribute to the propagation of tissue damage. One important target of Hb׳s peroxidase reactivity is its own globin structure. Amino acid oxidation and crosslinking events destabilize the protein and ultimately cause accumulation of proinflammatory and cytotoxic Hb degradation products. The Hb scavenger haptoglobin (Hp) attenuates oxidation-induced Hb degradation. In this study we show that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), Hb and the Hb:Hp complex share comparable peroxidative reactivity and free radical generation. While oxidation of both free Hb and Hb:Hp complex generates a common tyrosine-based free radical, the spin-trapping reaction with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) yields dissimilar paramagnetic products in Hb and Hb:Hp, suggesting that radicals are differently redistributed within the complex before reacting with the spin trap. With LC-MS(2) mass spectrometry we assigned multiple known and novel DMPO adduct sites. Quantification of these adducts suggested that the Hb:Hp complex formation causes extensive delocalization of accessible free radicals with drastic reduction of the major tryptophan and cysteine modifications in the β-globin chain of the Hb:Hp complex, including decreased βCys93 DMPO adduction. In contrast, the quantitative changes in DMPO adduct formation on Hb:Hp complex formation were less pronounced in the Hb α-globin chain. In contrast to earlier speculations, we found no evidence that free Hb radicals are delocalized to the Hp chain of the complex. The observation that Hb:Hp complex formation alters free radical distribution in Hb may help to better understand the structural basis for Hp as an antioxidant protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lanthanide Lewis acid-mediated enantioselective conjugate radical additions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Manyem, Shankar

    2002-08-22

    [reaction: see text] Lanthanide triflates along with proline-derived ligands have been found to be efficient catalysts for enantioselective conjugate addition of nucleophilic radicals to enoates. N-Acyl oxazolidinones, when used as achiral additives, gave meaningful enhancements in the ees for the product.

  19. ESR studies of radiation induced radical products from linoleic acid and linolenic acid and the radioprotective effect by α-tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Younan; Tu Tiecheng; Dong Jirong; Zhang Jiashan; Li Nianyun

    1993-01-01

    Primary radicals from the γ-radiolysis of air-saturated linoleic acid and linolenic acid at 77 K, and the subsequent secondary radicals appeared during the course of variable temperature elevation were investigated by ESR. The ESR spectrum from samples irradiated and observed at 77 K shows the presence of the radical anion doublet arise from the electron adducts of the carboxy groups and the poorly resolved broad singlet results from some carbon-centered radicals. Annealing to approximately 125 K which allows for molecular oxygen migration results in the formation of peroxyl radicals. At 247 K, the ESR spectrum is a multi-line pattern which is attributable to structure of the α-carbon radical superimposed on the pentadienyl radicals. The ESR spectra from linoleic acid-α-tocopherol and linolenic acid-α-tocopherol binary systems irradiated at 77 K and recorded at 140 K or 215 K revealed the characteristic similarity to that from α-tocopherol alone, no trace of ESR signal from either peroxyl or the composite pattern from superposition of pentadienyl radical and α-carbon radicals can be found out. Therefore α-tocopherol has exerted radioprotection effect on peroxidation of linoleic acid and linolenic acid

  20. Development of a new free radical absorption capacity assay method for antioxidants: aroxyl radical absorption capacity (ARAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Nagai, Kanae; Fujii, Yuko; Ouchi, Aya; Mukai, Kazuo

    2013-10-23

    A new free radical absorption capacity assay method is proposed with use of an aroxyl radical (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(4'-methoxyphenyl)phenoxyl radical) and stopped-flow spectroscopy and is named the aroxyl radical absorption capacity (ARAC) assay method. The free radical absorption capacity (ARAC value) of each tocopherol was determined through measurement of the radical-scavenging rate constant in ethanol. The ARAC value could also be evaluated through measurement of the half-life of the aroxyl radical during the scavenging reaction. For the estimation of the free radical absorption capacity, the aroxyl radical was more suitable than the DPPH radical, galvinoxyl, and p-nitrophenyl nitronyl nitroxide. The ARAC value in tocopherols showed the same tendency as the free radical absorption capacities reported previously, and the tendency was independent of an oxygen radical participating in the scavenging reaction and of a medium surrounding the tocopherol and oxygen radical. The ARAC value can be directly connected to the free radical-scavenging rate constant, and the ARAC method has the advantage of treating a stable and isolable radical (aroxyl radical) in a user-friendly organic solvent (ethanol). The ARAC method was also successfully applied to a palm oil extract. Accordingly, the ARAC method would be useful in free radical absorption capacity assay of antioxidative reagents and foods.

  1. Protective effect of aqueous extract from Spirulina platensis against cell death induced by free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wan-Loy; Lim, Yen-Wei; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty; Lim, Phaik-Eem

    2010-09-21

    Spirulina is a commercial alga well known to contain various antioxidants, especially phycocyanin. Apart from being sold as a nutraceutical, Spirulina is incorporated as a functional ingredient in food products and beverages. Most of the previous reports on antioxidant activity of Spirulina were based on chemical rather than cell-based assays. The primary objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant activity of aqueous extract from Spirulina based on its protective effect against cell death induced by free radicals. The antioxidant activity of the cold water extract from food-grade Spirulina platensis was assessed using both chemical and cell-based assays. In the cell-based assay, mouse fibroblast cells (3T3) cells were incubated for 1 h in medium containing aqueous extract of Spirulina or vitamin C (positive control) at 25, 125 and 250 μg/mL before the addition of 50 μM 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) or 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS). The cells were incubated for another 24 h before being assessed for cell death due to apoptosis using the Cell Death Detection ELISA Kit. Spectrophotometric assays based on DPPH and ABTS were also used to assess the antioxidant activity of the extract compared to vitamin C and vitamin E (positive controls). Spirulina extract did not cause cytotoxic effect on 3T3 cells within the range of concentrations tested (0 - 250 μg/mL). The extract reduced significantly (p assay, the radical scavenging activity of the extract was higher than phycocyanin and was at least 50% of vitamin C and vitamin E. Based on the ABTS assay, the antioxidant activity of the extract at 50 μmug/mL was as good as vitamin C and vitamin E. The results showed that aqueous extract of Spirulina has a protective effect against apoptotic cell death due to free radicals. The potential application of incorporating Spirulina into food products and beverages to enhance their antioxidant capacity is worth exploring.

  2. MISCONCEPTIONS AND NON-SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS ON FREE RADICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiris Sindeaux de Alencar Pires de Oliveira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Misconceptions or alternative conceptions are defined as conceptions that are somewhat different from the scientifically accepted ones and are known to be highly resistant to changes. Free radicals are a widely publicized subject in the media due to their putative importance in human aging and health. Free radicals are a subject susceptible to misconceptions widely spread by the media supporting prejudicial advertising inducing antioxidant consumption. OBJECTIVES: Identify and categorized different free radicals misconceptions published in printed media. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Revista Veja (Digital Archive, the weekly magazine with the largest circulation in Brazil, was selected for this investigation. Period analyzed: from 01/01/2000 to 31/07/2014 with search terms Free radicals and antioxidants. Passages selected were classified as: Right Concept (RC, Wrong Concept (WC, Misconception (MC, Inadequate generalization (IG, Inductive [to misconceptions] Concept (IC, Inductive [to misconceptions] Information (II, and Not fit the inclusion criteria (NFIC. Each one of these categories were further subdivided. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: 79 magazine articles, advertisements and information materials were found which led to 293 text passages. 56.3% were MC, 21.4% II, 8.8% IC, 5.4% IG, 3.4% RC, 2.7% WR, 2.0% NFIC. The most frequently subcategory in each category was: MC: x [something] combats free radicals (22.6%; II: x [substance] is antioxidant (54.0%; IC: x [something] increases free radicals production (34.6%; IG: antioxidant x [substance] combats cancer (56.3%; RC: too much vitamins and minerals is harmful to health (30.0%; WR: free radicals are formed during oxygen conversion to energy process (25.0%. CONCLUSION: Magazine analysis reveal non-scientific concepts (MC, II, IC and IG to be highly frequent, notably misconceptions. Moreover, non-scientific concepts together reach 91.8% of all concepts while right concepts respond for only 2

  3. DNA damage and radical reactions: Mechanistic aspects, formation in cells and repair studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadet, J.; Ravanat, J.L.; Carell, T.; Cellai, L.; Chatgilialoglu, Ch.; Gimisis, Th.; Miranda, M.; O'Neill, P.; Robert, M.

    2008-01-01

    Several examples of oxidative and reductive reactions of DNA components that lead to single and tandem modifications are discussed in this review. These include nucleophilic addition reactions of the one-electron oxidation-mediated guanine radical cation and the one-electron reduced intermediate of 8-bromo-purine 2'-de-oxy-ribo-nucleosides that give rise to either an oxidizing guanine radical or related 5',8-cyclo-purine nucleosides. In addition, mechanistic insights into the reductive pathways involved in the photolyase induced reversal of cyclo-buta-cli-pyrimidine and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts are provided. Evidence for the occurrence and validation in cellular DNA of (OH) · radical degradation pathways of guanine that have been established in model systems has been gained from the accurate measurement of degradation products. Relevant information on biochemical aspects of the repair of single and clustered oxidatively generated damage to DNA has been gained from detailed investigations that rely on the synthesis of suitable modified probes. Thus the preparation of stable carbocyclic derivatives of purine nucleoside containing defined sequence oligonucleotides has allowed detailed crystallographic studies of the recognition step of the base damage by enzymes implicated in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Detailed insights are provided on the BER processing of non-double strand break bi-stranded clustered damage that may consist of base lesions, a single strand break or abasic sites and represent one of the main deleterious classes of radiation-induced DNA damage. (authors)

  4. Free radical scavenging injectable hydrogels for regenerative therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komeri, Remya [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Polymer Science Division, BMT Wing, Thiruvananthapuram 695 012, Kerala State (India); Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam [Dept. of Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha NE68178 (United States); Muthu, Jayabalan, E-mail: mjayabalan52@gmail.com [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Polymer Science Division, BMT Wing, Thiruvananthapuram 695 012, Kerala State (India)

    2017-02-01

    Pathological free radicals generated from inflamed and infarcted cardiac tissues interferes natural tissue repair mechanisms. Hypoxic microenvironment at the injured zone of non-regenerating cardiac tissues hinders the therapeutic attempts including cell therapy. Here we report an injectable, cytocompatible, free radical scavenging synthetic hydrogel formulation for regenerative therapy. New hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared with D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer (PEAX) and PEGDiacrylate. PEAX-P hydrogel swells 4.9 times the initial weight and retains 100.07 kPa Young modulus at equilibrium swelling, which is suitable for cardiac applications. PEAX-P hydrogel retains elastic nature even at 60% compressive strain, which is favorable to fit with the dynamic and elastic natural tissue counterparts. PEAX-P hydrogel scavenges 51% DPPH radical, 40% hydroxyl radicals 41% nitrate radicals with 31% reducing power. The presence of hydrogel protects 62% cardiomyoblast cells treated with stress inducing media at LD 50 concentration. The free hydroxyl groups in sugar alcohols of the comacromer influence the free radical scavenging. Comparatively, PEAX-P hydrogel based on xylitol evinces slightly lower scavenging characteristics than with previously reported PEAM-P hydrogel containing mannitol having more hydroxyl groups. The possible free radical scavenging mechanism of the present hydrogel relies on the free π electrons associated with uncrosslinked fumarate bonds, hydrogen atoms associated with sugar alcohols/PEG and radical dilution by free water in the matrix. Briefly, the present PEAX-P hydrogel is a potential injectable system for combined antioxidant and regenerative therapy. - Graphical abstract: Injectable hydrogel with inherent free radical scavenging property for regenerative tissue engineering application. - Highlights: • Novel injectable hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared using D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer

  5. Free radical scavenging injectable hydrogels for regenerative therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komeri, Remya; Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2017-01-01

    Pathological free radicals generated from inflamed and infarcted cardiac tissues interferes natural tissue repair mechanisms. Hypoxic microenvironment at the injured zone of non-regenerating cardiac tissues hinders the therapeutic attempts including cell therapy. Here we report an injectable, cytocompatible, free radical scavenging synthetic hydrogel formulation for regenerative therapy. New hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared with D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer (PEAX) and PEGDiacrylate. PEAX-P hydrogel swells 4.9 times the initial weight and retains 100.07 kPa Young modulus at equilibrium swelling, which is suitable for cardiac applications. PEAX-P hydrogel retains elastic nature even at 60% compressive strain, which is favorable to fit with the dynamic and elastic natural tissue counterparts. PEAX-P hydrogel scavenges 51% DPPH radical, 40% hydroxyl radicals 41% nitrate radicals with 31% reducing power. The presence of hydrogel protects 62% cardiomyoblast cells treated with stress inducing media at LD 50 concentration. The free hydroxyl groups in sugar alcohols of the comacromer influence the free radical scavenging. Comparatively, PEAX-P hydrogel based on xylitol evinces slightly lower scavenging characteristics than with previously reported PEAM-P hydrogel containing mannitol having more hydroxyl groups. The possible free radical scavenging mechanism of the present hydrogel relies on the free π electrons associated with uncrosslinked fumarate bonds, hydrogen atoms associated with sugar alcohols/PEG and radical dilution by free water in the matrix. Briefly, the present PEAX-P hydrogel is a potential injectable system for combined antioxidant and regenerative therapy. - Graphical abstract: Injectable hydrogel with inherent free radical scavenging property for regenerative tissue engineering application. - Highlights: • Novel injectable hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared using D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer

  6. EPR detection of free radicals in UV-irradiated skin: mouse versus human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, B.A.; Buettner, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation produces free radicals in Skh-1 mouse skin, contributing to photoaging and carcinogenesis. If a mouse model is a general indicator of free radical processes in human skin photobiology, then radical production observed in mouse and human skin should be directly comparative. In this work we show that UV radiation (λ > 300 nm, 14 μW/cm 2 UVB; 3.5 mW/cm 2 UVA) increases the ascorbate free radical (Asc) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal in both Skh-1 mouse skin (45%) and human facial skin biopsies (340%). Visible light (λ > 400 nm; 0.23 mW/cm 2 UVA) also increased the Ascsignal in human skin samples (45%) but did not increase baseline mouse Asc, indicating that human skin is more susceptible to free radical formation and that a chromophore for visible light may be present. Using EPR spin-trapping techniques, UV radiation produced spin adducts consistent with trapping lipid alkyl radicals in mouse skin (α-[4-pyridyl 1-oxide]-N-tert-butyl nitrone/alkyl radical adduct; a N = 15.56 G and a H 2.70 G) and lipid alkoxyl radicals in human skin (5,5-dimethylpyrroline -1-oxide/alkoxyl radical adduct; a N = 14.54 G and a H = 16.0 G). Topical application of the iron chelator Desferal to human skin significantly decreases these radicals (∼50%), indicating a role for iron in lipid peroxidation. (Author)

  7. DFT and time-resolved IR investigation of electron transfer between photogenerated 17- and 19-electron organometallic radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James B.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Andersen, Lars K.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-04-30

    The photochemical disproportionation mechanism of [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in the presence of Lewis bases PR{sub 3} was investigated on the nano- and microsecond time-scales with Step-Scan FTIR time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. 532 nm laser excitation was used to homolytically cleave the W-W bond, forming the 17-electron radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and initiating the reaction. With the Lewis base PPh{sub 3}, disproportionation to form the ionic products CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup +} and CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup -} was directly monitored on the microsecond time-scale. Detailed examination of the kinetics and concentration dependence of this reaction indicates that disproportionation proceeds by electron transfer from the 19-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3} to the 17-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}. This result is contrary to the currently accepted disproportionation mechanism which predicts electron transfer from the 19-electron species to the dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2}. With the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3} on the other hand, ligand substitution to form the product [CpW(CO){sub 2}P(OMe){sub 3}]{sub 2} is the primary reaction on the microsecond time-scale. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations support the experimental results and suggest that the differences in the reactivity between P(OMe){sub 3} and PPh{sub 3} are due to steric effects. The results indicate that radical-to-radical electron transfer is a previously unknown but important process for the formation of ionic products with the organometallic dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and may also be applicable to the entire class of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond.

  8. Radicals in DNA as seen by ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, M.C.R.

    1997-01-01

    This is a review of ESR studies, mainly of DNA systems, after exposure to ionising radiation at low temperatures. Under this conditions 'direct' damage is of major significance, and ESR evidence for the concept of the initial formation of electron-gain and electron-loss centers localised within DNA bases, and deeply trapped by proton-gain and loss, will be discussed. It is stressed that 'negative' evidence, showing that various phosphate and sugar centred radicals are not detected, is of major importance since the ESR 'fingerprints' of base-radicals are relatively ill defined. (author)

  9. A pulse radiolysis study of the OH radical induced autoxidation of methanesulfinic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.

    1996-01-01

    Methanesulfinic acid, CH3SO2H, reacts with OH radicals at pH 7 forming CH3SO2 radicals with a rate constant k = (6.0 +/- 1.0) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The CH3SO2 radical absorbs at 325 nm with an extinction coefficient of 900 +/- 100 M(-1) cm(-1) and disappears in a second order self-reaction with k...... takes place. During the course of the chain oxidation a peroxyacid, presumably methaneperoxymonosulfonic acid, is formed and accumulated. This acid absorbs in the UV and eventually decays by reaction with excess methanesulfinic acid k = 5 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1). The final product of the chain autoxidation...... = (1.0 +/- 0.2) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). This radical reacts with oxygen, k = (1.2 +/- 0.3) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), forming a peroxy radical which absorbs in the UV below 300 nm. The peroxy radical reacts in turn with methanesulfinic acid reforming the CH3SO2 radical whereby a chain oxidation of sulfinic acid...

  10. Vinylcyclopropylacyl and polyeneacyl radicals. Intramolecular ketene alkyl radical additions in ring synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Benoit; Herbert, Nicola M A; Harrington-Frost, Nicole M; Pattenden, Gerald

    2005-01-21

    Treatment of a variety of substituted vinylcyclopropyl selenyl esters, e.g. 11, with Bu(3)SnH-AIBN in refluxing benzene leads to the corresponding acyl radical intermediates, which undergo rearrangement and intramolecular cyclisations via their ketene alkyl radical equivalents producing cyclohexenones in 50-60% yield. By contrast, treatment of conjugated triene selenyl esters, e.g. 32, with Bu(3)SnH-AIBN produces substituted 2-cyclopentenones via intramolecular cyclisations of their ketene alkyl radical intermediates. Under the same radical-initiating conditions the selenyl esters derived from o-vinylbenzoic acid and o-vinylcinnamic acid undergo intramolecular cyclisations producing 1-indanone and 5,6-dihydrobenzocyclohepten-7-one respectively in 60-70% yields. A tandem radical cyclisation from the alpha,beta,gamma,delta-diene selenyl ester 31 provides an expeditious synthesis of the diquinane 35 in 69% yield.

  11. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Benjamin B; Savee, John D; Trevitt, Adam J; Osborn, David L; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-08-28

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e.˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (-H = 27%, -CH3 = 73%) and (-H = 14%, -CH3 = 86%), respectively. Together, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.

  12. Activation of semantic information at the sublexical level during handwriting production: Evidence from inhibition effects of Chinese semantic radicals in the picture-word interference paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuqian; Liao, Yuanlan; Chen, Xianzhe

    2017-08-01

    Using a non-alphabetic language (e.g., Chinese), the present study tested a novel view that semantic information at the sublexical level should be activated during handwriting production. Over 80% of Chinese characters are phonograms, in which semantic radicals represent category information (e.g., 'chair,' 'peach,' 'orange' are related to plants) while phonetic radicals represent phonetic information (e.g., 'wolf,' 'brightness,' 'male,' are all pronounced /lang/). Under different semantic category conditions at the lexical level (semantically related in Experiment 1; semantically unrelated in Experiment 2), the orthographic relatedness and semantic relatedness of semantic radicals in the picture name and its distractor were manipulated under different SOAs (i.e., stimulus onset asynchrony, the interval between the onset of the picture and the onset of the interference word). Two questions were addressed: (1) Is it possible that semantic information could be activated in the sublexical level conditions? (2) How are semantic and orthographic information dynamically accessed in word production? Results showed that both orthographic and semantic information were activated under the present picture-word interference paradigm, dynamically under different SOAs, which supported our view that discussions on semantic processes in the writing modality should be extended to the sublexical level. The current findings provide possibility for building new orthography-phonology-semantics models in writing. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. EPR detection of hydroxyl radical generation and its interaction with antioxidant system in Carassius auratus exposed to pentachlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yi [Key Laboratory of Pollution Processes and Environmental Criteria (Nankai University), Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang Xiaorong, E-mail: yiyluo@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ji Liangliang; Su Yan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-11-15

    In the present study, direct evidence of hydroxyl radical production in livers of Carassius auratus exposed to pentachlorophenol (PCP) was provided using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with spin-trapping. A dose-effect relationship was obtained between hydroxyl radical intensities and PCP exposure. It was observed that hydroxyl radical was significantly induced by 0.001 mg l{sup -1} (below the criteria for Chinese fishery water quality) of PCP exposure. A strong positive correlation (r = 0.9581, p < 0.001) was observed between PCP liver concentrations and hydroxyl radical intensities within 7 d of PCP exposure, which suggests that hydroxyl radical are mainly produced from PCP itself. However, no correlation was observed between PCP liver concentrations and hydroxyl radical intensities after 7 d, and a higher intensity of hydroxyl radical could still be observed when the PCP liver concentrations decreased to a lower level, which suggests that other mechanisms may possibly contribute to hydroxyl radical production after 7 d. The glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio decreased below that of the control level during the entire period of PCP exposure (0.05 mg l{sup -1}), which suggested oxidative stress occurred.

  14. Advanced technologies of production of cemented carbides and composite materials based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.; Pavlotskaya, E.; Martynova, L.; Epik, I.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents new technological processes of production of W, WC and (Ti, W)C powders, cemented carbides having a controlled carbon content, high-strength nonmagnetic nickel-bonded cemented carbides, cemented carbide-based composites having a wear-resistant antifriction working layer as well as processes of regeneration of cemented carbide waste. It is shown that these technological processes permit radical changes in the production of carbide powders and products of VK, TK, VN and KKhN cemented carbides. The processes of cemented carbide production become ecologically acceptable and free of carbon black, the use of cumbersome mixers is excluded, the power expenditure is reduced and the efficiency of labor increases. It becomes possible to control precisely the carbon content within a two-phase region -carbide-metal. A high wear resistance of parts of friction couples which are lubricated with water, benzine, kerosene, diesel fuel and other low-viscosity liquids, is ensured with increased strength and shock resistance. (author)

  15. Verification of Radicals Formation in Ethanol-Water Mixture Based Solution Plasma and Their Relation to the Rate of Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudare, Tomohito; Ueno, Tomonaga; Watthanaphanit, Anyarat; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-12-03

    Our previous research demonstrated that using ethanol-water mixture as a liquid medium for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles by the solution plasma process (SPP) could lead to an increment of the reaction rate of ∼35.2 times faster than that in pure water. This drastic change was observed when a small amount of ethanol, that is, at an ethanol mole fraction (χethanol) of 0.089, was added in the system. After this composition, the reaction rate decreased continuously. To better understand what happens in the ethanol-water mixture-based SPP, in this study, effect of the ethanol content on the radical formation in the system was verified. We focused on detecting the magnetic resonance of electronic spins using electron spin resonance spectroscopy to determine the type and quantity of the generated radicals at each χethanol. Results indicated that ethanol radicals were generated in the ethanol-water mixtures and exhibited maximum quantity at the xethanol of 0.089. Relationship between the ethanol radical yield and the rate of reaction, along with possible mechanism responsible for the observed phenomenon, is discussed in this paper.

  16. Free radical scavenging injectable hydrogels for regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeri, Remya; Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2017-02-01

    Pathological free radicals generated from inflamed and infarcted cardiac tissues interferes natural tissue repair mechanisms. Hypoxic microenvironment at the injured zone of non-regenerating cardiac tissues hinders the therapeutic attempts including cell therapy. Here we report an injectable, cytocompatible, free radical scavenging synthetic hydrogel formulation for regenerative therapy. New hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared with D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer (PEAX) and PEGDiacrylate. PEAX-P hydrogel swells 4.9 times the initial weight and retains 100.07kPa Young modulus at equilibrium swelling, which is suitable for cardiac applications. PEAX-P hydrogel retains elastic nature even at 60% compressive strain, which is favorable to fit with the dynamic and elastic natural tissue counterparts. PEAX-P hydrogel scavenges 51% DPPH radical, 40% hydroxyl radicals 41% nitrate radicals with 31% reducing power. The presence of hydrogel protects 62% cardiomyoblast cells treated with stress inducing media at LD 50 concentration. The free hydroxyl groups in sugar alcohols of the comacromer influence the free radical scavenging. Comparatively, PEAX-P hydrogel based on xylitol evinces slightly lower scavenging characteristics than with previously reported PEAM-P hydrogel containing mannitol having more hydroxyl groups. The possible free radical scavenging mechanism of the present hydrogel relies on the free π electrons associated with uncrosslinked fumarate bonds, hydrogen atoms associated with sugar alcohols/PEG and radical dilution by free water in the matrix. Briefly, the present PEAX-P hydrogel is a potential injectable system for combined antioxidant and regenerative therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring the dynamics of hydrogen atom release from the radical-radical reaction of O(3P) with C3H5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Sun-Kyu; Kwon, Lee-Kyoung; Lee, Hohjai; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2004-01-01

    The gas-phase radical-radical reaction dynamics of O( 3 P)+C 3 H 5 →H( 2 S)+C 3 H 4 O was studied at an average collision energy of 6.4 kcal/mol in a crossed beam configuration. The ground-state atomic oxygen [O( 3 P)] and allyl radicals (C 3 H 5 ) were generated by the photolysis of NO 2 and the supersonic flash pyrolysis of allyl iodide, respectively. Nascent hydrogen atom products were probed by the vacuum-ultraviolet-laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the Lyman-α region centered at 121.6 nm. With the aid of the CBS-QB3 level of ab initio theory, it has been found that the barrierless addition of O( 3 P) to C 3 H 5 forms the energy-rich addition complexes on the lowest doublet potential energy surface, which are predicted to undergo a subsequent direct decomposition step leading to the reaction products H+C 3 H 4 O. The major counterpart C 3 H 4 O of the probed hydrogen atom is calculated to be acrolein after taking into account the factors of barrier height, reaction enthalpy, and the number of intermediates involved along the reaction pathway. The nascent H-atom Doppler profile analysis shows that the average center-of-mass translational energy of the H+C 3 H 4 O products and the fraction of the total available energy released as the translational energy were determined to be 3.83 kcal/mol and 0.054, respectively. On the basis of comparison with statistical calculations, the reaction proceeds through the formation of short-lived addition complexes rather than statistical, long-lived intermediates, and the polyatomic acrolein product is significantly internally excited at the moment of the decomposition

  18. Exploring the dynamics of hydrogen atom release from the radical-radical reaction of O(3P) with C3H5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sun-Kyu; Kwon, Lee-Kyoung; Lee, Hohjai; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2004-05-01

    The gas-phase radical-radical reaction dynamics of O(3P)+C3H5→H(2S)+C3H4O was studied at an average collision energy of 6.4 kcal/mol in a crossed beam configuration. The ground-state atomic oxygen [O(3P)] and allyl radicals (C3H5) were generated by the photolysis of NO2 and the supersonic flash pyrolysis of allyl iodide, respectively. Nascent hydrogen atom products were probed by the vacuum-ultraviolet-laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the Lyman-α region centered at 121.6 nm. With the aid of the CBS-QB3 level of ab initio theory, it has been found that the barrierless addition of O(3P) to C3H5 forms the energy-rich addition complexes on the lowest doublet potential energy surface, which are predicted to undergo a subsequent direct decomposition step leading to the reaction products H+C3H4O. The major counterpart C3H4O of the probed hydrogen atom is calculated to be acrolein after taking into account the factors of barrier height, reaction enthalpy, and the number of intermediates involved along the reaction pathway. The nascent H-atom Doppler profile analysis shows that the average center-of-mass translational energy of the H+C3H4O products and the fraction of the total available energy released as the translational energy were determined to be 3.83 kcal/mol and 0.054, respectively. On the basis of comparison with statistical calculations, the reaction proceeds through the formation of short-lived addition complexes rather than statistical, long-lived intermediates, and the polyatomic acrolein product is significantly internally excited at the moment of the decomposition.

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of radicals formed by radiolysis at 77 K of nitroalkanes and of their solutions in organic glasses. Chromatography analysis of radiolysis products of nitromethane in ethanol solution in a vitreous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosilio, C.

    1969-01-01

    With a view to explaining the formation of the final products resulting from the photolysis and the radiolysis of nitro-alkanes, we have attempted to identify the paramagnetic species formed as intermediates during the radiolysis. Our work has covered the structure and the reactivity of the radicals formed by 7 irradiation of the nitrogen containing derivatives at 77 K, and on the mechanism of formation and of disappearance of these radicals in the various matrices used. The radicals resulting from the removal of a hydrogen atom in the α position of the NO 2 group, and the radicals resulting from addition reactions on the nitrogen group characterized by an unpaired electron on the nitrogen have been identified, either during the radiolysis of pure nitroalkanes, or during the radiolysis of nitro-alkanes in solution in organic glasses at 77 K. A study has been made of the conformation and the movements of radicals in the matrices, and the mechanism of formation of the observed radicals produced generally by the capture by the nitro-alkanes of primary radiolysis species. The nitro-alkanes in ethanol solution can behave as traps both for electrons and for free radicals. The study of the radiolysis of nitro-alkanes in solution in a polar ethanol glass has been completed with chemical analyses on the final radiolysis products; it has been possible to deduce the capture efficiency of trapped electrons and of free radicals by nitro-alkanes in ethanol. For this we have determined the radio-chemical yields of hydrogen, acetaldehyde and glycol as a function of the capture agent concentration, for the nitro-methane-ethanol system. A mechanism for the disappearance of the observed radicals is proposed. (author) [fr

  20. EPR study of free radicals in bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Mladenova, Ralitsa

    2004-05-01

    The features of the recorded EPR spectra of paramagnetic species formed in bread and rusk are reported. The appearance of free radicals in them is only connected with their thermal treatment since the starting materials (flour and grains) exhibit very weak EPR signal. The obtained EPR spectra are complex and indicate that: (i) the relative number of paramagnetic species depends on the temperature and treating time of the raw product; (ii) the g-values are strongly temperature dependent with a tendency to coincide at t≥220 °C. Because of the relatively low (150-220 °C) temperature of thermal treatment, the studied free radicals can be assumed to appear in the course of the browning (Maillard) reaction and not to the carbonization of the material.

  1. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone: reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10(8) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10-1000 μmol dm(-3)) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  2. Radical transfer between proteins: role of tyrosine, tryptophan and protein peroxyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.A.; Ostdal, H.; Davies, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Reaction of the Fe(III) forms of the heme proteins myoglobin (Mb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with H 2 O 2 gives rise to high-oxidation-state heme-derived species which can be described as a Fe(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical-cation ('Compound 1'). In the case of Mb, the Fe(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical-cation undergoes rapid electron transfer with the surrounding protein to give protein (globin)-derived radicals and an Fe(lV)-oxo species ('Compound 2'). The globin-derived radicals have been shown to be located at two (or more) sites: Tyr-103 or Trp-14, with the latter radical known to react with oxygen to give a Trp-derived peroxyl radical (Mb-Trp-OO*). With HRP, the Fe(lV)-oxo porphyrin radical-cation carries out two successive one-electron oxidation reactions at the exposed heme edge to give firstly 'Compound 2' [the Fe(lV)oxo species] and then the resting Fe(III) state of the enzyme. n this study we have investigated whether the Trp-14 peroxyl radical from Mb and the Compound 1 and 2 species from HRP (in the absence and presence of free Tyr) can oxidise amino acids, peptides and proteins. Such reactions constitute intermolecular protein-to-protein radical transfer reactions and hence protein chain-oxidation. We have also examined whether these oxidants react with antioxidants. Reaction of these heme-protein derived oxidants with amino acids, proteins and antioxidants has been carried out at room temperature for defined periods of time before freeze-quenching to 77K to halt reaction. The radical species present in the reaction system at the time of freezing were subsequently examined by EPR spectroscopy at 77K. Three free amino acids, Tyr, Trp and Cys (with Cys the least efficient) have been shown to react rapidly with Mb-Trp-OO*, as evidenced by the loss of the characteristic EPR features of Mb-Trp-OO* on inclusion of increasing concentrations of the amino acids. All other amino acids are much less reactive. Evidence has also been obtained for (inefficient) hydrogen

  3. Repair Activity of trans-Resveratrol toward 2'-Deoxyguanosine Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xing; An, Ping; Li, Shujin; Zhou, Liping

    2018-04-26

    In the present study, the repair activity of trans-resveratrol toward 2'-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) radicals in polar and nonpolar solvents was studied using density functional theory. The hydrogen transfer/proton coupled electron transfer and single electron transfer (SET) mechanisms between trans-resveratrol and dGuo-radicals were considered. Taking into consideration the molar fraction of neutral trans-resveratrol (ROH) and anionic trans-resveratrol (RO - ), the overall rate constants for repairing dGuo-radicals by trans-resveratrol are 9.94 × 10 8 and 2.01 × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 in polar and nonpolar solvents, respectively, and the overall rate constant of repairing cation radical (dGuo •+ ) by trans-resveratrol via an SET mechanism is 7.17 × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . The repair activity of RO - toward dGuo-radicals is better than that of ROH, but the repair activity of ROH toward dGuo •+ is better than that of RO - . Unfortunately, neither ROH nor RO - can repair the 2'-deoxyribose radicals of dGuo. It can therefore be concluded that trans-resveratrol is an effective antioxidant for repairing base radicals of dGuo and dGuo •+ . The study can help us understand the repair activity of trans-resveratrol toward dGuo radicals.

  4. Functionalized graphene quantum dots loaded with free radicals combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry to screen radical scavenging natural antioxidants from Licorice and Scutellariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoying; Niu, XiuLi; Shi, Gaofeng; Chen, Xuefu; Yao, Ruixing; Chen, Fuwen

    2014-12-01

    A novel screening method was developed for the detection and identification of radical scavenging natural antioxidants based on a free radical reaction combined with liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Functionalized graphene quantum dots were prepared for loading free radicals in the complex screening system. The detection was performed with and without a preliminary exposure of the samples to specific free radicals on the functionalized graphene quantum dots, which can facilitate charge transfer between free radicals and antioxidants. The difference in chromatographic peak areas was used to identify potential antioxidants. This is a novel approach to simultaneously evaluate the antioxidant power of a component versus a free radical, and to identify it in a vegetal matrix. The structures of the antioxidants in the samples were identified using tandem mass spectrometry and comparison with standards. Fourteen compounds were found to possess potential antioxidant activity, and their free radical scavenging capacities were investigated. The order of scavenging capacity of 14 compounds was compared according to their free radical scavenging rate. 4',5,6,7-Tetrahydroxyflavone (radical scavenging rate: 0.05253 mL mg(-1) s(-1) ) showed the strongest capability for scavenging free radicals. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different c...

  6. Carbon-centered radicals in γ-irradiated bone substituting biomaterials based on hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlo, Jaroslaw; Strzelczak, Grazyna; Lewandowska-Szumiel, Malgorzata; Sterniczuk, Marcin; Pajchel, Lukasz; Michalik, Jacek

    2012-09-01

    Gamma irradiated synthetic hydroxyapatite, bone substituting materials NanoBone(®) and HA Biocer were examined using EPR spectroscopy and compared with powdered human compact bone. In every case, radiation-induced carbon centered radicals were recorded, but their molecular structures and concentrations differed. In compact bone and synthetic hydroxyapatite the main signal assigned to the CO(2) (-) anion radical was stable, whereas the signal due to the CO(3) (3-) radical dominated in NanoBone(®) and HA Biocer just after irradiation. However, after a few days of storage of these samples, also a CO(2) (-) signal was recorded. The EPR study of irradiated compact bone and the synthetic graft materials suggest that their microscopic structures are different. In FT-IR spectra of NanoBone(®), HA Biocer and synthetic hydroxyapatite the HPO(4) (2-) and CO(3) (2-) in B-site groups are detected, whereas in compact bone signals due to collagen dominate.

  7. Homegrown religious radicalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    It has been reported that a growing number of youngsters from Western Europe are engaging in conflicts motivated by religious and political conflicts in the Middle East. This paper explores the reasons behind this seemingly religious radicalization from the point of view of the youngsters...... youngsters and parents of youngsters who have chosen a radicalized path in life. The paper will shed light on how the sense of and yearning for belonging and recognition have to be taken into account in our understanding of homegrown religious radicalization...

  8. Photodissociation of anisole and absolute photoionization cross-section of the phenoxy radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Pratt, S T

    2013-11-21

    We have studied the photodissociation dynamics of anisole (C6H5OCH3) at 193 nm and determined the absolute photoionization cross-section of the phenoxy radical at 118.2 nm (10.486 eV) relative to the known cross-section of the methyl radical. Even at this energy, there is extensive fragmentation of the phenoxy radical upon photoionization, which is attributed to ionizing transitions that populate low-lying excited electronic states of the cation. For phenoxy radicals with less than ∼1 eV of internal energy, we find a cross-section for the production of the phenoxy cation of 14.8 ± 3.8 Mb. For radicals with higher internal energy, dissociative ionization is the dominant process, and for internal energies of ∼2.7-3.7 eV, we find a total cross-section (photoionization plus dissociative ionization) of 22.3 ± 4.1 Mb. The results are discussed relative to the recently reported photoionization cross-section of phenol.

  9. Analysis of radicals induced in irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, Keigo; Kaimori, Yoshihiko; Kawamura, Shoei; Sakamoto, Yuhki; Nakamura, Hideo; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    By electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed free radicals in γ-ray irradiated foods; black pepper, green coffee bean and ginseng. We also analyzed the decay behavior of radiation induced free radicals during storage of irradiated foods. The ESR spectrum of experimental irradiated foods consists of a sextet signal centered at g=2.0 and a singlet signal at the same g-value position and a singlet signal at g=4.0. The singlet signal at g=2.0 is originated from organic free radicals and its peak intensity showed the dependence of γ-ray irradiation dose levels. The signal intensity was decreased during storage. Only after 3 hours of radiation treatment the peak intensity was decreased fast and after that the intensity was decreased slowly. The relaxation times, T 1 and T 2 , of radiation induced free radicals showed the variations before and after irradiation. During long time storage period it was shown that T 1 was increased and T 2 was decreased. By analysis of decay process using the simulation methods based on the theory of reaction speed, it is considered that at least two kinds of radicals were induced in irradiated foods during long time storage. (author)

  10. Standard Gibbs free energies of reactions of ozone with free radicals in aqueous solution: quantum-chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Sergej; von Sonntag, Clemens

    2011-11-01

    Free radicals are common intermediates in the chemistry of ozone in aqueous solution. Their reactions with ozone have been probed by calculating the standard Gibbs free energies of such reactions using density functional theory (Jaguar 7.6 program). O(2) reacts fast and irreversibly only with simple carbon-centered radicals. In contrast, ozone also reacts irreversibly with conjugated carbon-centered radicals such as bisallylic (hydroxycylohexadienyl) radicals, with conjugated carbon/oxygen-centered radicals such as phenoxyl radicals, and even with nitrogen- oxygen-, sulfur-, and halogen-centered radicals. In these reactions, further ozone-reactive radicals are generated. Chain reactions may destroy ozone without giving rise to products other than O(2). This may be of importance when ozonation is used in pollution control, and reactions of free radicals with ozone have to be taken into account in modeling such processes.

  11. Measurements of free radicals in a megacity during the Clean Air for London Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Dwayne; Whalley, Lisa; Stone, Daniel; Clancy, Noel; Lee, James; Kleffman, Jorg; Laufs, Sebastian; Bandy, Brian

    2013-04-01

    Free radicals control the photo-oxidative chemistry of the atmosphere, being responsible for the transformation of primary emissions into secondary pollutants such as NO2, O3, multifunctional species and particulates. Here we present measurements of OH, HO2 and RO2 radicals and OH reactivity recorded at North Kensington, Central London, during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) of the Clear Air for London (Clearflo) project in the summer and winter of 2012. OH and HO2 were measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy at low pressure (the FAGE technique), and RO2 was measured using the recently developed ROXLIF technique, which utilises an external flow-reactor interfaced to FAGE, and which is able to discriminate between HO2 and organic peroxy radicals. Through control of reagent gases we are further able to provide a separate measurement of those RO2 species which are known to give an interference for HO2 measurements (namely alkene, aromatic and large-chain alkane derived RO2). OH reactivity was measured using laser-flash photolysis combined with FAGE. Low concentrations of radicals were observed during the winter IOP, with mixing ratios of [OH] ~ 0.04 pptv, [HO2] ~ 0.4 pptv, and [RO2] ~ 1.6 pptv at noon, all displaying a negative correlation with NO. The photolysis of O3 and subsequent reaction of O(1D) with H2O vapour was only a minor contribution to radical production in winter, with photolysis of HONO a major radical source. The summer IOP coincided with the London Olympic Games, with a number of pollution events, with ozone peaking at 100 ppbv (exceeding EU air quality directives) and elevated radical concentrations (peak [OH] ~ 0.14 pptv, [HO2] ~ 4 pptv, [RO2] ~ 6.4 pptv) being observed. The net rate of ozone production was calculated from radical observations and agreed well with measured ozone production, suggesting that advection/dilution by continental air-masses was not playing a significant role in determining ozone

  12. Is Radical Innovation Management Misunderstood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Jimmi Normann; Gertsen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This paper poses a critical view on radical innovation (RI) management research and practice. The study investigates how expected RI performance influences firms’ under- standing of their RI capability. RI performance is often based on output measures such as market shares or fiscal return...

  13. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón, Gabriel J; Ramirez, Pedro T; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries.

  14. Photochemical sensitization by azathioprine and its metabolites. Part 3. A direct EPR and spin-trapping study of light-induced free radicals from 6-mercaptopurine and its oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D E; Sik, R H; Bilski, P; Chignell, C F; Reszka, K J

    1994-12-01

    Sunlight has been implicated in the high incidence of skin cancer found in patients receiving 6-mercaptopurine (PSH) in the form of its pro-drug azathioprine. In this study we have used EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with the spin-trapping technique to determine whether PSH and its metabolic or photochemical oxidation products generate highly reactive free radicals upon UV irradiation. When an aqueous anaerobic solution (pH 5 or 9) of PSH (pKa = 7.7) and either 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) or nitromethane (NM) were irradiated (lambda > 300 nm) with a Xe arc lamp, the corresponding purine-6-thiyl (PS.) radical adduct and the reduced form of the spin trap (MNP/H. or CH3NO2.-) were observed. However, no radical adducts were detected when PSH and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) were irradiated (lambda = 320 nm) in oxygen-free buffer. These findings suggest that PSH does not photoionize but that instead MNP and NM are reduced by direct electron transfer from excited state PSH, 1.3(PSH)*. In aerobic solution, oxygen can act as an electron acceptor and the O2.- and PS. radicals are formed and trapped by DMPO. 6-Mercaptopurine did photoionize when irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as evidenced by the appearance of the DMPO/H.(eq- + H+) adduct, which decreased in intensity in the presence of N2O. 1.3(6-Mercaptopurine)* oxidized ascorbate, formate and reduced glutathione to the corresponding ascorbyl, CO2.- or glutathiyl radicals. The photochemical behavior of 6-thioxanthine and 6-thiouric acid was similar to PSH. However, the excited states of these metabolic oxidation products exhibited stronger reducing properties than 1.3(PSH)*.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Measurement of OH free radical in magnetized sheet plasma crossed with vertical gas-flow by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonegawa, Akira; Takatori, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Kawamura, Kazutaka; Takayama, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrated the production of OH free radicals in an argon magnetized sheet plasma crossed with vertical gas-flow mixed with an oxygen gas O 2 and a hydrogen gas H 2 . The density and the rotational-vibrational temperature of the OH free radicals were measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The density of OH free radicals increases with increasing O 2 gas-flow, while the high energy part of the electron-energy-distribution-function f e (E) above 8 eV decreases. These results suggest the high energy part of f e (E) is contributed to the dissociation of O 2 and the production of OH free radicals. (author)

  16. Phosphite radicals and their reactions. Examples of redox, substitution, and addition reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, K.; Asmus, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Phosphite radicals HPO 3 - and PO 3 2 -, which exist in an acid-base equilibrium with pK = 5.75, are shown to take part in various types of reactions. In the absence of scavengers, they disappear mainly by second-order disproportionation and combination; a first-order contribution to the decay is also indicated. HPO 3 - and PO 3 2 - are good reductants toward electron acceptors such as tetranitromethane. In this reaction phosphate and C(NO 2 ) 3 - are formed. Phosphite radicals can, however, also act as good oxidants, e.g., toward thiols and thiolate ions. These reactions lead to the formation of RS. radicals which were identified either directly, as in the case of penicillamine, through the optical absorption of PenS. or more indirectly through equilibration of RS. with RS- to the optically absorbing RSSR-. disulfide radical anion. A homolytic substitution reaction (S/sub H/2) occurs in the reaction of the phosphite radicals with aliphatic disulfides, yielding RS. radicals and phosphate thioester RSPO 3 2 -. Lipoic acid, as an example of a cyclic disulfide, is reduced to the corresponding RSSR-. radical anion and also undergoes the S/sub H/2 reaction with about equal probability. An addition reaction is observed between phosphite radicals and molecular oxygen. The resulting peroxo phosphate radicals establish an acid-base equilibrium HPO 5 - . reversible PO 5 2- . + H+ with a pK = 3.4. Absolute rate constants were determined for all reactions discussed

  17. Radical Evil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Manrique

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an aporia in Kant’s analysis of evil: he defines radical evilas an invisible disposition of the will, but he also demands an inferential connection between visible evil actions and this invisible disposition. This inference,however, undermines the radical invisibility of radical evil according to Kant’s own definition of the latter. Noting how this invisibility of moral worth is a distinctive feature of Kant’s approach to the moral problem, the paper then asks why, in the Groundwork, he nonetheless forecloses a question about evil that seems to be consistent with this approach. It is argued that to account for this aporia and this foreclosure, one has to interrogate the way in which the category of religion orients Kant’s incipient philosophy of history in Die Religion.

  18. Radicals derived from acetaldehyde and vinyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Marissa L; Morgan, W James; Winkles, Alexander T; Abbott, Adam S; Villegas-Escobar, Nery; Mullinax, J Wayne; Turner, Walter E; Wang, Xiao; Turney, Justin M; Schaefer, Henry F

    2017-10-18

    Vinyl alcohol and acetaldehyde are isoelectronic products of incomplete butanol combustion. Along with the radicals resulting from the removal of atomic hydrogen or the hydroxyl radical, these species are studied here using ab initio methods as complete as coupled cluster theory with single, double, triple, and perturbative quadruple excitations [CCSDT(Q)], with basis sets as large as cc-pV5Z. The relative energies provided herein are further refined by including corrections for relativistic effects, the frozen core approximation, and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The effects of anharmonic zero-point vibrational energies are also treated. The syn conformer of vinyl alcohol is predicted to be lower in energy than the anti conformer by 1.1 kcal mol -1 . The alcoholic hydrogen of syn-vinyl alcohol is found to be the easiest to remove, requiring 84.4 kcal mol -1 . Five other radicals are also carefully considered, with four conformers investigated for the 1-hydroxyvinyl radical. Beyond energetics, we have conducted an overhaul of the spectroscopic literature for these species. Our results also provide predictions for fundamental modes yet to be reported experimentally. To our knowledge, the ν 3 (3076 cm -1 ) and ν 4 (2999 cm -1 ) C-H stretches for syn-vinyl alcohol and all but one of the vibrational modes for anti-vinyl alcohol (ν 1 -ν 14 ) are yet to be observed experimentally. For the acetyl radical, ν 6 (1035 cm -1 ), ν 11 (944 cm -1 ), ν 12 (97 cm -1 ), and accounting for our changes to the assignment of the 1419.9 cm -1 experimental mode, ν 10 (1441 cm -1 ), are yet to be observed. We have predicted these unobserved fundamentals and reassigned the experimental 1419.9 cm -1 frequency in the acetyl radical to ν 4 rather than to ν 10 . Our work also strongly supports reassignment of the ν 10 and ν 11 fundamentals of the vinoxy radical. We suggest that the bands assigned to the overtones of these fundamentals were in fact combination bands. Our

  19. Precursor Ion Scan Mode-Based Strategy for Fast Screening of Polyether Ionophores by Copper-Induced Gas-Phase Radical Fragmentation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevelin, Eduardo J; Possato, Bruna; Lopes, João L C; Lopes, Norberto P; Crotti, Antônio E M

    2017-04-04

    The potential of copper(II) to induce gas-phase fragmentation reactions in macrotetrolides, a class of polyether ionophores produced by Streptomyces species, was investigated by accurate-mass electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Copper(II)/copper(I) transition directly induced production of diagnostic acylium ions with m/z 199, 185, 181, and 167 from α-cleavages of [macrotetrolides + Cu] 2+ . A UPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodology based on the precursor ion scan of these acylium ions was developed and successfully used to identify isodinactin (1), trinactin (2), and tetranactin (3) in a crude extract of Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 in the precursor ion scan mode. In addition, copper(II) was also used to induce radical fragmentation reactions in the carboxylic acid polyether ionophore nigericin. The resulting product ions with m/z 755 and 585 helped to identify nigericin in a crude extract of Streptomyces sp. Eucal-26 by means of precursor ion scan experiments, demonstrating that copper-induced fragmentation reactions can potentially identify different classes of polyether ionophores rapidly and selectively.

  20. OH radicals distribution in an Ar-H2O atmospheric plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Nikiforov, A.; Xiong, Q.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Lu, X.; Leys, C.

    2013-09-01

    Recently, plasma jet systems found numerous applications in the field of biomedicine and treatment of temperature-sensitive materials. OH radicals are one of the main active species produced by these plasmas. Present study deals with the investigation of RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet in terms of OH radicals production by admixture of H2O into argon used as a feed gas. Generation of OH radicals is studied by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The excitation dynamics of OH radicals induced by the laser photons is studied by time-resolved spectroscopy. It is shown that vibrational and rotational energy transfer processes, which are sensitive to the surrounding species, can lead to the complication in the OH radicals diagnostics at high pressure and have to be considered during experiments. The axial and radial 2D maps of absolute densities of hydroxyl radicals at different water contents are obtained. The highest density of 1.15 × 1020 m-3 is measured in the plasma core for the case of 0.3% H2O. In the x-y-plane, the OH density steeply decreases within a range of ±2 mm from its maximum value down to 1018 m-3. The effect of H2O addition on the generation of OH radicals is investigated and discussed.

  1. Erectile function after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Frey, Anders; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    collected database and a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study in patients following radical prostatectomy. Erectile function was assessed with the IIEF-5 and the question "Is your erectile function as good as before the surgery (yes/no)". Patients were included if they were sexually active before...

  2. Effect of reagents and medium nature on direction of cation-radical transformations in the reaction of diarylamines with nitrosonium borofluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshechko, V.G.; Inozemtsev, A.N.; Pokhodenko, V.O.

    1983-01-01

    Diphenylamine and 4, 4'-dimethoxydiphenylamine in acetonitrile are oxidized monoelectronically by NOBF 4 . On the 4, 4'-dimethoxydiphenylamine example a maximum current concentration of intermediate cation-radicals formed in this reaction is measured. Cation-radicals in acetonitrile get dimeric transforming into products of oxidizing condensation of amines, with no respective nitrozamines being observed. Nitrosamines production on through cation-radical-NO recombination is realized but in the presence of protonoacceptor solvents, in particular pyridine

  3. Ion conducting solid polymer electrolytes based on polypentafluorostyrene-b-polyether-b-polypentafluorostyrene prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankova, Katja; Jannasch, P.; Hvilsted, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Novel triblock copolymers based on central poly( ethylene glycol) ( PEG) or poly( ethylene glycol-co-propylene glycol) (PEGPG) blocks with poly( pentafluorostyrene) (PFS) outer blocks were prepared by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) with polydispersities on the order of 1.2 - 1...

  4. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA.

  5. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. A Brief Review on Electro-generated Hydroxyl Radical for Organic Wastewater Mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Nurhayati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radical is a highly reactive oxidizing agent that can be electrochemically generated on the surface of Boron doped diamond (BDD anode. Once generated, this radical will non-selectively mineralize organic pollutants to carbon dioxide, water and organic anions as the oxidation products. Its application in Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP to degrade nonbiodegradable even the recalcitrant pollutants in wastewater has been increasingly studied and even applied.

  7. IN VIVO EVIDENCE OF FREE RADICAL FORMATION AFTER ASBESTOS INSTILLATION: AN ESR SPIN TRAPPING INVESTIGATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been postulated that the in vivo toxicity of asbestos results from its catalysis of free radical generation. We examined in vivo radical production using electron spin resonance (ESR) coupled with the spin trap alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (4-POBN); 180 d...

  8. Demonstration using EPR spin-trapping of an oxygen-dependent, carbon-centered free radical generated by soybean lipoxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.F.; Smith, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    Purified prostaglandin synthase produces a carbon-centered, oxygen-dependent free radical which they have shown forms a spin-trapped adduct with 4-POBN and has characteristic hyperfine spin coupling constants (hfsc). As production of this radical is cyclooxygenase-dependent, additional studies on radical production were done using soybean lipoxygenase. The latter generates a lipid substrate-derived free radical trapped by the EPR spin trap 4-POBN [α-(4-pyridyl 1-oxide)N-tert-butyl nitrone]. With linoleate as substrate, the hfsc are a/sub N/ = 15.5 G, a/sub β//sup H/ = 2.7 G. This signal is inhibited by ETYA, various antioxidants and heat inactivation of the enzyme. Additional hfsc are not seen when the enzyme is incubated in an 17 O 2 atmosphere, but the signal is inhibited by anaerobeosis. Substitution of 13 C 18 carbon free fatty acids from Chlorella pyrenoisdosa for linoleate produces 2 new lines for each of the original 6 observed with 12 C substrate; the new spectrum has hfsc of a/sub N/ = 16.0 G, a/sub β//sup H/ = 2.4 G, a/sub β/ 13 C = 4.2 G. This demonstrates that the radical is carbon centered and oxygen-dependent and appears not to be the same radical formed by enzymic hydrogen abstraction from the lipid substrate. This radical and the prostaglandin synthase-dependent radical appear to be nearly identical

  9. Encapsulation of Gibbsite platelets with free radical and controlled radical emulsion polymerization approaches, a small review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loiko, O.P.; Spoelstra, A.B.; van Herk, A.M.; Meuldijk, J.; Heuts, J.P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Water-borne anisotropic polymer-Gibbsite latex particles were prepared by a conventional and an atom transfer radical polymerisation (ATRP) based starved-feed emulsion polymerisation without any chemical modification of the platelet surface. Anionic co-oligomers, synthesised via ATRP, were used in

  10. Influence of Free Radicals on the Intrinsic MRI Relaxation Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, Rong-Wen; Scotti, Alessandro M; Li, Weiguo; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Cai, Kejia

    2017-01-01

    Free radicals are critical contributors in various conditions including normal aging, Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and diabetes. Currently there is no non-invasive approach to image tissue free radicals based on endogenous contrast due to their extremely short lifetimes and low in vivo concentrations. In this study we aim at characterizing the influence of free radicals on the MRI relaxation properties. Phantoms containing free radicals were created by treating egg white with various H 2 O 2 concentrations and scanned on a 9.4 T MRI scanner at room temperature. T 1 and T 2 relaxation maps were generated from data acquired with an inversion recovery sequence with varied inversion times and a multi-echo spin echo sequence with varied echo times (TEs), respectively. Results demonstrated that free radicals express a strong shortening effect on T 1 , which was proportional to the H 2 O 2 concentration, and a relatively small reduction in T 2 (free radicals was estimated to be in the pM range that is within the physiological range of in vivo free radical expression. In conclusion, the free radicals show a strong paramagnetic effect that may be utilized as an endogenous MRI contrast for its non-invasive in vivo imaging.

  11. Quantitative detection of plasma-generated radicals in liquids by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresp, H; Hammer, M U; Winter, J; Reuter, S; Weltmann, K-D

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the qualitative and quantitative detection of oxygen radicals in liquids after plasma treatment with an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is investigated. Absolute values for · OH and O 2 ·- radical concentration and their net production rate in plasma-treated liquids are determined without the use of additional scavenging chemicals such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) or mannitol (D-MAN). The main oxygen-centred radical generation in PBS was found to originate from the superoxide radical. It is shown that hidden parameters such as the manufacturer of chemical components could have a big influence on the comparability and reproducibility of the results. Finally, the effect of a shielding gas device for the investigated plasma jet with a shielding gas composition of varying oxygen-to-nitrogen ratio on radical generation after plasma treatment of phosphate-buffered saline solution was investigated. (paper)

  12. Heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals: uptake kinetics, condensed-phase products, and particle size change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. J. George

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics and reaction mechanism for the heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by gas-phase OH radicals were investigated under NOx-free conditions. The reaction of 150 nm diameter Bis(2-ethylhexyl sebacate (BES particles with OH was studied as a proxy for chemical aging of atmospheric aerosols containing saturated organic matter. An aerosol reactor flow tube combined with an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS was used to study this system. Hydroxyl radicals were produced by 254 nm photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapour. The kinetics of the heterogeneous oxidation of the BES particles was studied by monitoring the loss of a mass fragment of BES with the ToF-AMS as a function of OH exposure. We measured an initial OH uptake coefficient of γ0=1.3 (±0.4, confirming that this reaction is highly efficient. The density of BES particles increased by up to 20% of the original BES particle density at the highest OH exposure studied, consistent with the particle becoming more oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis showed that the major particle-phase reaction products are multifunctional carbonyls and alcohols with higher molecular weights than the starting material. Volatilization of oxidation products accounted for a maximum of 17% decrease of the particle volume at the highest OH exposure studied. Tropospheric organic aerosols will become more oxidized from heterogeneous photochemical oxidation, which may affect not only their physical and chemical properties, but also their hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation activity.

  13. Absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taatjes, Craig A; Osborn, David L; Selby, Talitha M; Meloni, Giovanni; Fan, Haiyan; Pratt, Stephen T

    2008-10-02

    The absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical has been measured using two completely independent methods. The CH3 photoionization cross-section was determined relative to that of acetone and methyl vinyl ketone at photon energies of 10.2 and 11.0 eV by using a pulsed laser-photolysis/time-resolved synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry method. The time-resolved depletion of the acetone or methyl vinyl ketone precursor and the production of methyl radicals following 193 nm photolysis are monitored simultaneously by using time-resolved synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Comparison of the initial methyl signal with the decrease in precursor signal, in combination with previously measured absolute photoionization cross-sections of the precursors, yields the absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical; sigma(CH3)(10.2 eV) = (5.7 +/- 0.9) x 10(-18) cm(2) and sigma(CH3)(11.0 eV) = (6.0 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2). The photoionization cross-section for vinyl radical determined by photolysis of methyl vinyl ketone is in good agreement with previous measurements. The methyl radical photoionization cross-section was also independently measured relative to that of the iodine atom by comparison of ionization signals from CH3 and I fragments following 266 nm photolysis of methyl iodide in a molecular-beam ion-imaging apparatus. These measurements gave a cross-section of (5.4 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 10.460 eV, (5.5 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 10.466 eV, and (4.9 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 10.471 eV. The measurements allow relative photoionization efficiency spectra of methyl radical to be placed on an absolute scale and will facilitate quantitative measurements of methyl concentrations by photoionization mass spectrometry.

  14. Radical constructivism: Between realism and solipsism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Delgado, Alberto

    2002-11-01

    This paper criticizes radical constructivism of the Glasersfeld type, pointing out some contradictions between the declared radical principles and their theoretical and practical development. These contradictions manifest themselves in a frequent oscillation between solipsism and realism, despite constructivist claims to be an anti-realist theory. The paper also points out the contradiction between the relativism of the radical constructivist principles and the constructivist exclusion of other epistemological or educational paradigms. It also disputes the originality and importance of the radical constructivist paradigm, suggesting the idea of an isomorphism between radical constructivist theory and contemplative realism. In addition, some pedagogical and scientific methodological aspects of the radical constructivist model are examined. Although radical constructivism claims to be a rational theory and advocates deductive thinking, it is argued that there is no logical deductive connection between the radical principles of constructivism and the radical constructivist ideas about scientific research and learning. The paper suggests the possibility of an ideological substratum in the construction and hegemonic success of subjective constructivism and, finally, briefly advances an alternative realist model to epistemological and educational radical constructivism.

  15. Radical Rearrangement Chemistry in Ultraviolet Photodissociation of Iodotyrosine Systems: Insights from Metastable Dissociation, Infrared Ion Spectroscopy, and Reaction Pathway Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranka, Karnamohit; Zhao, Ning; Yu, Long; Stanton, John F; Polfer, Nicolas C

    2018-05-29

    We report on the ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) chemistry of protonated tyrosine, iodotyrosine, and diiodotyrosine. Distonic loss of the iodine creates a high-energy radical at the aromatic ring that engages in hydrogen/proton rearrangement chemistry. Based on UVPD kinetics measurements, the appearance of this radical is coincident with the UV irradiation pulse (8 ns). Conversely, sequential UVPD product ions exhibit metastable decay on ca. 100 ns timescales. Infrared ion spectroscopy is capable of confirming putative structures of the rearrangement products as proton transfers from the imine and β-carbon hydrogens. Potential energy surfaces for the various reaction pathways indicate that the rearrangement chemistry is highly complex, compatible with a cascade of rearrangements, and that there is no preferred rearrangement pathway even in small molecular systems like these. Graphical Abstract.

  16. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes: a time-resolved EPR study - Part I. Alkyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved EPR was applied to detect short-lived alkyl radicals in pulse radiolysis of liquid alkanes. Two problems were addressed: (i) the mechanism of radical formation and (ii) the mechanism of chemically-induced spin polarization in these radicals. (i) The ratio of yields of penultimate and interior radicals in n-alkanes at the instant of their generation was found to be ≅ 1.25 times greater than the statistical quantity. This higher-than-statistical production of penultimate radicals indicates that the proton transfer reaction involving excited radical cations must be a prevailing route of radical generation. The relative yields of hydrogen abstraction and fragmentation for various branched alkanes are estimated. It is concluded that the fragmentation occurs prior to the formation of radicals in an excited precursor species. (ii) The analysis of spin-echo kinetics in n-alkanes suggests that the alkyl radicals gain the emissive polarization in spur reactions. This initial polarization increases with shortening of the aliphatic chain. We suggest that the origin of this polarization is the ST mechanism operating in the pairs of alkyl radicals and hydrogen atoms generated in dissociation of excited alkane molecules. It is also found that a long-chain structure of alkyl radicals results in much higher rate of Heisenberg spin exchange relative to the recombination rate (up to 30 times). That suggests prominent steric effects in recombination or the occurrence of through-chain electron exchange. The significance of these results in the context of cross-linking in polyethylene and higher paraffins is discussed. (Author)

  17. Superoxide dismutase 1-mediated production of ethanol- and DNA-derived radicals in yeasts challenged with hydrogen peroxide: molecular insights into the genome instability of peroxiredoxin-null strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogusucu, Renata; Rettori, Daniel; Netto, Luis E S; Augusto, Ohara

    2009-02-27

    Peroxiredoxins are receiving increasing attention as defenders against oxidative damage and sensors of hydrogen peroxide-mediated signaling events. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deletion of one or more isoforms of the peroxiredoxins is not lethal but compromises genome stability by mechanisms that remain under scrutiny. Here, we show that cytosolic peroxiredoxin-null cells (tsa1Deltatsa2Delta) are more resistant to hydrogen peroxide than wild-type (WT) cells and consume it faster under fermentative conditions. Also, tsa1Deltatsa2Delta cells produced higher yields of the 1-hydroxyethyl radical from oxidation of the glucose metabolite ethanol, as proved by spin-trapping experiments. A major role for Fenton chemistry in radical formation was excluded by comparing WT and tsa1Deltatsa2Delta cells with respect to their levels of total and chelatable metal ions and of radical produced in the presence of chelators. The main route for 1-hydroxyethyl radical formation was ascribed to the peroxidase activity of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1), whose expression and activity increased approximately 5- and 2-fold, respectively, in tsa1Deltatsa2Delta compared with WT cells. Accordingly, overexpression of human Sod1 in WT yeasts led to increased 1-hydroxyethyl radical production. Relevantly, tsa1Deltatsa2Delta cells challenged with hydrogen peroxide contained higher levels of DNA-derived radicals and adducts as monitored by immuno-spin trapping and incorporation of (14)C from glucose into DNA, respectively. The results indicate that part of hydrogen peroxide consumption by tsa1Deltatsa2Delta cells is mediated by induced Sod1, which oxidizes ethanol to the 1-hydroxyethyl radical, which, in turn, leads to increased DNA damage. Overall, our studies provide a pathway to account for the hypermutability of peroxiredoxin-null strains.

  18. Free terminal amines in DNA-binding peptides alter the product distribution from guanine radicals produced by single electron oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konigsfeld, Katie M; Lee, Melissa; Urata, Sarah M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-03-01

    Electron deficient guanine radical species are major intermediates produced in DNA by the direct effect of ionizing irradiation. There is evidence that they react with amine groups in closely bound ligands to form covalent crosslinks. Crosslink formation is very poorly characterized in terms of quantitative rate and yield data. We sought to address this issue by using oligo-arginine ligands to model the close association of DNA and its binding proteins in chromatin. Guanine radicals were prepared in plasmid DNA by single electron oxidation. The product distribution derived from them was assayed by strand break formation after four different post-irradiation incubations. We compared the yields of DNA damage produced in the presence of four ligands in which neither, one, or both of the amino and carboxylate termini were blocked with amides. Free carboxylate groups were unreactive. Significantly higher yields of heat labile sites were observed when the amino terminus was unblocked. The rate of the reaction was characterized by diluting the unblocked amino group with its amide blocked derivative. These observations provide a means to develop quantitative estimates for the yields in which these labile sites are formed in chromatin by exposure to ionizing irradiation.

  19. Isomerizations of the Nitromethane Radical Cation in the Gas Phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Carlsen, Lars; Elbel, Susanne

    1986-01-01

    The concurrent isomerizations of the nitromethane radical cation to its aci-nitromethane and methylnitrite isomers, respectively, has been established based on metastable ion studies and collision activation mass spectrometry. The energy diagram for the ionized nitromethane/aci-nitromethane tauto......The concurrent isomerizations of the nitromethane radical cation to its aci-nitromethane and methylnitrite isomers, respectively, has been established based on metastable ion studies and collision activation mass spectrometry. The energy diagram for the ionized nitromethane...

  20. Electron paramagnetic relaxation studies of free radicals in. gamma. -irradiated DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, M; Yoshi, G [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    1980-01-01

    Using the continuous microwave power saturation method the T/sub 1/ spin-lattice relaxation time and T/sub 2/ spin-spin relaxation time for DNA radicals (measured at 297/sup 0/K) are reported. Identical experiments carried out on thymidine-5'-monophosphate sodium salt (TMP) and deoxycytidine-5'-monophosphate sodium salt (dCMP) are also reported. Irradiated DNA produces TMP radicals on the base moiety and dCMP radicals on the sugar moiety. Comparing the relaxation times of DNA with those of TMP and dCMP provided a reliable analysis of the nature of DNA radicals.

  1. The Radical Tragic Imaginary: Castoriadis On Aeschylus & Sophocles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Biluš Abaffy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Castoriadis’ entire colossal politico-philosophical-psychoanalytical project is based around the notion of radical autonomy, which, he argues, was most closely appropriated by the ancient Greek imaginary and the newly born dēmokratía. This paper critically examines Castoriadis’ treatment of the earliest democrats in the world—the ancient tragedians—and argues, contra Castoriadis, that it was Aeschylus, rather than Sophocles, that embodied the classical apotheosis of radical human autonomy.

  2. Efficient peroxydisulfate activation process not relying on sulfate radical generation for water pollutant degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yin; Wang, Yuru; Le Roux, Julien; Yang, Yang; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2014-05-20

    Peroxydisulfate (PDS) is an appealing oxidant for contaminated groundwater and toxic industrial wastewaters. Activation of PDS is necessary for application because of its low reactivity. Present activation processes always generate sulfate radicals as actual oxidants which unselectively oxidize organics and halide anions reducing oxidation capacity of PDS and producing toxic halogenated products. Here we report that copper oxide (CuO) can efficiently activate PDS under mild conditions without producing sulfate radicals. The PDS/CuO coupled process is most efficient at neutral pH for decomposing a model compound, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). In a continuous-flow reaction with an empty-bed contact time of 0.55 min, over 90% of 2,4-DCP (initially 20 μM) and 90% of adsorbable organic chlorine (AOCl) can be removed at the PDS/2,4-DCP molar ratio of 1 and 4, respectively. Based on kinetic study and surface characterization, PDS is proposed to be first activated by CuO through outer-sphere interaction, the rate-limiting step, followed by a rapid reaction with 2,4-DCP present in the solution. In the presence of ubiquitous chloride ions in groundwater/industrial wastewater, the PDS/CuO oxidation shows significant advantages over sulfate radical oxidation by achieving much higher 2,4-DCP degradation capacity and avoiding the formation of highly chlorinated degradation products. This work provides a new way of PDS activation for contaminant removal.

  3. Efficient peroxydisulfate activation process not relying on sulfate radical generation for water pollutant degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao

    2014-05-20

    Peroxydisulfate (PDS) is an appealing oxidant for contaminated groundwater and toxic industrial wastewaters. Activation of PDS is necessary for application because of its low reactivity. Present activation processes always generate sulfate radicals as actual oxidants which unselectively oxidize organics and halide anions reducing oxidation capacity of PDS and producing toxic halogenated products. Here we report that copper oxide (CuO) can efficiently activate PDS under mild conditions without producing sulfate radicals. The PDS/CuO coupled process is most efficient at neutral pH for decomposing a model compound, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). In a continuous-flow reaction with an empty-bed contact time of 0.55 min, over 90% of 2,4-DCP (initially 20 μM) and 90% of adsorbable organic chlorine (AOCl) can be removed at the PDS/2,4-DCP molar ratio of 1 and 4, respectively. Based on kinetic study and surface characterization, PDS is proposed to be first activated by CuO through outer-sphere interaction, the rate-limiting step, followed by a rapid reaction with 2,4-DCP present in the solution. In the presence of ubiquitous chloride ions in groundwater/industrial wastewater, the PDS/CuO oxidation shows significant advantages over sulfate radical oxidation by achieving much higher 2,4-DCP degradation capacity and avoiding the formation of highly chlorinated degradation products. This work provides a new way of PDS activation for contaminant removal. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Quantitative detection of RO2 radicals and other products from cyclohexene ozonolysis with ammonium-CI3-TOF and acetate-CI-API-TOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, A.; Scholz, W.; Mentler, B.; Fischer, L.; Berndt, T.

    2017-12-01

    The performance of the novel ammonium-CI3-TOF utilizing NH4+ adduct ion chemistry to measure quantitatively first generation oxidized product molecules (OMs) as well as highly oxidized organic molecules (HOMs) was investigated for the first time. The gas-phase ozonolysis of cyclohexene served as a test system in order to evaluate the capability of the detection systems. Experiments have been carried out in the TROPOS free-jet flow system at close to atmospheric conditions. Product ion signals were simultaneously observed by the ammonium-CI3-TOF and the acetate-CI-API-TOF. Both instruments are in remarkable good agreement within a factor of two for HOMs. For OMs not containing an OOH group the acetate technique can considerably underestimate OM concentrations by 2-3 orders of magnitude. First steps of cyclohexene ozonolysis generate ten different (m/z product peaks) main products comprising 92% of observed OMs. The remaining 8% are distributed over several (m/z peaks) minor products that can be attributed to HOMs, predominately to highly oxidized RO2 radicals. Summing up, observed ammonium-CI3-TOF products yield 4.9 x 109 molecules cm-³ in excellent agreement with the amount of reacted cyclohexene of 5.0 x 109 molecules cm-³ for reactant concentrations of [O3] = 2.25 x 1012 molecules cm-³ and [cyclohexene] = 2.0 x 1012 molecules cm-³ and a reaction time of 7.9 s. NH4+ adduct ion chemistry based CIMS techniques offer a unique opportunity for complete detection of the whole product distribution, and consequently, for a much better understanding of atmospheric oxidation processes.

  5. Engineering radical polymer electrodes for electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevers, Douglas R.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Wheeler, Dean R.

    2017-06-01

    In principle a wide range of organic materials can store energy in the form of reversible redox conversions of stable radicals. Such chemistry holds great promise for energy storage applications due to high theoretical capacities, high rate capabilities, intrinsic structural tunability, and the possibility of low-cost "green" syntheses from renewable sources. There have been steady improvements in the design of organic radical polymers, in which radicals are incorporated into the backbone and/or as pendant groups. This review highlights opportunities for improved redox molecule and polymer design along with the key challenges (e.g., transport phenomena, solubility, and reaction mechanisms) to transitioning known organic radicals into high-performance electrodes. Ultimately, organic-based batteries are still a nascent field with many open questions. Further advances in molecular design, electrode engineering, and device architecture will be required for these systems to reach their full potential and meet the diverse and increasing demands for energy storage.

  6. Investigating radical cation chain processes in the electrocatalytic Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Yasushi; Okada, Yohei; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Single electron transfer (SET)-triggered radical ion-based reactions have proven to be powerful options in synthetic organic chemistry. Although unique chain processes have been proposed in various photo- and electrochemical radical ion-based transformations, the turnover number, also referred to as catalytic efficiency, remains unclear in most cases. Herein, we disclose our investigations of radical cation chain processes in the electrocatalytic Diels-Alder reaction, leading to a scalable synthesis. A gram-scale synthesis was achieved with high current efficiency of up to 8000%. The reaction monitoring profiles showed sigmoidal curves with induction periods, suggesting the involvement of intermediate(s) in the rate determining step.

  7. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  8. Analysis of conformations and ESR spectra of free radicals in carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaghyan, G.V.; Abaghyan, A.G.; Apresyan, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    The conformations of free radicals arising when the unpaired electron is localized on carbon atoms in pyranose ring of carbohydrate molecule are considered. On the base of the analysis of expected conformations of radicals a possible contribution of β-protons in hyperfine structure of ESP spectra is predicted. The results of conformational analysis for different types of free radicals are in satisfactory agreement with the corresponding experimental data for the liquid phase. 17 refs

  9. Key factors which concur to the correct therapeutic evaluation of herbal products in free radical-induced diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare eMancuso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For many years now the world's scientific literature has been perfused with articles on the therapeutic potential of natural products, the vast majority of which have herbal origins, as in the case of free radical-induced diseases. What is often overlooked is the effort of researchers who take into consideration the preclinical and clinical evaluation of these herbal products, in order to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy and safety. The first critical issue to be addressed in the early stages of the preclinical studies is related to pharmacokinetics, which is sometimes not very favorable, of some of these products, which limits the bioavailability after oral intake. In this regard, it is worthy underlining how it is often unethical to propose the therapeutic efficacy of a compound on the basis of preclinical results obtained with far higher concentrations to those which, hopefully, could be achieved in organs and tissues of subjects taking these products by mouth. The most widely used approach to overcome the problem related to the low bioavailability involves the complexation of the active ingredients of herbal products with non-toxic carriers that facilitate the absorption and distribution. Even the induction or inhibition of drug metabolizing enzymes by herbal products, and the consequent variations of plasma concentrations of co-administered drugs, are phenomena to be carefully evaluated as they can give rise to side-effects. This risk is even greater when considering that people lack the perception of the risk arising from an over use of herbal products that, by their very nature, are considered risk-free.

  10. Free radicals in chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, M R

    1991-12-15

    During the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of cancer-causing agents, mechanisms of cancer formation and the behavior of cancer cells. Cancer is characterized primarily by an increase in the number of abnormal cells derived from a given normal tissue, invasion of adjacent tissues by these abnormal cells, and lymphatic or blood-borne spread of malignant cells to regional lymph nodes and to distant sites (metastasis). It has been estimated that about 75-80% of all human cancers are environmentally induced, 30-40% of them by diet. Only a small minority, possibly no more than 2% of all cases, result purely from inherent genetic changes. Several lines of evidence confirm that the fundamental molecular event or events that cause a cell to become malignant occur at the level of the DNA and a variety of studies indicate that the critical molecular event in chemical carcinogenesis is the interaction of the chemical agent with DNA. The demonstration that DNA isolated from tumor cells can transfect normal cells and render them neoplastic provides direct proof that an alteration of the DNA is responsible for cancer. The transforming genes, or oncogenes, have been identified by restriction endonuclease mapping. One of the characteristics of tumor cells generated by transformation with viruses, chemicals, or radiation is their reduced requirement for serum growth factors. A critical significance of electrophilic metabolites of carcinogenes in chemical carcinogenesis has been demonstrated. A number of "proximate" and "ultimate" metabolites, especially those of aromatic amines, were described. The "ultimate" forms of carcinogens actually interact with cellular constituents to cause neoplastic transformation and are the final metabolic products in most pathways. Recent evidence indicates that free radical derivatives of chemical carcinogens may be produced both metabolically and nonenzymatically during their metabolism. Free radicals carry no

  11. Radical Scavenging Efficacy of Thiol Capped Silver Nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    aSchool of Studies in Chemistry, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492 010, India. bDepartment of ... of nanosilver in foods, health care and consumer products as antimi- ... of the radical scavenging behavior of thiolated antiox- idants (alone) and ..... case of GSH@AgNPs; DPPH scavenging activity was found to be ...

  12. Trichloroethylene Radicals: An EPR/SPIN Trapping Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steel-Goodwin, Linda

    1995-01-01

    .... As part of the process to develop environmental and health effects criteria for base clean-up the initial radicals produced by TCE were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR...

  13. Leghemoglobin-derived radicals. Evidence for multiple protein-derived radicals and the initiation of peribacteroid membrane damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Mathieu, C

    1996-01-01

    , with the consequent generation of lipid-derived radicals. The formation of such radicals may result in the depletion of membrane antioxidants and the initiation of lipid peroxidation. This transfer of damage from the heme center via the protein surface to neighboring membranes may be of considerable biological......-derived phenoxyl radical present at Tyr-133 in the soybean protein and Tyr-138 in the lupin protein. To obtain further information on these protein radicals and their potential interaction with the physiologically important peribacteroid membrane (which surrounds the microsymbiont in vivo), EPR spin trapping......); these radicals may be side chain- or alpha-carbon-derived, their exact sites have not been determined. Some of these radicals are on the protein surface and may be key intermediates in the formation of protein dimers. These radicals have been shown to be capable of reacting with peribacteroid membrane fractions...

  14. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and photodissociation of polyatomic molecules and radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.Y. [Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States)

    1993-12-01

    In the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the photodissociation (PD) dynamics of triatomic molecules. However, the PD study of radicals, especially polyatomic radicals, has remained essentially an unexplored research area. Detailed state-to-state PD cross sections for radicals in the UV and VUV provide challenges not only for dynamical calculations, but also for ab initio quantum chemical studies. The authors have developed a laser based pump-probe apparatus for the measurement of absolute PD cross sections for CH{sub 3}S and HS is summarized.

  15. Muonium-containing vinyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.J.; Symons, M.C.R.; Roduner, E.; Heming, M.

    1987-01-01

    Exposure of trimethylsilylacetylene and bis(trimethylsilyl)acetylene to positive muons gave radicals whose muon-electron hyperfine coupling constants establish that the corresponding vinyl radicals were formed. (author)

  16. Formation of radicals in coal pyrolysis examined by electron spin resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Chang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy is used to study materials with unpaired electrons, such as organic radicals and metal complexes. This method can also be used to follow radical reactions during pyrolysis of carbonaceous materials. However, the temperature dependence of ESR measurement should be considered. To enable reasonable comparisons, results measured at different temperatures must be converted. In this study, we investigated the behavior of free radicals in the process of coal pyrolysis using in situ and ex situ ESR. The ESR data were collected at both pyrolysis and room temperatures, and apparent differences were analyzed. The differences were diminished when our data were converted to the same measurement temperature level based on the Boltzmann distribution law. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of process conditions on the behavior of free radicals in the solid phase of coal. We found that temperature is the most important factor determining the formation and behavior of free radicals in the solid phase, followed by the residence time. Relatively active radicals were quenched by hydrogen-donor solvents to some degree, while stable radicals remained.

  17. Radicals in arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Palenstijn (Willem Jan)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractLet K be a field. A radical is an element of the algebraic closure of K of which a power is contained in K. In this thesis we develop a method for determining what we call entanglement. This describes unexpected additive relations between radicals, and is encoded in an entanglement

  18. Photoprotective effect of vitamins A and E on polyamine and oxygenated free radical metabolism in hairless mouse epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khettab, N; Amory, M C; Briand, G; Bousquet, B; Combre, A; Forlot, P; Barey, M

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the photoprotective effect on skin of vitamins A and E, due to inhibition of polyamine synthesis and production of free radicals. These variables were measured in the lumbar epidermis of the female hairless mouse subjected to UVA + B irradiation. Polyamines were assayed in epidermal homogenate by HPLC, and production of oxygenated free radicals was determined by spectrofluorometric assay of malonyl dialdehyde. It was determined that butyl-hydroxy-toluene and vitamin E inhibited production of free radicals (56% and 60%, respectively) and caused a significant reduction in polyamine biosynthesis (P less than 0.01), whereas the inhibitory effect of malonyl dialdehyde induced by vitamin A (30%) had no associated effect on polyamine metabolism.

  19. Multiple free-radical scavenging capacity in serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oowada, Shigeru; Endo, Nobuyuki; Kameya, Hiromi; Shimmei, Masashi; Kotake, Yashige

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a method to determine serum scavenging-capacity profile against multiple free radical species, namely hydroxyl radical, superoxide radical, alkoxyl radical, alkylperoxyl radical, alkyl radical, and singlet oxygen. This method was applied to a cohort of chronic kidney disease patients. Each free radical species was produced with a common experimental procedure; i.e., uv/visible-light photolysis of free-radical precursor/sensitizer. The decrease in free-radical concentration by the presence of serum was quantified with electron spin resonance spin trapping method, from which the scavenging capacity was calculated. There was a significant capacity change in the disease group (n = 45) as compared with the healthy control group (n = 30). The percent values of disease’s scavenging capacity with respect to control group indicated statistically significant differences in all free-radical species except alkylperoxyl radical, i.e., hydroxyl radical, 73 ± 12% (p = 0.001); superoxide radical, 158 ± 50% (p = 0.001); alkoxyl radical, 121 ± 30% (p = 0.005); alkylperoxyl radical, 123 ± 32% (p>0.1); alkyl radical, 26 ± 14% (p = 0.001); and singlet oxygen, 57 ± 18% (p = 0.001). The scavenging capacity profile was illustrated using a radar chart, clearly demonstrating the characteristic change in the disease group. Although the cause of the scavenging capacity change by the disease state is not completely understood, the profile of multiple radical scavenging capacities may become a useful diagnostic tool. PMID:22962529

  20. Preoperative radiochemotherapy and radical surgery in comparison with radical surgery alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, C.; Schettler, D.; Bohndorf, W.

    1994-01-01

    A multicentric, randomized study of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and the oropharynx has been undertaken by DOeSAK. The results after radical surgery alone have been compared with the results of combined preoperative radiochemotherapy followed by radical surgery. Patients with primary (biopsy proven) SCC of the oral cavity or the oropharynx with tumor nodes metastasis (TNM) stages T2-4, N0-3, M0 were included in the study. A total of 141 patients were treated by radical surgery alone, whereas 127 patients were treated by radical surgery preceded by preoperative radiochemotherapy. The pre-operative treatment consisted of conventionally fractioned irradiation on the primary and the regional lymph nodes with a total dose of 36 Gy (5 x 2 Gy per week) and low-dose cisplatin chemotherapy with 5 x 12.5 mg cisplatin per m 2 of body surface during the first week of treatment. Radical surgery according to be DOeSAK definitions (DOeSAK, 1982) was performed after a delay of 10-14 days. During the follow-up period, 28.2% of all patients suffered from locoregional recurrence, and 27.2% of the patients died. The percentages were higher after radical surgery alone for locoregional recurrence (31% and 15.6%) and for death (28% and 18.6%). The life-table analysis showed improved survival rates of 4.5% after 1 year and 8.3% after 2 years in the group of patients treated with combined therapy. The demonstrated improvement appeared to be significant with the Gehan-Wilcoxon test as well as with the log rank test below a P value of 5%. (au) (29 refs.)

  1. Radicals in arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palenstijn, Willem Jan

    2014-01-01

    Let K be a field. A radical is an element of the algebraic closure of K of which a power is contained in K. In this thesis we develop a method for determining what we call entanglement. This describes unexpected additive relations between radicals, and is encoded in an entanglement group. We give

  2. [The significance of free radicals and antioxidants due to the load induced by sport activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, V; Liska, J; Racek, J; Rokyta, R

    2004-01-01

    Sport performance is followed by a high production of free radicals. The main reasons are reperfusion after the previous imbalance between the increased need of the organism and the ability of blood supply by oxygen, increased production of ATP, decomposition of the cells particularly white blood cells, oxidation of the purin basis from DNA, stress, output of epinephrine release of free iron, increased temperature in the muscle and its inflammation, and the reception of free radicals from external environment. Peroxidation of lipids, proteins, DNA and other compounds follows the previous biochemical steps. Antioxidants are consumed by free radicals, antioxidative enzymes are released into blood plasma, intracellular calcium is increased, the production of nitric oxide rises, the levels of hydrogen peroxide and hypochlorous acid increase. These penetrate through the membranes and oxidatively damage the tissues. Training improves the ability of the organism to balance the increased load of free radicals. The damage can be lowered by the application of a mixture of antioxidants, the most important are vitamin C, A, E, glutathione, selenium, carnosine, eventually bioflavonoids and ginkgo biloba. The lack of antioxidants can significantly diminish the sport performance and therefore the supplementation with antioxidants is for top sportsmen but also for aged people advisable.

  3. The radiolysis of uracil in oxygenated aqueous solutions. A study by product analysis and pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuchnmann, M.N.; Sonntag, C. von

    1983-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals are generated by the radiolysis of N 2 O-O 2 (4:1 v/v)-saturated aqueous solutions of uracil. They add to the 5,6-double bond of the substrate. These radicals are converted by oxygen into the corresponding peroxyl radicals (I) and (II), respectively. Peroxyl radical (I) undergoes a base-induced O 2 - elimination. As an intermediate 5-hydroxyisopyrimidine is formed which rearranges into isobarbituric acid and adds water forming 5,6-dihydro-5,6-dihydroxyuracil. Competing with this base-induced reaction of radical (I) there is a bimolecular decay of radicals (I) and (II). These processes become predominant at low pH. For this reason a strong pH dependence of G (products) is observed. The major products are (G values at pH 3 and 10 in parentheses) 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrouracil (1.1; 2.4), isobarbituric acid (0; 1.2), N-formyl-5-hydroxyhydantoin (1.6; 0.2), 5-hydroxybarbituric acid (0.9; 0.2). 5-Hydroxybarbituric acid is formed in its keto form. Its deprotonation has been followed by pulse conductometry. Details of the reaction mechanism, e.g. the involvement of oxyl radicals in the bimolecular decay of (I) and (II), are discussed. (author)

  4. Anatomical landmarks of radical prostatecomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Horn, Lars-Christian; Neuhaus, Jochen; Constantinides, Costantinos; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, we review current literature and based on our experience, we present the anatomical landmarks of open and laparoscopic/endoscopic radical prostatectomy. A thorough literature search was performed with the Medline database on the anatomy and the nomenclature of the structures surrounding the prostate gland. The correct handling of puboprostatic ligaments, external urethral sphincter, prostatic fascias and neurovascular bundle is necessary for avoiding malfunction of the urogenital system after radical prostatectomy. When evaluating new prostatectomy techniques, we should always take into account both clinical and final oncological outcomes. The present review adds further knowledge to the existing "postprostatectomy anatomical hazard" debate. It emphasizes upon the role of the puboprostatic ligaments and the course of the external urethral sphincter for urinary continence. When performing an intrafascial nerve sparing prostatectomy most urologists tend to approach as close to the prostatic capsula as possible, even though there is no concurrence regarding the nomenclature of the surrounding fascias and the course of the actual neurovascular bundles. After completion of an intrafascial technique the specimen does not contain any periprostatic tissue and thus the detection of pT3a disease is not feasible. This especially becomes problematic if the tumour reaches the resection margin. Nerve sparing open and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy should aim in maintaining sexual function, recuperating early continence after surgery, without hindering the final oncological outcome to the procedure. Despite the different approaches for radical prostatectomy the key for better results is the understanding of the anatomy of the bladder neck and the urethra.

  5. Mechanistic investigations of novel photoinitiators for radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a wide variety of photoinitiators (PIs) available for radical polymerizations. A common example are two-component (Type II) systems such as benzophenone and tertiary amines. However these systems also suffer from problems due to bimolecularity. These include the possible back electron transfer (BET) leading to deactivation, as well as the solvent cage effect, occurring in highly viscous media. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the reaction mechanism of several photoinitiating systems, which show superior performance. Moreover, they exhibit additional benefits such as circumvention of oxygen inhibition by decarboxylation. Thereby this work helps to understand the molecular basis of the performance of different PI systems. In vestigated PIs included benzaldoxime esters, covalently linked benzophenone and N-phenylglycine as well as derivatives of both systems. Furthermore a PI based on benzophenone extended by ethynyl moeities is discussed. The main tool in this investigation was photo-CIDNP (chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization), an NMR based technique for studying radical reactions. A complementary view was obtained with TR-EPR (time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance), which provides direct information about the active radical species. The results were further compared with quantum mechanical calculations (DFT) of the magnetic properties of the radicals. The theoretical approach was further applied to other paramagnetic species such as donor-acceptor systems. (author) [de

  6. Radical cations of quadricyclane and norbornadiene in polar ZSM-5 matrices: Radical cation photochemical transformations without photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnabas, M.V.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    Radical cations of quadricyclane (Q) and norbornadiene (NBD) are produced by γ-radiolysis in zeolites. In polar ZSM-5, only one radical cation is initially observed below 100K. Increasing the temperature above 200K gives rise to the cyclopentadiene radical cation. Higher temperatures (>360K) give rise to the cyclopenten-4-yl radical. The observation of cyclopentadiene radical cation implies the occurrence of the reverse Diels-Alder reaction. This is a thermally forbidden, photochemically allowed, process, which is made possible by the interaction of the polar zeolite matrix sites with parent NBD and Q radical cations

  7. Research Note: Inside an Indonesian Online Library for Radical Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Haniff Hassan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This Research Note provides a review of an Indonesian online library for radical materials. The objective of this review is to compile data and information that will contribute to the understanding of the online radicalisation phenomenon as well as the extremists themselves. Based on data found on the online library, this Research Note reports findings on the influence of Al-Maqdisi’s website; the emphasis on translation work of Arabic materials to Indonesian language by radicals and the value of Arabic materials to them. It also covers influential thinkers and ideologues and the use of the Wikipedia modus operandi to hasten the development of the website and effect mobilisation and recruitment, among others things. Based on the data found, this Research Note concludes that ideas matter to radicals.

  8. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e aq - , (CH 3 ) 2 (OH) CCH 2 · , CO 2 ·- , H · , ·OH and N 3 · radicals were studied by γ-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/·OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  9. The reactions of SO3 with HO2 radical and H2O...HO2 radical complex. Theoretical study on the atmospheric formation of HSO5 and H2SO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Javier; Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Anglada, Josep M

    2010-03-07

    The influence of a single water molecule on the gas-phase reactivity of the HO(2) radical has been investigated by studying the reactions of SO(3) with the HO(2) radical and with the H(2)O...HO(2) radical complex. The naked reaction leads to the formation of the HSO(5) radical, with a computed binding energy of 13.81 kcal mol(-1). The reaction with the H(2)O...HO(2) radical complex can give two different products, namely (a) HSO(5) + H(2)O, which has a binding energy that is computed to be 4.76 kcal mol(-1) more stable than the SO(3) + H(2)O...HO(2) reactants (Delta(E + ZPE) at 0K) and an estimated branching ratio of about 34% at 298K and (b) sulfuric acid and the hydroperoxyl radical, which is computed to be 10.51 kcal mol(-1) below the energy of the reactants (Delta(E + ZPE) at 0K), with an estimated branching ratio of about 66% at 298K. The fact that one of the products is H(2)SO(4) may have relevance in the chemistry of the atmosphere. Interestingly, the water molecule acts as a catalyst, [as it occurs in (a)] or as a reactant [as it occurs in (b)]. For a sake of completeness we have also calculated the anharmonic vibrational frequencies for HO(2), HSO(5), the HSO(5)...H(2)O hydrogen bonded complex, H(2)SO(4), and two H(2)SO(4)...H(2)O complexes, in order to help with the possible experimental identification of some of these species.

  10. Diffusion of 1,4-butanedithiol radicals on Au(111) and Au(100): A DFT-based comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Andreas; Pehlke, Eckhard [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Organic molecules chemisorbed on surfaces hold the perspective of surface functionalization. The 1,4-butanedithiol radical chemisorbed at the Au(111) or Au(100) surface serves as a model system for the S-Au molecule-substrate bond. Density functional total-energy calculations have been carried out for the chemisorption of the radical on the unreconstructed Au surfaces, which are both known to be stabilized under electrochemical conditions. Local minima with close-by energies indicate multi-valley potential-energy surfaces, which originate from the interplay between the two S-Au adsorbate-substrate bonds and the internal degrees of freedom of the butanedithiol radical. Diffusion paths of the radical on both Au surfaces have been calculated within DFT using VASP. The diffusion barriers for translation and rotation of the radical differ. They can be fine-tuned by varying the applied potential in the electrochemical cell. This is considered theoretically by inspecting the variation of the dipole moment along the reaction paths. Consequences for the dynamics of succeeding diffusion hops are discussed.

  11. Lymphocyte-Related Inflammation and Immune-Based Scores Predict Prognosis of Chordoma Patients After Radical Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhao Hu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory microenvironment plays a critical role in the development and progression of malignancies. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of lymphocyte-related inflammation and immune-based prognostic scores in patients with chordoma after radical resection, including the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR, platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR, monocyte-lymphocyte ratio (MLR, and systemic immune-inflammation index (SII. A total of 172 consecutive patients with chordoma who underwent radical resection were reviewed. R software was used to randomly select 86 chordoma patients as a training set and 86 chordoma patients as a validation set. Potential prognostic factors were also identified, including age, sex, tumor localization, KPS, Enneking stage, tumor size, and tumor metastasis. Overall survival (OS was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method and multivariate Cox regression analyses. NLR, PLR, SII, Enneking stage, tumor differentiation and tumor metastasis were identified as significant factors from the univariate analysis in both the training and validation sets and were subjected to multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis. The univariate analysis showed that NLR ≥1.65, PLR ≥121, and SII ≥370×109/L were significantly associated with poor OS. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis, SII, Enneking stage and tumor metastasis were significantly associated with OS. As noninvasive, low-cost, reproducible prognostic biomarkers, NLR, PLR and SII could help predict poor prognosis in patients with chordoma after radical resection. This finding may contribute to the development of more effective tailored therapy according to the characteristics of individual tumors.

  12. Tropospheric chemistry of natural hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and peroxy radicals: Their connections to sulfuric acid production and climate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1993-05-01

    Recent work has shown that natural hydrocarbon emissions can significantly affect the levels of urban and regional tropospheric ozone. We report on the reactivities of these biogenic trace gases, particularly isoprene, focusing on their importance in the production of aldehydes and peroxy radicals, leading to increased levels of hydrogen over regional forests. Hydrogen peroxide can lead to the wet oxidation of sulfur dioxide to acidic sulfate in aerosols, fogs, and clouds. In turn, acidic sulfate can act to as a light scattering aerosol and a source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), potentially leading to global cooling. Aerosol sulfate and other dissolved organic and inorganic compounds can also play important roles as a greenhouse species in the lower troposphere

  13. beta-Scission of C-3 (beta-carbon) alkoxyl radicals on peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, H A; Mortimer, A; Easton, C J

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O(2) brings about multiple changes in the target molecules. These alterations include oxidation of side chains, fragmentation, cross-linking, changes in hydrophobicity and conformation, altered susceptibility to proteolytic enzymes, and formation...... of methanal (formaldehyde). This product has been quantified with a number of oxidized peptides and proteins, and can account for up to 64% of the initial attacking radicals with some Ala peptides. When quantified together with the hydroperoxide precursors, these species account for up to 80% of the initial...... radicals, confirming that this is a major process. Methanal causes cell toxicity and DNA damage and is an animal carcinogen and a genotoxic agent in human cells. Thus, the formation and subsequent reaction of alkoxyl radicals formed at the C-3 position on aliphatic amino acid side chains on peptides...

  14. Investigation of free-radical processes in low temperature radiolysis of copolymers of ethylene with styrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal'tseva, A.P.; Golikov, V.P.; Leshchenko, S.S.; Karpov, V.L.; Muromtsev, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Free radical processes during γ-radiolysis of statistical ethylene-styrene copolimers (ESC) have been investigated. The presence of styrene links in the ESC has been shown to reduce both radical yields and their reaction ability as compared with low density polyethylene irradiated under the same conditions. The character of radical processes in ESC sighificantly depends both on styrene concentration in them and on the dose absorbed. The most pronounced decrease in radical yield is found in the copolymer having 5 mol % styrene. This effect seems to be caused by the accumulation in the irradiated copolymer of products which are capable of more effective dissipation of absorbed energy than only styrene links alone

  15. ESR investigation of L-α-alanine and sucrose radicals produced by heavy-ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Sato, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated sucrose and L-α-alanine radicals produced by heavy (particle) ion irradiation with various LETs (linear energy transfer). The impact of the heavy ions on the samples produced stable free radicals, which were analyzed by ESR (electron spin resonance). Identical spectra were measured after one year. The obtained spectral patterns were the same as those for helium (He), carbon (C), and neon (Ne) ions irradiation. The absorbed dose dependences for the irradiated sucrose and alanine samples were examined. The ESR response has a linear relation with the absorbed dose. The ESR response at 60 Gy was slightly lower than a linear line for sucrose; however, the response showed good linearity for the alanine. In addition, the total spin concentration obtained by heavy-ion irradiation correlated logarithmically with the LET. Qualitative ESR analyse showed that the production of sucrose and alanine radicals depended on both different particle irradiation and the LET under the same dose. Thus, the present ESR results imply that sucrose together with L-α-alanine can be used to monitor LET as well as the number of ionizing particle for the production of stable free radicals. (author)

  16. High-frequency electromagnetic radiation and the production of free radicals in four mouse organs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barcal, J.; Stopka, Pavel; Křížová, Jana; Vrba, J.; Vožeh, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 56, 1-2 (2014), s. 9-14 ISSN 1337-933X Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Free radicals * Mobile phones * Paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy * Radiation Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  17. α-Tocopherol impact on oxy-radical induced free radical decomposition of DMSO: Spin trapping EPR and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Cwielag-Piasecka, Irmina; Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: α-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of ·CH 3 to ·OCH 3 . Display Omitted Highlights: → α-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of DMSO to ·CH 3 . → α-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of ·CH 3 to ·OCH 3 . → α-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of PBN. → The structures of observed spin adducts were theoretically confirmed. - Abstract: EPR spin trapping and theoretical methods such as density functional theory (DFT) as well as combined DFT and quadratic configuration interaction approach (DFT/QCISD) were used to identify the radicals produced in the reaction of oxy-radicals and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence and absence of α-tocopherol. Additionally, the mixtures of α-tocopherol with linolenic acid and glyceryl trilinoleate as well as bioglycerols (glycerol fractions from biodiesel production) were tested. α-Tocopherol inhibited oxidation of the main decomposition product of DMSO, ·CH 3 to ·OCH 3 but did not prevent the transformation process of N-t-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) into 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). Theoretical investigations confirmed the structures of proposed spin adducts and allowed to correlate the EPR parameters observed in the experiment with the spin adducts electronic structure.

  18. ESR and spin-trapping study of room-temperature radicals in γ-irradiated polycrystalline pyrimidine nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Kuwabara, M.; Yoshii, G.

    1983-01-01

    Free radicals produced in γ-irradiated polycrystalline 5'-dCMP (free acid and 2Na), 3'-CMP (free acid and Li), and 5'-UMP (2Na) were studied by ESR and spin-trapping. The results were compared with those of previous single-crystal studies. Furthermore, attempts to identify free radicals in γ-irradiated 5'-dUMP (2Na), 5'-CMP (free acid and 2Na), and 3'-UMP (Na), which have not been the subject of single-crystal studies to date, were made. After γ-irradiation at room temperature to a dose of 100 kGy, the polycrystalline samples were dissolved in aqueous solutions of t-nitrosobutane in the presence or absence of oxygen. The presence or absence of oxygen was helpful in analyzing the presence of more than one radical species. Thus two types of radicals could be established for all samples. Radical -C 5 H-C 6 H 2 -, formed by H addition to the double bond of the base, was observed in the presence of oxygen, and radical -C/sub 5'/H 2 , formed by the transformation of the radical due to loss of an H atom at the C/sub 5'/ position of the sugar moiety, was observed in the absence of oxygen. In some cases, radicals located at the C/sub 1'/, C/sub 4'/, and C/sub 5'/ of the sugar moiety were tentatively identified. For the ESR spectrum associated with radical at C/sub 1'/ the possibility of another explanation was also discussed in relation to the spectrum due to radical at C 5 of the base. Radical -C 5 H 2 -C 6 H-, formed by H addition to the double bond of the base, was not identified

  19. Radiolysis of uracil in oxygenated aqueous solutions. A study by product analysis and pulse radiolysis. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchnmann, M N; Sonntag, C von [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Strahlenchemie

    1983-10-01

    Hydroxyl radicals are generated by the radiolysis of N/sub 2/O-O/sub 2/ (4:1 v/v)-saturated aqueous solutions of uracil. They add to the 5,6-double bond of the substrate. These radicals are converted by oxygen into the corresponding peroxyl radicals (I) and (II), respectively. Peroxyl radical (I) undergoes a base-induced O/sub 2//sup -/ elimination. As an intermediate 5-hydroxyisopyrimidine is formed which rearranges into isobarbituric acid and adds water forming 5,6-dihydro-5,6-dihydroxyuracil. Competing with this base-induced reaction of radical (I) there is a bimolecular decay of radicals (I) and (II). These processes become predominant at low pH. For this reason a strong pH dependence of G (products) is observed. The major products are (G values at pH 3 and 10 in parentheses) 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrouracil (1.1; 2.4), isobarbituric acid (0; 1.2), N-formyl-5-hydroxyhydantoin (1.6; 0.2), 5-hydroxybarbituric acid (0.9; 0.2). 5-Hydroxybarbituric acid is formed in its keto form. Its deprotonation has been followed by pulse conductometry. Details of the reaction mechanism, e.g. the involvement of oxyl radicals in the bimolecular decay of (I) and (II), are discussed.

  20. Peroxyl radical reactions with carotenoids in microemulsions: Influence of microemulsion composition and the nature of peroxyl radical precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Agamey, Ali; McGarvey, David J

    2016-01-01

    The reactions of acetylperoxyl radicals with different carotenoids (7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene and ζ-carotene) in SDS and CTAC microemulsions of different compositions were investigated using laser flash photolysis (LFP) coupled with kinetic absorption spectroscopy. The primary objective of this study was to explore the influence of microemulsion composition and the type of surfactant used on the yields and kinetics of various transients formed from the reaction of acetylperoxyl radicals with carotenoids. Also, the influence of the site (hydrocarbon phases or aqueous phase) of generation of the peroxyl radical precursor was examined by using 4-acetyl-4-phenylpiperidine hydrochloride (APPHCl) and 1,1-diphenylacetone (11DPA) as water-soluble and lipid-soluble peroxyl radical precursors, respectively. LFP of peroxyl radical precursors with 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene (77DH) in different microemulsions gives rise to the formation of three distinct transients namely addition radical (λmax=460 nm), near infrared transient1 (NIR, λmax=700 nm) and 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene radical cation (77DH(•+), λmax=770 nm). In addition, for ζ-carotene (ZETA) two transients (near infrared transient1 (NIR1, λmax=660 nm) and ζ-carotene radical cation (ZETA(•+), λmax=730-740 nm)) are generated following LFP of peroxyl radical precursors in the presence of ζ-carotene (ZETA) in different microemulsions. The results show that the composition of the microemulsion strongly influences the observed yield and kinetics of the transients formed from the reactions of peroxyl radicals (acetylperoxyl radicals) with carotenoids (77DH and ZETA). Also, the type of surfactant used in the microemulsions influences the yield of the transients formed. The dependence of the transient yields and kinetics on microemulsion composition (or the type of surfactant used in the microemulsion) can be attributed to the change of the polarity of the microenvironment of the carotenoid. Furthermore, the nature of

  1. Taking a radical position: Evidence for position specific radical representations in Chinese character recognition using masked priming ERP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Fan eSu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the investigation of orthographic representation of Chinese characters, one question that has stimulated much research is whether radicals (character components are specified for spatial position in a character (e.g. Ding, Peng, & Taft, 2004; Tsang & Chen, 2009. Differing from previous work, component or radical position information in this study is conceived in terms of relative frequency across different positions of characters containing it. A lexical decision task in a masked priming paradigm focusing on radicals with preferred position of occurrence was conducted. A radical position that encompasses more characters than other positions was identified to be the preferred position of a particular radical. The prime that was exposed for 96ms might share a radical with the target in the same or different positions. Moreover, the shared radical appeared either in its preferred or non-preferred position in the target. While response latencies only revealed the effect of graphical similarity, both effects of graphical similarity and radical position preference were found in the ERP results. The former effect was reflected in greater positivity in occipital P1 and greater negativity in N400 for radicals in different positions in prime and target characters. The latter effect manifested as greater negativity in occipital N170 and greater positivity in frontal P200 in the same time window elicited by radicals in their non-preferred position. Equally interesting was the reversal of the effect of radical position preference in N400 with greater negativity associated with radicals in preferred position. These findings identify the early ERP components associated with activation of position-specific radical representations in the orthographic lexicon, and reveal the change in the nature of competition from processing at the radical level to the lexical level.

  2. Functions of Research in Radical Behaviorism for the Further Development of Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigland, Sam

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of behavior began as an inductively oriented, empirically based scientific field. As the field grew, its distinctive system of science--radical behaviorism--grew with it. The continuing growth of the empirical base of the field has been accompanied by the growth of the literature on radical behaviorism and its…

  3. Methodological Behaviorism from the Standpoint of a Radical Behaviorist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J

    2013-01-01

    Methodological behaviorism is the name for a prescriptive orientation to psychological science. Its first and original feature is that the terms and concepts deployed in psychological theories and explanations should be based on observable stimuli and behavior. I argue that the interpretation of the phrase "based on" has changed over the years because of the influence of operationism. Its second feature, which developed after the first and is prominent in contemporary psychology, is that research should emphasize formal testing of a theory that involves mediating theoretical entities from an nonbehavioral dimension according to the hypothetico-deductive method. I argue that for contemporary methodological behaviorism, explanations of the behavior of both participants and scientists appeal to the mediating entities as mental causes, if only indirectly. In contrast to methodological behaviorism is the radical behaviorism of B. F. Skinner. Unlike methodological behaviorism, radical behaviorism conceives of verbal behavior in terms of an operant process that involves antecedent circumstances and reinforcing consequences, rather than in terms of a nonbehavioral process that involves reference and symbolism. In addition, radical behaviorism recognizes private behavioral events and subscribes to research and explanatory practices that do not include testing hypotheses about supposed mediating entities from another dimension. I conclude that methodological behaviorism is actually closer to mentalism than to Skinner's radical behaviorism.

  4. The free radical species in polyacrylonitrile fibers induced by γ-radiation and their decay behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weihua; Wang Mouhua; Xing Zhe; Wu Guozhong

    2012-01-01

    Free radicals in vacuum, air and oxygen atmospheres were studied using electron spin resonance (ESR). Mainly two types of radicals, namely alkyl radicals and polyimine radicals, are formed in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers after γ-ray irradiation. The G value of the radical formation was calculated to be 2.1 (number of radicals per 100 eV absorbed) in air at room temperature based on the ESR measurements. The radical stability and decay behaviors at room temperature and elevated temperatures were also investigated under different atmospheres. The alkyl radicals were found to be rather stable when stored in vacuum at room temperature, but they decayed via reaction with oxygen when stored in air. The alkyl radicals disappeared completely after a thermal treatment at 110 °C in vacuum, but only 15% of the polyimine radicals decayed; this indicates that polyimine radicals are more stable compared to the alkyl radicals due to their lower mobility. - Highlights: ► Radicals formed by radiation were assigned to polyimine and alkyl radicals. ► G-value of radicals was measured to be 2.1 per 100 eV. ► The radicals were found to be extremely stable in vacuum at room temperature. ► Effect of oxygen on radical decay under various conditions was studied.

  5. The Rise of Radicals in Bioinorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harry B; Winkler, Jay R

    2016-10-01

    Prior to 1950, the consensus was that biological transformations occurred in two-electron steps, thereby avoiding the generation of free radicals. Dramatic advances in spectroscopy, biochemistry, and molecular biology have led to the realization that protein-based radicals participate in a vast array of vital biological mechanisms. Redox processes involving high-potential intermediates formed in reactions with O 2 are particularly susceptible to radical formation. Clusters of tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) residues have been found in many O 2 -reactive enzymes, raising the possibility that they play an antioxidant protective role. In blue copper proteins with plastocyanin-like domains, Tyr/Trp clusters are uncommon in the low-potential single-domain electron-transfer proteins and in the two-domain copper nitrite reductases. The two-domain muticopper oxidases, however, exhibit clusters of Tyr and Trp residues near the trinuclear copper active site where O 2 is reduced. These clusters may play a protective role to ensure that reactive oxygen species are not liberated during O 2 reduction.

  6. Ethylbenzene induces microsomal oxygen free radical generation: antibody-directed characterization of the responsible cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serron, S C; Dwivedi, N; Backes, W L

    2000-05-01

    Small aromatic hydrocarbons cause changes in oxidative metabolism by modulating the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes, with the changes in these enzymes being responsible for qualitative changes in aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine if exposure to the small alkylbenzene ethylbenzene (EB) leads to an increase in hepatic free radical production. Male F344 rats were treated with ip injections of EB (10 mmol/kg) and compared to corn oil controls. Hepatic free radical production was examined by measuring the conversion of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) to its fluorescent product 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). A significant elevation of fluorescent DCF production was observed after treatment with EB, despite the lack of effect on overall cytochrome P450 levels. This process was shown to be inhibitable by metyrapone, an inhibitor of P450. DCF production was also inhibited by catalase, suggesting that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is one of the reactive oxygen intermediates involved in EB-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Interestingly, superoxide dismutase (SOD) did not inhibit DCF production in corn oil-treated rats but was an effective inhibitor in the EB-treated groups. In an effort to determine if the increase in ROS production was related to changes in specific P450 enzymes, DCF production was measured in the presence of anti-CYP2B, anti-CYP2C11, anti-CYP2E1, and anti-CYP3A2 inhibitory antibodies. Anti-CYP2B antibodies inhibited DCF production in EB-treated, but not corn oil groups, which is consistent with the low constitutive levels of this enzyme and its induction by EB. The data also demonstrate that CYP2B contributes to ROS production. Anti-CYP2C11 did not influence DCF production in either group. ROS formation in corn oil-treated rats as well as in ethylbenzene-treated rats was also inhibited with antibodies to anti-CYP2E1 and anti-CYP3A2. These results suggest that CYP2C11 does not appear to

  7. Radical's view of sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: General concept in radiation biology is that free radicals are highly reactive and they can damage vital cellular molecules leading to injurious effects. However, in this talk, evidence will be presented through the techniques of electron paramagnetic resonance ( EPR ) and pulse radiolysis that free radicals can be highly selective in their reaction with the target molecules. In addition, attempts will be made to present a brief account of emerging scenario of free radical generation, identification and their involvement in radiation damage mechanisms in chemical and biological systems

  8. OH radicals distribution in an Ar-H{sub 2}O atmospheric plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.; Leys, C. [Department of Applied Physics, Research Unit Plasma Technology, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Nikiforov, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Research Unit Plasma Technology, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Academicheskaya St., 1, Ivanono, 153045 (Russian Federation); Xiong, Q. [Department of Applied Physics, Research Unit Plasma Technology, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, Hubei 430074 (China); Britun, N. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Universite de Mons, 20 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Snyders, R. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Universite de Mons, 20 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Centre, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Lu, X. [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Recently, plasma jet systems found numerous applications in the field of biomedicine and treatment of temperature-sensitive materials. OH radicals are one of the main active species produced by these plasmas. Present study deals with the investigation of RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet in terms of OH radicals production by admixture of H{sub 2}O into argon used as a feed gas. Generation of OH radicals is studied by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The excitation dynamics of OH radicals induced by the laser photons is studied by time-resolved spectroscopy. It is shown that vibrational and rotational energy transfer processes, which are sensitive to the surrounding species, can lead to the complication in the OH radicals diagnostics at high pressure and have to be considered during experiments. The axial and radial 2D maps of absolute densities of hydroxyl radicals at different water contents are obtained. The highest density of 1.15 × 10{sup 20} m{sup −3} is measured in the plasma core for the case of 0.3% H{sub 2}O. In the x–y-plane, the OH density steeply decreases within a range of ±2 mm from its maximum value down to 10{sup 18} m{sup −3}. The effect of H{sub 2}O addition on the generation of OH radicals is investigated and discussed.

  9. Prospects of radical-interacting porphyrin photosensitizers and their possible use in photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Dezso; Shuliakovskaya, T.; Vidoczy, Tamas; Elzemzam, Saleh; Vasvari, Gabor; Suemegi, L.; Kuti, Zsolt

    1994-03-01

    Based on literature data obtained in various fields with respect to studies on the role of free radicals in biology and on the kinetics of triplet-doublet interactions, it is suggested that excited photosensitizers react in vivo with free radicals formed in malignant tissues during photodynamic therapy (PDT) and this interaction competes with sensitizer-radical + molecule and the singlet oxygen mediated effects. Experimental results by laser flash photolysis and electron spin resonance revealed that sensitizer applied in PDT react with stable free radicals presumably both by energy transfer and electron transfer.

  10. Investigation of the oxidation of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) by OH radicals in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Albrecht, Sascha; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Gkatzelis, Georgios I.; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Kaminski, Martin; Keutsch, Frank N.; Novelli, Anna; Reimer, David; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Vereecken, Luc; Wegener, Robert; Zaytsev, Alexander; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    The photooxidation of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) was investigated in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR for conditions at which organic peroxy radicals (RO2) mainly reacted with NO (high NO case) and for conditions at which other reaction channels could compete (low NO case). Measurements of trace gas concentrations were compared to calculated concentration time series applying the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM version 3.3.1). Product yields of methylglyoxal and glycolaldehyde were determined from measurements. For the high NO case, the methylglyoxal yield was (19 ± 3) % and the glycolaldehyde yield was (65 ± 14) %, consistent with recent literature studies. For the low NO case, the methylglyoxal yield reduced to (5 ± 2) % because other RO2 reaction channels that do not form methylglyoxal became important. Consistent with literature data, the glycolaldehyde yield of (37 ± 9) % determined in the experiment was not reduced as much as implemented in the MCM, suggesting additional reaction channels producing glycolaldehyde. At the same time, direct quantification of OH radicals in the experiments shows the need for an enhanced OH radical production at low NO conditions similar to previous studies investigating the oxidation of the parent VOC isoprene and methacrolein, the second major oxidation product of isoprene. For MVK the model-measurement discrepancy was up to a factor of 2. Product yields and OH observations were consistent with assumptions of additional RO2 plus HO2 reaction channels as proposed in literature for the major RO2 species formed from the reaction of MVK with OH. However, this study shows that also HO2 radical concentrations are underestimated by the model, suggesting that additional OH is not directly produced from RO2 radical reactions, but indirectly via increased HO2. Quantum chemical calculations show that HO2 could be produced from a fast 1,4-H shift of the second most important MVK derived RO2 species (reaction rate constant 0

  11. Loading of free radicals on the functional graphene combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry screening method for the detection of radical-scavenging natural antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoying; Shi, Gaofeng; Chen, Xuefu; Chen, Fuwen; Yao, Ruixing; Wang, Zhenju

    2013-11-13

    radical scavenging capacity. The use of the free radical reaction screening method based on LC-PDA-ESI/APCI-MS/MS would provide a new approach for rapid detection and identification of radical-scavenging natural antioxidants from complex matrices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. UV absorption spectrum and kinetics of the self-reaction of neopentyl radicals in the gas phase at 298 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Ellermann, T.; Wallington, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    , sigma((CH3)3CCH2) (240 nm) = (4.88 +/- 0.42) x 10(-18) cm2 molecule-1, has been obtained based on absolute yields using CH3O2 as a reference. The decay of neopentyl radicals was found to follow second-order kinetics in accordance with the self-reaction 2(CH3)3CCH2--> products, with an absolute...

  13. EPR spin trapping of protein radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, Clare Louise

    2004-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping was originally developed to aid the detection of low-molecular-mass radicals formed in chemical systems. It has subsequently found widespread use in biology and medicine for the direct detection of radical species formed during oxidative stress...... tumbling radicals are often broad and relatively poor in distinctive features, a number of techniques have been developed that allow a wealth of information to be obtained about the nature, site, and reactions of such radicals. This article summarizes recent developments in this area and reviews selected...... examples of radical formation on proteins....

  14. Numerical estimation of ultrasonic production of hydrogen: Effect of ideal and real gas based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-01-01

    Based on two different assumptions regarding the equation describing the state of the gases within an acoustic cavitation bubble, this paper studies the sonochemical production of hydrogen, through two numerical models treating the evolution of a chemical mechanism within a single bubble saturated with oxygen during an oscillation cycle in water. The first approach is built on an ideal gas model, while the second one is founded on Van der Waals equation, and the main objective was to analyze the effect of the considered state equation on the ultrasonic hydrogen production retrieved by simulation under various operating conditions. The obtained results show that even when the second approach gives higher values of temperature, pressure and total free radicals production, yield of hydrogen does not follow the same trend. When comparing the results released by both models regarding hydrogen production, it was noticed that the ratio of the molar amount of hydrogen is frequency and acoustic amplitude dependent. The use of Van der Waals equation leads to higher quantities of hydrogen under low acoustic amplitude and high frequencies, while employing ideal gas law based model gains the upper hand regarding hydrogen production at low frequencies and high acoustic amplitudes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Photoswitching of triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion with photo-generated radical from hexaphenylbiimidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, Zafar [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Toffoletti, Antonio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Marzolo, 1, 35131 Padova (Italy); Zhao, Jianzhang, E-mail: zhaojzh@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Barbon, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.barbon@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Marzolo, 1, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    Photoirradiation generated radical from hexaphenyl-biimidazole (HPBI) was used for reversible switching of triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) upconversion, based on quenching of the photosensitizer triplet state by radical-triplet pair mechanism. Upon 365 nm irradiation, the TTA upconversion in a system composed by a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivative and perylene, was completely switched off due to quenching of triplet state of photosensitizer by photogenerated radical from HPBI. The upconversion was recovered after leaving the samples in darkness, due to regeneration of HPBI Dimer. The photophysical process involved in the photochromism and photoswitching of TTA upconversion were studied with steady-state UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and EPR spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: Radical-switched TTA upconversion was achieved with reversible quenching of the triplet state by photo-generated stable organic radical from photochromic hexaphenylbiimidazole.

  16. Study of Radiation Induced Radicals in HAP and β-TCP Based Bone Graft Materials by ERP Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltar-Strmecki, N.; Matkovic, I.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphates such as beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) are frequently used as dental implants due to proven excellent biocompatibility. Because of their resorption in the body and direct contact with tissues, in order to inactivate bacteria, fungal spores and viruses, they are usually sterilized by γ-irradiation. However, literature provides little information about effects of γ-irradiation on the formation and stability of the free radicals in the bone graft materials during and after sterilization procedure. In this study EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) spectroscopy was used to investigate HAP and β-TCP based dental implants present on the market. Eight dental graft materials present on the market were investigated: Bioresorb R Macropore, Poresorb R -TCP, Easy-Graft T M and Cerasorb R synthetic β-tricalcium phosphates, Easy-Graft T M crystal and Ossceram R two phase synthetic CaP consisting of 60 % HAP and 40 % β-TCP, and Dexabone R and Bio-Oss R bone graft material of bovine origin. EPR study shows that this is the only technique for characterization of free radicals that can simultaneously determine not only the presence and content, but also the position and the structure of free radicals formed by γ-sterilization in the investigated materials, as well as the paramagnetic substitutions incorporated in the materials during the synthesis (such as Mn 2+ , Fe 3+ or Cr 2+ ). Additionally, EPR provides information on stability of irradiation-induced radicals (CO 2 - , trapped H-atoms, NO 3 2 etc.) and processes for reducing them. Results show that EPR should be considered as a valuable technique in improving the quality of bone graft materials, which must be sterile, and to offer the high quality, efficacy and reliable materials to the patients.(author)

  17. Search for heavy long-lived charged particles with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G [Fakultaet fuer Mathematik und Physik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg i.Br. (Germany); Abbott, B [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Abdallah, J [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and ICREA, Barcelona (Spain); Abdelalim, A A [Section de Physique, Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Abdesselam, A [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Abdinov, O [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Abi, B [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Abolins, M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Abramowicz, H [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abreu, H [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud and CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Acerbi, E [INFN Sezione di Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy); Acharya, B S [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Udine (Italy); ICTP, Trieste [Italy; Adams, D L [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Addy, T N [Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Adelman, J [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Aderholz, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Muenchen (Germany); Adomeit, S [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Adragna, P [Department of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Adye, T [Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Aefsky, S [Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States)

    2011-09-20

    A search for long-lived charged particles reaching the muon spectrometer is performed using a data sample of 37 pb{sup -1} from pp collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2010. No excess is observed above the estimated background. Stable {tau}{sup -tilde} sleptons are excluded at 95% CL up to a mass of 136 GeV, in GMSB models with N{sub 5}=3, m{sub messenger}=250 TeV, sign({mu})=1 and tan{beta}=5. Electroweak production of sleptons is excluded up to a mass of 110 GeV. Gluino R-hadrons in a generic interaction model are excluded up to masses of 530 GeV to 544 GeV depending on the fraction of R-hadrons produced as g{sup -tilde} -balls.

  18. Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevitt, Adam J.; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-23

    Low temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165 and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, 3.9 - 4.9 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a slower rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 105 K. At room temperature, non-exponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C6H5CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C6H5 + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC6H4CH3) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the ~;; 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn?s moon Titan (~;;100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

  19. Improving the drug delivery characteristics of graphene oxide based polymer nanocomposites through the “one-pot” synthetic approach of single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Peng; Liu, Meiying; Tian, Jianwen; Deng, Fengjie [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Ke [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, Dazhuang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Liu, Liangji [Affiliated Hospital of Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330006 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The PEGylated graphene oxides with high water dispersibility, good biocompatibility as well as high drug loading capability were fabricated via “one-pot” SET-LRP. - Highlights: • Surface modification of graphene oxide with polymers. • One-pot single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization. • Improving drug delivery characteristics. • The synthetic approach is rather simple, universal and effective. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) based polymer nanocomposites have attracted extensive research interest recently for their outstanding physicochemical properties and potential applications. However, surface modification of GO with synthetic polymers has demonstrated to be trouble for most polymerization procedures are occurred under non-aqueous solution, which will in turn lead to the restacking of GO. In this work, a facile and efficient “one-pot” strategy has been developed for surface modification of GO with synthetic polymers through single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP). The GO based polymer nanocomposites were obtained via SET-LRP in aqueous solution using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) as the monomer and 11-bromoundecanoic acid as the initiator, which could be effectively adsorbed on GO through hydrophobic interaction. The successful preparation of GO based polymer nanocomposites was confirmed by a series of characterization techniques such as {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The resultant products exhibit high water disperisibility, excellent biocompatibility and high efficient drug loading capability, making these PEGylated GO nanocomposites promising candidates for biomedical applications.

  20. Metal-Diazo Radicals of α-Carbonyl Diazomethanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feifei; Xiao, Longqiang; Liu, Lijian

    2016-03-01

    Metal-diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes are new members of the radical family and are precursors to metal-carbene radicals. Herein, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-trapping, we detect diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes, induced by [RhICl(cod)]2, [CoII(por)] and PdCl2, at room temperature. The unique quintet signal of the Rh-diazo radical was observed in measurements of α-carbonyl diazomethane adducts of [RhICl(cod)]2 in the presence of 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-1-N-oxide (DMPO). DFT calculations indicated that 97.2% of spin density is localized on the diazo moiety. Co- and Pd-diazo radicals are EPR silent but were captured by DMPO to form spin adducts of DMPO-N• (triplet-of-sextets signal). The spin-trapping also provides a powerful tool for detection of metal-carbene radicals, as evidenced by the DMPO-trapped carbene radicals (DMPO-C•, sextet signal) and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane-carbene adducts (MNP-C•, doublet-of-triplets signal). The transformation of α-carbonyl diazomethanes to metal-carbene radicals was confirmed to be a two-step process via metal-diazo radicals.

  1. Radical intermediates involved in the bleaching of the carotenoid crocin. Hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions and hydrated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bors, W.; Saran, M.; Michel, C.

    1982-01-01

    The participation of the primary radicals in the bleaching of aqueous solutions of the carotenoid crocin by ionizing radiation was investigated, employing both X-radiolysis and pulse radiolysis. The pulse-radiolytic data demonstrated a very rapid diffusion-controlled attack by both hydroxyl radicals (radicalsOH) and hydrated electrons (e - sub(aq)), while superoxide anions (O 2 - ) did not react at all. The site of the initial reaction of these radicals was not limited to the polyene chromophore. Slower secondary reactions involving crocin alkyl or peroxy radicals contribute mainly to the overall bleaching, in particular during steady-state irradiation. (author)

  2. Formation of long-lived radicals on proteins by radical transfer from heme enzymes--a common process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostdal, H; Andersen, H J; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    concentrations were observed after limited digestion, although this effect was less marked with the HRP/H2O2/BSA system than with Fe(III)Mb/H2O2/BSA, consistent with different modes of radical transfer. More extensive digestion of BSA decreased the radical concentration to levels below those detected with native...... investigated using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/H2O2, in the presence and absence of added tyrosine. Incubation of HRP with H2O2 and bovine or human serum albumins, in the presence and absence of tyrosine, gave long-lived albumin-derived radicals as detected by EPR spectroscopy. Evidence has been obtained...... for these albumin radicals being located on buried tyrosine residues on the basis of blocking experiments. The effect of protein conformation on radical transfer has been investigated using partial proteolytic digestion prior to protein oxidation. With HRP/H2O2/BSA and Fe(III)Mb/H2O2/BSA increased radical...

  3. The dissociation of vibrationally excited CH3OSO radicals and their photolytic precursor, methoxysulfinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alligood, Bridget W; Womack, Caroline C; Straus, Daniel B; Blase, Frances R; Butler, Laurie J

    2011-05-21

    The dissociation dynamics of methoxysulfinyl radicals generated from the photodissociation of CH(3)OS(O)Cl at 248 nm is investigated using both a crossed laser-molecular beam scattering apparatus and a velocity map imaging apparatus. There is evidence of only a single photodissociation channel of the precursor: S-Cl fission to produce Cl atoms and CH(3)OSO radicals. Some of the vibrationally excited CH(3)OSO radicals undergo subsequent dissociation to CH(3) + SO(2). The velocities of the detected CH(3) and SO(2) products show that the dissociation occurs via a transition state having a substantial barrier beyond the endoergicity; appropriately, the distribution of velocities imparted to these momentum-matched products is fit by a broad recoil kinetic energy distribution extending out to 24 kcal/mol in translational energy. Using 200 eV electron bombardment detection, we also detect the CH(3)OSO radicals that have too little internal energy to dissociate. These radicals are observed both at the parent CH(3)OSO(+) ion as well as at the CH(3)(+) and SO(2)(+) daughter ions; they are distinguished by virtue of the velocity imparted in the original photolytic step. The detected velocities of the stable radicals are roughly consistent with the calculated barriers (both at the CCSD(T) and G3B3 levels of theory) for the dissociation of CH(3)OSO to CH(3) + SO(2) when we account for the partitioning of internal energy between rotation and vibration as the CH(3)OSOCl precursor dissociates. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Atmospheric Oxidation Mechanism of Furfural Initiated by Hydroxyl Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaocan; Wang, Liming

    2017-05-04

    Furfural is emitted into the atmosphere because of its potential applications as an intermediate to alkane fuels from biomass, industrial usages, and biomass burning. The kinetic and mechanistic information on the furfural chemistry is necessary to assess the fate of furfural in the atmosphere and its impact on the air quality. Here we studied the atmospheric oxidation mechanisms of furfural initiated by the OH radicals using quantum chemistry and kinetic calculations. The reaction of OH and furfural was initiated mainly by OH additions to C 2 and C 5 positions, forming R2 and R5 adducts, which could undergo rapid ring-breakage to form R2B and R5B, respectively. Our calculations showed that these intermediate radicals reacted rather slowly with O 2 under the atmospheric conditions because the additions of O 2 to these radicals are only slightly exothermic and highly reversible. Alternatively, these radicals would react directly with O 3 , NO 2 , HO 2 /RO 2 , etc. Namely, the atmospheric oxidation of furfural would unlikely result in ozone formation. Under typical atmospheric conditions, the main products in OH-initiated furfural oxidation include 2-oxo-3-pentene-1,5-dialdehyde, 5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone, 4-oxo-2- butenoic acid, and 2,5-furandione. These compounds will likely stay in the gas phase and are subject to further photo-oxidation.

  5. Highly selective transformation of ammonia nitrogen to N2 based on a novel solar-driven photoelectrocatalytic-chlorine radical reactions system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Youzhi; Bai, Jing; Li, Jinhua; Luo, Tao; Qiao, Li; Zeng, Qingyi; Zhou, Baoxue

    2017-11-15

    A highly selective method for transforming ammonia nitrogen to N 2 was proposed, based on a novel solar-driven photoelectrocatalytic-chlorine radical reactions (PEC-chlorine) system. The PEC-chlorine system was facilitated by a visible light response WO 3 nanoplate array (NPA) electrode in an ammonia solution containing chloride ions (Cl - ). Under illumination, photoholes from WO 3 promote the oxidation of Cl - to chlorine radical (Cl). This radical can selectively transform ammonia nitrogen to N 2 (79.9%) and NO 3 - (19.2%), similar to the breakpoint chlorination reaction. The ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency increased from 10.6% (PEC without Cl - ) to 99.9% with the PEC-chlorine system within 90 min operation, which can be attributed to the cyclic reactions between Cl - /Cl and the reaction intermediates (NH 2 , NHCl, etc.) that expand the degradation reactions from the surface of the electrodes to the whole solution system. Moreover, Cl is the main radical species contributing to the transformation of ammonia nitrogen to N 2 , which is confirmed by the tBuOH capture experiment. Compared to conventional breakpoint chlorination, the PEC-chlorine system is a more economical and efficient means for ammonia nitrogen degradation because of the fast removal rate, no additional chlorine cost, and its use of clean energy (since it is solar-driven). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  7. Identification of free nitric oxide radicals in rat bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleksinskaya, Marina A; van Faassen, Ernst E H; Nelissen, Jelly

    2013-01-01

    trapping and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy we give the first experimental confirmation of free NO radicals in rodent BM. NO production was quantified and attributed to enzymatic activity of NO synthases (NOS). Although endothelial NOS (eNOS) accounts for most (66%) of basal NO, we...

  8. Radical SAM, A Novel Protein Superfamily Linking Unresolved Steps in Familiar Biosynthetic Pathways with Radical Mechanisms: Functional Characterization Using New Analysis and Information Visualization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofia, Heidi J.; Chen, Guang; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Miller, Nancy E.

    2001-03-01

    A large protein superfamily with over 500 members has been discovered and analyzed using powerful new bioinformatics and information visualization methods. Evidence exists that these proteins generate a 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical by reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through an unusual Fe-S center. Radical SAM superfamily proteins function in DNA precursor, vitamin, cofactor, antibiotic, and herbicide biosynthesis in a collection of basic and familiar pathways. One of the members is interferon-inducible and is considered a candidate drug target for osteoporosis. The identification of this superfamily suggests that radical-based catalysis is important in a number of previously well-studied but unresolved biochemical pathways.

  9. Atmospherically Relevant Radicals Derived from the Oxidation of Dimethyl Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardyukov, Artur; Schreiner, Peter R

    2018-02-20

    The large number and amounts of volatile organosulfur compounds emitted to the atmosphere and the enormous variety of their reactions in various oxidation states make experimental measurements of even a small fraction of them a daunting task. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a product of biological processes involving marine phytoplankton, and it is estimated to account for approximately 60% of the total natural sulfur gases released to the atmosphere. Ocean-emitted DMS has been suggested to play a role in atmospheric aerosol formation and thereby cloud formation. The reaction of ·OH with DMS is known to proceed by two independent channels: abstraction and addition. The oxidation of DMS is believed to be initiated by the reaction with ·OH and NO 3 · radicals, which eventually leads to the formation of sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) and methanesulfonic acid (CH 3 SO 3 H). The reaction of DMS with NO 3 · appears to proceed exclusively by hydrogen abstraction. The oxidation of DMS consists of a complex sequence of reactions. Depending on the time of the day or altitude, it may take a variety of pathways. In general, however, the oxidation proceeds via chains of radical reactions. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been reported to be a major product of the addition channel. Dimethyl sulfone (DMSO 2 ), SO 2 , CH 3 SO 3 H, and methanesulfinic acid (CH 3 S(O)OH) have been observed as products of further oxidation of DMSO. Understanding the details of DMS oxidation requires in-depth knowledge of the elementary steps of this seemingly simple transformation, which in turn requires a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. The methylthiyl (CH 3 S·), methylsulfinyl (CH 3 SO·), methylsulfonyl (CH 3 SO 2 ·), and methylsulfonyloxyl (CH 3 SO 3 ·) radicals have been postulated as intermediates in the oxidation of DMS. Therefore, studying the chemistry of sulfur-containing free radicals in the laboratory also is the basis for understanding the mechanism of DMS oxidation in the

  10. Pigment and amylase production in Penicillium sp NIOM-02 and its radical scavenging activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhale, M.A.; VijayRaj, A.S.

    Penicillium sp NIOM-02 was isolated from the marine sediment, produced red pigment. The pigment extracted from this fungus scavenged 2, 2-diphenyl-1-pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. Penicillium sp NIOM-02 grown in media containing corn steep liquor...

  11. Radical Intermediates in the Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons by Bacterial and Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes†

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yongying; He, Xiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    Cytochromes P450cam and P450BM3 oxidize α- and β-thujone into multiple products, including 7-hydroxy-α-(or β-)thujone, 7,8-dehydro-α-(or β-)thujone, 4-hydroxy-α-(or β-)thujone, 2-hydroxy α-(or β-)thujone, 5-hydroxy-5-isopropyl-2-methyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one, 4,10-dehydrothujone, and carvacrol. Quantitative analysis of the 4-hydroxylated isomers and the ring opened product indicates that the hydroxylation proceeds via a radical mechanism with a radical recombination rate ranging from 0.7 ± 0.3 × ...

  12. Radical surgery compared with intracavitary cesium followed by radical surgery in cervical carcinoma stage IB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinga, D.J.; Bouma, J.; Aalders, J.G. (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)); Hollema, H. (Dept. of Pathology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    Forty-nine patients aged {le} 45 years, with cervical carcinoma stage IB ({le} 3 cm) were treated with either primary radical surgery (n = 26), or intracavitary irradiation followed by radical surgery (n = 23). With primary surgery, ovarian function had been preserved in 15 of the 25 patients, who were alive and well. Seven of the primary surgery patients were irradiated postoperatively and 2 others with a central recurrence were cured by irradiation. One other patient, who was not irradiated postoperatively, had an intestinal metastasis and died of the disease. If any of the adverse prognostic factors (as reported in the literature) had been considered as an indication for postoperative irradiation, 17 patients instead of 7 would have been irradiated after primary radical surgery. In the comparable group of 23 patients treated by intracavitary irradiation and radical surgery (and in 4 cases postoperative irradiation as well) there was no recurrence. There was no significant statistical difference between the treatment results in the cesium + surgery group and those who underwent primary radical surgery. Young patients with early cervical carcinoma without prognostic indicators for postoperative irradiation can benefit from primary radical surgery, because their ovarian function can be preserved. (authors).

  13. Radical surgery compared with intracavitary cesium followed by radical surgery in cervical carcinoma stage IB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinga, D.J.; Bouma, J.; Aalders, J.G.; Hollema, H.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-nine patients aged ≤ 45 years, with cervical carcinoma stage IB (≤ 3 cm) were treated with either primary radical surgery (n = 26), or intracavitary irradiation followed by radical surgery (n = 23). With primary surgery, ovarian function had been preserved in 15 of the 25 patients, who were alive and well. Seven of the primary surgery patients were irradiated postoperatively and 2 others with a central recurrence were cured by irradiation. One other patient, who was not irradiated postoperatively, had an intestinal metastasis and died of the disease. If any of the adverse prognostic factors (as reported in the literature) had been considered as an indication for postoperative irradiation, 17 patients instead of 7 would have been irradiated after primary radical surgery. In the comparable group of 23 patients treated by intracavitary irradiation and radical surgery (and in 4 cases postoperative irradiation as well) there was no recurrence. There was no significant statistical difference between the treatment results in the cesium + surgery group and those who underwent primary radical surgery. Young patients with early cervical carcinoma without prognostic indicators for postoperative irradiation can benefit from primary radical surgery, because their ovarian function can be preserved. (authors)

  14. Methyl Radicals in Oxidative Coupling of Methane Directly Confirmed by Synchrotron VUV Photoionization Mass Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Liangfeng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Wendong; Wang, Yu; Sun, Shaobo; Qi, Fei; Huang, Weixin

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase methyl radicals have been long proposed as the key intermediate in catalytic oxidative coupling of methane, but the direct experimental evidence still lacks. Here, employing synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectroscopy, we have directly observed the formation of gas-phase methyl radicals during oxidative coupling of methane catalyzed by Li/MgO catalysts. The concentration of gas-phase methyl radicals correlates well with the yield of ethylene and ethane products. These results lead to an enhanced fundamental understanding of oxidative coupling of methane that will facilitate the exploration of new catalysts with improved performance. PMID:23567985

  15. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2000-03-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e{sub aq}{sup -}, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH) CCH{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}, CO{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}, H{sup {center_dot}}, {center_dot}OH and N{sub 3}{sup {center_dot}} radicals were studied by {gamma}-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/{center_dot}OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  16. Free radicals and lipid peroxidation mediated injury in burn trauma: the role of antioxidant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Jureta W.

    2003-01-01

    Burn trauma produces significant fluid shifts that, in turn, reduce cardiac output and tissue perfusion. Treatment approaches to major burn injury include administration of crystalloid solutions to correct hypovolemia and to